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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1964 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1965

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1964
  Victoria, B.C., November 20, 1964.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year en
March 31, 1964, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
 The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1964.
E. R. RICKLNSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1963, to March 31,1964
Hon. W. D. Black Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler   Director of Social Welfare.
 Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
R. J. BurnhaM—
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
.Departmental Comptroller.
.Superintendent of Child Welfare.
.Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
.Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
.Director of Medical Services.
.Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons'
and Disabled Persons' Allowances and Supplementary Assistance.
Personnel Officer.
Superintendent, Provincial Home.
.{Casework Supervisors, Social Ass
Mrs. J. P. Scott {    Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler Training Supervisor.
Mrs. M. Titterington. Supervisor, Social Service Departme
of Tuberculosis Control.
J. McDlARMID_
Miss W. M. Urquhart.
Dr. P. W. Laundy	
E. W. Berry	
Mrs. M. Dighton
G. P. Willie	
N. S.
t, Division
A. A. Shtpi
—Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
Miss M. Jamieson Administrator, Region I.
H. E. Blanchard Administrator, Region II.
R. I. Stringer Administrator, Region III.
W. J. Camozzi Administrator, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Administrator, Region V.
 Administrator, Region VI.
 Administrator, Region VII.
CONSULTANTS
W. H. Crossley_
Mrs. C. Mackenzie..
F. S. Hatcher	
Miss B. W. Snider—
-Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services.
^.Medical Social Work.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I.—General Administration:
Director of Social Welfare	
Assistant Director of Social Welfare	
Part II.—Regional Administration:
Region I	
Region n	
Region III	
Region IV	
Regio
Regio:
VH_
Part III.—Divisions:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division	
Child Welfare Division !	
Medical Services Division ■.	
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Assistance	
Part IV.—^Institutions:
Brannan Lake School for Boys .	
Willingdon School for Girls	
Provincial Home, Kamloops	
Welfare Institutions Board	
Part V.—Social Work Services:
Division of Tuberculosis Control and Pearson Poliomyelitis Pavilion	
Part VI.—^Accounting Division I	
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART 1.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
The demand on Government for welfare services continues at a steady pace,
and this can be expected in view of the rising population in the Province.
In order to provide the best possible welfare services, continuous study and
planning have been carried out. Staff utilization has been given full consideration
with adjustments in case loads and reorganization of areas, and for the sake of
continuity some of the reports in the following pages show activity carrying forward into the present calendar year.
Social welfare services and prograrnming for these services are not static.
For example, there is a changing situation in connection with tuberculosis, and due
to the nature of these changes extra allowances have been authorized for members
of families who are in receipt of social allowance when individuals show a TB.
reaction although not diagnosed as being positive. This change was made in order
to increase the money available to the family for extra diet needs.
In the area of welfare institutions—namely, boarding homes giving care to
elderly persons who need personal care but not bed care—changes are taking place.
The type of construction of the institutions themselves is becoming more sophisticated and buildings are being contemplated, and constructed, with an increase in
the number of stories. As well, institutions are being brought into being which
give special services to persons in need of extra care but not needing care at a
private-hospital level. In order to increase the service to persons who are not in
need of care in hospitals or other institutions, accommodation has been offered to
such individuals in the Provincial Home, Kamloops, with gratifying results. This
home has always given an excellent service for aged men in need of accommodation.
Concentration on the field of rehabilitation is continuing in conjunction with
the Health Branch of the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
The team approach is proving effective, and with the establishment of screening
committees in the local communities it is obvious that resources are being developed
which will prove of great advantage.
In October, 1963, the Federal Old Age Security allowance of $65 per month
was increased to $75 per month. In December, 1963, the Disabled Persons' Allowance, the Blind Persons' Allowance, and Old-age Assistance were increased from
$65 per month to $75 per month.
In the Social Allowance category, authorization was given to make available
an extra $10 a month to increase the rental allowance if and where necessary.
A slight increase took place in the number of persons receiving Social Allowance,
but the turnover in case load continued. The movement in case load indicates
that many people who needed services and financial help did nevertheless subsequently return to employment and to a self-supporting status.
An Act Respecting Training-schools for Children, chapter 50 of the Statutes
of 1963, assented to March 27, 1963, has been implemented.   The regulations
 j 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
made pursuant to the Act were effective December 3, 1963. The Training-schools
Act Release Board was constituted to carry out the purpose and intent of this
legislation, and monthly meetings have been held. The members of this Board are:
Chairman, Mr. E. R. Rickinson (Deputy Minister of Social Welfare), Mr. T. D.
Bingham (Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare), Mr. N. A. McDiarmid (Departmental Solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General), Mr. A. Jones (Supervisor, Probation Branch, Department of the Attorney-General), and Mr. J. A.
Sadler (Director of Social Welfare).
The following tables outline the statistical information in connection with the
case loads during the year, and it will be noted that the small numerical decrease
in the number of persons receiving aged allowances continues. However, it will
also be noted that there has been a rise in demand for child welfare services, and
this is outlined in detail in the report of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Table II.—Movement t
n Case Load during Fiscal Year 1963/64
Cafego,
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed
during Year
Number
PerCen.
Number
PerCen.i
l|Ho|aicI	
j;|
W*
l
7M
T^^^SSlSSi
.oi
Totals for Province	
94.823
100.0
94,699
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category and as a Percentage of Populati
as at March 31st for the Years 1963 and 1964
The Emergency Welfare Services Supervisor has continued to implement
community and Departmental staff-training programmes. The positive results of
this training were demonstrated in the way the staff reacted in time of emergencies,
such as during flooding in various areas of the Province last year, and the worth of
the training programme was proved.
The Co-ordinator, Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services, has concentrated his studies in the two metropolitan areas of Victoria and Vancouver.
The Office Consultant, during field trips, consolidated the necessary information for the evaluation of office methods and procedures within the Department.
The Research Consultant and her staff have carried on case-load surveys to
provide material vital to Departmental planning and operation.
The co-operation which has been given during the year by officials from other
Government departments, municipalities, and private agencies has been most helpful,
and I would like to express my appreciation on behalf of the Department of Social
Welfare for the guidance and help which have been extended.
 REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. BURNHAM
I wish to submit the report of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare for the
fiscal year April 1, 1963, to March 31, 1964.
In order to keep our staff informed on recent developments in the welfare field,
we held three regional meetings throughout the Province this year, giving nearly
all our social workers the opportunity to attend. Regions I and LT held their meeting in Vancouver; Regions III, IV, and VI in Penticton; and Regions V and VII
in Terrace. The Community Chest and Councils of the Greater Vancouver area
were very helpful in allowing some of their experienced staff members to take part
in these meetings, and our staff gained much from their presentations. This year we
were able to send six members of our staff to the School of Social Work, University
of British Columbia, on bursaries of $ 1,400. An additional bursary of $1,000 was
provided a student who had just completed his Bachelor of Arts and wished to take
a year's training in social work. We anticipate increasing the number of bursaries
for the next university year.
Our senior stenographers have had the advantage of meeting together in the
various regions to discuss their work problems with Mrs. Mackenzie, our Office
Consultant. These meetings are of assistance to our stenographers in helping them
carry out their duties in office management and routine.
Mrs. Mackenzie, as well as taking an active part in these meetings, visited a
number of district offices to give first-hand advice and help to the staff. She has
also made further amendments to the Office Manual, while attending to her many
other duties.
