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Annual Report of the British Columbia Police Commission for the Calendar Year 1980 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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 The Honourable Henry Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
The Annual Report of the British Columbia Police Commission
for the calendar year 1980 is herewith respectfully submitted.
roy s. McQueen
Chai rman
British Columbia Police
Commi ss ion
March 1981
	
 The Honourable Allan Williams, Q.C.
Attorney General of British Columbia
Parliament Buildings
Vi ctori a, B.C.
DEAR MR. WILLIAMS:
I have the honour to submit to you the Annual Report
of the British Columbia Police Commission for the calendar year]
1980 pursuant to the provisions of section 10 of the Police Actjj
S.B.C. ^^^k,   chapter 64.
Yours very truly,
roy s. McQueen
Chai rman
British Columbia Police
Commi ssion
March 1981
 (604)668-238
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   POLICE   COMMISSION
1550-409   GRANVILLE   ST., VANCOUVER, B. C. V6C   IT2
1980 ANNUAL REPORT
(Bulletin Number  Eight)
CONTENTS
Introduction
Chairman's Message
B.C. Pol ice Academy
Crime Statistics
The Pol ice and the Publ
Citizen Complaints
Crime Prevention
Other B.C. Pol
ice Commission Activitii
April 1981
Page
3
5
7
15
17
25
31
  Introduction
B.C. Police Commission
The Police Act of British Columbia establishing the British
Columbia Police Commission was proclaimed in June, 197*1. The Police
Commission was established to improve the quality of police service
fifiBthe province and was given the following specific responsibilities
under section 5 of the Police Act:
"Sec. 5 (1)
5.    (l)  It is the function of the commission
(a) to maintain a system of statistical records, and
to carry out research studies or projects, related
to law enforcement and crime prevention, for the
purpose of assisting the provincial force and
municipal forces;
(b) to consult with, and give information and advice to,
the commissioner, chief constables, boards, and
committees, on matters related to police and policing;
(c) to establish, subject to the approval of the minister,
minimum standards for the selection and training of
constables;
(d) to establish and carry out, or to approve and supervise, programmes, for the training and retraining of
constables and persons who intend to become constables;
(e) to establish and carry out, or to approve and supervise,
programmes for the promotion of harmonious relationships between constables and the public;
(f) to assist in the co-ordination of policing by the
provincial force and municipal forces; and
(g) to perform such other functions and duties as may be
given to it under this Act or the regulations.
(2)  The commission, subject to the approval of the minister,
may make rules regulating or prohibiting the use by the provincial force or municipal forces, or by both, of such firearms and equipment, or classes of firearms and equipment, as
the commission may designate.  197**, c.64, s.5-"
The executive of the B.C. Police Commission consists of a full-
time chairman and two full-time commissioners, appointed for a maximum
term of five years; two seconded police officers of Inspector rank
(appointed for a two-year term); and the Director of the Police Academy.
The work of the Commission in carrying out its mandate includes
liaison with Police Boards, with Municipal Councils, with Police Managers
and Police Associations and with others in the field of policing and the
 administration of justice.  Keeping the community's interest in mind,
with regard to policing service, is a basic policy of the Commission.
Policing in British Columbia
Policing in British Columbia is financed in four different
ways.  All municipalities with a population of over 5,000 are
required by the Police Act to provide policing within that
municipality.  A total of twelve municipalities have their own
municipal police department, namely Central Saanich, Delta, Esquimalt
Matsqui, Nelson, New Westminster, Oak Bay, Port Moody, Saanich,
Vancouver, Victoria, and West Vancouver.  Forty-three other municipalffl
contract with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to provide such servicl1
Rural areas and municipalities with a population of under 5,000 are
policed by the Provincial Force, which is also the RCMP under contract!
with the province of British Columbia.
All the enforcement of criminal law, provincial law and, in 1
some cases, municipal bylaws, as well as the general maintenance of la
and order is undertaken by these municipal and provincial forces.  In
addition, there is a federal force of RCMP responsible for the enforcef
ment of federal laws (e.g., Food and Drug Act, Narcotic Control Act, 1
Customs Act) within the province of British Columbia.
In the twelve municipalities which have their own police depafc
ments, the Police Act provides for the establishment of municipal poll]
boards to govern these police departments. The police boards, consistl
of the mayor (ex-officio chairman of the board), one person appointed f
the municipal council and three persons appointed, after consultation r
the council, by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, represent the citib
of the municipalities. Appointed members of police boards hold office!
up to four years, or including re-appointment, for a total of not morel
six successive years.
Police boards usually hold meetings on a monthly basis, or mcfe
often depending on the size and activities of the police department. |
B.C. Police Commission gives advice to boards when asked, on matters ||
as budgets, police strength, policing policy and management.
Commission Offi
The B.C. Police Commission offices are located at #1550-409
Granville Streeet, Vancouver, B.C. V6C 1T2, telephone 668-2385 (main
office), and at 947 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C. V8V 3K3, telephone
387-6696.
 Chairman's Message
The British Columbia Police Commission has promoted in 1980,
and will continue to promote in 198I, the high standard of professionalism
already achieved in the police forces in British Columbia.  In keeping
with the message of the Lieutenant-Governor, His Honour H. Bell-Irving
to the recipients of the first annual honours award for meritorious
police service, the Police Commission will encourage public awareness
and understanding of the role and duties of police.
