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Report of the Ministry of Forests Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1981 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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 Report of the
Ministry of Forests
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1981
u>.
\mi\
Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Forests
Honourable T.M. Waterland, Minister
 December 1, 1981
The Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving,
D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia
May It Please Your Honour:
Herewith I respectfully submit the Annual Report
of the Ministry of Forests for the year ended
March 31, 1981.
Yours truly,
T.M. Waterland,
Minister
 September 30, 1981
The Honourable T.M. Waterland,
Minister of Forests,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report
of the Ministry of Forests for the year ended
March 31, 1981.
Yours truly,
T.M. Apsey,
Deputy Minister
 Contents
I. DIRECTORY MK
II. DEPUTY MINISTER'S MESSAGE ■ K
HI.    PROGRAM REPORTS 9|
Silviculture ft|f. |. .......,]
Protection .via I
Harvesting .-$.  j
Range ..*?. .1
Recreation H .sP..;.L.B.  2
Associated  $b. |jgil..Tsl.  ,2
Administration/Operations S. .iJi .2
IV.     SUMMARY STATISTICAL TABLES .,2
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6:
Table 7:
Table 8:
DETAILED STATISTICAL TABLES
Silviculture ..'.	
Protection	
Harvesting	
Range 	
Recreation	
VI.     THE STRUCTURE OF THE MINISTRY.
Headquarters	
Forest Regions	
Forecast and Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Program  .3 Mjt/1
Forecast and Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Forest Region M. M,2
Composition of Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Program ..§!..., ii L;
Composition of Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Forest Region .1. m|,;
Forest and Range Revenue in 1980-81, by Forest Region M. Jt'.a
Ministry of Forests Personnel (Permanent Staff) in 1980-81, by Program .3 .111.;
Ministry of Forests Personnel (Permanent Staff) in 1980-81, by Forest Region JB.;
Forest Land in British Columbia, by Forest Region ..!.......«|
Silviculture
The ministry's silviculture program providt tt
the maintenance and improvement oftbejti
resource. In 1980-81 initiatives were taken k
increase seedling production by private im
Four nurseries were approved for deveiopnx tt
forest industry licensees and seven comtnei»
nurseries were allocated production. ■
 __ "      "' Mi
fti
 Directo-ty
  91
Directory                 (Jm
Victoria
R.W. LONG,
Ministry Comptroller, Financial Services n
Minister
HON. T.M. WATERLAND
J.G. HILL,
Director, Systems Services Branch ■
Executive Committee
T.M. APSEY,
Deputy Minister and Chairman,
Executive Committee
W. YOUNG,
J. SHEPPARD,
Director, Legal and Administrative Servu
Branch
J.H. TAYLOR,
Director, Technical Services Branch »
Chief Forester, Forestry Division
R.W. ROBBINS,
Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations Division
Forest Regions and Districts 1
AC. MacPHERSON,
Assistant Deputy Minister,
Timber, Range and Recreation Division
R.J. CULLEN,
Assistant Deputy Minister,
Finance and Administration Division
Cariboo Forest Region
regional manager
j.a.d. Mcdonald,
Williams Lake
DISTRICT MANAGERS
Staff Consultant
J.A.K. REID
Branch Directors
J.R. COX,
Director, Information Services Branch
R. REEVES,
Alexis Creek Forest District, Alexis Creel 1
L. ASHTON,
Horsefly Forest District, Horsefly   ]
R.T. OSTBY,
100 Mile House Forest District, 100 Mile)
E. KNIGHT,
Director, Strategic Studies Branch
OJ. KETTLESON,
Quesnel Forest District, Quesnel
CJ. HIGHSTED,
Director, Planning Branch
W.S.CARR,
Williams Lake Forest District, Williams la 1
F. HEGYI,
Director, Inventory Branch
RX. SCHMIDT,
Director, Research Branch
C.M.JOHNSON,
Director, Silviculture Branch
Kamloops Forest Region
REGIONAL MANAGER
A.B. ROBINSON,
Kamloops
DISTRICT MANAGERS
D.H. OWEN,
Director, Protection Branch
M.E. MONTEITH,
Clearwater Forest District, Clearwater   ij
J. MILROY,
Director, Range Management Branch
H.W.A.JANNING,
Kamloops Forest District, Kamloops
JJ.JUHASZ,
Director, Timber Management Branch
A.P. PETTY,
Lillooet Forest District, Lillooet
H.N. MARSHALL,
Director, Recreation Management Branch
J.E. LeDUC,
Merritt Forest District, Merritt
R.D. THOMAS,
Director, Valuation Branch
F. PEARCE,
Penticton Forest District, Penticton
CP. WILLIAMS,
Director, Engineering Branch
J.H. LITTLE,
Salmon Arm Forest District, Salmon Ma A
L.G. UNDERWOOD,
E.W. HEWITT,
 L Forest Region
Prince Rupert Forest Region
tc/VL MANAGER
REGIONAL MANAGER
HI5WR,
JA. BIICKERT,
:1s i
Prince Rupert
IRT MANAGERS
DISTRICT MANAGERS
A) IN,
J.H. WENGER,
re Forest District, Castlegar
Bulkley Forest District, Smithers
IBaSH,
VACANT,
blary Forest District, Grand Forks
Cassiar Forest District, Dease Lake
IX.ER,
G.F. DODD,
Birook Forest District, Cranbrook
Kalum Forest District, Terrace
GL,
T.H. PETER,
)k n Forest District, Golden
Kispiox Forest District, Hazelton
VACANT,
AEY,
reaere Forest District, Invermere
Lakes Forest District, Burns Lake
HACK,
wnay Lake Forest District, Nelson
R.W. THOMAS,
Mid-Coast Forest District, Bella Coola
kpiE,
sfeoke Forest District, Revelstoke
D.A. AMONSON,
Morice Forest District, Houston
J.G. WARD,
North Coast Forest District, Prince Rupert
aieorge Forest Region
T.A. DYER,
10/VL MANAGER
Queen Charlotte Islands Forest District,
JHBERT,
Queen Charlotte City
iai George
Vancouver Forest Region
HUT MANAGERS
REGIONAL MANAGER
GI3S,
D. GRANT,
iwm Creek-Chetwynd Forest District,
Vancouver
Spin Creek
lY;
DISTRICT MANAGERS
itelson Forest District, Fort Nelson
D.E. deHART,
Hi,
Campbefl River Forest District, Campbell River
it. James Forest District, Fort St. James
J.H. CARRADICE,
HOSON,
Chilliwack Forest District, Chilliwack
irt. John Forest District, Fort St. John
T.A. WALKER,
N1SON,
Duncan Forest District, Duncan
ac nzie Forest District, Mackenzie
D.B. DOERKSEN,
HXTONS,
Maple Ridge Forest District, Maple Ridge
eBde-Valemount Forest District,
R.A.CAMPBELL,
cBde
Port Alberni Forest District, Port vUberni
T1NAMAN,
W.S. MILLWARD,
in George East Forest District,
Port McNeill Forest District, Port McNeill
W George
J.B. MOUNTAIN,
\GEE,
Powell River Forest District, Powell River
»8 George West Forest District,
B.C. CUSTANCE,
fe George
Sechelt Forest District, Sechelt
METT,
N.P. GILGAN,
JWrhoof Forest District, Vanderhoof
Squamish Forest District, Squamish
 Range Management
The ministry's commitment to coordinate i
resource management is borne out in itsn]
program. In 1980-81 the ministry seeded 1\
hectares of forest and range land, increasit
their productivity, and helping to ensureti I
future of this renewable resource.
  Deputy Minister's Message
This report differs significantly in content and
organization from previous annual reports of the
Ministry of Forests. For the first time, it has been
prepared in accordance with the Ministry of
Forests Act, 1978. As such, the report forms an
integral part of the forest and range resource
management system now used in the Ministry.
The new management system of the Ministry
is rooted in three Acts passed in 1978 relating to
the management, protection and conservation of
provincial forest and range resources. The three
Acts are:
Ministry of Forests Act, 1978
Forest Act, 1978
Range Act, 1978
With the proclamation of these Acts on January 1,
1979, British Columbia entered a new era of
resource stewardship.
The Ministry of Forests Act defines the
purposes and functions of the Ministry as well as
the management process through which the
Ministry is expected to operate. The Act demands
that the Ministry be operated in a business-like
fashion and that public accountability be
emphasized.
The purposes and functions of the Ministry as
stated in the Ministry of Forests Act are to:
(a) encourage maximum productivity of the
forest and range resources in the
Province;
(b) manage, protect and conserve the forest
and range resources of the Crown,
having regard to the immediate and long
term economic and social benefits they
may confer on the Province;
(c) plan the use of the forest and range
resources of the Crown, so that the
production of timber and forage, the
harvesting of timber, the grazing of
livestock and the realization of fisheries,
wildlife, water, outdoor recreation and
other natural resource values are
coordinated and integrated, in
consultation and cooperation with other
ministries and agencies of the Crown and
with the private sector;
(d) encourage a vigorous, efficient and
world competitive timber processing
industry in the Province; and
(e) assert the financial interest of the Crown
in its forest and range resources in a
systematic and equitable manner.   	
The management system to be followed
the Ministry is also described in the Ministry
Forests Act. Figure 1 is a schematicB
representation of this management system.  I
The Act requires a periodic forest and n J
resource analysis which is the main "engine" 1
driving the management process. The analys
provides a long term perspective on the
opportunities facing the industry and any
constraints which are likely to impede its
development.