National welfare grants are being increased each year, and we have been able
to put them to good effect. Some of the grants were used for staff development,
but the larger portion was utilized to carry out various projects throughout the
Province. In Fort St. John a project has been established to survey the area in
terms of staff needs to meet the variety of social problems present in the community, and also to help plan for a number of children in care. A consultant was
placed in the Child Welfare Division to assist the field in maintaining and improving
standards of service to children and families in the Province. A social worker was
placed in the Surrey office to strengthen the adoption programme in a community
where there appeared to be a number of potential adoption homes present. Assistance was also provided the Community Chest and Councils of Vancouver to carry
on with their area demonstration project, which involves research into the treatment
of multi-problem families in an area where several social agencies are at work.
The National welfare grants programme was established to help develop and
strengthen welfare services in Canada in order that they will effectively meet the
needs and also help prevent welfare problems and dependency. Costs of staffing
the various projects are shared equally between the Provinces and the National
Government. This year the total sum allotted for use by the Provincial and
National Governments was $40,000. Next year it is anticipated this sum will be
increased to in excess of $100,000.
Once again I wish to thank all staff members for their co-operation with this
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 J 13
PERSONNEL
Mrs. M. E. Dighton, Personnel Officer
Although the position Personnel Officer was created in April, 1962, the reports
concerning staff continued until this year to be located under the heading " Assistant
Director of Social Welfare," which position was formerly responsible for staff.
Previous reports have commented that the standards of service the Department
gives are dependent on the quality of the people it employs—their knowledge,
understanding, and skills. Every effort is made to select those most capable of
administering the legislation for which this Department is responsible. We are
concerned that our social workers be the best available, and we are equally interested
in employing high-calibre clerical staff and those who work in many capacities within
the institutions attached to this Department. The staff of this Department are its
assets. It is the goal of every member of the Department to give the best possible
service to every individual who requires our help and thus enable him to carry on
alone—in this way to administer our very fine remedial social legislation in the
most advantageous manner for the benefit of the citizens who pay for it. We are
justly proud of our staff and their untiring and devoted attention to duty.
The staff has grown over the years to a present total of 645, and added to this
as of April, 1964, are another 59 positions. The processing of applications, letters
of reference, serving on panels, health reports, salaries and classifications, evaluations, rating forms, holidays, sick leave, transfers, advancements, and terrninations
contribute to the volume of work. It was my privilege during the year under review
to visit each office in Region IV and three of the offices in Region I. This was of
great value as it enabled me to get to know personally for the first time some staff
members whom I had not previously met, as well as talk with those who were already
known to me. Opportunities to meet with other staff have been provided through
attendance at regional and supervisory conferences.
The following table shows the total number of staff (clerical, professional, and
technical) that were employed, and their location in the Department, as of March
31, 1964:—
Table I.—Total Number of Staff as at March 31,1964
General Administration :- ■   ■ ■        12
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation       ■ 5
Field Service '. 374
Child Welfare Division ' ';   ' 30
Provincial Home     35
Brannan Lake School       62
Willingdon School I
^Assistance Board i „ 77
Total ! 645
Most inquiries about numbers of staff concern the social-work positions. We
have therefore developed the following table, based on an examination of the
Estimates. This table indicates the increase in and location of social workers in
the Department of Social Welfare from March 31, 1960, to the present date.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Social-work Positions, 1960-64
Previous reports have not made mention of the municipal social workers in
municipal and (or) amalgamated offices. Since staff in these offices work side
by side and share in the total Provincial case load, this should be recorded, otherwise we do not have a complete picture of the average number of cases carried by
Provincial social workers. As of March 31, 1964, the municipal social workers
numbered 86 plus 13 social-work assistants, making a total of 99.
One question has recurred at intervals, and it will be necessary to go back to
an event which took place April 1, 1956, to clarify the matter. Up to March 31,
1956, all social-work staff working in psychiatric-treatment institutions were part
of the staff of this Department and were included in the total staff count as per the
Annual Reports.
On April 1, 1956, the Psychiatric Division, made up of 42 social workers, was
transferred to the Provincial Secretary's Department. Actually these was no difference in the field case loads as a result of the move. This Division took with it the
cases being carried by each worker.
The following table varies slightly from Table II for reasons as noted.
Table III.—Social Workers, 1960-64
March 31, 1960 -
March 31, 1961 I
March 31, 1962 ..
March 31, 1963 ..
March 31, 1964
  285
n has several causes. First, the figures shown in Table in include
all social workers. (Table II does not include those paid from the Federal training
grants.) Second, a local situation can create a need for additional help. For
example, large numbers of unemployed persons will arrive in a particular locality
when employment prospects appear probable; many will require help until work is
found or until movement takes place to another area, and to alleviate the situation
extra staff is employed. Third, over the past two years a serious shortage of adoption homes has resulted in formulating a programme designed to assist in meeting
this great need. As a result, additional staff was placed in 1963 and 1964. Fourth,
the figures include staff on educational leave.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 15
The Federal training grants programme has enabled the Department to further
increase its social-work staff. Costs of this increase are shared 50-50 between the
Federal and Provincial Governments. In 1963 we added, through this means, eight
positions (of which two were clerical). The remaining six covered the appointments
of a Research Consultant to the Research Division, a Child Welfare Consultant for
Special Placements to the Child Welfare Division, a supervisor and two social
workers for the Fort St. John project, and a social worker for the Surrey adoption-
home project. These positions will continue and additional projects will be added
as trained staff is available.
The bursary programme permitted us to assist seven staff members attending
schools of social work, for a total expenditure of $9,400 in the year under review.
The programme has been considerably accelerated through the aid of Federal
grants, and training grants to members of our staff in the 1964/65 school term will
amount to $24,000, plus another $2,000 to persons proceeding directly from the
B.A. degree to the B.S.W. degree.
The following table shows the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal
years ended March 31, 1963, and March 31, 1964:—
Table IV.—Social-work Staff as at March 31,1963 and 1964
Table V.—Staff with Degrees in Social Work
Men
Women
Tota,
f<!    • 1W    V
|
l
»S22X*£2%
jjjguggjg^
A
sSHHain^Ea
nM_£fb^sii_z:
I
,42
143
If the reader will refer to the Annual Report of March 31, 1958, it will be
noted the social-work staff was made up of 40 men and 148 women. There has
been a steady change-over; for example, on March 31, 1962, the ratio was 114
men to 142 women, and the present report, March 31, 1964, shows the ratio of
men to women is almost equal. The increased interest on the part of men is also
reflected throughout enrolment at all schools of social work, and it is an interesting
fact that the profession is no longer regarded as women's work.
During the year under review there was a total of 66 social worker separations,
and they occurred for the following reasons:—
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VI.—Social Worker Separations, 1963/64
Domestic  	
To further education	
Personal reasons	
To accept other employment _
111 health._	
Moved from area or Provii
Transferred	
Services unsatisfactory	
To accept municipal job ..
TRAINING DIVISION
Douglas W. Fowler, Supervisor
This has been another active year in the Training Division, with nine four-week
classes being conducted. These consisted of five Part I courses and four Part III
courses, involving a total of 86 social workers.
Sixty-four in-service trainees were appointed, and of these 15 had previous
experience. Ten of that group held a B.A. degree or equivalent, and four of the
remaining five had two years' university or better.
Forty-nine workers were appointed who had no previous experience. Of these,
34 held a B.A. degree or equivalent and six had three years' university or better.
Fifty-two persons were given Part I in-service training, two of which were
municpal social workers.