In 1980 the British Columbia Police Commission endeavoured to
improve public understanding and awareness of the complaint system,
and I am happy to report that our endeavours did not generate a
significant increase in complaints against the police. We plan to
conduct again, during the summer of 198I, a survey auditing citizens
who have complained, and police officers who have been the subject of
citizen complaints, as to their degree of satisfaction with the complaint
process. The object of such audit is, of course, to try to achieve the
best process possible in the handling of complaints.
Again in 1980, law enforcement increased in British Columbia
as did the crime rate.  Criminal code offences increased 1.3  percent
over 1979 and the crime rate rose to 120.8 pwe 1,000 population.  This
increase in the crime rate indicate we must not cease in our efforts
to promote crime prevention practices and habits amongst the citizens
of British Columbia.  It is the view of the British Columbia Police
Commission that crime prevention must be a primary goal for all police
forces and the citizens of British Columbia.  Effective crime prevention
programs involving active participation by the public is one of the few
ways of controlling the escalating cost of policing.  Police forces are
seeking more manpower in order to combat the rising crime rate, and even
if the police population were doubled, the increased enforcement of law
and order would not be as effective in reducing the crime rate as would
the dedicated involvement of the public at large in crime prevention
programs and practices.
We had some staff changes in the British Columbia Police Commission during 1980.  Inspector Douglas MacLeod was appointed the Chief
Constable of the Delta Police Department and he was succeeded as Executive
Officer with the Commission by Inspector Neil Campbell from the Vancouver
Police Department.
Norman Brown was added to the Commission staff in the role of
Crime Prevention Co-ordinator with Gail Russell as secretary.
The administration staff of the Commission remains the same as
'ast year with Anna Terrana as Administrative Assistant, Jeanne LaFleche
as Information Co-ordinator, Marnie Styan as Senior Secretary, Esther
Vitalis as Secretary, Stella Macfarlane as Research Clerk and Journal
Circulation Secretary, and Marilyn Johnson as Special Projects Consultant.
 The British Columbia Police Commission invites suggestions or
criticisms from all sources towards increasing understanding and
support in attaining assistance for police work and crime prevention.
 B.C. Police Academy
As submitted by John Post, Director, B.C. Police Academy.
The past year, 1980, has been a year of evaluation, reorganization
and consequential change.  Some progress, we hope, was noticeable.
During this year the Training Rules were presented to the police
community. After seven months of discussion, consultation with police
boards, chiefs, police associations, B.C. Federation of Police Officers
and invaluable advice from the Training Officers Advisory Committee, these
rules were accepted by all. The British Columbia Police Commission
approved the rules as policy in November of 1980, the Attorney General
has now signed them, and they will be gazetted in the very near future.
The Training Rules moved the police career closer to true
professionalism. They provided for minimum training standards as a prerequisite to continued employment in the office of municipal constable.
They render persons qualified or certified under these rules eligible
to that office for a period of time after their employment as a municipal
^instable terminates; they allow persons with previous police experience
to qualify by writing exemption examinations and to be certified by submitting themselves to a challenge procedure; and they establish accountability to the police community for the general quality of training.
There has also been a significant reorganization of the Police
Academy, which particularly strengthened the Advanced Training Program.
Four instructors were assigned to a newly created 'instructional
services' section to develop, co-ordinate and administer advanced training sessions under the supervision of the Advanced Training Program
director. This has resulted in an extensive advanced training program
calendar for 1981. New and modern methods have been adopted to develop
training curriculum. One of the first courses developed by this means
was the Radio Dispatchers/Complaint Takers program.  If the critiques
by the students in this course are any indication, we can consider these
methods to be useful and applicable to our training.
Our recruit training section has had an extremely busy year also.
In 1980, 339 recruits were enrolled at the academy. This increase of
nearly 13 percent over 1979 did not go unnoticed. The fifteen instructors
in this program were assigned in excess of one thousand "student training
days" each, and it appears that in 1981 the training starts will have to
be increased by 50 percent to meet the training needs.
The apparent, justified complaints about the content of our
upper training blocks did not go unheeded.  Remedial adjustments have
been made to avoid a wasteful overlap with the curriculum of our lower
level training blocks. This change has been met with very positive and
favourable reaction by our students and has, no doubt, improved our standard
 In August of 1980, two candidates submitted themselves to the
first three-day challenge procedure.  This procedure, designed to
excuse candidates for municipal constable positions from all recruit
training, prevents training for the sake of training.  Persons eligible
for this procedure are RCMP officers who served in British Columbia,
and persons who were police officers in another province or were so
employed in British Columbia but are no longer "an eligible municipal
constable".  Those belonging to the last two categories must first
pass an "exemption examination".  This examination excuses the
individual from completing the "Basic Peace Officers Training Program"
while the challenge procedure excuses the individual from completing
the "General Peace Officers Program" (the former consists of training
blocks I, II, and III, and the latter of IV and V).  We and the
candidates were very pleased with this proto-program and with minor
changes this procedure consisting of simulations, skill testing and
oral examinations, will be repeated for eight candidates this coming
June.
