Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

British Columbia Board of Parole Annual Report 1980-81 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0372109.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0372109.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0372109-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0372109-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0372109-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0372109-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0372109-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0372109-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0372109-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0372109.ris

Full Text

 British Columbia
Board of Parole
Annual Report
1980-81
Illustrations by Peter Lynde
 British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia.  Board of Parole.
Annual report. —1980/81-
ISSN-0710-7^12
1.  British Columbia.    Board of Parole.     2.  Parole -
British Columbia - Periodicals.
HV9309.B7B71+ 35^.7110081193
 25th June, 1981
| The Honourable Allan Williams, Q.C., Attorney General
of the Province of British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour of submitting the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Board of Parole for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1981.
Yours respectfully,
JOHN KONRAD
Chairman.
  1	
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
ft   INTRODUCTION	
1
Background
New Mandate
2   PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE	
2
Definition
The Justice System
Purpose of Parole
Underlying Principles
Focus of Responsibility
1 3   BOARD MEMBERSHIP	
.   4
Philosophy of Citizen Involvement
Community Membership
Criteria for Membership
Recruitment of Members
Policy Executive
1 4. PROGRAM POLICIES....
     6
The Board
The Inmate
The Parole Hearing
The Parole Certificate
Support Systems
5. MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION	
  10
Office of the Chairman
Staffing Structure and Complement
Program Implementation
I   Administrative Agreement With the Corrections Branch
Guidelines for Members
6. PROGRAM INFORMATION	
  12
Board Reviews
Board Decisions
Member Workload
Parole Supervision
Suspensions and Revocations
1   Inmates Serving Definite/Indeterminate Sentences
Mandatory Supervision
Parole by Deportation
7. CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PAROLING AUTHORITIES	
  16
Membership
Transfer of Jurisdiction
Current Issues
8. PRIORITIES FOR 1981/1982                                         	
  17
f  Philosophy
Policy
P   Operational
Legislation
V
 Page ;
APPENDICES  19
A. Principles Underlying Parole.
B. Criteria for Membership.
C. Criteria for Parole Decision Making.
D. Policy on Use of Community Based Residential Centres.
E. Organizational Chart.
F. Memorandum of Understanding.
TABLES  2M
I. Number of Board Hearings by Region by Month.
II. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Interior Region.
IE. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Northern Region.
IV. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—North Fraser Region.
V. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—South Fraser Region.
VI. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Vancouver Region.
VII. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Vancouver Island Region.
VIII. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Board Office.
IX. Number and Type of Decisions by Month—Provincial Summary.
X. Number and Type of Decisions by Region—Provincial Summary.
XI. Number on Parole by Month—Provincial Summary.
XII. Suspensions and Dispositions by Month—Provincial Summary.
 fr—
1. INTRODUCTION
Background
The British Columbia Board of Parole has experienced a year of new beginnings and growth during fiscal 1980/81. From its inception in 1949 to the present,
the Board's mandate was confined to the release of young adult offenders under the
lage of 22 during the indeterminate portion of a definite/mdeterminate sentence of
imprisonment. The definite/indeterminate sentence provided for under the PRISONS AND REFORMATORIES ACT (CANADA) has now been repealed and the
repeal is awaiting proclamation by the Government of Canada.
New Mandate
The new mandate of the Board is under provisions of the PAROLE ACT
■CANADA). This Act was revised in 1978 to allow the provinces to establish Parole
Boards for the release of any inmates incarcerated in provincial Correctional
Centres, other than
• inmates sentenced to life imprisonment as a minimum punishment,
• inmates in respect of whom sentences of death have been commuted to life
imprisonment, or
• inmates sentenced to detention in a penitentiary for an indeterminate
period.
jM#llllll'lillplllll]ll
The purposes of incarceration are punishment (denunciation), deterrence
and isolation of the dangerous offender.
In electing to assume this responsibility the Government of British Columbia
K-established the Board of Parole in October 1979 by Order in Council, appointing
m Chairman and re-appointing the six Members previously on the Board.
The exercise of this new mandate commenced, by administrative decision of
government in February 1980, following on similar decisions by the Province of
Ontario in 1978 and the Province of Quebec in 1979. The National Parole Board
retains jurisdiction in British Columbia for those inmates incarcerated in federal
jgenitenfiaries. The Prairie and Atlantic provinces have not exercised their right
finder the PAROLE ACT and provincial inmates in those provinces remain under
'^National Parole Board jurisdiction.
 2. PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE
Definition
Parole is a procedure whereby an inmate who is considered suitable may be
released from prison at an appropriate time before expiration of a sentence of
incarceration to serve the balance of sentence in the community subject to conditions of the parole certificate and under such agreements made between the Parole
Board and the inmate in the release plan.
Most inmates are eligible to be considered for parole upon having served one-third
of the sentence of imprisonment.
Justice System
Parole is granted selectively to inmates who qualify under the criteria set out in
the PAROLE ACT (CANADA) and is intended to support the general aim of justice,
namely, the protection of society. The Board does not change the sentence of
imprisonment imposed by the judge. It makes a subsequent decision, however, to
alter the manner in which that sentence will be served if the reintegration of thel
inmate back into the community can be aided by an early release under supervisions
While the Board is viewed on the one hand as one of the components of the
justice system it operates also as an independent quasi judicial agency in its decision
making responsibility.
Purpose of Parole
The primary purpose of parole as stated previously is to support the basic aiml
of justice, namely, the protection of society. The Board, through its policies,
attempts to promote a consistent approach to the offender throughout the interrelated processes of law enforcement, judicial sanction and correctional decision
making. It seeks to render decisions on the appropriateness of early release iffl
accordance with the rules of fundamental fairness guided by the principles of equity
and justice. It is committed to ensure that the decision making process is administered within acceptable limits of discretion and judgment.