A great deal of interest in our training programme is manifested by persons
who wish to enter the field, and we conduct an average of 25 interviews per month
with prospective staff members. In February the Training Supervisor and Assistant
Training Supervisor interviewed 50 University of British Columbia students graduating in the spring and fall of 1964. These interviews were arranged on the campus,
and 10 new staff members were obtained in this manner.
The problem of staff turnover still concerns us, but it is of interest to note that
many persons leaving our employ do so to obtain further training or to broaden
their experience by accepting employment in other agencies. We have been
encouraged by the additional funds being made available through Federal welfare
grants for staff training and the response of our staff to the opportunities provided
to obtain professional education.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
PART II.—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
Miss M. Jamieson, Regional Director
I beg to submit the annual report for Region I for the fiscal year ended March
31,1964.
There were no major changes in the geographical boundaries. The region
includes Vancouver Island, adjacent islands, and a northern strip of the west coast
of the Mainland. From figures completed in the 1961 Census, there are approximately 291,000 persons within the boundaries of the region. About 4 per cent of
these people receive services from our Social Welfare Department.
The region is served by seven offices manned by 38 social workers, four district
supervisors, supporting clerical staff, two municipal administrators, and one Regional
Director.   This is an increase of two social workers, as follows:   ~
social worker employed by the Municipahty of Saanich, one hal
handling adoption only in Victoria district office, and one full
on limited child care and adoptions case load in Courtenay a
clerk-stenographer was added to the Courtenay district office staff.
There was an unusual number of staff changes during the year for a variety
of reasons—educational leave, marriage, inter-office transfers, illness, retirement,
and, sadly, the death of two members of the social-work staff. These changes created
much additional work and stress to both social worker and clerical staff, which was
alleviated to some degree by several retired social workers coming on staff for
temporary periods.
The case load for this region on March 31, 1964, was 11,380. Table I shows
the ad_nistrative offices with distribution of case load by category of services and
Table II indicates the numerical and percentage comparison of case load by major
categories in Region I for the fiscal years 1962/63 and 1963/64.
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category
of Services as at March 31,1964
One half-ri
ne social worker
le social worker
One half-time
 I  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
The Alberni-West Coast flood disaster of March 28, 1964, caused substantial
property damage, but miraculously there was no loss of life nor serious injury.
The immediate and effective co-operation of all concerned was an unforgettable
experience. Private citizens, municipal officials, community organizations, and
business firms gave unstintingly to the emergency welfare operation, despite their
other heavy responsibilities. It is not easy to single out any one person or organization, but special tribute is due Mayor Bishop of Alberni, Mayor Hammer of Port
Alberni, the Salvation Army, the Red Cross, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
church groups, public health nurses, and many others. Technical assistance was
provided by Civil Defence disaster plan personnel. Social workers and clerical
staff of the Alberni district social welfare office deserve sincere commendation for
their initiative in setting up emergency welfare services speedily and efficiently; their
positive action in this crisis is a matter of pride to themselves and the Department
The support extended by senior officials of the Department and regional staff was
immediate and appropriate.
In conclusion, the regional staff and I are grateful for the co-operation and
e received from those who have assisted us in meeting our responsibilities.
H. E. Blanchard, Regional Director
Public welfare in the geographic area of British Columbia known as Region II
is administered from municipal and Provincial offices as follows:	
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of municipal
acrrninistrators): District of Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New
Westminster City, City and District of North Vancouver, District of
Richmond, Vancouver City, and District of West Vancouver.
District offices (Department of Social Welfare offices under the charge
of district supervisor, serving unorganized areas and per capita
municipalities): New Westminster district office, serving unorganized areas and the municipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody; Powell River district office, serving the
District of Powell River and surrounding area, including Texada
Island; Vancouver district office, serving unorganized areas of University of British Columbia Endowment Lands, North Arm of Bur-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
J 19
rard Inlet, Howe Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt Peninsula, and
Ocean Falls and adjacent coast.
a of Table I following will reveal an over-all increase in case
load of just over 0.54 per cent as compared with 0.46 per cent for the previous year.
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance cases have decreased by 557
cases, continuing the trend as reported last year when a decrease of 719 cases was
indicated- Social Allowance cases show an increase but at a reduced rate, 415
as compared with 712, partly affected by the exodus of 133 Doukhobor cases from
Region II during 1963/64. As the fiscal year closed, it was planned to integrate
the administration of the remaining 55 Doukhobor cases with other Social Allowance cases instead of carrying them as a separate group.
The categorical allowances show only minor fluctuations from the previous
year, but Family and Child Welfare cases show a significant increase, not so much
in the numbers alone, but the volume of work involved in this type of case. Adoption homes that have been approved for the placement of children on this basis and
the number of children so placed show no significant increase. However, the
number of foster homes in use at March 31, 1964, had risen to 379, as compared
with 325 reported the previous year, and the number of children in foster homes
increased from 580 to 685. This increase of children in foster homes reflects two
factors: First, that homes desiring the adoption placement of a child seem not to
be so readily available as they were a few years ago, and, second, an increasing
number of situations where family circumstances require the removal of a child
or all the children of a family from parental control.
In an attempt to explore the posibility of increased adoption placements, a
special project in this regard was initiated in July, 1963, and is continuing. A well-
qualified social worker was assigned to the project to cover areas in Region II, where
it was believed additional and directed help would produce results. At fiscal-year
end the project shows promise of producing the anticipated results.
Table II shows the various categories of cases as distributed among the several
administrative offices in the region.
M
,962/63
,963/64
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
R„n,il    <S„ryir»
12'l88
l
12,638
09
}        7-
Old Age Security S
Wlementery Social All
wance_
40.0
33,306
100.0
33,486
 J 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA    '
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Admit
of Region II as at March 31, 1964
MM % lib   ill   f I   1?    I     lb    If   si   »**
 | » 13 jsfeg j g^s 11> I ga 1 a 1 >s | >s | g=> [
Emergency Shelters
During the winter of 1963/64 the shelter facilities operated by the private
agencies in Vancouver were sufficient to take care of those single transient men who
required this service, so there was no need to supplement on an emergency basis.
In New Westminster, where the shelter functions as a temporary home to permit
time to process the applications of single transient men, a very successful operation
was organized and supervised on our behalf by the Salvation Army. This year the
shelter was operated for seven months, being closed from June to October, inclusive,
during which period the single transient male problem is lessened for this office.
During the seven months' operation, 957 men were served, making an average of
137 per month with an average stay of three days. An average of 921 meals was
served per month. Total cost of the operation, which was borne by the Department
of Social Welfare, was $5,523.37, for an average of approximately $1.85 per man
per day.
Unemployed Single Men, Vancouver City
The number of unemployed single men on Social Allowance in the City of
Vancouver continues to present a real problem for the city social service department
and is of deep concern to the Department of Social Welfare.
A special problem with a portion of this classification of Social Allowance
recipient, usually considered to be a " transient" group, results from drunkenness,
probably only partially due to idleness. In those cases where men have been known
to use their assistance unwisely, the Vancouver social service department has arranged for the administration of their allowances through some reliable agency or
person. An interesting experiment in this regard was established about November
1963, whereby arrangements were made with the manager of a downtown hotel
to undertake the administration of any such cases referred to him. The average
number of such cases in the hotel during any month would be about 75. The men
have their lodging in the hotel, meals are arranged for in nearby restaurants, and
minor comforts are arranged. This is reported to be a successful programme, and
great credit is due to the hotel manager.
