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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1964 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1965

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1964
B LEGISLATIVE
 "I
   To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year
1964 is herewith respectfully submitted.
Office of the Minister of Labou
February, 1965.
 "1
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Forty-seventh Annual Report
n the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31, 1964.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
 Department of Labour
. OFFICIALS
The Honourable L. R. Peterson, Q.C., Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
Miss W. Snape, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour and Director, Equal Pay Act,
Fair Employment Practices Act, and Public Accommodation Practices Act,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
R. A. MacDonald, Administrative Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. D. Forrest, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Melville, Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
G. H. O'Neill, Chief Industrial Relations Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
R. G. Clements, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. S. Haddow, Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
L. Stadnyk, Compensation Counsellor, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C. Box 996, Courthouse, Mission City, B.C.
P.O. Box 1317, Courthouse, Cranbrook, B.C.     Courthouse, Nanaimo, B.C.
1005—102nd Avenue, Dawson Creek, B.C.       P.O. Box 60, Courthouse, Nelson, B.C.
523 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C. 1600 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C
Courthouse, Kelowna, B.C. P.O. Box 820, Terrace, B.C.
Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Vice-Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.i
Fraudena Eaton, O.B.E., Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3,
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
I. R. Edgett, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. S. Wilson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Vice-Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.i
Fraddena Eaton, O.B.E., Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3,
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
I. R. Edgett, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. S. Wilson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. W. Coton, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 John Melville, Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. Beck, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
T. A. Turnbull, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
ihn S. White, Member, Department of Education, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.<
S. W. Simpson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
(Headquarters: 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
a Eaton. John Melville. Col. J. W. Inglis.
 Summary of Contents
[ List of Acts Affecting Labour  Inside front cover
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour 11
I Highlights of the 1964 Statistical Report on Trades and Industries 12
Employment by Industrial Classification 12
The Labour Force ——-   16
Labour Income 20
Hours of Work  '- 21
Earnings —! ! 23
Summary Statistics of Employment, Payrolls, and Average Weekly Wages
and Salaries, by Industries, 1950 to 1964 (First Eight Months)  27
Comparative Summary Statistics 31
Board of Industrial Relations 32
Meetings and Delegations _ — 32
Orders and Regulations Made during 1964 32
Investigations and Wage Adjustments 33
Court Cases __ 35
Control of Employment of Children Act 36
Equal Pay Act 37
Fair Employment Practices Act	
Public Accommodation Practices Act-
Employment Agencies Act	
Inspection of Factories	
Homework-
Elevators 	
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch—
Trade-schools Regulation Administrative Office	
Labour Relations Act—Report of Labour Relations Branch-
Settlements by Conciliation Officers	
Mediations	
Arbitration Boards	
Conciliation Board Chairmen-
Table I.—Analysis of Certifications Issued h
Table HI.—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1963 and 1964 i (
Table IV.—Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards Appointed
during 1963 and 1964, by Predominant Cause (
 1
O 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Labour Relations Act—Report of Labour Relations Branch—Continued
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1964	
Table V.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1964	
Table VI.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1950-64—
Table VLI.—Analysis of Time Loss by Industry, 1964	
Directory	
Officials of Congresses, Councils, etc	
Annual Survey of Organized Labour in British Columbia, 1964 7
Table VLLT.—Number of Labour Organizations Reporting, etc 7
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Major Industrial Classifications, 1964 8
Organizations of Employees 8
Organizations of Employers S
 | Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1964)
J Fair Employment Practices Act Amendment Act, 1964
This amendment adds age discrimination to the list of prohibited employment
i practices if the person has attained the age of 45 years and has not attained
the age of 65 years. It also prohibits an employer from expressing in any advertisement for employment any intent to discriminate against any person between the
ages of 45 and 65 years, unless the limitation, specification, or preference is based
on a bona fide occupational qualification.
Age-discrimination prohibitions do not apply to
(a) termination of employment because of the terms or conditions of any
bona fide retirement or pension plan;
(b) operation of the terms or conditions of any bona fide retirement or pension
plan which have the effect of a minimum service requirement;
(c) operation of the terms or conditions of any bona fide group or employee
insurance plan.
Trade-schools Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1964
Amendments made to the Trade-schools Regulation Act (1) prohibit the
operator of a trade-school from receiving any fee from any person for finding
employment, and (2) revise causes for cancellation of the registration of a trade-
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Highlights of the 1964 Statistical Report
on Trades and Industries
This review of the year 1964 represents the 47th report in the annual statistical
series issued by the Department.
Within the changing environment of a fast-growing and highly complex econ-   |
omy, most major economic indicators continued to show an upward trend during
1964.
The importance of economic expansion through export markets was reflected
in the rising foreign demand for lumber, and wood and paper products. World
demand for most metals continued to shape new plans for continued development
in the mining industry.
Manufacturing production continued to grow in strength and volume, despite
some losses experienced in the ship-building section due to strike activity early in
the year.
Construction industries maintained an expansive programme of tremendous
activity in all types of building. The changing requirements of a growing population
created new trends in high-rise apartment building, commercial and institutional
The labour force climbed rapidly during the early months of 1964 and reached
new record highs during July and August. With employment mounting steadily
during the year, by September unemployment had dropped to 3.9 per cent of the
labour force.
Reflecting a growing labour force with higher earnings, labour income increased
from a final total of $2,248,000,000 in 1963, and will approximate $2,440,000,000
for 1964. Highest actual monthly total was reached in August of 1964, when the
preliminary figure for that month was recorded at $214,700,000, compared with the
previous high of $197,900,000 for September, 1963.
Industrial wage levels continued their upward trend, and were again higher in
British Columbia during 1964. By July the average weekly composite figure representing earnings was 3.4 per cent above the comparative figure for 1963. Highest
point for the composite average weekly figure was reached in August, when weekly
earnings rose to $94.83, compared with a previous high of $92.04 in June of 1963.
Based on the year 1949 as 100, the index of aggregate payrolls reached a high
point of 278.1 in August of 1964, up from the previous highest point of 254.0 in
August of 1963.
Employment by Industrial Classification
Employment levels moved up steadily during the early months of 1964 and,
with the exception of some setbacks due to strike activity during the second quarter,
continued to gain strength as the year progressed. By June the six months' average
industrial composite index had increased to 120.6 from 115.9 for a comparable
period in 1963, a gain of 4 per cent.
Principal gains were noted in the manufacturing industries, particularly in wood
products, the pulp and paper industry, and iron and steel products. Peak employment was maintained as production levels climbed in plants producing plywood,
lumber, and all manner of building materials.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1964 O 13
A major loss in employment was suffered early in the year in the ship-building
industry, where prolonged strike action halted activity in the principal yards during
the greater part of February, March, and April.
H Mining employment continued at maximum levels in most operating mines,
and was maintained in a wide range of exploration and development work. Some
losses, however, occurred later in the year due to strike activity, and closure of
operations in some instances.
H Employment generally improved in the operation of public utilities, retail and
wholesale trade, and the service industries.
H Employment trends in the major divisions and the industrial composite are
indicated by index figures in Table 1 for the years 1950 to 1964. Index figures on
a monthly basis have been included for the 12 months of 1963 and the first eight
months of 1964.
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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The Labour Force
Since the sharp advance in 1957, year-to-year increase in the British Columbia
labour force during the past six years has averaged an approximate 2.3 per cent a
year. Early in 1963 the monthly totals for the first time began to exceed 600,000,
and at the close of that year the 12-month average total labour-force figure stood
at 616,000.
Although during this period (1958 to 1963) the total British Columbia labour
force increased by some 64,000, an increase of 11.6 per cent, the proportionate
increase was greater for female workers entering the working force than for males.
The increase for female workers in the labour force was 28.8 per cent during the
six years, compared with an increase of 6.2 per cent for males.
During 1964, total labour-force figures recorded a new high of 672,000 for
the months of July and August, compared with a peak figure of 646,000 in August
of 1963. The summer average based on the six months from May to October of
1964 climbed to 656,000 from 627,000 reported for this period in 1963. The
annual average labour force for the full year of 1964 was estimated to exceed
643,000, an increase of 4.4 per cent.
Month-to-month levels of employment and unemployment are shown in Table
2, which follows, and which also sets out the 12 months' average for each year and
the winter and summer averages based on six months' seasonal totals in each case.
Unemployment rates have fallen consistently during the past two years. While
considerable variation still occurs in the rate shown for the winter high in comparison
with the low summer figure, the yearly average has shown a marked improvement
over unemployment rates of earlier years. In January of 1963 winter unemployment reached 9.8 per cent of the total labour force, but had dropped to only 4.5
per cent by September of that year. Moving into 1964 the winter months of January
and February showed conditions generally improved in comparison with the previous
year, and while the percentage unemployed exceeded 7 per cent during the first
quarter, by August the percentage had declined to 3.9 per cent. At this point the
national average unemployment rate for Canada was 3.4 per cent.
Charts accompanying this section will show the comparitive trends in the total
labour force, employment and unemployment, and the percentage variation of unemployment. In Fig. 3, which covers the period 1958 through 1963 and the first
10 months of 1964, the proportion of the unemployed is shown as the shaded section
between the trend lines of total labour force and employment.
Following in Fig. 4 is the percentage variation of unemployment on a monthly
basis for the same period, and also for a composite year indicating a six-year span of
1958 to 1963.
 II
1
HIGH
LIGHTS OF 1964
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Fig. 5.  Estimated Annual Labour Income, British Columbia,
Years 1958 to 1964
.^^4($2,440,000,000)    1
_ s.?d.4.9:2,400,000,000
 1 2,300,000,000
iEstimared Annual Labour Income;   a
Years 195 8 to 1964          | |
$2,24
 ]2,200,000,000
 J2,100,000,000
$2,090
_ ;' 2,000,000,000
$1,984
 11,900,000,000
$1,948
 ; 1,800,000,000
 I 1,700,000,000
_ jl, 600,000, 000
$1,873
Labour Force
$1,763
500
/      /
/           /            I            \            \           \          \      \
|       1958      |       1959              1960              1961       |      1962              1963        |      1964      j
Labour Income
Final figures for 1963 show total labour income in British Columbia at $2,248,-
000,000, an increase of 7.6 per cent above the 1962 total.   This closely compares
with the national percentage gain of 7.8 per cent for Canada as a whole during the
Early estimates of total labour income in British Columbia for the full year
1964 are formulated on the basis of monthly figures for the first eight months, and
for this reason must be considered as preliminary and subject to revision in later
Reports. Information relating to total labour income is made available by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Monthly estimates of labour income in British Columbia for the first eight
months of 1964 showed consistent gains of over 8 per cent when related to similar
months of 1963. On the basis of the trend established from January to July, the
1964 preliminary figure for total labour income should approach $2,440,000,000.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1964
Table 3.—Estimated Annual Labour Income in British Columbia
1947  $641,000,000
1948  794,000,000
1949  825,000,000
1950  915,000,000
1951  1,072,000,000
1952  1,214,000,000
1953  1,279,000,000
1954  1,302,000,000
1955  1,426,000,000
1956 $1,649,000,000
1957  1,765,000,000
1958  1,763,000,000
1959  1,873,000,000
1960  1,948,000,000
1961  1,984,000,000
1962  2,090,000,000
1963  2,248,000,000
1964.  2,440,000,000!
A revision of monthly data for 1963 and preliminary monthly totals of labour
income for the first eight months of 1964 follows in Table 3A. The revised figures
for 1963 show a January low of $171,500,000, increasing to a high mark of $197,-
900,000 in September of that year. During the first eight months of 1964 the
monthly totals were consistently in excess of 8 per cent ahead of similar months in
1963. From the January low of $185,400,000, monthly totals climbed steadily to
a high point of $214,700,000 reached during the month of August.
Table 3A.—Labour Income, Monthly Estimates, British Columbia
January 	
February ..
March	
June	
July	
. 171.5
. 174.8
. 177.4
. 180.0
. 187.1
195.0
. 193.6
. 197.6
. 197.9
. 194.8
. 192.3
. 186.0
185.4
190.6
191.5
196.2
Hours of Work
While some variation becomes apparent from year to year in the average hours
worked in leading industries, the fluctuations, where noted, usually result from
periods of unusual activity or depression in the business or industry concerned.
A review of the movement in average hours during an eight-year period from 1957
to 1964 shows most upward variations offset by compensating declines in the year
following, so that, with an occasional exception, no marked trend is established.
Two exceptions to the general pattern were noted in the transportation and service
industries, which showed slightly shorter working-hours each year over the eight-
year span.