 Parole is an early release from prison requiring the inmate to serve the balance
of the sentence of incarceration under supervision in the community.
Underlying Principles
The concept of parole is based on the beliefs that the criminal law prescribes
the limits of acceptable behaviour, that citizens must be held accountable for their
actions, and that they must accept the consequences of their behaviour if they violate
acceptable norms. Consideration for parole must consistently reinforce individual
citizen responsibility while recognising that society shares in the responsibility to
prevent crime and that it must attempt to eliminate the causes of criminal behaviour.
A more complete statement of the principles underlying parole that guide the work
of the Board can be found in Appendix A.
Focus of Responsibility
The policies and activities of the Board are designed to reinforce individual
responsibility on the part of the inmate. This is illustrated most forcefully in that the
. lrftnate is required to make application in order to be considered for parole and in the
application the inmate must indicate the commitments he is prepared to make if
released on parole. The Board recognises, however, that the community must be
 receptive to the return of the offender from imprisonment. The reality is that most!
offenders will return to the community whether on parole or at expiry of sentence
and through its attitudes and the provision of supportive services and resources the I
community can play a large part in the successful reintegration of the offender as a
responsible citizen.
The community must be supportive in its attitude and must provide assistance and resources
in order for an inmate to successfully reintegrate into the community.
3. BOARD MEMBERSHIP
Philosophy of Citizen Involvement
The decision to grant or deny parole to an inmate is one that significant™
affects many people including the community at large. With this fact in mind it is
important that the community be involved in the decision making process concerning parole. All members of the B.C. Board of Parole with the exception of the
Chairman, are lay members of the community who, in the discharge of their
responsibility, reflect the interests and well-being of the community as well as the
needs of the inmate.
Community Membership
In order to adequately reflect the interests and concerns of the various communities throughout British Columbia the membership of the Board is established on a
regional basis consistent with the regional organization of other components of the
provincial justice system (i.e., crown counsel, court services and corrections). ThB
Chairman of the Board, whose appointment is full time, is appointed in accordant
with professional and managerial qualifications. The 1980/81 membership of the;
 The people who decide on parole releases are citizens from communities
throughout British Columbia.
Board comprising of 21 people, reflects a broad range of community representa-
Eon. The membership including occupation and/or background and regional loca-
Bon is as follows:
Warren H. Bruleigh
Patricia A. Ryan
Edmond E. Schweitzer
-J. E. (Ed.) Tait
Harry Hoeft
Robin Insley
Christopher J. A. Dalton
Metty J. Dube
N. E. (Scotty) McLeish
Joan M. Norris
Irene Peterson
Peter A. Dueck
Jake Gerestein
Robert W Galbraith
JMiise Hodgson
Eric Kelly
Gordon M. Kirkpatrick
S. Rocksborough Smith
Interior Region
Church Minister
Home maker
Building contractor
School Principal (retired)
Northern Region
Businessman
College instructor
North Fraser Region
Business executive (retired)
Foster mother
Probation Officer (retired)
Alderman
Home maker/instructor
South Fraser Region
Businessman
Retailer (retired)
Law enforcement consultant
Vancouver Region
Home maker
School Principal (retired)
Psychiatrist (retired)
Correctional Administrator (retired)
Vernon
Kamloops
Kelowna
Kamloops
Prince George
Prince George
West Vancouver
Mission
Burnaby
Pitt Meadows
Port Coquitlam
Abbotsford
Abbotsford
Abbotsford
Richmond
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
 Island Region
Arthur J. R. Ash Businessman (retired) Victoria
Elsie MacAulay Home maker Victoria
Larry Ryan Labour organizer Victoria
Special Mention
Acknowledgment is made of long and dedicated service by three Board
Members whose terms of appointment expired at the end of March, 1981.
They are:
• Mr. Eric Kelly, Member since 1962
• Mrs. Joan Norris, Member since 1965
• Dr. Gordon Kirkpatrick, Member since 1968
The unique contributions of these Members will long be remembered particularly in relation to the Board's previous mandate in dealing with the youngj
offender.
Also resigning from the Board is
• Mr. Robert Galbraith, Member since 1979
His departure was occasioned by his appointment early in 1981 as Chief
Coroner for the Province of British Columbia.
Criteria for Membership
In assessing citizens as candidates for membership on the B.C. Board of
Parole, there are four general criteria used as follows:
• the nature of the person's community involvement,
• the candidate's capacity for decision making,
• an understanding or interest in justice related issues, and
• broad credibility at the community level.
For a more complete statement of the criteria for membership please refer ot
Appendix B.
In addition to the above criteria an effort is made to ensure that the candidal^
for membership reflect broad representation of community interests and concerns
in order to reflect a balanced perspective both at the regional and provincial level.
4. PROGRAM POLICIES
The Board
The Board is committed to a responsive decision making process. In order km
meet this objective, the Board Members conduct parole hearings at the Correctional
Centres in which the inmate applicants are incarcerated. To ensure that parole
eligibility dates established by statute are met, the Board Members receive all
information pertaining to the inmate and his application at the hearing thereby
eliminating time consuming pre-distribution of documentation. Members are
scheduled firstly at Correctional Centres in the region in which they reside. This
practice is overlaid, however, with a policy of dynamic rotation and combination of
members. Normally no more than four applications are reviewed in one day.
