BC Sessional Papers

Ministry of Health Annual Report 1981 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1982

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 ]/[inistry
if Health
Annual Report
981 I
Province of
British Columbia
  l@ffice of the Minister of Health,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
May 1, 1982
|e Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
■ The aAnnual Report of the Ministry of Health for the calendar year of 1981 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
JAMES A. NIELSEN
Minister of Health
  fjBnistry of Health
ffioria, B.C.
Wy 1, 1982
> Tie Honourable fames A. Nielsen,
lKisfer of Health,
mmoria, B.C.
I  I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Health for
tie calendar year 1981.
PETER BAZOWSKI
Deputy Minister of Health
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tontents
ffiemographic Features    1
Iplicy and Resource allocation Committee    2
Medical Advisory Committee    3
Information Services    4
Special Care Services    5
Management Operations    7
preventive Services    9
community Care Services  15
Medical Services Commission  15
I   Mental Health Services  21
Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission  25
\   aAlcohol and Drug Programs  27
Estitutional Services  29
i   Emergency Health Services Commission  29
F   Hospital Programs ;  31
'   Home Care/Long-term Care  41
Enistry of Health Expenditures  51
  The Year in Review
r e Ministry of Health, the year 1981/82
nrked by a major reorganization de-
xo streamline Ministry operations, re-
pgrams into more appropriate group-
a I improve the managerial capability of
A istry by addressing areas such as the
uy of management controls, manage-
normation systems and policy analysis
ielopment.
o the reorganization were the realign-
various programs into three major
fields — Preventive Services, Corn-
it Care Services and Institutional Serv-
e h headed by an assistant deputy min-
md the addition of a policy planning
biy.
it Jim Nielsen, Minister, said in an-
icg the changes: "By establishing three
mis of program policy, we hope to re-
6 hierarchical organizational levels and
a gher visibility to lower-cost and cost-
li' programs."
e ar of reorganization was marked by a
b' of other highlights within the
st;-f
Iironjunction with the Health Labour
Riitions Association, the Ministry estab-
fed a provincial data base, including
w;e, benefit and time information for all
jo covered by HLRA's certification as
b< jaining agent for B. C .'s hospitals. This
s):em will provide a modelling ca-
piility to project future costs as well as
lb ability to monitor certain trends
wiin the industry.
Ablicy and Resource Allocation Com-
mee, chaired by the Deputy Minister
at made up of the program Assistant
Diuty Ministers, was set up to co-ordi-
ru; the Ministry's policy initiatives as
w as maximize senior management in-
13 into decisions affecting the allocation
ohsources within the Ministry.
Aigh priority in the reorganization has
bet the centralization of all financial ac-
ti'ies under the Management Opera-
Ji'isDivision. The financial services
nudate is comprehensive and the new
onnization allows the executive director
toirovide direction and support in all
*' areas of financial management
ffrrol.
• An executive information system was designed and implemented providing the
Minister and senior executive staff with
terminal access to cost and service utilization information on the Ministry's operations. While the system currently
provides access to financial data regarding hospitals, it is planned to extend the
system in 1982/83 to include information
on hospital capital development, Long-
Term Care, grants, the Medical Services
Plan, and the Dental Care Plan.
• A Medical Advisory Committee was also
formed during the year. It provides advice on matters requiring a professional
background, including funding proposals for new technology and innovations in health-care delivery systems.
• Twenty major hospital construction projects were either completed or had
reached the final stages of construction.
These included four new hospitals — including Children's and Grace in Vancouver — at a total cost of approximately $158
million.
• The largest dental health survey of children ever carried out showed that the
dental health of the province's young
people has steadily improved over the
past 20 years.
• The Ministry's participation in the International Year of the Disabled saw the
Community Vocational Rehabilitation
Service assist more disabled persons on
their way back to employment.
• After many months of negotiation, the 10
provinces and two territories signed reciprocal agreements to standardize the
handling of out-of-province hospital inpatient claims.
• In Home Care/Long Term Care, 1,435 intermediate-care beds were opened during the year.
• New rural services initiated during the
year included a health clinic at Dease Lake
in northwestern B.C. In co-operation
with the provincial chapter of the College
of Family Physicians of Canada, the clinic
will provide full-time physician services
to the area.
  |iAL Report, 1981
olographic
ttures
[ 1, British Columbia's population con-
m grow at the same fast rate as in 1980.
pvince's population in 1981 was
,7. That is 2.9% higher than 1980's fig-
[667,200.
were 3% more births in 1981 than in
ie birth rate stood at 15.2 per 1,000
Ion, compared with a rate of 15.1 in
ie number of illegitimate births in-
eby 13% in 1981. They represented
j f all births in 1981, compared with
1980.
marriage rate increased slightly, to 9.1
;0 population.
eeath rate was unchanged, continuing
: 1-time low level of 7.4 per 1,000 first
dlin 1980.
i te of death from heart disease in 1981
t<>40 per 100,000 population from the
rord low of 220. There was no change in
it )f death from cancer, the second lead
ing cause of death, with 166 deaths per 100,000
population. A slight decline occurred in the
rate of deaths from cerebrovascular disease,
the third leading cause. There were 66 deaths
per 100,000 population from this cause in
1981, slightly below the figure of 68 for the
previous year. Mortality from accidents increased in 1981, to 64 per 100,000 population
compared with 59 in 1980.
More than half the accidental deaths in 1981
resulted from motor vehicle accidents, compared with48% in 1980. In 1971 the proportion
was 38% and in 1961,31%. Falls accounted for
16% of accidental deaths in 1981, compared
with 19% in 1980. Drowning accounted for
8.7% in 1981 and 8.9% in 1980. Poisonings
accounted for 5% of accidental deaths in both
years.
The suicide rate of 15 deaths per 100,000
population was unchanged from 1980.
The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live
births was 11, the same as in 1980.
 MinistryofHeaith
Policy and Resource
Allocation Committee
The lVllnistry announced in July that a policy and resource allocation committee — to
consider questions having major policy implications — was to be formed. It was part of
the initial phase of the reorganization of the
Ministry.
The committee is headed by the Deputy
Minister and supported by the Ministry's Assistant Deputy Ministers and the Senior Medical Adviser.
Its role will be to investigate, review and
evaluate programs and policies, taking into
account needs and resource requirements.
 Ival Report, 1981
Medical Advisory
iimmittee
It during 1981, in April, a committee of
S.nistry's senior medical staff was
•ii.
p vides professional opinions on matters
1 uire a medical background. For exam-
liexamines proposals for funding new
tilogy; reviews Ministry budgets in
if medical needs; and examines innova-
hlth-care delivery systems.
|:ommittee is also the Ministry's main
ic of communication with physicians on
(nssional matters,
i Ministry's Senior Medical Adviser
|e as committee chairman. The committee
v ts other members from Hospital Pro-
a the Vancouver Bureau, the Medical
HjCorrjimission, the Forensic Psychiatric
ll'S Commission, and Public Health
 inistry of Health
Information
Services
A heavy demand from the public and media
for information on the Ministry's services continued through 1981.
The preparation of press releases, background material for speeches, supervision of
audio-visual scripting and the publication of
brochures, pamphlets and other printed materials were among the division's activities.
The division researched and wrote approximately 180 press releases and prepared material for 58 speeches. The complexity of many
of the Ministry's programs required extensive
research on most topics.
Information Services also had responsibility
for the Ministry's photographic and art services, a displays unit and the Ministry's reference library.
The displays service had an unusually busy
year, adding to its services a tractor-trailer unit
which travelled to several centres with displays illustrating the Ministry's programs and
objectives, on a pilot project basis.
 ual Report, 1981
ecial Care
Etvices
Ministry continued to provide grants
sanely of community-based agencies,
Sin turn provide a wide spectrum of
(services province-wide.
8 racts were implemented for the 1981/82
ear. The Ministry negotiated the pur-
f specific health services with individ-
incies. In addition, performance-based
ging was introduced for the 1982/83 ap-
sm process. AH agencies completed
g estimates which established an opera-
aninimum, with increases built in on an
Ssntal basis.
xal Care Services is also responsible for
ong primary health care to isolated rural
inities.
e rural services in 1981/82 included a
f clinic at Dease Lake in northwestern
id, in conjunction with the B.C. chap-
Clege of Family Physicians of Canada,
{.■oduclion of full-time physician serv-
t hat area. In addition, full-time nursing
jes and visiting physicians were
4'd to the Zeballos area on Vancouver
west coast.
  Management
Operations
 Ministry of HealtiI
Management Operations
Management Operations was formed in
1981 as part of the reorganization of the
Ministry.
Headed by the Senior Assistant Deputy
Minister, it consists of Financial Services, Personnel Services, Planning, Policy and Legislation, Management Services, Central Services,
Management Information Systems and Legal
Services.
During 1981, the Planning, Policy and Legislation Division directed, co-ordinated or was
extensively involved in, for example, a hospital role study. An addendum to the original
Phase I discussion paper was produced, completing Phase I. Work began on Phase II,
which will develop a methodology for applying the results of the hospital role classification
scheme developed in Phase I.
Other involvements of the division included: completion of the provincial study of
severely handicapped children; Phase I or the
provincial rehabilitation study; and pilot
nospice projects in Vancouver and Victoria,
including evaluation of these projects.
A high priority in the reorganization of the
Ministry has been the centralization of all fi
nancial activities under the Management C
erations Division.
A review of the organization of the finant
services of the Ministry had concluded the
realignment of reporting relationships am
much more centralized organization struct!
were essential to the efficient management
the Ministry's financial resources.
