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ANNUAL REPORT CORRECTIONS BRANCH April 1, 1980 - March 31, 1981 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1982

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 Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Attorney General
ANNUAL REPORT
CORRECTIONS BRANCH
April I 1980—March 31, 1981
 British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia.  Corrections Branch.
Annual report. — 1979/80-
Report year ends March 31.
Report for 1979/80 covers Jan. 1, 1979 to
March 31, 1980.
Continues: British Columbia.  Corrections
Branch. Annual report of the Corrections
Branch.
ISSN 07U-5156 = Corrections Branch annual
report (Victoria)
1. British Columbia.  Corrections Branch.
2. Corrections - British Columbia - Periodicals.
HV7315.B7B7*f      35U.7H'008tf9
 me Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please your Honour:
I hereby respectfully submit the Annual Report of the Corrections Branch for the
period April 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981.
ALLAN WILLIAMS
Attorney General
(  Office of Attorney General
I  February 1982
 -»,
To the Honourable Allan Williams,
Attorney General:
Sir:
I am pleased to submit the 1980-81 Annual Report of the Corrections BrancM
As in last year's Annual Report, the structure of this report parallels Branch
activities as outlined in the estimates. The report encompasses the wide range of Branch!
activities, identifies priorities and summarizes achievements.
The year under review was primarily one where previous organizational changes
and program initiatives were consolidated. This was most evident in the year's focus on
the development and implementation of standards. During the year, the Service Delivery Standards were finalized and published setting out province-wide guidelines for the
delivery of the services offered by the Branch. Through the provision of standards, an
objective guide is provided which assists in ensuring the delivery of a highly professional level of correctional service.
During the year, certain management support functions were amalgamated. Tfim
Resource Analysis Section was combined with Operations and Management Systems,
thus reducing the number of administrative units in the Management Services area.
Such economies have been accomplished without a reduction in services. Improved
services and increased effectiveness were sought through such initiatives since no
increase in the number of staff or management positions was possible during the year.
Consistent with the focus on standards is the emphasis the Branch placed on the
professional upgrading of its staff. Staff members participated in mandatory and
voluntary training and professional development programs. Those offered at the lustice
Institute comprise the major component of this process of professional upgradingjH
Associated with the development of standards for the Branch is the program
evaluation process. Initiated this year with the design of an evaluation process for secure
institutions, program evaluation will be a long-term project, aimed at reviewing and
assessing the effectiveness of the various areas of responsibility in the Branch.
The establishment of Branch Staffing Standards continued during the year through
the Post Review and the Staff Planning Technique. The Post Review was implemented
to help achieve the equitable distribution of staff relative to work load and standards
within adult correctional centres and to review manpower requirements. The Staff
Planning Technique for Probation and Family Services is intended to identify the
Branch's manpower requirements in community offices. Both the Post Review and
Staff Planning Project are ongoing projects.
The Corrections Branch has long sought to use alternatives to incarceration in
carrying out its mandate and it remains Branch policy to utilize secure institutions only
as the last resort. This has been a slowly evolving process over the last 20 years.
Initially developed to provide more humane treatment for offenders, the concept of
alternatives has broadened recently to include the idea of restitution to the individual or
community against whom the offense was committed. This philosophical change is
leading to a further examination of the Branch's role and the degree of involvement in
victim services.
One program reflecting the concept of restitution is the Community Service Order j
Program. Through this program, juvenile and adult offenders have the opportunity to \
 [recompense an individual or the community for damages resulting from their committal
of an offense. The program also encourages the active participation of community
{groups and individual volunteers.
The first priority of the Branch in its education and work programs at the various
Kistitutions across the province is to ensure that time spent there will be as constructive
j as possible, and that attitudes and skills acquired during a sentence will be of long-term
fuse for an individual. It is also important mat training and work be meaningful for the
[offender and that work projects be useful to the community. This has challenged the
[Branch over the years to provide worthwhile programs without unnecessarily duplicat-
jing training and vocational opportunities already existing in the community. The
continuing use of the Temporary Absence Program allows eligible individuals serving a
isentence to have access to those educational and vocational opportunities and resources
^ithin the community.
Over the year, there has been an increase in educational and related programming
E)r juveniles. One new program introduced at Metchosin Camp during the year is the
■Work Experience and Life Skill Development (WELD) program designed to provide
I pre-employment and life skills training. The Branch continues to provide youth
offender programs that encourage positive self-development through the challenge of
the environment. These wilderness programs are designed to allow young offenders to
develop their physical capabilities and to acquire a measure of self-confidence and self-
awareness that will allow more positive reintegration with the community.
There has also been an increase over the year in the work programs offered by the
Branch in co-operation with other ministries, agencies or industries. Of particular
importance in these interministerial work opportunities is the Salmonid Enhancement
Program, a joint Federal/Provincial program to rehabilitate west coast fish stocks, and
the various programs of the Ministry of Forests. Brittain River Camp, a new facility at
Jervis Inlet, was opened this year. It is a joint project with the Ministry of Forests which
provides the work and the supervision for the juvenile tree spacing project at the site.
I An ongoing and major concern of the Branch is the condition of its older facilities.
The Branch's older facilities, such as the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
and the Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre, do not meet United Nations
minimum standards. The Five Year Plan for Branch facilities is a response to this
concern. Completion of the renovations at Prince George Regional Correctional Centre
during the year was part of the realization of this goal. Construction of the Vancouver
Pjetrial Services Centre began during the year and this facility should be completed and
ready for use in late 1982. It will alleviate the chronic overcrowding in the Lower
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre and meet, in part, the long-standing goal of
providing separate facilities for remanded and sentenced individuals in the province.
I In closing, I wish to acknowledge and thank all those individuals, both staff and
private citizens, who were involved over the year with the work of the Corrections
Branch. Without the dedicated involvement of staff and the generous participation of
volunteers, the programs of the Branch could not be effective.
Respectfully submitted,
BERNARD G. ROBINSON
Commissioner
  CONTENTS
Page
ffietter from the Attorney General  iii
■Letter from the Commissioner  iv
CORRECTIONS BRANCH ORGANIZATION AND SERVICES  1
ACTIVITY REPORTS
SECURE CUSTODIAL FACILITIES: Activity Description  2
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre (VIRCC)  2
Victoria Youth Detention Centre (VYDC)  3
Vancouver Region
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre (LMRCC)  4
Lakeside Correctional Centre for Women  5
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre (WYDC)  6
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Security Unit  6
Interior Region
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre (KRCC)  7
Northern Region
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre (PGRCC)  8
OPEN FACILITIES: Activity Description  10
Vancouver Island Region
Lakeview Youth Containment Camp  11
Jordan River Camp  11
North Fraser Region
Twin Maples Correctional Centre  12
New Haven Correctional Centre  13
Alouette River Correctional Centre (ARCC)  14
Pine Ridge Camp  15
Stave Lake Camp  16
Boulder Bay Camp  16
South Fraser Region
Mount Thurston Camp  17
Ford Mountain Camp  18
Centre Creek Camp  18
Interior Region
Rayleigh Farm Camp  19
Bear Creek Camp  20
Northern Region
Hutda Lake Camp  21
 Page!
COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAMS: Activity Description   22
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Community Correctional Centre  22|
Snowdon Work Release Unit  23 J
New Directions Program  241
Work Experience and Life Skills Development (WELD)  241
Metchosin Camp  25
Contracted Services  25 J
Vancouver Region
Porteau Cove Camp  261
Burnaby Community Correctional Centre  271
Lynda Williams Community Correctional Centre  271
Marpole Community Correctional Centre  27jl
Detention and Recreation Extension Program (DARE)  28]
Contracted Services  28
North Fraser Region
Southview Place Community Correctional Centre  29i<
Brittain River Camp  30l
Contracted Services  3(M
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Community Correctional Centre   30
Developing Attitudes, Skills, and Habits Programs (DASH)  3TI
Contracted Services ,w...   3l|
Interior Region
Kamloops Community Correctional Centre   321
Contracted Services   33
Northern Region
Terrace Community Correctional Centre   3||
Contracted Services   34
PROBATION AND FAMILY SERVICES: Activity Description   3a
Vancouver Island Region   37
Vancouver Region   38
North Fraser Region  4OT
South Fraser Region  41
Interior Region  z^m
Northern Region  4ffl
MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES: Activity Description  46
Resource Analysis Section  46
Program Analysis and Evaluation  4ffl
Information Services  47
 IV
Page
Staff Development  48
Provincial Classification  49
Psychological Services  50
Religious Programs  50
Medical Services  51
INSPECTION AND STANDARDS DIVISION: Activity Description and
Report  53
APPENDIX'A"  54
Figure 1—Corrections Branch Organizational Chart, 1980  54
Figure 2—Corrections Branch Administrative Regions  55
Table 1—Budgetary Expenditures for Fiscal Year, 1980-81  56
Table 2—Comparison of Average Count and Capacity for Adult Institutions by Level of Security, 1980-81  57
Table 3—Adult Institutions, Percent of Admissions and Average Count by
Selected Categories  58
Table 4—Corrections Branch Profile of Client Community Services
Population  60
Table 5—Disposition of Adults on Admission, 1980-81  62
Tkble 6—Corrections Branch Establishment by Activity  62
Figure 3—Definitions  63
Table 7—Corrections Branch Establishment by Region, Fiscal Year,
1980-81  64
Table 8—Temporary Absence Statistics  65
APPENDIX "B"  66
Corrections Branch Regions, Districts, Facilities and Offices
  Corrections Branch
)rganization and Services
ithui the broad framework of the
ministration of justice in the Province of
itish Columbia, the Commissioner of
rrections is responsible to the Attorney
neral for the management and operation of
I Corrections Branch. The Branch delivers
;/ide range of correctional programs,
jluding Family Court Counselling Services,
,ult and Juvenile Probation, Community
Ivice and Attendance Programs, Juvenile
jtimfions, Adult Institutions for remanded
isons and for offenders serving sentences
ciptotwo years.
1: legislative mandate of the Corrections
Inch is derived from the B.C. Correction
A the B.C. Family Relations Act, and the
Juvenile Delinquents Act, Parole Act, Prison
Reformatories Act, and Criminal Code of
Canada.
The operations of the Corrections Branch are
managed through six regions. Each region
(see Figure 1) is headed by a Regional
Director and within each region Corrections
programs are the specific responsibility of
District Directors and Local Directors
responsible for each institution or service
delivery unit. In addition, there are nine
support sections within the Commissioner's
Office in Victoria under the direction of the
Deputy Commissioner. A complete list of all
of the components of the Branch can be
found in the Appendix on page 66.
 Secure Custodial Facilities: Activity Description
Secure custodial facilities are one aspect of
the provincial corrections system. The
Branch maintains a total of eight secure
institutiuons — six for adults and two for
youths. These facilities are located in major
population centres of the province and have a
total maximum capacity of 954 for adults and
81 for juvenile offenders.
The Corrections Branch provides secure
institutions for two reasons: to provide secure
custody for adults accused of a criminal
offence and remanded in custody to await
trial or sentence; and to provide the necessary
secure facilities for adults sentenced to a
maximum term of not more than two years
less a day.
The youth centres meet similar needs for
juveniles, both boys and girls below the age
of 17.
All offenders and juveniles who are an escape
risk and those who are medically unfit for
open facilities are detained in separate secure
institutions, which also provide special
facilities for the protective custody of
individuals and for those who may be a
danger to others. Individuals sentenced to a
term of imprisonment in a secure regional
correctional institution remain until either
their sentence expires, they are released on
parole, or they qualify for transfer to an open
facility or another type of program.
Although secure custody and imprisonment
are the main functions of secure institutions,
it is the policy of the Corrections Branch to
effect that custody or imprisonment in as
humane and constructive a manner as
possible. A wide range of programs and
activities, including work, recreation,
education, life skills and spiritual
development, help remanded and sentenced
individuals make the most positive and
constructive use of their time.
There are five secure institutions for adult
males: the Vancouver Island Regional
Correctional Centre (VIRCC) in VictoM
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre (LMRCC) in Burnaby, the ChiM
Security Unit, the Kamloops Regional™
Correctional Centre (KRCC), and the Pri
George Regional Correctional Centre M
(PGRCC).
Male offenders are classified and
subsequently placed in an appropriate ■
institution depending on the severity of tl
crime and the characteristics of the offm
When secure custody beyond the resoffl
the closest regional centre is required^H
offenders can be transferred to the Lowei
Mainland Regional Correctional CentiS
which has special secure facilities to met
these needs. Classifications and transferal
arranged on a case-by-case basis.
The Lakeside Correctional Centre for
Women, on the grounds of LMRCC in
Burnaby, is the secure facility for aduM
female offenders and women remanded i
custody to await trial.
The two secure facilities for juveniles art
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre (\®j
in Burnaby and the Victoria Youth Deters
Centre (VYDC).
The reports which follow detail the priore
activities and achievements of the provin
eight secure facilities from April 1, 1980iV
March 31, 1981.
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Regional Correction
Centre (VIRCC)
The central priority of the Vancouver mt&
Regional Correctional Centre is to mamti
the capability to provide secure custody a
circumstances where adult offenders hav
been remanded in custody to the centre t
await trial. In fulfilling its principal func
 jtivity Reports	
llffltre must provide secure and safe
pdy for all offenders assigned to the
iity and ensure that those on remand are
iable when required by the courts.
ii though the facility has been identified
jinarily a secure remand centre since
;:, it continues to receive sentenced
,i5ers as well. This puts considerable
pffis on the staff and facilities of the
■e. To alleviate this problem, staff
lipts to classify and transfer sentenced
rars to another appropriate facility
i.n five to seven days of sentence.
Iffiion to its prime function, Vancouver
Id Regional Correctional Centre must
maintain the capacity to enforce and
tap temporary secure custody for
mals assigned to programs at the
ouver Island Community Correctional
:e and Jordan River Camp.
^Ber Island Regional Correctional
e has seen a continued trend over the
ive years to increased use. In 1980-81,
idly average count reached 123. In a
itjaoriginally designed to accommodate a
cited maximum of 60, this level of
ilafion places enormous pressures on the
i:and physical facility. Related to such a
slevel of utilization is the high volume of
rssion/discharge activity that totalled
fi inmate movements in 1980-81 — 4397
ti:s and 4280 discharges.
!te overcrowding and budget constraints,
Eagre strives to provide a high standard
ce and to ensure that remanded offenders
viccess to community resources and
pit systems.
;<isBa background of chronic pressure, it
|jmte to the staff that the record of
roe availability for Court remains very
glFor the third consecutive year, the
n also maintained its escape-free record.
«ria Youth Detention Centre (VYDC)
oia Youth Detention Centre is one of
ill® institutions in the province
o'ling secure custody for delinquent
youths under the age of 17 remanded in
custody to await trial, and youths committed
to containment.
Its key function is to ensure the availability of
court-remanded and pre-court detained
youths for court appearances. The centre
attempts to fulfil this mandate by providing a
facility and level of care that both protects
society from the delinquent behaviour of
youths and provides the opportunity for the
constructive use of time spent in custody.
In addition to its secure custodial role for
remanded youths, Victoria Youth Detention
Centre must carry out an assessment and
classification process for all sentenced youths
admitted to the facility. The centre provides
individualized programming for youths
received at the facility through the
assignment to each one of a case manager or
counsellor. In consultation with other
professionals, the case manager develops an
overall program and release plan for the
youth.
Although the centre completed some much-
needed renovations in 1979, security
remained a concern in 1980-81. Security
inadequacies with fire doors and locks
resulted in an unusually high number of
escapes from the building. In an attempt to
resolve these difficulties, further renovations
were undertaken in February and March of
1981 at the cost of $304,000. Both fire safety
and overall security were upgraded with the
installation of new doors and windows and
improvements in the physical layout of the
building.
The centre provides ten single and six double
rooms with separate leisure activity space.
There is also an academic classroom, an arts
and crafts classroom and a woodworking
shop. Both indoor and outdoor recreation
facilities are provided.
The successful utilization of the centre's
resources and facilities depends in large
measure on the volunteer program supervised
by a full-time volunteer co-ordinator staff
position. Volunteers participate in all aspects
of the centre's programs, including
 educational services, recreational programs,
leisure-time activities and even receptionist
services. In 1980-81, the centre averaged 118
volunteers providing 2355 hours per month of
voluntary service.
Educational services are provided by a full-
time teacher funded by the Ministry of
Education and supervised by the Victoria
School District. There is a contracted arts and
crafts teacher and there are plans to staff the
wood-working shop with a full-time
industrial arts teacher. Chaplaincy services
are now provided under a new agreement by
the Youth Guidance Section of Youth for
Christ. The centre also has part-time
psychological services provided by a clinical
psychologist, and full-time medical services
provided by a nurse.
During the time the centre was closed for
renovations in the early spring, Metchosin
Camp and the Victoria City Police cells
provided temporary short-term secure
facilities. A program called House Arrest was
initiated at that time to provide a community
alternative to placing youths on remand in
custody. In the House Arrest Program the
court places the youth on a strict court order
which spells out the conditions by which the
youth must abide. The project staff visits the
youth's residence or contacts parents (or
guardians) by telephone several times a day
to ensure the youth is abiding by the rules
determined by the court. If the rules are
broken, the youth will be placed in custody
to appear before the court within 24 hours.
From February 13 to March 31, while the
renovations were in progress, 22 youths were
placed on House Arrest. Only three were
returned to custody for failure to abide by the
rules.
Vancouver Region
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre (LMRCC)
The Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre is the largest of the secure institutions,
providing accommodation for 512 adult 8
offenders. Included in this total are facij
to receive special cases from other regiq
such as escape risks, individuals requffl
protective custody and difficult offencfl
The centre's hospital provides medicaTl
services, dental services, psychiatric seil
and assistance to the physically disablec
It is the main function of the centre to
provide secure custody and related servij
for both adult males remanded in custoc j
pending court appearances and those
sentenced to secure imprisonment. DS
limitations related to the age and
inadequacies of the physical plant, stam
members are constantly striving to proaj
effective security and a wider range of \
educational and recreational prograirJBI
facilities for the population, which in
1980-81, averaged very close to capacita
502.44 per day.
During the year, security was upgraded i
the installation of two new guard toweSI
South Wing, the maximum security uffll
spite of serious inadequacies, the Oentn
Control Unit succeeded in providing ■
segregation as required throughout thc*j
Security fencing was upgraded in the™'
area, the South Wing yards and Westgal
"B" fields.
For 1980-81, security procedures were ||
intensified and security upgraded. A
disturbance in the East Wing in June wat
only major incident during fiscal 1980-f
There were two minor disturbances in S[
Wing. Both were satisfactorily resolvS
The program in Westgate "B" has been
generally successful. There has been an
increase in both the quality and quanti™
activities which emphasize the conshtraj
use of time through work, social prograi
and recreation to prepare the inmates foi
return to an open facility or for re-entry:
the community on Temporary Absence?!;
Parole. In particular, the programs focusi
training inmates for work in the commut
on release. Notable successes include tf
Sheet Metal Shop program which this yr
won the contract with the Ministry of
 Itivity Reports
|flirtation and Highways to provide
Broad sign blanks. The shop also offered
Juction and supervision in welding. A
IHbay, where the yard was prepared and
lahtled by a work gang, was another
i ess.
Wing houses 180, including 19
ffive custody units. To meet its priorities
fading safe custody, exercise and useful
:, the East Wing makes good use of
Educational and recreational programs,
i an offender is classified to the East
Ijftie is interviewed for job placement
issigned to the most suitable activity. A
j;ular objective for the East Wing is to
Ice the number of inmate/inmate assaults.
Wing usually receives the camp
[ments who are being returned from an
t setting because they are unsuitable for
Iffiironment.
feral renovations at the centre included the
Ilea installation by the B.C. Buildings
Boration of new plumbing in Westgate
I Other improvements included the
jnting of Westgate "B" and roof repairs.
5 paving planned for 1980 as part of the
ying roads and grounds maintenance was
KDjppleted and will have to be
seduled for next year.
$ Services, the Business Office and the
ards Office all implemented
lpvements in procedures, including the
elation of a computer for the Records
M
It ugh Westgate "B" was able to report an
npvement in the range and quality of
:eams, facilities and activities, and the
ICssful utilization of programs, other units
it centre remain in dire need of expanded
leies and programs. The West Wing
DCs 178 inmates but lacks the space for
Ksary recreational activities. In the South
fii, where over 80% of the population of
men awaiting trial, the facilities are
&pessly outdated and inadequate.
Mams are very limited and the restricted
Igfflaits activities as well. This maximum
501 ty unit will be phased out once the
Stiuver Pretrial Centre is ready in late
Nevertheless, despite continuous pressures on
an outdated facility, the centre continues to
provide specialized secure custodial services
to the entire province and to meet the
immediate secure custody and containment
needs of the Lower Mainland area.
Lakeside Correctional Centre
Consistent with the recommendations of the
1978 Report of the Royal Commission on the
Incarceration of Female Offenders, Lakeside
Correctional Centre has undergone a number
of significant renovations and improvements
since that time. As the only secure custodial
facility for women in the province, Lakeside
continued, in 1980-81, to upgrade its
facilities and programs and to extend a wider
range of services to its inmates.
In 1980-81, the main objectives included
providing more varied and meaningful
programs, increasing the decision-making
role of the centre's population and reducing
inmate/inmate assaults and escapes.
The security record at the centre is much
improved. In 1980-81, there were no escapes
and no major disturbances. Staff assaults,
inmate/inmate assaults and segregation
requirements were also substantially reduced.
The daily average count was also reduced
from 63 in 1979 to 50 in 1980-81.
Consistent with the implementation of
standards, there were several improvements
to the facility in 1980-81. These included the
installation of telephones in each unit,
allowing unrestricted access for toll-free
dialing; washers and dryers in each living
unit; and an emergency communication
system. Other physical improvements
included the renovation and decoration of the
visiting and administration areas; the design
and installation of segregation doors; and the
repainting of the interior. A dining-room was
provided with the space renovation in the
Remand Unit. New plumbing and new
exterior lighting were installed at the centre.
Despite improvements in both programs and
facilities, there remain some unresolved
 Activity Reports
difficulties. The necessity of housing the
psychiatric problems in inadequate facilities
and the delays in receipt of Orders-in-Council
for commitment are significant problems that
require attention. There is also a need to
provide better facilities to house inmates in
protective custody and a requirement to
separate women waiting trial and those
sentenced.
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre
(WYDC)
The Willingdon Youth Detention Centre,
located in Burnaby, is one of the two secure
custodial facilities for youths, both boys and
girls below the age of 17, remanded in
custody or sentenced to containment for
delinquent behaviour.
For a number of years, the centre has
suffered from chronic overcrowding which
puts undue pressures on both the facility and
the staff. This overcrowding is reflected in an
annual increase in the daily average count
from 44 in 1978, to 59 in 1979 and 63.4 in
fiscal 1980-81. There is concern that the
debilitating effects of this overcrowding are
causing a deterioration in program quality
and the unavoidable violation of standards in
matters such as sleeping space per youth.