Our Assessment Centre has provided considerable service to the
police community by assisting in administering pre-selection and promotional procedures.
The following number of candidates went through the Assessment
Centre in I98O:
166 recruits
kO  corporals
8 sergeants
6 inspectors
18 faculty
for a total of 238 candidates.  A further 26 peace officers were traineg
to be assessors.
During 1980 we contracted a reliability study to be done of out
methodology in assessing personnel and prospective personnel.  We were
very pleased to learn that our reliability level was rated at 96 percenl
Needless to point out that this is a favourable symptom of having a
satisfactory validity level as well.  At present, insufficient data is
available to determine that level with any accuracy.  However, if our
volume continues at the present trend, we are advised that in 1984 a
validity study will be feasible.
Also new and revamped is our Driver Training course.  The tota
emphasis is on skilful and safe driving.  A portion of the Boundary Bay
airport's runway was secured as a permanent location for the course and
a classroom was furnished in the adjacent communications building.
Considerable notoriety has cultivated interest in our program on the
part of other police training institutions.
In conclusion, we at the academy emphasize that this is your
training school and we are grateful for any input and interest and are
anxious to respond to your needs.
 7
fcrime Statistics
B.C. Totals
The Uniform Crime Reporting System indicated an increase in
Criminal Code offences (excluding drug offences and traffic C.C.
offences) of 7-9 percent, from a total of 295,030 in 1979 to 318,284
in 1980. This increase is almost three times the 2.7 percent increase
recorded in 1979 and the largest increase in the last five years.
The B.C. crime rate for 1980, based on a 2,635,900 population figure,
was 120.8 crimes per 1,000 population.
The following table shows the major offence categories which
added together represent the total Criminal Code offences (with the
Broviso mentioned above).  Number of offences for 1979 and 1980 are
shown with the percentage difference (+ for i ncrease, - for decrease)
as well  as  the percentage c
eared.
Table  1
Offences  against  Persons
1980
1979
%   D
iff.
t  Cleared
27,582
24,630
+11.9
70.7
Offences  against Property
196,279
180,255
+
8.8
24.1
Other C.C.   Offences
Total   C.C.   Offences
94,423
90,145
+
4-7
33.5
318,284
295,030
+
7-9
30.9
Offences against persons   increased more  than
property or other  C.C.   offences   in  the above  table  in
age;  they also exhibited  the highest  clearance  rate.
offences
terms  of
agai nst
percent-
Offences against  Persons
Table 2
Homicide
1980
1979
%  D
i fference
105
86
+22.0
Attempted Murder
99
84
+17-8
Sexual   Offences
1,948
1,763
+10.4
Assaults
22,781
20,499
+11.1
Robbery
Total
2,649
2,198
+20.5
27,582
24,630
+11.9
Total   Offences  against  Persons accounted
total   Criminal   rode offences   in Table   1.      Homicid
for  8.7 percent of  the
es  experienced   the greates
 8
increase at 22.0 percent followed closely
that followed closely again by Attempted
by Robbery at 20.5 percent and
"lurder (17-8 percent).
Offences against Proper
Table 3
Break and Enter and The
1980
1979        %  Difference |
 "'
ft   46,786
42,697         + 9-5
Motor Vehicle Theft
12,376
11,910         + 3-9
Theft (Over $200
+ Under $200)
117,458
107,666         + 9.1
Possession of Stolen Prop.   2,499
2,420          + 3-2
Frauds
Total
17,160
15,562          +10.2
196,279
180,255          + 8.8
Total Offences
the total Criminal Code
increase was experience
numerical increase was
against  Property
Offences in Table
d in Frauds, at 10
in Thefts, at 117,
accounted for 61.7 percent of
1. The greatest percentage
.2 percent; the greatest
458 for 1980, 9,792 more than \
the previous year.
Other Criminal Code Off
ences
Table 4
Prostitution
1980
1979        %  Difference '
70
97          -27.8
Gaming and Betting
51
15         +240.0
Offensive Weapons
2,192
2,115          + 3.6
Others
Total
92,110
87,918          + 4.7
94,423
90,145          + 4.7
Total Other Criminal Code Offences accounted for 29.6 percent cl
the total Criminal Code Offences in Table 1.
Drug Offences
According to the data collected, total Drug Offences increased 1
20.2 percent from 9,325 in 1979 to 11,215 in 1980.  However, due to a
new reporting procedure implemented in 1979, the figures collected for '
that year are questionable and considered low, perhaps by as much as 10 1
 Grand Total
The 'grand total' (total Criminal Code offences plus Drug offences plus Federal, Provincial and Municipal offences) was 378,251 offences in 1980, compared with 351,346 in 1979, an increase of 7.6 percent.
Federal Statute offences increased 1b.9 percent over 1979
(from 3,936 to 4,562); Provincial Statute offences increased 0.8 percent,
ffiom 28,063 to 28,311; Municipal offences increased from 14,922 to 15,879,
up 5-9 percent.
Intoxication in a Public Place
The number of offences in the State of Intoxication in a Public
Place category increased only marginally in 1980, from 55,555 to 55,858,
or 0.5 percent.