As of 1963, the annual index figure representing the 12 months' average
working-hours in 16 classifications of British Columbia business and industry was
  computed at 37.1 hours per week, showing only a fractional change from the previous year's figure of 37.0.
For the first eight months of 1964 the index figure for average working-hours
rose slightly in the construction industries and pulp and paper manufacturing, but
in comparison with the same early months of 1963 was a little lower in other
manufacturing classifications, ship-building, transportation, and services. Little
change was apparent in the average working-hours for workers in primary indus-
Comparative averages for working-hours in the industries covered in the 1964
survey are included in the tables which follow, with similar figures for previous
years. The chart shown as Fig. 6 indicates the prevailing trend in average weekly
hours in selected industries over an extended period from 1954 to 1964.
Earnings
Wage levels in British Columbia edged higher during the early months of 1964,
and by August were averaging a 3,6-per-cent gain over comparative figures for 1963.
Representing the major group of non-agricultural industries, the composite figure
indicating average wages and salaries during the previous year had climbed from
$87.44 to $90.49, a rise of 3.5 per cent.
Early indication of a peak year in earnings came during the second quarter of
1964, when the composite figure was recorded at $94.67 in May, some 4.4 per cent
above the average for the same month in 1963.
During the first eight months of 1964, increases were apparent in all major
classifications, ranging from 2.3 per cent in the service group to as high as 6.3 per
cent in the construction industry. For the manufacturing industries as a whole,
wages and salaries increased by 3.8 per cent, although in the secondary industries of
wood and wood products above average increases were the rule. Within the
manufacturing group the eight months' average figure for weekly earnings was some
6.4 per cent higher in pulp and paper mills, followed by an increase of 4.8 per cent
in sawmills and planing-mills. Other classifications showing wage and salary increases of over 3 per cent included transportation and communication, up 3.9 per
cent; logging-workers, a gain of 3.4 per cent; trade, 3.3 per cent; mining, 3.2 per
cent; and food-manufacturing, also with weekly earnings increased by 3.2 per cent
for the first eight months of 1964 in comparison with a corresponding period in
1963.
Prime example of the growth in wages and salaries during 1964 was apparent
in the figure representing average weekly earnings for all British Columbia workers
in manufacturing. While this figure had increased from $90.94 to $94.43 during
the previous year, further gains noted for manufacturing-workers in the first eight
months of 1964 resulted in a new high for this figure. Based on the first eight
months of the year, the average weekly earnings for all British Columbia workers in
manufacturing was recorded at $97.91. Comparative figures for major groups and
individual business and industrial classifications are listed in the tables which follow,
for the years 1950 to 1963 and the first eight months of 1964.
 "1
DEPARTMENT C
Table 4.
—Earnings, Hours, and Real Earnings for Hourly-rated Wage
in Manufacturing Industries, British Columbia, 1954-64
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 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1964 O 27
Summary Statistics of Employment, Payrolls, and Average Weekly Wages and Salaries, by Industries,
1950 to 1964 (First Eight Months).
The following tables summarize the historical trends established in various
industries and major groups covering the period 1950 to 1963 and including the
first eight months of 1964. Representative figures shown indicate the annual
fluctuation in employment, payrolls, average weekly earnings, and hours of work.
Industrial Composite
Mining
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 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1964                                                    O 29
Manufacturing                                          Pulp and Paper Mills
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 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1964
Comparative Summary Statistics, 1964 and 1963,
Showing Percentage Changes
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 ENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
G. A. Little, Vice-Chairman 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton, O.B.E. 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
C. Murdoch 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
P. Baskin     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
J. R. Edgett   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
R. S. S. Wilson  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Secretary:
C. R. Margison   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head office Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch offices:
411 Dunsmuir St., Vancouver Box 996, Courthouse, Mission City.
P.O. Box 1317, Courthouse, Courthouse, Nanaimo.
Cranbrook.
1005—102nd Ave., Dawson Creek. P.O. Box 60, Courthouse, Nelson.
523 Columbia St., Kamloops. 1600 Third Avenue, Prince George.
Courthouse, Kelowna. P.O. Box 820, Terrace.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the thirty-first annual report of the Board
of Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31, 1964.
Meetings and Delegations
The Board held 51 meetings during the year.
Hearings were held by the Board in Vancouver in connection with the revision
of Order No. 16 (1964) (Occupation of Janitor) and Order No. 46 (1963)
(Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry). In addition, hearings were held regarding
an application from the Ambulance Employees' Union, Local 873, requesting the
Board to make a minimum wage order applicable to ambulance drivers and attendants, hours of work of employees in the pulp and paper industry, and hours of
work of driver-salesmen in the soft-drink industry.
Orders and Regulations Made during 1964
Minimum Wage Orders
Following public hearings held by the Board in 1963 and 1964, the following
Orders were made:—
No. 5 (1964)—Occupation of Ambulance Driver and Attendant.
No. 16 (1965)—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS O 33
No. 15 (1964)—Funeral Service Business.
No. 14 (1964)—Occupation of Janitor.
No. 9 (1965)—Mining Industry.
No. 18 (1965)—Occupation of Stationary Steam Engineer.
Order No. 19  (1952) of the Board, providing for a daily guarantee for
students attending school, was rescinded as this provision is now incorporated in
all existing orders.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the Hours of Work Act
Regulation No. 17 (1964), applicable to bakery salesmen, reduces the weekly
hours of work of the deliverymen from 48 to 44.
Regulation No. 21 (1964), applicable to the fresh fruit and vegetable industry,
exempts that industry from the daily and weekly limits of hours of work provided
in section 3 of the Act. It is now a continuing exemption instead of for a fixed
seasonal period.
The annual regulation permitting persons in retail establishments to work
certain additional hours during the Christmas season was also made.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the Male and Female
Minimum Wage Acts
After due inquiry the Board made Regulation No. 8 (1964), which exempts
pupils enrolled in classes of an Occupational Programme of Studies in a public or
secondary school, offered in accordance with the regulations of the Department of
Education and under the supervision of the local school authority, for the period
expiring June 30, 1965.
Investigations and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1964 the Industrial Relations Officers of the Department made
36,082 investigations. Through the efforts of the Department and the co-operation
of employers, adjustments made during 1964 amounted to $340,596.13. Department cars travelled 187,046 miles in connection with the administration of the
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female
Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Department, it may
be presumed that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation
administered by this Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the
following table:—
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments, 1963 and 1964
Number of Industrial Relations Officers1._
26
26
Annual Holidays Act—
1,114
Arrears paid 	
-    $53,079.00
$61,977.87
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Female Minimum Wage Act
Firms involved    	
Male Minimum Wage Act-
Firms involved	
Employees affected .
Arrears paid	
$14,015.07      $14,163.31
Payment of Wages Act—
Firms involved             1,158 1,485
Employees affected li_ 1                     2,071 2,738
Arrears paid     1 -- $131,148.17    $203,369.65
Total adjustments  $251,754.97    $340,596.13
Payment of Wages Act
Plans authorized under section 4 (2) (a) (iv)           79 5
Certificates made1 under section 5 (1) (c) H            ...._ 129 95
Certificates sent under section 5 (1) (d)   129 95
Certificates confirmed2 under section 5 (2) (a)  _L__ 99 81
Certificates cancelled under section 5 (2) (6) 2 6
Certificates cancelled and remade under section 5 (2) (&) __ 9 6
Certificates paid before confirmation                       .— 15 16
Certificates made under section 5 (3) filed with Registrar
of—
County Court3 ......                                                  .... 95 70
Supreme Court   . ^_^_  5 5
Appeals under section 5 (4) ?5l5_-'^!_2.J.SS]3^        	
Demands made under section 6 (1) ■        OS \n 22 18
Demands for security under section 8(1)  ~  5 1
Applications to Judge under section 8 (3)  -     1
Under section 4 (2) (a) (iv) of the Payment of Wages Act and section 15(1)
(c) of the Truck Act, the Board has authorized plans having general application
with respect to the following:—
For the purchase of bonds issued by the Dominion of Canada, the
Province of British Columbia, or their agencies.
To pay either in whole or in part for board and (or) lodging.
For medical coverage under M.S.A.
To meet credit obligations through the Retail Credit Grantors' Adjustment Bureau Limited.
For payments to (1) a credit union incorporated under the Credit Unions
Act, and (2) a society licensed under the Insurance Act.
To meet credit obligations.
 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS O 35
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of
compliance with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is
necessary to resort to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the
legislation will be obtained. A summary of Court cases during the year 1964
follows:—
Court Cases for the Year 1964
Retirement
During the year Miss Ella M. George, who had served with the Department
as stenographer, inspector, and later in an administrative capacity for 29 years, and
Mr. D. F. T. Gibson, who had been with the Department as an Industrial Relations
Officer for 16 years, retired.
Conclusion
The Board at this time would like to thank employers, trade-unions, other
organizations, and employees for the co-operation extended to its officials during
the year 1964 in the administration of the various labour laws.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
C. Murdoch.
P. Baskin.
J. R. Edgett.
R. S. S. Wilson.
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children Act
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour
or a person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of
children under 15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is
prohibited by the Control of Employment of Children Act.
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be
adversely affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in
close co-operation with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the
children. Permits are issued only when it has been established that the child's
health will not suffer, and that the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe
conditions or interfere with their standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries
for which permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
(12) Laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry,
power of any kind.
Summar
of Permits Issued for Year 1964
District
£K
Dsor
as
io^a
sipn
g
uss
121
gg
g
Total
iii
|
j
|
i
l
l
i
Amusements	
s
:=
|
-
I
m
—
'\
I
?
GtSciryi0°r°moeavC;
Landry	
i
2
Ship-building	
_'
Totals	
4
—
2
3
2
11 i
25
13
50
 Equal Pay Act
This Act, which was proclaimed December 31, 1953, prohibits discrimination
between male and female employees with respect to rates of pay in any case where
a female does the same work as a male for the same employer in the same establishment. A difference in the rate of pay between a female and a male employee based
on any factor other than sex is not a violation of the Act.
No complaints were received under this Act in 1964.
Summary of Proceedings under the Equal Pay Act
Complaints received	
Complaints referred to Industrial Relations Officers 1
Complaints settled by Industrial Relations Officers I	
Complaints referred to the Board	
Complaints withdrawn	
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Fair Employment Practices Act
This Act, which was passed in 1956 and amended in 1964, is designed to
prevent discrimination in regard to employment and membership in trade-unions
by reason of race, religion, nationality, ancestry, place of origin, and age if the
person has attained the age of 45 years and has not attained the age of 65 years.
The use or circulation of " application for employment" forms or advertisements
in connection with employment which express directly or indirectly any limitation
or preference as to the race, etc., of any person is prohibited, unless the preference
or limitation is based upon a bona fide occupational qualification.
The principle underlying section 5 of the Act is that a person's race, religion,
colour, nationality, ancestry, or place of origin rarely affect his work performance,
and normally should not be the subject for employment inquiries which he is
expected or required to answer. Reduced to its minima terms, the " application
for employment" form would only show the individual merits and qualifications of
prospective employees with regard to the jobs to be filled.
The Act does not apply to an employer who employs less than five employees,
or to any exclusively charitable, philanthropic, educational, fraternal, religious, or
social organization that is not operated for profit, or to any organization that is
operated primarily to foster the welfare of a religious or racial group and is not
operated for profit. Institutions operating under the provisions of the Public Schools
Act are, however, subject to the legislation.
The limitations in the Act with respect to age do not apply to
(a) termination of employment because of the terms or conditions of any bona
fide retirement or pension plan;
(6) operation of the terms or conditions of any bona fide retirement or pension
plan which have the effect of a minimum service requirement;
(c) operation of the terms or conditions of any bona fide group or employee
During 1964 one complaint was received by the Department in addition to
many inquiries. Following investigation by an officer of the Department, the
complaint was satisfactorily resolved.
The Department acknowledges with thanks the co-operation of all persons
concerned in the matter of complying with the requirements of the Statute. The
assistance afforded by the Vancouver Labour Committee for Human Rights and
the Vancouver Civic Unity Association in supporting the principles the legislation
upholds is also gratefully acknowledged.
 PUBLIC ACCOMMODATION PRACTICES ACT
Public Accommodation Practices Act
This Act, which was passed at the 1961 Session of the Legislature, is intended
to prohibit any person from denying accommodation, services, or facilities customarily available to the public to any person because of race, religion, colour,
nationality, ancestry, or place of origin. The use of discriminatory notices or
advertising is also prohibited.
No complaints were received under this Act during 1964.