At the hearing a quorum of two Members have the full authority to either grant
or deny parole, defer the decision to a later date or in a case of a post suspension
hearing, revoke parole. Wherever two Members constituting a quorum are in
disagreement concerning a decision, the Chairman will assign a third member to
vote resulting in a majority decision.
 rf^.
gpard policy provides to the inmate the opportunity to appear before the Board Members
and to be assisted by others of his choice.
 The Inmate
Consistent with thel
principles of individual re- j
sponsibility the Board has j
adopted a policy that re- j
quires the inmate to make!
application if he wishes to be j
considered for parole. The j
parole application sets forth
the inmate's plan for release, ]
including commitments he is
prepared to make with re- ]
spect to residence, employ-J
ment, educational or treatment program, his method of j
financial support and a list of j
persons who are able to
provide support on released
According to law, any in-1
mate has the right to apply!
for parole.  The Board,]
through its policies has not!
constrained that right with
regard to any category of of J
fence, length of sentence or
inmate performance whilea
incarcerated.
The Parole Hearing
The policy of the Board
provides for the inmate to
appear at the hearing in order ■
to personally present his
plans for release and provida
opportunity for the Board
Members to ask questions*
Parole hearings are conS
ducted as near to the inmate's parole eligibility date
as possible which, in mosH
cases, is at the point at whicffl
one-third of the sentence has!
been served.
The inmate is permitted to invite persons to attend the hearing who have a
legitimate interest in relation to the sentence being satisfied and in relation to the
reintegration of the inmate into the community.
The criteria for decision making are provided in legislation and state that the
Board may grant parole if it considers that:
• the inmate has derived the maximum benefit frpm imprisonment,
• the reform and rehabilitation of the inmate will be aided by the grant of
parole, and
• the release of the inmate on parole would not constitute an undue risk to
society.
For further interpretation of the criteria please refer to Appendix C.
The responsibility to initiate a parole hearing rests with
the inmate. He makes application, proposing
a plan for release.
	
 An inmate must meet the criteria set out in law in order to be
granted release on parole.
Under current policy the Board may grant temporary (time limited) parole or
mill parole. In selected instances the Board may grant parole prior to normal
gigibility if:
• the inmate is terrninally ill,
• the inmate's physical or mental health is likely to suffer serious damage if he
continues to be held in confinement, or
• there is a deportation order made against the inmate under the IMMIGRATION ACT and the inmate is to be detained until deported.
Parole is considered as a full release from prison and is distinct and separate
from Temporary Absence, which is granted to inmates on a daily or short term basis
under the authority of the Corrections Branch administration. The Board to date has
not adopted a policy providing for Day Parole as provided for in the PAROLE ACT
(CANADA).
The Parole Certificate
Whenever parole is granted, a certificate is issued under the authority of the
Board by the Members making that decision. The certificate contains firstly the
Conditions of parole, which reflect the controlling elements including supervision
gnd secondly, agreements for release that reflect supportive requirements such as
fjesidence, employment and treatment programs.
Any Member of the Board has the authority to suspend parole where the
conditions of the certificate have been violated, to prevent a violation of the
 conditions of parole or to protect society. Within 14 days the Member taking suchl
action may either reinstate parole or refer the matter to the Board for a full hearing.!
At this hearing the parole can either be reinstated or terminated by revocation!
When an inmate accepts parole he forfeits remission earned prior to his release and
upon revocation the Board has explicit jurisdiction to re-credit any or all of thel
remission previously earned. Generally remission is not re-credited upon!
revocation.
Support Systems
In order for the Board Members to render a fair and just decision on parolel
applications a wide network of information and support services are required*
These services are provided in accordance with the Administrative Agreement]
established between the Board and the Corrections Branch of the Ministry of
Attorney General (see Section 5 below). This Agreement prescribes the provision on
reports from institutional correctional officers, probation officers in the com-!
munity, pre-sentence reports, comments from police and judges previously involved with the inmate, psychiatric reports and other pertinent information if
available. All the above information-is co-ordinated prior to the hearing by Parolei
Co-ordinators who are appointed by the Corrections Branch and are available to
assist and advise Members at the hearing. In addition, all of the technical and 3
administrative support is provided to the Board Members at the hearing by staff ofl
the Corrections Branch.
The Board has developed a policy concerning the use of Community Basedl
Residential Centres operated by the private sector. These Centres are to be used in
order to provide additional supervision, surveillance or program services where, in
the judgment of the Board, these services are necessary for parole to be successfully
implemented. For a complete policy statement regarding the use of Communi™
Based Residential Centres please refer to Appendix D.
5. MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
Office of the Chairman
The Office of the Chairman, located in Surrey, B.C., provides management
administrative, information and co-ordination services required by the Board. Wit™
the implementation of the Administrative Agreement between the Board and the
Corrections Branch operational support is provided by Corrections Branch persona
nel at the Regional, District and local levels. Further decentralisation of the Board
Office is therefore not considered necessary at the present time.
Staffing Structure and Complement
The day to day management of the Board Office is delegated to the Executive
Director who reports to the Chairman. The Executive Director is responsible foffl
operational management, administrative procedure, interpretation of policy and tliS
provision of advice on policy development. The balance of the Board staff complex
ment is comprised of:
• Secretary to the Chairman
• Parole Analyst
• Clerk of the Board
• Office Assistant.
An organizational chart of the Board is shown in Appendix E.