Persons Charged
The number of adults charged for all Criminal Code offences
(including Drug offences, excluding Traffic offences) was 61,895, an
increase of 8.1 percent over 1979- The number of juveniles charged
for all Criminal Code offences (including Drug, excluding Traffic) was
1^,941, an increase of 59-9 percent over the 1979 total of 9,340.
Traffic
The number of persons charged with Traffic offences totalled
287,936, an increase of 30.2 percent over 1979 (221,191).
1980.
The following table shows some of the traffic data for 1979 and
Table 5
%  Difference
1980
1979
"riving while   Impaired
22,977*
21,264*
Traffic Accidents
146,302
125,854
Persons  Killed
784
723
Persons  Injured
35,000
31,106
+ 8.0
+16.2
+ 8.4
+12.5
There were 203 accidents   in  British Columbia   in which fatalities
occurred where  the driver(s)   had   been  drinking   (an   8.6  percent   increase
over  the 187   in   1979)   and   10,256 non-fatal   accidents where  the driver(s)
had been drinking,   compared with  8,975   in   1979   (up   14.3  percent).
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O
 14
Police Use of Firearms
The Commission is required, under the Police Act, to receive
a report on the number of shots fired by police officers on duty.  In
1979, there were 102 shots fired by 51 police officers.  In 1980, there
was a total of 111 shots fired by 66 police officers.  Thirty-four shots
were fired by 23 members of municipal police departments; seventy-seven
shots were fired by 43 members of the RCMP.
Revolvers accounted for 95 of the shots fired in I98O; shotguns accounted for 15; rifles accounted for one.  One hundred and six
of the shots fired were fired intentionally, while five were fired
unintentionally. One person was killed and seven injured.  Property
damage totalled approximately $ 3,100.
The Police Firearms' Regulations set specific instructions
about the type of firearms and ammunition allowed; the terms under
which a firearm may be carried; the use of firearms; and, within the
report on number of shots, the terms under which firearms may be used.
Copies of the Regulations are available, upon request, from the B.C.
Police Commission.
 15
The Police and the Public
"The ability of the Police to perform their duties is
dependent upon public approval of police existence, actions,
behaviour and the ability of the Police to secure and maintain
public respect."
Sir Robert Peel, founder
of the modern police system
in Bri tain in 1822
The vital importance of mutual respect between police and
.public and the necessary public support of policemen which flows
[from that attitude has been said often but it cannpt be said too
|often. History shows that when this essential aspect of policing
loses support there can be only harmful results.
Policemen are not set above the public. They are themselves
members of the public, and although they are granted a few special
powers, they remain, in essence, citizen-policemen, differing from the
rest of us only in that they devote their full time to preservation
of peace and good order.
The average citizen recognizes that policemen deserve his
idilling co-operation and, at times, his active assistance.
That recognition will be more widespread as knowledge of
Ppol ice responsi bi 1 i t i es and policing problems becomes more widely
Renown in the community.
The British Columbia Police Commission has two major
responsibi1ities in this area, one to the police and one to the general
public.
For the police there is a broad program of studies at the
British Columbia Police Academy, a set of province-wide standards for
{police dress, deportment and general policies and, last year as in
previous years, numerous seminars where police and concerned citizens
are brought together to seek solutions to problems.
It is less easy for the Commission to carry the message of
mutual dependence to the general public.  Most people are busy with
Bheir own affairs.  Under ordinary circumstances they do not have to
Pall on the police for help and they do not feel much need to be
informed about police work and police problems.  A vague and
generalized approval seems sufficient contribution to them.  However,
the Commission seeks to speak to as many as will listen.  Police work
ln this province is, in our opinion, generally at a high level of
professionalism and it is important that as many people as possible
 16
should be informed.  Meetings of public bodies, including police
boards, lectures and speeches to interested citizen groups and the
dissemination of information through the B.C. Police Journal are
among the methods of informing the public.
Particular attention is paid to arranging for the freest
possible flow of information between police and ethnic minority
groups.
 T
17
ptizen Complaints
British Columbia's public complaint system, enacted in 1975,
has since formed the basis for similar legislation in other
jurisdictions.  It provides for the right of any citizen to have a
complaint against a policeman dealt with. A process of four stages
is provided: the first, an attempt to resolve the matter informally,
BBvided the complaint is not so serious that is required to be dealt
with immediately as a criminal investigation. Approximately eighty
percent of citizen complaints are resolved informally.  If informal
resolution fails, there may be a formal request for police investigation,
and, in some cases, a police disciplinary hearing.  The complaining
citizen has the right to carry his complaint beyond the police inquiry
stageto citizen bodies, first the local police board and finally the
B.C. Police Commission.  (In the case of the RCMP, a federal force
acting provincial ly, the Attorney General may approve the appeal of
police action on citizen complaints directly to the H.C. Police Commission.)
Three main programs in relation to citizen complaints were
undertaken by the Commission during 1980:
1. A universal complaint form, which would supply fuller
statistics on a comparable basis for all forces, was designed and is
now being tested by Victoria City Police for suitability.
2. More than 30,000 single-sheet brochures were issued to
municipal halls, libraries, police stations and other public places,
outlining citizen complaint processes for the public.