It is hoped that the newly devised
contingency plan for overcrowding and
Treasury Board's approval for ten new beds
will alleviate the situation.
As in previous years, the program focus at
the centre is educational, with the Burnaby
School Board supporting educational
initiatives taken at Willingdon. It is a credit
to the educational staff and volunteers that
the quality of these programs remains high,
despite the pressures of inadequate space or
staff. A study completed this year by the
Ministry of Education confirmed the urgent
requirement for more classroom space as a
prerequisite for additional staff.
The Volunteer Program at the centre, coordinated largely through the office of the
chaplain, involved more than 300 volunteers
in religious, recreational and tutorial
activities in 1980-81. The chaplain's wo: J
also includes counselling and religiouSI
services. This diverse and extensive projjl
requires a more adequate Chaplaincy Ceil
and consideration should be given to 1
providing one in any expansion plans.B
A full range of medical, dental and
psychiatric services are offered to the ceoj
population through the well-equipped ora
clinic, supplemented by the specializeaB
facilities at the Lower Mainland Regions!!
Correctional Centre hospital and througl ;J
referrals to specialists. The centre's clin h
recently applied for accreditation.
An inevitable result of continued ovef^O
crowding in 1980-81, was the requiremM
increase staff time beyond that allocated v
in the budget. The resulting cost overruns
$144,000.
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Security Unit
This small 25-bed secure unit fills a unite
and diverse role for the North and Soutl
Fraser Regions.
The Unit has three principal functionsSB
provides secure backup and segregation J
capability for inmates presenting
management problems from North and .im
Fraser open facilities; it is a receptionfflB
. classification centre for inmates sentemB
from the South Fraser Region or inmate I
sentenced in other court locations and
classified to the Chilliwack Forest CaimH
the unit also provides highly individuanfl
assessment and case management planngi
for inmates presenting classification ancu
management problems to Provincial
Classification. An offender may stay at e
centre for a period of 30 to 60 days, affJ
which he is classified and transferred tiij^
appropriate facility.
Once the offender is assessed and has bsu
classified, transfer usually takes place \thjj
 pity Reports	
lours. Case management has been
i^lly successful in contributing to pre-
R planning and has served as a valuable
wt to promote good staff/inmate
Irons.
ffiers admitted to the Chilliwack Forest
15s are first classified at the unit and
Rmrnediately at one of the camps. Also
Hed in the 25 bed facility are five units
dding protective custody and five for
Ration purposes for disciplinary
iffims from throughout the two regions.
ffie the prime functions of the unit are to
sify and transfer offenders to more
opriate settings and to return problem
ates to open settings as soon as possible,
|S are limited educational and recreational
rams at the centre. These limitations act
iMfacentive for a returnee to improve his
jiyjour and be allowed to return to open
ngs quickly; however, increased staff and
itional facilities would allow for an
msion of programs, removing the
SSty of facilities serving more than one
I tion and the overlap of staff
Mibilities, as is the present case.
irior Region
itiloops Regional Correctional Centre
KCC)
bKamloops Regional Correctional Centre
tides secure facilities for both remanded
Sentenced offenders from the Interior
S)n. The centre accommodates 86,
|ding 26 remand beds in a separate
|ing. When security requirements exceed
fivel provided at the centre, offenders are
liferred to either the Prince George
|)nal Correctional Centre or the Lower
feland Regional Correctional Centre.
ifnain priorities of Kamloops Regional
Actional Centre are full inmate
(I! ipation in both work programs and
fflams for personal development, and staff
m ipation in constructive staff training
programs. Specifically, the centre aims to
involve all sentenced inmates in worthwhile
work programs and all remand inmates in
leisure time activities. To help achieve this,
all sentenced inmates are classified to job
placements within three days of initial arrival
at the centre; and a wide variety of leisure
activities are offered.
The emphasis on transferring more suitable
offenders to the forest camps and the
Community Correctional Centre has resulted
in a number of problems, requiring the
upgrading of security and supervision at
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre.
Incidents this year included a brief major
disturbance that caused approximately
$10,000 damage. Six inmates were
subsequently charged in outside courts for
their parts in the disturbance. Such situations
are being addressed by closer supervision,
the implementation of a life skills course and
additional counselling.
Security upgrading this year included
improvements to all security fences and the
training and qualification testing of 25 staff in
the use of firearms. An alarm system was
installed in the Program Office to enhance
security there.
Improvements at the centre this year were
mainly in the area of recreational facilities
and equipment.
To meet its objective of providing a wide
variety of worthwhile work programs for
sentenced inmates the centre offers
employment in groundswork, forestry-related
projects and agricultural harvesting.
Some work projects in forestry and parks
were discontinued this year because of either
the lack of suitability of the work or the
location, or the nature of the sentenced
offenders who would be involved in the
project. Successful projects included the
maintenance of the grounds at the centre, the
manufacture of fence stakes for the Ministry
of Forests and the harvesting of farm produce
at Tranquille Farm, a nearby facility for
mentally handicapped adults.
1
 llmvity Reports
The centre has experienced increased
overcrowding in recent years and there has
been a lack of remand space in the Region. In
response to these situations, it is significant
to note that a new centre for Kamloops has
been approved within the Five-Year
Corrections Plan for facilities.
Northern Region
Prince George Regional Correctional
Centre (PGRCC)
The Prince George Regional Correctional
Centre is the second largest secure institution
for adult male offenders in the Province with
a maximum capacity of 140. As well as
serving the needs of the Northern Region, it
provides facilities for inmates from Kamloops
who require more security than Kamloops
Regional Correctional Centre can provide.
Consistent with the overall Branch priorities
for secure institutions, long-standing
priorities of the Prince George Regional
Correctional Centre include the classification
of inmates to the lowest security setting
possible, and the phasing out of the use of
firearms as a security measure in the
sentenced exercise yard. This latter goal was
met in part by the installation of fencing with
a metal hood-style top.
Although the centre continues to carry out
classifications in accordance with its priority
regarding security, the results are not always
positive. There were two major disturbances
at the centre this year; however, neither was
violent. Permitting sentenced offenders to
participate in open programs as an alternative
to containment in a secure institution
increases the pressure for effective programs
in an open setting. The results of this are
covered elsewhere in this report in the
assessment of the programs at Northern
Region s Hutda Lake Camp.
During the last fiscal year, major renovations
were initiated at the centre. The long period
of disruption demanded tolerance and cooperation from staff and imates alike, and
both responded well. The new additional
ready for occupancy in September 1980;
however, delays in shipping vital equipS
resulted in a postponement in the opennl
the new kitchen facilities until late sprOT
1981. The kitchen staff is to be comma
for the delivery of good meals from their,
cramped facilities in a temporary trailew
the renovations were completed.
Despite the provision of potatoes and otf
vegetables by the farm on-site, food cSI
remained over budget. It is anticipateomi
food costs will continue to rise next yiWl
Improvements at the centre this year iffflj
a new air-conditioning system, new gyir
facilities, improved medical facilitiesm
renovated visiting areas. A great deal ha:
been accomplished over the last two yS
improve the environment at the centre, in
the renovation to the actual living uniff
finished, Prince George Regional
Correctional Centre will be one of the bit
equipped in the Province.
This year, the expansion of the educatm j
program into the protective custody anc
remand units was accomplished. One oh
most positive aspects of programs at w
centre is the three-day treatment-oriera
Alcohol Awareness program that is hM
monthly on-site.
Part of the challenge over the last year Ii
centre has been to implement a new ■"
organizational structure. This has reqiiiif
flexibility from staff and long hours of o
operation with the Post Review TeamjflJ
the effort put into the new organizatioia
the centre's staff, it was gratifying thatiel
Post Review Team chose to use the Pri:ff
George Regional Correctional Central]
as the provincial guide.
Staff changes included the implementiaSi
the long-awaited annual shift schedulenjt
drastic reduction in the number of staf
rotated anually between the Main Cen^
Hutda Lake Camp. This latter decisioi
followed an in-house evaluation of the
—
 ition system. Other staff-related
{Rations included the introduction of the
i?eh's new uniform and the successful
:gration of female staff as supervisors.
Bgreatest challenges for the Prince George
;ional Correctional Centre in 1981-82 will
be to achieve a stable, effective organization;
to make full use of the renovated facilities
and expanded programs; to minimize the
negative effects of assigning the lowest
possible security classification to offenders
from the Region; and to rigorously monitor
expenses to remain within the budget.
J
 Open Facilities: Activity Description
As an alternative to secure institutions for
those inmates classified as suitable, the
Branch provides open facilities throughout
the province. These are minimum security
centres, semi-isolated forest camps, farms or
ranches that provide suitable settings for
work programs and personal development.
To be judged acceptable for participation in
an open setting, convicted adult offenders
and juveniles must conform to the following
profile: they must not be an escape risk; they
must pose no danger to the community; and
they must be physically fit enough to take
part in rigorous work and training. These
determinations can be made internally by the
classification officers who recommend
transfer once an offender or juvenile has been
initially admitted to a secure institution.
The projects carried out at open facilities
include forest management and maintenance,
sawmill operation, wilderness survival, crop
raising, animal husbandry and salmon
rehabilitation. Some of these are operated
with other provincial ministries, such as the
Ministry of Forests and the Ministry of
Environment, or federal departments, such as
Environment Canada. It has proven to be a
mutually beneficial partnership with the
added bonus, in some cases, of providing
services to a community and generating
better understanding and goodwill for the
Branch and its programs.
For participants in open programs who
qualify, temporary leave from the facility can
be provided through the Temporary Absence
Program mostly for purposes of training or
employment. This compensates to an extent
for the limited access most open facilities
have to community resources as a result of
their somewhat isolated locations.
The prime focus in an open setting is on
valuable work experience. The effectiveness
of work programs and their impact on
10
participants is constantly monitored an|
changes are introduced as required. Th9
Branch must also ensure that standardsB
accommodation and related amenities ar
maintained and that facilities are provicB
leisure-time activities. In a setting whert
effective work programs are the prioriS
however, accommodation and recreatiojj
facilities and programs are usually quia
basic. Leisure activities encouraged at a
facilities include hobbies, correspondeml
courses, sports, games and participatiSI
community groups such as the John hSI
and Elizabeth Fry societies, and Alcoho
Anonymous.
Although the participants in open prog|j
are classified as not dangerous, a majial
concern is the number who walk away f j
these settings or go absent without leaffil
an ongoing challenge to the Branch to en
that those in open settings remain in the
facility for the duration of their sentejOTl
without having to resort to security mese
associated with secure institutions.
The Branch maintains a total of 15 opei<
facilities with a maximum capacity of 71:
As with the secure institutions, there an
separate facilities for adult males and
females, and others for juveniles.
There are 11 facilities for adult male
offenders — Jordan River Camp, AldaB
River Correctional Centre, New Haven
Correctional Centre, Stave Lake Campft
Ridge Camp, Ford Mountain Camp, Mid
Thurston Camp, Bear Creek Camp. RaSl
Farm, Hutda Lake Camp and Bouldeal
Camp.
The only facility for adult female offeiS
Twin Maples Correctional Centre. Julfl
boys are accommodated at Centre Crejl
Camp and both boys and girls particiBB
programs at Lakeview Youth Contains H
Camp. Young men aged 17 to 22 partial
at Boulder Bay Camp.
1)
 tivity Reports
icouver Island Region
;eview Youth Containment Camp
affe 1979, Lakeview Camp was
Sated an open facility youth
lament centre. Since that time its
rity has been to provide juveniles
Hfltted to containment at Lakeview with a
filed lifestyle that will promote personal
rth, educational skills and healthy work
t£ This program is aimed at the
essful reintegration of youths into the
^ffiity.
camp has an active educational program
edby two on-site teachers. In 1980, 19
(meceived their grade 10 diplomas, one
.(ral his grade 12 diploma and 20 others
Iffltially upgraded their education
wing admission to Lakeview.
ugh co-operation with the Ministry of
its, the camp has set up a small sawmill
ialvage operation which provides on-the-
I raining in woods safety, and chain saw
Inill operation. The project has produced
[us wood products, including large
| titles of cedar stakes for use in the
iMVfinistrv of Forests nursery.
61980 wilderness program trained 25
jisfin such skills as first aid, search and
e, and wilderness survival. A new
B'am involving volunteers provided cross-
Stry ski patrols at Mount Washington and
luted on all weekends that the ski area
Bipen to the public. Through the
(jsory Board, the camp identified and
8;d out several community volunteer
Sets. These included lawn and garden
Btenance and firewood cutting, services
Irtnmlar use to old age pensioners who
'9i otherwise have done without.
Sigh the year the Release Co-ordinator at
gimp successfully arranged home or
ffliurjity pre-release visits for all eligible
s? ints prior to their being screened for
as release. This program is significant in
teiccessful reintegration of youths into the
Nliunity.
Jordan River Camp
Located west of Jordan River on the
southwest coast of Vancouver Island, Jordan
River Camp houses a maximum of 40 adult
males. It is an isolated location with only
essential facilities, including Atco trailers
which provide accommodation. The focus at
Jordan River Camp is on inmate participation
in work programs and training, and the
fostering of personal development. The camp
encourages participation in a variety of work
projects and through the case management
process prepares inmates for re-entry into the
community as a productive member of the
work force.
For the sixth consecutive year, the camp
participated in the joint federal-provincial
Salmonid Enhancement Program. This work
project was initiated to increase the depleted
fish stocks in the Sooke, Jordan River and
Port Renfrew areas. It consists of the removal
of debris from streams, clearing logjams,
slashing of trails and assembly of spawning
boxes. An estimated 12 800 hours were
invested this year in these activities. The
camp also worked year-round for the
Ministry of Highways and Transportation
clearing growth along the West Coast Road
as a safety measure for the public. Work for
the Ministry of Forests included the clearing
of fire access roads. The alderwood salvaged
from this operation was donated as firewood
to old age pensioners and needy families.
Other community service projects included
work in Sooke at the Brownie camp where
hazardous trees were cleared and the water
line was installed below ground. The work
crews also put in many weeks of work at the
Girl Guide camp, located in the Shirley
District, where tree clearing and the
construction and maintenance of buildings
were the main jobs.
Although the work programs are varied and
worthwhile, the camp would benefit from the
development of a recreational and leisure-
time program and the provision of
recreational facilities, particularly a
gymnasium. These additions would help to
establish and maintain morale and would
11
 Activity Reports
reinforce the development of positive
behaviour habits. The camp must also
anticipate the replacement of Atco trailers
which were installed in 1975 and have a lifespan of only five years. As in most open
facilities, the camp extends access to
community resources through the granting of
Temporary Absence passes to eligible
inmates. In 1980-81, there were 198
applications for work release, 114 of which
were approved, and 60 applications for short-
term passes, of which 29 were granted.
North Fraser Region
Twin Maples Correctional Centre
Twin Maples Correctional Centre, located at
Maple Ridge, is a unique open facility
providing accommodation for 43 adult female
offenders. In 1980-81, most residents of Twin
Maples were transfers from Lakeside
Correctional Centre for Women. Others were
sentenced directly from the courts. The
centre also provides programs under a bilateral transfer agreement for federal
offenders serving long-term sentences. Twin
Maples also has special facilities for women
requiring protective custody, and through a
unique program, facilities for pregnant
women and mothers with children under two
years of age.
Twin Maples is a valuable alternative to
Lakeside. The focus at the centre is on
constructive, community-oriented programs
designed to prepare the women for gradual
re-entry into the community. These programs
teach alcohol awareness, self-awareness and
the building of self-confidence, as well as
providing meaningful training and experience
in several areas of work. Other aspects of
Twin Maples that contribute to its success are
the lack of physical confinement, the natural
staff rapport and involved case management,
that is, the step-by-step planning of an
individual's program and the planning for her
release. Women respond positively to these
programs and opportunities.
12
Work programs at the centre are diver^
and include a farm on-site, offering an •
interesting range of projects to in vol vern
women. Ruskin Farm, part of the Twifflj
Maples facility, continues to provide egi
pork and beef to the Region's forest cot
and other correctional institutions. Alffl
the herd of beef cattle was reduced
considerably to 45 head and the chick^i
were also reduced to about 1 000, stocB
increase next year. Farm work involves
women in chores, caring for and feedm|
animals, and maintaining buildings and
equipment.
The Tailor Shop is housed in the newesl
building in the complex, providing bri{|
spacious quarters for work and trainiirel
also a valuable earning process for [
participants who are paid for what thej I
produce. The Tailor Shop continues tal
provide garments for other facilities wis
the Corrections Branch and, by contral
through the Purchasing Commission, te
government agencies. Items produceml
institutional clothing, towels, pyjamral
drapes. Other work options at the cents
indoor and outdoor maintenance, anffll
the garden, greenhouse or kitchen. Bej
the centre is readily accessible to a wi
range of learning institutions, Twin MB
offers not only educational upgrading «fr
a number of specialized courses and tin
such as child care, hairdressing, flor^B
arranging, dog grooming, and trainiSB
non-traditional jobs, the latter offered*
Pacific Vocational Institute. The Tempis
Absence Program allows offenders toijS
the centre to attend educational prognta
the community. Placements in botnS
community day-care and the element™
school program as teachers' aides prc$p
further opportunities for developmenjBj
In addition to these educational
opportunities, Twin Maples offers a vfe;
range of self-help programs and a divsjtj
recreational and leisure-time activities*
designed to meet the goal of positive 9<8
development.
 aMaples is the only facility in North
ffia where a pregnant woman or a
SSiwith a child under two is allowed to
|jie child with her in the correctional
BBSupport for the program is
iSpread and it is recognized as an
Ktant advance in correctional attitudes.
e 1980, the Twin Maples on-site day-care
ity has provided care for up to five
Iren. The day-care program, which has
ved outstanding community support,
ides service to the community and paid
loyment to the participants, as well as
[iding day-care facilities for the mothers
I are resident at the centre. To adequately
I the day-care program, long-term
l|aers are trained in child care/early
I hood education at nearby Douglas
J'ge
Infinity service is an important part of
Iteactivity while at Twin Maples. One
|:ular program is the volunteer
raration in care of the infirm at the
idge Hospital.
i Maples fills an important role in the
fictional process. Future alternative or
Bided use could give consideration to
aig the centre the focal point for
lefronal institutes' industry or a
D>rary facility for women in crisis in the
iwnitv.
eHaven Correctional Centre
eflaven Correctional Centre, located in
juby, offers a minimum security facility
use up to 40 young male offenders from
£7 to 22. The focus at the centre is on the
Piion of suitable training to prepare the
W, men for re-entry into the community.
Sitional upgrading and positive personal
aipment are other aspects of New
aVs overall program.
eHaven continues to apply its successful
'Pich to social responsibility training
|?;h four successive levels of
I'pment. Any offender admitted to New
W progresses through the four levels to
eventual release or parole. Advancement to
each successive level is dependent on
successful completion of the preceding level.
The junior level stresses personal
responsibility and includes neatness,
cleanliness and punctuality. Level Two, the
intermediate level, broadens the focus to
include responsibility to the group. It is
referred to as the environmental
responsibility level. The senior level, or
service responsibility level, involves
leadership in the New Haven community. The
final stage of the program is the Temporary
Absence level, which demands responsibilitv
in the outside community, through work or
educational release. Levels One to Three are
each a minimum of one month; the final level
is of an indeterminate length according to the
terms of parole or the end of a sentence.
The routine at New Haven involves residents
in a full working day. Evenings are used for
educational upgrading, recreation and
physical exercise, and club activities. The
work program at the centre emphasizes work-
habit training to make participants more
readily employable on release. Work options
range from woodworking and metalworking
to farmwork, janitorial tasks or work in the
laundry. All trainees participate in kitchen
work on a rotational shift.
In 1980-81, the Woodworking Shop
constructed furniture.and other wood items
which were provided as a community service
to local ball clubs, the Twin Maples Child
Care Program, the Brookswood Lions Club,
Langley Church and Porteau Camp. The
small farm maintained on-site provided
market garden produce for use at the centre.
Educational upgrading includes remedial
work at the Grades 1 to 6 levels at the centre,
correspondence courses or day release to
attend classes in the community. Eleven
trainees took educational upgrading in the
community during 1980-81. Seven
successfully completed the work: four
completed Grade 10, one finished Grade 12,
and two were successful in both Grade 10
and Grade 12 courses.
13
Ui
 Activity Reports
The health and medical needs of residents at
New Haven are met through a wide range of
in-house services supplemented by referrals
to specialists in the community and access to
community hospitals or the hospital at the
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre for diagnosis, emergency and acute
medical services.
Security is maintained at the centre through
head counts and adherence to a strict daily
routine resulting in few walkaways in
1980-81. Although almost 1 500 Temporary
Absence passes were granted through the
year, not one trainee became unlawfully at
large while on Temporary Absence.
Routine maintenance by B.C. Buildings
Corporation at the centre during the year
included some internal and external
repainting, the reroofing of two farm outbuildings and renovations to the kitchen and
dining-room facilities to conform with health
regulation standards. The sports field was
rebuilt and returfed. Once the work on the
drainage system is completed next year, the
field will be available for increased use.
Community interaction is achieved at New
Haven through such programs as Invisible
Bars which involves New Haven trainees and
probationers referred from the Burnaby and
Coquitlam courts. Volunteer participation of
residents in work with the handicapped at
Pearson Hospital was successful in the three
months the program was active. It presently
requires a new volunteer sponsor in order to
continue. Courses in public speaking and
related activities sponsored by Toastmasters
Club 59 provided valuable training and social
interaction.
The average length of stay at New Haven is
now 7.15 months compared with a stay of
11.50 months in 1975. Related to this
reduced length of stay is the parole program
which is judged to be 70% successful based
on the number of paroles granted and the
number revoked. This success rate compares
favourably with the 1975 success rate of 71%
when trainees were kept almost twice as long
at New Haven before parole was granted.
14
Alouette River Correctional Centre]
(ARCC)
Alouette River Correctional Centre, loca
in Maple Ridge, continues to function
primarily as a specialized alcohol-orienJe
treatment centre for adult male offenders
Other chemical dependencies are consfilf
in the self-awareness and training progra
the centre offers.
The main facility at Alouette River  j
Correctional Centre houses 119. There a
also specialized Security Unit and Recef
Centre facilities that house an additioffi
for a maximum capability of 153.
Almost 50% of the residents at the centri
referred from the courts which recognizi
specialized function of the centre. Offers
are also classified and transferred to the
centre from other correctional insitutEE
because of behaviour problems related t
alcohol or chemical dependency, makin
almost 90% of the centre's population
individuals with problems related to alcic
abuse.