 I OF LABOUR
Employment Agencies Act
This Statute requires persons operating an employment agency to register with
the Department of Labour. The Act does not apply to a person operating an
employment agency for the sole purpose of hiring employees exclusively for one
employer or to trade-unions within the meaning of the Labour Relations Act.
During the year 1964 the following employment agencies were registered with the
Department:—
Ann Leigh Office Services, 101, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Best Employment Agency, 212, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
B.C. Personnel, Room 1, 409 Granville Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Burnaby Sitter Service, 6157 Bryant Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Business and Professional Men's Employment Association, 2275 West Seventh
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Butler's Hiring Services, Room 628, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Cal's Employment Agency, 103 First Street East, Revelstoke, B.C.
Campbell River Employment Agency, 932 Island Highway, Campbell River,
B.C.
Chinese Employment Service, 434 Columbia Street, .Vancouver 4, B.C.
Dave Boddy's Employment Service (1962) Ltd., 213 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Lamond, Dewhurst & Associates Ltd., 815 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.
Drake International Services Ltd., 540 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Dumaresq Loggers' Agency, 328 Carrall Street, Vancouver, B.C.
John W. A. Fleury & Associates Ltd., 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Fraser Valley Farm Bureau, 216 Keefer Street, Vancouver, B.C.
General Employment Bureau, 438 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Helpful Aunts Bureau, 4049 West 31st Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Loggers Agency Limited, 415 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Management Development Agency, 210, 678 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Manforce, 1120 Denman Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Martha's Home Aids, 2933 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Meldrum's Employment Agency, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Mennonite Bethel Agency, 5851 Cree Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mutual Employment Office, 436 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
McDonald, Currie & Co., 640 Hastings Street West, Vancouver 2, B.C.
MacMillan Placement Service, 61, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Office Assistance Vancouver Ltd., 540 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Payne-Ross Limited, 580 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co., 410 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.
The Relyon Employment Bureau, 4259 East Hastings Street, North Burnaby,
B.C.
Ruby's Baby Sitting Bureau, 40 West 43rd Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Stevenson & Kellogg, Ltd., 810, 675 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
The Baby Sitting Bureau, 3235 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Towboat Services Association, 220 Alexander Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Tulk Personnel Ltd., 411 Vancouver Block, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver,
 EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES O 41
Vancouver Baby Sitters Agency, 1140 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Victoria Baby Sitting Bureau, 648 Fernhill Road, Victoria, B.C.
Western Placement Service, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Woods, Gordon & Co., 409 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Wright Placement and Office Services, 902, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Yukon Home and Office Services, 13b Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver,
 O 42 DEPARTMENT OF
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administratice office 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Administrative Official of the Branch
J. D. Forrest     Chief Inspector of Factories.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1964.
Factories
The upward swing of construction in general during the year 1964 has been
felt throughout the Province, and as a consequence the Branch has been involved
in the upsurge with respect to more factories being built in all areas.
The present and future construction of pulp and paper plants of course has
demanded more time and attention than usual in that three are under construction
and three others are in the design stage. In addition, many of the existing pulp
plants are undertaking expansion. Also quite a few factories associated with the
pulp and paper industry are being built. This is particularly true in the construction
of chemical plants, where these factories are in themselves major projects, all of
which involves the Branch from the drawing-board to the operational stage.
With the Branch working closely with the firms from the drawing-board to the
operational stage, we are again very gratified to see high standards being introduced
as far as the working conditions are concerned with respect to lighting, temperatures, ventilation, sanitation, and lunchroom facilities.
In September of this year a survey was made of the fruit packing and processing industry in the Okanagan region as a result of complaints registered in regard
to carbon monoxide fumes emanating from tow motors. Our investigations revealed that without very careful maintenance and servicing of vehicular stackers
with internal-combustion engines, carbon monoxide fumes can cause contamination
of the air to a dangerous extent. In some cases, employees have been quite seriously affected, requiring medical attention. The Branch usually approaches this
problem in confining the areas in which tow motors operate to eliminate contamination of air in the general work area of the plant. Secondly, if this approach is
not successful, exhaust equipment can be installed in the working areas used by
this equipment, and, thirdly, there is the alternative of converting from internal-
combustion type of engines to electrical machines. It appears where adverse conditions are experienced from this source of contamination, most firms are gladly
following the latter course, which eliminates the hazard altogether.
The problem associated with the industry just described of course applies
to any industry where there is heavy traffic from the extensive use of internal-
combustion type of engine, and it also occurs quite often in industries where high
stacking of materials is a general practice. In such cases it is often the tow-motor
operator who is affected, because the carbon monoxide gases are confined to the
two motor routes, which are narrow passageways, and they cannot escape.
It can be concluded from the results of our findings in this investigation that
more emphasis must be put on the necessity of ensuring that frequent tune-ups of
this type of equipment are accepted as normal operating procedure.
 FACTORIES INSPECTION BRANCH O 43
In the course of the current year, we, for the first time, addressed the annual
meeting of the sanitarians of the Provincial Health Branch. The purpose of the
address was to acquaint the employees of this Branch with the functions of the
Factories Branch.
Factory inspections  ---    1,527
Homework investigations —— 5
Child employment investigations	
Directives — 137
Homework
There are only 17 authorized homeworkers in the Province.
Elevators
The year's construction boom has entailed the erection of the largest number
of apartments and office buildings in British Columbia. It also is responsible for
the demand for the installation of more passenger elevators of the automatic type
than ever before. This unprecedented volume of new elevators not only increased
the work load, but found us in the position of coping with the most modern
elevator equipment, which was in advance of our existing elevator regulations.
This situation was rectified by revising existing regulations and also adopting
the effective sections of the Canadian Standards Association Elevator Safety Code
B44-1960, all of which were gazetted on December 10, 1964, and became effective
January 1,1965. The Safety Code will be applicable to all elevators installed after
1964.
The adoption of this Code for the Province of British Columbia brought about
a common standard practically across Canada. Its effect from an operational point
of view is to give us a common language to deal with the elevator-construction
industry, and it will therefore be an effective tool in our work. The final results will
be greater protection for industrial personnel and the public at large in that safety
will be engineered into each unit more so than ever before.
The number of new installations that we dealt with during the year increased
by 75 per cent over the previous year. As an indication of the volume of elevator
construction completed in the Province in the past five years, 25 per cent of the total
elevators in service have been installed in this short period.
New Installation  Plans Received
?.0fi
Total ..       .                .
Initial  and   Periodic
Inspections
Dumb-waiters
Total 	
  2,062
 O 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Elevator Operators' Licences
Temporary      355
Permanent     273
Renewals 1,044
We are again pleased to note that no fatal accidents occurred in the elevator
field during 1964. Some of the serious accidents that have come to our attention,
however, have indicated that they have resulted from unauthorized interference
with elevators and improper work procedures rather than mechanical failures.
Accidents to children travelling on escalators also concern us, but investigation
indicates that reduction in this type will occur only when parents exercise greater
control over small children and infants, as directed by the management of the
buildings in which escalator units are provided for public transportation.
Conclusion
After 18 years of service with the Branch, Mr. R. M. Purdie retired as Chief
Inspector.   Mr. J. D. Forrest, Factories Inspector, succeeded him in this position.
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by
other Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of
the staff. Also, we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry
for their co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH      O 45
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Head office 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Branch offices:
Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Department of Labour, Courthouse, Kelowna.
Department of Labour, 1600 Third Avenue, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Courthouse, Nelson.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
J.Melville -                   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Members:
R. S. Beck    - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
T. McGibbon -                   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
S. W. Simpson -                   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
T. A. Tijrnbull -     -     -     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
W.H.Welsh -                   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J.S.White    - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Administrative Officials of the Branch
John Melville     -  Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training.
Samuel W. Simpson    - Assistant Director of Apprenticeship
and Industrial Training.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Apprentices in Training
The year 1964 in the apprenticeship field was one of substantial growth.
On December 31,1964, there were 3,797 apprentices registered on the records
of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch. This is a 32-per-cent
increase over 1963. During the year 456 apprentices completed their practical and
theoretical training and were graduated from the programme.
 0 46                                         DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of Apprentices in Trades
-—
vE
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
m
?&
Pits,
Second
Third
Pourth
i
mechanic
1
I
i
I
|
J
1
i
Auto body and fender repair	
B?-      -==
f™y,™%™^a%?~
K^S'Sctoriia'lteSi—
MrsceuLeous trades	
1,640
m
641
>91
171
3,797
456
Apprenticeship Technical Training
Each succeeding year brings a greater awareness as to the value of the technical
training programme of theory related to the trade, which is provided for apprentices
either by a day-school programme or an evening-school programme.
In order to provide for the technical advances which are constantly taking place
in industry and the trades, it has been necessary to revise and upgrade the apprentice
technical training programmes.
Because it is felt by trade advisory committees that evening programmes do not
provide the best method of teaching related theory, there has been a gradual but
sustained movement toward more daytime training classes.
The daytime classes offer continuous instruction for a one-month period, and
have unquestionably shown that they are superior to evening classes.
During 1964 the growth in the number of registered apprentices has been truly
amazing; this, of course, has resulted in many additional technical training classes.
Daytime training classes were held in the British Columbia Vocational Schools
in Burnaby, Nanaimo, and Kelowna.   It is interesting to note that while these classes      1
 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH      O 47
are primarily designed to provide training for apprentices from areas in which the
concentration of industry is insufficient to establish evening classes, more employers
and employee organizations from urban areas request that their apprentices be
assigned to daytime classes.
Last year, 1964, saw a considerable increase in the number of apprentices
attending daytime classes. This group of 1,114 apprentices is indicative of the
growth of daytime classes.
The evening programme remained about the same as the previous year, with
1,562 apprentices attending evening classes in Vancouver, Victoria, and Trail. The
technical training programme for the Kitimat area has gradually changed from evening to daytime instruction, and apprentices are now attending daytime classes at
the British Columbia Vocational School at Burnaby.
It is expected that as additional school facilities and funds become available,
more apprentices will be scheduled to daytime classes.
Pre-apprenticeship Training
Pre-apprentice training classes are being offered in a variety of trades at all the
regional British Columbia Vocational Schools. There is always some expansion or
contraction with regard to the trades in which training shall be offered. This
flexibility is necessary if we are to meet the training needs of industry.
During 1964, training was offered in 19 trades. Applicants for this training
are jointly selected by the Departments of Labour and Education. To facilitate
training arrangements, all pre-apprentices are indentured to the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee. Upon completion of training and after they have obtained
employment, they are indentured as apprentices to employers with whom they
complete their apprenticeship and obtain journeyman status.
It is expected that 1965 will bring another increase in pre-apprentice training.
It is the intention of the Apprenticeship Branch to expand (raining in all trades, in
relation to the needs of industry.
The year 1964 was one of steady growth as far as pre-apprentice training
was concerned.   During the year 511 graduated, leaving 322 in training at the end
Supervision and Promotion
The Apprenticeship Branch, in co-operation with management and labour, is
constantly exploring new areas in which apprentice-training may be made available.
Promotion of apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship training was fulfilled
during the year by the counselling staff of the Branch and by the officers of the
Industrial Relations Branch. Reports of routine investigations of each registered
apprentice were made to the Branch by the Industrial Relations Officers.
Apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programmes were explained to students,
student counsellors, and principals by the Apprenticeship Counsellors during visits
made to secondary schools in the Province.
Apprenticeship Advisory Committees
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee met five times during the year to
consider and approve new contracts of apprenticeship, the cancellation of apprenticeship contracts, the transfer of apprentices between employers, the extension of
apprenticeship contracts, and the issuing of certificates to apprentices who satisfac-
 O 48 DEPARTMENT OF
torily completed their training. Approval was also given to enrol selected students
in the pre-apprentice programme.
The trades of lathing and sprinkler fitting were recommended to the Honourable
the Minister for designation and were added by Order in Council No. 3059 to
Schedule A of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act on November
3, 1964.
Meetings were held during the year of all individual trade advisory committees
for purposes of receiving recommendations for new courses, revision of existing
courses, and also examining draft copies of trade analyses and interprovincial examinations. New trade advisory committees were appointed in Nelson for the auto
mechanics trade, the heavy-duty trade, and millwright trade.
Tradesmen's Qualification
An amendment to the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act was
proclaimed on January 6,1964, by Order in Council No. 3263, whereby the application of tradesmen's qualification requirements could be broadened. A Co-ordinator
of Examinations was appointed to the staff in connection with the expanded programme. Although no regulations were promulgated to make certification compulsory, interest and participation of industry increased considerably during the year.