The financial services mandate isH
prehensive and the new organization §§8
the executive director to provide directioWa
support in all key areas of financial mif|i|
ment and control. The division is organii
into three sections: financial analysisJM
ning and budgets; accounting operataoJla,
financial policy and procedures. At theisffl
time, a number of functions of the fiiwnl
offices of the various headquarter divffitj
were amalgamated to provide a co-ordSy
support group for more effective plannii
budgeting and expenditure control.■
For Personnel Services, the latter part of
year was marked by a major reorganizar]
with increased emphasis on labour relatM
and classification. The reorganization alsos
the introduction of a regional concept for
delivery of personnel services.
Table 1
Registrations, certificates, and other documents processed by
Division of Vital Statistics, 1980 and 1981
Registrations accepted under Vital Statistics Act—
Birth registrations	
Death registrations	
Marriage registrations	
Stillbirth registrations	
Adoption orders	
Divorce orders	
Delayed registrations of birth	
Registrations of wills notices accepted under Wills Act	
Total registrations accepted	
Legitimations of birth effected under Vital Statistics Act	
Alterations of given names effected under Vital Statistics Act	
Change of Name applications granted under Change of Name Act	
Materials issued by the Central Office—
Birth certificates ,	
Death certificates	
Marriage certificates	
Baptismal certificates	
Change of Name certificates	
Divorce certificates	
Photographic copies	
Wills Notice cerhfication	
Total items issued ,	
Non-revenue searches for government ministries by the Central Officer
TOTAL REVENUE	
1 Preliminary.
39,143
40,480'
19,616
21,380!
23,718
24,620'
294
330'
2,176
1,690'
9,586
9,490'
255
210'
53,750
57,702
148,538
155,902'
206
220
377
372
3,844
3,563
96,663
89,461
8,443
7,626
10,684
10,273
15
11
3,681
2,863
243
232
14,850
14,176
13,066
13,3581
147,645
142,155]
26,588
27,119
S968,049
Sl,257j8jH
 Preventive
Services
 10
Ministry of HeaHth
Preventive Services
Preventive Services consists of the following programs: Public Health Inspection; Public Health Nursing; Speech and Hearing; Dental Health Services; Epidemiology; Nutrition;
Occupational Health; and the Vancouver Bureau. The latter includes the Medical Supply
Service; the Division of Venereal Disease Control; the Division of Tuberculosis Control;
Community Vocational Rehabilitation Services; and Health Laboratory Services.
The dental health survey of children in
1980, the largest dental health research project
ever carried out, showed the improvement in
dental health of children in B.C. over the past
20 years.
The average number of teeth lost through
extraction in 15-year-olds fell from 1.1 in
1958-60 to 0.1 in 1980.
Vision Services produced a 16 mm film,
Sight-Seeing Eyes, for elementary school
children.
The public health nursing project, At Risk;
Early Pregnancy Profile, involving nutritionists
and physicians, led to more effective monitoring of pregnancy outcomes. Special prenatal
classes involving teenage and single mothers
and others with special needs, increased by
36.7%. Perinatal deaths (infants up to seven
days and stillbirths) decreased from 15 per
1,000 births in 1978 to 12.6 per 1,000 births in
1980.
The province-wide demand for hearing
services resulted in the continued extension of
audiology services.
The Speech and Hearing Division worked
closely with the Ministries of Education,
Human Resources, the federal departments of
Veterans' .Affairs and Health and Welfare C
ada to provide standardized serviceHF
There was a continued decline in the ii
dence of measles, rubella, diphtheria, a
pertussis. Vaccination coverage rates i
proved with an over-all rate of approxunal
89% assessed during Grade 1. (Tables $3)
While the gonorrhea rate remained un
ceptably high, and the division of vener
disease control has been vigilant in its cont
program for syphilis, several other conditio
were being treated by VD clinics in 191
These include non-gonococcal genital infi
tions, herpes, genitalis, and two parasitic
testations—pubic lice and scabies. (Table
In 1981, a new core program for the Nul
tion Division greatly assisted in the plannir
implementation, and evaluation of nutriti
services. On-going programs, as well as sj
cial projects, were designed to meet sped
needs of the population during the prenat
infant, early childhood, childhood and ac
lescent, adult and elderly stages of life,
Nutrition Week 1981 proved to be a succe
ful awareness program. More members oft
public took part than in previous years.
As expected, 1981 was a busy year for Co
munity Vocational Rehabilitation Services.
The International Year of The Disabled p
duced a dramatic increase in the numbei
referrals of disabled persons for vocational
habilitation. (Table 5)
For example, as of November 1981, th
were about 100 more disabled persons spi
sored in a variety of employment preparat
programs, compared with 1980.
 Ijnual Report, 1981
11
School Health Program
II ■
Area of activity ranked according to time spent
Percent of total time in
elementary schools per
student enrolled
Percent of total time in
secondary schools per
student enrolled
t cation and follow-up of health problems (vision, hearing and other).
K g support and guidance for students and families with chronic or acute
45.28
27.42
15.94
6.90
4.46
28.5
34.1
15.2
12.8
9.2
3
Sunicable disease control and immunizatioi
3
2
100.00
100.00
Reported Communicable Diseases, 1977-1981
1,                                                     (Rate per 100,000 population)
1977
1978
19
'9
1980
1981
Number
of Cases
Rate
Number
of Cases
Rate
Number
of Cases
Rate
Number
of Cases
Rate
Number
of Cases
Rate
1
2
57
7
70
307
1
884
15
40
14
45
78
310
101
539
1
9
0.1
0.1
2.3
0.3
2.8
12.3
0.1
35.4
0.6
1.6
0.6
1.8
3.1
12.4
4.0
21.6
0.1
0.4
15
35
17
58
908
3
1
794
12
43
15
104
1
90
129
105
1,297
16
0.6
1.4
0.7
2.3
35.9
0.1
0.1
31.4
0.5
1.7
0.6
4.1
0.1
3.6
5.1
4.2
51.3
0.6
21
23
9
56
810
459
7
76
14
286
1
237
1,801
163
1,784
4
1
18
0.8
0.9
0.4
2.2
31.6
17.9
0.3
3.0
0.5
11.1
0.1
9.2
70.2
6.3
69.5
0.1
0.1
0.7
77
29
11
67
857
29
3432
17
2
37
37
534
102
242
1582
1,808
9
2.9
1.1
0.4
2.5
32.5
1.1
13.-
0.6
0.1
1.4
1.4
2-.3
3.9
9.2
6.0
68.6
0.3
79
1
43
3
68
881
280
25
1
38
35
283
52
50
265
1,252
13
as
1
1.6
0.1
2.5
32.6
10.4
0.9
(1
1.4
1.3
10.5
1.9
1.9
9.8
46.4
siea of the newborn
Ifflf	
ISay, type unspecified	
Iifection—
jttbxication—
iiulism	
lis—
matis—
mm
o/elitis	
H	
Bmccal throat infection
BSarlet fever	
Ipi and paratyphoid fever
Total	
0.5
2,482
99.4
3,643
144.0
5,769
244.7
4,359
165.3
3,369
124.7
1 ss than 0.05.
wraected figures.
 12
Ministry of Health
Rates Per 100,000 Population of New Notifications1 of Venereal Infection2
1946-1981
500
400
300
&   200
100
*-H
INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS3
'**•*•*■
■*..*•*'  EgEjjgBi
125
75  .
1
1 Excludes transfers and transients.
1 Excludes gonorrhoea epidemiological, syphilis epidemiological, and non-gonococcal urethritis.
3 Primary, secondary, and early — latent syphilis.
 nual Report, 1981  13
I  Caseload for Community Vocational Rehabilitation Services
January 1 to December 31,1981
currently under assessment or receiving services—January 1,1982  1,176
■New cases referred to C. V. R. S. Committees in Vancouver Metropolitan
■Region (7 committees)    423
New cases referred to C.V.R.S. Committees outside Vancouver Metro-
■politan Region (44 committees)    616
Cases re-opened (all regions)    276
new referrals considered for services January 1,1981 to December 31,1981 (includ-
i re-opened)  1,315
;cases provided with service in 1981 ._„  2,491
  Community
Care
Services:
Community Care Services comprises the
Medical Services Plan (including the
Dental Care Plan), Mental Health
Services, Forensic Psychiatric Services,
and Alcohol and Drug Programs
Medical
Services
Commission
 16
Ministry of Health
Medical Services
Plan
The Medical Services Plan provides prepaid
medical coverage on uniform terms and conditions for all residents of the province and
their dependents.
Insured services under the plan are paid for
insured persons regardless of age, state of
health, or financial circumstances, provided
the premiums fixed by the commission are
paid.
Payment for the services provided is made,
according to a scale of fees approved or prescribed by the commission, or on a salaried,
sessional or contract basis at levels approved
by the commission.
During the year the commission continued
to provide service with emphasis on prompt
payment of practitioners, and improved relations with the public and health professions.
The taxable income ceiling for premium assistance was raised during the year from
$1,770 to $2,740.
Effective July 1, 1981, those subscribers
whose taxable income for 1980 was $1,810 or
less qualified for 90% premium assistance.
Those subscribers whose taxable income for
1980 was over $1,810, but not more than
$2,740, will qualify for 50% premium
assistance.
The total expenditure for insured benefits
under the Medical Services Plan rose 16.5% to
$502,670,042 in 1980/81, from $431,471,022 in
1979/80.
The increased costs to the Medical Services
Plan were a result of upward revisions to the
fee schedule, increased utilization of benefits,
changes in the practitioner/population ratio,
and increased population.