 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
The Cathkin Group-living Home for boys, opened late in the previous fiscal
year, has now been in operation for 15 months. Financed by the Department of
Social Welfare, it is under the supervision of the Child Welfare Division through
the Burnaby social service department, with services available from the nearby
Mental Health Clinic. The home will accommodate six boys. By the beginning of
the year five boys were in residence. During the year eight boys received treatment,
and five were in the home at March 31, 1964.
This has been a year of testing out methods, adjusting, and learning from successes and failures. Experience with this home confirms belief that such resources
can be helpful and encourages hope that other such homes can be established in
Region II to serve both girls and boys at the younger age-level as well as those in
the adolescent years.
The Department of Social Welfare has enjoyed the co-operation of the private
agencies and the municipal welfare departments, and I take this opportunity to
thank them for their help.
This is an opportunity for me to thank the social workers and supervisors of
the Department who have served in Region II during this fiscal year. Credit must
be given to the clerical staff in all offices. Their constant support is much appreciated. I desire also to thank senior administration on behalf of staff and myself for
their encouragement and support.
R. I. Stringer, Regional Director
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region III for the fiscal year 1963/64.
There have been no changes in the regional boundaries. The region extends
from the International Boundary to Wells Gray Park and from Revelstoke and
district to Bralorne.
Social welfare services are provided from seven Provincial offices—one each
located at Lillooet, Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, Oliver, and Pen-
ticton. Services in the MunicipaUties of Armstrong, Enderby, North Kamloops,
Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, and Summerland are provided by the nearest Provincial
district office, and paid for by the municipality concerned on a per capita basis.
Under the provisions of the Municipal Act certain organized areas are exempt from
providing social welfare services. There are 14 such district municipalities and
villages in Region Hi, and the necessary services are provided in them as if they
were actually unorganized territory.
The economy continued to improve, the most apparent growth being in the
tourist industry and construction necessitated by the need for additional facilities.
Population continued to increase at a steady rate. As a result, there were
additional social welfare services required, resulting in an over-all increase in case
load, even though the financial assistance services actually decreased.
From the following table it can be noted that the Social Allowance case load
decreased from 34.2 to 32.9 per cent of the total case load, an actual decrease from
3,229 to 3,146 cases. A total of $617,067.13 was granted to employable persons,
a decrease of 25 per cent over the preceding year. There was also a decrease of
76 in supplementary assistance to those in receipt of Old Age Social Security. There
was, however, an increase in the total case load from 9,453 to 9,560, an increase
 j 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of approximately 1 per cent. In addition to this increase in the case load, there were
28,969 cases opened and closed, approximately 4 per cent more than the year before.
Most of the increase was in the Family and Children's Services, which altogether
accounted for an additional 210 cases.
Child-in-care case load alone rose from 681 to 709, an increase of 28 children-
in-care or 4 per cent during the year. On the positive side, however, this increase
was less than the 19-per-cent increase of the previous fiscal year.
Three additional social workers were assigned to the region specifically to work
in the adoption and child-in-care categories. This " blitzkrieg " method was fairly
successful, but because of the necessity of devoting equal energies to the more
preventive services and because of changes in staff, it soon became apparent that the
activities of this staff were too restricted. Plans were therefore made to broaden
their sphere of usefulness. We were also pleased to receive notification that the
Government had authorized an increase of lO'/i clerical and professional staff for
this region beginning with the new fiscal year. Careful studies were immediately
commenced to ensure that this additional manpower would be effectively utilized.
The social workers continued to concentrate on the Social Allowance case load,
and their efforts were partly responsible for the reduction in that category of service,
particularly in the employable group. The more difficult rehabilitation cases were
referred to the various rehabilitation committees with marked success, particularly
in the Vernon and Kamloops areas, where continuity of staff and the effective
co-operation of the National Employment Service's Special Placement Officer resulted in a good level of service.
A study was made of the effectiveness of services to families who had been
deserted by the bread-winner. It was found that whereas family desertion does not
occur as frequently as is sometimes thought, a desertion that is not resolved promptly
tends to become a long-term case. It was also found that one of the barriers to
prompt action was locating the missing husband. Therefore, at present, efforts are
being made to develop more effective location and follow-up methods.
In closing, may I again congratulate both the municipal and Provincial staffs
for the effective, dedicated work that they have performed.
Offices
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 J 23
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region III for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
Walter J. Camozzi, Regional Director
The Rockies, the 49th parallel from Bridesville to meet them, and a line drawn
from Bridesville along the eastern margin of the Arrow Lakes north of Field form
the triangle shape of Region IV, which remains unchanged.
There have been no administrative changes. It was served by a Regional
Director at Nelson, three district offices supervised by district supervisors at
Nelson, Cranbrook, and Trail, with sub-offices at New Denver, Fernie, Creston,
Golden, Castlegar, and Grand Forks respectively, which are served by 23 social
workers and 14 clerical staff.
A programme to achieve first-rate office accommodation was completed in the
year, interestingly enough at a considerable net saving in rent to the Department.
The little nursing home " Pavilion " is still in operation at New Denver, at its
capacity of 14 to 15 patients, providing good care under the matron, Miss Gladys
Reynolds, R.N. Local people are actively interested in the patients and supply
company and other extras. We are particularly thankful to Mr. D. Westaway,
WS^ngineer of ^ Highways Department, for more than ordinary helpfulness
in keeping the place in good shape. Mr. E. Owens, the Nelson Fire Chief, gave a
demonstration at our request on use of essential equipment. This later paid off
when an aide, Mrs. V. Detta, making Use of this knowledge, with the matron, put
out a fire accidentally started by a patient.
There has been no dramatic industrial development in the region. The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company expanded its output tremendously at
Kimberley, in iron and fertilizer production particularly, but with a disproportionate
increase in staff due to increased efficiency of the plant. There is planning, however,
for further development, which may mean the hiring of quite a few more men.
Winter works were used by Castlegar and Montrose, but bad weather reduced
the work period to a month or less for our clients.
The vocational school was completed in Nelson, and the area is proud of
having it. Notre Dame College became a university this year with degree-granting
powers. These two educational units do not add a great deal to the local economy,
but may indicate that Nelson is becoming less of a commercial centre and more and
more a residential and vocational one. Some of our wards were enrolled at the
vocational school, and we expect to use it more.
The Kinsmen completed their plans for a low-rental " villa," and the Honourable Minister, Mr. Black, was invited to turn the first sod. We are glad of this
added facility in Nelson for older people.
 j 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Community organization work was developed more in the Trail district in
child welfare work. The local Council of Women undertook to publicize the need
for foster homes, to explain the responsibilities of foster-parenthood, to visit prospective foster-parents, and to forward cards describing 33 possible foster homes.
Five already have been used for seven children. There is good commumty work
and, incidentally, good staff development.
One worker was able to attend the Child League Conference in Vancouver.
An inter-regional conference with Regions VI and IE was particularly successful
and hugely enjoyed, and is a particular credit to the staff of Region HI, who
organized it so well.
It is impossible to write an annual report in Region IV without mention of the
Doukhobors, who continue to involve a great deal of time and who show the least
response to our efforts. Although ostensibly large numbers went to the coast, many
travelled back and forth, as did their files. Out of 151 files transferred to Vancouver,
41 were back in Nelson by April.