3. Audits of the 1979's public complaints in three forces
were conducted to determine the degree of comprehension of the system
and satisfaction with it on the part of both citizens and policemen.
The audits were conducted in the jurisdictions of Vancouver
Pal ice Department, North Vancouver Royal Canadian Mounted Police
municipal detachment and Surrey RCMP municipal detachment.  Lengthy
personal interviews were conducted by researchers with citizens and
police.
Unfortunately the results fell far short of statistical
reliability.  Although the number of citizens and police who refused
to partcipate was small, large numbers of citizens who had made
complaints the previous year proved untraceable.  In the three municipalities only a third could be reached.  Proportionate responses from police
were higher, although some had since been transferred out of the area,
but the number was, nevertheless, small with a resultant large statistical
error factor.
The results, therefore, are considered indicative rather than
-—  ^^^^^^^— 1
 conclusive as to the functioning of the complaints system.  Within
these limits, responses indicated citizen dissatisfaction with the
resolution of their complaints in a third of the cases.  The proportion of dissatisfaction felt by officers involved was about the
same.  General public attitudes toward all three municipal forces was
indicated to be about 70 percent favourable or highly favourable.
The responses indicated that, in all three municipalities,
knowledge of the complaint process was widespread only among police.
Four out of five of the citizens complaining did not know of the
existence of complaint procedures when they made their complaint and,
having gone through the process, a significant number appeared to remal
in ignorance of the process.
The Commission, this year as last, has grave doubts there is
adequate public knowledge of this section of the B.C. Police Act.
If the public lacks knowledge of the provisions of the Act for internali
police investigation followed, if necessary, by civilian review, it
follows that public confidence in the complaint procedure must also be I
lacking.
It may reasonably be inferred by our 1980 audits that the
average citizen has much more confidence in his police than he has
in the ability of the system to correct abuses of police power when
they do occur.
The number of complaints registered during 1980 was lower than |
the previous year. There were 652 against RCMP officers, compared wiml
795 in 1979 and 305 against municipal forces, compared with 465.
Three appeals, still pending, were made to police boards fromll
municipal force discipline court procedures during I98O.  Seven request
for inquiries into RCMP discipline matters have been referred to the
Attorney General with requests for public review.
Further complaint statistics are contained in the following
charts.  Vancouver, being a much larger force than any other, is shown .
in a separate graph.
An additional comment in this year's report concerns the nummfi
of citizen complaints as compared with the number of police-citizen
contacts during the year.  An example of some of the recorded contacts I
is as follows:
TRAFFIC    Traffic offences 750,852
Written warnings issued   144,948
Suspensions 19,349
Accidents 146,302
Total criminal code offences
(other than traffic) including drug offences        378,251
Total 1,439,702
 IT
19
It is estimated from traffic and criminal offence records
totalling approximately 1,500,000 contacts, that a small percentage
*f .07 resulted in citizens filing complaints concerning the
behaviour of police in British Columbia.
 TOTAL NUMBER OF CITLZEN COMPLAINTS AGAINST
POLICE TO TOTAL STRENGTH OF FORCE
MUNICIPAL, RCMP, AND COMBINED
1976-1980
□
Number of
Complaints
1976
1977
as
IOCS  1978
1979
1980
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
O
JO
E
o
o
305
1658
652
957
Authorized
Police Strengths
3785
5443
1000      2000      3000       4000
Number of Complaints / Police Strengths
5000
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siureiduioo jo jeqwnN
 NUMBER AND TYPES OF POLICE INVOLVED
IN CITIZEN COMPLAINTS
MUNICIPAL, RCMP, AND COMBINED
1980
N = 413
N = 709
RCMP
Detective ^\j N = 1122
8% COMBINED
 TOTAL NUMBER OF CITIZEN COMPLAINTS AGAINST
POLICE TO TOTAL STRENGTH OF MUNICIPAL FORCE
 1  Citizen
Oimplainfc
Central Saanich
^yV\   Strength of
VVvn Municipal Force
4  12
Delta
^SSSSS^
49                          94
Esquimalt
K\\
10         29
Matsqui
^N^^N
Nelson
6                          51
3  15
New Westminster
^\N*\^NSSS
15                                             89
Oak Bay
^S^
Port Moody
0        24
12    23
Saanich
^^^^^^SSSSSSSSSSS^
8                                                                   116
Victoria
\^^^*^^^^u^^
24                                                                                  154
West Vancouver
**sxsss*^
2                                    65
0
20         40         60         80        100       120       140       160
Number of Complaints / Strength of Force
-;■■■
 CITIZEN COMPLAINTS AGAINST THE VANCOUVER
POLICE DEPARTMENT BY TYPE OF COMPLAINT
1979 & 1980
Neglect of Duty
2%
Authorized Strength  =  982
Neglect of Duty
1%
Authorized Strength = 958
 25
Crime Prevention
The growth and evaluation of crime prevention programs and
Bactices were a major concern of the B.C. Police Commission in 1980.
fn September, a full-time crime prevention co-ordinator was taken on
staff in order to assist various police forces and detachments in
fuilding and administering crime prevention projects.  Resource and
consultative services for crime prevention are now centred in the
Commission main office.