10
 '. Program Implementation
With the commencement of the new mandate in February 1980, the Board
established an implementation schedule covering the first six months whereby
inmates with eligibility dates that had already passed would be given the first
priority at hearings. In addition, a procedure was developed whereby those applications that had been initiated previous to February 1980 and forwarded to the
| National Parole Board, would be continued in that process to their conclusion
except for the final decision which was then made by the B.C. Board of Parole. The
[implementation schedule and hand-over of applications from the National Parole
Board were completed by June 1980
The information that is supplied to inmates consists firstly of a sentence
calculation that is provided to them upon admission to a Correctional Centre. As
part of the orientation the inmate is then given an application form for parole with a
■sheet of instructions on how the form is to be filled out. Additionally, the inmate is
r provided with a more extensive "Guide to Early Release" as a reference document.
■Staff within the Correctional Centres is, of course, available to assist and to answer
I questions as necessary.
Administrative Agreement With the Corrections Branch
From the start it was agreed in principle that services required by the Board
would only be established if such services were non-existent or unavailable from
[ other agencies. Based on this commitment the Board entered into an Administrative
Agreement with the Corrections Branch through which the following services are
provided by the Corrections Branch:
• information concerning the inmate and his application,
• co-ordination of information for the parole hearing and logistical support,
and
• supervision of parolees.
These services are provided on the basis of minimal standards set by the
■Corrections Branch in consultation with the Board. The Administrative Agreement
Evas formally signed by the Chairman of the Board and the Commissioner of
Corrections in March 1981 (see Appendix F).
In making a decision of whether the inmate qualifies for parole, the Board Members
consider information from many sources.
11
 Guidelines for Members
In addition to the Board being an independent agency in its decision making
responsibility, each of the Members casts an independent vote making a decision on
a parole application. Decisions are made by weighing the information concerning
the inmate against the statutory criteria set out in the PAROLE ACT.
Guidelines have been provided to the Members by the Chairman and are
intended to enhance the consistency, uniformity and equality of the application of
statutory criteria and policy provisions. They are viewed as procedural standards
and relate to issues like:
• the review of information at parole hearing,
• the conduct of the hearing,
• dealing with outstanding charges,
• writing reasons for decisions, and
• re-crediting remission on revocation.
6. PROGRAM INFORMATION
Board Reviews
As mentioned previously, the responsibility to initiate an application for parole ]
rests with the inmate. Inmates need not apply for parole and of course in many ■
instances don't. Some of the reasons for non-application include the following]
factors:
• sentences are too short for an application to be processed,
• temporary absence privileges are preferable to some inmates,
• accepting parole requires the inmate to forfeit earned remission and serve j
the full term of the sentence, and
• parole requires regular reporting to a supervisor.
It is important to note that the average daily count of sentenced inmates inl
provincial Correctional Centres for the year was 1307. The average number of
admissions per year for the years 1978-1980 was 6996. Of this figure 71.5%, orl
5000, were admitted with sentences of three months or less most of whom would
not apply for parole.
In fiscal 1980/81 the Board conducted a total of 284 hearing days for an
average of just under 24 hearing days per month, a figure that has remained!
relatively constant after the implementation period. It should also be noted that!
based on a total of 1039 reviews conducted during the year, there were an average of j
3.6 reviews per hearing day. A complete accounting of Board hearings by Region!
and month is provided in TABLE I.
Board Decisions
The Board is authorized to grant or deny parole and to revoke parole pre^|
viously granted. Any decision can be deferred for short periods and for specific*
reasons. In certain cases the Board chooses to take NO ACTION where it is
impractical to proceed due to time constraints or due to the escape of an inmate fromj
prison. TABLES II to VHI provide a complete breakdown of the decisions of thel
Board by Region and month with TABLES IX and X providing a summary for thej
entire province by month and by Region. It is noted that of the 1039 reviews
conducted, 527 or 50.7% resulted in a grant of parole.
The regional variations for grant of parole were a high rate of 55.2% in thM
North Fraser Region, to low of 36.4% in the South Fraser Region. This comparison
12
 ..—
WM
The Board, in reviewing an application for parole, can grant or deny parole. Sometimes
| decisions are deferred for brief periods. All decisions are supported with written reasons.
[excludes the "Board Office" category with a grant rate of 67.2% where reviews
were conducted primarily as a function of the implementation schedule referred to
[ on page 11.
The Regional variations for denial of parole were a high of 45.4% in the South
[Fraser Region to a low of 22.4% in the North Fraser, excluding again the "Board
[Office" reviews with a denial rate of 15.5%. The Regional variations for deferrals
were a high of 18.9% in the North Fraser Region to a low of 8.0% in the Interior
i Region.
The variations for revocations were a high of 12.3% in the Vancouver Region
to a low of 3.2% in the North Fraser Region. The high rate in Vancouver Region is a
■function, at least in part, of many inmates on parole being sent to Lower Mainland
■Regional Correctional Centre upon suspension, resulting in the post suspension
■hearing leading to revocation being conducted there.
Future experience and analysis will begin to show what sort of correlation
Exists between the rates indicated and
• the rates of decisions at each Correctional Centre, and
• the criteria used for placement of inmates at the various Correctional
Centres.
A review of TAB LEX will reveal that 371, or35.7%ofthe 1039 reviews were
conducted in the North Fraser Region. That Region in the same year, on a daily
ftount basis, housed 291or22.3%ofthe total number of inmates. The higher rate of
■reviews in this Region is most likely due to three special programs operating in that
'Region, namely Twin Maples Correctional Centre, Boulder Bay Camp and New
Haven Correctional Centre.
I Member Workload
The workload of the Board Members is determined by the number of applica-
tions received from inmates. Members are assigned to conduct hearings firstly at
the Correctional Centres within the Region of their location. They are scheduled at
hearings at Correctional Centres in other Regions in order to:
• equalize the workload on a provincial basis, and
13
 • acquaint them with the full range of correctional programs throughout the
province.