The orientation and self-awareness progir
at the centre consist mainly of providmj
residents with a full range of informatic
about alcohol and chemical dependency
their effects on bodily and mental funcin
Initial training is followed by an introditit
to the Alcoholics Anonymous program f
individuals are judged to be ready, thejai
participate in the community Alcoholic
Anonymous program attending sessions
a sponsor. The community involvemen
through sponsorship and the centre's
affiliation with Alcoholics Anonymousn t
community are most significant aspectifq
overall program at Alouette River. 1
The specialized units at the centre are ed
secure back-up facilities for severeaj
disciplinary problems from open faciliiSs:
elsewhere in the Region and for the
temporary holding of direct court tefeiisi
who arrive at the centre with no secur'
clearance. The latter requirement resu frc
the centre's participation in the North 'as?
Alternate Entry Project where offende are
 iJBty Reports
it ced directly to a centre like Alouette
<n rather than to the Lower Mainland
gial Correctional Centre for
is icajion and possible transfer. The
fiJrotion this year of the direct court entry
I] by the main courts in Vancouver
iud in fewer unclassified offenders
ing at the centre.
aiffirity Unit/Reception Centre facilities
Ihxntre were in the process of being
giled this year. Construction and related
rations, including general security and
3 ;urity upgrading, should be completed
tl summer of 1981. During the year,
Miction also began on the Activity
nl. When this new building is completed
thfall of 1981, it will house conference
duaiselling rooms, a light industry
jgm, a hobby shop and a gymnasium,
afeioility will provide the long-awaited
dii nal space required for the expansion of
)gms, particularly recreational and
su-tune activities.
; pt of the training offered at the centre,
;reas been an Impaired Drivers'
lucion Program. Originally designed for
fenrs charged with impaired driving, the
ur-.y program became compulsory for all
iidts at the centre in October, 1980.
leintre also offers a variety of worthwhile
>Tlsrojects. Residents can participate in
ojes ranging from outdoor parks
ainiance and grounds work to kitchen
?tknd training, or the recent Salmonid
taement Program. Requirements for this
arkroject included a building, fish tanks
id tish fence. The Salmonid Enhancement
ogm, a joint federal-provincial effort,
ovi:s meaningful work designed to
ere; the fish stocks in the South Alouette
iveind other area rivers. Park work at the
imrnity level involved constructing
?rseick riding trails for the Maple Ridge
irksnd Recreation. At the provincial level,
invved cleaning, maintaining and
Wig existing campsites or clearing for
Pfeflilnew campsites for the Ministry of
and Parks and Housing. A crew involved
HPXnds maintenance at the centre cleared
an area for a new soccer field and assisted
with the construction required for the centre's
role in the Salmonid Enhancement Program.
Other community work projects provided a
new sun deck for the Problem Centre and
cleared 13 acres at Ruskin Farm (Twin
Maples) to prepare the ground for a
Christmas tree nursery. Cleaning crews
worked daily at the centre. Other community
interaction occurs when local sports teams
participate in events with teams from the
centre.
Pine Ridge Camp
Pine Ridge Camp, located near Haney, has
been operating for 25 years. The camp
accommodates 52 and serves as a facility for
repeat offenders who do not fit into any
specialized open program. The staff at Pine
Ridge use case management to help the
offenders plan their camp work and self-
development programs to prepare them for
re-entry into the community.
Pine Ridge operates a number of its own
work programs or can arrange through work
release for inmates to participate in programs
at such locations as Camp Point and Brittain
River. Effective work programs at the camp
include logging and the operation of a
sawmill, a joint undertaking with the
Ministry of Forests, for whom the camp also
produces stakes. In 1980-81, stake
production totalled 22 000 and man-days
invested in the sawmill operation totalled
21 258. All equipment in the logging and
sawmill operation was well maintained
through the year and in operational order at
the end of fiscal 1980-81. The camp also
operated work programs for the Ministry of
Lands, Parks and Housing and for the
Ministry of Human Resources.
Proximity to the campus of the Pacific
Vocational Institute permits Temporary
Absence passes to be used for the purposes of
educational and vocational upgrading. Six
residents attended Pacific Vocational Institute
for vocational training and eight for
educational upgrading.
15
 It is an ongoing priority to reduce the number
of walkaways from the camp. This is
accomplished in part by involving residents
in work and leisure-time activities.
Community inter-relations at the camp are
fostered through a number of community
service projects, sports activities and
participation in self-help groups that involve
members of the community, such as M2, a
program where one volunteer works closely
with one inmate, and Alcoholics
Anonymous.
Stave Lake Camp
This open facility was constructed in 1971 on
the shores of Stave Lake, about 32 km east of
Haney. It provides work placement for up to
55 men, primarily first offenders. Since its
inception, Stave Lake Camp has been a
successful inter-ministerial and private sector
venture, jointly funded by the Corrections
Branch, the Ministry of Forests, the Ministry
of Lands, Parks and Housing, the Mission
Tree Farm and B.C. Hydro.
The camp exists to provide a work program
to clear the Stave Lake basin and to prepare it
for development as a recreational area. The
program is particularly good training for reentry since all activities are geared to match
industrial standards and the staff at the camp
are all experienced in the use of logging
equipment and tools.
In 1980-81, 69 985 man-hours resulted in 15
hectares cleared, 4 hectares of debris yarded
and piled, 12 hectares burned and 10 hectares
groomed and winnowed with a hired Cat.
From this, 1 332 cords of firewood were
supplied to the Ministry of Lands, Parks and
Housing and 25 000 b.f.m. of sawlogs sent to
the Pine Ridge Camp sawmill. Fence posts,
shakes and cedar blocks were also produced
as a result of the clearing project.
Stave Lake Camp promotes effective case
management as preparation for re-entry and
encourages educational upgrading and
vocational training at Pacific Vocational
Institute. The camp also screens and sfH
suitable workers for Brittain River CafflB
Camp Point and Pine Ridge Camp.
The Arts and Crafts and Recreation bfl
enable inmates to use leisure time for he
and indoor games. The sports field is
available for outdoor activities. InmatS
interact with the community through ■
voluntary participation in camp self-hffl
groups, sports activities and communW
service projects.
Boulder Bay Camp
Boulder Bay Camp is an open facilibM
designed to accommodate 51 young me
aged 17 to 22 in a wilderness setting lc-1
at the north end of Alouette Lake and is
accessible only by boat. The work anc|i
training program, operated as a high ifi
wilderness activity, is best suited to
physically-fit first offenders serving sen
of nine to 15 months.
The staff attempts to promote good beb
through exposing young men to a vigou
training program of hard manual work
combined with special wilderness cours
and experiences. It stresses physical!
conditioning, self-sufficiency and teaire
The camp operates year-round with a rv
four-month program starting each mon
Young men are involved in intensive p I
training, first aid, water safety, rappellg
search and rescue, fire-fighting, heavy«
and community service, as covered in e
four stages of development.
General improvements to the site in HO
involved an upgrading of both safety al
security with the installation of lightin
around the camp and on the access rata!
Alouette Lake. Construction of a new o
shed should be completed by May 19!
Living units and kitchen facilities werilf
improved. The addition of a porch am
exterior door provided access to the fit 9
stretcher. Other safety-minded improvW
were the numbering of key camp locam
and the development of a fire safety^:?]
 Aivity Reports
jsor those stations to ensure that all camp
Sties are being maintained to fire safety
itaards.
tiiew landing craft acquired by the camp
larear proved useful in search and rescue
Siffons on the lake and was more efficient
transporting loads and providing access
ifi;Sie lakeshore for firewood cutting. The
m;ement of canoes this year with
luinum ones minimized maintenance
,;o parties were involved in a lake clearing
ro:t at the north end of Alouette Lake,
fifing with a yarder, several hectares of
rilvere piled ready for burning. Wood
wction in 1980-81 was 716 cords of
BJQd, 36 squares of shakes and 400 shake
M
tomunity service projects included the
e|ng and preparation of campsites at 20
Kreek on Harrison Lake for the
lutry of Forests; building adventure
la;"ounds at Pitt Meadows; clearing bike
aiat Fern Crescent Day Care Centre; and
Island clearing and equipment building
'Q:ts.
heoung mens' training proved effective in
swil search and rescue activities at the
ar during the year. Assistance was
xl'led by staff and youths to stranded
Ms and to canoeists in difficulties in a
initorm and to lost hikers and an injured
lil
kping with the priority to provide staff
IB'g and to assist with the upgrading of
afikills, courses were organized at the
iraand staff also participated in
llSronal development off-site. Among the
Dils at the camp was a fire suppression
>m sponsored by the Ministry of Forests
l»ch five staff members took part.
ffliunity support and interest in Boulder
Samp is increasing. In 1980-81, 428
ISs--attended graduations and several
(Individuals and groups toured the
til;.
South Fraser Region
Mount Thurston Camp
Mount Thurston Camp, one of the three
Chilliwack Forest Camps, accommodates 50
men. Priorities at the camp are to use
counselling and case management techniques
for effective sentence planning and to provide
meaningful work programs and training to
prepare inmates for re-entry into the
community.
Camp maintenance and the upgrading of
facilities are ongoing features of the camp
work program. During 1980-81, the living
units were renovated to provide individual
rooms for inmates. The long-anticipated
addition to the camp church was also
completed. The Religious Activities Centre
was formally opened during the year and
became the focal point for visits by local
church groups and other related activities.
As part of the maintenance of the camp,
offenders may be involved in tasks in the
kitchen, laundry or grounds, or they can
provide cleaning services to the camp. The
carpentry shop and vehicle maintenance shop
provide work and basic vocational training.
The camp butcher shop supplied beef to all
the Chilliwack Forest Camps from cattle
raised on the open facility farms in other
Regions. For offenders who work in the
butcher shop, basic training is provided in
butchering and preparing meat.
Central to the work program at the camp are
the activities associated with the Ministry of
Forests' sawmill on-site. Continuous forest-
related work includes logging; sawmill and
planermill operation; thinning, pruning and
stand improvement; fire suppression; lumber
production; stake cutting; and recreational
site maintenance and construction. During
the year, 311 079 b.f.m. of lumber were cut
and distributed to Corrections Branch
facilities and the Forest Service. A total of
150 000 cedar stakes were cut and 7 589
seedling pallets produced. It required 444
man days of logging to keep the mill supplied
with logs.
17
 Activity Reports
Although some educational upgrading and
basic vocational training is available at the
camp, during 1980-81 most offenders
interested in upgrading their educational level
or skills attended community college courses
on Temporary Absence passes. If specialized
training is required, an eligible offender may
be transferred to another facility closer to the
institution providing the training.
The camp participated in several community
service projects during the year, including the
construction of a playground and the
development of a picnic site. Other
community-related activities were sports
events, visits from church groups and the
volunteer sponsorship of camp residents to
local Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.
Weekly family visits were arranged at a
community facility to assist those families
who lacked transportation to get to the camp.
Camp visits were arranged if required. Other
leisure-time activities included a wide range
of hobbies, mostly related to woodworking.
The daily average count at Mount Thurston
Camp was 39. With the introduction of the
Alternate Entry Program, inmates with more
diversified backgrounds have been classified
to the forest camps.
It is anticipated that the Impaired Drivers'
Education Program will be introduced next
year as part of the training offered at the
camp.
Ford Mountain Camp
Ford Mountain Camp provides
accommodation for 50 men who continue to
be housed in temporary trailer facilities set up
following the destruction of the camp
buildings in a 1978 fire. The priority of the
camp is to teach skills related to meaningful
forestry-oriented work. Case management is
utilized for effective sentence planning and
the preparation of inmates for re-entry into
the community.
The camp rebuilding program began in
October 1980 and is scheduled for
completion in August 1981. Activities at the
18
camp were somewhat limited because oRb
lack of facilities during the constructidni
Although the living quarters were not«|
completed, an addition to the gymnasffil
was finished during the year. The weigfiti
room and meeting-room in the additiolM
well used during leisure time. ConstrueBJ
activities obstructed the view and causec
some difficulties for camp security. TfBI
should be readily resolved when the BJ
construction is complete and the temp®|
trailers are removed. Educational actiml
the camp are minimal; however, durinal
year two inmates were granted Tempora:
Absence passes for purposes of educag|
upgrading.
In keeping with the camp's priority, all -ir
is forestry-related. Inmates are trainee!
use of power saws and other forestry-ffill
work skills. Work includes juvenile tree
spacing (thinning), site preparation, con
picking, tree planting and brushing. EliB
inmates can obtain work releases to ean<
with the B.C. Forest Service.
The camp's major active community s§l
through the year was providing firewooio
old age pensioners and the disabled. Th
service was co-ordinated by the chaplai
Other work crews helped with cemeteia
clean-ups. Community involvement wa
evident in the active sports program wiltl
camp baseball and soccer teams partffin
in games with community teams. Chun
groups and the Chilliwack church baselll
league also visited the camp for sports ei
and group sessions.
Centre Creek Youth Camp
Centre Creek Youth Detention CentreiM
open juvenile containment facility for ;ul
aged 14 to 17. Located in a wilderness
setting 40 kilometres southeast of Chitift
the centre saw its first full year of operip
in 1979.
The 30-bed facility received most of it M
1980-81 residents as transfers fromB
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre in
 w
Pity Reports	
iaby. In addition, one youth was
iferred from the Victoria Youth Detention
BBhjiitially, youths admitted to the
:e are confined to activities within its
ilaries; gradually, community options in
work and recreation become available to
ffts at the centre.
fSais at Centre Creek is on participation
HRctive and meaningful activities
ped to improve personal skills.
liffts also participate in release planning
the day of their arrival. An important
:t of the self-development program is
ational upgrading. For boys who have
jmnpleted Grade 10, participation in the
bmic program is compulsory for a
I num of one and one half hours a day,
I;lays a week. The work program at the
Ifincludes maintaining and upgrading
Iliabilities and also participating in
^^raty service projects. Community
|r:e may also include job placement in the
|ffiity. During 1980-81, staff and
2| at Centre Creek completed a
Ibishment of the living quarters, the
uition building and the classroom
ding. It was felt that if residents were
wed in the refurbishment, they would
& a higher priority on maintaining the
edes. Other work at the centre included
irletion of the ball field started in 1979
fcirther upgrading of the recreation
aies and grounds.
i attempt to better co-ordinate the
ifng introduction of new activities at the
'ii:, Senior Youth Supervisors were placed
xirge of each of the four aspects of the
I'lj program — In-camp Work;
Bnmity Work; In-camp Recreation; and
H^ity Recreation. The remaining
jjDnent — School — remained the
liability of contracted teachers from the
hiwack School Board. Other management
laes included the implementation of a
iWd shift schedule as a response to
wing levels of utilization at the centre,
neivised schedule will require some
"fbnal modification next year to be
nnetely successful.
In 1980-81, utilization dropped to 75% from
90% during 1979, and at times during the
year, it was as low as 50%. The average daily
count was 15.7 and the average length of stay
was seven and a half months.
Centre Creek is in the process of re-defining
its program and priorities. This should be
completed in 1981-82.
In a year of consolidation of programs and
staff, as well as program adjustment
following the recommendations of the Post
Review Team, the centre was successful in
reducing its estimated operating budget by
$115,000.
Interior Region
Rayleigh Farm Camp
Rayleigh Farm Camp, located near
Kamloops, accommodates 30 men. The
priorities of the camp are to provide a
worthwhile work program and opportunities
for positive personal development in
preparation for re-entry into the community.
Integral to the work program is the operation
and maintenance of the farm. Inmates at the
camp worked six days a week on farm-related
tasks and also carried out renovations and
improvements to farm buildings and
equipment. A number of safety-minded
improvements were also completed during
the year 1980-81, including work on the
irrigation system, the fencing around the
corrals and the gas and diesel fuel tanks.
A long-term project initiated in 1980-81 was
the replacement of perimeter fencing. A start
was also made on upgrading the camp's
irrigation system. During the year, $65,000
was allocated for the standardization of
pumping stations and electrical systems.
Although camp facilities were upgraded
during 1979, the new water supply system
and the newly installed alarm system required
additional work.
Farm production aims to meet the annual
requirement of the Region's Main Centre and
19
 Activity Reports
affiliated units for beef and potatoes, and to
supply vegetables as required to the camp. In
both cases during 1980-81, production
exceeded requirements; as a result, 18 head
of beef were shipped to the Chilliwack
Forestry Camps and excess vegetables were
frozen to meet off-season needs. Hay
production at the camp was double
expectations.
In addition to farm-related tasks, the camp
inmates also participated in tree-spacing and
clearing and burning debris at Heffley Lake;
clearing ski runs at Todd Mountain; clearing
a site after selective logging at Knuff Lake;
and tree clearing at Tranquille School. In a
worthwhile community service project,
inmates provided assistance on a YM/YWCA
swimming program for mentally-handicapped
children. They also helped with a park
cleanup program in the community.
An important and effective philosophy
maintained at the camp during the year was
to extend responsibility to inmates who
demonstrated that they could handle it
effectively. Disruptive inmates were
disciplined or transferred to more secure
institutions.
Recreation and leisure-time facilities are
well-used at the camp and there is an ongoing
program of community interaction which
includes participation in Alcoholics
Anonymous. The Native Indian Crafts
program was discontinued during the year as
a result of internal problems at the Indian
Friendship centre and the termination of
program staff.
Bear Creek Camp
Bear Creek Camp is located near Clearwater
and accommodates 30 men. The camp was
constructed last year to replace Clearwater
Forest Camp. The new facility has the
advantage of being conveniently located near
the camp's sawmill. Although a new sawmill
was purchased late in 1980, it did not become
operational in the reporting year.
20
The Bear Creek Camp work program is!
centred on the forestry operation. All inmi
are engaged in some form of work, either I
inside or outside the institution. The work It
offers inmates the opportunity to acquire I
some of the basic skills required for
employment in the forest industry on relejd
During the year, a variety of wood produi*
were produced for various government™
ministries and the community. A total of d
19 378 man-hours were expended in thai
forestry work program.
The camp also provides pasture in the
summer months for 20 head of cattle. A &|
of 256 man-hours were spent caring for«r
cattle and working on irrigation, fertilffll
and fence repairs.
Inmates were also involved in a varietjra
community service projects, such as cleiiif
lawn maintenance, sports field constructs
and ski hill development, which provifflr
total of 4 792 man-hours of work.
The case management process is used I
extensively at Bear Creek Camp, with eai
resident planning his sentence and posEi I
release activities in considerable detaiMl
the assistance of staff.
The Temporary Absence Program alloSII
camp residents to leave the facility fomflj
purposes or educational upgrading. IiT
1980-81, there were 60 applications fora
for fire suppression duty, of which 54 wej
approved. For employment, education a' I
other purposes, there were 71 applicawB
which 31 were approved.
The new camp facilities provided a supeon
leisure-time program. Still required are i
hobby room and completion of the camps
field. In addition to using the recreation*'
facilities in the camp, residents took pain
fishing and hiking trips and a variety of
sports in competition with communitayffl
Both Alcoholics Anonymous and the Jci
Howard Society provided services toffll
camp.
 ijthern Region
ida Lake Camp
Sited in an isolated area outside Prince
jrge, the Hutda Lake Camp
"mmodates 50 men. This open facility
Hides inmates with the opportunity to
leiop forestry-related skills through work
leceamp's sawmill or in forestry-related
performed outside the camp on
iporary Absence passes. Work outside the
a? includes lookout work or fire
uression during the fire season. During
$1-81, a new sawmill burner, purchased by
flffiiistry of Forests was installed at the
a 3.
[ilia Lake suffered a serious setback in its
Drams and activities following a major
Bent in August 1980 when three violent
lutes assaulted four staff members,
fcusly injuring one who required
Bitalization. The three now face charges
ii tside courts. The riot and fire that
alwed the assault completely destroyed the
administration building and caused
approximately $100,000 damage to the camp.
The replacement of lost equipment cost about
$30,000 and disrupted budget management
for 1980-81.
Although a new gymnasium for the camp was
completed during the year and ready for use,
full utilization was not possible as adjacent
rooms had to be used as temporary
administrative offices.
Staff difficulties during the year, related to
staff rotations between Main Centre and
Hutda Lake Camp, were eased with a
reduction in the number of staff rotated
annually.
Next year will be important as Hutda Lake
Camp works to achieve a level of stability
and an expansion of programs and activities.
A possible new direction in the Region will
be to implement an increase in direct entry to
the camp. With the regional emphasis on
minimizing security classifications, the
challenge will be to use the classification
process effectively and to ensure appropriate
decision making.
21
1
 Activity Reports
Community-Based Programs: Activity Description
Community-based programs are another more
recently developed aspect of the provincial
corrections system. They include community
correctional centres for adults; attendance
programs, both activity-oriented and
educational, mostly for juvenile delinquents;
and a number of contracted services for both
juvenile delinquents and adults.
Community correctional centre programs
allow for gradual re-entry of inmates by
phasing them back into the community
through job placement or training in the
community and through participation in
community service projects.
To be eligible for admission to a community
correctional centre, individuals must pose no
threat to the community. They must be
responsible and motivated and be able to
benefit from the educational or vocational
training programs and opportunities available
in the community.
Offenders can be admitted to a community
correctional centre directly from the courts or
on a Temporary Absence pass from a more
secure facility. The centre may also house
those serving an intermittent sentence. For
the most part, those who are resident in a
community correctional centre go out on a
daily basis for work or training. They also
have responsibilities at the centre and
opportunities for recreation and leisure-time
activities.
Attendance programs for youths and young
adults may be administered by the Branch or
run privately. They focus primarily on
educational and activity programs designed to
foster confidence, self-discipline and a sense
of responsibility. These programs also
include remedial education and life skills
training.
Contracted services provide a variety of
separate residential and non-residential
programs for juvenile and adult offenders.
Youth services include remand homes and
22
programs specializing in educational, I
recreational and life skills activities. Sor ,
these occur in the community, sometimirt
with a sponsor. Adult services include aiH
treatment, counselling, and housing wjnS
employed.
Throughout the province, a variety of
education programs are contracted. The:i|
operated both in the community and win
some correctional institutions.
Community Service Orders involving yit|
and adults on probation are often
administered as part of the contractedBj
services. The community becomes invce«
through the supervision of an individua B
carrying out a Community Service Ord ii
Such an order might be in the form of'«
to be performed by the offender as   1
compensation to a victim or to the
community for damages incurred wherafl
offence or delinquent act was commiraBJ
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Community
Correctional Centre
The Vancouver Island Community   j
Correctional Centre is located in VictoDpl
close to the Vancouver Island RegionSB
Correctional Centre. It can accommod«n|
to 25 men; about 20 residents and otngflj
serving intermittent sentences. Facilitiiati
the centre are now old and require conaitt
maintenance, making the existing facilfe
increasingly costly and impractical. fl|
Replacement is a priority.