The resource analysis is required to incl J
(a) a description of the present conditi J
the forest and range resources of th J
Province;
(b ) a description of the Ministry progn sj
presently being applied to the fore n
range resources;
( c ) an analysis of trends in world detm sj
for and supplies of forest and range
resources and the products I
manufactured from them; and
(d) a summary of public policy issues'lj
are expected to affect significantly £
use, ownership, licensing and M
management of forest and range
resources.
The first Forest and Range Resource Arm
Reportwas submitted on September 30,19'aJ
was subsequently presented to the British  I
Columbia Legislature in March, 1980. The nit
was widely discussed both within and outsiioi
Government. Undoubtedly, the wood suppl I
analysis in the report attracted the mostatftid
as it confirmed that the provincial timber sum
limited and that local wood shortages coulc
emerge in a number of areas of the Provinci -
within the next 20 years.
While the resource analysis sets forth aid
general framework for defining what is want'
from the forest and range resources of the 1
Province, actual programs to meet the challgq
revealed by the analysis are developed throM
five-year resource program. The program l<s -
ahead five years, but is updated annually so Jl
each yearly program is put into a broader >
perspective.
The requirements for the five-year res |fi
program are also stated in the Ministry of FP
Act. The five-year program must contain:   i
(a) a set of alternatives for restocking |g
 land, for increasing the nroducttg
 Figure 1
KlNUAL
1PORT
MINISTRY OF FORESTS ACT
PERIODIC RESOURCE ANALYSIS
5 YR. PROGRAMS
(UPDATED ANNUALLY)
ANNUAL BUDGET
IMPLEMENTATION
NEW
GOVERNMENT
PRIORITIES
 forest and range land and for otherwise
improving forest and range resources in
the Province, identifying for each
alternative relative costs and benefits;
and
(b) a recommended program for
implementation by the Ministry during
the next five years including the
respective roles to be played by the
Crown and the private sector.
The set of alternatives prepared by the
Ministry is submitted in September of each year.
Government chooses a preferred option along
with the appropriate level of funding for
implementation by the Ministry in the following
fiscal year. A five-year program report detailing the
approved program is then presented to the
Legislature. The SistFive-YearForestand Range
Resource Program was submitted to the
Legislature in March, 1980.
The final step in the new management system
of the Ministry is the public monitoring of
performance required by the Ministry of Forests
Act. The performance of the Ministry in carrying
out the programs for the 1980-81 fiscal year set
forth in the Five-YearForest andRange Resource
Program dated March, 1980 is the subject of this
annual report. This review and evaluation will
serve as a basis for adjustments and changes to
subsequent five-year resource programs.
Since this report covers the activities of the
Ministry for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1981,
some duplication with the 1980 Annual Report
previously published by the Ministry is
unavoidable. The calendar year report will not be
published in subsequent years, but a statistical
supplement containing many of the tables
traditionally found in it will be issued to maintain
historical continuity in key statistical series.
A broad overview of Ministry expenditure,
revenue and accomplishments during 1980-81
follows. Because the first five-year program did
not specify physical program goals for its initial
year, 1980-81, this report cannot compare targets
with actual achievements. The format of the
second five-year program was changed to include
specific goals for 1981-82 and the Ministry's
performance in meeting them will be assessed in
next year's annual report.
In 1980-81, expenditure by the Ministry of
Forests totalled S268.2 million. This amount
includes funding from the following three sources:
Ministry of Forests budget $ 163.4 million
Forest and Range
Resource Fund 23.9 million
Credits against stumpage revenue      80.9 million
Total S268.2 million
All expenditure tables contained in this repon
include Ministry of Forests expenditures made
from all three sources.
Ministry expenditure exceeded the amoit i
forecast in the five-year program by 3 per cent
( S7.8 million). Expenditure was significantly
higher than expected for the Harvesting Progr,
By Forest Region, the difference between acta
and forecast expenditure was the greatest in tt
Prince George Forest Region. A comparison of i
actual and forecast expenditure by program an
Forest Region is shown in Tables 1 and 2.
The composition of actual Ministry of Fot
expenditure is detailed in Tables 3 and 4.
Approximately 45 per cent of Ministry fl
expenditure was made through the private set
in the form of contract work and section 88
credits against stumpage. The private sector vj
particularly important in the Silviculture and
Harvesting Programs where much of theajivi I
was carried out by licensees and private
contractors.
Forest revenue in 1980-81 amounted to
$360.8 million. Stumpage, after the deduction I
section 88 credits (totalling S80.9 million),
accounted for more than 85 per cent of forest I
revenue. Almost 70 per cent of stumpage revejl
in 1980-81 was attributable to the VancOT« A
Prince Rupert Forest Regions. Stumpage rates
the coast fell more slowly than in the interior i J
to the more gradual downward adjustment in i
coastal log prices. Table C-2 gives a detailed
breakdown of forest revenue by Forest Regiot a
revenue category.
Range revenue in 1980-81 amountedfto fn
million. The Cariboo and Kamloops Range
Districts accounted for almost three quarters i
this total. Range revenue by Range District is
displayed in Table D-2.
Ministry expenditure under the Harvestii
Program in 1980-81 totalled $ 102.2 million
Approximately one half of this amount consist
of credits against stumpage, mainly for road
construction. Almost 188 000 hectares (ha) o
land was logged to produce approximately 73
million cubic metres (m3) of wood.    I
Under the Silviculture Program, Ministry I
expenditure totalled 171.6 million./Almost 74 I
million trees were planted on approximately I
63 000 ha of Crown land during 1980-81. Afin
2 2 400 ha were spaced to improve the value:
growth of the timber remaining on these area
Ministry expenditure for ProtectiorM
amounted to S30.0 million. Fire management
accounted for more than 90 per cent of this «-
The remaining S2.3 million was devoted to pi
management. During 1980-81, wildfires burn^,|
 ul m m3 of timber on 65 600 ha. .Although
Rprovincial area burned was slightly less
Hlen-year average of 70 200 ha, the fire
in as severe in the Prince George Forest
L lore than 80 per cent of the timber
nil the Province in 1980-81 was located in
Bit Region.
ha ler details on the activities and
tij shments of the Ministry in 1980-81 are
Br 1 in the program reports which follow.
n mclusion, this report marks the
lis on of the first cycle in the new
management system initiated by the Ministry of
Forests Act. Significant strides have been made in
placing the operations of the Ministry on a more
business-like basis. With this footing in place, I am
confident that British Columbia, through the
Ministry of Forests, will continue its leadership
role in forest and range resource management in
coming years.
T.M. Apsey,
Deputy Minister
 Recreation
The forest is for everyone. During 1980-81 th
ministry developed 73 new recreation sites a |
300 kilometres of trail throughout British
Columbia. _.
 Program Reports
 Silviculture Program
The objectives of the Silviculture Program are
to restock denuded land and to improve the value
and productivity of forest stands by tending
practices. Denuded land is restocked through
planting or natural regeneration. Site preparation
is often done prior to planting or to ensure natural
restocking. A brushing and weeding treatment
may be required in some plantations to ensure
that the seedlings attain a "free to grow"
condition. The value and productivity of forest
stands is improved through silviculture treatments
such as spacing, fertilization and conifer release.
Forecast expenditure for 1980-81 was $75.4
million; actual expenditure was $71.6 million (see
Table A-l). The fertilization program planned in
the Vancouver Forest Region was curtailed due to
a shift in priorities during the year. Actual
expenditure in future years is planned to increase
significantly as the Silviculture Program expands
to meet the goals established in the Ministry's
five-year program.
Under the terms of the British Columbia
Canada Subsidiary Agreement on Intensive Forest
Management, the federal government contributed
$5.8 million toward the $71.6 million spent on the
1980-81 Silviculture Program. The objective of
the Agreement is to enhance the forest resource
base of the Province through the implementation
of intensive forest management Toward this
objective, federal contributions were used in
support of spacing, reforestation, fertilization and
other projects.
During the year, a significant policy decision
concerning nurseries was made. Following
discussion and consideration of the responses to
the White Paper on the Growing of Tree Seedlings,
it was decided that:
(i)    production from Ministry nurseries will
be constrained to about 100 million
seedlings per year,
(ii)  all production above this level required
to meet the five-year program goals will
be achieved through the development
and expansion of private nurseries, and
(iii) the Ministry will pay for the cost of
producing seedlings in private nurseries
which are used to restock Crown land.
As a result of this policy, in 1980-81 the
Ministry approved 4 nurseries to be developed by
the forest industry (licensees), and 7 commercial
nurseries were allocated production.
During the year, the Ministry and licensees
surveyed 212 500 hectares (ha) of Crown land
which was denuded in previous years and left i f
restock naturally, or was site prepared and left f
restock naturally (see Table A-2). Of the area f
surveyed, 66 per cent (141 200 ha) was found [
have sufficient commercially valuable trees to
classified as satisfactorily restocked. ThJM
remaining area (71300 ha) will be planted, sit
prepared for natural restocking or left for natal
restocking depending on the results oftlilsurJ
Areas are inspected to determine if site   j
preparation is necessary to obtain naturaH
restocking or to prepare land for planting Tab 1
A-3 gives statistics on areas of Crown land whi. 1
were site prepared in 1980-81 and left for natu f
restocking. The area actually treated was 26 K
ha while 30 200 ha were found not to requite; I
treatment. Table A-4 shows the areas of Crow f
land which were site prepared in 1980-81 in
anticipation of planting. Over 46 000 ha were '
actually treated while 7 800 ha were found nol f
require any treatment.
In 1980-81, 73-8 million trees were plantt I
on 62 900 ha of Crown land (see Table A-5). 11
addition, approximately 4 million trees were {
planted on private land bringing the total numl i
of trees planted during the year to about 78
million.