The automobile mechanics' trade showed the greatest increase of examination
and certification activity. The examining board already established in Vancouver
travelled to Powell River, Prince Rupert, and Terrace to examine automobile mechanics in those areas. The Vancouver examining board also travelled to Kelowna,
Nelson, Prince George, and Victoria to conduct initial examinations, after which
local examining boards were appointed in each of these four cities. The area examining boards function under the chairmanship of the Apprenticeship Counsellor in the
district and use the facilities of the regional British Columbia Vocational Schools
and appropriate industrial premises to examine automobile mechanics in those areas.
During 1964 there were 561 tradesmen's qualification certificates issued to automobile mechanics, compared to 125 during the previous year. The total issued since
the start of the certification programme reached 796.
The refrigeration-trade and the radio-television servicing-trade examining
boards conducted examinations in Vancouver during the year. Tradesmen's qualification certificates issued brought the total in the refrigeration trade to 81 certificates
and in the radio-television servicing trade to 122 certificates.
The following table indicates the distribution of examination results for the
calendar year:—
Trade
""
■
Quaked in
1964 by-
Certifl-
in 1964
Examina-
1
M
1
omobile mechanic
Kelowna
39
436
316
\
?r1r,Sc°enGlc7r^=r
n
15
it
z
g
 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH      O 49
The foregoing figures deal with the certification programme on a voluntary
basis. Discussions have been held, and are continuing, with interested organizations
in the trades of radio-television servicing and refrigeration in regard to mandatory
certification. Several other trades have indicated to the Department that they are
interested in examination and certification. Unions and employer organizations of
the plumbing, steam-fitting, sprinkler fitting, and painting trades are co-operating
with the Department through committees to consider the advisability of applying
tradesmen's qualification requirements to those trades.
Federal-Provincial Co-operation
A new Apprenticeship Training Agreement was signed during the year between
the Province of British Columbia and the Government of Canada.
The new Agreement, which expires March 31, 1967, provides much greater
scope than the previous Apprenticeship Training Agreement for the purpose of
expanding the apprenticeship programme, which is closely integrated with manpower
development as a whole.
Directors of Apprenticeship from all Provinces and the Territories met during
the year in Ottawa with training officials of the Federal Government.
Interprovincial standard apprenticeship completion examinations were conducted in the following trades: Auto-body repair, carpentry, electrical work, heavy-
duty repair, motor-vehicle repair (automotive), plumbing, and sheet-metal work.
In addition, the following trade examinations were instituted on a trial basis
toward official use in the future: Bricklaying, painting and decorating, radio-
television servicing, refrigeration, and machinist.
British Columbia undertook the preparation of the interprovincial examination
in the millwright trade to be used on a trial basis in 1965.
Conclusion
At this time I wish to acknowledge with thanks the increasing interest and
co-operation which have been extended to the Branch by employers, trade-unions,
trade advisory committees, and educational authorities, which have been largely
responsible for the expansion of the apprenticeship programme.
Respectfully submitted.
John Melville,
Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training.
 DEPARTMENT
Report of the Trade-schools Regulation
Administrative Office
Administrative offices    -     -     -     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Col. J. W. Inglis. John Melville.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report of the administration of
the Trade-schools Regulation Act for the year ended December 31, 1964.
The administrative officers met 16 times during the year to consider matters
requiring their attention and made appropriate recommendations to the Honourable
the Minister regarding the registration and conduct of trade-schools. In addition
to their regular meetings, the administrative officers met with the proprietors of
hairdressing-schools and other interested parties to discuss problems regarding the
operation of the schools.
Since the last report all practical schools situated in the Province were visited
for purposes of routine inspection, inspection of premises and facilities in connection with new applications, and, in addition, where necessary in connection with
specific complaints.
By December 31,1964, 97 schools had been registered to offer correspondence,
practical, and combined correspondence-practical courses to residents of British
Columbia. Eighty-nine of these had renewed their registration from the previous
year. There were eight schools registered that had not previously registered. Twelve
registered schools discontinued operation during 1964.
The following list shows the schools that re-registered, registered, and discontinued during the year, along with the subjects taught.
Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1964
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont: Modern
business course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East 58th Street, Chicago 37,
111.: Engineering and commerce subjects as covered by the school bulletin.
Art Instruction, Inc., 500 South 4th Street, Minneapolis 15, Minn.: Illustrating and
cartooning, commercial art and design.
Atlantic School, Inc., Canada Building, 374 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, Ont.: Airline career training, air-line station agent training.
Associated Heavy Equipment Schools, Inc., 1101 North-east 79th Street, Miami 38,
Ha.: Heavy-equipment operation.
Canadian Institute of Science & Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West, Toronto,
Ont.: Civil, mechanical, electrical, radio, and aeronautical engineering; other
groups as per school bulletin " Engineering Opportunities."
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224—16th Street North-west, Washington 10, D.C.: Electronic engineering technology.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE O 51
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Limited, 65 Jean Talon Street West,
Montreal 10, Que. (correspondence instruction and resident training):
Draughting (practical and correspondence), welding (practical and correspondence), diesel engines (practical and correspondence), diesel auto (practical
and correspondence), refrigeration and air-conditioning (correspondence).
The Creative School of Art Limited, 65 Jean Talon Street West, Montreal 10, Que.:
Showcard writing (correspondence), commercial sign-writing and truck-lettering
(practical).
The School of Creative Photography Ltd., 65 Jean Talon Street West, Montreal 10,
Que.:  Photography.
DeVry Technical Institute of Canada, Ltd., 970 Lawrence Avenue West, Toronto
19, Ont.:  Electronics.
Famous Artists Schools, Inc., Westport, Conn.: Commercial art and illustrating,
fine arts painting, professional cartooning, advanced creative painting.
Famous Writers Schools, Inc., Westport, Conn.: Fiction writing, non-fiction writing,
business writing, advertising writing.
Gale Institute, Inc., 3255 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis 8, Minn.: I.B.M. machine
accounting, engineering drawing.
Greer Shop Training, Inc., 2230 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, HI. (correspondence instruction and resident training): Automotive mechanics, diesel engines,
heavy-equipment operation, welding technology.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
HI.: Accounting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.: Architecture, art, business training, chemistry, civil
engineering, draughting, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile-manufacture, traffic management. (Other courses as
listed in prospectus.)
International Data Processing Institute Ltd., 277 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont.:
I.B.M. key-punch, basic machine operation and control, I.B.M. panel wiring.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, HI.: Business
management, foremanship training, accounting, traffic and transportation, law,
stenographic-secretarial training, stenotypy (less machine). (Other courses as
per prospectus.)
Lincoln Extension Institute (Canada) Ltd., 60 Front Street West, Toronto 1, Ont.:
Industrial management.
The National Institute of Broadcasting, 410 Hart Building, 261 Fort Street, Winnipeg 2, Man.: Radio and television broadcasting.
National Technical Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif,
(correspondence and resident training): Television, radio, electronics, and
communications course, advanced television and industrial electronics course,
auto and diesel mechanic's course, air-conditioning, refrigeration and electrical
appliances, home appliance technician's course.
National Radio Institute, 3939 Wisconsin Avenue North-west, Washington, D.C.,
20016: Radio and television servicing with TV. kit, radio and television servicing without TV. kit, radio and television communications, electronics (principles, practices, maintenance), servicing electrical appliances.
Radio College of Canada, operated by Northern Institute of Technology, 461 King
Street West, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Radio-television-electronic technology, com-
: "*:~~s, electrical technology, aeronautical electronics.
 0 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Sales Training, Inc., 1271 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Professional salesmanship and personality development programme.
Shaw Schools Limited, 55 Charles Street West, Toronto 5, Ont.: Commercial business courses, short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Technical Training Institute, 5018 North-east Union Street, Portland 11, Ore.:
Electricity, radio-television, industrial electronics, telephony, carrier and microwave, diesel and heavy-equipment operation.
Television-Electronics Institute Ltd., 65 Jean Talon Street West, Montreal 10, Que.
(correspondence instruction and resident framing): Electronics-television-
radio (practical), television-radio (correspondence), television service and
repair (correspondence).
Tractor Training Service Ltd., 3339 Bloor Street West, Toronto 18, Ont: Tractor
and equipment training—Massey-Ferguson specialized training, J. I. Case specialized training.
Advance Business College, 4457 East Hastings Street, Burnaby 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Anne Fraser School of Beauty (Fort St. John), Fort Hotel, Fort St. John, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Anne Fraser School of Beauty (Prince George), 1645 Third Avenue, Prince George,
B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Autolec National Educational Programme, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Automotive electrical and carburettor courses.
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Flor-
B.C. Market Training Institute Ltd., 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Grocery cashiering, P.B.X. receptionist, demonstrator training, meat-wrapping,
sales clerk-cashiers, I.B.M. key-punch machine operation, teletype-machine
operation.
Burnaby Beauty School, 4682 East Hastings Street, North Burnaby, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Capilano Typing School, 606 Westview Shopping Centre, North Vancouver, B.C.:
Typewriting.
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
An Electric Typewriter Assistance Ltd., 423 West Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.:
Electric typewriter instruction in conjunction with dictating equipment and
shorthand.
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
El-Mar Dress Design School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking and designing, tailoring, leatherwork, millinery, fashion sketching.
Fich Institute of Data Processing Ltd., Suite 6, 1557 West Broadway, Vancouver 9,
B.C.:  Basic data-processing course, electric computor programming.
General Business College, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Glamour School of Advanced Hairstyling, 658 View Street, Victoria, B.C.: Advanced hair styling (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association
certificate).
Herbert Business College, 246 Lawrence Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
The Hi-Art Studio of Fashion, Suite 205a, 1255 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.: Fashion art.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE O 53
Peter Johnson's Hair Styling School, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Barbering.
Kamloops School of Hairdressing (formerly Olga's School of Hairdressing), 424
Victoria Street, Kamloops, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Kinman Business University, 110 South Howard Street, Spokane 4, Wash.: Business
education, including accounting and business administration, secretarial science,
stenographic, office-machines training.
Lions Gate Beauty School, 112 West 12th Street, North Vancouver, B.C.: Hairdressing.
The Lydia Lawrence Fashion Institute, 1394 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.:
Professional dressmaking, design and pattern-making, fashion drawing, fashion
embroidery.
Mario & Carlo Advanced School of Hair Design, 5750 Cambie Street, Vancouver
15, B.C.: Advanced hair styling (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
Moler School of Hairdressing, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 6407 Fraser Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 4242 East Hastings Street, North Burnaby, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 1104 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 710 Columbia Street, New Westminster, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Barbering, 376 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Barbering.
Monterey School of Hairdressing, 446 Jubilee Street, Duncan, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Mount Royal College, 1135 Seventh Avenue, Calgary, Alta.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Arthur Murray School of Dancing, 166 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
Blanche MacDonald Ltd., 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 3009a—32nd Avenue, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
The Nanaimo School of Hairdressing, 195 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
National Charm & Modelling School, 204, 625 View Street, Victoria, B.C.: Personal
development and modelling.
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster School of Hairdressing, 228 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Hairdressing.
North Shore Hairdressing School, 1433 Pemberton Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.
Hairdressing.
Olga's School of Hairdressing Ltd., 3205—31st Avenue, Vernon, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Pacific Coast Beauty School Ltd., 1119 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Penticton Business School, 221 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
 0 54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Port Alberni School of Hairdressing, 130 Third Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
The RayvanLegal Secretarial School Ltd., 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Legal secretary.
Roggendorf School of Hairdressing Ltd., 13625—105a Street, North Surrey, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Sandy's Advanced Hair Design School, 4928 Imperial Street, South Burnaby, B.C.:
Advanced haircutting (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
The Secretariat Ltd., 1255 West Pender Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Advanced
secretarial.
Sprott-Shaw Victoria Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw School Vancouver Ltd., 902 Helmcken Street, Vancouver l, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Ann's Convent, Wallace Street, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial
and governmental).
Sun Electric Automotive Testing School, 837 Royal Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.:  Automotive engine testing.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Union Bartending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Bartending.
The Valle School of Beauty Ltd., 132 Main Street, Chilliwack, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Victor Comptometer Ltd., 1014 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:   Comptometry.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Victoria School of Bartending, 921 Falaise Crescent, Victoria, B.C.:   Bartending.
Wesley's Academy of Hair Design, 1812 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.:
Advanced hair design (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
Western Radio Academy, 887 Chilco Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting, including voice production and reception on instruments.
Western School of Commerce (1952) Ltd., 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), P.B.X. course.