The centre's prime function is to provisoi
opportunities for selected offenders tqjpg
to community life. The centre aims at3(l
participation by residents in employ ml^i
training opportunities or in volunteer IRSS
This is achieved by insisting that all ni(Hi
at the centre obtain work or training vl*p
two weeks of their arrival.
 jdition to providing educational and
[oyment opportunities, the centre also
illes a number of other services through
!|Se management process. These include
Bmt for drug and alcohol problems;
Conciliation and financial management
iselling; and family counselling. The
■e also implements pre-parole testing
z the Temporary Absence Program in
|H;tion with B.C. Parole. The process
Ives placing the inmate in the community
imoint supervision prior to parole for
ation purposes.
fflmity Service Order projects provide
tes with the opportunity to compensate
[immunity or individuals for damages.
b concept of restitution is central to the
norary Absence Program of the facility.
cig 1980-81, residents at the centre
i:ipated in several community service
[ ets contributing a total of 23 61.5
aifeer hours to the community. Projects
ded participation in the Salmonid
incement Program and work in such
leons as Shawnigan Lake, Swan Lake,
fesmwood Community Centre and the
55 Road Hospital.
uig 1980-81, utilization of the centre
'Sged 28.27 residents on a daily basis.
n the Native Indian Friendship Centre
tsxome directly involved with native
>ce on the Temporary Absence Program,
|alkaways of B.C. Indians have stopped.
f: 22 inmates at the centre who appeared
sj: the Parole Board, 21 were granted
|j! during the year.
acdon Work Release Unit
Jjjjlon Work Release Unit is located near
Sfjbell River. It provides to suitable
ig;s the opportunity to participate in
Hies of the Community and Isolated
mRelease programs. Most residents at
S: it are on Temporary Absence from
Miecure facilities in the Region. The unit
p|:ts as a facility for intermittent
Jces and provides backup facilities for
*| ers from the Camp Point program
awaiting transfer back to the Vancouver
Island Regional Correctional Centre in
Victoria.
The unit develops and maintains a wide range
of programs designed to permit gradual reentry into the community. Programs and
activities at Snowdon encourage participants
to exercise personal decision-making in areas
such as work, recreation, religious
development, education and life skills.
Most residents on job placement work within
the forest industry in isolated camps in the
northern portion of Vancouver Island. To
facilitate this job placement, the unit
develops and maintains rapport with several
logging agencies on the north end of
Vancouver Island and in the Campbell River
area.
In addition to paid employment, Snowdon
residents also participate in community
service projects. During 1980-81, volunteer
work included providing firewood to seniors
in the Campbell River area and assisting
seniors with small garden projects and snow
removal. Residents from Snowdon assisted
several service clubs with beach and roadside
cleanups and Salmon Festival activities.
Together with life skills training and on-the-
job employment training, Snowdon also
allows residents to participate in educational
upgrading programs. During 1980-81, three
inmates wrote and passed their General
Education Diploma exams. Others enrolled in
correspondence courses.
All residents at the unit became involved in
various recreation activities and several
community groups visited Snowdon to
participate in sports events.
Although Snowdon can accommodate 30 or
more men, maximum utilization was not
realized during the year; the average daily
count was 20.7. Although all facilities at the
unit are serviceable, the living quarters
require considerable repair and the
administrative office needs an addition to
provide an office, two protective custody
units and a staff room.
23
 New Directions Program
The New Directions Program shares facilities
with other Victoria attendance programs in
the Coldharbour Road Centre. The program
serves the courts and probation services of
the Greater Victoria area by providing
educational upgrading, life skills instruction,
outdoor recreation and work experience for
juveniles and young adults, both male and
female.
Individuals referred to the New Directions
Program may be on probation or having
social or academic problems in the regular
school system. They can be court-ordered to
attend the program or referred through the
Probation Office by teachers, social workers
or parents.
The priorities of the program are to reduce
the recidivism rate of probationers; to
increase self-esteem, self-confidence and
understanding of self and others; to improve
social skills and physical health of
participants; and to upgrade educational
skills for return to the regular school system
or entry to the work force.
The educational aspect of the New Directions
Program is provided on week-days from 9:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. from September to June. It
is an individualized program geared to meet
the particular needs of each participant. In
September 1980, an all new teaching staff
began working for New Directions,
producing some program changes.
Consideration is being given to making the
program more goal-oriented.
In addition to the educational program,
participants become involved in community
service projects and special outings. In
1980-81, community service projects
included participants acting as tutors at
Sundance Elementary School and at the
Victor Street School for mentally-
handicapped children, and raising money for
the Terry Fox Fund.
Special outings are designed to increase
awareness and appreciation of constructive
leisure-time activities. During the year, these
24
outings included rock-climbing with ona
the instructors from Metchosin Camp; a
camping and boat trip to Parker Island; ail
hiking trips to Mount Finlayson.
The house that provides facilities for tha
Directions Program has been designated i
heritage building. During 1980-81, theffl
were minor improvements to the housejBI
mostly upgrading and renovations reqiH
meet Health and Safety requirements. I
Renovations and upgrading will continra
year.
In 1980-81, 37 youths and young adulH
enrolled in the New Directions ProgranS
average length of stay was 37 days. TH
completing educational upgrading reft™
regular or alternative schools, participffl
work experience or joined the regular w
force, among other activities.
Work Experience and Life Skills
Development (WELD) Program
A new program was added to the VicfSl
based attendance programs this year. It I
operations on May 20, 1980. Based in <c
farmhouse on the Metchosin Camp proj]
about 19 kilometres outside Victoria, m
Work Experience and Life Skills
Development (WELD) Program is desija
to provide pre-employment and life skil
training to male juvenile and young adul
probationers with the goal of reducin™
recidivism rate. Attendance at the three
month course is either required by the tn
of a Probation Order or may be voluntas
A main objective of the program is tofjffl
that each participant is gainfully empKji
completion of the course. The program!)
teaches basic life skills and good work ja
habits, as well as assisting participants!M
job search and interview techniques, ai
resume and job application preparation
The focus of the first phase of the ccfflH
self-evaluation. Phase two concentraraO
pre-apprentice skills and job training. »
performance is acceptable, a participfflB]
seek alternative employment at this sta:.
 iivity Reports	
| ould be a paying job, further
■iffinal, vocational training or
Ijtation in a more advanced Branch
Iim. For those who continue or return to
[ ELD program, phase three concentrates
Iji placement.
glance, specific performance and
Res are monitored and rewarded to a
jxium of $2.50 per day, paid from a fund
I shed through payment to participants
lor contracted services. Such contract
B'or private individuals included yard
Bp, demolition of old buildings and
Btfbrk. Program participants also
kned maintenance tasks on the
bosin Camp property, including falling
Hjees; road and drainage work; and
lc:epairs.
;r: 1980-81, 31 participants took part in
HiLD program.
bosin Camp
le. -week Metchosin Camp program,
lited on weekends only, is designed to
[J; delinquent youths from their
iinities during high crime periods.
imp is located on 45 hectares in
jlisin, about 19 kilometres outside
pa. By improving physical health and
■likills through a program of physical
Bflntal challenge, and increasing self-
it, self-confidence and understanding of
ifjl others, Metchosin Camp aims to
liuith'e recidivism rate of participating
foners, both male and female juveniles
wjjuig adults. Participants are court-
feji to attend the program at Metchosin
W|is a condition of their Probation.
[siting offers suitable conditions for the
I'M activities of the camp's program,
nfig physical fitness, first aid, map and
his reading, rock climbing and
•RSng, canoeing and water safety, and
lltyind rescue. In-camp training is
JW with wilderness outings, such as
ifjfmbing, canoe trips and alpine
?econs.
The camp requires 100% participation in its
wide variety of program activities.
Participants are involved in both in-camp and
field experiences. These, in turn, involve
camp and community and include small
vessel navigation and operation, marine
safety training and ocean survival. The latter
activities centre on the Freedom Found Boat
Program which is an integral part of the
Metchosin Camp program.
The motor vessel Freedom Found, a 56-foot
former Ministry of Forests coastal patrol
boat, can accommodate up to 10 passengers.
During 1980-81, there were 45 training trips
involving 396 passengers. Most of these trips
were Metchosin Camp outings. The program
places youths in an unfamiliar setting where
teamwork and consistent, positive behaviour
towards others and towards property is
necessary for both their safety and survival.
During 1980-81, 80 young probationers
attended Metchosin Camp. Of this number,
67 successfully completed the program. In
addition to 11 regular groups, Metchosin
Camp operated a special program during the
summer months to service the North Island
District and also offered one course for
younger offenders, aged 11 to 13.
The total replacement of buildings and
facilities at Metchosin Camp is a branch
priority; however, this building project is
currently being held in abeyance while
consideration is given to relocating the
program.
Contracted Services
In addition to Branch initiatives, a variety of
contracted services are used in the Vancouver
Island Region to broaden the range of
programs and services of the Branch and to
meet specific needs when the resources or
personnel are not available within the
Ministry. Contracted services also provide
valuable, and sometimes less costly,
alternatives to Branch services.
To provide alternative accommodation for
juvenile and adult offenders, community-
25
 Activity Reports
-
,~IU.J
based residential centres (CBRC's) operate
throughout the Region. Some are private
agencies providing accommodation for
groups; others are operated by private
citizens and offer accommodation for one or
two persons.
As a less costly alternative to secure remand
beds in the Region, a number of
communities, including Port McNeill and
Campbell River, contract for private juvenile
remand bed space. During the year, there has
been an increase in the provision of private
remand bed space throughout the Region.
Campbell River contracted its Community
Service Order Program on a part-time basis
to offset the increasing workload of the
Probation Officer. As an alternative to the
classroom situation, this community also
experimented with an individualized
approach to the Impaired Drivers' Education
Program in co-operation with the Drug and
Alcohol Commission. Regular Impaired
Drivers' Education Courses were offered in
Courtenay, Port Alberni and Nanaimo,
among other centres.
In the northern part of the Island, contracted
services include the Courtenay Alternate
School, the Diversion and Juvenile
Accountability Board operated by the
Nanaimo John Howard Society, Campbell
River Youth Outreach and the Port Alberni
Attendance Program.
In the southern part of the Island, the
Community Diversion Centre in Victoria is a
contracted service which focuses on
counselling and activity programs as an
alternative to the conventional formal justice
system response for those convicted of minor
offences.
The Duncan Volunteer Society was
contracted to operate the Community Service
Order Program in that community and the
Native Courtworker Program continued to
operate successfully, despite a reduction in
staff. A contract with the Lake Cowichan
Activity and Resource Centre resulted in the
26
integration of a number of services, inffl
the activity centre, a streetworker, alterris
education and job search assistance.
Vancouver Region
Porteau Cove Camp
Porteau Cove Camp is located in a setrH
isolated setting about 56 kilometres noS
Vancouver on Howe Sound. The campH
a range of wilderness-oriented progranfii
juvenile males aged 13 to 17 who are len
to the Porteau Cove Camp programs o:ffia|
order. Although operated by the VanccSi
Region, the camp takes referrals from ad
the Province. The programs are desigr |jl
develop physical fitness, self-confideiffl
self-awareness, and to help participanltaq
realize their potential. During 1980-8Ufa
juvenile males graduated from the fou
courses operated by Porteau Cove Carfel
During the summer from June 28 to J /da
1980, the Search and Leadership Trailed
(SALT) Course operated at the camp. tur<
juveniles graduated from the demandi;:2J
day course which stresses physical train
through daily running and swimming iHsi
canoeing, and projects involving haip
physical labour. Despite poor weatheihil
course was successfully completed™
The winter weekend program operatefa
September through May for a mininBBB
nine weeks. The focus is on daily ph;^
training leading to wilderness traininj:&
well as on work projects, including bi§r
construction. The weekend program n
designed to keep juveniles out of the ttfjt
high crime periods. It provides constate
activity to help participants realize tjiiR
potential.
The mid-week program is open to jupijt
males from the Metro Vancouver arei£t
the Learn How to Work Program, thsbs/i
week course focuses on life skills an#>t!;
preparation training combined with ]$&■
training. Participants learn basic j
employment-related skills, such as
 pty Reports
BRg a job application, handling an
iew and understanding employer
flfpns. Participants also take part in
unity service projects and assist with
Wrministerial programs as the
nid Enhancement Project.
mrth Porteau Cove Camp program is a
:ecamp operated at Lewis Lake outside
■River. Referrals are received from the
imEeninsuIa, Powell River, Texada
|, and Courtenay and Comox on
laver Island. Activities in this 11-week
Iffie similar to other Porteau Cove
Wgrams where physical activity is
d and participants are encouraged to
ffieir potential. As a community
swoject, the participants at Lewis
fitextensive work on a wilderness
jite for the public.
I; the year, major improvements were
i out on the Porteau Cove Camp
l;s, including the addition of a food
it area, a walk-in cooler, extra floor-
Bioid a fireplace. These renovations
cihe camp more practical for large
I and more functional in the winter
l)y Community Correctional Centre
gmaby Community Correctional
Bis located in recently renovated
I; in Burnaby. It accommodates 20
during 1980-81, 296 men participated
Srogram at the centre. Of this total,
f hem found work, many with the
m of Forests. Residents at the centre
wkpart in educational upgrading
nc Williams Community Correctional
fcjltida Williams Community
Bfional Centre is located in central
h?'ver. This unique institution in the
pons system—the only provincial
Pjjaity correctional centre for women—
lis accommodation for up to 10
9V Priorities at the centre include job
eeitnt, educational upgrading and
vocational training. The main goal is 100%
inmate participation in volunteer projects
within the community.
During 1980-81, 75 women took part in
programs at the centre, some as transfers
from Lakeside and Twin Maples, others as
direct referrals from the courts.
Marpole Community Correctional Centre
The Marpole Community Correctional
Centre, located in the Marpole District of
south Vancouver, provides accommodation
for up to 18 men. The centre provides
training and programs to prepare residents for
effective reintegration with the community.
The major focus of the centre's program is to
place residents in jobs as quickly as possible
after admission. Despite difficulties with the
labour market, the centre has been
remarkably successful in realizing this goal.
Of the 207 persons admitted to the centre in
1980-81, 196 of them were successfully
employed. Most of them found work within
seven to ten days after arrival. Job placement
counselling is available for those people who
lack basic skills in job application and
interview techniques.
Beginning in March 1980, the centre began
to receive admissions on direct entry from the
courts. Although this demands extra
paperwork for centre staff, the new procedure
for admissions has been integrated smoothly
with the administration of the centre.
Transfers are still received from other
institutions in the region.
In addition to the individualized counselling
that is central to the program at the centre,
the Impaired Drivers' Education Course is
offered whenever it is needed, depending on
the resident population and their reasons for
being at the centre. Because many residents
at the centre have alcohol-related problems,
there was increased surveillance for
contraband through the year. More effective
enforcement of the centre's strict discipline
code during the year resulted in a reduction
in the number of transfers back to the Lower
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre.
27
-L—
 Activity Reports
Residents at the centre during the year were
also involved in educational upgrading or
vocational training. They were encouraged to
take part in community recreation activities
and sports. Generally a positive relationship
was maintained with the community and
there was good acceptance of the centre and
its programs.
Detention and Recreation Extension
(DARE) Program
The Detention and Recreation Extension
Program is a Probation Supervision Program
for juvenile boys and girls who live in the
urban areas of Vancouver, North Vancouver
and West Vancouver. The program provides
an alternative to incarceration of juveniles
and allows them to remain in the community
while receiving the supervision and support
of a Probation Officer.
The program priority is to provide intensive
supervision for a selected number of
individuals who are on probation. This is
achieved by assigning a limited number of
juveniles to each of the program workers,
who then organize their time to provide for
the separate supervision of each individual
for whom they have responsibility.
During the period of intensive supervision,
workers participate with the juveniles in a
variety of activities. The goal is to provide
the probationers with opportunities to
successfully acquire and improve social,
recreational and vocational skills.
During 1980-81, 132 juveniles on probation
participated in the program. They took part in
a wide range of activities, all of which took
place in the community using facilities and
resources which are available to the general
public. Activities included shopping, laundry,
mowing lawns, walking, visiting, sewing and
cooking, and strenuous activities, such as
hiking, racquetball, skating, floor hockey,
basketball, swimming and skiing. Work-
related activities included job-hunting,
babysitting, painting, laying floor covering,
decorating, cleaning fireplaces, washing cars,
delivering papers, woodworking and fixing
tires.
28
The three major difficulties over the cod
the year—learning how to supervise dill
to-manage adolescents within the comi m
setting, providing continuous service vik
staff were involved with mandatory tram
and gaining access to funds budgeted ll
activities—were challenges the staff ir i\\
positive efforts. The result was anticiojuBJ
resolution of the problems in the new lea
year.
During the year, data was gathered ancti
collated on a contracted basis in prepaH
for a statistical evaluation of the DARlil
Program.
Contracted Services
On behalf of the entire region, East Dri
in Vancouver managed a number of
specialized programs on a contracted stf
These included Psychological ServicfeH
Step-Up Program, which was supervijjjl
under DARE, Community-based Resiinl
Centres, the Impaired Drivers' CourslH
the Shoplifting Program.
Delivery of Psychological Services wlfl
disrupted early in the year as a result HI
dispute between the psychologists am ha
Government of British Columbia. Wlfl|
was resolved, increased assessment sin
were available to the Branch. TheseBI
assessment services filled a critical nid
the case management resources availitsj
Probation Officers.
The Step-Up Program is an Alternathirl
Rehabilitation Education Program fo
juveniles on Probation. Step-Up is diija
to accommodate 40 students and the r.\
on improving classroom behaviour; I
upgrading in the basic subject areasJB]
reading, spelling, writing, math andwa
studies; and providing structured 1
opportunities for social and physical -jA
development. This program has filleaTi
critical need by providing a legitima (tn
program for specific juveniles on pr'f'lj
who would otherwise be dropouts frflj
activities usually associated with thspi
group.
 ;tivity Reports
Runity-based Residential Centres for
jviduals preparing for reintegration with
[community provide accommodation on a
fflfct basis throughout the Region. Group
lities utilized this year included the
/ation Army Anchorage House, the Allied
Band M6tis Society House, Grandview
igr and the Caroline Hatfield Society
lise. The advent of the new B.C. Board of
lie and the reduction in the use of
wary Absences led to a significant
tm in the use of Community-based
iaential Centre beds in 1980-81.
Ijaheless, these private agencies continued
jrifvide services which met the special
Is of people being released from
Itutions to the community.
ling 1980-81, the Impaired Drivers'
ation Program for people convicted of
jiired driving was provided under contract
1'ancouver City College. This year, 122
Me participated in the program under
Jrtprder. The Impaired Drivers' Course in
I^Mancouver continued to operate;
o;ver, on the recommendation of the
ict, similar courses in Powell River and
gelt were discontinued. The contract
'py thus saved was reallocated to the
Ittworker Program in Powell River.
Jluyenile Shoplifting Program is a
0 acted service managed through the Yale
lit Intake Unit. The program provides
pi al services for young people involved in
flifting. During 1980-81, the program
| significantly with 80 referrals and 63
(J)letions.
M Vancouver District ran two programs on
l.fltraded basis. One was the provision of
tjpntial accommodation for females by
f?i:a Maria. During the year, 154 bed days
liused in this program. The second was a
JW diversified program contracted to the
M-Jeth Fry Society. In addition to
[fflling bed space and counselling for
pnes, the Society operated a court referral
pam for shoplifters. In 1980-81, 312 new
p'.s were recorded in the shoplifting
,r"im and 721 women remained involved
<m ongoing basis for counselling.
The North Shore District contracted for the
delivery of several special programs,
including a shoplifting program, a drug and
alcohol awareness program for schools
operated by the Queen Mary Community
School Association, and group counselling
sessions for parents of delinquent teens.
The Community Service Order Program
continues to grow. In Squamish, a
Community Service Order was contracted
half-time to administer the program, which
also operates in Powell River, Sechelt, Bella
Coola and Ocean Falls.
The Job Placement Program is a contracted
regional resource seeking to place referrals in
jobs, job training or educational upgrading
courses.
North Fraser Region
Southview Place Community Correctional
Centre
Southview Place Community Correctional
Centre is located on the grounds of New
Haven Correctional Centre. It provides
accommodation for up to eight men, although
use is generally limited because of the
specialized nature of the program. Southview
Place is an unstaffed facility where residents
are carefully selected for their motivation to
work. It provides an effective alternate
environment where selected offenders can
accomplish re-entry into the community.
At present the building is in excellent
condition. Recent renovations have included
a new roof, conversion of the oil furnace to
gas and repainting the interior and exterior of
the house.
Except for building maintenance, the
program incurs no direct costs since
participants work and with their earnings they
supply their own food, clothing and supplies;
pay the bills; and replace furniture and
utensils as required. Families of the residents
are free to visit in order to maintain family
relationships and residents are expected to
support their families from their earnings.
29
ULtt.
 Activity Reports
With recent changes in the B.C. Board of
Parole and the Temporary Absence Program,
occupancy rates in Southview Place and other
similar facilities were affected. In fact, by the
end of the year, Southview Place was
unoccupied. A priority for next year would
be finding a way to effectively and fully
utilize this valuable facility.
Brittain River Camp
Brittain River Camp is located in an isolated
setting on Jervis Inlet. On January 1, 1981,
this Region took over responsibility for
development of the camp from Vancouver
Island Regional Correctional Centre.
Although it is now managed by the North
Fraser Region, this camp serves the entire
province.
The unique re-entry program at the camp
employs selected individuals on Temporary
Absence and involves them in a juvenile tree
spacing project for the Ministry of Forests
which provides the necessary supervision.
Participants in the project are encouraged to
graduate to piece-type work where they can
increase .their pay.
At the present time, the camp facilities are
still under construction. On completion in
May 1981, Brittain River Camp is expected
to accommodate 20 men. At the present time,
however, occupancy averages six men.
Contracted Services
Community-based Residential Centres for
adults were provided to the Region during the
year by St. Leonards House, the Seven Step
Society, Belavista Motel and the Maple
Ridge Treatment Centre. Through this
contracted service, accommodation was
provided for 40 offenders.
Utilization of community-based residential
bed-space varied during the year. Initially, the
demand was very high. Later in the year,
when changes in the Temporary Absence
Program were implemented and the new B.C.
Board of Parole took office, utilization
dropped dramatically. The key change
affecting the utilization of this bed-space was
30
the Branch policy that back-to-back 15-d
temporary absences were not allowed, fjffl
not permitting work release inmates tofl
in community-based residential centres*
To achieve full utilization of this bed-spl
the Region in the future may require a
different emphasis; for example, Bail I
Supervision, Probation and some paroles!
or Temporary Absences on leave fromBJ
isolated Ministry of Forest projects raaWi
utilize these services.
The major contracted service in the Real
this year was Gateway Correctional Serai
This organization provides an importafnl
alternative to short-term incarceration.
Residents receive intensive one-to-oneBjl
supervision and a full range of speciauaB
counselling services, including personfflB
family, financial and alcohol counsell™B
addition, Gateway provides employmento
accommodation assistance and educatiSB
upgrading. During 1980-81, there weral
referrals for these services.
The North Fraser Region contracts wifflB
licensed psychologists for services to tea:
probation supervision and institutional c;e
management.