Approximately 21 per cent of the area
planted in the Province was good site forestlai I
70 per cent medium site and 9 per cent poor si j
On average, the forest land planted in the
Vancouver Forest Region was the most
productive, followed closely by the coastal are 5
the Prince Rupert Forest Region and then Prim I
George and Prince Rupert (interior) Forest    i
Regions. Spruce was planted on 46 per cent of 1
area, followed by Douglas fir (17 per cent),
hemlock (14 per cent) and lodgepole pine (111
cent).
The Ministry established over 10 000 suniS
plots on areas planted during the year. The dat:
from these plots will allow the Ministry to gauj
the success of the plantations and, hence, the a ■
satisfactorily restocked through planting«|
Table A-6 gives statistics on the area of
Crown land which received brushing and
weeding. This treatment is most important in 11
Vancouver Forest Region (2 500 ha treated in I
1980-81) where brush encroachment in
plantations on very productive land is serious. >
Table A-7 shows areas of Crown land whi t
received silviculture treatment during 1980-8 4
improve the value and productivity of the exisg
 an forest stands. Spacing was the most
,rtj t treatment with 22 400 ha completed,
lament, by removing competitive trees,
a i: crop trees to grow faster and attain a
Jia able size sooner.
Ta e A-8 shows the Ministry's inventory of
je< and changes in the inventory during the
year. Over 1 700 kilograms (kg) of seed were
added to the inventory as a result of collections of
cones from wild stands. About 50 kg of seed from
seed orchards were added to the inventory. The
contribution of seed from seed orchards will
increase significantly in the future as the orchards
established recently reach seed producing age.
Forest Protection Program
|h Ministry of Forests has the responsibility
^tcing the forest and range resources of the
to from damage by wildfires and pests,
di insects and diseases. These
jt'ilities are addressed through Forest
tctn and Fire Suppression. The major
itii are devoted to fire management and pest
Lgtent.
MANAGEMENT
n, 1980 fire season began with an
tniy dry spring with drought conditions in
lorern forests, especially in the Fort Nelson
BaiiRiver areas of the Prince George Forest
ph Wildfires started easily, spread rapidly,
pe difficult to control The fire situation was
p cisiderably with higher than normal
all July and August. While the number of
Rixduring the year was 33 per cent below
len tax average, Fire Suppression
nd ore was 7 per cent higher. This
ioriip was mainly due to the northern fire
lek where most fires were inaccessible and
ogiics of the fire control difficult and costly.
es -2 through B-5 provide pertinent
•ticon suppression costs, fire numbers and
es, id areas and timber volumes burned for
pRcst Region in the Province.
iThtnajor provincial fire management goals
e fr-year program are to keep the area
ledelow 69 000 hectares (ha) and the
mef mature and immature timber burned
wi>7 million m3 per year. For the year, the
bu ed was 65 600 ha and the timber burned
2.3million m3, both below the target goals.
Ot:r important accomplishments were
e ding the year. In order to improve the
ieo' of initial attack systems, the first
Iqsters-controlled fire attack crew using the
Mf r rappel technique was established for
'im wide use. It consisted of an 18-man crew
g a ;11206 Long Ranger helicopter. A
'mi location and mapping system was
llQJd and tested successfully in the southern
interior. This network will be expanded to cover
the whole province within three years. a\n
investigation of fire ecology and fire impact north
of 57 degrees latitude was initiated. This project
will lead to improved guidelines for fire
management practices in the northern forests.
Fire management administration was refined
in the areas of policy and regulations. Fire
prevention regulations were amended to include
petroleum industry activities, and the systems for
administering forest use restrictions, burning
permits and smoke management were improved.
Policies were clarified to promote rapid initial
attack on fires by all parties and agencies on both
Crown and private lands and the responsibilities
for the control of fires further defined.
More than 5 000 ha were burned to
prescription to reduce dangerous fuel hazards. In
addition, all silviculture burns, and the burns to
improve wildlife and domestic livestock habitats
were approved, assisted and monitored by
protection personneL
Forest Protection and Fire Suppression are
complementary in meeting fire management
objectives. FaXpenditures in the activities of each
are outlined in Tables B-l and B-2.
PEST MANAGEMENT
The forest and range analysis completed by
the Ministry in March, 1980 identified the
significant impact that forest insects and disease
have on the Province's forest resources. In British
Columbia more than 200 000 ha of pine and
spruce forest are under attack by bark beetles. The
Nelson and Cariboo Forest Regions are the most
severely affected. Losses due to disease pathogens
are not accurately known. Conservative estimates
place total provincial timber losses to insects,
disease organisms, and unwanted vegetation in
excess of 16 million m3 annually.
To realize the potential reduction of timber
losses, pest management effort was increased at
provincial and regional levels to define the extent
and impact of forest pests in British Columbia, to
 develop strategies and methods to reduce timber
losses, and to establish and monitor pest control
activities.
During 1980-81, $2.3 million was expended
on pest management administration at provincial,
regional, and district levels. This included training,
equipment, information publications and
development of guidelines for forest operations in
infected or suspect areas. A major portion of the
pest management effort was in detection with
Ministry survey crews and support funding for
Canadian Forestry Service staff who provided
services and training in detection and mapping of
infestations. Various pest control efforts including
rehabilitation projects, research, and road access
to infested areas for control and sanitation logging
were accomplished.
Special projects undertaken included oV, 1
mistletoe control measures incorporated into
harvesting contracts, the preparation of trap tt f
to reduce spruce beetle infestation levels and I
monitoring of various root disease control
measures for developing management guidelii i
A study of the severe bark beetle problems in I i
Cariboo Forest Region was completed and
recommendations were made to co-ordinate 1
timber salvage and pest control measures.
Increased effort on pest management at al
levels will take time to be fully effective. The
future impact on Ministry objectives will M
significant.
Table B-l outlines pest management
expenditure incurred by Forest Region.
Harvesting Program
The objective of the Harvesting Program is to
make timber available to the forest industry in a
manner which reflects provincial forest resource
use objectives and ensures that the financial
interests of the Crown are realized. The program
includes timber administration, technical services,
valuation, scaling, engineering services, forest
development roads and primary access roads.
Expenditure on Harvesting in 1980-81 was
$ 102.2 million (see Table C-l). Approximately 60
per cent of this total was accounted for by
engineering services and road construction. Most
of the road construction is performed by the
private sector which is reimbursed through
credits against stumpage.
The second largest category of expenditures
in Harvesting was technical services which
totalled $ 19.5 million. This component was
moved to the Finance and Support Services
Program in the rearranged program structure of
the second Five-Year Forest and Range Resource
Program. This move more accurately reflects the
role of technical services which is closely linked
to all other activities of the Ministry, not just the
Harvesting Program.
Expenditure for scaling amounted to $ 13-9
million in 1980-81. Much of the total is
recoverable through the scaling fees paid by the
forest industry. Scaling fees and other sources of
forest revenue by Forest Region are shown in
Table C-2.
Expenditures under the remaining two
categories of the Harvesting Program, valuation
and timber management, together totalled $8.7
million. Expenditure relating to the
implementation of the Small Business Enterpri
Program is included in timber management.
g 1980-81, approximately 188000hecfct
(ha) were logged to produce 73 million m3 of
wood. Details of the area harvested and the tin i
harvest are shown in Tables C-5 and C-6. The a
logged in 1980-81 was approximately llSeni
(22 000 ha) greater than the average establish ;
in the first Five-Year Forest and Range Resout
Program while the harvest was approxinSfely I
per cent less.
Forest revenue resulting from the Harvesj
Program fell to $360.8 million in 1980-81 Iron
$570.2 million in the previous fiscal year, As
shown in Table C-2, the Vancouver ForestRe|8
accounted for approximately 50 per cent of th
forest revenue collected by the Province in   I
1980-81. Coast stumpage prices remained
relatively high throughout much of the year as
Vancouver Log Market prices did not fall as    i
quickly as North .American lumber pricet^H
Minimum stumpage rates were prevalent in th
interior for much of the year. Average stumpaj
prices by species and Forest Region for'|S)8(M $
are shown in Table C-3.
The financial performance of the forest   J
industry was mixed in 1980 as market conditi *
differed sharply between the wood products '• jj
pulp and paper sectors. The integrated compaS
generally fared better as strong demand and
increased prices for newsprint and market pul
partially offset depressed lumber markets. Th(
North American residential constructionjmari i
was particularly hard hit by high interest rates i
which continue to depress the market this y«^
   M
tarts in the United States tumbled from
tion units in 1979 to 1.3 million in 1980.
Mi/ithstanding the mixed markets, me
U ustry, which depends upon the wood
f lable under the Harvesting Program,
i: 1 to make a major contribution to the
c 1 economy. The forest industry provided
ately 95 000 man-years of employment
j Tie value of shipments by the forest
increased slightly to $7.4 billion in 1980
H:line in sawmill shipments was more than
increases in the pulp and paper sector,
f.billion represented slightly less than 50
li>f the total value of shipments by all
I ilumbia manufacturing industries.
Li sports by the forest industry in 1980
It 1 to $5.7 billion or approximately 60 per
I e total value of British Columbia foreign
p lumber of licences administered and the
cf wood committed under the Harvesting
Lire shown in Tables C-8 and C-9
tdy. The Vancouver Forest Region
administers the largest number of licences, 1767
or 40 per cent of the provincial total, and also has
the largest commitment, 18.8 million m3 or 28 per
cent of the provincial total. By volume of wood
committed, the timber sale harvesting licence is
the most important form of tenure in the Province
while the timber sale licence (all categories) is the
most common form of tenure.
A major initiative under the Harvesting
Program is the Small Business Enterprise Program.