On January 1,1981, the Dental Care Plan of
British Columbia was established, under the
supervision of the Medical Services Commission. During the first three months, to the end
of the 1980/81 fiscal year, the plan was fully
operational, with enrolment of beneficiaries
and the payment of dental claims on schedule.
The plan provides coverage of basic dent
try and removable prostheses. There are i
premiums.
It will pay up to $700 a year for each perst
in a number of categories.
The beneficiaries include some clients of tl
Ministry of Human Resources; people wl
receive premium assistance from the Medic
Services Plan and their dependents; people I
years and older who do not receive premiu.
assistance from the Medical Services Plan; ar
children 14 years and younger.
Table 6      Subscriber Statistics J
Registrations and persons covered1 by premiu
subsidy level at March 31,1981
Subsidy
(per cent)
90..
50..
Nil.
Total..
272,496
972,952
1,245,448
Persons
421,715
2,227,810
2,649,525
1 Coverage data do not include members ol the Canada
Armed Forces, RCMP and inmates of Federal penitentiaries.
Table 7
Persons covered by age group!
at March 31,1981
Age group
Perse
 ....33,6
 MSU
 40i,e
  462,3
  791,5
....»6,3
...JI03,4
...4*25,8
.....47,5
..10,3
...5,7
	
2,649,5
 viual Report, 1981
17
Coverage by Family Size at March 31,1981
567,014
Coverage by Age Group at March 31,1981
pi i
■ ■ I
■ ■ I
■ ■ !
I I I
Under 1 1-4 5-14 15-24 25-44 45-64 65 &      Unknown
 w
Ministry of He
alth
Medical Services Commission
Fee-for-service Payments
Medical Practitioners and Dental Surgery in Hospital
Distribution of Fee-for-service Payments
for Medical Services (Shareable)
Table 10
Specialty
AMOUNT PAID'
1979/80 1980/81
PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL
1979/80       1980/81
COST PER PERSON'
1979/80 1980/81
General Practice	
Dermatology	
Neurology	
Psychiatry	
Neuropsychiatry	
Obstetrics and Gynaecology..
Ophthalmology	
Otolaryngology	
Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat	
General Surgery	
Neurosurgery	
Orthopaedic Surgery	
Plastic Surgery	
Thoracic Surgery	
Urology	
Paediatrics	
Internal Medicine ~
Radiology	
Pathology	
Anaesthesiology	
Physical Medicine	
Public Health	
Microbiology	
Dental Surgery in Hospital ...
Osteopathy	
Nuclear Medicine	
Unclassified	
158,
4,
3,
10,
13,
13,
6,
21,
2,
10,
2,
2,
5,
7,
25,
27,
37,
14,
141,797
298,941
043;580
328,785
304,089
513,293
933,539
242,783
147,775
353,556
028,378
267,676
821,731
404,774
724,521
687,211
,440,626
760,750
,725,287
,722,177
545,440
99,686
15,575
,467,182
259,830
684,686
,595,621
TOTAL    378,559,289
181,570,921
5,085,560
3,679,085
12,290,280
338,217
14,915,234
16,036,623
7,072,221
172,923
23,645,362
2,372,111
11,766,863
3,160,303
2,760,411
6,623,708
8,571,490
29,836,114
33,017,927
47,444,889
16,824,633
598,511
67,280
162,751
1,853,099
236,904
885,573
7,172,032
41.77
1.14
.80
2.73
.08
3.57
3.68
1.65
.04
5.64
.54
2.71
.75
.64
1.51
2.03
6.72
7.33
9.96
3.89
.14
.03
.00
.39
.07
.18
2.01
438,161,025
41.44
1.16
.84
2.80
.08
3.40
3.66
1.61
.04
5.40
.54
2.69
.72
.63
1.51
1.96
6.81
7.53
10.83
3.84
.14
.02
.04
.42
.05
.20
1.64
61.0929
1.6608
1.1758
3.9902
.1175
5.2204
5.3828
2.4117
.0571
8.2492
.7836
3.9666
1.0901
.9290
2.2115
2.9697
9.8281
10.7244
14.5739
5.6874
.2107
.0385
.0060
.5668
.1004
.2645
2.9343
100.00
69.07.
1.93.
1.39!
4.67
.121
5.67'
6.101
2.691
.06!
8.99!
.90!
4.471
1.20,
1.051
2.51!
3.261
11.351
12.561
18.04'
6.40i
.22'
.02
.06
.70
.09
.33
2.72
166.68
1 Includes only those payments which have been made during the respective fiscal periods.
2 Based on insured population as at October 1, as derived from Statistics Canada Data (October 1,1979 = 2,588,548; October 1,1980
2,628,662. New population statistics received April 1, 1980.
 \toal Report, 1981
Distribution of Medical Fee-for-service Payments
and Services by Type of Service
19
' Type of Service
General Practitioner
fcitsexamination	
aVxantination	
aeitt office visit	
BluBclav, Holiday or emergency
t use visit	
aent house visit..
tflEjsit	
Subtotals	
Specialists
ration	
[!/isit..	
fcisit	
^il visit	
Subtotals	
eiesia..
tics.	
-Procedures..
100	
un office procedures..
diherapy	
tliagnosis	
nary function	
Duteous	
I Other Medical
Subtotals	
TOTALS
Number of Services
1979/80 1980/81
1,078,055
5,902,427
1,675,979
604,699
119,771
46,655
1,513,018
10,940,604
981,533
12,598
509,275
671,237
2,174,643
2,173,584
59,459
490,450
801,200
1,199,295
8,359,432
1,229,612
207,926
64,978
32,788
17,071
14,635,795
27,751,042
1,166,743
7,956,753
12,891i
637,221
118,601
44,395
1,490,946
11,428,550
1,036,243
14,157
560,292
685,004
2,295,696
2,244,219
61,364
497,119
816,627
1,229,786
9,115,288
1,211,857
224,016
83,822
36,236
17,405
15,537,739
29,261,985
Amount Paid
1979/80 1980/81
26,210,066
70,792,448
11,376,595
16,289,734
2,492,821
760,773
10,643,113
138,565,550
42,947,843
508,702
5,165,087
6,944,880
55,566,512
17,786,592
10,461,167
45,414,345
15,713,190
24,326,058
45,133,839
8,926,498
8,148,875
3,557,226
403,099
4,556,338
184,427,227
378,559,289
160,215,201
50,534,367
614,477
7,516,401
7,640,766
66,306,011
20,290,844
11,447,487
48,401,688
18,130,734
28,088,694
57,402,980
9,156,119
9,528,320
5,002,345
461,598
3,729,004
211,639,813
438,161,025
29,713,903
98,214,759
177,372'
17,769,342
2,563,758
750,652
11,025,415
r. i schedule item 0107 in service code 51 as of April 1,1980.
Additional Benefits Fee-for-service
li2       Distribution of fee-for-service payments for insured services, additional benefits
Type of service
Amoun
1979/80
paid1'2
1980/81
Percentage of total
1979/80       1980/81
Cost per person3
1979/80         1980/81
710
322
4,242
9,970,672
430,704
4,770,381
1,926
2,497,322
5,420,004
134,133
4,392
11,905,995
421,703
5,928,442
3,310
2,770,107
6,412,064
125,995
2,710
.00
.00
.02
42.91
1.85
20.53
.01
10.75
23.33
.58
.02
43.18
1.53
21.50
.01
10.05
23.26
.46
.01
.0003
.0001
.0016
3.8519
.1664
1.8429
.0007
.9648
2.0938
.0518
.0017
	
	
4.5293
upathic	
.1604
E^Kpy (office)
2.2553
	
Deal.	
.0013
».	
1.0538
ttetric.
2.4393
hontic	
.0479
:J;ified	
.0010
Totals	
23,234,808
27,570,326 a
100.00
100.00
8.9760
10.4883
—	
:ludes only those payments which have been made during the respective fiscal periods,
-iwe amounts are fee-for-service payments made under the plan only, and in no way reflect the total for the services of these
5tners.
sed on insured population as at October 1, as derived from Statistics Canada Data 1979 = 2,588,548; 1980 = 2,628,662. New
'U on statistics received April 1,1980.
 "1
20
Ministry of Health
Summary of Expenditures
1970/71 to 1980/81
Medical
Fee-for-servi
Salaried and
Sessional
Additional
Benefits
Administration
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1977/78
1978/79
1979/80
1980/81
122,818,267
127,000,505
139,532,341
159,614,356
190,452,494
250,026,093
268,496,749
298,900,495
337,513,465
384,735,825
445,734,331
4,375,798
4,788,365
6,022,920
7,991,062
10,424,602
15,437,520
14,880,410
17,749,957
19,484,932
23,200,389
28,368,006
$
6,611,815
5,534,520
7,897,244
8,963,080
11,089,892
15,045,516
17,090,707
17,436,161
21,132,210
23,534,808
28,567,705
$
6,030,059
6,567,847
7,320,137
8,581,794
12,501,015
12,659,521
13,040,063
13,207,188
16,856,376
19,883,088
21,435,615
S
139,835aW:
143,891181
160,772JlH
185,150)^1
224,468,551
293,168,650
313,507,929
347,293,801
394,986,9®
451,354,110
524,105;li
Whereas preceding statistical tables are prepared on a cash basis, the above summary is compiled on an accrual bas
Dental Care Plan costs in 1980/81: claims payments $10,843,578, administration costs $2,927,527.
 On Page 80, Table 109,
figures listed under "Neglect'
should appear under "Sexual
Abuse" and vice versa.
 22
Ministry of Health
Mental Health
Services
During 1981 Mental Health Services continued its direct responsibility for administering Riverview Hospital, Burnaby Psychiatric
Services, Integrated Services for Child and
Family Development (Victoria), and the Mental Health Centres. The Delta sub-office was
made a full centre, and the Maples adolescent
unit was temporarily transferred to the Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission.
The Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service (GVMHS), funded completely by the Ministry, maintained a very close liaison with
Mental Health Services. Other divisions of the
Ministry which had a close working relationship included Hospital Programs; Long Term
Care; Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission; Medical Services Commission, which
pays private psychiatrists; and Preventive
Services.
In housing, a vital support for many patients, an acting co-ordinator of residential
services was appointed; more than 50 group
home places were obtained through the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing; and 10 staff
positions were transferred from Riverview to
serve patients in the community.
At Riverview, consolidation of wards and
the development of rehabilitation programs
continued. The hospital received one-year accreditation from the Canadian Council on Accreditation. The Riverview Volunteer Society
developed a boarding home proposal, and;
sisted in the implementation of the patien
council.
Programs including pre-vocational activi
centres, lithium groups, and life skills grotr
were developed at various Mental Heal
Centres.
The construction of the Maples' 26 secu
beds and expansion of servicesfw
continued.
Vancouver General Hospital opened a 1
bed adolescent unit; planning started on tl
construction of a 25-bed unit in Victoria; anc
day program for adolescents was opened
Kelowna.
For staff education, the electives progra
provided approximately 200 workshops
mental health centres and other agencies. Br
ish Columbia hosted the western.irite
provincial conference on rural mental healt
Statistics showed that mental health ce
tres, including Burnaby, saw approximate
15,390 out-patients. Burnaby admitted 334 i
patients and Riverview admitted 1,285 i
patients. Riverview's in-patient populatic
stayed stable at about 1,100 patients. GVMr
saw approximately 3,000 patients™
Total expenditures for the service, indudii
a grant to GVMHS, were $70,624,01M
 sOal Report, 1981
23
Patient movement trends for mental health facilities 1979-1981
MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES
YEARLY SUM OF ENTRIES1
Oct. 1979 to
Sept. 1980
Oct. 1980 to
Sept. 1981
RESIDENT OR CASELOAD
End of
Sept. 1980
End of
Sept. 1981
ntal health facilities	
al programs, Riverview..
ic Facilities	
yview	
jj^t -	
n^MW	
Health services2	
-patient units	
fflpf.'ZZZ"!."!.""
nt-patients	
ntal health centres...
jfia&d	
aby—Central	
^m Children's	
I Day program..
I North	
South	
ISike- Vanderhoof..
3lg|l River	
iwack	
tenav       	
brook      	
son Creek	
an......	
|||Sparwood	
Melson	
5t. John	
□narks	
loops	
a/na .
iat..
ley..
[eRii
itt..
limo
dge
Westminster..
h Delta	
roos	
cton
Alberni	
Coquitlam	
HflYdy	
11 River	
asSeorge	
ie Rupert	
:n Charlottes..
;nel	
ich...
BBErm	
t«r	
archers.
mish
if	
|e	
Hey..
ams Lake	
amunity care teams.
aelm House	
Iway Clinic	
lano.
nt Pleasant	
riond
mm- Ouiyoi)3	
h Vancouver	
hcona	
End	
Side.	
3-C. (out-patient)	
12,831
1,314
175
98
65
12
9,634
394
326
68
10,948
9,062
354
220
94
112
152
140
42
14
137
146
187
211
230
81
6
264
97
445
341
125
165
169
37
291
358
98
281
98
350
331
334
86
127
97
141
38
44
234
112
127
73
58
67
258
148
244
425
223
419
208
96
1,708
42
240
188
190
161
147
211
269
13,111
1,201
145
104
16
25
10,092
388
334
54
11,377
9,536
269
203
196
114
170
158
12
91
187
189
209
164
333
6
81
191
102
345
237
134
209
208
41
333
417
122
184
85
273
469
295
92
117
74
149
40
410
154
124
64
127
65
296
181
215
434
357
484
102
24
1,673
66
225
158
149
165
67
195
203
277
168
135
19,523
1,113
687
452
139
96
14,712
52
17
35
17,671
14,573
341
366
176
28
518
292
46
22
177
198
235
335
187
59
6
400
87
1,117
438
161
409
531
39
330
460
329
259
134
721
457
461
83
177
374
38
25
47
233
109
239
87
66
131
800
161
505
925
394
472
344
131
3,011
78
686
256
325
306
247
317
357
352
87
21,102
1,097
527
367
72
88
16,489
53
23
30
19,425
16,350
291
405
242
22
538
255
31
60
275
264
224
267
363
12
39
530
62
1,288
429
198
423
536
67
493
622
264
349
218
600
803
398
171
174
396
85
32
31
323
130
284
75
56
159
629
225
554
952
528
544
351
83
2,989
110
645
248
324
324
66
266
338
334
334
86
rthe residential facilities, this includes permanent transfers
[b^otal does not include community care teams.
PSj^community care team commenced reporting.
admissions from the community, returns from leaves and escapes.
 24
Ministry of HealIh
Patient movement data1 for mental health facilities, 1981
MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES
Direct       Returns    Permanent
Admissions from leave"   .transfers
Discharges
Permaneng am
transfers   Ueatl
AH mental health facilities	
Hospital programs, Riverview..
Geriatric facilities	
Valleyview	
Dellview	
Skeenaview	
Mental health services2	
Total in-patients	
Burnaby	
B.C.Y.I5.C	
Total out-patients «**•>■'	
All mental health centres	
Abbotsford	
Burnaby—Central	
Children's	
Day program	
North	
South	
Bums Lake-Vanderhoof	
Campbell River	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay ^—i-v
CranbroOK	
Dawson Creek	
Duncan	
Fernie-Sparwood	
Fort Nelson	
Fort St. John	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kitimat	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
North Delta	
Osoyoos	
Penticton	
Port Ajberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Hardy	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Queen Charlottes	
Quesnel	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
Sechelt	
Se Cure,	
Smithers	
Squamish	
Surrey	
Terrace	
Trail	
Vernon	
V.I.S.C...
Victoria	
Whalley	
Williams Lake	
All community care teams	
Blenheim House....'.1.	
Broadway Clinic	
Kitsilano	
Mount Pleasant	
Richmond	
S.A.F.E.R. (July81)3	
South Vancouver	
Strathcona	
West End	
West Side	
1,637
,182
135
105
5
25
1,866
387
341
46
B.C.Y.D.C. (out-patient)..
12,341
892
135
105
5
25
9,860
381
336
45
10,933
9,155
235
193
183
109
195
151
13
107
173
209
196
124
324
1
76
173
108
320
219
145
209
197
31
316
445
131
196
81
228
423
279
85
105
52
159
48
425
195
125
51
115
71
251
181
192
387
321
495
84
23
1,647
63
223
149
151
148
89
177
197
277
173
131
253
253
43
37
11,450
1,184
235
131
75
29
8,472
388
332
56
10,543
433
100
52
•     35
13
8,451
367
312
55
9,643
7,955
296
160
157
113
144
233
3
71
71
141
204
307
155
55
44
59
77
199
203
107
185
85
1
139
252
121
91
1
479
119
373
3
132
65
133
48
21
348
171
96
81
87
48
519
100
191
440
201
463
87
76
1,559
29
291
160
152
143
1
177
180
263
163
129
705
695
1
1 Table compiled from actual data through September 1981 and proj<
opened in 1981, table compiled on basis of available data.
2 Sub-total does not include community care teams.
3 Month community care team commenced reporting.
cted for the remainder of the year. NOTE: For community care tea
 I   Forensic
Psychiatric
Services
Commission
 26
MlNISTI
°f Health
Forensic
Psychiatric
Services
Commission
To meet its obligations under the Forensic
Psychiatry Act, the commission operates a 140
bed in-patient secure mental health facility;
two out-patient clinics; and travelling clinics at
Prince George and Kamloops.
Psychiatric assessment services are
provided to provincial adult and youth detention centres and to local lock-ups in the Lower
Mainland.
Consultative and educational services are
offered to persons involved in the mental
health and justice systems.
The secure hospital is in Coquitlam near
Riverview Hospital. Men and women charged
with offences are admitted by court remand
order for assessment of mental disorders, for a
period of up to 30 days.
Those persons whom the courts have found
unfit to stand trial, or not guilty of an offence
because of insanity, are admitted by court
order for treatment until the pleasure of the
Lieutenant Governor is made known. The
hospital also accepts transfers of prisoners
serving sentences in provincial correctional
centres, who have been certified as mentally ill
under the Mental Health Act of British
Columbia.
During 1981, approximately 85% of all admissions were accused persons remanded for
psychiatric assessment.
Mental status evaluations were completed
as quickly as thoroughness allowed. Over 80%
of persons assessed for fitness to stand trial
were considered to meet the legal criteria. Persons admitted as unfit to stand trial accounted
for 7% of admissions. An average length of
stay in hospital was three months.
Court finding of "not guilty by reason of
insanity" accounted for 2% of admissions, a
reduction from previous years. The Canadian
Criminal Code provision for detention at the
pleasure of the Lieutenant Governor is for indeterminate detention. While hospitalization
time for these patients is longer than required
to modify the acute stage of illness, the vast
majority are conditionally discharged by cab
net order to the community, under commi;
sion supervision. Adjusting to life outside th
^institution has always presented special pro!
lems for many of these persons, due in part t
an absence of transitional housing to compk
ment the individual's community rehabiubj
tion program.
In 1981, the commission took possession c
three homes on Riverview Hospital grounds
Seventeen patients have been transfers
from hospital to these transition homes
where they are experiencing the challenges c
more independent living while being guidei
and monitored by institute treatment stafl
This was considered the most important ad
junct to prevention achieved in 1981.