New Registrations of Schools for  1964
Canadian Meat Training Institute, 1166 Dundas Street West, Toronto 3, Ont.:
Meat-cutting.
The Crest School of Beauty, 688 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Hollywood School of Beauty, 934 Burnett Street, Coquitlam, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Maison Raymond Beauty School Ltd., 4685 Kingsway, Burnaby 1, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Modern Schools, Incorporated, 426 Findlay Street West, Carey, Ohio: Motel-
management training.
Montrose School of Hairdressing, 2567 Montrose Avenue, Abbotsford, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Olga's Advanced Academy of Hairdressing, 3205—31st Avenue, Vernon, B.C.:
Advanced hair design (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
Wesley's School of Hairdressing, 422 Richards Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Hairdressing.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE O 55
Registered Schools That Discontinued Operations during 1964
Abe & Don's Advanced School of Hair Design, 202 Oakridge Centre, Vancouver
15, B.C.
Emilio & Johnny's Advanced School of Hair Design, 633 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.
Gale Institute, Inc., 3255 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis 8, Minn.
Monterey School of Hairdressing, 446 Jubilee Street, Duncan, B.C.
Olga's Advanced Academy of Hair Design, 3205—31st Avenue, Vernon, B.C.
Port Alberni School of Hairdressing, 130 Third Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.
Sandy's Advanced Hair Design School, 4928 Imperial Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Success College, 1768 William Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Sun Electric Automotive Testing School, 837 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Union Bartending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Victoria School of Bartending, 921 Falaise Crescent, Victoria, B.C.
Weldor Training Centre, 1368 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Respectfully submitted.
 O 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel
Labour
Chief Executive Officer:
Relations
B. H. E. GOULT -
-   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch
Chief Conciliation Officer:
R. G. Clements -
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.      1
Conciliation Officers:
George Carmichael
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
E. P. Fisher -
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.      j
C. M. Gilmour   -
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Colin Kay   -
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J. A. Laffling   -
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.      1
J. E. McElroy    -
-   411 Dunsmuir Street j Vancouver 3.
A. Titmuss -
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
W. T. McLaughlin
-   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
R. S. Raguin
-   Courthouse, Kelowna.
Labour
Chairman:
Relations
Board
W. H. Sands -     -
-   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Vice-Chairman:
G. A. Little
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Members:
Mrs. Fraudena Eatoi
J     -   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Charles Murdoch
-   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Penrod Baskin   -
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J. R. Edgett
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
R. S. S. Wilson   -
-    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Secretary:
C. R. Margison -
-   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Registrar:
D. W. Coton
-   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister of Labou
Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
B.C.
SlR,-
—I have the honour to presen
the annual report of the Labour Relations
Branch for the year ended December 3
, 1964.
The
year was one in which many I
najor collective agreements were negotiated
involving, amongst others, the lumber a
nd logging industry, the construction indus-
try, manufacturing, the fishing industry (shore workers), maintenance workers,
office employees, and service worker
s.    The number of Conciliation Officers
appointed and strike votes taken rose sharply over the figures for 1963.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH O 57
Additionally, the annual estimated total of paid workers in the British Columbia labour force rose from 501,000 to 531,000; trade-union membership increased
from 222,138 to 226,690—the second highest percentage increase over the figures
for 1945 since 1958—and hundreds of disputes were referred to Conciliation
Officers. Despite these factors, the strike loss, though the trend was upwards, was
not disproportionate.
Time loss through industrial disputes as a percentage of the estimated total
working time of wage and salary earners amounted to 0.147.
There were 30 disputes causing time loss during the year. Of these, two
commenced in 1963. Seven disputes involving 10 employers and 593 workers, and
creating a time loss of 1,242 working-days, commenced without prior reference to
conciliation procedures, contrary to the provisions of the Labour Relations Act.
During the months of May and July, office-workers employed by a Vancouver
Island manufacturer struck for terms and conditions of an initial collective agreement, after exhausting conciliation procedures. Although the number directly
affected was minimal, approximately 3,500 other workers refused to cross picket
lines. The dispute was finally resolved through negotiation, with Departmental
assistance. A strike in the Interior of the Province, involving approximately 4,000
workers, was also settled through the process of mediation.
Applications for certification showed an increase for the third successive year.
The number of certifications cancelled decreased slightly from the 1963 figures.
Applications for the variance of certification and declaration of successor status
were marked by an upward trend.
Orders issued by the Labour Relations Board in conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the Labour Relations Act* totalled 23, an increase of six over
the preceding year. Nine settlements were effected by Departmental Officers, a
decrease over those of 1963.
The Labour Relations Board met during the year on 72 occasions and held
35 hearings, as compared with 63 meetings and 27 hearings in 1963.
Six hundred and sixteen certifications were issued by the Board—115 rejected
and 150 withdrawn. The total number of certifications dealt with during the year
(881) showed an increase of 79 over the total dealt with in 1963. Administrative
personnel conducted 33 votes in connection with applications for certification and
10 votes upon applications for decertification.
Section 22 (4) of the Labour Relations Act provides that at any time prior to
the appointment of a Board of Arbitration either party to a collective agreement
may request the Registrar, in writing, to appoint an Officer of the Department of
Labour to confer with them to assist them to settle the differences. The Officer,
after conferring with the parties, may make a report to the Registrar, which may
then be referred to the Labour Relations Board. The Board may, if in its opinion
the difference is arbitrable, refer the matter back to the parties or inquire into the
difference and, following such inquiry, make an order for a final and conclusive
settlement of the difference.
There were 87 settlements effected by Officers of the Department in 1964, an
increase of 50 over the preceding year. Twenty-nine Orders were issued by the
Labour Relations Board, and in seven instances the differences were referred back
to the parties. The Board decided in three cases that the questions were not
arbitrable.
 0 58 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Settlements by Conciliation Officers
There were 450 disputes referred to Conciliation Officers during the year.
Thirty-nine cases, unterminated at December 31, 1963, were carried over from
that year.
Of these, Conciliation Officers settled 165, and 75 were referred to Conciliation
Boards. In 13 cases the application for the appointment of a Conciliation Officer
was withdrawn or the appointment cancelled, and in 131 cases Conciliation Officers
did not recommend Boards. These 131 referrals were made by Conciliation Officers
in conformity with the provisions of section 29 (1) of the Labour Relations Act;
that is, the Officer reported that it was not advisable to appoint a Conciliation Board,
and therefore made recommendations concerning the matters in dispute. Thirteen
similar cases, unterminated at December 31, 1963, were carried forward. These
recommendations were sent to the parties, and in each instance took the place of
a report of the Conciliation Board. Of these 144 disputes, in 79 instances the
Officers' reports resulted in immediate settlement; there was eventual settlement,
without time loss, in 33 instances; and in 32 cases the decision of the parties upon
the acceptance or rejection of the Officer's report had not been received at December
31, 1964.
Section 29 (2) of the Labour Relations Act provides that the Conciliation
Officer can recommend only that no Board be appointed. If the Minister concurs,
he may, by written notice, advise the parties that a Conciliation Board will not be
appointed. At this stage the parties may request a strike or lockout vote, or they
may proceed to bargain further. At any time the Department is ready to assist the
parties to reach settlement. In 59 such cases, Conciliation Officers recommended
only that a Conciliation Board should not be appointed.
Seventy-five disputes, covered by Conciliation Officer appointments, were
referred to Boards. In addition, two cases in which a Board had not been appointed
at December 31, 1963, were carried forward to 1964. Of these 77 disputes, one
was withdrawn, 67 others were covered by Boards appointed, in four instances
settlement was reached before Boards were appointed, and in the remaining five
cases Boards had not been appointed at December 31, 1964.
In 46 instances, at the year's end Conciliation Officers had not reported upon
appointments which had been made.
Mediations
It is a pleasure to report that the efforts of Departmental Officers were successful during the year in resolving many disputes by mediation, following the exhaustion
of the machinery of the Labour Relations Act.
In eight instances in which eight employers were involved, mediators settled
disputes where strikes were in progress. Four thousand five hundred and forty-five
workers were affected.
Settlements by mediation followed in 13 disputes where strike votes had been
taken and employees had voted for strike action. Twenty-four employers and 726
workers were involved.
In seven instances, in which six employers and 246 workers were involved,
mediation was a sequel to the failure of conciliation procedures and was requested
by one or both parties.
These mediations involved a total of 38 employers and 5,517 workers, and
were responsible in great measure for the maintenance of industrial peace in British
Columbia.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH O 59
Arbitration Boards
On the requisite application where the grievance procedure under collective
agreements had been invoked, chairmen were named to nine Arbitration Boards by
the Minister of Labour and to two Arbitration Boards by the Labour Relations
Conciliation Board Chairmen
In accordance with the provisions of the Labour Relations Act, chairmen were
named by the Minister of Labour to 40 Conciliation Boards. Nominees of the
disputant parties selected chairmen on 27 occasions.
Various tables, descriptive of the work of the Branch, follow.
Respectfully submitted.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Branch.
Table I.—Analysis of Certifications Issued to December 31,  1964
Pile-drivers—
Plumbing—
15
Totals, construction _L_ 1
Logging and lumbering and sawmill	
Manufacturing—
Automobile repairs and garage    ... 10
Bread and other bakery products  6
Clothing *»«• __ 1
Concrete products  12
Distilled liquors ^ .      1
Furniture and fixtures  8
Iron and steel products    8
Machinery    7
Miscellaneous  ___. 26
Printing and publishing    5
Pulp and paper    6
Totals, manufacturing	
Mining	
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Service—
_       4
     14
Other services
Restaurants, cafes, taverns, anc
catering..    17
Trade—
Building materials and supplies
._    17
       2
Dairy products .	
       1
30
Machinery and equipment	
Miscellaneous trade	
1
.      6
Transportation, storage, and commu
.   .      _       1
Storage and warehouse	
Truck transportation            17
Totals, transportation, storage, and com-
Crrand totals
616 10,192
Table II.—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Minister of Labour,
1963 and 1964
Conciliation Officers—                                                     I963 ]964
Appointed .   372 450
Recommendations in lieu of Board                             108 131
No Board recommended : ■■ :.:.        34 59
Mediation following Board report or strike or lockout vote                                                   .26 28
Conciliation Boards     71 67
Conciliation Board members where parties fail to
Conciliation Board chairmen—
Where nominees fail to agree .    43 40
 LABOUR RELATIONS
Table II.—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Minister of Labour,
1963 and 1964—Continued
Grievance procedures provided  I 8
Applications to alter rates of pay, etc.—
Granted                -111.. _       4 2
Rejected >.         1 1
References under section 55  1
Appointments, Industrial Inquiry Commission                _ 4
Strike votes conducted       148 255
Table III.—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1963 and 1964
Applications for certification—                                         1963 1964
Certifications ordered  607 616
Applications rejected  115 115
Applications withdrawn    80 150
Total applications 802 881
Votes ordered                                        30 33
Variance of certification—
Certifications varied      64 75
Applications rejected ! i I        3 4
Applications withdrawn *B        8 	
Totals    75 79
Declaration of successor status—
Declarations given      59 75
Applications dismissed       2 	
Applications withdrawn !    _ 	
Votes ordered._   	
Totals   61 75
Cancellation of certification—
Certifications cancelled          54 52
Applications rejected                                           23 17
Applications withdrawn       3 5
Total cancellations _,      80 74
Votes ordered           6 10
Applications to alter rates of pay, etc.—
Applications granted    	
Applications rejected       1
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Complaints under section 7—
Orders issued	
Complaints rejected	
Settlements effected by Officer of the Department-
Complaints withdrawn	
Applications for consent to prosecute—
Consents granted 	
Applications rejected	
Applications withdrawn— 	
Appeals from decisions—
Appeals granted—
Appeals d'
Appeals withdra
Appointments, Arbitration Board chairmen—Appoint-
Appointments, member to Arbitration Board—
Appointments made by B
Appointments made by parties following applic:
to Board	
Applications rejected—.
Dispute resolved by Officer of Department:	
Requests for decisions under section 65—
Decisions made   —few*
Requests withdrawn  	
Applications for an Officer under section 22 (4)—
Settlements effected by Officer of Department-
Orders issued	
Referred difference back to parties	
Questions not arbitrable	
Hearings held	
Table IV.—Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards
Appointed during 1963 and 1964, by Predominant Cause
All terms of collective agreement...
Hours of work and other causes	
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1964
In the following tables, strikes and lockouts are recorded together. The term
" dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
Figures shown are inclusive of all industrial disputes involving time loss which
have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to obtain this information preclude the possibility of serious omission, but revisions may be made in
the light of later information.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH O 63
Estimates of time loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a work
stoppage lasts by the number of employees directly involved in the dispute which
leads to the strike or lockout, and who are on strike or locked out and not replaced.