This program is designed to promote competition
in the forest industry by ensuring that room
remains for the dynamic, innovative small
operator. Table C-4 shows the volume billed and
the stumpage received under this program in
1980-81. On average, the bonus bid represented
65 per cent of the total stumpage received on
timber billed under this program in 1980-81. .As
shown in Table C-7,566 sales were made under
the Small Business Enterprise Program in 1980-81.
These sales represented an estimated volume of
2.0 million m3 and an estimated value of $ 10.2
million.
Range Management Program
toverall goals of the Range Management
uare to supply forage for domestic and
ulates, while conserving the resource
iiion" base so that a flow of forage will
u in the future, in a manner consistent with
>!use goals for Crown lands. In 1980-81,
ni:d use for domestic ungulates was
Oanimal unit months (AUM's) which
ssi the goal of 934 000 AUM's for 1984-85
fed in the first five-year program,
ecast expenditure for 1980-81 was $3.3
ntctual expenditure was $2.9 million (see
J1). In addition, Range Management staff
ii:red the expenditure of $3.5 million
g^oordinated Resource Management Plans
I). CRMP funding is through the
ilire and Rural Development Subsidiary
imt (ARDSA), a joint British Columbia-
Is litiative.
!s»e revenue (see Table D-2 ) from the use
S| range tenured through permits and
Swas $1.4 million in 1980-81. Revenue
Jil over the previous year because of
a*' in authorized use, utilization and use
'0980-81, the rent applied to authorized
810.20 per AUM; the same rent as in the
0' year. However, the use fee applied to
|s ilized is tied to cattle prices and
increased to $1.44 per AUM compared to $1.04
per AUM in 1979-80.
Grazing permits and grazing licences in
1980-81 are summarized in Table D-3. Actual
utilization was 921 900 AUM's; 98 per cent of the
authorized use.
Hay cutting permits and hay cutting licences
in 1980-81 are summarized in Table D-4. Most of
the authorized hay cutting permits and hay cutting
licences are for wetlands of the interior.
Differences between authorized use and
utilization are primarily due to high water table
resulting from climatic variation and other factors.
Range improvements funded by the Ministry
during the year are shown in Table D-5. Range
improvements made from ARDSA funded projects
are excluded.
Weed control is principally for knapweed
(400 ha) and thistle (40 ha). Knapweed control
programs have been mainly for containment.
Fencing, water developments and other
improvements are principally capital expenditures
for new improvements to provide better
utilization of existing forage. Seeding is mainly on
disturbed forest sites (17 100 ha) with grassland
rehabilitation on 22 sites (700 ha). Increased
forage production through seeded clearcuts is
being integrated into range unit planning in the
 Kamloops Range District to a major extent and is
being initiated in the Cariboo, Prince George and
Prince Rupert Range Districts. In biogeoclimatic
zones where research has been conducted, cattle
production on seeded clearcuts has not
significantly impacted on forest production and is
a cost-effective means of increasing forage
production for domestic and wild ungulates.
Range inventory conducted in conjunction
with the Inventory Branch resulted in 904 000 ha
being sampled in the field and 13 500 ha being
=f|
search
processed for computer retrieval. Researffl
continued on biological control of knapweed
on range burning. The Research Branch has
initiated research projects on range topics
CRMP's funded under ARDSA show 30
completed (13 completed in 1980-81) and 74
progress (17 initiated in 1980-81). These Oft)
cover 3.96 million ha and have contributfB
resolution of many problems resulting from
multiple-use of Crown range.
Recreation Management Program
The objectives of the Recreation Management
Program, within the Ministry's integrated resource
use framework, are to maintain and enhance
recreational values (including the aesthetic values
of the forest landscape) and to provide a system of
sites and trails to facilitate public recreational use
of Crown lands.
Expenditure on Recreation Management in
1980-81 was $2.8 million (see Table E-l). Site
and trail maintenance, improvement and
development accounted for most of the
expenditure during the year. Approximately 300
kilometers (km) of trail and 73 recreation sites
were developed. Over 300 existing sites and 240
km of existing trail were improved during the
year. Maintenance was performed on 990 sites and
766 km of trail.
Higher emphasis was given to plannffl
inventory and research activities than in prev»
years. These were continued and/or initiated I
ensure that recreation values are protecttMi
maintained.
Recreation site and trail use is shown in
Table E-2. The Ministry now has 1127 siWic
Province and manages over 2 600 km of trail
Summer use was down slightly in 1980.
particularly in the Vancouver and Kamloops
Regions, due to unusually damp and cool weal
However, winter recreation activity again
increased noticeably, and it is estimated that 1
million user visits were made to recreational)
and trails managed by the Ministry during the
Provincial residents made up a high percent
the user population.
Associated Program
The purpose of the Associated Program is to
support the timber, range and recreation
management functions of the Ministry. In 1980-81,
the Associated Program included planning,
inventory, research and computer consulting.
Expenditure under the program totalled $20.0
million which was approximately 80 per cent of
the amount budgeted in the Gist Five-Year Forest
and Range Resource Program (see Table 1). The
research component of the program accounted for
more than 40 per cent of the total program
expenditure.
In the revised program structure introduced
in the second Five-Year Forest and Range
Resource Program, the /Associated Program
disappeared as the four component activities were
allocated to the related programs which they
support. In the new program structure, planni
and inventory are included with the Harvestin
Program, research is included under theM
Silviculture Program, and computer consultin
included in the Finance and Support Program
PLANNING
The Planning Branch develops resource
planning systems to implement the Minis®]
five-year resource program and is also respom
for coordinating these systems with those of c
resource Ministries.
In 1980-81, the Branch completed l4Tii
Supply Area (TSA) analyses. As of March 31.1'1
this brought the total number of analyses ffa
completed to 28 out of the 33 TSA's establish!
for the Province. On the basis of these anahrse.
 Ii, Forester had established 14 allowable
I (ts (MC's) by the end of the fiscal year.
v lew provincial forests were established
80-81 bringing the total number to 102
r{31 1981. The objective of the provincial
Ingram is to designate the land base
U o maintain provincial forest and range
cwoduction.
p'ORY
.inventory Branch is responsible for
h the statistics and maps required for the
Sent of the forest and range resources of
p. ice.
80-81, the Branch assisted regional staff
H ting re-inventory surveys in several
t in remeasuring sample plots in both
fed managed stands. Decay studies were
r :d out in the forest regions,
ll: 8 shows the area of Crown and private
al in British Columbia by forest region.
a: cover status of the Crown land is also
e Approximately 54 per cent of Crown
Slipcovered by mature timber.
ISaCH
a try research is generally aimed at
pg and using knowledge and methods
ribute to the improved management of
c forest and range resources under the
am of the Ministry.
80-81, Ministry expenditure on research
tU. 1 million which exceeded the amount
sti the first Five-Year Forest and Range
<i°rogram by approximately $2.4 million
ale 1). The $8.1 million excludes another
$ 1.3 million devoted to research which has been
allocated directly to other programs, principally
the Silviculture Program.
The Ministry has placed a high priority on
establishing the research capability and
knowledge required to help meet some of the
difficult challenges of the Silviculture Program.
Additional highly skilled research staff were
recruited for tree growth and yield analysis, forest
regeneration and tending studies, planting stock
improvement and tree breeding. Several new
research projects were initiated that address high
priority information needs such as more effective
reforestation strategies for severe sites and
managed stand yield tables for intensive
silviculture practices.
Two integrated resource management
programs were established to increase the benefits
to the province from the forest land base. The first
program addresses the impact of mass wasting in
the Queen Charlotte Islands on stream habitat and
forest productivity and the second is a long term
program between the Ministries of Forests and
Environment to examine wildlife - intensive
forestry interactions on Vancouver Island. .Also, a
range research program was initiated to assist
range managers in meeting provincial production
goals.
A research centre consisting of a laboratory,
greenhouse and service complex was constructed
near Vernon to accommodate forest geneticists,
tree physiologists and other staff.
The results of the experiments and field
studies by the Research Branch are published each
year in the Forest Research Review.
Administration/Operations Program
lliidministration component of this
mrovides Executive direction for the
rjnd support services such as manpower
if ent, financial management and facilities
ie°nt. The operations component (Field
>|is)Jncludes staff at the field level to
rtther programs such as Protection,
*tn, Range and Silviculture.
«*s revised program structure introduced
Sond Five-Year Forest Range and
^Program, the Administration/
Hi is Program disappeared. The operations
oi nt was distributed across all other
to and all finance and support activities
M to form the Finance and Support
Program. These changes will be reflected in the
Annual Report for 1981-82 which reports on the
second Resource Program.
Expenditure for 1980-81 was $38.6 million
with $13.7 million for Administration and $24.9
million for Field Operations.
One of the major tasks of the administration
component during 1980-81 was to continue
implementing the reorganization of the Ministry. A
significant problem has been the high level of
vacancies in permanent positions (see Tables 6
and 7). During the year, over 17 per cent of all
permanent positions were unfilled by permanent
staff. Of the 570 vacancies in March, 1981,190
were in the process of being staffed on a
 permanent basis. /Although many of the functions
of the vacant positions are being carried out by
auxiliary staff, this is not a desirable situation. With
classification of the majority of positions
completed in 1980-81, the vacancy problem can
be remedied as staffing accelerates during
1981-82.
Research
Tree improvement applies genetics to W^tn
production to produce faster growing trees. A
research facility devoted to tree improvemen <
consisting of laboratory, greenhouse and serd
complex coupled with a seed orchard, was
established near Vernon.
 Summary Statistical Tables
NOTE: All financial data for 1980-81 contained in sections IV and V are unaudited.