Changes were made to the Mental Health Ac
during the year, which directly affected thi
institute.
Previously, an order-in-council was re
quired before a certified mentally ill prisone
could be transferred from prison to a menta
health facility for treatment. The legislate!
changes provided for immediate transfer an
treatment of those persons, permitting mor
prompt intervention in the illness.
The Vancouver forensic clinic accepts courl
ordered referrals of adults and juveniles; fol
lows up the maj ority of persons on conditiona
discharge from the Forensic Psychiatric In
stitute; co-ordinates services to lock-ups an
detention centres in the Lower Mainland; an
organizes travelling clinics to the Interior.
Case activations continued to increase i
1981. Approximately 950 persons were re
ferred by the courts, an increase of 7% ovd
1980.
Persons receiving counselling at year's en
numbered 127. Of these, 58 were con
ditionally discharged persons from the iij
stitute. The rest were clients on bail, on recos
nizance, or probation.
The Victoria forensic clinic provides service
to Vancouver Island similar to those of m
clinic in Vancouver.
A highlight of activities during the year wd
the further implementation of psychiatri
services to the Vancouver Island Regional Cod
rectional Centre (VIRCC). Accused persori
requiring a remand in custody for psychiatri
assessment were seen in VIRCC by the clinic]
psychiatrist, often making it necessary to e-j
cort and admit the accused, to the F°«nsj
Psychiatric Institute, with disruption of live
and public expense.
 Alcohol
and
Drug
Programs
 28
Ministry of H
ealth
Alcohol and Drug
Programs
The role of the Alcohol and Drug Commission was significantly changed during 1981.
The commission, which was expanded in light
of its new functions, will act as an advisory
body coordinating the alcohol and drug services developed over the past eight years with
other government services.
In 1981, several initiatives to provide more
effective service were developed, with a
greater emphasis being placed on preventive
services.
Program evaluation and treatment services
were reorganized by integrating services for
alcohol and other drugs. This resulted in the
more efficient use of treatment staff and a better geographical distribution of treatment
clinics. Services to more communities will 1
provided in the next phase of progra
development.
Northern Way Detoxication Centre, whii
will replace the City of Vancouver drunk tan
was completed. Staff for this program we
being recruited at the year-end and the pr
gram was operating early in 1982.   j
Alcohol and Drug Programs funded 55 vc
untary societies to operate programs in tl
alcohol and drug field in the 1981/82 fisc
year, at a cost of $7,850,785. In addition,
directly administered out-patient clinics i
seven communities outside Vancouver, thrt
detoxication centres, and four out-plnei
services in Vancouver.
 Institutional
Services:
Institutional Services consists of the
Emergency Health Services Commission,
Hospital Programs, and Home Care/
Long-Term Care.
Emergency
Health
Services
Commission
 in
30
Ministry of Health
Emergency Health
Services
Commission
While the primary concern of the commission since its inception has been to provide
ambulance service throughout the province, it
also has the powers and authority:
• to provide emergency health services;
• to establish, equip, and operate emergency health centres and stations in areas
the commission considers advisable;
• to assist hospitals, other health institutions and agencies, municipalities and
other organizations and persons in
providing emergency health services,
and to train personnel to provide services, and to enter into agreements or arrangements for that purpose;
• to establish or improve communications
systems for emergency health services in
the province;
• to make available the services of medically trained persons on a continuous, or
temporary basis, to those residents of
B.C. who are not, in the opinion of the
commission, adequately served;
• to recruit, examine, train, register and license emergency medical assistants;
• to perform any other function related to
emergency health services as the Lieutenant Governor in Council may order.
The commission is also responsible for the
medical aspects of disaster planning, as well as
the maintenance, inspection, replacement
and storage of federal emergency medical
supplies stored throughout the province.
In 1981, 10 full-time crew members were
posted to Kelowna and immediately started
training as an advanced life support team.
Eight full-time crew members were posted to
Vernon, some of whom will be trained as
trauma attendants. Two full-time crew mei
bers were posted to Sidney. A second full-tin
crew member was added in Cresto
Hazelton, Sparwood, and Port McNeill we
each allocated a full-time crew member/a
ministrator. In addition, six crew membe
and one dispatcher were added in the Vanco
ver area, which now has 228 crew positioi
and 18 dispatchers. New services operated 1
part-time personnel were opened at Cassi;
Zeballos and Peachland.
The vehicle modification depot in Victor
manufactured 31 standard ambulances ar
two 4-wheel drive ambulances at a substanti
cost-saving per unit. They replace older, unr
liable vehicles beyond maintenance/™
All aspects of training ambulance crew
both lriU-time and part-time, are contracted ■
the Justice Institute of British Columbia. Tl
utilization of training days in 1981 was 7,31
for new personnel, and 20,510 for advanca
training and development of existing staff.
The areas of training included programs f
emergency medical assistants, advanced 11
support, trauma attendants, infant transpoj
training community instructors, and pr
grams for public awareness and knowledge
cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, basic \i
support.
In 1981 the air ambulance service continuij
to be extensively used to transport patient
involving 4,050 flights and 4,100 patients, i
18% increase in flights over 1980.
Road ambulance call volume of 226,034
1981 represented an increase of 11% overl9cj
During the year, the upgrading of an
bulance stations continued for the improv
ment of crew and equipment accommodatioi
  32
Ministry
of Health
Hospital Programs
Under the Hospital Insurance Act, Hospital
Programs pays the cost of in-patient services at
various levels of care, and the costs of certain
out-patient services, including emergency
treatment and day-care surgery. In addition to
patient benefits, Hospital Programs also
provides consulting and inspection services to
the province's public hospitals and licensed
private hospitals.
Hospital Programs pays at least 60 per cent
of the approved net costs of major hospital
construction and renovation for acute, rehabilitation and extended-care facilities built
by public hospitals and other non-profit organizations. It also provides grants for the
purchase of hospital equipment.
In Hospital Programs during 1981, 20 major
hospital projects were completed, or had
reached the final stages of construction, including four new hospitals, at a total cost of
approximately $158 million.
The largest of these new hospitals were the
new Children's and Grace Hospitals in Vancouver, designed to provide a total of 200 pediatric and 122 obstetrical beds respectively. The
total cost of this combined project, inducting
the provision of teaching facilities was originally funded under the Ministry of Education
but was subsequently handled by the Ministry
of Universities, Science and Communication.
The two hospitals, while keeping their separate identities, will share many service facilities with each other and the adjacent
Shaughnessy Hospital.
The other two new facilities were quite distinctive. One was a new unit built in Burnaby,
which combined 40 extended-care bedswi
40 beds for intermediate care, each unitusii
common lounge, dining and activitywrei
under one management. The other was t
New Denver Health Centre, built adjacent
an intermediate-care unit called the Pavilio
The health centre, besides providing diagnc
tic and treatment facilities, contains 10 be
which can be used for short-term acute
extended-care patients, depending on nee
Substantial progress was made on a ne
and enlarged emergency department and
27-bed coronary care unit at Vancouver Gei|
eral Hospital, as part of the new Laurel Stre
complex. Besides providing a major erne
gency and crisis centre, the Emergency Di
partment also provides teaching and clinic
research facilities, in cooperation with th
University of British Columbia. The operan
of these facilities is expected in 1982.
During 1981, after many months of negoti
tions, the 10 provinces and two territorii
agreed to enter into agreements for the rJ
ciprocal processing of out-of-province hosp|
tal in-patient claims. The new process will n
lieve hospitals from having to deal with ti
hospital plans in other jurisdictions. Insteai
each provincial or territorial plan will indue
in operating payments to their hospitals, tl
cost of care for qualified beneficiaries fro:
other areas of Canada, and the host plan
recover their costs by direct bulk billings to tl
other plans. The new process began in Britii
Columbia on October 1, 1981, and it is ei
pected that all participants will benef
through the reduction in individual biffing
 ,<ual Report, 1981
33
ts separated and proportion covered by Hospital Programs, British Columbia public
;neral hospitals1 only (excluding federal, private, extended care and out-of-province hospi-
aKtion), 1976-1981/82. TabIe 16
T
jtal hospitalized
public hospitals
■
Covered by
lospital programs
Adults
and
children
Newborn
Total
Adults
and
children
Newborn
Total
e j separated:
408,278
406,180
408,606
410,648
409,216
423,394
36,117
36,980
37,938
39,880
41,514
43,198
444,395
443,160
446,544
450,528
451,252
466,592
390,641
386,872
389,922
390,513
389,573
402,139
95.7
95.2
95.4
95.1
95.2
94.9
35,292
36,119
37,293
39,125
40,767
42,515
97.7
97.7
98.3
98.1
98.2
98.4
422,991
427,215
429,638
430 340
179	
180' 	
B	
I823..	
444,654
:i age of total
es separated:
Mi.	
95.8
j..:.	
95.4
179..	
95.7
HI	
95.4
IHRBP
95.2
I823..	
95.3
dudes rehabilitation and long term care statistics,
nended as per final report received from hospitals.
3 test 1981/82 hospital reports available.
ipatient days and proportion covered by Hospital Programs, British Columbia public
eneral hospitals1 only (excluding federal, private, extended care and out-of-province hospi-
Ijffation), 1976-1981/82. Table 17
Total hospitalized in
public hospitals
Covered by
hospital programs
Adults
and
children
Adults
and
children
edays
>79...
m\.
*812..
*823..