Members are retained for parole hearings on an " as needed" basis. During the
year each member attended on average just under 26 hearings or just over two
hearings per month. On this basis a wide range of people is available for membership as they are able to include this responsibility alongside other obligations that
they carry.
Parole Supervision
The number of inmates who were granted parole during the year is 527. The
number of people on amonthly basis is shown in TABLE XI. The monthly average
of persons on parole for the year is 224, however for the period after implementation
was completed, the monthly average stands at 256.
The supervision of parolees is provided by Corrections Branch staff. The
Board is advised whenever conditions of parole are violated or problematic circumstances develop that could lead to violations. This information is provided directly
to Board Members who then decide whether the parole should be suspended or not.
Inmates who are released on parole remain under supervision until the full expiry
of the prison sentence imposed by the court.
14
 Suspensions and Revocations
The suspension of parole certificate is temporary in nature and is based on
information concerning violations or the likelihood of violations of parole. The
decision to suspend parole can be reversed by the Member authorizing suspension
or the matter can be referred to a full review of the Board at a normal hearing. At the
post suspension hearing, where the inmate is again present, the Board may reinstate
the parole or withdraw the certificate permanently, called revocation.
During the year 113 (or 21.4%) of the 527 inmates released on parole were
suspended. Of these 113, 72 (or 63.7%) were revoked, 18 (or 15.9%) were
reinstated on parole. No further action was taken in relation to 23 (or 20.4%). A
complete analysis of the outcome of suspensions is contained in TABLE XII.
Inmates Serving
Definite/Indeterminate
Sentences
While the provisions in
the PRISONS AND REFORMATORIES ACT for the defi-
i nite/indeterminate sentence
have been repealed, the repeal
[has not yet been proclaimed.
The courts have imposed defi-
|taite/indeterminate sentences
[ in decreasing numbers with
the result that there are cur-
[rently only 15 persons in the
■province with this type of sen-
Itence. Of these, seven are cur-
Irently incarcerated and eight
lare on parole. The Board is
■carefully monitoring these
leases on an ongoing basis to
ensure that the intentions of
the court resulting in these
■sentences are fully satisfied.
[Mandatory Supervision
Mandatory supervision
applies only to inmates sentenced to two years or more
who are released from prison
without parole where the in-
■mate has more than 60 days
remission standing to his
credit. In these cases the inmate must serve the remission
Jtime under supervision.
As there is a transfer
Rigreement between the Correctional Services of Canada
and the B.C. Corrections
Branch, there are inmates
Roused in provincial Correc-
tional Centres who are serving
sentences of two years or
I	
Violations of parole conditions result in suspensions of
parole. Sometimes parole is reinstated but most violations lead to permanent cancellations (revocations).
15
 more. Where these inmates are released from prison, the Board issues the Certifi-1
cate of Mandatory Supervision, which occurred in the case of three inmates during
the past year.
Mandatory Supervision does not apply to inmates with sentences of less than
two years.
Parole by Deportation
The Board may grant parole for purposes of deportation prior to the normal
eligibility if the applicant qualifies and there exists an order for deportation against
the inmate.
During the year the Board has granted releases of this nature to eight inmates to
the following countries:
India  1 Hong Kong  1
France  1 U.S.A  5
7. CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PAROLING AUTHORITHiS
Membership
The Canadian Association of Paroling Authorities was formed in January!
1980, with charter members being
• The National Parole Board of Canada,
• The Ontario Board of Parole,
• La Commission Qu6becoise des Liberations Conditionnelles, and
• The B.C. Board of Parole.
The Association has as its purpose:
"... to provide a forum for the discussion of problems and
the sharing of experiences of mutual interest to the Boards,
and to provide a vehicle for the expression of the concerns of
the Association."
Transfer of Jurisdiction
To give effect to the provisions of the PAROLE ACT (CANADA), the AssociaB
tion has entered into an Agreement for the transfer of any inmate released on parolta
to any part of Canada. This Agreement has been signed on behalf of the folia
member Boards by:
• The Solicitor General of Canada,
• The Minister of Correctional Services of Ontario,
• The Minister of Justice of Quebec, and
• The Attorney General of British Columbia.
Administrative procedures pursuant to the Agreement are now being developed by the Executive Directors of the Boards in consultation with the correcS
tional services in each of the respective jurisdictions involved.
During the year the following transfers took place under the Agreement:
National Parole
Board* Ontario Quebec
Transfers to  17 5 2
Transfers from  — 4 —
k To Prairie and Atlantic Provinces.
16
 The authority of the B.C. Board of Parole is transferable to other Boards
anywhere in Canada.
I Current Issues
The issues currently being examined by the Association include the following:
• the philosophy, purpose and fundamental principles of parole,
• the use and rationale of community Board Members, and
• the adoption of uniform standard conditions of parole by the four Boards.
8. PRIORITIES FOR 1981/82
The Board, in completing its first full year of operation, has beeen involved in
policy and program development in almost all facets of the parole decision making
program. In order to further guide and inform the work of the Board and to refine its
operations, a statement of managerial priorities has been identified for 1981/82 as
■ollows:
philosophy
Purpose of Parole. It is essential that there continue an ongoing discussion of
the purpose of parole in the context of justice in the 1980s. This discussion should
be pro-active in its approach and critical in its method. The context for this
Escussion will be twofold, namely, with other paroling authorities in Canada
■"National, Ontario and Quebec) and with other senior policy makers in the admin-
istration of justice in British Columbia.