A major portion of crime prevention effort has involved the
enhancement of police and community program co-operation. Once again,
IHIsiness, service clubs, and the community at large have contributed
to many programs started by local police departments and detachments.
Some of the contributors include: Kiwanis Lions, College of Pharmacists,
Council of Forest Industries, Vancouver Island Construction Association,
^micipal councils and many other organizations and individuals.
Crime Prevention Committee
The B.C. Police Commission's Crime Prevention Committee was
set up to assist police and various communities to develop preventive
Bograms according to their specific needs and abilities. The Crime
Prevention Committee consists of a chairman, the crime prevention coordinator, a secretary and members of municipal police forces as well
as RCMP area crime prevention co-ordinators.  Also represented on the
committee are the provincial Attorney General's Ministry, the Solicitor
General of Canada and CLEU.
Through 1980, this committee received and considered many
worthwhile projects wholly or partially shared with the community at
J&rge. Some projects were wholly supported, while others received "seed"
landing to help them get started and prove their effectiveness to the community in the prevention of crime. This demonstrated co-operation of
police and community is a major objective of the committee as it is
recognized as being vital to the success of crime prevention and the
containment of public costs.
The headquarters of the crime prevention committee has been
moved from Saanich Police Department to the B.C. Police Commission.  A
vote of thanks must be extended to the Saanich Police for their support
of the Committee over 1979-80.
Goals of the Crime Prevention Committee
1.  To reinforce the fact that crime prevention has always
been and will be an inherent part of the peace officers'
role;
 26
2. To increase the activities of the community in their
own crime prevention efforts;
3. To generate effective government support and commitment to crime prevention at all levels of government:
municipal,provincial, federal;
4. To develop ways of evaluating the effectiveness of
crime prevention efforts and of predicting future crime
and social trends;
5. To give more attention to the Native people and their
problems and concerns; and
6. To establish crime prevention priorities and to allocate resources accordingly.
Crime Prevention Association
The B.C.Pol ice Crime Prevention Association is now in its
fourth year of operation, having been incorporated in April 1978 with
the support of the B.C. Police Commission, to further the cause of
crime prevention in the province.  The Association has, in its
constitution, specific objectives relating to crime prevention - the
promotion of agency operation, the improvement of capabilities,
the encouragement of the co-ordination of resources,  and the develop,
ment of province-wide training programs.  The Association membership
is made up of representatives from both municipal police and the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police from all areas of the province, united
in the common purpose of crime prevention.
In 1980, the Association saw the realization of its efforts
to establish a course for crime prevention practitioners. Held at
the Justice Institute in November, 1980, the course was a major step!
forward for crime prevention practice in British Columbia. One of thj
first courses of its kind in Canada, the expertise of both the Police
College and RCMP training sections were utilized to establish trainin
standards and format.
The members of the Association have been involved in many sel
workshops and projects. Aside from their own major seminar in Octobel
the Association has sent representation to the Canadian Chiefs of Poll
conference and the International Crime Prevention Practitioners' confir
in Louisville, Kentucky. Members of the Association have made themsej
available for many speaking engagements and training sessions for bot
police and community.
The Association is looking forward to continued co-operatiql
the B.C. Police Commission, and expansion of its role of service to t|
police community and the public at large. There are many people in tf
province who have much to contribute to the art of crime prevention;!
Association hopes to reach those people and utilize their expertise.
 If
27
■provincial Crime Prevention Seminar
In October of 1980, the British Columbia Police Commission again
sponsored the annual Provincial Crime Prevention Seminar for members of
the B.C. Police Crime Prevention Association.  Ninety police officers
Brticipated from around the province.
The key-note speaker was Chief/Supt. W. Neill, Officer in Charge
of the Criminal Investigation Branch "E" Division 1.  The key-note address
theme was "Crime Prevention into the 80's" and this theme was followed
Hroughout most of the deliberations and discussions.
Highlight of a very stimulating seminar was an address by the
Honourable Allan Williams, Attorney General of British Columbia.  After
making a major speech regarding community crime prevention policy, he
referred to the group present as being key in implementing necessary
programs.
B.C. Police Commission Crime Prevention Fund
In 1980, funds were disbursed to a variety of sources.  Projects
ranged from the target hardening variety such as Block Parents, Neighbourhood Watch, Range Patrol, etc., to newer programs such as the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design training course and educational programs.
Also, resource material was continually being developed and uptdated
throughout I980.
In 1980, a renewable provincial Attorney General allotment of
$ 75,000 and a non-renewable federal Solicitor General fund of $ 70,000
was expended on behalf of crime prevention and preventive policing in
SMtish Columbia.
Crime Prevention Projects funded in 1980 by B.C. Provincial Government
Many of the crime prevention programs authorized in 198O were
a continuation of some developed in 1979; others were new. Major
disbursements of funds were as follows:
i)     Vandalism Programs
Vandalism is recognized as one of the major crime
problems in Canada and the Crime Prevention Committee
has therefore authorized expenditures of monies to
prevent vandalism. The Saanich Police Department was
the major developer of such programs.  The Committee
had an "Anti-Vandalism" brochure published for
distri bution.
Total $ 10,500
 28
(ii)    Provincial Programs
The Crime Prevention Committee has contributed
to several programs started all around the
province with the printing of stickers (i.e.