 Table 1 Forecast and Actual Expenditure
in 1980-81, by Program
Table 2 Forecast and Actual I
in 1980-81, by Forest Regffl j
Forecast Actual
PROGRAM Expenditure1 Expenditure2
(thousands of dollars)
Timber
Silviculture 75,380 71,635
Protection^ 28,970 30,013
Harvesting 88,250 102,163
Range
Range 3,340 2,945
Recreation
Recreation 3,190 2,798
Associated
Research 5,730 8,108
Other 18,780 11,888
Administration/
Operations
Ministry H.Q. 14,010 13,693
Field Operations        22,750 24,926
TOTAL 260,400 268,169
aVoras.-
Forecast expenditure in the Five- Year Forest and Range
Resource Program, March 1980.
Incorporates alt expenditures including accruals of $.603
million. Funds are from three sources:
(i) Ministry of Forests budget,
(ii) Forest and Range Resource Fund, and
OH) Expenditures by licensees under Section 88
of the Forest Act.
•> The budgetary allocation for the Fire Suppression
component ofthe Protection Program was $8,460 million.
Actual expenditure was $18,363 million.
FOREST
REGION
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Victoria
TOTAL
NOTES:
1
Forecast
Aetna
penditure
' Expendit;
(thousands of dollars).
23,100
20,52
26,600
26,6/
27,100
26,44
43,400
57,9*
31,400
32,05
50,800
45,«
58,000
58,80
260,400
268.K
Forecast regional expenditure implicit in the Five-Yet
Forest and Range Resource Program, March 1980.
Includes all expenditures. Funds are from three some
(i) Ministry of Forests budget,
(ii) Forest and Range Resource Fund, and    j
(Hi) Expenditures by licensees under Section 88 ofth
Forest Act.
 Table 3 Composition of Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Program
Wages & Salaries
Materials,
Supplies &
Permanent Temporary,
(S\M
Staff          Aux. Staff
Expenses       Contracts
(thousands of dollars)
Section 88
Total
H
fcriilture
5,215            15,602
8,586            14,646
27,586
71,635
(ontion
2,879             7,664
5,909            11,454
2,107
30,013
L-sting
25,665            7,394
14,294              3,802
51,008
102,163
tn
757                669
949                 570
0
2,945
•e;on
:cation
282              1,363
513                 482
158
2,798
cied
Birch
1,818             1,935
3,191              1,164
0
8,108
th
3,477             2,770
4,930                 711
0
11,888
ir tration/Operations
InryH.Q.
4,075              1,351
2,673              5,594
0
13,693
slOperations
16,510             3,963
4,120                 333
0
24,926
A
60,678           42,711
45,165            38,756
80,859
268,169
Table 4
Composition of Actual Expenditure in 1980-81, by Forest Region
Wages & Salaries
Materials,
Supplies &
Permanent Temporary,
IE'REGION
Staff          Aux. Staff
Expenses       Contracts
(thousands of dollars)
Section 88
Total
be
5,313            4,753
3,154             3,032
4,271
20,523
ll«S
6,344            5,695
4,249             3,294
7,089
26,671
iOI
6,739            4,987
(1.532)1            6,761
9,485
26,440
eeleorge
7,168             6,098
5,233             7,343
32,144
57,986
ceupert
5,961             4,408
4,028              3,625
14,060
32,082
ccer
11,830             6,667
5,860              7,500
13,810
45,667
or
17,323           10,103
24,173              7,201
0
58,800
1A
60,678           42,711
45,165            38,756
80,859
268,169
NOTE:l Credit results from recoveries from B.C. Hydro for the Revelstoke Reservoir
Clearing Program amounting to $5-300 million.
 Table 5 Forest and Range Revenue in 1980-81, by Forest Regie
FOREST
Forest
Range
Total
REGION
Revenue1
Revenue
Revenue
(thousands of dollars)
Cariboo
26,644
552
27,196
Kamloops
22,539
522
23,061
Nelson
15,413
118
15,531
Prince George
45,734
223
45,957
Prince Rupert
62,037
30
62,067
Vancouver
181,228
1
181,229
Victoria
7,243
1
7,244
TOTAL
360,838
1,447
362,285
NOTE:
equaled $80,859 million in 1980-81. Gross Ministry of
Forests revenue totalled $443-144 million. Credits
approved by program and forest region are shown in tables
3 and 4 under the column beading "Section 88".
PROGRAM
April 1,1980
March 31,1981
Positions
Staff
Vacancies
Positions
Staff        Vac
Timber
Silviculture
281
238
43
281
208
Protection
90
62
28
90
54
Harvesting
961
798
163
961
804
Range
43
29
14
43
26
Recreation
14
3
11
14
5
Associated
255
225
30
255
206
Administration/
Operations1
1,578
1,327
251
540
1,578
1,349
TOTAL
3,222
2,682
3,222
2,652            !
NOTE: 1 The Field Operations component of tbe Administration/Operations Program
includes staff working in other programs.
 ^able 7 Ministry of Forests Personnel (Permanent Staff) in 1980-81, by Forest Region
If
IV
April 1,1980
Positions
March 31,1981
Staff
Positions
Staff
Vacancies
Vacancies
)l
285
245
40
285
244
41
lips
355
292
63
355
282
73
p
352
315
37
352
293
59
George
399
302
97
399
307
92
slupert
332
257
75
332
243
89
tver
609
513
96
609
522
87
ii
890
758
132
890
761
129
3,222 2,682 540 3,222 2,652 570
1 able o Forest Land in British Columbia, by Forest Region1
Crown Forest Land2
Private
r
NC
Forest
V
Mature
Immature
NSR3
Brush4
Other5
Total
Land
(thousands of hectare)
n M
3 534.8
2 686.4
155.4
19.0
80.5
6476.1
443.5
;ps
2 241.9
1 974.9
130.7
19.7
20.5
4 387.7
946.3
1 335.7
2 084.9
241.8
21.0
80.3
3 763.7
681.1
ijeorge
7 840.7
8 235.7
196.7
627.0
396.7
17 296.8
1 589.9
itupert
8 700.7
2 340.7
344.0
75.1
204.1
11 664.6
613.1
:rer
2 181.6
1 450.6
88.2
6.0
98.2
3 824.6
586.4
Total
6919-6
5 334.0
4 444.8
18 886.7
12 277.7
4 411.0
25 835.4    18 773-2      1 156.8        767.8 880.3       47 413-5     4 860.3     52 273.8
NOTES:    Source: Forest and Range Resource Analysis Technical Report,
Land owned by the Province which has a productive capacity best suited
to the growing of forest crops.
* Not Satisfactorily Restocked. Stands which have been disturbed over 75 percent by fire,
logging or other causes and have not restocked with sufficient numbers of
commercial species.
Non-commecial Brush. Areas that have been invaded and covered by brush
and non-commercial species.
^ Includes miscellaneous cover types such as non-productive timber, noncommercial
timber and residual stands following logging.
 Forest Protection
The ministry continued to take the maprrole
provincial fire management through a hectic
fire season. The area burned was kept to 65 00
hectares, well below the Five-Year Program In
of 69 000 hectares. ■
 Detailed Statistical Tables
NOTE: Totals in certain tables are not equal to the sum of their components due to rounding.
 J
Tota
4,70
7,64
4,09
10,01
7,21
23,01
14,94
71,6?
Table A-1 Silviculture Expenditure in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST
REGION
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Victoria
Basic &         Nursery           Seed         Inventory
Administration    Intensive    Operations  Operations  & Research
(thousands of dollars)
1,238                  3,332                    0                 41                89
1,093                  6,412                  10                 72                62
625                  3,213                    0               183                73
502                 9,327               152                33                 0
538                 6,515                  46                 79                38
2,127                 19,327                 341             1,073                150
1,310                   526           10,526           2,016             566
TOTAL
7,433                48,652           11,075            3,497              978
XablC A-2 Surveys on Crown Land of Natural Regeneration1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST
REGION
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Area                   Area Not                  Area
Area               Satisfacatorily      Satisfacatorily      Satisfecatori
Surveyed               Stocked                Stocked               Stocked
(hectares)                                                               (*)
44 943                   38 850                   6093                   86-4
28 842                    13 458                   15 384                    46.7
30 265                     18 163                   12 102                    60.0
35 678                   23 696                  11982                   66.4
31457                    19873                   11584                    63.2
41345                   27164                  14181                   65.7
TOTaAX
212 530                  141204                   71326
NOTE:    Does not include surveys on natural regeneration on Crown land within Trei:
66.4
Farm Lice"
 A-3 Site Preparation on Crown Land for Natural
Regeneration in 1980-81, by Forest Region
Prince
Prince
Iment
Cariboo Kamloops  Nelson
George
Rupert    Vancouver
Total
(hectares^
carified
512           787         1512
205
0                   0
3 016
ast burned
381           242              56
0
0                 10
689
•d and burned
33          553           989
1 187
37                  0
2 799
fdonly
16             39              17
145
0                   0
217
:al treatment
0              0                0
54
0                   0
54
arified
292          842         1592
5 668
2 157                   0
10 551
dialling
0              0             66
0
0           2615
2 681
rned
97            42         1862
0
380              246
2 627
ling only
0               0                0
0
0                  0
0
2 422          991               0
102
0                  0
3515
:al
3 753       3 495        6094
7 361
2 574           2 871
26148
itment
10 151        1934                0
10 965
4 295           2 833
30 178
13 904       5 429        6 094
18 326
6 869           5 704
56 326
NOTES: ^Includes other site preparation treatment (cultivation, brush chopping etc.).
lble A-4 Site Preparation on Crown Land for Planting in
1980-81, by Forest Region
Prince
Prince
Iment
Cariboo Kamloops   Nelson
George
Rupert    Vancouver
Total
(hectares)
1 .arified
363           570           159
4 307
1113               213
6 725
list burned
2 407         3 051         1918
4977
4 974            4 092
21419
Id and burned
945        2 845             43
2 128
835                 28
6824
Id only
135            203                0
711
0                 14
1063
lal treatment
0                0                0
0
0                 78
78
luified
50              19              37
0
131                   0
237
1 falling
0                0              81
0
437           3 323
3 841
:rned
17             86           939
79
0            1040
2 161
ling only
192                0                0
0
20                  0
212
[
352            779                0
2 109
718                  18
3 976
al
4461         7 553         3 177
14311
8 228             8 806
46 536
'tment
0         1848                0
2 692
54             3 250
7 844
.