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Community Correctional i
Centre
The Chilliwack Community CorrectialM
Centre is located in a large old house ii al
Chilliwack which provides accommodsjol
for 15 men. The centre ensures that all i»
residents are given the opportunity for ol
entry into the community in preparatiofil
their release from custody. This is achilM
by resident participation in employmenra
education or community service. ResicJtal
participating with staff plan their activ&fl
and release through the case managemtoj
process, which outlines step by step wit
they will do to utilize their sentence tiijJjfi
best advantage.
 txntre provides employment counselling
Ifflmtifies job opportunities. It
(linages educational upgrading or
©ional training and provides personal or
y counselling, as well as referrals to
1 specialized community agencies for
problems as alcohol or drug abuse.
B temporary Absence Program allows
Halts to take full advantage of all the
jjrces and opportunities within the
IjBiity. A recently established Alcohol
Isness Program and an Impaired Drivers'
oie are available at the centre's residence.
Iiinployment skills training course assists
Ijnfs in their job search.
Btentre also offers accommodation and
^ vision to individuals from the
funding area serving intermittent
Iks.
i ipants for the regular program at the
a; are screened for suitability prior to
nisjpn, and are monitored regularly for
ffience to the program's strict disciplinary
ip Failure to maintain standards of
•met or lack of effort to achieve case
agement goals can result in a resident
i returned to a more secure environment.
dig 1980-81, the centre received 97
lnsions. Some of these were given passes
11: at community-based residential
n s, such as Thiessen House in Harrison
idhomas House in Chilliwack. One
isint attended the Western Pentecostal
ibCollege in Clayburn. In addition, the
m recommended referrals to the
inaven Alcohol Treatment Centre in
Wsford.
tSibeen a priority for some time to replace
tpility with a more suitable building,
(lino alternate site has been found, it is
Anticipated that a new building will be
fejucted on the existing site. The new
miig will provide accommodation and
administrative quarters but for other
;'i'ies and training, residents will use
^8 g community facilities and resources.
Developing Attitudes, Skills and Habits
(DASH) Program, Pierce Creek Camp
The Developing Attitudes, Skills and Habits
(DASH) Program is a year-round residential
program for juvenile probationers aged 14 to
17, offered as an alternative to containment
or transfer to adult court. It operates from
Pierce Creek Camp located in a wilderness
setting in the Chilliwack area. The program
consists of short courses on wilderness
survival training, including first aid, the care
and use of hand tools, physical training,
canoeing, hiking, camping and other skills
necessary to live and travel in the wilderness.
During their course, probationers also carry
out worthwhile community service projects,
such as campground maintenance, fire
suppression and participation in the Salmonid
Enhancement Program.
A priority for 1980-81 was to reorganize the
program to maintain its capacity and program
type and at the same time reduce its cost. The
resulting reorganization was implemented in
January 1981. The new program has a
slightly lower overall capacity but can now
accept youths on direct entry from the courts.
An unfortunate loss resulting from economic
necessity was the program's ability to accept
female probationers since this was the only
provincial attendance resource for girls.
The program change was achieved ahead of
schedule at a saving and the overall per diem
cost for the future has been reduced
significantly.
During 1980-81, 165 probationers were
referred to the wilderness challenge of the
DASH program. Of this number, 147
completed the course, with 78 of those
earning a full pass.
Contracted Services
As in previous years, community-based
residential centre accommodation and related
services were contracted for extensively
throughout the Region.
The House of Concord Residential
Attendance Program in Langley provides
31
ri-
 Activity Reports
accommodation for 42 male probationers
aged 14 to 19. It offers educational,
vocational and life skills training as well as
employment experience. The House of
Concord also sponsors a weekend wilderness
attendance program and a day attendance
program, which together accommodate an
additional 23 youths. Although the residential
program was well attended during 1980-81,
the day and weekend programs were underutilized and will likely not be continued next
year.
The Starting Point Community Remand
Home, sponsored by the Community
Resource Society in North Surrey, provides
community remand facilities for juveniles of
both sexes. The capacity is nine. The Moffat
Remand Home in Richmond, with a capacity
of seven, also offers community remand for
juveniles of both sexes. The Teen Challenge
Program provides a home-like environment
through its residential facilities for
individuals on Conditional Release Order,
Temporary Absence, Parole or Probation.
The Surrey Community Re-entry Centre
offers community re-entry services to the
Chilliwack and Haney Forest Camps and to
individuals on parole or probation. For the
third year in a row, utilization of the centre
was down. Specifically, the Temporary
Absence Program was severely restricted by
the terms of the new parole legislation and
the Direct Entry Program was implemented
more slowly than anticipated. The centre was
successful in finding employment for those
residents motivated to work. Alternate
program considerations for 1980-81 would
ensure more effective utilization of this
valuable community resource.
In July 1980, a new youth remand home
called One Way Place was opened in
Abbotsford. The home is operated by the
One Way Adventure Foundation and provides
accommodation for eight juveniles. At
Mission, the Davis Lake Project, a day-time
attendance program for unemployed, non-
school attending delinquents, was also started
this year.
32
A long-term residential program for juvJ
boys at North Bend was expanded to lwl
This resource was very well used during
year, achieving almost 100% utilizatioS]
Proctor Program, a residential program5;
juvenile girls in Chilliwack, continued
was reduced from two beds to one.   j
The Impaired Drivers' Course was off®
Richmond eight times during the yearij
Interior Region
Kamloops Community Correctional
Centre
The Kamloops Community CorrectioS
Centre, housed in a former motel near
Kamloops, provides accommodation fo!
men. The centre's main priority is to pin
a viable re-entry program for residents,
achieves this by providing educational
upgrading, vocational training and job i
placement.
During 1980-81, in a pilot project, mai n
residents at the centre were short-term
inmates classified to the communityBJ
correctional centre from more secura||
facilities. Of this group, about one thin
became eligible for Temporary Absenci
passes for educational or employment i
purposes. Educational opportunities Ml
the Basic Training and Skills Developrp
course and the Store Front Program ofji
Cariboo College, as well as educatiorjl
upgrading. Successful job placement   l
continues to be high at the centre, wffll
enjoys the co-operation of the commuf%
local employers.
Residents with behavioural problems ia(
to alcohol abuse obtain treatment at th
Crossroads Treatment Centre and the lui
Lake Native Indian Alcohol CentreM
During the year, the Home Placement i
Program was discontinued. Twenty-fh
persons participated in the program ding
1980-81. The centre continues to maiui*
positive relationship with the commuiy.i
 n
itivity Reports
j traded Services
ii 980-81, the Interior Region provided a
Iwange of contracted services, including
Ilntial and attendance programs,
jiion programs, specialized counselling
Stelated services from a number of
Iminity-based residential centres.
|;gi Lake Native Indian Alcohol Centre
the Crossroads Treatment Centre
ided treatment and counselling in the
Jim area. Alcohol awareness was also part
f e program at Howard House in Vernon
Sjgplowna. Residential facilities were also
nided by Howard House in Vernon and
itwna and by the Kamloops Y.W.C.A.
k training and paid employment from
llffi'-related activities were offered by the
!onwood Logging Centre.
Swear, many of the contracted residential
attendance programs in the region were
iltct to evaluation, resulting in changes in
in programs and cancellation of others.
hDne Way Adventure Foundation Program
JiBicton was confirmed as a success and
xmtinue to provide services for up to
v uvenile boys with severe behavioural
items. The Lost Creek Ranch juvenile
Idance program was cancelled because of
cof referrals.
toSanta Rosa Ranch weekend juvenile
feiance program, contracted to the Trail
iiict Child Care Society, was evaluated.
ubquently, additional transportation
10 ties were provided to extend the area the
at serves. Also a shorter format was
itiluced to provide the courts with another
festive program. As a result of the
raation process, changes introduced at the
jjjtKuring the year resulted in greater use
fts attendance program.
ffitae Way Adventure Foundation, Camp
Qhial at Hedley, continued to provide a
!Q!valuable residential remand alternative
11 veniles requiring more secure
Windings.
hfveekend Wilderness Program in
^stoke continued to be a success. This
\-
program provides a 24-day course for six
male probationers. A beneficial and unique
feature is the volunteer assistance provided
by previous program graduates. During the
year, the Loewen Ranch operated two four-
month residential programs for a total of six
boys.
Except in larger communities, such as
Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton and
Cranbrook, where a full-time officer coordinates the Community Service Order
Program, this program is administered on a
contract basis, thus extending service to all
communities in the Region.
The Impaired Drivers' Course was not as
extensively used as in previous years. In
Kamloops, 180 referrals attended the course,
which was contracted to the Continuing
Education Department at Cariboo College.
Vernon, Salmon Arm and a number of
smaller communities operated the course on a
contract basis. Throughout the Region,
referrals to this course were down. Reduction
in the use of the course by the courts suggests
that a modified approach is required for the
treatment of impaired drivers.
In Penticton, a Youth Worker provided a
variety of diversion initiatives in co-operation
with the Penticton Alternate School. Oliver
also hired a summer only Youth Worker on a
part-time contract. These contracts extended
the range of services that were offered,
particularly in offices with limited staff
resources.
Other juvenile attendance programs were
contracted in Clearwater, Merritt, Vernon,
Lillooet and Lytton.
Northern Region
Terrace Community Correctional Centre
The Terrace Community Correctional Centre
accommodates up to 21 men. The focus of its
program is to provide worthwhile and
profitable work experience as a means of
acquiring the skills necessary for positive reentry into the community.
33
 During 1980-81, the centre achieved this goal
through a unique work project where
residents of the centre formed an independent
Society—the Inmate Welfare Contracting
Society—to enter into contracts and provide
employment within the private sector.
This community-supported venture was most
successful during the year. Through a number
of diverse contracts, the Society earned
$146,343.69. After taxes and various other
payments, the balance was divided among
members of the Society. This provided
valuable training in money management and
also meant that residents had funds to be self-
sufficient upon release.
Contracts during 1980-81 included cutting
and delivering stakes to two pole plants;
land-clearing; cutting and delivering firewood
for the Parks Branch; selling firewood to the
public; house painting; garage and shop
cleanup; clearing of right of ways for the
Ministry of Transportation and Highways;
and manufacturing wood blocking for the setup of mobile homes.
In addition to their contracts, members of the
Society contributed to the community 2 845
voluntary man-hours of work and 450 hours
of heavy equipment operation, worth a total
of $37,087.50. Community service projects
included clearing land for the Terrace Rod
and Gun Club; bucking snags, burning slash
and clean-up for the Parks Branch; removal
of old bleachers, tree thinning and grubbing
of underbrush; snow removal, gardening and
cutting, splitting and delivering firewood for
Terrace and area seniors and needy families;
playground site preparation for the Jack Cook
School for mentally-handicapped children;
fence construction for the playground of the
United Church Children's Home; painting the
inside of 'Ksan House; and clean-up and
painting Skeena Residence #2 for the
mentally handicapped.
The success of the I.W. Contracting Society
enabled the centre to achieve financial
stability during the year. The Society also
acquired a truck-type loader and purchased a
flat-deck truck, power saws, a stationary
34
woodsaw, a mechanical wood splitter, nan i
tools and mechanical tools. B.C. Buildingi
Corporation donated a wheel-type loader, it
Society maintains all equipment and tools
and contributes towards the maintenance <
the centre.
Leisure-time activities at the centre incluc
swimming, bowling, fishing and visits to ea
local movie theatre.
Contracted Services
In the Northern Region, the relative isola'4
of many population centres and the vast aat
over which the Branch has jurisdiction
challenges the Branch to find ways to prcd
the same range and diversity of service^
are available in the more highly populatei I
southwestern part of the province. Extenses
use of contracted services is one way of
meeting that challenge. In addition to ■
providing residential accommodation foM
youths and adults, contracted services|
provide for the administration of the
Community Service Order Program in miy
centres and also ensure the provision of |
various attendance programs, including t
Impaired Drivers' Course and Project SM
Adventure, a diversion project for 12 to
year-olds.
During 1980-81, a total of 27 services mh
$293,000 were contracted by the Northe
Region. Because of the value of theseBJ
services and the flexibility they allow thi
Branch in responding to program needs,
contracted services in the Northern Regit
are likely to increase in the future.
In January 1981, a new community-basf;
residential centre was established in TeajSI
It provides two beds for female offendeiib
who do not require secure custody.
There is a very high need for programs m
facilities for juveniles in the Region. 'MvS
met in part by Camp Trapping, a residSlfi
wilderness resource administered by tffi
Cariboo Action Training Society, and frifi
new Pink Mountain facility in the Peace h:
River district which provides two beds \H
 m
'itivity Reports
Affile probationers. Other similar facilities
ijie the Keewatin Program at Mile 157 on
Waska Highway which provides 10 beds
residential wilderness program, the
^r:e George Receiving Home Society
villi has two juvenile remand beds, and the
fmix Transition Home Society in Prince
3cge which provides emergency beds for
m in addition to an attendance program.
Iffles from the Region may be referred to
hi)ASH Program or to Camp Colonial.
isiuse of the very high demand for juvenile
aVtnes in the Region, residential bed-space
n attendance programs are not always
viable when they are required. Juvenile
feiquents in the Region thus often find
l^lves facing containment as the only
IIMive. A priority is to provide expanded
aces to meet these needs in the future.
ost principal centres, the Community
eice Order Program is administered on a
fflact basis. For example, in Kitimat, the
ream is looked after by the Kitimat
gffinity Services Society. Similar
arrangements are made in Terrace, Smithers,
Prince George, Fort St. John and a number of
other centres. In some very small or isolated
communities, such as Lower Post, Fort
Nelson and Atlin, the administration of the
Community Service Order Program is the
responsibility of volunteers. In Prince
Rupert, a Community Service Officer is
under contract full-time. These diverse ways
of providing administration ensure that a
most valuable program continues to flourish
in the Region.
The Impaired Drivers' Course was contracted
for in Prince George, Williams Lake, 100
Mile House, Dawson Creek, Fort St. John
and Fort Nelson. Research contracts in the
Region included an attitudinal study of native
juveniles in the justice system, a study of the
justice system in isolated areas and an
evaluation of the Skeena Youth Work
Incentive Program. Research and evaluative
studies help the Region to plan its corrections
programs to best meet the particular needs of
the area.
35
 Activity Reports
Probation and Family Services: Activity Description
Probation Officers provide a wide range of
services to Courts and communities
throughout the province. Services include:
Supervision of adult and juvenile offenders:
Juveniles and adults convicted of
offences may be ordered to abide by the
conditions of a probation order, which
may include reporting to a Probation
Officer. In such cases, the Probation
Officer supervises the order to ensure
that conditions are being met and offers
counselling and/or referrals to other
agencies should they be required;
Family Court Services:
The Family Court Counsellor assists
separating families in negotiating terms
of separation agreements or consent
orders in regard to financial
maintenance, and in some cases,
custody of, and access to, children;
facilitates referrals to appropriate
agencies for marital counselling and
other services; provides short-term
marriage and family counselling; and
may provide administrative enforcement
of Court orders in matters of
maintenance payments;
Report Preparation:
Pre-Court Enquiry—a report prepared
for Crown Counsel regarding an alleged
delinquency. The report contains a
recommendation as to whether or not the
matter should be diverted from further
formal Court process;
Pre-Bail Report—prepared at the
request of the Court on an individual
being considered for bail supervision as
an aid in the determination of the
individual's suitability for bail;
Pre-Sentence Report—a report prepared
at the request of the Court on an
individual convicted of an offence as an
aid to the Court in determining
sentences;
36
Custody and Access Reports—prepaiJ
at the request of the Court as an aid i
determining which parent should ass t
custody of a child or children when 11
parents are separating and where the /
matter cannot be resolved outside the j
Court process;
Community Investigation for Temp®!
Absence or Parole—prepared at the
request of institutional personnel in
regard to an inmate who is eligible f
and who has applied for, a Temporarl
Absence Leave or Parole from an ■
institution. The community situation]
which the inmate intends to live is
examined in an effort to determinem!
appropriateness;
Development and operation of correcticmU
programs:
Community Service Order Program- I
this program is operated either bjj
Corrections staff or contracted witfilt
individual or organization in the I
community. The Court may order tf ;
individual perform a prescribed nune
of hours of community service as]
condition of a probation order, with *
nature of the service performed andn
supervision of it coordinated by the r!
Corrections Branch;
Impaired Drivers' Courses—indivieal
convicted of drinking and drivingjBI
offences may be ordered to attend e
Impaired Drivers' Course designed i
educate the impaired driver, to chaial
his/her attitudes, and to prevent ■
recidivism;
Other programs—programs such a
alternate schools, shoplifting preveiQ
and classroom discussion groups ai
examples of these programs.
Additionally, Probation Officers and Fail?
Court Counsellors interact with staff of he
community agencies to develop strateSffl
dealing with commonly perceived prob ns
 e are 92 Probation and Family Services
sfn the Province. During 1980/81,
i tion Officers and Counsellors
>'ised in excess of 16 000 probation and
lipervision orders and provided Family
['services to approximately 4 500
IB In addition more than 38 000
ligations and reports were prepared.
muver Island Region
iltion and Family Services
lion and Family Services Offices are
tl in Campbell River, Colwood,
may, Duncan, Lake Cowichan,
mo, Parksville, Port Alberni, Port
e Port McNeill and Sidney. In addition,
fi a provides services through the Family
uS.ervices Office, the Adult Probation
the Court Probation Office and the
ffid Case Management Unit.
})j81, several offices in the Region
need an increase in cases relating to
let, emphasizing the need to develop
nand resources and services for
I5S. One response to this need through
yr was a focus on diversion programs
Imitative measures to deflect
tyuals away from confrontations with the
ijustice system. In Victoria, for
ne, of 1 023 juveniles referred to the
i Court Services Office, 539 were
BiJBJanaimo also conducted a very
tful adult and juvenile diversion
Ira
tlr indicator of the growth of alternative
dealing with juvenile delinquents and
rsris the expansion of the Community
Order Program. In Courtenay, 228
fants in the program contributed
I (/hours of work to the community. The
9i Family Services Office administered
Seniles who contributed 9 198 hours of
% at ranged from helping to build a
( eenhouse to washing windows at the
9'n Army headquarters. With the
'C of the community, the Sidney
Oi, established in June 1980,
developed through the year. In Colwood,
program placements average 27 a month. To
meet anticipated expansion of the program,
the Nanaimo office produced a Standards
Manual for the Community Service Order
Program.
Other Region-wide concerns included
seeking community-based support to ensure
the continuation of programs threatened by
funding restrictions, and planning programs
and staff deployment to avoid the
unnecessary duplication of services.
The need to provide family-related services
fluctuated through the year as the Region
responded initially to the impact of legislative
changes and later in the year to ensuing
policy changes within the Branch. Most
offices reported an initial decrease in family-
related services, followed by an increase and
stabilization. With continuing growth in
population, Nanaimo anticipates an increase
in the demand for family services in the next
fiscal year. Victoria is planning to open an
new family services office next year to meet
the anticipated increase in demand in the
area. Sidney introduced a family services
office during the year in response to a
growing need for counselling in family
matters in the Saanich peninsula. The only
office reporting a consistent decrease in
family service cases over the year was
Colwood.
Staff in many offices are using a team
approach to handling workloads. This
ensures close co-operation within the Branch
and also develops good relationships with
related justice system officials and other
related government and private sector
agencies. The teamwork concept also helps
eliminate the unnecessary duplication of tasks
or services related to an individual who may
be involved in more than one case.
Developing good community relations is a
priority. Courtenay is involved in the
development of such community resources as
the Volunteer Bureau and the Youth Chance
Society. In the Sidney office, staff are
involved in the Community Counselling
Centre, the Native Resource Group and the
37
 Alcohol Awareness Program. The Colwood
office has also increased involvement in the
community during the year through contacts
with the Pacific Centre Youth Counselling
Program, and liaison with the R.C.M.P. and
with the Ministry of Human Resources.
Part of this thrust is community education. A
benefit of a community familiar with Branch
programs and services is increased volunteer
support for programs and activities. The
Colwood office wants to expand the volunteer
program for next year to provide assistance
with the supervision of juvenile delinquents,
particularly in the Sooke area. With heavier
caseloads and limitations on staff and
budgets, volunteers will play an increasingly
important role in the Region.
During the year, continued close liaison was
maintained with educational institutions
training people for social work. Students
from the University of Victoria and Camosun
College obtained field-work experience in the
Sidney and Victoria offices.
Generally through the year, the Region's
offices sought to enhance and expand
services and resources. The Port Alberni
Office provided more regular service to the
west coast communities of Tofino, Ucluelet
and Ahousat through monthly Court
attendance and meetings twice a month with
probationers. The Nanaimo office
concentrated on streamlining services to
effectively meet the increased demand
anticipated next year. Courtenay developed
attendance programs and, along with the
Victoria Adult Probation Office, initiated
victim reparation services through the
Community Service Order Program. Sidney
concentrated on the development of
Preventative Programs. The Duncan office
participated in the House Arrest Program.
In Victoria, the specialized Case
Management Unit co-ordinated services
related to the case management process by
providing classification for the Region,
screening and processing all applications for
Temporary Absence, processing applications
for B.C. Parole and supervising contracts for
38
community-based residential centres ami
remand homes in the Region. In additioio
behalf of the entire province, the unit co:
ordinates the adult wilderness camp projji
in conjunction with the Ministry of Fore.i]
Vancouver Region
Probation and Family Services
Probation and Family Services have 16
locations in Greater Vancouver and officii
Powell River, Squamish and Sechelt.B
During the year, offices handling juvenii
probation reported a reduction in thein"
caseloads. As well, the Region saw the i
implementation of some significant juffij
initiatives during the year. One such hijjj
was the "45 Days to Court" process]
implemented at the Vancouver FamilyCc
This process is designed to speed up then
from detainment to disposition for jmSs
Another initiative was the formation of e
South Vancouver Inter-agency Youth Sd
Committee, with nine related agencies
participating in a preventative program t
youths. The committee developed an Ii
Youth Services to assist them with the
program. In addition, a Juvenile Prostiji
Task Force was set up for the area,  j
The North Shore area of Vancouver wav
selected to be used as a model for the
prevention of juvenile crime. The proje j
in the planning phase this year and wilil
be implemented next year.
Ongoing juvenile programs that savl
increased participation during the yearei
the shoplifting program operated by thY
Street Intake Unit, as reported earlieajfl
Community-based Programs section olhi
report, and the Community Service Oisr
Program.
The West Juvenile Probation and Famiu
Court Services Office reported 58 juviile
referred to the Community Service Oi:r
Program. They worked a total of 1 78
hours. The Burrard Office recorded 7i
 *~~
Jiity Reports
ftals who worked a total of 1 800 hours.
ijBbistrict, juveniles worked 7 232
in on Community Service Orders, more
llsuble the time recorded the previous
ain the North East Office, 119 juveniles
I:djfor 3 931 hours in the program.
|)B included cutting and delivering
erjod to seniors and repainting Cedar
lt^amp. In the Sechelt area, the program
yd phenomenal growth. It also operated
P/ell River, Bella Coola and Ocean Falls.
ir; the year, the Job Placement Program,
llh juveniles and adults, focused on
^.employment for participants or
ang them to vocational training or
icional upgrading. Adult Probation
ic in the Region also reported an
8 ion of the Community Service Order
igm. The increased hours worked in this
igm indicate its success as a viable
irtive to incarceration. In the Vancouver
»i, more than 75 000 hours of work
ordered through the program. In
iln, some offices recorded community
n work performed on a voluntary basis,
pmple, Powell River and Sechelt
ii d over 1 000 hours of voluntary
unity work in addition to the 7 000
jsrdered by the court.