3,488,179
3,473,838
3,565,659
3,603,701
3,648,247
3,741,171
207,316
208,574
208,969
232,226
234,094
236,522
3,695,495
3,682,412
3,744,659
3,835,927
3,881,341
3,977,693
§i»of total
Edays
'79..
'81*..
S823..
3,343,172
3,337,330
3,428,709
3,460,477
3,505,965
3,614,613
95.8
96.1
96.2
96.0
96.1
96.6
201,111
202,751
203,299
225,992
228,476
230,949
97.0
97.2
97.3
97.3
97.6
97.6
3,544,283
3,540,081
3,632,008
3,686,469
3,734,441
3,845,562
95.9
96.1
96.2
96.1
96.2
96.7
idffijes rehabilitation and long term care statistics.
friended as per final report received from hospitals.
3 timated, based on latest 1981/82 hospital reports available.
 34
Ministry of Ha
M.TH
Table 18
Patients separated, total patient-days, and average length of stay according to type and location of hosoii
for Hospital Programs patients only, and days of care per 1,000 of covered population, 1976-1981/82
Total
(excluding
extended care)
Adults
and
children
Newborn
public hospitals
Adults
and
children
Newborn
Other B.C. hospitals including
federal and private
Adults
and
children
New-
bom
Institutions
outside
British Columbia1
Adults
and
children
New-
bom
Extendet
care
hospital'
Patients separated—
1976	
1977	
1978/79	
1979/80	
1980/811	
1981/822 ;	
Patient days—
1976	
1977	
1978/79	
1979/80	
1980/811	
1981/822	
Average days of stay-
1976	
1977	
1978/79	
1979/80	
1980/811	
1981/822	
400,675
394,727
397,273
398,457
396,753
408,514
3,424,979
3,397,729
3,488,887
3,521,692
3,558,391
3,663,074
35,832
36,496
37,636
39,516
41,124
42,877
204,156
205,059
205,431
228,587
230,739
233,233
5.70
5.62
5.46
5.78
5.61
5.44
390,641
386,872
389,922
390,513
389,573
402,139
3,343,172
3,337,330
3,428,709
3,460,377
3,505,965
3,614,613
35,292
36,119
37,293
39,125
40,767
42,515
201,111
202,751
203,299
225,992
228,476
230,949
5.70
5.61
5.45
5.78
5.60
5.43
475
350
213
256
519
5003
1,647
1,615
718
892
1,795
1,7003
3.47
4.61
3.37
3.48
3.46
3.40
65
31
24
59
503
390
250
130
94
279
2353
4.88
3.85
4.19
3.92
4.73
4.70
9,559
7,505
7,138
7,688
6,661
5,875
80,160
60,784
59,460
60,323
50,631
46,761
8.39
8.10
8.33
7.85
7.60
7.96
460
312
312
367
298
312
2,655
2,058
2,002
2,501
1,984
2,049
5.77
6.60
6.42
6.81
6.66
6.57
3,59.
4,02
3,
3,55;
3,
3,67!
1,498,79:
1,734,22!
1,841,08'
1,886,56
1,963,02
1,960,70
417.26
430.76
528.59
530.!
533.43
533.52
1 Amended as per final report from hospitals.
2 Estimated, based on latest 1981/82 hospital reports. Estimated patient-days (including new-born) per 1,000 of population covered
hospital programs: 1976—1,474; 1977—1,432; 1978/79—1,460; 1979/80—1,459; 1980/81—1,350; 1981/82—1,337 (because the armed torn
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and some other groups are not insured under the Provincial Plan, the actual incidence of days would
somewhat higher than shown). In addition, estimated patient-days per 1,000 population for extended care amounted to 603 in 1976,639
1977, 728 in 1978/79, 734 in 1979/80, 745 in 1980/81, and 756 in 1981/82. Population figures according to latest census figures.M
3 Including hospitals at Cassiar, Holberg and Masset.
Patients separated, total days' stay and average length of stay in British Columbia publ
hospitals for Hospital Programs patients only, grouped according to bed capacity, 1981/8:
(excluding extended care hospitals).
Table 19
Total
250 & over
Bed capacity
100 to 249 50 to 99 25 to 49   Under
Patients separated
Adults and children..
Newborn	
Patient days
Adults and children-
Newborn 	
Average days' stay
Adults and children..
Newborn	
402,139
42,515
3,614,613
230,949
8.99
5.43
202,476
20,641
1,982,615
124,227
9.79
6.02
133,229
16,185
1,168,966
83,511
8.77
5.16
36,675
2,903
266,397
11,572
7.26
3.99
19,183]
1,717
136,632
7,390
7.12
4.30
1 Estimated, based on latest available hospital reports for 1981/82.
 J ual Report, 1981
I [age distribution of patients separated and patient-days for Hospital Programs patients
fly, in British Columbia public hospitals, grouped according to bed capacity, 1981/821
I tcluding extended care hospitals).
Bed capacity
100 to 249 50 to 99
25 to 49    Under 25
lays
ii and children..
orn	
separated
: and children-
am	
Per cent
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Per cent
50.35
48.55
54.85
53.79
33.13
38.07
32.34
36.16
Per cent
9.12
6.83
7.37
5.01
Per cent
4.77
4.04
3.78
3.20
Per cent
2.63
2.51
1.66
1.84
mated, based on latest available hospital reports for 1981/82.
|Summary of the number of Hospital Programs in-patients and out-patients
1976-1981/82
Total adults
Children
and newborn
in-patients
Estimated number
of emergency
minor surgery
day care and
out-patients
receivmg
benefits
440,099
435,249
438,392
441,526
441,557
455,066
1,228,723
1,303,679
1,464,799
1,678,768
1,931,548
1,933,027
1,668,822
1,738,928
1,903,191
2,120,294
2,373,105
2,388,093
tended as per final report received from hospitals.
imated, based on latest available hospital reports for 1981/82.
Summary of Hospital Programs out-patient treatments, by category
1976-1981/82
iry
itient	
jmS.-.	
ud emergency...
surgery	
day care	
erapy	
(counselling	
[•lysis day care1
22,352
40,392
542,223
66,663
3,426
368,867
10,218
10,481
164,101
23,974
46,323
575,000
76,405
4,126
387,993
12,942
18,351
158,565
26,222
53,725
645,634
82,979
4,515
454,697
18,189
19,717
159,121
24,481
57,209
814,317
89,312
4,949
484,110
22,077
20,253
162,060
29,972
63,529
1,019,628
93,445
6,595
507,233
23,649
22,177
165,320
34,800
66,948
934,800
100,862
8,670
572,176
27,525
21,006
166,240
TOTALS..
1,228,723
1,303,679
1,464,799
1,678,768
1,931,548
1,933,027
nmenced June 1, 1976.
erindudes (a) cancer out-patients and (b) rehabilitiation day care.
mated. r '
	
 36
Ministry of Healti
Charts
The statistical data shoWn in the following charts
prepared by the Research Division are derived from admission/separation forms submitted to Hospital Programs. Note that the figures given are for fiscal year
1980/81.
Readers interested in the more detailed statistics
hospitalization in British Columbia may wish to refer
Statistics of Hospital Cases Discharged During 1980/j
and Statistics of Hospitalized Accident Cases, 1980/8
available from the Research Division.
Percentage distribution of days of care* by major diagnostic groups, Hospital Programs, 1980/8
Table 23
Infective and parasitic diseases 1.3%
Skin 1.3*
Congenital anomalies 1.3%.
Metabolic diseases 2.3%
Other 3.8%
Nervous system 4.1%
Genito-urinary system 5.7%
Mental disorders 6.9%
Respiratory system 8.6%
Neoplasms 11.2%
Skin 1.1
Infective and parasitic diseases 1.0%
Ill-defined conditions 2.1%
Metabolic disorders 2.6%
Other 3.1%
Nervous system 3.4%
Respiratory system 5.4%
Genito-urinary system 6.6'
Bones 7.2%.
Mental disorders 7.4%
Neoplasms 9.5%
Males
Circulatory system 18.2SJ
Females
Accidents 17.39m
Digestive system 11.6%
Circulatory system 14.3911
Bones 6.9%
Deliveries 14.3911
Accidents 12.99B
Digestive system 10.0%
Administration and payments to hospitals —1977/78-1981/82
Administration	
Grants to hosptials..
Total	
1977-78
$
3,856,217
573,896,901
577,753,118
1978-79
$
4,237,158
627,145,613
631,382,771
1979-80
$
4,459,302
696,184,526
700,643,828
5
5,317,086
959,961,923
965,279,009
1981-82
$
7,256,765
1,078,601,170'
1,085,857,935!
1 Also includes special warrant for $42,682,000.
! Source: Estimate of Revenue and Expenditure, Fiscal Year Ending March 31,1982.
 k ual Report, 1981
37
■ length of stay of cases* in hospitals in British Columbia, by major diagnostic groups
in descending order, 1980/81 (excluding newborns)
Mental disorders
Certain conditions originating in
the perinatal period
Endocrine, nutritional and
metabolic diseases
Diseases of the circulatory system
Neoplasms
Diseases of the musculoskeletal
system and connective tissue
Injury and poisoning
Congenital anomalies
Diseases of the skin and
subcutaneous tissue
Provincial average
length of stay
Diseases of the blood and
blood-forming organs
Diseases of the digestive system
Diseases of the nervous
system and sense organs
Infective and parasitic diseases
Diseases of the genito-urinary
system
Diseases of the respiratory
system
Supplementary classification
'ffijgmplications of pregnancy,
childbirth, and the puerperium
Symptoms, signs and ill-defined
conditions
* Including rehabilitative c
 38
Ministry op h|
U.TH
Percentage distribution of hospital cases* by type of clinical service, Hospital Programs, 19807!