4 461         9 400         3 177
17 003
8 282          12 056
54 379
NOTE: includes other site preparation treatment (cultivation, brush chopping, etc.).
 1                                                      J
Table A-5 Crown Forest Land Planted            Table A-6 Brushing and Weeding on Cn
in 1980-81, by Forest Region                                      Land in 1980-81, by Forest Re
FOREST                            Area                  Trees
REGION                         Planted             Planted
(hectares)         (thousands of trees)
Cariboo                             5 772                  7,193
Kamloops                          6 483                  8,267
Nelson                               5 907                 6,895
Prince George                19 775               25,212
Prince Rupert                   5 590                  7,425
Vancouver                       19 355                18,787
Area
FOREST REGION                              Treate
(hectare:
Cariboo                                                2(
Kamloops                                               26"
Nelson                                                  L  A
Prince George                                      5-
Prince Rupert                                         9;
Vancouver                                           2 50(
TOTAL                            62 883                73,778
TOTAL                                                 293f
Table A-7 Crown Forest Land Improved in 1980-81, by Forest Region 1
FOREST                                                                                Site               Conifer    Commercial  Misde
REGION                     Spacing1      Fertilisation   Rehabilitation     Release       Thinning     Cont
(hectares)
Cariboo                               2 243                   0                    20                      0                 0             133
Kamloops                            3 487                 11                   535                      0                 0                lq
Nelson                               1406                  0                   45                     0                0
Prince George                    1352                  0              2 643                     0                0            ¥ i
Prince Rupert                      2 751                   0                  403                      0                 0                 3
Vancouver                         11185            5 505                   159               2 680               31
TOTAL                               22 425            5 516               3 805               2 680               31              15d
Note: ! Includes Juvenile spacing and sanitation spacing.
 Table A-8 Seed Additions, Withdrawals and Inventory in 1980-81, by Species1
Additions                                Withdrawals
Private*
3 1
Inital         Natural    Seed Orchard   JVUnistry     Licensee
Final
Inventory2 Collections Collections  Nurseries3 Nurseries3   Other4   Inventory5
(kilograms)
esternRed
316.9           29.9              0.0                 15.3             4.1             o.O
327.4
Mow
14.4              1.6               0.0                    5.7             0.0              0.0
10.3
•ir
10 818.0          860.4             49.6               452.4         209.1            20.9
11 045.9
1
800.6             11.8                0.0                     8.1               0.0               2.5
801.9
lilis
4620.8            99.8               0.0                650.3            76.7            15.4
3 978.1
il
374.0            28.4               0.0                  11.9             8.5              0.3
381.8
; Mountain
98.6              0.0               0.0                    1.0             0.4              0.2
97.0
; Western
547.7              1.4               0.0                  45.5             9.5              4.2
490.0
;stern
112.5          160.8               0.0                    8.9              1.8              0.3
262.2
;»epole
3 866.0          244.7               0.0                  92.4           42.3            24.2
3 951.8
llerosa
621.6            15.8               0.0                  27.6            15.5              0.6
593.6
1 lglemann
1701.1            40.0               0.0                  35.2           22.9              0.0
1 683.0
Ijfjj
1 167.8              0.0               0.6                  21.5             8.9              0.2
1 137.8
[hite
3 387.6              0.0               0.0                102.6            11.7              5.4
3 267.9
1 :neral°
69999         199.9              0.0               235.0           41.2           36.9
6 886.8
;:ous
262.6              5.7               0.0                    7.6              3.1               1.6
256.0
35 710.4       1700.4             50.2             1720.9         455.9          112.6
35 171.6
NOTES:    Excludes approximately 200 kilograms of seed from exotic species.
2 April 1,1980.
3 For sowing of seedlings primarily in 1981-82.
Includes withdrawals for direct seeding, export, research purposes, etc.
5 Marcb31,1981.
Includes natural crosses between Sitka, Englemann, White and Black Spruce.
Table B-l Forest Protection Expenditure1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region
3
Planning,
Forest              Air            Development
Fire                   Pest          Protection   Operations       & Research
•l
Management  Management     Services        Services            Services
(thousands of dollars)
Total
5
1,022                   449                  167               111                         1
1,750
1
1,727                  448                  93                94                       2
2,364
1,034                   454                  108                 86                         2
1,684
(orge
515                    206                  177               181                         0
1,079
BDert
783                    203                  143               156                         0
1,285
or
1,776                   271                  154               118                         2
2,321
a
103                    273                 412                 35                     344
1,167
6,960               2,304              1,254              781                   351
11,650
jV072: 1 Standby expenditure is included tn Table B-2
to conform with the Ministry's program structure.
 J
Table B-2 Fire Suppression Expenditure in 1980-81,1
>y Forest Region
Direct
5uppr.
&
Site
FOREST
Fire
Suppr.
Equip
Standby &
Safety
Rehabil
REGION
Fighting
Flying
ment
Overtime1   '
framing
itation       To
(thousands of dollars)
Cariboo
454
533
52
231
8
0
Kamloops
372
393
193
350
1
13
y
Nelson
270
420
72
229
0
0
t
Prince George
6,027
1,511
141
406
0
0
8,(
Prince Rupert
617
529
68
50
1
32
w
Vancouver
239
581
56
353
0
0
P
Victoria
950
2,242
6,209
701
1,283
154
1,773
102
112
12
57
i\
TOTAL
8,929
Wit
NOTE: X
Standby expenditure is included
in this Table
to conform with the Ministry's program structure.
Table B-3 Number and Cause ofWildflres1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region 1
Prince                   Prince
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
George                   Rupert
Vancouver
Total
1980- Ten-Year     1980- Ten-Year
1980- Ten-Year
1980- Ten-Year    198O- Ten-Year
1980- Ten-Year
1980-   Id
CAUSE
1981 Average
1981   Average
1981   Average
1981   Average      1981
'number of wildfires)
Average
1981
Average
1981   Afj
Lighting
35   125
170  323
174  314
148 131      45
54
87
100
6591
Recreational3
8     27
42     69
24    38
20    30      29
23
29
52
152
Railroads
6      7
20     50
10    41
7    10         2
4
13
22
58
Smokers
17    37
41   118
29    53
17    22       16
19
20
84
140
Brush Burning*
29    20
21     26
15     16
41    24       14
8
6
11
126
Range Burning
40    32
4       9
0        1
33     14         1
3
0
1
78
Construction5
2      4
2       8
6      6
5      4         1
5
3
5
19
Industrial6
15    27
37    49
28    32
29    29      30
20
37
48
176
Incendiary
46    58
31     25
3      6
37    10         6
4
1
5
124
Misc. Known Causes
37    63
60   102
42     58
38    21       17
25
17
40
211
Unknown Causes
0       3
235  403
0       3
428  782
0       3
331   568
0       2         0
375  297     161
1
166
0
213
1
369
0
TOTAL
1,743 2
NOTES: X
Includes all wildfires in British Columbia.
Based on 1970 through 1979.
3
Campers, hunters, fishermen, etc
Excluding railway or right-of-way clearing.
5
toad,power, telephone,pipeline
and right-of-way construction
6
hogging, milling
and other industries.
 Table B-4 Area Burned by Wildfires1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region
Merchantable Timber
1980-
1981
Ten-Year
Average3
Immature Timber
1980-
1981
Ten-Year 1980-
Average 1981
(hectares)
Ten-Year
Average
1980-
1981
Ten-Year
Average
:orge
ipert
;:r«
516
201
93
8 268
318
237
9633
1038
2314
2 482
5 736
2 702
534
14 806
101
63
44
22 829
15
62
1512
2 071
2 136
7 498
1 124
656
1631
741
434
28 950
852
223
1623
2 723
4 198
24163
6669
976
2 248
1005
571
60 047
1 185
522
4 173
7 108
8 816
37 397
10 495
2 166
23 114  14 997  32 831  40 352  65 578  70 155
NOTES: ' Includes all wildfires in British Columbia.
2 Includes wildfires on NSR areas, NCC areas, grazing and pasture land,
non -productive sites and fires less than 4 hectares in area.
Based on 1970 through 1979-
'Table B-5 Timber Burned by Wildfires1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST           J
lerchantabl
e Immature
REGION
Timber2
Timber3
Total
(thousands of m3)
Cariboo
129
4
133
Kamloops
73
3
76
Nelson
19
2
21
Prince George
755
1231
1986
Prince Rupert
53
1
54
Vancouver
37
11
48
TOT.AL
1066
1252     2 318
NOTES:
Includes all wildfires in British Columbia.
Before salvage. Burned timber is salvaged wherever
practical.
* Estimates. Based on species and generalized age and site
information. Assumes complete mortality.