Immunity Pretrial Services Unit in
?wer provides an adult diversion
M and a job placement program,
it the year, 242 people were referred to
djireion program, most of whom took
the Community Service Order
8n Records for a six-month period
ji 68 referrals to the Job Placement
Pi placed in jobs. During the year, the
Unity Pretrial Services Unit was
l»l with the development of standards
?|ial Services and Bail Supervision,
'yher offices began to implement new
«lres in compliance with the standards
ffly the Branch. The implementation of
&s will be a long-term project in the
Nth Vancouver Office made high use
Supervision in its adult program with
Ws'supervised. The office also
operates a successful adult diversion
program. During the year, there were 113
referrals for diversion.
The Vancouver Court Adult Probation Service
Office acts as a community information
centre for the Branch. In 1980-81, the office
provided service to 4 500 clients; the number
of non-client inquiries was not recorded.
Several adult probation offices concentrated
on broadening and improving their
relationship with the community. The South
West Office emphasized improved relations
with agencies and individuals providing
Mental Health Care. Other offices
concentrated on improved service to the
community. In the North Shore District,
service to the more remote communities of
Bella Bella, Bella Coola, Ocean Falls,
Namu, Klemtu and River's Inlet was
increased to once every three weeks instead
of once every six weeks.
The plan to open a regular office in Bella
Coola in June 1981 will mean an even further
improvement in service to the community.
The plan to open a Pemberton-Whistler office
this year was not realized and service
continues to be provided to these
communities from Squamish.
Pending a final legislative decision regarding
the Province's role in family relations
matters, caseloads in Family Services
continued to fluctuate. Some offices reported
increases in cases related to access, custody
and Maintenance Orders, but generally,
caseloads were reduced. For example, the
Yale Street Intake Unit reported a drop from
an average of 99 cases to an average of 66
cases related to family matters.
In an expansion of services, the West End
Adult Probation and Family Court Services
Office added a component providing services
to the Supreme Court relative to matters of
family conflict. The East District also
reassigned a Family Court counsellor to
provide services to the Supreme Court of
British Columbia.
During the year, the North Shore District
participated in the Inter-agency Committee on
39
—i
 Child Abuse and the North Shore Child
Abuse Team.
Efforts in 1980-81 to integrate an office to
provide adult, juvenile and family services
met with difficulties. East District will
continue the pilot project for one more year.
Many offices reported an overall increase in
workload and anticipate even greater
increases in the future. With this view,
adequate staffing of all Probation and Family
Service offices in the Region will be a
priority for next year.
North Fraser Region
Probation and Family Services
There are seven Probation and Family
Services offices in the Region, located in
Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge and New
Westminster.
The Region was active in implementing the
new B.C. Parole system as an effective
means of community re-entry. Of a total of
541 parolees this year, 232 were from the
North Fraser Region. The Regional staff also
worked on a project to establish Parole
guidelines, policies and a Parole handbook
for Regional Corrections Staff.
Those offices providing services for juveniles
noted a decrease in the diversion rate for
1980-81, meaning that more juveniles
appeared before the courts. The resulting
pressure produced a decrease in the quality of
service from the Courts. This could be
alleviated by the provision of more alternative
facilities and programs for juveniles and the
availability of portable courtrooms. With the
closure of the DASH Program to female
participants, it is particularly important to
provide a suitable replacement program. In
addition, a specialized secure treatment
facility is required to meet the needs of
juveniles in the Region.
In October 1980, the Coquitlam Alternatives
Program became a daily attendance program
for any juveniles not working or attending
40
school. The program focus was the
development of life skills.
In December 1980, a diversion shopliftg
program for juveniles was implemented!
Coquitlam. In this program, juvenilesH
referred by the store owners to the R.GU
and from them, directly to ProbatioiMl
1980-81, there were 52 referrals. A
Shoplifting Program was also organize ft
Maple Ridge, but it was not implement
during the year.
To assist in co-ordinating all informati
about juvenile delinquents in Maple Rge
the Maple Ridge R.C.M.P. Youth Det
appointed a Youth Co-ordinating Offlci
Community Service Order Program ima
Region continues to expand. Participa
either diverted or court-ordered to corle
Community Service Order. In Coquitloj
206 juveniles completed 7 161 hours
work, including a fund raising campai|i
a rummage sale which together netted &
for the Terry Fox Cancer Fund. Abou 5
agencies in the Coquitlam area are ace!
involved with the program. During l!0i
110 adults contributed 7 727 hours of'o
In Maple Ridge, 44 juveniles worked s3
hours and 68 adults contributed 3 65(io
of work on the program. In New  I
Westminster, 403 Community Servio3i
were assigned, producing 13 750 hourf
work. An additional 4 500 voluntary m
were contributed to the community.!
Burnaby, a total of 12 637 hours wei
completed on the program. Burnaby id
Westminster together raised and don;d:
$6,000 to the Variety Club Telethon id,
$2,000 to the Terry Fox Cancer Fund
total number of hours for the prograiSS
50 645, well over last year's totaUB
Most offices handling adults reported
increase in probation supervision. Bl
supervision services also continued e;
in the Region. The New Westminster!!
added Bail Supervision to its servio in
November 1980. Since that time, it is
supervised an average of nine adultS'gH
month in the program. Investigativeej)
and report writing have become incasi
 cvity Reports	
j responsibilities. In the Burnaby offices
I the year, almost 800 reports were
■fid for the Courts.
j;ed Drivers' Courses were operated in
gion and were attended by 331
luals.
ifflFamily Services caseloads
|!elS stable overall, there was a dramatic
ee in the request for custody and access
[■This shift to providing expanded
s to the Courts often demanded the
srifnent of staff. With the changing
jjgin Family Services work, it is
iry to standardize the role of the
Services Counsellor.
a'es in the Region during the year
id a new court procedure for juveniles
ing quicker access and better planning
art appearances in New Westminster,
iiiry 15, 1981, New Westminster
i Victim Assistance Program.
BflBunplementation was slower than
i ted, services were provided to eight
E during the year. In Burnaby, the John
Society also operated a Victim
jice Program independent of
eons Branch.
Sjion also contributed to the
jitiye work of the Inter-ministerial
In's Committee which aims to meet
jieds of youths which require the
I of more than one Ministry.
hVaser Region
am and Family Services
dion offers Probation and Family
Sfrom offices in Abbotsford,
v:k, Cloverdale, Delta, Hope,
$ Mission, Richmond, Surrey and
)ck.
fiiEation of the Surrey Probation and
yervice Office was completed during
|f is part of the process to equalize
Qs among White Rock, Surrey
family Court, Cloverdale Pretrial
Services Unit and Surrey Adult Probation
staff. Reorganization achieved a fairer
distribution of the workload and resulted in
better service to the communities involved.
Most offices in the Region continued their
focus on prevention, improved relationship
and involvement with the communities they
serve and promotion for a greater
understanding of the corrections process.
Throughout the Region, the Inter-ministerial
Children's Committee maintained its coordinating role to ensure the most effective
service from a broad range of related
agencies in matters affecting juveniles.
The Community Service Order Program
expanded through the year. It is an
increasingly important alternative in the
corrections system, particularly because of
the reparative potential of the work assigned.
In October 1980, a major evaluation of the
program was initiated in the Region. A final
report is not expected until August 1981.
Meanwhile, recommendations published in
an interim report will be implemented in
1981-82.
Juvenile caseloads in the Region varied from
office to office but the concern for increasing
juvenile delinquency rates remains high.
Initiatives implemented in the Region during
the year to help prevent juvenile delinquency
included a co-ordinated effort with local
merchants in White Rock to reduce the
potential for criminal and delinquent
behaviour in the Semiahmoo Mall Shopping
Centre. In Surrey, there was a greater focus
on reparation and victim assistance in
juvenile assignments through the Community
Service Order Program. Chilliwack
implemented SCOOP—School Children Out
of Place. This joint School Board, R.C.M.P.
and Corrections program keeps track of
children on the street who ought to be in
school. In Mission, a similar program was
initiated with the local R.C.M.P. to identify
'street kids'. During the year, the Mission
office was also involved with starting a
juvenile attendance program at Davis Lake.
In the Cloverdale office, juvenile caseloads
were far below what had been anticipated for
41
 Activity Reports
the year and it was recommended that the
office be phased out and the staff relocated.
Community Service Order statistics for the
Region are incomplete; however, those
figures that are availabie indicate a
considerable increase in the use of this
alternative. In Richmond in the calendar year
1980, 19 000 hours were assigned. In Delta,
165 participants completed 5 424 hours of
work. In Chilliwack, 107 assignments
resulted in 6 550 hours of work. Mission
noted a drop in program statistics following
the resignation of the regular supervisor;
however, the community still recorded 3 790
hours of work. In Abbotsford, 3 840 hours of
work were performed on 61 assignments. In
January 1981, Langley added a Community
Service Order Program Officer and hopes to
enhance the program's effectiveness in the
future.
Population growth in the Region has resulted
in increasing pressures on Corrections staff.
This is particularly true in adult probation
where caseloads remain high and the demand
for investigative reports has increased
annually.
During the calendar year 1980, 92 referrals
completed the Richmond Impaired Drivers'
Course. In Chilliwack, the Proctor Program
for females continued, although bed-space
was reduced to one, as noted in the
Community-based Program section of this
report. In Surrey, the Adult Probation office
assisted in the establishment of a community
crime prevention program. A high level of
inter-agency co-operation ensured delivery of
a full range of services for adults supervised
by this office.
In most Family Services offices, the shifting
emphasis in family matters produced a
dramatic increase in requests for custody and
access reports, particularly in the last quarter
of the year. This trend can be expected to
continue. Family Services counsellors
maintained their focus on conciliation in the
resolution of difficulties. As in other
Regions, the changing responsibilities of
Family Service counsellors demands a
42
standardization of their role in order tojais
them in the provision of service.
The Region operated a number of sate*
offices during the year. Chilliwack   I
maintained an office in Agassiz to serve
Agassiz and Harrison Hot Springs. The oj
satellite office in Boston Bar relocated fin
its temporary quarters in a trailer to an
apartment in the area.
In the South Fraser Region, as in the reo
the province, the impact of the new B.C
Parole System and its effect on the I
Temporary Absence Program was felt va
inmate work releases were no longer al»
to utilize community-based residentiff
centres. Like many other centres, the Sr<
Community Re-Entry Centre suffered cri
the year and witnessed a further declimhi
utilization.
Interior Region
Probation and Family Services
A comprehensive range of Probation a
Family Services is provided to this Re,)i
through offices located in Ashcroft.BJ
Castlegar, Clearwater, Cranbrook, CreS
Fernie, Golden, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Kimberley, Lillooet, Merritt, Nelson,
100 Mile House, Penticton, Revelstojt
Salmon Arm, Trail, Vernon and Wiuj'lfc
Lake.
Trends noted in the Region during 19lli
included an expansion of the Commu::y
Service Order Program, particularly sa|
diversion alternative; a drop-in court «
to the Impaired Drivers' Course, sugjit
that more effective alternatives must
sought; and effective delivery of Fairi!
Services, despite continuing confusk
pending a final court decision on the
jurisdictions in family matters.
The Region was also involved in pioei
unique and somewhat controversiaMI
lawyer' system of consent orders thrg
Supreme Court regarding custody/acs
 ivity Reports
jffiiance orders. The system was devised
sist with the backlog of such cases.
IS in smaller communities in this
H often with only one Probation
Iffi concentrated on extending the range
■fees offered through close liaison with
:;sources in the community and with
id agencies, as well as through
acted services. Developing a greater
mess in the community and providing
nation to schools, service clubs and the
a helped to develop a positive rapport
Bter understanding of the corrections
{p. Prevention was the focus of this
le awareness campaign.
nghout the Region, all types of
oads remained high. Population growth
Iffiernie area will likely demand
pnal staff and resources in the future to
the needs of the area.
:iveniles in the Region, there is a need
ore alternative programs and facilities,
[ffiular, a juvenile remand capability is
idjin the Vernon area. During the year,
ed for expanded services was met in
y a new summer attendance program in
water and the development of a new
im in Golden. This Outward Bound-
brogram, called Project Adamant, is a
Corrections Branch, Ministry of Human
ixces. School Board and service club
3. Project Adamant, to be implemented
^rch 1981, will have a preventative focus
I ifl provide programs for both boys and
!
Cnton, the formation of the Native
iHCommittee resulted in the
ration of native juvenile delinquency in
ea.
Snloops, a very high percentage of
eles were diverted away from the formal
uwocess. Of 340 juveniles referred, only
taf before the courts.
th juveniles and adults in the Region,
•mmunity Service Order Program
it tied to provide an alternative to
Kiment and also a means to implement
the new emphasis on victim reparation. In all
but the larger centres, this program was
administered on a contract basis.
In Lillooet, 37 persons performed 2 352
hours of work. In Ashcroft, participants
worked for 1 938 hours. In Kamloops,
referrals averaged 42 a month, many of these
being juveniles. In Revelstoke, 55
assignments resulted in 4 214 hours of work.
In Vernon, 189 were referred to the program.
Figures were high in the Kootenay District as
well. An innovative approach was used in
Trail, Grand Forks and Greenwood, where
20% of those assigned designed their own
projects. In Penticton, with the help of the
Lions Club and the Library, assignees
prepared tapes of books for use by the blind.
Individuals assigned to the program may be
either court-ordered or diverted, making the
program a valuable alternative for both the
courts and Probation Officers.
Family Service Officers in the Region
continued to provide valuable services to
families in conflict, concentrating on
conciliation and counselling to resolve a large
portion of the cases. Clearwater offered a
family relations workshop through the North
Thompson Life Society. The manual
distributed by the B.C. Council for the
Family was useful in pre-marital counselling.
In Neison, Divorce/Separation Experience
Programs were attended by 75 people.
The Kamloops office provides one of the
most comprehensive range of services in the
province in family matters. During the year,
family court services in Kamloops were
initially drastically curtailed while staff
sought ways to work within the changing
guidelines for their involvement in family
relations. Gradually, through the year, these
services were re-established.
In 1980-81, a significant trend in the Region
was the courts' reduced use of the Impaired
Drivers' Course. Those communities where
the course remained viable, such as
Kelowna, worked very closely with the
Alcohol and Drug Commission and other
related agencies to modify the course to
43
'—
 Activity Reports
better meet the needs of those convicted of
impaired driving. It was felt that a revised
course with a preventative focus could be
used effectively in the schools and elsewhere
in the community.
Northern Region
Probation and Family Services
A full range of services is provided to the
main communities in the Northern Region
from offices in Dawson Creek, Fort St. John,
Kitimat, Mackenzie, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Queen Charlotte Islands, Quesnel,
Smithers, Terrace and Vanderhoof. Outlying
communities are serviced on a regular
visiting basis by staff from nearby larger
centres. This year, Terrace added Lower Post
and Atlin to the list of smaller communities
serviced in this way.
Contracted services are used extensively in
this Region to supplement statutory services
provided by the Corrections staff. They are a
more flexible form of service and can be
adjusted to respond to the changing levels of
demand.
Centres reporting increases in caseloads,
such as Prince Rupert, Kitimat and Prince
George, also experienced rapid industrial
growth and related population expansion. A
grave concern is the increasing severity in the
nature of offences in these centres. Fort
Nelson reported a drop in caseload, related to
the reduced level of gas exploration in the
area and the shift in population.
Throughout the Region, offices expressed a
concern about the inadequacy of programs
and facilities for juveniles. Because of the
lack of secure remand facilities and
attendance programs, juveniles have to be
sent outside their own area for these services
or kept in secure containment in the Region.
Neither existing solution is acceptable. A
priority for 1981-82 is the enhancement of
juvenile programs and facilities to match the
Region's requirements. This would include a
secure remand centre in Prince George
44
capable of accommodating from six to ei;4
juveniles. Facilities and services are alsra
needed for female juveniles and for distu*
youngsters aged 10 to 14.
Significant initiatives in youth work in th
Region included the team approach by al
involved agencies in the Queen Charlofflll
Islands, where 80% of the caseload is na
juveniles. Prince Rupert continued to oljl
Project Sea Adventure, a daily attendansl
program with a preventative focus. SiHJ
contracted for a preventative diversion]
program in the summer for native youth:
Although the Community Service Order a
Program exists in most communities, W
several smaller communities, it is
administered by volunteers. In most cent
however, it is a contracted service. A prii
for 1981-82 will be the co-ordinated
development of this program with emfflS
on the reparative nature of the work assts
Prince Rupert reported an expansion of i
Community Service Order Program. In
Mackenzie, the program declined for lai i
referrals. Referrals in Dawson Creek we:
also down in 1980-81, resulting in highs
to administer the program. In 100 Mile
House, the Band at Canim Lake Reservst
up a program for Band members. Thg
program continued to be a viable altefflj
for the courts and corrections staff,  j
Increases in adult caseloads were repjlmj
throughout the Region. Diversion is SB,
used with adults; instead, the emphasffii
such attendance programs as the Imparl
Drivers' Course and the Community Seti
Order Program. Bail and Parole Supeni
remained relatively low in the Region^
In the Northern Region, the Impaired]
Drivers' Course continued to be used ctt
extensively. Courses were conducted!
most part, on a contracted basis. In ION
House, two courses were completeeT
Dawson Creek, 86 referrals took part itl
eight courses, in Chetwynd, 45 partifcift
completed four courses. Fort St. John
continued to record the highest convicn
 HSr impaired driving in the province. In
jfSelson, three small-format courses were
bpleted but a backlog of referrals
lined. A large classroom format course
i d more adequately meet the
jfflnity's needs next year. Terrace
uced a 30-minute award winning video
{lie dangers of impaired driving that was
srod throughout the Pacific Northwest
larowhere in the country.
The service area that witnessed the most
changes in the Region during the year was
Family Services. The Prince Rupert office
expanded family services in the area of
consent orders and counselling agreements.
Smithers also reported an expansion of family
services. Many offices, such as 100 Mile
House, offer family services informally since
they do not have adequate specialized staff to
meet this need.
45
	
 Management Support Services: Activity Description
III
Management Support Services comprises a
number of sections which provide the
specialized services necessary to operate
correctional facilities and programs
throughout the province. They include the
Resource Analysis, Program Analysis and
Evaluation, and Information Services
Sections, all located in Victoria, and the Staff
Development, Provincial Classification,
Pyschological Services, Medical Services
and Religious Programs Sections, all located
in the Vancouver area.
Resource Analysis Section
In August 1980, as anticipated, the
Operations and Management Systems Section
was combined with the Resource Analysis
Section.
The role of the Resource Analysis Section is
to support Branch resource management and
provide analysis regarding these resources.
This includes a broad spectrum of financial,
data systems, manpower, facilities, food
services and material resources. The Section
also provides liaison with central agencies
over these matters.
Approximately 80% of the budget of
Corrections Branch is composed of staff
costs. One of the responsibilities of the
Resource Analysis Section is the
documentation of the numbers, classifications
and locations of administrative, institutional
and community service staff of the Branch
for budgeting and other purposes. The
section is also responsible for the coordination of the budget cycle each fiscal
year with regional management, and the
preparation of progress reports on Branch
expenditures throughout the year. The section
also assumes responsibility for these
functions for the Commissioner's Office.
Resource Analysis supplies administrative
services such as requisitioning and
vouchering for Branch-wide material
46
requirements and for various components
the Commissioner's Office in Victoria!
The responsibilities of the Resource Anasii
Section with regard to electronic data
processing include the maintenance, uSjflj
and improvement of the Provincial ClienS
File, a computerized record containing
current and historical information on all |
formal cases served by the Branch since i
1972, and the provision of this informatiu
Corrections field staff.
The Provincial Offender File is refereno I
regularly by operations staff for current r
offender location status and history. ,ASp
most inmate classifications are based onte
file.
During 1980-81, the section installed^
computer terminals in all the regional
correctional centres, the Provincial I
Classification Office in Vancouver, anfljai
Vancouver Court Team Probation Office!
Facsimile machines were installed in ml
regional correctional centres and the
Provincial Classification Office to enafte:
transmission of exact copies of legal
documentation on clients and to send toie
Resource Analysis Section data for daiL:
update of the Provincial Offender FileS
In 1981, a local institutional system foi
automation of inmate record management
initiated on a pilot basis. This system, 'lie
is being tested at the Lower Mainland E
Regional Correctional Centre, will be^
significant aid to records office personi. a
well as business managers. In February9i
the Project Definition document was|
completed, and in March, work hadj
commenced on the detailed Requiremes
Specifications.
A detailed Post Review of staff numbe ai
functions with the objective of ensurm,
appropriate levels and equitable distribfi
in all institutions was started early in?li9
This study continued through 1980-81 m<
 |je completed in the summer of 1981.
Rlishments of this major project have
ijffia setting up a base for comprehensive
l^entation of posts in all institutions,
,lping standards for relief of posts,
oping a system for recording employee
ices, and completion of organization
J by posts and position numbers.
ams which were experiencing staff
iencies were identified for resolution in
•82. Quantitative staffing standards that
ie translated to new facilities for
ing purposes were developed.
directions Personnel Classification
ffl initiated early in 1979, developed on
lule throughout the year. The project
w reviewing all correctional
latent job descriptions, classifying
iimark positions and developing a
IMation system that is intended to
de career mobility for Branch
>yees and contribute to the successful
sation of the community and institution
am staff.
eesource Analysis Section developed the
it and outline of the contents for a
ii cial Management Manual and a Human
stfces Management Manual. These
ills will be completed by the end of
582.
ig this year, some of the systems for
ie management were completed. These
lied the application of decals to all
l es in conformance with the Provincial
aty Program and the distribution of
i'"sal credit cards.
ic;t Management courses were provided
tl Justice Institute for support staff, and
'imd district directors in the Branch. The
:tn developed the course curricula and
J'led instructional resources in
niction with Vancouver Region's
srce Co-ordinator.
n/ format for variance analysis and
testing was developed and will be
lamented in 1981-82.
Program Analysis and Evaluation
The role of the Program Analysis and
Evaluation Section is to provide the Branch
with analysis and evaluation regarding
policies, standards, programs, procedures,
regulations and legislation in order to assist
in decision-making and in advocating the
development of new correctional programs.
An additional function of the section is
communicating within the Branch, the
Ministry and other ministries and relevant
agencies, information related to correctional
programs.