Summaries include only the record of time lost by these workers. Figures do not
include disputes which last less than one day.
Disputes are listed by industrial classification and in order of the date of their
 O 64
H
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O 68                                            DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VI.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1950-64
;^B
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1958-	
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Table VII.—Analysis of Time Loss by Industry
-—
Number o
Number involved
wSZs
gHn
Employers
Workers
traction
|
i
1J86
s
 Directory-
Part I.—Officials of Congresses, Councils, etc.
W.  M.  Black,  ■
Employees).
E. C. Sims, 617 For<
CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS
. Pacific Region
Thomas  C.  Gooderharr
Vancouver 10.
Dan Radford, Regional
Staff Officers
,  Regional  Director  of  Organizat
Director of Education, 2475 Manitol
PROVINCIAL FEDERATION
on,  2475  Manitoba
ia Street, Vancouver 1
itish Columbia Federation of Labou
President: E. T. Staley.
Secretary-Treasurer: E. P. O'Nea
ik and District Labour Cou
Room 210, 517 East Broad
. LABOUR COUNCILS
: Richard Tilip, 9025 Elwood Crescent, Dawson Creek.
Secretary: '.
Kelowna-Pentict
Secretary: '.
Secretary:
Nanaimo-Albe
Secretary:
Nelson-Trail a,
Secretary:
Prince George
Secretary:
ct Labou
Kil
Vanco.
Arnold I. Smith, P.O. Box 127, Nanaimo.
md District Labour Council
George Turner, 701 Front Street, Nelson.
md District Labour Council
Ron Tweedie, 909 Fifth Avenue, Prince George.
abour Council
Thomas Freitas, Box 465, Prince Rupert.
i District Labour Council
: C. P. Neale, 106, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver
ur Council
V. Toone, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
BUILDING TRADES COUNCILS
irtered by the Building and Construction Trades Department, A.F.L.-C
ievelstoke, and Okanogan District Construction and Trades Council
y: R. H. Merrington, 1036 Dynes Avenue, Penticton.
tano Building and Construction Trades Council
y {pro tern.): H. S. Glasneck, Box 1144, Kitimat.
,'e Building and Construction Trades Council
y: Fred Scholtz, 503 Alward Street, Prince George.
iland Building and Construction Trades Council
y: A. H. Gildemeester, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
lew Westminster and District Building and Construction Trades Counc
y: H. F. Taft, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
 0 70 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
METAL TRADES COUNCIL
(Chartered by the Metal Trades Department, A.F.L.-C.I.O.)
Vancouver Metal Trades Council
Secretary: David H. Chapman, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver 10.
PRINTING TRADES COUNCILS
(The International Allied Printing Trades Association, formed by the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders, the International Photo Engravers' Union, the International Printing
Pressmen and Assistants' Union, the International Stereotypers and Electrotypers' Union,
and the International Typographical Union, exercises jurisdiction throughout the United
States and Canada in regard to the Allied Printing Trades label. Adopted and owned by
the association, the label designates the products of the labour of its members. Use of
the label is granted to qualified shops by local Allied Printing Trades Councils.)
Vancouver Allied Printing Trades Council
Secretary: H. Torrence, 720 Beatty Street, Vancouver 3.
Secretary: W. I. Panton, 14906 Glen Avon Drive, North Surrey.
Victoria Allied Printing Trades Council
Secretary: C. H. Steele, 1946 St. Ann Street, Victoria.
PART II.—INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS, WESTERN REPRESENTATIVES,
OR OTHER LOCAL OFFICERS OF TRADE-UNIONS WHICH HAVE
LOCALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—AIR-LINE DISPATCHERS
Air Line Dispatchers' Association, Canadian
Council Chairman  (T.C.A., Vancouver):   A.  J.  Davidson, 945  Chapmond Crescent,
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—AIR-LINE FLIGHT ATTENDANTS
Air Line Flight Attendants' Association, Canadian
Business Manager: R. R. Smeal, 210, 1956 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—AIR-LINE NAVIGATORS
Air Line Navigators Association, Canadian
International Representative:   W. K. Henderson, President (C.A.L.N.A.) and Executive
Chairman of International Air Lines Navigation Council, Box 1, Pointe Claire, Que.
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—AIR-LINE PILOTS
Air Line Pilots' Association, Canadian
Western Representative:   Capt. J. A. Clements, First Vice-President, 5763 Oak Street,
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—T.C.A. SALES EMPLOYEES
Trans-Canada Air Lines Sales Employees Association
Western Region Vice-President: H. Holtman, c/o T.C.A. Air Line Sales, Winnipeg, Man.
Vancouver District Chairman: W. K. Kerr, Suite 28,1386 Nicola Street, Vancouver 5.
ASBESTOS WORKERS
Heat, Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers' International Association
International Vice-President:  Michael H. Nicols, Room 1, 67 Harbord Street, Toronto 4,
Ont.
AUTO WORKERS
BAKERY WORKERS
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union of A
Vice-President in Canada: lohnH.Reid, 1139 Bay Stre(
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
BARBERS
Barbers', Hairdressers' and Cosmetologists' International Union of America
International Vice-President: Allen Coleman, 421 West Broadway, Van
BOILERMAKERS
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers, Internatk
International Vice-President for Western Canada:  Donald G. Whan, 1
Edmonton, Alta.
BOOKBINDERS
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of
International Representative:  William li Lower, 2016—28th Avenue £
Canadian Director: E. C.Sim
BRICKLAYERS
Bricklayers', Masons'
3 Western Canada:  Gordon D. Murdoch, 1302-40th S
xhrncians- National Association
gional Director and Director for Network Affairs (Canada):   Timothy J. O'Sull
105 Carlton Street, Suite 31, Toronto 2, Ont.
International Rep
BUTCHER WORKMEN
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Amalgamated
Special International Representative:   George Johnston, Room 203, Labour Temple, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
CARPENTERS
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of
Western Representative: E. T. Staley, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Special Representative: R. E. Norris, Box 728, West Summerland.
British Columbia Provincial  Council Secretary:    Arthur Leam,  2750  Quadra  Street,
Victoria.
CEMENT WORKERS
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers of America, United International Union of
District Representative: Charles Morton, 3123 Breen Crescent, Calgary, Alta.
CIVIL SERVANTS
B.C. Government Employees' Association
General Secretary: E. P. O'Connor, 2090 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9.
CIVIL SERVANTS—LETTER CARRIERS
Federated Association of Letter Carriers
National Vice-President for British Columbia: J. Cox, 532 Homer Street, Vancouver 3.
CIVIL SERVANTS—POSTAL EMPLOYEES
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian
Western Regional Vice-President: Frank J. Walden, 10466—157th Street, North Surrey.
CrVTL SERVANTS—RAILWAY MAIL CLERKS
Railway Mail Clerks' Federation, Canadian
National Secretary-Treasurer: J. Belland, 15 Frenchette Street, Hull, Que.
 O 72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CLOTHING WORKERS
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America
Representatives in Canada:
Spivak, 348 Spadina Ave
Representative in Canada: Mrs. Emily Ross, 203 Donalda Block, Winnipeg, Man
CLOTHING WORKERS—LADIES' GARMENT WORKERS
Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, International
Vancouver Joint Board Manager: H. Minuk, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver
DISTILLERY WORKERS
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union of America
International Representative:   Paul Fournier, International Vice-President, 4C
Street West, Suite 1100, Montreal 2, Que.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of
International Representative: J. N. Ross, Room 5, 111 Dunsmuir Street, Vancom
ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS
FIRE-FIGHTERS
Firefighters, International Associt
International Representative
Secretary-Treasurer: W. H. Brett, Box 249, F
FISHERMEN
3 CERAMIC WORKERS
ramie Workers of North America, United
Representative: Lewis E. Toole, Room 3, Co-oj
Gla
t^S—"
Uni
h"r,Mn
^~~
CSi
ms, 193
EastHastin
S-tZi°Sf
W.M.
S™
iSS
£jg
aham, Roo.
£u*
;r3.
tive Board:
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH O 73
IRON WORKERS (STRUCTURAL)
International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers
District Representative: John David Paterson, Suite 401, 1347 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
JEWELLERY WORKERS
lewellery Workers' Union, International
General President and General Secretary-Treasurer:   Harry Spodick,  152 West 42nd
Street, Room 1131, New York, N.Y. 10036, U.S.A.
LABOURERS
Building and Common Labourers, and Hod Carriers' International Union of America
Vice-President: Herbert W. Flesher, 208, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2.
Consultant-Conciliators and International Representatives:   William Slewidge, Stacey J.
Warner, and W. E. Hart, 208, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2.
LATHERS
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union
International Representative  (Western Canada):   A.  H.  Burton,  9908—132nd Street,
North Surrey.
Secretary, Western Canada Council: G. S. Monkman, 1210 Lockley Road, Victoria.
LAUNDRY WORKERS
LITHOGRAPHERS
International Representative:  Theodore
LONGSHOREMEN
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union
International Representative: C. H. Pritchett, 138 Ea
st Cordova Stre
MACHINISTS
International Association of Machinists
International Representative:   lames McMillan, Gr
2414 Main Street, Vancouver 10.
and Lodge Re
tentative, Room 17
MARBLE, SLATE, AND STONE POLISHERS
Marble, Slate and Stone Polishers of United States and Ca
General President:   William Peitler, 821—15th St
U.S.A.
gBp
Washington 5, D.C.
MARINE ENGINEERS
National Association of Marine Engineers
National Representative:   R. G. Greaves, Nationa
Vancouver 3.
Western Representative:   R.  F.  Cook, Assistant
Vancouver 3.
President, 31
9 West Pender Street
Secretary,  319
West Pender  Street
MERCHANT SERVICE
Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.
MINE, MILL, AND SMELTER WORKERS
International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Work
Diamond Drillers' Union, Western District
International Representative:   Lance McPhee
 0 74 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
MINE WORKERS
United Mine Workers of America, District 18
International  Representative:    William  Ure,   President,   102-103   P.   Burns
r, 102-103 P. Burns Building, Calgary, Alta
MOULDERS
Molders and Allied Workers' Union of North America
International Representative:   Ernest Fish, Canadian Vice-President, 32 Heager
Brantford 1, Ont.
MOVING-PICTURE MACHINE OPERATORS
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and
Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada
Vice-President in Canada: A. L. Travers, 304 Broadway Avenue, Toronto, Ont.
Secretary, District No. 1 (includes British Columbia):   C. W. Christenson, 48(
east 52nd Avenue, Portland 6, Ore., U.S.A.
MUSICIANS
American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada
Representative in Canada: W. M. Murdoch, 17 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ont.
NEWSPAPER GUILD
American Newspaper Guild
Business Agent: C. Crombie, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
OFFICE EMPLOYEES
Office Employees'International Union
OPERATING E
Operating Engineers, International Union of
International Representative: Clifton H. Pari
Secretary, British Columbia Council:   Gee
Vancouver 10.
PACKINGHOUSE WORKERS
Special Re
PAPER-
PATTERN-M
Pattern Makers' League of North America
International Representative:  W. A. ]
U.S.A.
PEACE OFFICERS
Peace Officers, B.C. Federation of
President: Fred Mercer, New Westmi
Secretary-Treasurer: Robert Stewart,
Road,   North
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
Special Representative: Leslie J. Young, Suite 237, 32 Front Street West, Toronto, Ont.
PLASTERERS
Organizer: W. E. McMynn, 6
PLUMBERS
United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumb
and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada
General Organizer: Clifford Priestley, Suite 909,10145—12
Secretary, British Columbia Provincial Pipe Trades Assc
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
International Vice-President:  Bernard Rowbottom, 3231 Gage Avenue, Huntington Park,
Calif., U.S.A.
PRINTERS
Typographical Union, International
Western Representative: W. John Calhoun, 314, 511 Ash Street, New Westminster.
PRINTING PRESSMEN
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America, International
Western Representative: K. A. Glinz, 9526—73rd Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES
Public Employees, Canadian Union of
Representatives:  D. E. Crabbe, Suite 3, 5 East Broadway, Vancouver 10; P. J. Driedger,
990 Leon Avenue, Kelowna.
Secretary, British Columbia Division: J. R. Knight, Suite 3, 5 East Broadway, Vancouver
10.
President: George E. Bone, 261 Burnside Road West, Victoria.