There has been increased interest in civil defence. Several staff members
undertook communication, personal services, and feeding courses, some on their
own time, and quite a few of the staff attended a Friday and Saturday exercise in
January. A mobile feeding unit was delivered to our administration, and it has
been delivered to certain towns for publicity, and people know it is available in case
of emergency.
The case-load summary totals disclose last year to be the lowest in costs and
numbers of the last six and of the steady decrease of the last three. This could be
attributed to tighter controls and greater consciousness of staff in more accurate
counting, and I think some credit should be given here. In a review of the last 12
years, however, it is plainly seen that numbers and costs have alternated in three-year
phases to establish a trend line which is constantly rising. This constant rise reflects
general conditions, which may be higher in other areas but no less serious.
Again it is a pleasure to credit every co-worker in each office for their particular responsiveness in the last year. Special thanks are due to the Health Unit
Directors, the Government Agents, and the Highways and Probation Departments
for their help to us. My thanks, too, to municipal and private organizations for
their particular knowledge of local conditions and helpfulness, and I must register
my sincere appreciation of the interest and. concern of the Honourable Minister,
senior administration, and the divisions in helping us serve the people of this region.
Table I.-
e Offices
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 25
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
.962/63
.963/64
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
F mil  Se   ice
l
f|
"l
24
|
Qia«ge^r!t^Sjpplemeritary
Sdtfaf'AIIowanceL
°
5,724
.00.0
5,461
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Director
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Department of Social
Welfare in Region V for the fiscal year 1963/64.
Boundaries of the region remained unchanged and so did the boundaries
between districts.
The fiscal year began with increasing pressures, and by June of 1963 the total
case load for the region had reached a record high of 7,147. This pattern continued
throughout the summer months, and only by fall did some easing of pressures occur.
The decrease continued erratically so that by the end of the fiscal year, March 31st,
the total case load had reached a low for the fiscal year of 6,197.
This year-end case load was less than that at the beginning by 377, a decrease
of 5.7 per cent. This was the first time a decrease in case load had occurred in the
region.
Table I below shows the case loads by general categories for this fiscal year and
for the preceding one.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region V as at March 31 for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
<"
1,62/63
1963/64
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Fomily S«-vl~
.l
a
3?
oS."es't^rance	
0.8
^^1^^^^™°™"-=^=^
"1
Health and Institutional	
0.9
6,574
100.0
6,197
From the above it may be seen that the Social Allowance case load decreased
by 439.
Most significant, however, was an increase in Child Welfare case load, which
amounted to 87 cases.   This increase of 7.0 per cent was at least less than the
 j 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA ■-■
increase in the preceding fiscal year, when it reached 16.0 per cent. However, the
Child Welfare case load now comprises 21.4 per cent of the total case load in Region
V and is significantly different to the Provincial Child Welfare case load,, which
amounts to -11.4 per cent of the total case load.
Social Allowance continues as the largest proportion of case load, being 50.5
per cent of it.   Last year it amounted to 54.2 per cent of the total case load.
Old-age Assistance, Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance, and
Blind Persons' Allowances make up 22.1 per cent of the regional case load,
compared with 46.2 per cent of the Provincial case load. They remain a relatively
consistent portion of the case load in Region V in spite of the fact that a rapidly
increasing population in this northern area would obviously be the result of the influx
of relatively young persons.
The following Table II shows the case load by major categories in the various
district offices of the region.
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Office
Region Vasat March 31,1964
of
Ca.e8ory
w
JUL
<_f°
sgs
Oue^nel
vssr
wi_r
Tota.
Family Service	
"2
»
424
JM
l
l
1
237
__£?S
§=_
*
1,351    |     790
1,226
893
817           499   j      621
It may be seen from this table that the two Cariboo offices of Quesnel and
Williams Lake had a total of 1,438 cases at the end of the fiscal year. This was an
increase of 45 over the case load one year previously. This increase of 3.2 per cent
was unique, as this is the only area in which the over-all increase in case load
occurred in the region.
The North Central Interior offices of Prince George Main, Prince George Sub,
and Vanderhoof had a total of 2,618 cases for March 31,1964. This was a decrease
of 239 cases or 8.4 per cent.
The Peace River offices of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John had a case load
totalling 2,141 at the end of the year. That was a decrease of 183 cases or 7.9 per
cent during the year.
On September 15, 1963, a hostel for single transient men was opened in
Dawson Creek. This resource, offering bed and meals for 44 men, proved most
beneficial in working with this group of clientele. If served to reduce pressure on
interviewing staff in the office as the individual's applications could be handled more
simply and quickly at a specified time when a social worker took applications at the
hostel itself. Also it facilitated getting men out to employment, as they were much
more readily accessible than when they were accommodated in various parts of town.
A hostel capable of accommodating 45 single transient men was opened in
Prince George on February 17, 1964. Experience in Dawson Creek was repeated
in Prince George, and more effective work with these men became possible. It also
afforded opportunity for social-work staff to apply more time to work with other
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
cases, since the administrative problems in handling single
drastically reduced.
Planning for the establishment of receiving homes in Dawson Creek and Fort
St. John and a group-living home for boys in Vanderhoof was initiated, and it is
expected that these needed child welfare resources will be in operation in the early
part of the next fiscal year.
A district supervisor was appointed for Fort St. John and an additional social
worker there as well as one additional worker in Dawson Creek. A half-time social
worker was added to the staff of the Prince George main office to work on adoption
cases. Thus in September of 1963 the social-work staff was increased by 2Vi and
the supervisory staff by one.
In January one additional social worker was appointed to the Prince George
sub-office, and in February a half-time position was changed to full time.
The social-work staff on March 31, 1964, numbered 27, an increase of four
in the social-work staff during the year.
The stenographic staff was increased by 2Vi during the year, one being
appointed in Fort St. John to work on the Federal grants project there, a half-time
stenographer being appointed to the Prince George main office to work on the adoption project in that office, and a stenographer added to the Prince George sub-office.
Further staff increases are expected early in the new fiscal year.
In closing I wish to express my thanks to the many organizations and municipal
personnel in the region who have helped us with our work so generously. I also wish
to thank all members of staff, who have carried on so well and at the same time laid
the groundwork for the extension of resources and improved welfare services for the
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Director
The annual report is a pause, or time taken at the end of a year's hard work,
to asses what was accomplished, and to look at programme and methods before the
next year begins. This is the annual report of a field unit or region of the Department of Social Welfare. It is one of seven regions that serve the people of the
Province.
Region VI, or the Fraser Valley region, extends from Pitt Meadows, Surrey,
and White Rock in the west, along each side of the Fraser River to Manning Park
in the east, and near Lytton in the north. The United States Border is the southern
boundary. The population in the region increased by approximately 9,000 during
the year. The main increase took place in the western section of the region, where
there is a growing suburban population. Most of the 192,000 people in the region
live in municipalities.
The function of the region is to serve the people resident in it, to the maximum,
with the services of the Department of Social Welfare. In the Fraser Valley these
services are available at the local level through five Provincial offices and one
municipal social welfare department.
s'MirlThetProvincial offices are located at Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Haney, Laneley,
and White Rock.
In Surrey the responsibility for the aclrninistration of social welfare services
rests with the municipality. (This is provided for in the Social AskstMce Act and
regulations.) A casework supervisor and one-half of the Surrey social-work staff
are provided by the Provincial Government.
 j 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA'! W
The five Provincial offices and one municipal office of this region, at March
31, 1964, were staffed with 37 social workers, 4 district supervisors, 1 assistant
supervisor, 1 municipal administrator, and 1 Regional Administrator.