 Table C-l Harvesting Expenditure in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST
REGION
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Victoria
TOTa\L
Technical Timber      Engineering
Services      Valuation    Management     & Roads        Scaling Tot: I
1,616
609
1,772
368
1,683
295
2,062
714
1,916
682
2,126
554
8,339
875
19,514
4,097
(thousands of dollars)
463
3,843
956
7,4
274
4,314
1,392
8,11
624
8,716
1,290
12,61
883
26,565
2,081
32,3
482
11,303
2,027
16,4
791
3,462
5,832
12,7
1,066
1,915
272
124
4,583
60,118
13,850
102,1
Table C-2 Forest Revenue in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST
Annual
Stumpage
Roy
Scal
Inter
Gross
Less
Net
REGION
Rents
Stumpage
Credits
Stumpage
alty
ing
est
Other1
To
(thousands of dollars
Cariboo
1,154
28,223
4,271
23,952
I
653
755
129
26,
Kamloops
1,329
26,459
7,089
19,370
246
996
461
1381
22.)
Nelson
1,170
22,148
9,485
12,663
134
935
410
100
15,:
Prince George
2,775
71,485
32,144
39,341
107
1,487
1,897
126
45.
Prince Rupert
2,500
68,542
14,060
54,482
2,692
1,699
474
191
62.
Vancouver
6,384
173,719
13,810
159,909
10,528
3,316
498
5911
181.1
Victoria
881
76
0
76
0
0
0
6,286
TOT.AL 16,194      390,652     80,859      309,794    13,706    9,086     4,495     7,562    3603
NOTE:1 Includesforestrevenuefrom forestprotection agreements, recoveries of $5-812 n^iUion J
from theB.C. ■ Canada Intensive Forest Management Subsidiary Agreement   j
and other miscellaneous sources.
 1 Kb C"3 Average Stumpage Prices Received on Timber BUled from Tree Farm Licences,
Timber Sale Harvesting Licences and Timber Sale Licences other than
Small Business Sales
in 1980-81, by Species and Forest Region
BALSAM
CEDAR
CYPRESS                           FIR
j|
Volume      Price
Volume      Price
Volume      Price      Volume
Price
(,000m3)        (S/m3)
(,000m3)         (S/m3)
(,000m3)        (J/m3)        (,000m3)
(S/m3)
277             1.42
175            1.32
1249
3.43
ps
867             1.27
482         1.99
0.91           1210
2.71
|i
455           1.15
557          2.19
471
2.10
keorge
1 173           1-35
37         1.31
224
7.46
fcupert(C)
624           2.76
804          4.12
95          37.29              92
13.40
fcupert(I)
1218           1.64
145          2.19
*
3.75
>er(C)
2 857         10.89
2 893          8.26
478          56.57         1471
13.32
|ffi(I)
137           5.78
47         4.04
4          14.16              85
4.93
635
J
7 608           5.16
5 140          5.87
577          53.12         4802
it
HEMLOCK
LARCH
LODGEPOLE PINE              SPRUCE
CI
Volume      Price
Volume      Price
Volume      Price      Volume
'Price:'-;:j
(,000m3)        (*/m3)
(,000m3)         (S/m3)
(,000m3)        (S/m3)        (,000m3)
(S/m3)
3
31           1.04
-                    -
3 013         1.43           1497
3.03
>l'S
340          0.94
61           1.59
2 159         1.10           2 074
1.80
n
559          0.25
215           1.66
1624        0.99          1064
1.52
p eorge
23           1.17
-
3 581         1.30           6 487
3.05
p xpert (C)
1895           6.79
-
10         1.88              628
30.87
papert(I)
1227           0.91
-              -
1901         1.36           1411
2.49
A|(C)
5 074         10.58
-              -
1         7.19              140
36.92
>t=r(I)
108           4.71
276           1.64
22         1.13                61
3.48
434
1
9 257           7.42
12 311         1.27         13 362
iS
WHITE PINE
OTHER SPECIES
ALL SPECIES
0
Volume      Price
Volume      Price
Volume      Price
(,000m3)        (S/m3)
(,000m3)        (J/m3)
(,000m3)        (S/m3)
0(
1.07
2            1.33
6244          2.21
3CS
35             8.91
26             7.22
7 254          1.70
a
180             9.71
15           5.18
5 140          1.61
F«orge
•                1.08
22            0.51
11547          2.41
enpert (C)
2.61
18            1.51
4166        10.10
eupert(I)
-
24            0.61
5 926         1.61
au:r(C)
31           6.84
16           2.99
12 961        12.41
?ra(i)
5           8.04
251           9.20
1           0.74
124           2.97
470          4.77
\l
53 708          5.16
NOTES:     Volumes exclude firmwood rejects and waste.
' indicates volume less than500m^.
3 Average stumpage prices do not refle
t the effect of credits against stumpage.
 Table C-4 Stumpage Revenue from the Small Business Enterprise Program in 1<8
by Forest Region
Stumpage Recei
FOREST
Volume
Stumpage
Bonus
Stumpage
as a % of
REGION
Billed1
Appraised2
Bid
Received
Stumpage Apprai|
(,000m3)
(thousands of dollars)
(%)
Cariboo
231
321
1,115
1,435
447
Kamloops
107
157
208
365
232
Nelson
14
25
73
98
390
Prince George
93
262
351
613
234
Prince Rupert:
Coast
18
49
1
49
101
Interior
173
185
278
464
250
Vancouver
75
361
502
864
239
TOTAL
711
. l
1,360
2,528
3,8
286
NOTES: i Excludes firmwood rejects and waste.
' Appraised stumpage was set at prescribed minimum rates
for theperiodjune 1,1980 through March 31,1981.
Table C-5 Total Volume of All Products Billed1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region:
LAND STATUS
Prince      Prince
Cariboo   Kamloops   Nelson     George     Rupert    Vancouver   To
(thousands of cubic meters)
Crown Land
Tree Farm Licences2
Timber Sale Harvesting
Licences
Timber Sale licences
Licences to Cut
Timber Licences
Old Temporary Tenures3
Other4
Sub-Total
Private Land
Other5
TOTAL
111
3 052
3 514
166
0
0
65
6909
428
10
7 347
733
3 324
3 732
24
0
127
60
8 001
412
23
8 437
1469
2 417
1520
119
6
62
14
5 608
737
542
7 584
3 940
403
52
15
11
12 547
535
49
2 757
5 898
1834
247
0
754
18
11508
506
138
70761
495M
1533
861
447
64141
335
20 844
42641
591
27
16
'65!
6 350        13131       12 152        25167      72*
Includes firmwood rejects.
Includes schedule B lands only.
Includes special timber licences, timber leases, pulp licences, pulp leases and timber be
Includes farm woodlot licences, right of way, beachcomb, trespass andmisc.
Includes Indian Reserves and Dominion reserves.
 Table C-6 Area Harvested1 in 1980-81, by Forest Region
FOREST
Clear
Selective
REGION
Cutting
Cutting
(hectares)
Total
Cariboo
22 613
10 395
33 008
Kamloops
15 927
10 481
26 408
Nelson
14 240
8 165
22 405
Prince George
46 234
0
46 234
Prince Rupert
26653
1473
28 126
Vancouver
31 119
534
31653
TOTAL
156 786
31048
187 834
NOTE:
harvesting of private lands except private tanas within
Tree Farm Licences,
Tree Farms and Farm Woodlot Licences.
I Table C- 7 Small Business Enterprise Program in 1980-81, by Forest Region
fffiGION
(orge
Ipert
Registrants
Sales
Cat.12
338
595
428
491
500
771
3,123
Cat.23
Cat.1
(number
of)
97
51
223
53
220
24
191
12
206
166
171
94
Volume
Sold4
It. 2
Value5
(,000m3)
(*,000)
30
556.2
2,591.3
39
254.7
1,130.2
30
171.2
711.7
14
80.5
516.7
46
479-9
1,469.3
7
421.7
3,790.2
1,108
400
166
1 964.2
10,209.4
NOTES:1 On March 31,1981.
2 Category 1: Registrants who, at the time of application, did not own
a timber processing facility.
3 Category 2: Registrants who, at the time of application, owned a timber processing facility.
Tendered volume.
5 Value based upon appraised price at time of sale plus bonus bid, if any.
 I
Table C-8 Number of Tenures at March 31,1981, by Forest Region
Prince      Prince
TENURE
Cariboo   Kamloops   Nelson     George     Rupert
(number of licences)
Vancouver
TV
Tree Farm Licences1
17                 5                16
17
Farm Woodlot licences
11                2                4              6              4
10
Timber Sale Harvesting
licences
38               48               37             60             48
41
Timber Sale licences:
Quota
44            113              67             42             38
126
£ J
Third Band
31              65              33             62              4
0
S.B.E.P.2
90             116               87             31           285
101
V  1
Other
463               75             116            109           522
678             426             349           311           907
1,472
1,767a
2,
TOTAL
NOTES:    Tree Farm Licences 2,25 and 39 are in both Vancouver
and Prince Rupert Forest Regions.
Small Business Enterprise Program.
Table C-9 Commitment as at March 31,1981, by Forest Region
Prince      Prince
Tenure
Cariboo   Kamloops   Nelson     George     Rupert
(thousands of m3)
Vancouver
>T<
Tree Farm Licences1
119            772         1641            441        4194
11904
19
Farm Woodlot licences
2                0                12               1
2
1
Timber Sale Harvesting
licences
2 833          3 123          2 392          9024        6616
5 268
29
Timber Sale Licences:
Quota
354             138             123             490           240
1304
2
Third Band
2 767         3 043         2 149         4 408           501
0
12
S.B.E.P.2
341            352            276            989        1091
300
3
Other
ooooo
0
67
TOTAL
6416          7 429          6 581        15 353       12 643
18 778
NOTES:1 TreeFarmLlcences2,25and39areinbotbVancouver
and Prince Rupert Forest Regions.