Kghcv
Victim Reparation. The Board will examine policy options for including
tnatters relating to the victim in its information collection, decision making process
and obligations for inmates released on a parole certificate. These options will be
explored through extensive consultation with the judiciary, crown counsel, defence
17
—
 counsel, law enforcement and corrections. This commitment is based on a belief
that "comparative measures" are an important element in the satisfaction of
sentence and the offender assuming responsibility for his or her behaviour.
Policy Manual. While a Policy Manual was issued in 1980, considerable
developments in policy and procedural matters have occurred in the past year and so
the Board has committed itself to a complete re-issue of the Policy Manual during j
the coming year.
Operational
Communication with Inmates. A priority emphasis will be placed on ensuring j
that the policies and procedures of the Board are communicated effectively to the
inmate and that he is in possession of the necessary information to apply for parole.
Similarly, a procedure will be developed in order to implement the Board's policy of
making enquiry of the reasons for non-application of those inmates serving sen- j
tences of one year and longer.
Management Information System. The Board is committed to developing a '
comprehensive information system that will facilitate research and program j
evaluation.
Board Accountability. Special emphasis will be placed on developing methods ]
of informing the community of the Board's activities. To date this communication is 1
confined to a search for potential candidates and will be expanded to include
discussion of the purpose of parole, its objectives, practices, effectiveness and!
efficiency.
Communication with Justice Personnel. The first year of operation was!
focused primarily in establishing communication and effective working relationships with corrections personnel. The coming year will emphasize liaison with!
other selective personnel in the justice system, namely, police, crown counsel, the!
judiciary and Community Based Residential Centres.
Legislation
Parole Statute. The Board of Parole will continue to press for the enactment ofl
a provincial statute to prescribe the legal framework for its operation. A draft bill!
has been submitted and provides for a legal basis for the existence and indepen-B
dence of the Board and generally prescribes its operation within the context of thel
provisions of the PAROLE ACT (CANADA).
18
 APPENDED A
PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING PAROLE
1. Incarceration represents a substantive curtailment and deprivation of
individual freedom.
2. While incarceration is used variously by the courts as punishment, deterrence, and protection, deprivation of freedom is most often perceived by
the inmate as a punitive imposition.
3. The majority of inmates would wish to regain their freedom and would
strive toward that end through legitimate means if those means were
perceived by the inmate to be available.
4. While the major responsibility for initiating parole plans should rest with
the inmate, it is recognised that some inmates will require a great deal of
support and assistance in the various stages of parole application and
planning.
5. Imprisonment is generally regarded as having negative effects on the
inmate; however, early release while significantly reducing those negative
effects, should not detract from nor undermine the intent of sentence.
6. The intent of sentence as known (generally or specifically), should be
determinative in the satisfaction or completion of sentence—both during
the experience of incarceration and throughout the process of re-integration into the community.
7. The process of considering early release should be open, direct and
should seek the support and involvement of all legitimately interested and
concerned parties, in relation to satisfaction of sentence and re-integration
of the offender into the community.
8. The criteria for decision-making on early release must be based on the
general aims of justice and be complementary and supportive to the
various purposes of the justice system components.
9. While the general aims of justice prescribe the framework for decision
making on early release, this decision making is essentially a question of
judgment and must be exercised independently.
10. The process and provisions of parole must seek generally to reinforce the
offender's responsibility as a citizen, and specifically, to support any
reparative measures in which the offender may be involved as a consequence of his/her offence(s).
11. Given the eventual return of all'inmates to the community, society at
large, through its institutions and agencies, may best serve the interests of
protection and prevention through the provision of opportunities and
support to the offender who successfully qualifies for his/her parole.
u.
19
 APPENDIX B
CRITERIA FOR MEMBERSHIP
The philosophy of the B.C. Board of Parole is based on a commitment to
citizen participation in decision making in matters affecting the community. Consequently, all Members of the Board excluding the Chairman, are community]
members recommended for appointment on the basis of the following criteria:
The Nature of Community Involvement
There will be a strong emphasis on selecting candidates who have demon-j
strated through their activities and participation, a true sense of responsibility and]
interest in community affairs and concerns.
Personal Qualifications
Candidates will require a level of abilities, experience and objectivity consis-1
tent with the independent decision making role of the Board of j?arole within thel
framework of the justice system. They will also have an understanding and appre-J
ciation of the serious impact of their decisions both on the individuals concerned!
and on the community at large. In the interests of maintaining the independence and .
integrity of the Board, candidates may be required to undergo a routine security!
check and furnish references upon request.
Level of Understanding of the Justice Process
A general knowledge of the justice process and its component parts may be a
significant criteria for board membership. However, as opportunities will be!
provided for the orientation and ongoing development of all Board members, thisj
knowledge requirement may be supplanted by an active interest in learning about j
the justice process and system.
Community Representation
To be consistent with the principles underlying the development of communi™
membership, candidates should be seen by the community to represent broad areas!
of endeavour and achievement in the community, both with respect to community
activity and participation, and in terms of role, career or profession. The overriding
consideration in this sense would be one of broad credibility within the community
as opposed to the more limited representation of specific interest groups within the
community.
20
 APPENDIX C
CRITERIA FOR DECISION MAKING
{The Board considers that:
(a! The inmate has derived the maximum benefit from imprisonment:
Intent of sentence has been satisfied;
Program opportunities have been utilized;
Demonstrated responsibility in sentence and release planning.
(b) The reform and rehabilitation of the inmate will be aided by early release:
Program opportunities in the community are as good or better than
what is available in prison;
Release plans indicate adequate support for the inmate for his
re-integration into the community;
The intent of sentence can be more fully satisfied through reparative
measures to which the inmate is committed.