Significant achievements in 1980-81 included
the leadership role taken by the section in
responding to the proposed Federal Young
Offenders Act which will replace the 1929
Juvenile Delinquents Act. The section also
spearheaded a major provincial project to
design a consistent, systematic method of
evaluating all correctional programs with the
objective of assisting managers in decisionmaking at the local level and also facilitating
comparisons across the system for regional
and Branch managers.
During the year, the Program Analysis and
Evaluation Section acted as a resource to a
management consultant firm in the
development of the Staff Planning Technique
designed to forecast staff requirements in 92
offices across the province.This initiative
together with the previously mentioned Post
Review provide the basis for the
establishment of Corrections Branch Staffing
Standards.
The section also designed and/or maintained
Operational Manuals for field staff in relation
to the delivery of services in adult
institutions, juvenile institutions, family
services, and adult and juvenile probation
services.
Information Services
The objectives of Information Services are to
inform various publics of Branch policies and
programs; to inform Branch staff of Branch
policies, programs and procedures regarding
47
 operations; to keep the Branch informed on
public opinion of corrections programs; and
to consult with staff on communication
issues. These objectives were achieved
through planned communications, as well as
through the production and distribution of
printed and audio visual materials used by
corrections staff and others within the
criminal justice system.
During the year, the production of materials
included the Ministerial Briefing Book,
Corrections Newsletter (monthly), News
Releases, Bulletins, Annual Report, news
clippings, and the development or revision of
a variety of booklets and brochures.
Information Services also developed Branch
Communication objectives for inclusion in
Branch priorities.
Travel throughout the province to liaise with
Branch staff on communication matters and
to highlight programs through various
mediums continued to be a priority of
Information Services. During the year, the
Director visited most offices in every Region.
Several projects involving Information
Services were initiated in 1980. They
included the drafting of a Branch Media
Policy for Institutions, developing an
Information Section for a Management
Manual of Operations, and producing
guidelines for a new format in the preparation
and writing of the Branch Annual Report. In
addition, the Information Services Division
was involved with regional planning
workshops, consulting on communication
issues and assisting in the promotion of the
work of related agencies who assist the
Branch in carrying out its programs.
Staff Development
The Staff Development Division provides a
range of training courses and related services
to ensure that all Branch staff complete
required training. These services include
basic training for new institutional
employees, probation officers and line
managers, and also advanced training to
increase and update the skills of established
48
staff. The division also provides experffi
related to planning career development^
policy, maintains a manpower informafS
system, and acts as a resource and consul
to the field on unscheduled training neeus
Further priorities of the division included
developing an effective system of analS
Branch training needs and evaluating flffl
results; completing a cost-benefit analW
report of every course offered to ensuresBL
optimum use of Staff Development reseB
providing courses for managers; impreH^
skills and knowledge in Human Resoiffl
Management; and developing effectiveM
relationships with other justice systemBJ
training groups.
With the mandatory requirement for offl
job professional development, Corrects
Branch commits the highest number of stl
days to training of any government mima
This year, the total number of days
committed to staff development was 9/W
for a total of 1 491 students from acroS
province. In addition to attendance atS
offered by the Staff Development Divffl
the Justice Institute, 117 persons appliedi
and received a total of $12,547.47 in ffl|
subsidies provided by the Public Service
Commission and Staff Development ftH
Five others were granted educational lea!
complete their studies.!
In addition to regularly scheduled course j
there were several innovative courses!"
developed to meet specific field needs
included Hostage Survival, Career Planrj
Conflict Resolution by Mediation, Violet
in Families, Managing and Resolvingj
Conflict, and Situational Leadership.]
During the year, the Institutional Service:
Section refined the basic Juvenile Secur:
Officer course and also field-tested sevel
testing processes that will be implement ■
next year. Course content analysis meetijs
were held to ensure that total course corn
is evaluated, updated anel/or revised as I
applicable.
The Community Services Section devehe
clear and concise lesson objectives forj|h
 Rity Reports
ffi session of the Probation Officer Basic
ling Program and completed detailed
in plans for the adult and family
Bnal areas. Training courses
Jiasized experiential learning and
lication of current adult education
ies. Wherever possible, Community and
jffilonal programs were integrated.
ng 1980-81, administrative support staff
given their first centrally developed
ling, and more secretarial courses are
lira for next year. The manpower
Ry became a reality and will be a
ime tool for both staff development and
:eld. A study was begun to establish a
lierency base for family court counsellors
jm in identifying training needs and to
tlSh criteria for recruitment and
tion. A set of physical fitness standards
Hmttitv officers was introduced to the
jffions Branch, and Basic Training
Content was adjusted to allow time for
fflttraining and testing.
tincial Classification
HHnain responsibility of Provincial
ification to place sentenced inmates in
ppriate correctional facilities as soon as
sble after sentence and to react quickly to
csary placement changes. Further
[risibilities include advising the Branch
t; profile of inmate population and the
) appropriate distribution of inmates
"correctional facilities; advising the
a:mon the criteria for classification and
tards for judgement; recommending
3jOTcriteria for classification to various
r:tional facilities; controlling legal
cnentation of inmate transfers; and
llting and distributing information on
Jigs, inmate counts, and inmate location
' ch institution.
llpon, the staff of Provincial
a.fication manage International Transfer
ptments and Exchange of Services
iffints between the Government of
Ufa and the Government of British
Jima. These agreements allow for the
transfer of inmates to provincial institutions
to serve their sentences closer to their
families, communities or friends. Transfers
may also be effected to provide an offender
with specific training opportunities otherwise
unavailable.
Much of the information base relating to
Provincial Classification work is now
computerized, providing a readily accessible,
up-to-date resource for Branch and institution
staff.
During the year, a total of 9 038
classifications and reclassifications were
conducted throughout the province. A drop in
placements at the Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre resulted from the
implementation of the Alternate Entry
Program for the three lower mainland regions
which allowed for initial classifications to be
conducted at a number of locations, including
the Provincial Courts at 222 Main Street,
Vancouver, the North Fraser Regional
Reception Centre at Alouette River
Correctional Centre, and Chilliwack Security
Unit, in addition to the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre.
Provincial Classification for the Vancouver
Island Region is the responsibility of the
specialized Case Management Unit in
Victoria. Within the Vancouver Island,
Interior and Northern Regions, Classification
Officers are responsible to the Regional
Director for classification within the Regions
and to the Director of Provincial
Classification for inter-regional placements.
The number of initial classifications at the
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre has risen constantly over the years,
taxing the centre's classification system and
accommodations. As a result, the population
there is carefully monitored to ensure that the
facility is used only when necessary, and to
identify potential transfers to more suitable
alternate facilities. The implementation of the
alternate entry program has also helped to
alleviate the situation at the centre.
49
 Activity Reports
Psychological Services
The Corrections Branch has one full-time
senior psychologist who is responsible for the
delivery of all psychological services
throughout the Branch. There are, in
addition, some ten sessionally contracted
psychologists who each work from one to
five sessions per week.
The major thrust in providing pyschological
services within the Branch continued to be
the development of community resources.
Despite this priority, the Branch continued to
provide some direct services, such as in the
case management of inmates with serious
psychological/behavioural problems. Limited
direct psychological treatment of offenders is
available in some correctional centres, but
these services are primarily for short-term
crisis intervention rather than ongoing
treatment.
During the year, Psychological Services
adopted the British Columbia Pyschological
Association's Standards for Providers of
Psychological Services. The Corrections
Branch has taken the initiative of adopting
these standards and is now in the process of
implementing them. The expectation is that
the B.C. Pyschological Association will work
together with the B.C. Medical Association
to develop accreditation procedures for
services within correctional facilities.
This year, the Branch's Clinical Research
Committee, chaired by the Senior
Psychologist, chose as a focus for its work
matters related to sex offenders. The Forensic
Psychiatric Services Commission has shown
a continued interest in developing a
specialized program for these offenders and
the Branch has been working in co-operation
with them on this project. Members of the
Department of Criminology at Simon Fraser
University have also shown an active interest
in assisting in the analysis of Branch
information on sex offenders.
Religious Programs
Religious programs are co-ordinated by a
Director based in Vancouver. A staff of full-
50
time, part-time and voluntary chaplain»
ensure that pastoral care and counsellirH
well as spiritual support are provided for
offenders, juvenile delinquents, staff and
their respective families thoughout the
province. In addition, it is the responsjM
of the staff of Religious Programs to liais
with and involve community churchesBM
individuals and groups in correctionauB
activities.
The planned training course for new   j
chaplains was not realized this year; how;
discussions with the Pastoral Institute ot|
British Columbia were initiated with affij
to providing further training opportunimStf
chaplains. In the meantime, the Directffl
the Section provided a more intensiveBJ
orientation for two new chaplains.
To meet the objective of providing serwg|
equitably among all regions and institutes
some additional services were introduced i
year, notably in Terrace, at the Victoria ^ji
Detention Centre and the Interior Regior i
Weekly services were provided by all
chaplains. In addition, opportunities weivl
provided to offenders to attend churcfm
services in the community on a regular la
at three centres and as requested in at E:
five centres. At the Vancouver IslandBJ
Regional Correctional Centre, the chaplij;
held services in the cells on the tiers. At
Alouette River Correctional Centre the |i
services took on new meaning as thejBj
focused on the twelve steps of recovery tl
Alcoholics Anonymous Program.
In virtually all centres, an ongoing concn:
was the lack of adequate facilities for
conducting services and providing pastol
care and counselling. The concern for i]
providing equitable service to all centre! s :
demanded schedule preparation to ensuts
balance of services to such centres as
Alouette River Correctional Centre and vu
Maples. An attempt was also made duriJl
year to enhance the services at the Lakele
Centre and to find ways to involve new
volunteers in this activity. Religious seree:
 Jible to Lakeview Camp and Camp Point
S^nained inadequate. This will be
fined when the chaplain's position and
von of responsibilities is confirmed next
i
uection was involved in initiatives to
itive the methods of communicating and
lireting the role and functions of the
ijfflto community churches. The Director
(: Section acted as a resource person to
jsfllrnative Committee established by the
A rial Church Council on Justice and
(tenons.
liaplains were involved to an extent in
eing engagements in the community. In
don most chaplains were involved in the
itment, orientation and supervision of
teers involved in religious
oams.Virtually all chaplains were
jslgl in sponsoring M2/W2 programs and
ciolics Anonymous. They also provided
n, bible study discussion groups and
ns musical, dramatic and recreational
oams.
uiection attempts to ensure that a variety
ligious programs is made available. In
eng this goal, the chaplain at Willingdon
in Detention Centre reported that
oams at the centre included a combined
inight, church service, visitation
nam. In addition, the volunteers from
2/2 Christian Volunteers in Corrections
oded a one-to-one sponsorship program,
uligible residents of the centre, there was
eeekly bible study program called "Teen
iT and a weekly "Addictions Awareness"
oam in which various volunteer groups
iripated.
t tncouver Island Regional Correctional
eie, the chaplain provided a
Ritionship Enrichment Group" primarily
ir aching communication skills between
isrnds (inmates) and their wives. He also
icored programs on how to handle stress.
t ikeside Centre the chaplain reported
xattendance at regular church services but
interest and participation in informal
isission groups held regularly in the
Mion rooms.
By far the major portion of chaplains' time
during the year was given to the care and
counselling of individual offenders. Family
and marriage counselling was provided by
virtually all chaplains. The chaplain at
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre also made counselling available to the
children of inmates.
Chaplains worked closely with community
groups involved in providing programs to the
various institutions. Other work included
meetings and consultations related to the
development of standards for the Religious
Programs Section, administrative
responsibility, travel and training.
Medical Services
Medical Services to offenders are coordinated by one full-time senior medical
officer. Priorities of the Medical Services
Section include the provision of medical
services; the maintenance of security, as
required, for the protection of the public; the
upgrading of facilities; and the adoption and
implementation of Provincial Standards
relating to the provision of medical services
to those incarcerated. A major concern
during 1980-81 was trying to meet an
increased demand for services with
inadequate facilities and resources.
Medical Services staff maintained a high
degree of professionalism during the year in
the provision of services and related duties.
They developed and maintained positive
relationships with many outside agencies
providing related services and with the
related professional services of the
Corrections Branch.
Each Corrections Branch facility has local
doctors and dentists available to visit the
facility regularly, so that 90% of all medical
problems are handled locally. When an
offender requires hospital services and
security is not an issue, medical facilities in
the nearest community are used. Offenders
requiring medical attention who are likely
escape risks or who require protective
custody, however, are treated in the limited
51
 medical facilities within secure custodial
facilities.
The hospital at the Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre serves as a centralized
facility used for such offenders. It can
accommodate up to 40 patients. Until the
early part of 1979, the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre Hospital also
had access to a secure ward at Vancouver
General Hospital for surgery and treatment
that could not be provided on site. The
closure of the ward has resulted in additional
costs to provide individual security. In
addition, during the year, there were five
escapes from Vancouver General Hospital
resulting from the lack of provision of a ;
secure ward. It has remained a prioritBII
seek an effective resolution to this probH
Dental standards at the Lower Mainlan* j
Regional Correctional Centre Hospital™
been upgraded to meet the standards of I
British Columbia College of Dental
Surgeons. In addition, visiting speciaB
included a psychiatrist, dermatologist^
optometrist, physiotherapist, an E.E.G.
technician and a T.B. consultant. TheB
Hospital also routinely provided x-rayM
laboratory analyses, out-patient diagnosi
and some surgery, as well as respond™
emergencies.
52
 Dection and Standards Division: Activity Description and Report
Be chief priority of the Inspection and
a lards Division to ensure the maintenance
nigh level of standards in service
[S facilities, security and personal
istion.
(neve this, the division inspects all
atonal centres, youth containment
ass, remand facilities and other Branch
ies. It also investigates any matter on
! ritten request of the Minister or
jfflbioner, including escapes, suicides
dtaff misconduct. In addition, the
^investigates complaints received
ninmates, youths in containment or on
tia, probationers, parolees, youths on
Jfflmal release and parents of youths
d Corrections Branch supervision. The
jicm also responds to inquiries and
fsts, from staff and inmates alike, on
itrs dealing with the administration of
ah policy, rules and regulations. A final
ijnsibility is the review of inmate appeals
c lief against disciplinary hearing findings
'disposition.
iig the past two years, a key task has
ethe development of service delivery
mrds. In 1980-81, 25 sections of the
actions Branch Manual of Standards
aig with programs and performance were
ULed, published and distributed to each of
: ranch sites in the province. This is the
t realization of a long-term project to
vjp and implement standards for the
ah. The completion of the project will
never increasing demands on the
non.
11 g 1980-81, all Corrections Branch
wile facilities were inspected by the
won. By utilizing inspectors from local
safety, health and fire departments, the team
inspection concept was emphasized. In
addition, Corrections Branch expertise was
added in the assessment of security,
operational policy and management
procedures.
Because of staff commitments to the
development of the Manual of Standards, no
adult facilities were inspected this year. A
program of inspections for adult facilities has
been prepared and will be implemented
during 1981-82.
During 1980-81, a total of 50 investigations
were undertaken by division staff at the
request of the Minister or Commissioner.
They dealt with assault, accidents, escapes,
incidents and disturbances, inmate deaths and
suicides, and staff misconduct.
Over the course of the year, the division also
dealt with a total of 301 inmate complaints.
This represents a 28% decrease from the
number of complaints processed the previous
year. These complaints were, for the most
part, resolved or referred too appropriate
agencies for resolution. The Division also
addressed 52 appeals for review of
disciplinary hearings, of which 25% were
allowed.
During the past year, the responsibilities of
the division's Branch Safety Officer were
enlarged to encompass those of a Ministry
Safety Officer. This Officer assisted in the
development of the Health and Safety
Committees at strategic locations throughout
the province. He also initiated a computer
data program whereby all reported accidents
can now be tabulated, categorized and cost
analyzed in detail. The division plans further
refinement to this process in the coming year.
53
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1/3
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II
S z o
m f;
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£2
UJ  <
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to 5
life
Z
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<A
1
 pendix A
FIGURE 2 CORRECTIONS BRANCH ADMINISTRATION REGIONS
See Map below foi
Lower Mainland
Regional Areas
Etegion I    Vancouver Island
Region 2   Vancouver
[Region 3   South Fraser
Region 4   North Fraser
Region 5   Interior
Region 6   Northern
55
 Appendix A
TABLE 1 EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL 1980/81
Activity
Secure Custodial
Island	
Vancouver	
South Fraser	
North Fraser	
Interior	
Northern	
Year-end Adjustments..
Open Facilities
Island	
Vancouver	
South Fraser	
North Fraser	
Interior	
Northern	
Year-end Adjustments..
Community-based Programs
Island	
Vancouver	
South Fraser	
North Fraser	
Interior	
Northern	
Year-end Adjustments.
Probation and Family Services
Island	
Vancouver	
South Fraser	
North Fraser	
Interior	
Northern	
Year-end Adjustments..
Management Support Services
Island	
Vancouver	
South Fraser	
North Fraser	
Interior	
Northern	
Activity
Sub-total
3,480,887
14,419,368
547,390
2,038,302
2,423,428
(4,125)
1,644,086
2,320.080
5,720,714
1,129,907
724,343
(1,346)
1,388,138
1,696,564
2,176,877
185,578
770,026
404,059
(1,272)
2,072,964
3,496,348
2,509,641
1,931,245
1,956,261
1,743,987
(9,121)
607,089
957,138
1.014,329
1,738,352
101,012
282,087
Commissioner's Office
General Administration	
Religious Programs	
Provincial Classification	
Staff Development	
Resource Analysis	
Program Analysis and Evaluation	
Operations and Management Support..
Information Services	
Discretionary Resources	
Training Relief.	
Year-end Adjustments	
Inspection and Standards	
386,804
291,878
371,141
,233.683
345.848
264,420
260,720
104,460
215,694
637,096
(8,697)
Acny j
Tola
56
Branch Total    63,773,585 — Balances to Public Accoun
Figures exclude decimal points and are rounded to the
 IB..
si
ge ulili/ation of Corrections facilities..
i''s and home supervision	
CABLE 2 COMPARISON OF AVERAGE COUNT AND CAPACITY FOR ADUL
LEVEL OF SECURITY. 1980/8
■ Remand	
Sentenced..
Total...
TY FOR AD
/81
ULT INSTITUTIONS BY
Capacity
Count
Utilization %
954
356
489
845
85.7
610
489
80.2
165
121
73.3
1729
1455
82.2
0
44
N/A
57
L.
 Appendix A
TABLE 3 MINISTRY OF ATTORNEY GENERAL CORRECTIONS BRANCH ADULT INSTITUTION!
Percent of Admissions and Average Count by Selected Categories
SENTENCED
3-yr. trend     Definitions*
AGE
Under 18  3.6
18-19  12.9
20-21  12.3
22-24  15.9
25-29  17.6
30-34  12.2
35-39  8.0
40-49  10.9
50+   6.5
SEX
Male  92.8
Female  7.2
RACE
Native  16.9
Non-Native  83.1
RECIDIVISM
MEASURES
No previous formal
contact  28.0
No previous time in jail 12.2
No previous jail
sentence  14.1
Previousjailover2 yrs.
ago  9.5
Previous jail within
2 yrs  36.2
OFFENCE
Administrative  1.5
Breach of probation ... 3.4
Breaking and entering 8.6
Cannabis  3.6
Cannabis possession .. 2.0
Driving while disqualified  5.4
Driving and drinking.. 26.6
Drugs  8.7
Heroin  1.8
Motor vehicle related.. 35.0
Person  9.6
Property  32.4
Publicorder  8.9
Serious  10.7
Sexual  1.5
Theft by fraud  2.3
Theft under $200  8.0
Violent   4.3
Weapons  3.7
SENTENCE LENGTH
IN DAYS
1-7      8.7
8-14     21.7
15-21     8.3
22-30   15.4
31-45     2.2
46-60    6.2
61-90    9.8
91-180  |1 4
181-270  4 2
271-360  3.9
361-719  4.6
720+  2.9
Indefinite 7
Actual number of
admissions/count.... 7151
2.8
3.1
2.2
3.5
3.0
14.9
13.4
15.6
11.9
16.6
16.1
12.4
13.7
13.7
15.7
17.2
16.0
17.7
16.0
16.4
18.4
17.8
17.7
18.1
18.3
10.8
11.7
12.9
12.5
10.6
7.2
8.4
7.0
8.1
7.4
8.3
10.0
8.1
9.6
7.5
4.3
7.2
5.2
6.6
4.5
93.5
95.4
94.1
95.2
95.6
6.5
4.6
5.9
4.8
4.4
16.4
18.8
17.6
17.7
18.6
83.6
81.2
82.4
82.3
81.4
15.9
10.6
.4
1.9
21.0
3.8
2.2
10.0
12.1
4.8
13.9
17.7
52.6
6.0
22.8
3.0
3.8
4.5
2.0
4.8
11.3
14.4
23.2
4.7
.6
58
23.8
13.3
14.4
9.9
25.1     13.7
2.0
3.2
9.7
2.4
6.4
47.2
.4
1.1
22.7
2.9
25.8
6.9
.8
34.9
9.0
35.2
8.7
10.4
1.7
9.0
10.4
3.5
13.6
17.2
1.0
3.0
1.8
4.9
.9
3.6
9.7
18.3
11.6
15.2
25.5
4.0
* See Figure 3—Definition;,.
9.1
13.3 20.5
10.3 7.3
39.2    49.4
1.1
3.7
10.6
6.7
.5
31.2
10.6
37.6
9.0
12.2
1.9
2.8
8.1
8.5
16.1
1.9
6.6
10.5
12.5
5.1
4.7
4.8
1.6
24.2
1.8
8.7
7.2
1.4
13.4
18.6
57.4
6.8
4.6
12.9
9.7
.7
3.1
.9
4.8
9.9
18.3
12.1
15.8
23.8
3.5
1290   7032   1301   6856    1138
6.3
14.5
13.2
16.3
18.1
12.0
7.5
6.9
5.1
3.4
11.5
9.5
15.9
18.2
17.9
8.2
10.2
5.3
15.3
12.6
17.1
3.6
14.6
10.7
15.4
18.7    21.6
11.8
6.1
15.4
13.3
15.5
7.6
6.9
4.2
6.7
7.7
4.9
.8
13.4 j
16.2
18.3    21.2
12.5     14.4
7.7      7.7
7.0
4.3
7.8
3.71
91.4    92.9    92.2    94.7    94.3    95.8
8.6      7.1      7.8     5.3     5.7     4.2
16.6    15.1    17.7    20.0    15.0    17.7
83.4    84.9   82.3    80.0    85.0    82.3 '
34.9
40.9
35.1
34.0
31.6
33.3
10.1
6.2
9.0
7.1
10.0
7.9
10.6
10.8
10.6
12.1
11.6
10.1
8.5
7.6
8.3
8.2
9.5
8.4
35.9
34.5
37.0
38.6
37.3
40.4
3
.1
.0
2
.1
2
'fl
4
2.7
.8
2.1
.8
2.7
1.5
17.5
14.8
17.2
20.4
17.7
17.6
5
1.3
1.0
1.6
.7
.7
1.0
6
.3
.7
.4
.3
.5
.1
.3
.4
.2
7
2.4
.7
3.0
.8
2.6
.7
5
10.3
15.9
9.9
9.1
11.4
15.6
5
3.8
6.2
1.1
2.0
1.1
.9
8
4.1
1.6
4.9
1.6
4.2
1.7
9
23.1
36.3
22.9
32.8
23.4
.15.0
10
54.2
46.3
55.2
53.8
54.9
50.4
11
9.3
4.5
10.5
6.7
9.7
6.0
12
25.7
50.1
23.4
40.0
25.2
46.6  )
n
3.3
5.0
3.8
5.6
3.4
5.2
14
3.4
2.0
3.3
3.4
3.7
2.3
8.9
3.6
8.2
4.0
7.4
3.7 ■
15
16.1
31.7
16.1
28.1
16.7
30.4
16
13.0
17.4
13.1
15.5
13.3
16.8 ■
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A'W
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A    ,
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/AlA'i
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/S{4I
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A    1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A V/
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A   /
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
4319
383
4423
359
4441
35! .
 r
pendix A
,E 3 MINISTRY OF ATTORNEY GENERAL CORRECTIONS BRANCH ADULT INSTITUTIONS—Continued
Percent of Admissions and Average Count by Selected Categories
SENTENCED
Aver.