Table 26
Males
Psychiatric 5.3%
Pediatric surgical 7.3%
Pediatric medical 9.5,
Adult medical 31.5
Psychiatric 4.8%
Pediatric surgical 4.0'
Pediatric medical 5.6
Maternity 20.3%
Females
Rehabilitative care 0.7%
Adult surgical 45.7%
Rehabilitative care 0.6%
Adult surgical 39811
Adult medical 25.3%
i Including rehabilitative care.
 Lual Report, 1981
39
sage distribution of hospital days* by type of clinical service, Hospital Programs, 1980/81
fcdt medical 36.59!
atnc surgica
13.6%
k atric medical 6.2%
[i hifflric 7.0%	
Giatjilitative care 3.3%
iliatric medical 3.9%
lchiatric7.9%
jftemity 12.8%
Laltpiedical 31.5%
I duding rehabilitative care.
Males
Females
Rehabilitative care 3.4%
Adult surgical 43.3%
Pediatric surgical 2.1%
Adult surgical 38.5%
  Home Corel
Long-Term Care
 42
Ministry of HealtIj
Home Care/
Long-Term Care
The Long-term Care program provides in-
home and institutional care to persons who
can no longer function independently as the
result of health-related problems.
Home support services include homemaker
services, community physiotherapy, home
care nursing services, and adult day care.
Residential care is provided in community
care facilities, mental health boarding homes,
licensed private hospitals, family care homes,
group homes for independent living, and government institutions.
During 1981 a review of the level of home-
maker hours purchased was undertaken
throughout the province to keep expenditures
within approved budget limits.
This review was initiated to identify and
eliminate those services which fall outside
service boundaries felt appropriate for home-
makers, and which would not affect the care
requirements of those receiving services. This
review was successful in maintaining the overall number of services and clients within budgetary allocations.
An internal working committee within the
Long-term Care program initiated and drafted
revised facility standards, which would
sure a minimum standard of care through
all facilities in the province. Work was c
tinuing on a final draft of these standai
which could then be implemented in the r
fiscal year.
Preliminary discussions for a revised hi
ing system were initiated between the Mil-
try and the B.C. Association of Private G
Facilities (PRICARE). Although the details
revised system were not finalized, it is anl
pated that such a system could be imp
mented in the next fiscal year.
An outside consultant was retained to a
duct a feasibility study on the needs of
behaviourally-disturbed elderly. A propo
was then developed for the establishmenl
short stay assessment and treatment cent
and special care units for the specific need;
the psychiogeriatric or behaviourally-d
turbed elderly. This proposal was being
viewed by senior Ministry staff at year-ei
Since January 1980, the construction of
additional 2,600 intermediate-care beds v
approved, with 1,435 opening in 1981. AI:
an additional 12 adult day centres w(
opened in 1981.
 fjAL Report, 1981
«]
Long-Term Care Program services provided
Homemaker
agencies
Adull day
care
Assessment and
treatment centres
Family care
homes
Group
homes
Non-profit
facilities
Proprietary
facilities
Mental health
boarding homes
Private
hospitals
23
106
129
175
32
|
111
159
17
11
211
222
Nonprofit
Propria*
36
No. of clients
26,573
1,253
1,995
43,876
■utilization 30
rate (ft)
Age-specific utilization rates by source of care
(March 31,1981)
Average utilization over 65:
.facility clients (includes extended care) 6.6%
Homemaker services 7.7%
FAC      = Facility
HMKR = Homemakei
 44
Ministry of Health
Number of Long-Term Care clients
Table M                                       November 1979-September 1981
Facility                                                Homemaker
clients                                                 clients
27,000.
26,573
26,000a
a
25,000.
24,322
24,000.
IISE
22,000
i
20,000.
Mumber
18,137
i
)f              18,000,
:IientS      16,000.
16,570        HW£|1
15,096          15'757        nK»|»
■
14,000.
-    j                                I
12,000.
j
10,000,
1
8,000
i      .              i
w
6,000.
!
4,000.
•                                         !                   i                ffl
2,000.
■ f ii !■  11
ML
Nov./79        Sept./80         Sept./81        Nov./79        Sept./80
Sept./81
rable 31                                     Number of Long-Term Care clients
Facilities
Homemaker
Nov./79      Sept./80      Sept./81
Nov./79      Sept./80     Sept./
Personal can
5,391        5,057        4,573
3,975        4,218        4,734
2,656        3,047        3,485
2,029         2,423         2,739
1,045'        1,012'       1,039'
10,811       14,231      15,3.
3,531        5,035       5,9:
2,038        2,843       2,9!
823        1,081       [B
934        1,132       1,K
Extended ca
-e	
Tote
1	
15,096       15,757       16,570
18,1372     24,322'    26,551
1 Does no
2 Figures i
include extended care clients in public extendec
efer to clients approved for service. This may be
care units.
10-15% higher than the figure for cli
tnts actually receiving service.
 [JAL
; cent
Report, 1981
Facility utilization rates for persons 65 and over
65-69
70-74
75-79
80-84
Facility utilization rates for persons 65 and over (figures are percentages
of the general population)
75-79
85-89
90-t
egional District	
ancouver Regional District..
;rof British Columbia	
I Average	
0.83%
1.36%
0.93%
1.12%
:.82
!.50
1.94
'.18
4.08
5.30
4.86
4.96
8.98
11.63
12.21
11.37
18.42
20.66
23.72
21.20
'41.25
40.71
40.75
40.81
Homemaker utilization rates for persons 65 and over
UiU
65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90 +
Homemaker utilization rates for persons 65 and over (figures are percentages
of the general population)
65-69
'
egional District...	
'ancouver Regional District.
'er of British Columbia	
"1 Average	
1.62%
2.88%
3.23%
2.86%
3.27
5.63
6.44
5.63
6.34
9.44
12.14
9.96
11.24
14.45
18.29
15.16
17.76
16.59
21.52
18.30
18.59
18.24
20.78
19.05
 Fi
46
Ministry of Healti
Composition of the provincial facility population by care level
Per cent
25     j
20   |
15
10
5
Ul ■ ■ ■
PC IC1 IC2 IC3 EC
Composition of the provincial facility population by care level (rows total 100%)
Table 37 (includes extended care units).;
PC
Under 65	
65-69	
70-74	
80-84 V..J§
85-89	
90+	
All clients
30.0%
26.2%
25.1%
25.2%
25.2%
18.0%
25.0
23.9
24.0
23.6
21.0
21.0
17.1
17.6
16.7
16.8
16.9
16.0
14.5
14.5
14.0
12.8
11.6
13.0
13.4
17.8
20.2
21.6
25.3
32.0
24.5
22.6
16.8
13.2
Table 38
Composition of the provincial Homemaker population by age group and care lev
Per cent
60 ■
50 ■
40
30  ■
20
10 ■
■
L^
PC
ici
IC2
IC3
EC
Composition of the provincial Homemaker population by age group care level
Table 39 (rows total 100%)
PC
ICI
IC2
IC3
EC
Under 65	
48.1%
61.2%
62.1%
62.9%
60.9%
55.1%
42.4%
22.0
20.9
20.7
20.9
21.5
22.0
23.8
14.7
10.8
10.3
10.1
11.0
13.5
14.1
6.0
3.4
3.7
3.4
4.1
5.5
9.6
9.2
3.7
3.2
2.7
2.5
3.9
10.1
4.5
65-69	
70-74 j
75-79	
80-84	
85-89	
90+ ..I:.: Ci.i
All clients	
57.6
21.5
11.8
4.6
 tjal Report, 1981
Home Nursing Care Program
(Me distribution by age groups or patients admitted to the Home Nursing Care Program
April 1,1979-March 31,1980
Home Nursing Care aProgram
age distribution by age group and category of patients admitted to the Home Nursing Care Program
April 1,1979 to March 31,1980
lerl year..
iZKears	
M4 years...
154 years...
'74 years...
'34 years...
jyears	
I TOTAL...
Age
Percentage
hospital
replacement
11
6
6
4
Percentage
non-hospital
replacement
7
9
20
19
10
Total
percentage
3
4
18
15
26
23
 48
Ministry of Healti
Home Nursing Care Program
Percentage distribution and number of Home Nursing Care patients by diagnostic groups in descendi
order April 1,1979 to March 31,1980
Table 42
Diagnosis
Number of
patients
Percentage of
total patients
1. Circulatory	
2. Malignant neoplasms	
3. Accidents	
4. Gastrointestinal	
5. Musculoskeletal	
6. Endocrine .jf......
7. Skin	
8. Childbirth	
9. Symptoms undiagnosed
10. Respiratory	
11. Nervous system	
12. Gynecology	
13. Blood disorders	
14. Perinatal	
15. Genitourinary	
16. Mental disorders	
17. Sense organs	
18. Nonmalignant neoplasm
i9. Infective	
20. Congenital	
TOTAL  .....
9,083
5,647
5,628
5,289
3,484
2,851
2,829
2,760
2,292
2,032
1,803
1,779
1,210
1,025
965
921
865
727
486
242
51,918
17.51
10.9
10.8
10.2
6.7
4.4]
3.9
3.5
3.4
2.3
2.0
1.9
1.8
1.7
1.4
0.9
0.51
 <ual Report, 1981
49
Adult care facilities
fnm permits and 74 licences issued with capacity of 3,831 to new and existing facilities between
December 1,1980 to November 30,1981
PERSONAL CARE
! i permits..
IBs....	
i permits..
Ifflfg..	
Licences	
Capacities..
25
523
Licences         15
Capacities      349
1 permits..