(c) The release of the inmate on parole would not constitute an undue risk to
society:
Outstanding charges;
Nature of the current offence and the harm done or risked;
Degree of culpability.
* The major criteria are statutory, based on the Parole Act of Canada. The
supporting criteria are designed to expand on the practical application of those
criteria.
21
 APPENDIX D
POLICY ON USE OF COMMUNITY RESIDENTIAL CENTRES
The B.C. Board of Parole endorses a policy of utilizing the program services
offered by agencies of the private sector (Community Residential Centres) to meefl
the objectives of ensuring adequate control and/or support for certain offender!
where an early release from incarceration is authorized.
In authorizing an early release from incarceration by means of a Parole]
Certificate, the Board addresses two major concerns:
I The warrant of imprisonment is then satisfied by the parolee remaining
under supervision in the community. This supervision contains control]
elements reflected in the standard and special Conditions of the Parole
Certificate.
2. The re-entry of the offender into the community and his/her reintegration as
a responsible citizen is aided by the provision of support as reflected in tha
Agreement for Release in the Parole Certificate.
The Board is therefore authorized to use the service of the Community
Residential Centre for a parolee where:
(a) The inmate applicant qualifies for release by the criteria set out in the
Parole Act (Canada) but where the additional control and/or support of a
placement in a Community Residential Centre is essential for the parola
plan to be implemented effectively, and
(b) The Community Residential Centre has an existing contract for bed usaga
with the B.C. Corrections Branch and funds are available, or the services
of the agency are available without cost to the Board and/or the inmata
and
(c) The Community Residential Centre has bed space available at the time tha
authorized release is to be effected, and
(d) Such placement is undertaken following a review by the Board of tha
suitability of the Community Residential Centre.
The Board, consistent with this policy, supports the policy issued jointly by
the Correctional Services of Canada and the B.C. Corrections Branch under tHa
title, Use and Financial Support of Community Residential Centres in British
Columbia.
Date of issue: March 13th, 1981.
22
 APPENDIX E
B.C. BOARD OF PAROLE
k    MEMBERS
.    INTERIOR
	
MEMBERS
SOUTH FRASER
POLICY
EXECUTIVE:
—Chairman
—Executive
Director
—One Member
each Region
1 MEMBERS
NORTH
MEMBERS
VANCOUVER
■ MEMBERS
BoRTH FRASER
MEMBERS
VANCOUVER ISL.
SECRETARY
TO CHAIRMAN
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
PAROLE
ANALYST
RECEPTIONIST,
SECRETARY TO
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
REGISTRY
CLERK
A
nTD PAROL
E AN/
JLY
ST
Note—The B.C. Board of Parole operates as an independent agency in a quasi judicial function.
The support services required are provided through the offices of the Assistant Deputy Minister, Support and
^ministration, Ministry of Attorney General (e.g., Personnel, Finance, Facilities Management).
A liaison with the Ministry's Executive Committee for administrative purposes is provided by the Commissioner of Corrections who is a member of that Committee.
	
23
 APPENDIX F
I. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
RE: Administrative Agreement between the
B.C. Board of Parole and the
B.C. Corrections Branch
At the time the Government of the Province of British Columbia decided tol
exercise the option available to the provinces under the Parole Act (Canada) witlffl
respect to the development of a provincial paroling authority, commitments in
principle were made within the Ministry of Attorney General respecting the rela\
tionship between the B.C. Board of Parole and the B.C. Corrections Branch.
Although these two agencies exist independent one of the other, the commiS
ments were premised on a recognition that both agencies support the common goals
of the administration of justice.
Further to the above, and in the interests of effective working relationships and
the efficient utilization of resources, it is agreed that the Parole Board will focus its
activities in the area of decision making, and the Branch will supply the serviceS
required by the Board, in the institution and in the field, necessary to carry out tha
operations of the parole program.
These various responsibilities are set out in the attached Administrative Agreement between the B.C. Board of Parole and the B.C. Corrections Branch whicffl
become effective immediately.
MR. JOHN KONRAD MR. BERNARD ROBINSON
Chairman, B.C. Board of Parole Commissioner, B.C. Corrections^^
Branch
Date: March 11, 1981.
24
 TABLE I
Number of Board Hearings by Region by Month
North
Fraser
South
Fraser
Vancouver
Island
Board
Office
Fiscal Year 1979/80
0
0
0
1
3
6
0
2
0
2
0
0
I
3
4
14
Total	
0
1
9
2
2
0
4
18
Fiscal Year 1979180
April	
■May i	
lune	
I My	
August	
September	
(October	
■November	
December	
January	
February	
March	
Total	
Percent of Total.
20
7.1
4
8
8
14
9
9
8
10
10
9
10
12.3
11
23
19
31
24
26
24
24
26
24
24
28
TABLEH
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — Interior Region
Defer        Revoke Other
Fiscal Year 1979180
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
March	
0
Total	
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fiscal Year 1980181
3
5
3
4
3
4
2
2
2
3
2
5
1
3
0
1
1
3
4
2
4
3
3
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
Kay	
8
4
Ely	
6
5
9
KJctober	
6
4
6
January    ..
7
"February ...
8
March.
7
Total	
38
26
6
5
0
75
Er cent of Total	
50.7
34.7
8.0
6.6
0
100
25
 TABLE III
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — Northern Region
Deny
Defer        Revoke        Other
Fiscal Year 1979180
0
3
0
2
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
March Y z.
8
Total	
3
2
3
0
0
8
Fiscal Year 1980/81
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December...
January	
February	
March	
Total	
Percent of Total..