Count
W DEFAULT
reason for
Mission    19.7
sed on payment
ine..     2.7
::al
I ICES
i tared to
itentiary     5.1
etg federal time...    2.5
J LOCATION
5.1     16.4
.5     2.0
4.6
4.1
I OF WARRANT
itir...   :
26.6    30.5    29.6    29.9
jops. . .
George
8.1
6.8
5.3
2.1
2.7
3.0
2.6
7.1
6.0
5.6
2.6
.9
oFraser	
ii Fraser	
tver	
itiver Island .
E.	
13.6
7.3
10.0
29.7
17.9
19.3
12.5
9.0
10.6
33.1
15.3
8.4
6.7
3.9
2.2
2.7
2.4
2.0
21.5
12.9
6.6
8.5
32.7
17.7
4.3
2.2
2.0
21.7
13.4
9.2
9.0
32.2
14.3
16.4
1.9
25.0
9.8
5.2
3.8
3.5
2.7
3.7
2.4
2.0
20.7
12.2
7.5
10.8
27.9
20.9
.1
1.9
5.3
1.9
4,1
.0
.0
.0
.0
49.4
50.4
49.6
47.2
11.6
7.1
12.0
10.2
3.3
3.4
4.9
5.3
8.2
3.8
6.0
4.5
18.3
3.6
3.7
22.5
13.1
8.2
9.7
27.5
18.9
16.7
13.4
Dt-raser	
»u:raser	
j/eg.	
verIsland ....
B'SISTODY
*.A	
Wluiity	
S CUSTODY
95.8
1.7
21.5
9.1
33.3
10.3
47.5
39.3
13.2
16.1
12.9
22.9
2.6
27.9
17.5
13.2
22.4
8.4
31.6
10.1
48.0
37.2
14.8
5.7
6.0
14.6
9.6
8.7
6.4
13.0
II.1
6.9
;&lumber of
fldsions/count..
1.4
1.5
1.9
1.9
7.5
12.0
12.0
17.2
8.6
25.8
9.6
3.1
6.2
6.3
17.4
7.4
10.4
5.0
13.5
11.0
6.8
6.8
2.0
3.6
13.1
20.4
8.4
22.3
13.2
17.0
4.9
30.5
19.4
90.4
4.3
2.8
5.8
6.5
15.8
7.3
10.3
7.5
7.1
2.2
12.8
13.3
22.0
8.6
28.9
13.7
46.8
38.7
14.5
9.1
20.6
3.9
6.9
9.3
9.0
12.3
7.6
9.9
10.5
7.3
8.2
7.2
8.9
7.3
/.i
8.9
7.4
7.3
7.7
6.5
6.8
8.4
6.3
6.6
8.3
9.2
52.5
55.1
52.7
50.9
48.3
42.2
15.7
10.9
16.2
15.7
19.1
25.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
5.2
5.5
6.9
8.0
5.4
6.5
10.8
7.0
8.9
7.7
9.6
8.5
.0
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
69.0
77.1
67.4
68.8
66.6
60.7
15.0
10.2
16.6
15.5
18.4
23.3
99.9
99.7
100.0
100.0
99.8
99.9
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.2
.1
6.7
2
10.3
.4
10.1
.4
14.6
I.I
15.5
1.4
15.4
1.4
9.8
1.4
8.8
1.4
8.8
1.4
15.8
3.7
15.5
4.4
15.5
4.3
9.6
3.9
9.5
4.6
9.0
4.4
6.5
3.7
5.4
3.6
6.3
4.2
10.7
8.3
10.7
9.9
9.7
9.0
12.6
16.6
13.3
21.1
13.3
20.8
8.8
22.9
7.3
22.8
8.1
24.7
2.4
10.8
2.0
II.1
2.1
11.2
1.5
10.1
.9
7.3
.9
7.5
.6
5,3
.4
4.4
.6
7.2
.3
6.0
.4
6.9
.2
3.6
7032 1301 6856 1138
fytdby O. K. Muirhead, Senior Research Analyst. Re:
J—
59
 m
Appendix A
TABLE 4 CORRECTIONS BRANCH PROFILE OF CLIENT COMMUNITY SERVICES POPULATION
Probation
Bail Supervii
Category
Definitions*
% of Total
Admissions
SENTENCE LENGTH IN DAYS
1-90   9.1
91-180  36.6
181-360  34.9
361-720  14.7
721 +  2.1
Indefinite  2.7
COURT LOCATION
Vancouver  10.9
Victoria  10.4
Kamloops  2.3
Prince George  3.6
Kelovvna  2.6
New Westminster  2.1
Nanaimo  3.7
Surrey  2.7
Courtenay  2.3
Quesnel  1.4
Vernon  2.3
REGION OF WARRANT
Interior ,	
North	
North Fraser	
South Fraser :...
Vancouver	
Vancouver Island	
Outside B.C	
REGION OF SUPERVISION
Interior	
North	
North Fraser	
South Fraser	
Vancouver	
Vancouver Island	
DAYS UNDER SUPERVISION
1-90 	
91-180	
181-360 :	
361-720 ;..'.	
721+	
Actual number of admissions	
% of Average
Caseload
3.1
21.8
34.9
29.0
5.3
5.9
10.1
7.3
3.0
3.8
3.1
2.4
[ * 3^i" ''
2.8
2.0
1.6
2.3
20.2
22.0
14.6
16.3
9.9
9.7
11.8
12.0
16.7
16.4
23.8
20.6
3.0
3.0
18.7
20.6
16.1
19.1
9.4
8.5
13.2
14.2
19.4
16.8
23.3
20.8
9.1
1.6
14.6
6.0
41.1
29.1
26.1
36.8
9.1
26.4
3 939
* *
1980/81
% of Total      %offfi
Admissions        Casejt
54.5
19.8
.1
9.5
.1
.9
.3
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
10.6
5.2
6.5
56.0
20.9
.0
.2
10.0
3.3
5.9
61.1
19.5
54.5
27.7
13.5
3.7
.6
2 638
* See Figure 3—Definitions.
* * Percent of average caseload is based on a sampling methodology. The actual number of cases composing the average ci-oi
this period is not presently available.
Prepared by G. K. Muirhead, Senior Research Analyst, Resource Analysis Section.
60
 IE 4 CORRECTIONS BRANCH PROFILE OF CLIENT COMMUNITY SERVICES POPULATION—Continued
Probation  Bail Supervision
Definitions*
Category
Jer 18...
9..	
ill..	
UK	
IS	
(i4„	
,9..	
(-9. 	
(	
ale..
'e	
(Native	
:jflSM MEASURES
trevious formal contact	
ct^ious time in jail	
trevious jail sentence	
idus jail over 3 months ago..
'ous jail within 3 months	
ICE
Irustrative	
3 h of probation	
Bung and entering	
iiSs „...	
ubis possession	
riig while disqualified.,
rilg and drinking	
sn	
|ffihicle related..
ri ui~—
Pttt	
ll-order..
ris...	
xl.......	
Kby fraud	
Wffir$200..
Mil	
eons	
^ Jal number of admissions..
1980/81
1980/81
% of Total
Admissions
% of Average
Caseload
1
% of Total      % of Average
Admissions        Caseload
32.2
23.0
7.7
3.2
16.2
17.8
14.5
13.8
10.6
14.5
14.6
12.3
9.7
11.5
16.5
14.1
10.2
10.9
18.4
21.7
6.5
7.2
11.4
14.7
4.2
5.1
5.6
7.4
5.9
5.4
7.0
8.1
4.5
4.6
4.3
4.5
82.8
84.2
85.7
86.3
17.2
15.8
14.3
13.7
11.8
14.2
6.3
5.8
88.2
85.8
93.7
94.2
66.9
59.7
38.3
32.4
17.2
14.7
16.2
10.5
3.1
4.1
13.6
19.5
8.9
16.9
24.7
31.2
3.8
4.6
7.2
6.4
.1
.3
3
.0
.0
.8
.6
4
2.5
1.3
11.3
16.0
12.1
12.1
3.8
4.0
5
8.3
6.1
2.8
2.2
6
2.3
1.3
.7
1.2
.4
.4
20.0
13.4
7
3.2
2.4
5.5
6.6
5
18.1
17.0
.2
.6
5
2.0
2.3
26.2
19.4
8
5.0
3.7
7.6
9.7
9
16.4
21.1
44.9
50.7
10
47.8
46.2
17.3
15.4
11
12.5
12.2
5.9
8.5
12
18.7
24.1
1.5
2.1
13
2.9
4.5
2.7
3.7
14
3.8
4.0
14.4
11.7
8.2
5.3
1.8
3.2
15
8.9
12.7
2.8
4.2
16
9.8
10.4
3 939
* *
2 638
[i^Egure 3—Definitions.
ercent of average caseload is based on a sampling methodology. The actual number of cases composing the ave
"I is not presently available,
"tied by G. K. Muirhead, Senior Research Analyst, Resource Analysis Section.
	
61
 Appendix A
TABLE 5 CORRECTIONS BRANCH DISPOSITION OF ADULTS ON ADMISSION, 1980/81
Sentenced Remand
Offences2*
Property10	
Motor vehicle related8..
Drinking and driving7..
Public Order11	
Theft under $200	
Breaking and entering..
Person9	
Serious12	
Drugss	
Weapons16	
Violent15 	
Sex'3	
Total2	
Admissions...
Probation
Institutions
Bail Suvervision
Custot
37.8
37.6
46.6
54
31.7
31.2
5.2
4
27.5
23.5
3.5
2
16.9
9.0
13.0
9
13.5
8.1
8.4
7
6.4
10.6
10.8
17
8.8
10.6
16.6
23
6.0
12.2
18.9
25
5.8
6.7
18.3
11
3.0
4.6
9.4
13
2.0
5.0
8.9
16
1.9
1.9
3.0
3
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/
9 451
6 856
2 453
44
' See Figure 3 — Definitions.
TABLE 6 CORRECTIONS BRANCH ESTABLISHMENT BY ACTIVITY
Activity 1980/81
Secure Custodial Facilities  769
Open Facilities  387
Community-based Programs  154
Probation and Family Services  514
Management Support Services  231
Inspection and Standards  6
Tbtal  2 061
19:
(ProK
62
 pendix A __	
FIGURE 3
DEFINITIONS
Kimbers within the body of these tables are percentages. To arrive at the absolute number for any percentage,
Jply the figure by the actual number (of admissions or average count) listed at the bottom of the page for that
Imn.
Btfence categories group Criminal Code and Provincial Statutes into categories that are not mutually exclusive.
IB the specific offence of impaired driving is grouped both in the Drinking and Driving aggregate as well as the
otor Vehicle related aggregate group.
URiistrative offences are those relating to money and public administration under the following acts: Family
Boons. Women and Children's Maintenance, Customs, Post Office, Unemployment Insurance,
caches of probation, parole, 64A and intermittent sentences.
:ludes all trafficking, possession, importing, possession with intent to traffick, and cultivation offences.
;ludes cannabis possession only.
Ilffdes impaired driving, driving over .08 and failure to blow.
IBaes impaired driving, driving over .08, failure to blow, failure to stop, negligence in the use of a motor vehicle,
malifled driving, taking an auto without consent and other Motor Vehicle Act offences.
;Iudes all offences involving direct intended harm to a person. These are: pointing a firearm, rape, attempted rape,
; with an underage female, sex with the feeble-minded, indecent assault, incest, buggery, gross indecency,
I Mating children, murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, attempted suicide, harm with intent to wound, common
ault, assault with intent to wound, assaulting a peace officer, kidnapping, robbery, extortion, harassing or
satening and contributing to juvenile delinquency.
hides all theft offences plus extortion, breaking and entering, possession of housebreaking instruments, possession
l^^n property, false pretences, fraud, forgery, counterfeiting, arson.
iludes unlawful assembly, riot, resisting a peace officer, failure to assist a peace officer, impersonating a peace
licer, causing a disturbance, trespassing, vagrancy, mischief, common assault, assaulting a peace officer, unlawfully
JiKtling, fraud in obtaining food or lodging, harassing or threatening, liquor act, railways act, false fire alarm.
1 hides escaping lawful custody, rape, attempted rape, sex with an underage female, sex with the feeble-minded,
iecent assault, murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, harm with intent to wound, assault with intent to wound,
Hoping, robbery, extortion, making counterfeit money, all drug importing or trafficking, conspiracy, breach of
fliSial parole, buggery, incest and gross indecency.
Abides rape, attempted rape, sex with an underage female, sex with the feeble-minded, indecent assault, incest,
itfKry, gross indecency, obscene matter, corrupting children, indecent act, indecent exposure, prostitution-related,
t/dy house-related and other moral offences.
"bse offences in which the theft is indirect and non-violent, including theft by conversion, forgery and uttering,
Sirarfeiting, public fraud.
Ise are offences involving direct serious physical violence to a person including rape, attempted rape, indecent
sum, murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, harm or assault with intent to wound, kidnapping, robbery.
Tildes possession or use of a firearm, explosives or other weapon, pointing a firearm and robbery.
63
 TABLE 7 ESTABLISHMENT SUMMARY BY REGION, FISCAL YEAR 1980/81
Comm.      Island     Vancouver S. Fraser N. Fraser   Interior    Northern
Classification office      Region      Region      Region     Region     Region     Region   j
Deputy Minister (Comm.)  1
Associate Deputy Minister  1
Management  24          11           21            8          13            7           6
Chaplain  18
Administrative Officer 3  3
Administrative Officer 2  9
Administrative Officer 1   2
Research Officer 4  1
Research Officer 3  1
Probation Officer 5  3
Probation Officer 4  21            7           8           4           2
Probation Officer 3  5             4           4                         4           7
Probation Officer 1 and 2  11          53           83          53         41          47         29
Interviewer 2  7           19            3           4           2           1
Captain, Minor Vessel  1
Librarian 2  1
Senior Corrections Officer  2            6          24            6           8           4           4   j
Principal Officer  1          22          45          26         31          15          14
Corrections Security Officer  1         131         386        106        129          98         78
Food Services Officer 3  1
Food Services Officer 2  1             11111
Food Services Officer 1   8           16           7          10           5           3   .
Instructor  1             2            1           7            3           5   j
Medical Officer 4  1
Medical Officer 3  1
Psychologist 4  1
Psychologist 3  1
Dentist 2  1
Nurse 5  1
Nurse 3  1
Nurse 2  1           11                         7
Senior Hospital Officer 1  1
Medical Technician 3 (X-Ray)  1
Pharmacist 2  1
Lab Technician 3  1
Clerk 5  1                         2
Clerk 4  2                          2                         2                         ll
Clerk 3  5            2            9           2           1            2           ll
Clerk Steno 5  1                         2
ClerkSteno4  2                          2                         2                         1
Clerk Steno 3  5            2            9            2           1            2           11
Office Assistant 2  15          30          32         20      .17          24         19
Office Assistant 1  2            1
Carpenter Foreman  1                          1
Carpenter  1             1
Tradesman  1
Electrician Foreman  1                          I
Electrician  1
Plumber Foreman  1
Plumber  1                          1
Painter  1
Mechanic 6  1
Mechanic 5  1
Mechanic 3  1           2
Mechanic 2  1
Foreman of Works 2  1
Supervisor of Stores 1  1
Stockman 3  1
Total permanent positions  106        299         722        258       303        224        176
Total man-years of permanent positions  97     294.50   721.75      255     301.50  218.25     173W
64
 TABLE 8 TEMPORARY ABSENCE STATISTICS, 1980/81
Type of Absence
Active
Beginning
of Month
April 1980
Application
Received
21
186
3
4 587
2 919
212
Active
End of
Month
March 1981
11-term  21 4 587 3 351 28 33
juauous        186 2 919 1740 216 132
e:al     3 212 122 7 4
Mulative total        210 7 718 5 213 251 169
Revocation
I   Unlawfully at Large  87
I   Convicted of Additional Criminal Offences  10
I Centre-Community Behaviour  154
Total    251^
Total number employed         1,947
jl^tal number of person-days worked      22 950
Total amount earned $852,672
: Total restitution and fines paid    $16,832
ijbtal room and board paid    $48,409
ii Total family maintenance paid $154,325
Total debts paid    $35,942
JTotal income tax paid  $148,408
65
 Appendix B: Corrections Branch Regions
Districts, Facilities and Offices
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
Resource Analysis
Program Analysis and Evaluation
Information Services
Provincial Classification
Religious Programs
Staff Development Division
Psychological Services
Medical Services
Inspection and Standards
VANCOUVER ISLAND REGION
Vancouver Island Regional Office
South District 1
South District 1 Office
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre
Vancouver Island Community Correctional
Centre
Vancouver Island Case Management Unit
Victoria Adult Probation Office
Colwood Probation Office
Victoria Court Probation Office - Adult
South District 2
South District 2 Office
Jordan River Camp
Victoria Youth Detention Centre
Victoria Juvenile Probation and Family Court
Services
Victoria Attendance Programs:
—New Directions Program
—Metchosin Camp
—WELD
Sidney Probation Office
Duncan Probation Office
Lake Cowichan Office
North District
North District Office
Snowdon Work Release Unit
Lakeview Youth Camp
Campbell River Probation Office
Port Hardy Probation Office
66
Courtenay Probation Office
Port Alberni Probation Office
Parksville Probation Office
Nanaimo Probation and Family Court!
Services
Port McNeill Probation Office
VANCOUVER REGION
Vancouver Regional Office
East District
East District Office
South East Adult Probation Services I
South Juvenile Probation and Family »|
Services
East Juvenile Probation and Family Cot
Services
North Juvenile Probation and Family @qj
Services
Burnaby Community Correctional CeM
Yale Street Juvenile Probation and Fami
Court Services
DARE Office
North East Probation and Family Court:
Services
West District
West District Office
South West Adult Probation Servicer
West End Adult Probation and FamiljJCj
Services
West Vancouver Probation and Family hi
Services
Community Pretrial Services Unit
Burrard Juvenile and Family Court Ser->
Vancouver Court Adult Probation Servis
West Juvenile Probation and Family CcS
Services
Marpole Community Correctional Cen
Lynda Williams Community CorrecUo
Centre
North Shore District
North Shore District Office
West Vancouver Probation Office 1
Porteau Cove Camp
 Sipendix B: Corrections Branch Regions,
Jstricts, Facilities and Offices
iirelt Probation and Family Court Services
JBnish Probation and Family Court
Rices
}.m Vancouver Juvenile and Family Court
Bices
iejl River Probation and Family Court
srvices
[th Vancouver Adult Probation Office
\mla District
<<er Mainland Regional Correctional
entre
sside Correctional Centre for Women
:h Containment
/ingdon Youth Detention Centre
inal Services Centre
(ITH FRASER REGION
ih Fraser Regional Office
3 District
a District Office
l;|sford Probation and Family Services
ere Creek Camp
tiwack Probation and Family Services
iiMTreek Camp — DASH Program
c: Probation and Family Services
Sion Probation and Family Services
Vwistriqt
|©istrict Office
rdale Probation and Family Services
et Probation and Family Services
tley Probation and Family Services
ittnond Probation and Family Services
itmond Adult Probation Office
ty Community Residential Centre
i;y Probation and Family Services
my" Adult Probation Office
le Rock Probation and Family Service
uiwack Forest Camps
km Office, Chilliwack Forest Camps
uiwack Community Correctional Centre
htwack Security Unit
fciGThurston Camp
)i Mountain Camp
NORTH FRASER REGION
North Fraser Regional Office
District 1
District 1 Office
Burnaby Central Probation Office
Burnaby North Probation Office
Burnaby South Juvenile and Family Services
New Westminster Probation Office
New Haven Correctional Centre
District 2
District 2 Office
Twin Maples Community Correctional Centre
Maple Ridge Probation Office
Coquitlam Adult Probation Office
Coquitlam Juvenile and Family Services
District 3
Haney Forest Camps Administration
Haney Forest Camps
Boulder Bay Camp
Brittain River Camp
Pine Ridge Camp
Stave Lake Camp
Southview Place Community Correctional
Centre
District 4
District 4 Office
Alouette River Correctional Centre
INTERIOR REGION
Interior Regional Office
Kamloops District
District Office, Kamloops
Ashcroft Probation Office
Clearwater Probation Office
Kamloops Probation Office
Lillooet Probation Office
Merritt Probation Office
Okanagan District
District Office, Okanagan
Oliver Probation Office
Penticton Probation Office
67
L
 Appendix B: Corrections Branch Regions,
Districts, Facilities and Offices
Kelowna Probation Office
North Central District
Vernon Probation Office
North Central District Office
Salmon Arm Probation Office
Dawson Creek Probation Office
Revelstoke Probation Office
Fort Nelson Probation and Family Service 1
Fort St. John Probation Office
Kootenay District
Mackenzie Probation Office
District Office, Kootenay
One Hundred Mile House Probation and
Castlegar Probation Office
Family Services
Cranbrook Probation Office
Prince George Adult Probation Office   I
Creston Probation Office
Prince George Juvenile Probation and Fan
Fernie Probation Office
Services
Golden Probation Office
Vanderhoof Probation Office
Kimberley Probation Office
Quesnel Probation Office
Nelson Probation Office
Williams Lake Probation and Family Coui
Trail Probation Office
Services
Institutions
Institutions
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
Prince George Regional Correctional Ceni
Rayleigh Camp
Hutda Lake Camp
Bear Creek Camp
Kamloops Community Correctional Centre
NORTHERN REGION
Northern Regional Office
West District
West District Office
Terrace Community Correctional Centre
Queen Charlotte Islands Probation Office
Prince Rupert Probation Office
Terrace Probation Office
Kitimat Probation Office
Smithers Probation Office
Queen's Primer 1
or British Columbia iD
Victoria. 1982
68

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