PULP AND PAPER MILL WORKERS
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers' International Brotherhood
International Representatives:   S. G. Green (Eleventh Vice-President), J. W. Terry, R.
Biasutti, and A. K. Stelp, Suite 202, 1089 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—FIREMEN AND OILERS
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of
Western Representative: William Hanesiak, 1097 Church Avenue, Winnipeg 14, Man.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of
General Chairman, Canadian Pacific Railway, Prairie and Pacific Regions:   H. L. May,
803, 356 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—LOCOMOTIVE FIREMEN AND ENGINEMEN
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of
General Chairman:   C. J. Allen, 104 Empire Life Building, 1434 St. Catherine Street
West, Montreal 25, Que.
General Grievance Committee:   Fred Priske, Secretary-Treasurer, B.L.F. and E., Canadian Pacific Railway System, 208 Winnipeg Avenue, Port Arthur, Ont.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—MAINTENANCE OF WAY
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of
Vice-President in Canada: C. Smith, 115 Donald Street, Winnipeg 1, Man.
Joint Protective Boards:  Canadian National Railways System Federation, Western Lines—
General Chairman, D. O. Spicer, 115 Donald Street, Winnipeg 1, Man.;  Canadian
Pacific Railway System Federation—General Chairman, E. Streeting,  1706 Bank
 O 76 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—RAILROAD SIGNALMEN
Railroad Signalmen, Brotherhood of
Grand Lodge Representative:   H. A. Stockdale, Apartment 3, 3895 Maplewood A
Montreal 26, Que.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—RAILWAY CARMEN
General Vice-President:   Roger Melancon, 1369 St. Catherine Street West, Montr
Que.
General Executive Board: Stephen ZIoty, 1143 Redwood Avenue, Winnipeg 14, Man
International Representative in British Columbia:   Fred Tomkinson, 1879 Barclay
Vancouver 5.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—RAILWAY CLERKS
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of
Field Representative: William A. MacKay, 2416 West 13th Avenue, Vancouver 9.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—RAILWAY CONDUCTORS
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of
Vice-President, District No. 4:   George P. Lechner, 201, 445 Sutter Street, San Fn
8, Calif., U.S.A.
General Adjustment Committee:   British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (
Routes)—W. I. Boston, 1841 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver 9.
General Chairman, General Committee of Adjustment:  G. W. Brown, 5036 Earles
Vancouver 16.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—SLEEPING-CAR PORTERS
Sleeping Car Porters, Brotherhood of (A.F.L.-C.I.O.-C.L.C.)
International Field Representative:   A. R. Blanchette, 517 Castle Building, 1410 !
Street, Montreal 2, Que.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—SWITCHMEN
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES—TRAINMEN
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of
Vice-President in Canada: G. C. Gale, 610 Broadway A
General Chairman: J. V. Robinson, 1564 Merlynn Cres
General Secretary-Treasurer:   W. Chase, 1322 Standard
RETAIL CLERKS
1001 Securities Building, Seattle 1, Wash., U.S.A
RETAIL AND WHOLESALE EMPLOYEES
ice-President in Charge, Pacific
T-METAL WORKERS
 LABOUR
NS BRANCH
O 77
SHIPYARD WORKERS
men; Machinists', Fitters' and Helpers'
makers' Industrial Union; Shipwrights',
ndustrial Union; Mar
oiners' and Wood Cau
a of Structur
ne Workers
lkers' Indus
al Draughts-
rial Union).
Representative: Will)
am A. Stewart
Presid
339 West Pender S
ver3.
SHOE WORKERS
Boot and Shoe Workers' b
Local President and £
ecretary: J.P
Roddy
2296 East 51st Avenu
.Vancouver
16.
STEELWORKERS
United Steelworkers of An
Representative and A
Vancouver 10.
R. Douglas, P.O
jea Supervisor
J. Alton and
Box 1186, Kit
F. S.
mat; E
Du
.P.
Columbia:  P. Ba
nphy, 33  East Br
Rodda, Box 2269,
skin, 33 Eas
oadway, Va
Merritt.
tBroa
r 10;
STEREOTYPERS
Canadian Vice-Presid
pers of North America
ent: George P. Fry, 59 C
veden Avenue, To
onto, Ont.
STONE-CUTTERS
International Representative: James Wright, 100 Lindsay Avenue, Toronto, Ont.
TEAMSTERS
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America
Teamsters Joint Council, No. 36: General Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local
No. 31; Taxicab, Stage and Bus Drivers' and Dispatchers' Union, Local No. 151;
General Teamsters' Union, Local No. 181 (Kelowna); Bakery Salesmen's Union,
Local No. 189; Building Material, Construction and Fuel Truck Drivers' Union,
Local No. 213; Miscellaneous Workers', Wholesale and Retail Delivery Drivers'
and Helpers Union, Local No. 351; Milk Sales Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union,
Local No. 464; General Warehousemen's Union, Local No. 842.
Canadian Representative of the Western Conference of Teamsters: E. M. Lawson,
President and Executive Officer of Teamsters Joint Council No. 36, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
TELEPHONE EMPLOYEES
Telephone Workers of British Columbia
General Secretary, Plant Division: B. H. Johns, 415, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver 2.
General Secretary, Clerical Division:   J. N. Gravel, 415,  543  Granville Street, Vancouver 2.
General Secretary, Traffic Division:   Mrs. Hazel J. Magee, 415, 543 Granville Street,
Vancouver 2.
TEXTILE WORKERS
Textile Workers' Union of North America, International
Canadian Representative: J. Harold Daoust, 120 Eglinton Avenue, Toronto 12, Ont.
TILE-SETTERS
Tile Setters' Union (Chartered to the Bricklayers', Masons' and
Plasterers' International Union of America)
Special Organizer, Western Canada: Gordon D. Murdoch, 1302—40th Street South-east
Calgary, Alta.   "
TRANSIT WORKERS
Amalgamated Transit Union
General Executive Board  Member:   George M.  Morrison,  4253  West  10th  Avenue,
 DEPARTMENT C
of North America
•torValin, 133 CleridgeAve
J. Stoney, 50 Elsie Street, Sa
1 No. 1, Director:  J. A. Moore, 2859 Commercial Drive,
: J. Clayton Walls, 1139 Ellis Street, Kelowna.
-ANNUAL SURVEY OF ORGANIZED LABOUR
IN  BRITISH  COLUMBIA, 1964
The survey of labour organizations in British Columbia for 1964 is based on
returns submitted by trade-unions and other associations of workers during the
early months of the year.
With the assistance of the British Columbia Department of Labour and the
Department of Labour, Canada, the Provincial Bureau of Economics and Statistics
completed the collection and tabulation of the 1964 data, a brief summary of which
is contained in the following pages.
In addition to the summary totals of union membership shown in relation to
similar figures for the previous year, a chart has been included to show on the basis
of broad groups the distribution of union membership in various industries.
Labour Membership
Total membership of all British Columbia labour organizations reporting in
the current 1964 survey was 226,690, compared with a final total of 222,138 in
1963, an increase of 2.05 per cent.
In the current survey a total of. 47 unions was recorded as having membership
figures of 1,000 or more during 1963 and 1964. Of these 47 larger unions, 16
reported growth in membership averaging more than 4 per cent, while 10 showed
decreases in membership totals of over 4 per cent in comparison with 1963.
Sizeable increases in membership totals were noted in unions associated with
the woodworking occupations, steelworkers, pulp and paper employees, public
service groups, retail trade, and office workers. Increases in membership also
occurred in trade-unions connected with construction, manufacturing, and some
sections of the transportation industry. Slightly lower totals were apparent in some
unions associated with the mining and fishing industries, coastal shipping, local
transit union memberships, labourers, fruit and vegetable workers, and one public
service group.
In Table VIII, which follows, the total union membership for the 1963 year
is shown as 222,138, which figure represented some 44.3 per cent of all paid
workers in British Columbia for that year. During 1964, however, rapid growth
in the labour force resulted in a considerable increase in the annual estimated total
of paid workers (up from 501,000 to 531,000 in 1964). As this over-all increase
included large sectors of employment not heavily unionized, it is not surprising that
in spite of the increase in trade-union membership (226,690 in 1964) the organized
labour membership as a percentage of total paid workers decreased slightly to 42.7
per cent.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH O 79
Table VIM.—Number of Labour Organizations Reporting, Membership and
Percentage Increases or Decreases, and Membership as a Percentage of
Paid Workers in Non-agricultural Industries as of January 1st of Each
Year, 1945-64.
Major Industrial Groups
Where adequate information as to the employers of the majority membership
of each union is available from the survey returns, a segregation of total union
membership by industry becomes practicable. While some difficulty is experienced
in the allocation of membership in the case of locals or branches of a union being
active in more than one type of industry, a segregation on the basis of the broad
industrial classification enables a comparison to be made with previous years.
In the manner of previous reports the annual percentages relating to the proportion of total trade-union membership in the various industrial classifications has
been indicated in a circle chart, which follows. For 1964 the distribution showed
only fractional percentage changes from the general pattern established in 1963.
The dispersion of total membership was as follows:—
The largest proportion of union members was found in the public and personal
service workers' section. This combined classification (public service membership,
25.1 per cent, and personal service membership, 7.1 per cent) accounted for 32.2
per cent of the total union membership in 1964, and increased slightly from the
previous year. Included in this classification are some of the larger trade-union
membership groups in Federal, Provincial, and municipal employment. The
manufacturing industries accounted for the second largest percentage of organized-
labour membership, with 29.7 per cent of the total, almost evenly divided between
the secondary forest industries of wood and wood products, and other manufacturing. Compared with 1963, a small increase was apparent in the wood and
wood-products manufacturing section of this group.   The third largest percentage
 0 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
of union membership was accounted for in the transportation and communication
industries, which were responsible for 12.4 per cent of the total, followed by the
construction industries, with 9.6 per cent. Other classifications represented on the
circle chart showing the 1964 distribution included the fishing industry, with 4.0
per cent of the total; trade, 3.8 per cent; the logging industry, 3.6 per cent; public
utilities, 2.4 per cent; mining, 2.1 per cent; and all others, 0.2 per cent.
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership
by Major Industrial Classifications, 1964
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
The fist of British Columbia labour organizations which follows is arranged
alphabetically, showing the local number and name and address of the secretary
or responsible official. All addresses are in British Columbia, except where otherwise indicated.
Inclusion of the name of any organization in the listing does not necessarily
constitute its recognition as a trade-union within the meaning of the Labour
Relations Act.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                         0 81
Bakery   and   Confectionery   Workers'   International
I         No. 9.—Local Council Chairman, R. Burrow, 8369-
D. Burchinsky, 784 Bast 17th Avenue, North Van-
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
Albemi  District   School   Board   Employees'   Union
Secretary, J. P. Roddy, 2296 Bast 51st Avenue, Van-
Amalgamated Transit Union, Local No. 101.—Finan
Amalgamated Transit Union, Local No. 109.—Secre-
A.^™SSc^-S0^aSo^eSS^cretMy
BrwoertosnoTrAnSlca!' UnL^rnational'unfoI
HPHBhHh
BrZ^T^t; V^L^nZLa^Z
Jot^rvlut^^cT^eorgT' T' ^""^ ™~
 0 82                                         DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BC    Government  Employees'   Association,   Alberni
B.C.   Government  Employees'   Association,   Oakalla   1
Branchy-Secretary,-J. G. Allen, *1756—iis'th Ave-
BlSrS3neSrL   T^M^
^Bra^^Sec^tlr^^                                                      1
B C°"Government Employees' Association, Cranbrook
B.C0WGoveirament   Employees'   Association,   Prince      I
B.C. Government Employees' Association, Princeton      j
Branch.—Secretary,  K.  J.  MacDonald,  Box  981,
PrSceiorrSeCretar>''   S   HudS°n'   P'°'   B°X   456,
B.^Government  Employees*  Association,   Duncan
B.C™Government   Employees'   Association,   Quesnel
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. W.  Geoghegan, Box 52,
Omineca Branch.^Secretary,  L.  S.  Neilsen, Box
Lake Branch.—Secretary, 3. G. Rattray, Box  100,
Mack,  Room S, 407 West Hastings  Street,  Van-
B.caSSGovemment   Employees'   Association,   Grand
B.C°UGovernment  Employees'   Association,   Vander-
B.C. Government Employees' Association, Woodlands
B.CrGeorvemment Employees' Association,  Langford
British Motore Corporation'of-Canada Ltd    (Western
B.C^ove^nSnr.  Employees'   Association,   LUIooet
P. Campbell, c/o 4280 Lougheed Highway, Burnaby
Bir^^?^l^mT]°^^°B^]uciMl
BiSS?IB%£S^N^°^z-
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                         0 83
II  Buildin   Service Employees, International Union of,
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brother-
|        V. Larson, R.R. 1, Campbell River.