Small Business Enterprise Program.
 Table D-1 Range Management Expenditure1 in 1980-81, by Range District
Improvements
rcT
b'
lips
o,
ciieorge
otupert
crer
J
Planning, Repair, Inventory,
Administration Maintenance   Development      Research
(thousands of dollars)
509
149
219
361
189
12
105
1,544
33
0
31
20
0
0
0
84
347
578
69
36
10
0
0
1,040
112
1
34
74
0
0
56
277
Total
1,001
728
353
491
199
12
161
2,945
NOTE:l Excludes expenditure funded through the Agriculture and Rural Development Subsidiary
Agreement (ARDSA) which was administered by the Ministry of Forests.
Table D-2 Range Revenue in 1980-81, by Range District
-
RANGE DISTRICT
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Victoria
TOTAL
Annual Rents
and Fees
(thousands of dollars)
552
522
118
223
30
1
1
1,447
J. able D"3 Grazing Permits and Grazing Licences in 1980-81, by Range District
SMSTjRICT
Permits
Licences
Number
Authorized
Utilized
Number
Authorized
Utilized
(AUM'
1
(AUM'
)
0(
559
333,014
323,195
36
39,298
41,448
OCi
516
287,766
285,412
13
33,536
33,536
ui
257
68,689
68,689
15
6,282
6,282
e,':orge
396
139,581
137,161
12
957
846
d pert
134
26,345
24,675
1
70
63
31) :r
8
608
608
0
77
0
0
1,870
856,003
839,740
80,143
82,175
NOTE: x Animal Unit Month (AUM) means the amount of forage required for one month
by an average animal of the genus bos, aged
6 months or older.
 Permits
Licences ]
RANGE DISTRICT
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Number
Authorized
Utilized
Number
Authorized    Uflliz
'tonnes)
(tonnes)
38
571
315
39
627            39<
0
0
0
1
10               K
0
0
0
2
35               3(
9
148
148
1
9               <
8
83
83
0
0               (
0
0
0
0
0                (
TOTAL
802
546
43
681
4*1
Table D-5 Range Improvements1 in 1980-81, by Range District
RANGE DISTRICT
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
TOTAL
Weed
Water
Seeding2
Fencing3
Control4
Development5 1
0th
(ha)
(km)
(ha)
(no.)
(nc
3 025
66
15
5
3
11380
79
306
32
3
975
21
87
16
2
1939
131
61
0
2
387
35
0
0
50
0
0
1
_
	
17 756
332
469
Excludes improvements financed through ARDSA.
Includes grassland rehabilitation and seeding of disturbed forest lands (clearcuts, &
Includes repair and maintenance offences and new fences constructed, m
Control of knapweed, thistle, etc.
Includes repair and maintenance of water developments and new water developw
Includes repair, maintenance and development of trails, corrals, cattleguards,etc.
 I
Administration
3
103
>1
42
139
Cwge
R>ert
97
54
V
133
i
117
685
Site/Trail
Protection & Maintenance,
Maintenance       Improvements &
of Rec. Values Development
(thousands of dollars)
6 285
44 526
81 285
0 205
47 148
32 333
65 0
275
1,782
Research &
Inventory
2
18
0
0
0
18
18
56
Total
396
630
505
302
249
516
200
2,798
Table E-2 Recreation Site and Trail Use in 1980-81, by Forest Region
3
US
tl
orge
;jpert
ner
Class A Sites1
Class B Sites3
Trails
Number
UserVisn^^
Number
User Visits2
Length4
User Visits5
144
133,444
2
2,092
210
16,000
233
350,000
106
61,800
629
34,000
216
160,815
24
5,672
977
30,000
153
122,410
19
2,695
337
50,000
63
88,153
19
25,964
99
8,000
127
262,000
21
191
8,600
425
50,000
936
1,116,822
106,823
2,677
188,000
NOTES:1 Class A Sites are those with tables, litter facilities and ground toilets.
* Estimates. Based on field surveys.
$ Class B Sites are those with litter facilities only.
In kilometers.
iLi-
 Harvesting
The Harvesting Program increases theamountt-1
timber accessible to the forest industry. Sixtyp I
cent of the program's activity was devoted to
engineering and road construction ■  j
 The Structure of the Ministry
 Ministry Organization
The Ministry established its present structure
provide overall guidance. They also advise the
in order to decentralize administrative authority.
deputy minister and through him, the mmllera
The district, region and headquarters staffs work
government on all matters relating to forest and
together to decentralize decision-making. The
range policy.
Ministry headquarters staff define policy and
Headq
uarters
As shown in the organization chart on page
timber, range and recreation programs and rela
47, the Ministry headquarters staff is organized
resource management policies. It also advises t
into the following four divisions:
executive on all matters involving engineering
- Forestry;
valuation activities. The division is composed ol
- Timber, Range and Recreation;
the following five branches:
- Finance and Administration;
- Range Management;
- Operations.
- Timber Management;
Each of the four divisions is headed by an
- Recreation Management;
assistant deputy minister who reports to the
-Valuation;
deputy minister. These four officials, together with
- Engineering.
the deputy minister as chairman, constitute the
The Finance and Administration Divisio
Ministry's executive. In addition to the four
responsible for advising the executive in all
assistant deputy ministers, the directors of the
administrative matters and for developing polk
Information Services Branch and the Strategic
and procedures pertaining to the Ministry's
Studies Branch report directly to the deputy
general administration. The division is tempos
minister.
of the following five branches:
The functions of each division are
- Personnel Services;
summarized below.
- Financial Services;
- Systems Services;
The Forestry Division ensures that all Crown
- Legal and Administrative Services;
forest and range lands are managed to provide the
- Technical Services.
greatest long-term benefits for British Columbia.
The Operations Division is responsible fo
The assistant deputy minister of this division is
ensuring that the Ministry's policies, programs
also the chief forester. The Forestry Division
procedures are promptly and effectively
maintains a comprehensive inventory of all the
implemented in the province's six Forest Regit
province's forest and range resources and assesses
and 46 Districts. The assistant deputy minister
these lands in terms of their present and potential
operations functions as the deputy minister's
uses. The division comprises the following five
immediate assistant in administering and
branches:
coordinating all field operations. The six Fores
- Planning;
Regions are:
- Inventory;
- Cariboo;
- Research;
- Kamloops;
- Silviculture;
- Nelson;
- Protection.
- Prince George;
The Timber, Range and Recreation Division
- Prince Rupert;
is responsible for formulating comprehensive
1
 Headquarters Organization
_
OFFICE OF THE
DEPUTY MINISTER
DEPUTY MINISTER
[      OFFICE OF THE
ASS.tfT.ANT
Wt DEPUTY MINISTER
FINANCE
AND ADMINISTRATION
DIVISION
ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
fl MATION
[ViS BRANCH
OFFICE OF THE
.ASSIST-ANT
DEPUTY MINISTER
TIMBER, RANGE AND
RECREATION DIVISION
ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
OFFICE OF THE
ASSISTANT
DEPUTY MINISTER
FORESTRY DIVISION
CHIEFFORESTER
OFFICE OF THE
ASSKTANT
DEPUTY MINISTER
OPERATIONS
DIVISION
ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
PERSONNEL
SERVICES BRANCH
DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL
SERVICES BRANCH
MINISTRY
COMPTROLLER
SYSTEMS
SERVICES BRANCH
DIRECTOR
LEGAL AND
ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES BRANCH
DIRECTOR
TECHNICAL
SERVICES BRANCH
RANGE
MANAGEMENT
BRANCH
DIRECTOR
TIMBER
MANAGEMENT
BRANCH
DIRECTOR
RECREATION
MANAGEMENT
BRANCH
DIRECTOR
VALUATION
BRANCH
DIRECTOR
ENGINEERING
BRANCH
PIANNTNG
BRANCH
INVENTORY
BRANCH
RESEARCH
BRANCH
SILVICULTURE
BRANCH
PROTECTION
BRANCH
STRATEGIC STUDIES
BRANCH
REGIONAL
MANAGERS
 Forest Regions
For administrative purposes, the Province is
divided into six Forest Regions. Each is
administered from its own regional office by a
regional manager. Each Forest Region is further
subdivided into Forest Districts which are under
the direction of district managers. The internal
organization of each regional office, as shown on
page 49, is analogous to that of Ministry
headquarters. Three regional staff members
provide advice and services to the regional
manager and to the various district managers and
field personnel. Regional office personnel are
responsible for servicing, coordinating and
monitoring the activities of all field personnel
operating out of district offices throughout eacl
region.
The staff of each regional office develops
regional programs and plans and ensures that at
policies, programs and procedures originating
from Ministry headquarters are administered
consistently and effectively throughout thereei
 REGIONAL
MANAGER
INFORMATION
OFFICER
FINANCE AND
ADMINIaSTRATION
MANAGER
TIMBER, RANGE AND
RECREATION
MANAGER
FORESTRY
MANAGER
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICER
RECREATION
OFFICER
SILVICULTURE
OFFICER
PERSONNEL
OFFICER
TIMBER
OFFICER
INVENTORY
OFFICER
TRAINING
OFFICER
VALUATION
OFFICER
PROTECTION
OFFICER
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
OFFICER
RANGE
OFFICER
PLANNING
OFFICER
ENGINEERING
OFFICER
FOREST
RESEARCH
OFFICER
Forest
egion Organization
HYDROLOGIST
PEDOLOGKT
DISTRICT
.MANAGERS

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