Social welfare is, by nature, service to people. " Service " in public welfare
means financial assistance, medical care, direct counselling, guidance, generally
any activity of the caseworker which assists a family or individual.
During the year we provided social services to families, children, the aged,
and handicapped adults. These services flowed in three main channels—Old-age
Assistance Board, Social Assistance and Rehabilitation, and Family and Child
Welfare.
At the field level, Old-age Assistance serves persons aged 65 and over and
disabled adults who require financial' assistance to meet costs of maintenance. This
group requires a wide range of services. Each of the offices of the region has a
specialist who works with this age-group. The emphasis is to promote self-care—
the personal ability to meet the demands of everyday life. When self-care is no
longer possible, housekeeper or homemaker service may be provided. Chronic
illness often results in boarding-home or private-hospital placement. Someone has
cleverly said that old people have little use for " tea, sympathy, and c
They prefer the approach that gives them a sense of dignity of self-worth.
Under the Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division, social a:
provided in the region on a uniform basis, as necessary, to eligible recipients. Provincial funds were used in conjunction with municipal and Federal matching funds.
Table I shows that there was no appreciable increase in the number of social assistance cases over the report of one year ago (increase of only 17 cases, with a
regional population increase of approximately 9,000).
Our Social Assistance Act enables us to administer social assistance in a manner
which encourages and aids recipients to maintain and develop their ability toward
self-care and self-support.
Caseworkers are responsible for the direct contact with families and individuals
receiving financial assistance. This requires social casework skill and judgment.
Everyone who is eligible for assistance has at least one major problem in addition
to financial need. Within policy, we gave help when and where it was needed.
Our approach was to try to make each contact with a recipient or applicant as constructive an experience as possible—not harrassment or humiliation.
There is an increasing focus on rehabilitation for social assistance recipients.
In Chilliwack a local rehabilitation committee is in operation.
We co-operated with the Provincial Mental Hospital in a programme of placement of improved patients in boarding-homes. As at March 31, 1964, there were
154 of these patients placed in the region plus seven adult retardates from The
Woodlands School.
In the past year the focus in Family and Child Welfare services was one of
helping parents provide more adequate care for their children, if that was at all
possible. This focus reflects two aspects in our thinking about parents, unmarried
mothers, and children. First, it represents an awareness that behaviour of parents
(including unmarried mothers) is often a product of their own problems, and,
second, it reflects.greater recognition of the importance and meaning of the child's
own home and family to him.
After doing all in our power to strengthen families so that children need not
be removed from their homes, 338 children were admitted into care during the year.
This is an increase of 74 over the previous year. Two-hundred and forty-five of
these were apprehended under the Protection of Children Act.   The child-in-care
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 J 29
case load increased by 129 during the year. At March 31, 1964, there were 715
children receiving substitute care in foster homes.
The need for adoption homes has become a most pressing one, also the need
for foster homes for adolescent children.
Public welfare is an ever-changing field. Staff must be informed on programme
changes as well as new methods, as they are developed through research and experimentation. In the fall of the year under review, many of the staff of this region
joined in an inter-regional conference held at Penticton.
As one looks through the many activities and reports of the past year, the word
" project" stands out.
Projects add knowledge, improve skills, and provide an opportunity to keep
abreast of new ideas.
In June an adoption project was initiated in Surrey. It is unique, for it is a
co-operative venture of Federal, Provincial, and municipal governments. The purpose is to study a backlog of pending adoption homes, assess adoption procedures,
and consider recruitment methods.
An interdepartmental project was started in the region in conjunction with
Mental Health Services. It is an experiment in foster-home placement of some
of the children in The Woodlands School or those who are certified for admission.
A maximum number of 30 children will be involved.
A Child Welfare project was commenced in Chilliwack. A survey was made
of all children in care in the Chilliwack area, and a case load of approximately 60
children was selected for the project worker. This case load consisted of children
available for aloption and children who might be returned to natural parents if the
parents are strengthened in their ability to carry the parental role.
At the end of the year under review, these projects were at various stages of
development.
Through the year a competent, imaginative, and devoted staff of social workers
and stenographers, Provincial employees and municipal employees, combined their
ideas, skills, and time with hard work to provide public welfare services to those
who needed them.
3a
.962/63
1963/64
Number
PerCeat
Number
Percent
sssysE
1221
22
I
19
I
I
&&!S_&
ance	
l'ra>
140
11,5.4
11,629
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories as at March 31, 1964
REGION Vn
W. H. Crossley, Regional Director
The area covered by the region remained the same this year. The region
stretches from the village of Endako on the east to the Queen Charlotte Islands on
the west and from Milbanke Sound on the south to the Alaska Border on the north.
There are two population facts of interest. Terrace, for the second year in a row,
was the second fastest-growing municipality in the Province, reaching an estimated
8.500 in the immediate area this year. Noteworthy also is the fact that the population on the Indian reserves in the region is increasing quickly with a birth-rate
index 2V4 times the Provincial average. As this situation has pertained for the
last few years, it now means a high percentage of children reaching their teen-age
years resident on reservations. This presents a growing problem since their adjustment to mixed society and their entry into the economic stream is problematic.
The economic conditions varied from place to place this year. In thftSrrdthersV
Burns lake area, the lumbering was.slow to start in the spring due to inclement
weather but became highly active until snow conditions partially closed it down in
the early winter. In Terrace, activity both in forestry and building remained high
all year, leading to a heavy influx of transients in the spring and early summer,
most of whom found work after temporary help was given. In Prince Rupert the
economy was affected by the fishing strike, which also caused extra work for
several months for the staff there. At the year's end, projected pulp-mill developments in the region led to an aura of prosperity and activity, resulting in the arrival
of some transient unemployed.
• a- V^S yea^ WaS again notable for the participation of community groups and
individual citizens in providing resources jointly with the Department to serve
children better. In April, 1963, the Van der Sander Subsidized Receiving Home
for Infants in Prince Rupert was approved. This privately sponsored home has
been a valuable resource this year. In January the receiving home committee of
the Friendship House Association in Prince Rupert called tenders for the construction of a $30,000 receiving home for eight children, ages 2 to 14. In Terrace, the
cnristian Welfare Council undertook a successful community canvass for monev to
start a fund for a $29,000 receiving home to be built on 10 acres of donated land.
Unfortunately the Gardiner Group Home for Boys in Smithers closed temporarily
in August, due to Mr. Gardiner becoming ill. This had proven to be a valuable
resource for teen-age boys unable to use ordinary foster homes. This sharing of
our responsibihty with the community for the well-being of children has been an
encouraging experience.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 I 31
The operation, after one year's experience, of the Friendship House hostel for
transient single men, also run by the Friendship House Association in Prince Rupert,
mentioned in last year's report, has heen most successful, with a large number of
men being found work and being rehabilitated. We reimburse the association a
daily rate for each man lodged who is eligible for assistance from our Department.
There is no doubt that this is the best way we have found to help this hard-to-reach
group.
M _e staff-deyelopment programme was continued successfully this year, with a
series of local staff meetings in Terrace and Prince Rupert under the leadership of
Mr. A. J. WriptTdTstrict supervisor. We were also fortunate in having Mr. D.
Fowler, training supervisor, present an institute for all regional social-work staff in
May. The topifc-was■" Philosophy and Practice in Public Assistance." Mr. T. D.