38
37.3
10.6
TABLE IV
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — North Fraser Region
Revoke Other
Fiscal Year 1979180
10
17
0
5
1
8
0
0
0
0
11
March	
30
Total.:.	
27
5
9
0
0
41
Fiscal Year 1980181
11
11
19
23
18
14
13
23
14
23
22
14
5
10
5
2
4
7
7
8
16
5
5
9
6
6
7
3
7
7
7
6
8
2
6
5
0
0
0
0
2
1
3
4
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
22
27
31
July	
28
31
30
30
41
December	
38
January	
30
February	
33
March	
30    1
Total	
205
83
70
12
1
371
Per cent of Total	
55.2
22.4
18.9
3.2
.3
100
 -
26
 TABLE V
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — South Fraser Region
Defer        Revoke
Fiscal Year 1979180
0
7
0
4
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
13
7
4
2
0
0
13
Fiscal Year 1980/81
[April	
i May	
[ June	
July	
[August	
September.,
October	
[ November..
December...
[ January	
| February	
March	
Total.
f Per cent of Total..
36.4
45.4
12.1
6.1
TABLE VI
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — Vancouver Region
Deny
Bkpril ;„X.;^
May	
■June	
Duly	
■August	
■September	
■October	
■November	
December...-	
■January	
■February „	
March	
Total .4nrr.;
f Per cent of Total.,
Fiscal Year 1979/80
2
6
3
17
0
6
0
0
0
0
5
29
Total	
8
20
6
0
0
34
Fiscal Year 1980/81
4
17
15
12
7
12
11
14
7
7
47.0
12
19
17
32
20
19
14
24
20
27
21
28
27
 TABLE VH
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — Vancouver Island Region
Month
Grant
Deny
Defer
Revoke
Other
Total
Fiscal Year 1979/80
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fiscal Year 1980/81
3
8
5
4
4
8
5
3
11
5
2
6
3
1
2
2
1
4
4
2
8
1
2
2
2
3
2
0
2
2
0
0
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
1
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
12
9
7
9
14
10
6 •
21
8
7
10
July	
August	
November	
December	
March	
Total	
64
32
15
10
1
122
52.5
26.2
12.3
8.2
,8
100
TABLE VIJJ.
Number and Type of Decisions by Month —
Board Office
Month
Grant
Deny
Defer
Revoke
Other
Total
Fiscal Year 1979/80
2
6
2
14
1
4
0
0
0
4
5
28
March	
Total	
8
16
5
0
4
33
Fiscal Year 1980181
2
5
1
5
3
7
6
0
2
2
6
0
2
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
12
2
9
5
8
6
0
2
2
7
1
July G	
October	
January	
February	
March	
Total	
39
9
2
5
3
58
Per cent of Total	
67.2
15.5
3.5
8.6
5.2
100
28
 TABLE IX
Number and Type of Decisions by Month — Provincial Summary
Defer        Revoke        Other
Fiscal Year 1979180
14
39
5
42
2
23
0
0
0
4
21
March	
108
53
47
25
0
4
129
Fiscal Year 1980181
[April	
I May	
June	
[July	
August	
September..
■October	
I November..
December..
[January	
February	
■March	
Total	
Per cent of Total..
29
44
39
56
49
53
39
46
41
52
44
35
527
20
31
22
18
16
20
24
24
39
16
16
31
277
12
16
16
9
12
14
11
12
13
7
14
13
1
2
3
9
8
4
7
10
1
10
10
11
76
62
93
80
96
85
94
81
92
93
87
86
90
1,039
TABLE X
Number and Type of Decisions by Region ■
Provincial Summary
Region
Grant
Deny
Defer
Revoke
Other
Total
Interior .7J.	
38
38
205
24
119
64
39
26
35
83
30
62
32
9
6
10
70
8
38
15
2
5
9
12
4
31
10
5
0
2
1
0
3
1
3
75
94
371
66
253
122
Board Office	
58
Total	
527
277
149
76
10
1.039
29
 TABLE XI
Number on Parole by Month — Provincial Summary
Month
No. at
Beginning
Grants
Transferred In
Revoked
Transferred Out
Terminations
No. at End
of Month
Fiscal Year 1979180
16
27
14
39
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
1
16
27
65
Fiscal Year 1979180
65 ,
89
131
161
196
219
251
258
259
275
288
286
29
44
39
56
49
53
39
46
41
52
44
35
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
2
3
9
8
4
7
10
1
10
10
11
1
0
4
4
2
5
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
1
2
9
16
12
22
32
21
26
35
34
89
131
161
196
219
251
258
259   1
275
288
286
275
July	
August	
September	
TABLE Xn
Suspensions and Dispositions by Month — Provincial Summary
Month
Suspensions
Dispositions
Revoke1
Reinstate
Other2
Fiscal Year 1979/80
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
March	
Total	
2
2
0
0
Fiscal Year 1980/81
4
5
11
14
7
7
10
11
11
14
9
10
2
4
6
9
2
2
7
7
8
9
9
7
1
0
4
1
1
4
1
2
0
2
0
2
1
1
1
4
4
1
2
2
3
3
0
1
July	
January	
February	
March	
Total	
113
722
18
23
1 The revocations reported on this Table are in relation to the suspensions
coincide with revocation decisions for the year reported on Tables IX and ?
2 Other dispositions would include "No Action" taken when sentenced
when jurisdiction transferred to another ftirole Board.
authorized during the year and do not
C.
pi red or Temporary Parole ended and
Q
ueen's Printer for British Columbia ©
Victoria, 1981
30

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0372109/manifest

Comment

Related Items