[■HBS	
> 1 permits.,
BlOs	
INTERMEDIATE CARE
13
815
382
Licences         17
Capacities    1,007
Licences	
Capacities.,
10
y/4
j^llv Disabled
lim permits..
jacities	
l8—
1 ffW permits..
icities	
i' Retarded
<-
i:im permits.,
Hmoes	
i:im permits..
aaties ,
and Drugs
•-
urim permits..
tadties	
sig—
irim permits..
acities	
SPECIALIZED RESIDENTIAL CARE
10
104
15
245
10
105
2
10
Licences	
Capacities..
Licences	
Capacities..
Licences	
Capacities..
Licences	
Capacities..
Licences	
Capacities.
Licences	
Capacities I
13
123
4
36
7
86
1
15
2
26
Closures
Table 44
PERSONAL CARE
Licences      16
Capacities    273
INTERMEDIATE CARE
Licences	
Capacities..
SPECIALIZED RESIDENTIAL CARE
Psychiatrically Disabled
Licences  8
Capacities  78
Mentally Retarded
Licences  6
Capacities  37
Alcohol and Drugs
Licences  4
Capacities  144
Total of 34 facilities, with a capacity of 532, were closed.
 ^»~l
50
Ministry of HeaIM
Table 45
The Provincial Child Care Facilities Licensing Board
1981 statistics
==
Child
Out of
Nursery
Kinder
Group
Family
Specialized
Residence
for
children
Specialized
minding
school
garten
day care
day care
day care
residence
Amendme
Interim
permits
12
73
39
0
37
75
1
12
6
Capacities..
216
418
601
0
657
345
12
76
60
Licences....
16
108
41
0
43
138
6
16
1
45
Capacities.
292
660
740
0
870
606
70
98
30
120
669 new interim permits and licences with a total capacity of 5,871 in 1981
Table 46
Closures in 1981
Child
minding
Out of
school
Nursery
Group
daycare
Family
day care
Specialize
daycare
Facilities	
Capacities..
6
77
36
468
29
408
102
44
181 facilities, with a total capacity of 1,537, were closed.
 Ministry
of Health
Expenditures
 52 Ministry of Health
Expenditures by Principal Categories in the Ministry of Health \
e47 for the Fiscal Year 1980/81
Total Expenditure
Fiscal Year Ended
March 31,1981
$  1
Minister's Office  204,244
Administration and Support Services  23,872,360
Preventive Services  39,733,614
Direct Care Community Services  261,536,823
Hospital Programs  965,276,999
Medical Services Commission  537,876,762'
Emergency Health Services Commission  37,154,274
Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission  4,935,300
Alcohol and Drug Commission  12,805,505
Building Occupancy Charges  29,850,614
Computer and Consulting Charges  2,317,000
1,915,563,495
Statutory
Interest on Overdue Accounts  5,101
1,915,568,596
1 The expenditure of $537,876,762 shown for Medical Services Commission is the gross operating cost as shown in the detai
statements of the Public Accounts. The actual charge to Vote 119 was $352,335,891 and covered the subsidy by the province for low-inco
residents and the estimated deficits not covered by premiums and other revenue. Also included in the Medical Services Commission w
charge of $13,501,609 for Dental Care Services which will be shown separately in the Public Accounts.
 .Report, 1981 i^l^KikL-i.' 53
■Mailed Expenditure by Principal Categories in the Ministry of Health
for the Fiscal Year 1980/81
Total Expenditure
Fiscal Year Ended
March 31, 1981
$
jet's Office  204,224
i istration and Support Services  23,872,360
■i tive Services: $
Kntive Programs ^    36,284,203
lints—Health Services      3,449,411
39,733,614
p Care Community Services:
ilg Term Care  168,199,777
fee Care  12,164,818
nrununity Physiotherapy Lj  516,836
Rising Boards  537,906
Stal Health  55,645,968
Kernment Hospitals  24,471,518
j:al Programs:
fgiinistration      5,317,086
yinents to Hospitals:
■paims  916,179,454
»jrants in Aid of Equipment      8,754,673
KCapital and Debt Service    35,025,786
lal Services Commission:
Baits:
^Medical Care  484,945,915
■Additional Benefits JMW  28,567,705
Administration    24,363,142
261,536,823
965,276,999
537,876,762
;ency Health Services Commission  37,154,274
ic Psychiatric Services Commission  4,935,300
nil and Drug Commission  12,805,505
Ing Occupancy Charges  29,850,614
ruter and Consulting Charges  2,317,000
ory:
terest on Overdue Accounts  5,101
Bbtal, Ministry of Health     1,915,568,596
'	
 54 Ministry of Health
Medical Services Plan
Financial Statement
Auditor's Report
To the Chairman of the
Medical Services Commission of British Columbia, and
To the Minister of Health
Province of British Columbia:
I have examined the statement of financial position of the Medical Services CommissSm
British Columbia as at 31 March 1981 and the statement of operations and working capita
deficiency for the year then ended. My examination was made in accordance with generall
accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included such tests and other procedures as
considered necessary in the circumstances.
In my opinion, these financial statements present fairly the financial position of the Commis
sion as at 31 March 1981 and the results of its operations for the year then ended in accordance witl
generally accepted accounting principles, as modified by Note 1 to the financial statements
applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year.
ERMA MORRISON, C.A.
Auditor General
Victoria, B. C.
29 May 1981
Exhibit
Medical Services Commission of British Columbia
Statement of Financial Position
Table 49 March 31,1981
1981 1980
$ $
Assets
Cash  5,120,829        4,197,35.
Accounts receivable  1,534,395        1,588,641
Due from the Province of British Columbia  20,000,000
26,655,224       5,785,99:
Liabilities
Bank overdraft  1,419,622
Accounts payable          1,566,977 527,50:
Premiums received in advance        18,104,034 15,923,521
Estimated liability for unpresented and unprocessed benefit claims       61,500,000 52.500,01*1
82,590,633 68,951,02:|
Working Capital Deficiency—Exhibit B        55,935,409
26,655,224
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
Approved by the Commission:
Dr. D. M. Bolton, Chairman •
 i Report, 1981
Medical Services Commission of British Columbia
Statement of Operations and Working Capital Deficiency
for the Year Ended March 31,1981
kbers' premiums (Note 1)	
t e of British Columbia premium assistance..
Ore
is
;cal care	
Immal benefits..
titration
lies and employee benefits I
(processing expenses	
leal office expenses	
i pancy expenses	
a operating expenditure over revenue..
ttions
n:e of British Columbia I.....
icapital def iciency-
■mg of year	
i capital def iciency-
jyear—Exhibit A	
1981
1980
$
$
179,862,707
155,217,061
34,903,114
31,456,261
214,765,821
186,673,322
484,945,915
407,936,214
28,567,705
23,534,808
513,513,620
431,471,022
11,912,554
10,750,191
8,472,953
6,356,216
2,773,558
1,723,919
1,204,077
1,052,762
24,363,142
19,883,088
537,876,762
451,354,110
323,110,941
264,680,788
330,340,564
258,032,994
(7,229,623)
6,647,794
63,165,032
56,517,238
55,935,409
63,165,032
Medical Services Commission of British Columbia
Notes to Financial Statements
March 31,1981
I cit accounting policies
K financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted ac-
■Brinciples except that:
Iffiemiums from individual subscribers are included in revenue only when cash is re-
jceived. Premiums from other sources are recognized as revenue on an accrual basis.
jThe cost of furniture and equipment is charged to administration expenses in the year of
Inquisition.
iNo accrual for holiday pay is provided for salaried employees.
BIyears' statements were headed Medical Services Plan of British Columbia Operated by
■er the Medical Services Commission of British Columbia.
 56      Ministry of HealtI
Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission
Statement of Expenditure
for the Period April 1,1980 to March 31,1981
Table 51 Vote 121
Expenditure by Standard Classification $
Salaries  3,767,
Temporary salaries  280^
i047,
Travel expense  43
Professional and special services  709
Office expense.....  25,
Office furniture and equipment	
Materials and supplies  286,
Acquisitions—machinery and equipment	
Grants, contributions and subsidies „-«_  53
5,179
Less transfers:
Vote 100—salary adjustment        227,387
Vote 178—employee  6,147
Vote 185—pre-retirement leave  10,744
Total transfers ^.al-,..i.g.,^.,J  244
4,935,
Alcohol and Drug Commission
Financial Statement of Expenditures
Table 52 April 1,1980 to March 31,1981
By Activity $ $
Alcoholism treatment and rehabilitation program         8,270,
Heroin treatment program (net of recoveries)        4,535,
12,805,
By standard expenditure classification
Salaries—permanent .",.. lT^n..L^..^„r  6,534,
Salaries—temporary assistance  1/374,
Travel  157,
Professional and special services  460,
Office expense  1"°'
Office furniture and equipment  "■*
Materials and supplies  &*>
Acquisition—machinery and equipment  •*■
Grants *S fes:.  5,617,
Sub-total , ...La,  I4'933-
Less
Salary and employee benefit transfers from Votes 100 and 178  101,961
Subsidy from drug, alcohol and cigarette education prevention
and rehabilitation fund 4x* m.d03a^uii^.        2,021,989
Other fcu i:aaa.fetfe.M..tefo.s9  4,312      l^A
12,805,!
 [Report, 1981
Expenditure by Principal Categories in the Ministry of Health
for Fiscal Year 1980/81
[Table 53
Other:
Forensic
$4.9 million
.Alcohol and Drug
$12.8 million
Administration
$56.2 million
Preventive Services
$39.7 million
Emergency Health Services
$37.2 million
Total Health Services in 1980/81 — $1,915.6 million
  

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