"Didya" stickers), booklets (i.e. Preventive
Approach booklets), brochures (i.e. Operation
Provident, Apartment Security, Valuable Property),
posters (i.e. Ski Watch posters), crime prevention
folders, etc.
Total $ 20,00
(iii)   Crime Prevention Projects
The CPC has shared with the Kiwanis, the
Vancouver Island Construction Association and
other groups, projects aimed to alleviate crime
in the area of youth and construction.
Total $  5,00
(iv)    Rural Crime
Programs have been authorized in the area of
rural crime.  Booklets have been printed and a
book for the logging industry has been
prepared together with the Council of Forest
Industries.
Total $  4,5<j
(v)     Block Parents
As a continuation of the Block Parents program,
funding has been granted to Maple Ridge,
" Revel stoke, Nanaimo and Nakusp RCMP detachments
and to the Victoria Police Department.
Total $  1,
(vi)    Neighbourhood Watch
As a continuation of the very successful
Neighbourhood Watch program, the CPC
authorized printing of decals, posters,
and buttons.
Total $  6, Oil
 f
29
(vii)   Range Patrol
As a continuation of the Range Patrol program,
the CPC has authorized some funding to small
detachments for the acquisition of signs and a
rad io.
Total $   1,000
Signs and Display Boards
Expenditure for roadway and tourist warning
signs and display boards was authorized by
the CPC.
Total $   1,600
AND OTHER PROJECTS bringing the Crime Prevention funding offered by the Province
of British Columbia to a total of:
$ 75,000
Crime Prevention Projects funded in 1980 by Solicitor General
The funding for crime prevention received from the Solicitor
General's department for the years 1979 and 1980, amounting to $ 70,000,
was the last subsidy to be received from Ottawa to share this particular
type of funding of crime prevention projects with the Province of British
Columbia. A remaining total of approximately $ 30,000 was expended from
such funding during the year 1980 as follows:
Allocation of Funding to Association
For organization of annual seminar and attendance
at crime prevention workshops and conferences of
the members of the B.C. Police Crime Prevention
Association in order to improve police preventive
programs in the province of British Columbia.
Total $  12,000
Development of Crime Prevention Through
Environmental Design
For production of an   information  package which
will  develop an  understanding of  the need  for
 30
as well as the means by which we can design
buildings and place them in the environment
so as to limit opportunities for crime. The
package will contain material obtained within
the City of Vancouver and should be applicable
to other cities.
Total $ 9,800
(iii)   Victoria Kiwanis Wheels Project
For a program to provide initiatives to
students to stay in school and out of trouble;
to improve police image in the community and
in youth/school relationship and to develop
youths mentally and physically through a
constructive supervised experience.
Total $ 10,000
Nine thousand dollars, approved in 1979 for the production of a
training film for store security and rental sales clerks in small
businesses, was returned by the Vancouver Board of Trade because the
film was not produced.
These expenditures are the last in a cost-sharing arrangement for crime prevention between the Solicitor General's department
and the B.C. Police Commission over a period of more than three years.
The program has proven to be very successful and has witnessed a very
co-operative and productive relationship of two government agencies.
The executive of the B.C. Police Commission wishes to thank the
department of the Solicitor General for their co-operation in the
important field of crime prevention.
 31
Other B.C. Police Commission Activities
Research
One of the specific responsibilities of the B.C. Police Com-
Kssion, under Section 5 of the Police Act, is to maintain a system
of statistical records and to carry out research studies related to
law enforcement and crime prevention.
On a continuing basis, the Commission collects crime
■statistics on all departments and detachments in B.C., including
plated statistics such as citizen complaints, authorized police
strengths, and shots fired by police members. As well, the Commission
gathers manpower and policing data, including sociodemographic data
and police costs, in a Community Information Profile, from all departments and detachments. The Commission also maintains a library on
selected law enforcement issues, with a wide range of periodicals in
the criminal justice field.
In view of the above, the Commission is an active resource
for police, police planning personnel, students, and criminologists,
and other concerned citizens.
In 1980, a number of research projects were carried out
either by Commission staff or under the sponsorship of the B.C. Police
Commission.  In response to a request from the Attorney General's
ministry, a report on trends in municipal policing costs was undertaken. In-house reports were prepared on policing costs in Williams
Lake and the costs of witness protection in British Columbia.  The
final draft of a report on regionalization in the Capital Regional
District was completed.  A Victims' Services Directory, the result
of a summer student project, will be available for distribution in May.
ffifflother summer students project involved the auditing of citizen
complaints (see Citizen Complaints section).
The consultant, special projects, of the Commission meets
regularly with the Quarterly Research Committee of the ministry of
Attorney General .
The B.C. Police Journal
The B.C. Police Journal has been enjoying ever-increasing
support and acceptance from members of the policing community since
its inception in 1978.  The Journal covers news of particular relevance
to police members and encourages contributions from police and other
members of the criminal justice system.  A regular feature of the
Journal is "The Thin Blue Line", reporting news from the B.C. Federation
 32
of Police Officers. The Journal is published quarterly and distribut
free to all police officers in British Columbia.  Subscriptions and
exchange subcriptions are also available.