Box 44, Qualicum Beach.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brother-
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brother
hood of. Local No. 527.—Business Agent, A. J.
0. Guelpa, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Box 2084, Quesnel.
Keusch, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
 O 84
1
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Carpenters and J
oiners of America, United Brother-
CM Service Association of Canada.-Secretary, K.   ■
Bustae?s' Ag°en
R?'B27B6ucCtSn'fl116,' 3iw"vv£t
CivilTerviccASatiOToT'Ca'nada^ccrctary, E. R.      1
Civil Service Association of Canada.-Secretary, Mrs.        1
Workers'Loca
).-Secretary, D. Sherret, Box 1058,
^Ir^c^o^wi^fot^rar^^S^Sltt' ■      1
Su7rWR-  M'
Nustad,   8870-112th   Street,   North
Cil! B.eNortham°96fDnun°n Arenue",' ^ctoS"*' *""        1
nueWeltchil
iwack. DiCkiOSOn' 1U ViC'0ria AVe"
ttttt^^^boilK'^fcSrla0'0'8' "St'        1
ttlou^H^el
^£T<m&™£"; J'Poyser'4I1,
CoIdTctorTand Brakemcn   Order of Railway, Local       1
^cafNolT-
|l|||g P^derson, tofyls.
Avenuf'vaSu^.^'   *   B°S,0n'   ml'Whyte
1570, Abbotsford.
556.—Recording  Secretary,  N.   Hiebert,   Box 272,       1
Campbell, Box
490, Fort St John.
L.mB?' MacKende, *u'li^u^OTl" Aveme'^'enCTai      1
^■bSbb
Craltrook' avT^fitptyees' Association   Local No       1
aAnKad?Box2
T'Ke\ownaCanada—SeCtetary' C' *'
Cra'r,o'rook0rdinB SeCretaty' A' P' J°hnS°'n' B°X 2282'      1
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
Distillery,   Rectifying,
  LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                         O 87
■ Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United, Local
Grand Forks Civic Employees' Association, Local No.
1      HNo"I37-SwA^ T'wede^MS^Mf'stteet1
Kospm^loye'J-'vVl^^^^riio^BuZ^
"S^S^S! T^^T^TlS™*
HMpttaf Employees'   Association,   Royal  Jubilee-
Hospital Employees'' Association, SL Joseph's, Gen
eral.—Secretary, Mrs. E. M. Idiens, c/o St. Joseph's
fII^S^^^S"
Io|ISui§|»Sl
Quadra Street, Victoria.'
Hotel  and  Restaurant   Employees'   and   Bartenders'
L§ltMcl^5?I'^Nir
—Recording Secretary, Y. Keverkamp, 7827 Four-
HES3FS IS^^hSd1*0^
p^rs^^^ecr^.T'rMow^^'wett
G^fT)vt^T^%^-f7^,
KTvSSwfT^^l^^°B^%7oi
1       General Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local No.
InSngr'ation Staff Association,  Canadian, Pacific
Parker Street, North Burnaby.
1527.—Business Agent, A. Allen, 4, 2475 Manitoba
B*Tl |
  1
O 8g DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Kamloops and  District  School  Employees'   Union,      LetterCarriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 1  I
Kelly, Douglas and Subsidiary Companies Emptoyees'          102—Secretary, B. M. Ellis, 2506—37th Avenue, ; I
No^OM.-Secretary, J. Gallow, 2750 Quadra Street,          170.-^Secretary, J. Chapman, 6905 Burnaby Street I
M^^ecretary-Treasurer, E. Peck, Box 271, Lady- 172.—Secretary, E. J. Funk,  1724 Prairie Street;
smith.                                                                                        Port Coquitlam. I
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
f Way  Employees,  Brotherhood  o
le Ridge Municipal Employees*
Maintenance   of  Way  Employt
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Nanaimo Civic Employees, Local
Nanaimo Public Employees' Union.
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                      O 91
1       Nurses' Association of British Columbia, Registered.—
Packinghouse Workers, United, Local No. 430.—Sec
retary, L. T. Matasky, R.R. 1, Mission City.
Middleton, 6464 Kitchener Street, Burnaby 2.
tary, David Laws, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
O|CSnS^B^0™
^rpSSS*
|        vSSS^TsS^sS WesS
p5SE€^3efH2°xHd?SafS
KetoL,^'   B'   Henfli"g'   U5°   WChter   Street>
^opElec^elary^T B ^er^A^cromto
cording Secretary, Mrs. E. Terhune, 172 East Sixty-
retary, J. F. Bleakley, 7243—47th Avenue, Burnaby
 O 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
 LABOUR REL
||        Postal Employees, Canadian Association of, Local No
|i         Postal Employees, Canadian Association of, Local No
I        Postal Employees, Canadian Association of, Local No
Markley, 4745 Manson Street; Powell River.   '
ATIONS BRANCH                                      O 93
F."h! Larssen!?^ Mckenzie Street, Victoria.
Brotherhood of, Local No. 312.—Secretary, E. Day,
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Raflwa
12?—Secretary, E. Anderson, 631 Fitzwilliam
Saanich Municipal Employees' Union, Local No. 374.
key, 298 Main Street, Vancouver.
!l
?Bur5by!taiy' N M' ^^^^ M16 ^^
S^l^\m^t^ti^^Sfw!SWi,J^-
Rail™
"a^d'steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of, Local
Joteon^treervSoria15''   D°n  D°UglaS'   3'   7X5
B
S^v^Sve^™
We'sf P^ndJ Stteet,6Vanrauver 3.' BayCr' ^  ^
^tf^^^^B
^y^T%f^^C^ V^^T^^k
RaUwa
^^^B^f^^^'^xS^'^'^^^iaaat
Sooke School Board Employees'  Association, Local
M
retary-Treasurer, R. Krickan,' 4429 Klngsway!
^^K.^^t^^^^^^
Retail,
Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local
Steelworlters'of America  United  Local No. 2952.—
Broa
dwayTvancouver 10.'   Tvi0t'   212'   517   EaSt
Secretary, E. Meelaugriin, 33 East Broadway, Van-
Retail,
Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local
Steeiworkers of America, United, Local No. 3229.—
-Secretary, Mrs. F. Campbell, 876 Myhill Roadi
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
ssociation (Schc
 O 96                                         DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Teachers' Federation of British Columbia-CoHrtm^
Teachers' Federation of British Columbia-ConM™*,,       I
Maple Street, Powell River.
Queen   Charlotte   Islands   Teachers'   Association        1
(School District No.  50) .-Secretary, D. Dur-        1
"Sh^eSetSy! Mtosfv. r2?,°Box 37? Lfl!
Re^dstoke'TScheS'' Association  (School District
Maple Ridge Teachers' Association (School District
No. 42).—Secretary, Miss J. Dowling, 21410 Glen-
New^KtnunstmsS^
NeT^Srrm^Ie^rMpds^LrvSrtocipaU'
Stte'et^Victcfrfa'. ^ M' 1 *****' ^ 3*'*SO''
Westminster.
trict No. 30) .-Secretary, J. A. Warick, Lytton.
M°iiM?i£s^r^ IS
No. 77).-Secretary, Mrs. R. Sparke, Box 2193,       1
"doK3^*1 N°' "^-Sec^TStaRpStl
New^Smiinster8' ^^ *" B0Undary R°ad'       1
53).—Secretary,  Mrs.   E.   C.  Bryant,  Box  69,       1
OUver" N°' W'~SeCretary' T- J- SareU' Bo* 355'
S? u°i ft"Secretary' Miss a R Cowley' Bo*      1
University "huI Teachers' Association  (University       1
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                      O 97
1    Teachers' Federation of British Columbia-Continued
Telephone Workers, British Columbia, Local No. 17.
1484.—Secretary,   Vic   Skurjat,   4275   Lynn  Valley
r      Telephone Workers, British Columbia, Local No. 1.—
Trainmen, Railroad, Brotherhood of, Local No. 845.—
nuer Va^co^r W N°r<"!Uist' V***" Eigh* A^
cMver!0'' Wjmam BaSD' U6S PendreU Street' Van"
"^SSdJSWaSgi? & SSwaS
Strert*r«UioilMi"   A'   McD°nal<1'   1017   Hoover
Trans-Canada Air Lines (Air Canada) Sales Employ-
 O 98                                            DEPARTMENT
} OF LABOUR
Trans ort and General Workers, Canadian Brother-
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 226.-   1
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340.—     :'
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 413.—   1
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 632.—     j   1
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 868.—    j
Hughes, 145 MacDonald Avenue, North Burnaby 2.
Transport and General Workers, Canadian Brother-
Transport and General Workers, Canadian Brother-
National Upper Vancouver Island Branch.—Secre-
tary, W. E. Winter, National Employment Office,        1
Department of National Defence, 4050 West Fourth
Treasury Staff Association of Canada, Victoria Branch.
Branch.—Secretary-Treasurer,   Mrs.   J.' Paul,   c/o
Vm^Ba^A^UmT!°K^S^°%lr:cJ'w       1
H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau.™
"S^^BmS^mKallSch t^Bast        1
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
at Employees' Union.—Secre
cretary-Treasurer, B. Thompson, 11
Department of Shaughn
retary, W. Q. Sterling,
sr
Ho'sSrv5^
SSg
I^IP
VanSeTI:
Organizations of Employers
Each year the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, in conjunction with the
Labour Relations Branch, Department of Labour, compiles a listing of employer
associations in British Columbia. This year, 1964, the number of associations
reporting was 109.
All addresses shown in the following list are in British Columbia except where
otherwise indicated.
 1
0 100                                       DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Ind   trial Relations Western Association-
Fisherles Association of British Columbia.—President,     1
dent, B. M. HoSmeister;   Secretary, Ian Mahood,       1
Building and Construction Trades Council, Kamloops-
Barnis^SeCTetary*™. H?tMerrington' 1036 Dynes'
Columbia.—President, Lou Mallin; Secretary, J. R.
Taylor, 300, 1H1 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
William Phillips;  Secretary, Robert E.'purdy, 202,
Egg Producers' Association of British Columbia.—
^fcfa.^5^?»ssri«sss
Electrical Association of Vancouver.—President, H. B.
Johnson; Secretary, J. Crumey, 714 East Broadway,
West Broadway, Vancouver 9.'
Electronic Guild of British Columbia (afBliated with
tary, Mrs. G. M. Maude, 2007 West Fourth Avenue,
don Dubberley, 1025 West 77th Avenue, Vancouver
Electronic Guild of British Columbia, Victoria and
Insulation Contractors' Association of British Colum-       1
Electrical Service League of British Columbia.—Presi-
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH                                     O 101
II Jockey Club of British Columbia—President, Jack
Oil Well Drilling Contractors' Canadian Association—
Red Cedar Shingle Mill Consolidated Association-
President, J. S. Douglas;   Secretary, Miss M. E.
■     VanSverTetaIy' F' Bm8°tt' ^ ^^^ ^^
SCp?2ideS,S LA. Gra^Seeretory! F^M. Rede?!51035
■  Merchants   Exjttange ^^^"^£*£%?%&
Shippers' Association, Okanagan Federated. — Presi-
I     ^nt^C^rarmick^SeS'etr1^  W^a*^
Steel^rectors^sStton-President, R  C. Harris;
Thoroughbred Owners' Association of British Colum-
i       VaSuveAT*'315'' *■ H" P°01' '92° ^^ StKe^
Lindsay;  Secretary, A. A. Mortlock, 904 HeJmcken
I    MMa^rSeSeta^'FARlvWe'rM5SlTll9FW«t
Stteefvanco K' 1*"*"*' 4"' *"'W'*t Hastin*»
1    Motor Dealers' Association of British Columbia—
^mt,0™ p!' McCorrniack;CSS^etSyV1to)'BPBto-
1     Oil Heat Institute of'British Columbia—President,
WA?0^eUm^eisJci^r«^pf^W^P4?ES
1        Street, Vanc^^verT^' & W' Hanson' 2675 0ak
Wharf Orators'™" ociatitn of British Columbia—
1     ° retary! SrSrS^SaL^^vSria860-
||j|| ESSrSiJSSSZ tSan-
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to tl
e Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
inrightoftheProvtac
; of British Columbia.
1      3,860-1264-1351
<^8
   

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