Bingham, Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare, visited each office in the region
in July, leading an informative series of meetings. In October the professional
staff of Region JV joined us in a two-day meeting with speakers from Vancouver.
Mr. Dick Nan, of the Community Chest and Council, and Mr.. E. L. Coughlin,
municipal a_inistrator, and Mr. R. Burnham spoke on " Community Organization " and " Issues in Public Assistance " respectively. Whilst meetings of this
nature are expensive, they are invaluable as.a rneans.Qfjnaintaining standards and
improving total staff performance. This last year saw a very close working relationship established with the Department of Indian Affairs personnel in administering
the joint agreement pertaining to assistance and health services to native people
which was reached in the fall of 1962 and which was put into effect in January,
$9jSy.' Many joint meetings of a local nature were held in this connection.
The heightened interest this fall in public welfare brought forth many requests
for speakers. Public relations, always vital to our programme, increased with a
total of three television, appearances and at least 12 talks to various groups made by
staff members. The community image of the Social Welfare Department has a
direct bearing on the success of our programme, so that this work is important.
November saw the completion of the two-year Indian project in Prince Rupert,
a project under the aegis of the joint Federal-Provincial Welfare Ctommittee on
Indians. \ This one-worker project involved research, community development, and
intensive casework with a small case load -of-Indians living in an urban area. The
project was a success, with findings which resulted in specific recommendations to
both the Federal Department of Indian Affairs and our senior administration made
by the Joint Committee. In Smithers the Indian project, staffed by Mr. J. Gibson,
reached the end of a highly successful first year. As the project continues, the insight
gained into the social process on the three reserves in the project area will deepen
our ability to be of help to Indian people living on reserves. As a result of the work
done, the first receiving home on. a reserve with Indian foster-parents in British
Columbia was opened in January on Hagwilget Reserve near Hazelton. The project,
in one year, resulted in less children being admitted to care in the project area as
a result of neglect.
Table I following indicates the case-load make-up in each office. The number
of pension category cases in all offices is a small part of the total compared with
any similar offices in the south. This means that the major part of the case loads
are in the categories requiring the most intensive casework services. When this
total is compared with Table I in last year's Annual Report on page 31, significant
facts emerge. The Burns Lake case load dropped 40 cases, largely the result of
a transfer of 28 cases to Smithers and the closing of seven Family Service cases.
This office had been under pressure, with the case load heavy in intensive services.
 j 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Prince Rupert case load dropped, as a result of sufficient suitable staff, another
66 cases a drop of 159 cases in two years. It is significant that a major decrease
took place in Social Allowance (33), and a minor decrease in Child Welfare (14).
The Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance decrease is unusually large
in one year for a usually constant category. The number of children coming into
care was exceeded by the number discharged for the second year.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII for the Year 1963/64 as at March 31,1964
Terrace office was extremely busy, showing an increase of 63 cases. Child
Welfare increased 65 cases. This reflects the staff difficulties in mamtaining preventive services due to added cases and staff changes. Smithers office also experienced
an increase of 119 cases. The major increases were Social Allowance (74), Child
Welfare (23), Family Service (13), and Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance (23).
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII as a
for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
March 31st
1962/63
.963/64
Ctegorr
Number | PerCen,
Number | P«C«U
s|PIa^______=
§
l
TOtalS :^~_—;.r-'K\\ 'ln>- ov^«ara-
2,379     |      1O0.O     |      2,455
100.0
This table gives some information on a regional basis. The percentage make-up
of the case load shows significant change in that extensive service categories are up,
such as Social Allowance and Child Welfare, and light service categories are down,
for example, Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance and Old-age Assistance. The increase of 72 Child Welfare cases is unhappy because, for the most
part, it indicates a growing number of children in foster homes. The increase in
Social Allowance was the result of changing economic conditions.
This year has seen increase in interest in developing much-needed resources for
senior citizens. There are groups in Prince Rupert, Smithers, and Burns Lake
moving toward building low-rent housing projects.   In Terrace a group is amassing
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 33t
funds to build a 15- or 20-bed boarding home, and in Hazelton there is an interest in
exploring the development of a small private hospital or nursing home.
In closing may I thank the staff for their constancy in serving our clients. We
have received grand co-operation from municipalities, school authorities, Indian
Affairs, Public Health, and many community groups and organizations as well as
individuals.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART III.—DIVISIONS
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
The social assistance programme has three prime objectives. The first is to
relieve want and to enable a minimum standard of living for persons who are unable
to provide for themselves because of health, lack of a bread-winner, or unemployment. The second is to bring about a return to self-dependence or to a higher level
of self-care. The third is to reduce or prevent the many serious social effects that
accompany economic deprivation.
During the fiscal year, applications for assistance and reviews of eligibility of
necessity absorbed the preponderance of staff t
ailable for social
There was a substantial increase in work load, with 63,747 applications and
reapplications made for assistance. This was a rise of 7.3 per cent over the preceding year, although in contrast the number of recipients during March, 1964, was
barely increased over the number of recipients for March, 1963 (see Table JJI).
The over-all cost of social assistance was up 6.6 per cent (see Table IV).
This increase is partly accounted for by a rise in the cost of medical services. There
was also increased emphasis on the meeting of special need, including an additional
provision of up to $10 per month extra allowance for families faced with excessive
rental costs.
Large numbers of transient single men continued to move about the Province,
and this presented a particularly difficult administrative problem in some areas.
The use of hostels was undertaken in Dawson Creek and Prince George on a trial
basis, and this proved markedly successful in providing both a measure of control
and a constructive help by enabling numbers of these men to become settled and
employed.
Although the public conception is often one of considerable abuse of public
assistance, in reality there have been few instances of fraud, and for the most part
these have been to single recipients.
Mf
Dependents
b3&.
Total
Casein
A   ril   1061
IIS
|6
II
1!
28 180
W^hl^lOCT	
25658
S£T^'?£?	
27,956
mS?964_Z_:
wm
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
March, 1962 4,422       4,928
March, 1963 , g i 4,446       4,673
March, 1964 ! 4,796        5,318
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1964,1963, and 1962
 jgS /      BRITISH COLUMBIA   "
Table III—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory, of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1964,1963, and 1962—Continued
PROVINCIAL MUNICIPAL
"S&fe1
war
*Wr
Basic Social Allowances
$25 365 840
91
2<*$?5
$25 756 670 00
R*to^Z7r™™^mm^^?^*"£-
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home
16,860.76
tt"ww!tSSSt^SSi, nursing-, arm private-home
^
»
6|
Hosmtal_^0ot,sS_St_M_f "^ ^^	
*
£«, municipal „are af<ZT^m(£^£______
*^5s7^0S
71
^osilmlo
$29,479,518
99
4 123'807
86
' 20/766.83
**aSS
do
M^S^°°^°5^0n of New Denver Pavmon-	
$29,185,870.61
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 37
For the fiscal yeati-1963/64 the Province received from the Federal Govern-
Unemployment Assistance Agreement __ $13,935,954.75
Sundry 85  '■  35.16
REHABILITATION
Rehabilitation has two major aspects as it relates to social assistance services.
Counselling, referrals for training, and general encouragment toward self-help
are provided where appropriate to assist employable persons back to employment.
The need for this kind of service has greatly expanded because of rapidly changing
employment needs that have displaced large numbers of unskilled persons and
forced emphasis on academic upgrading and vocational training. Thousands of
social assistance recipients received counselling services, and approximately 345
able-bodied recipients and 20 disabled recipients undertook training during the
fiscal year.