The B.C. Police Journal serves as an effective means of
promoting internal communications among members of the police community.
Symposium of Provincial Police Commissions
In October 1980, the annual symposium of provincial police
commissions was held in Banff, Alberta, hosted by the Law Enforcement
division of the department of the Solicitor General of Alberta. The
B.C. Police Commission was represented by Chairman Roy McQueen and
Commissioners Paul St. Pierre and Gordon Dalton.
A wide range of mutual concerns were discussed.  Each Com- I
mission presented a brief of specific subjects pertaining to the
policing field and a report on their activities. The B.C. Police
Commission prepared a brief with special emphasis on auditing and
the complaint system in an endeavour to ascertain the degree of
satisfaction of both complainants and officers involved in the compla'l
system. This issue has been on the priority list of the B.C. Police:!
Commission for the last two years.
A vote of thanks is owed to Ed Hale, director of Law Enforce!!
ment and his staff for a wel 1 organized interesting symposium.
Next year the symposium will be held in Quebec City.
Pol ice Board Workshop
In 1979 a decision was made by the executive of the B.C. Poll
Commmission to hold an annual police board workshop.  Both in 1979 an[
1980 the workshop was held in Vancouver and was well attended by all ;j
of the municipalities.
Issues of concern to the municipalities were discussed. Prii|
was placed by the participants on police costs, cost increases and thf
negotiations presently in progress between governments. A police.boaj
handbook, the first published in British Columbia, was circulated by f
B.C. Police Commission to the police board members.
Workshops proved to be very successful and a worthwhile effcf
thatgives the members of the various police boards an opportunity to
meet and exchange ideas.
t
 33
Police Honours Night
In 1980 the idea of establishing a Police Honours Night was
formed and arrangements were made to hold the first police honours night
in the beginning of 1981. The event is held to recognize those police
[officers tn British Columbia who performed in an outstanding manner
Buring the previous year. The event will be a yearly occurrence.
Regional Visits
In 1980 the executive of the B.C. Police Commission have
Organized regional visits to areas of British Columbia other than the
Bancouver Lower Mainland and Greater Victoria.
Members of the executive met with people in policing, minority
Igroups, municipal officials and the general public in Kelowna and Prince
[George. Communities from surrounding areas were also invited to attend.
Among the subjects discussed at these meetings are: the changing
role of policemen in society, police rights and responsibilities, the
limits of police power, professionalism and its implications, crime
[prevention, statistical data on crime and policing, the public complaint
procedure and many aspects of the costs of policing.
The visits have served to give the Commission a clearer insight
Knto the issues touching the populations of smaller communities and have
Brought those  issues and concerns to the attention of the provincial
government.
B.C. Pol ice Commission Goals and Activities
Nelson Communication Study
Eotor Vehicle Standards
Regional Visits
Bndian Special Constable Program
Review of Police Act and Regulations
Processing of Police Board Members
Police Board Workshops
Kictims Services Project
Progress
Completed
Completed
Conti nui ng
Continuing
Cont i nuing
Continuing
Conti nui ng
Continuing, almost complete
 34
Crime Prevention
Continui ng
Regionalization Studies
Completed
Negotiating RCMP Contracts
Cont i nu i ng
Citizen Complaint Forms and Audits
Continuing
Evaluation Report re Constables
Completed
Major Crime Investigation Procedures
Continuing
Monitoring of Shots Fired
Continuing
UBCM Involvement
Continuing
Promotional Pre-requisites - NCO's
Continuing
Police Manning Studies - Various Regions
Conti nuing
Police Honours Night
Conti nui ng
Meetings- Minority Groups
Continui ng
Auditing of Municipal Police Departments
Continuing
Visits of Municipal Police Departments
Conti nui ng
Visits of RCMP Detachments
Conti nuing
Visits of Police Boards
Cont i nui ng
Public 1nformation
Continuing
Attending CACP and BCACP Meetings
Continuing
Meetings with B.C. Federation of Police
Officers
Continuing
Attending annual Police Commission Symposium   Continuing
Reorganization of Records and Filing
Continuing, almost comples
Sponsoring Workshops and Seminars
Continuing
UCR Audit Seminars
Conti nu i ng
Research Projects
Conti nui ng
Community Information Profiles
Cont i nui ng
Police/Citizen Complaint Survey
Continuing
Juvenile Crime Prevention
Conti nuing
Publication and Co-ordination of
B.C. Pol ice Journal
Conti nui ng
RCMP Negotiations
The chairman of the Commission h
as been attending RCMP contract 1
advisory board meetings along with other
officials of the Attorney
General's ministry.  Negotiations are in
progress.
 35
B.C. Police Commission and B.C. Police Academy I98O/81 Budget
SALARIES - Established and Temporary
TRAVEL EXPENSE
PROFESSIONAL AND SPECIAL SERVICES
(including B.C. Police Academy
budget amounting to $ 1,409,065)
OFFICE EXPENSE
ADVERTISING AND PUBLICATION
MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES
GRANTS
OTHER EXPENDITURE
TOTAL BUDGET (1980/81)
B.C. Police Commission and
B.C. Police Academy $ 1,933,160
$  264
,345
34
,000
1,579
,315
18
,000
26
000
1
000
5
000
5
500
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