More intensive professional services, including diagnosis of social problems
and skilled help in their resolution, are provided in selected instances. Because
this is a more time-consuming service, it is considered that priority for this service
should go to young families and to persons who can be more readily helped. In
order to facilitate this kind of service and to make more effective use of professional
personnel, it is proposed to divide staff services into two streams for the social assistance programme: one would concentrate on efficient administration of assistance
and on counselling, referrals for retraining, and academic upgrading, together with
related helping services; the other would concentrate on assessment and treatment
services to the extent that availability of qualified staff time permitted. This programme intially will involve limited application in one or two offices to test out its
effectiveness prior to putting it into more general use.
The number of potentially employable persons who receive assistance primarily
for reasons of physical disablement is limited. More commonly such public dependency is related to social factors, the ultimate resolution of which is likely to be
dependent on provision of highly skilled casework services.
In some instances the problem is simply one of adequate opportunities or
facilities being available for medical treatment, training, or employment. In this
event, counselling and referral to the appropriate resource may be all that is
required.
For a number of others, however, social, health, educational, and employment
factors may all be involved, and joint case consultation by representatives of these
disciplines facilitates provision of the kind of opportunity and help that is needed
if the person is to attain self-dependence.
For this purpose special rehabilitation committees for disabled persons have
been established in Nanaimo, Chilliwack, and Prince George, bringing together
representatives of the National Employment Service, the Provincial Health Branch,
and the Department of Social Welfare in joint planning on behalf of a selected
number of disabled persons. By these means, it has been possible to assist disabled
persons back to employment, who would otherwise have required continued assistance. These projects have clearly demonstrated the key importance of skilled
social-work services in enabling the disabled recipient to take advantage of the
opportunities that can be made available by this medium.   The projects have also
 j 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
been of considerable value in improving the general working relations among the
local health, welfare, and employment agencies.
FAMILY SERVICE
These are services intended to reduce or prevent the damaging effects that
dependence on public assistance has for families and family members. When
assistance is of a very temporary nature, they are less needed. They become critical
considerations when continued assistance is necessary. The loss of status and the
economic deprivation that result from full dependence on public assistance tend to
produce breakdown in family functioning and to lead to the development of serious
character problems. These may have ultimate results in continued family patterns
of public dependence, in family desertion, child neglect, mental breakdown, alcoholism, delinquency, and crime, all problems that are exceedingly costly and difficult to
resolve. While experience has repeatedly shown the importance of greatly increased
efforts to prevent these effects, public assistance programmes have found it increasingly difficult to provide such services in the face of rising case loads. It is hoped
that by separating staff functions better use can be made of available professional
personnel, and the effectiveness of staff services can be greatly increased.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
A total of 35 Boards of Review was held.   Of these, 21 were in favour of the
GENERAL
In the end, to the extent this is possible, the best prevention is to obviate the
need for assistance by expansion of opportunities for education, training, and
employment. It must be recognized that the social assistance recipient has often
known little but failure in meeting the competitive standards of society. The evidence is that he often continues to be passed over for employment and training that
is within his capacities, in favour of others with higher academic qualifications.
It would appear desirable to gear programmes and provisions more specifically to
his need as one of the most vulnerable members of society.
Experience has shown the success of the programme in the end is very dependent on the special skills and knowledge of the social worker. To the extent that
these services can be maintained, extended, and improved, many people now disabled by social problems can be returned to satisfying self-dependence with a resultant saving both in the cost of public assistance and in the potential cost of future
social problems that are thereby prevented.
Sincere thanks go to all the staff of the Provincial and municipal offices and to
the staff of other agencies, private and public,' for their efforts in furthering the
objectives of this programme.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
Miss Mary K. King, Superintendent
The family and child welfare programme of the Department of Social Welfare
is administered by the Child Welfare Division of the Department. It is staffed
by 13 social workers, including the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Deputy
Superintendent of Child Welfare, and 26V4 stenographic and clerical staff. A consultative service to field staff and other child welfare agencies is slowly being
developed. In order to give the most efficient service, the field staff need strong
support and guidance from consultant staff in the Division. It is expected that
further progress in this will be made during the next fiscal year.
The Division functions through four sections—the Family Service and Protection Section (this includes services to unmarried mothers), the Child-in-care Placement Section, the Adoption Placement Section (located in Vancouver), and the
Adoption Completion Section. Through Federal Welfare Grants, a special placement project for children in care, staffed by a Special Placement Consultant, has
been developed and will be referred to later in this report.
The philosophy underlying family and child welfare services is based on a
firm conviction of the necessity of preserving and strengthening family life. Strong,
healthly adults grow out of strong, healthy families. It is also based on the conviction that children's needs must be met at the time they arise, otherwise the child
grows quickly beyond the point of help. The strenth of family life depends largely
upon what the parents were exposed to in their childhood. Prevention begins,
then, at the birth of the child and depends upon our ability to ensure, in so far as
possible, that the child's need for loving physical and emotional care, education,
and moral training is met, either by their own parents or, if this is not possible,
by some other resource. The best alternative resource to a child's own home is
a family home which as nearly as possible substitutes the good own home he might
have had.
There is a contradiction in our society which is hard to define. On the one
hand we have relative material affluence and on the other an increase in serious social
ills, such as divorce, desertion, temporary marital relationships, child abuse, delinquent behaviour, a lowering of age and increase in the illegitimacy rate, threatening
family life and healthy childhood growth. Never have we had so much knowledge
in the social sciences, so many resources available to us in the areas of health,
education, social services, and culture, and yet never before has society felt so
anxious, insecure, and threatened. Perhaps the threat of extinction by man's own
hand and the tensions created by the sudden economic and social changes which
have occurred is too much to expect the frail personality and character structure
of many men and women, parents, to cope with, and many parents are failing today
who could have cared satisfactorily for their children in less turbulent and stressful
times. It is the responsibility of the whole community to find ways of educating
and strengthening these parents and potential parents, so that they can achieve the
maturity required for parenthood in this period of time.
SERVICE NEEDED BY FAMILIES
Until preventive measures have been established on a broad community base,
as, for example, through parent education clincs, one of the methods of preserving
and strengthening family life for children is the casework service given by social
agencies through individual or group counselling.   For this service to be effective,
 j 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the social worker can work with only a few parents. The cost of social-work
time will therefore be high, but not nearly as high as the cost of dealing with the
results of broken homes, child neglect and abuse, placement of children born out of
wedlock, or helping children who have become delinquent in their behaviour or are
emotionally disturbed (see Table DC).
Other methods of preserving family life are the provision of adequate financial
assistance and medical care, both physical and mental, to the family and the use of
housekeeper and day-care services. These latter services are under study, with the
hope of greatly extending their use throughout the Province. The cost of these
services will also be high, but it is a constructive use of money which in the long
run will help parents to cope more effectively with their responsibilities toward their
children.
In reviewing services to family and children in this fiscal year, it is found that
approximately the same number of families received casework service this year as
last year. However, there has been an increase of 346 cases, or 24.9 per cent, in
the past two years (see Table I), and this perhaps is a hopeful indication of a
changing trend.
INCREASE LN NUMBER OF CHILDREN ADMITTED TO CARE
Again, this fiscal year, there was an increase in the number of new admissions
of children to care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and three Children's Aid
Societies. Five hundred and eleven more children were admitted than in the previous
year, making a total of 3,073 new admissions. One thousand nine hundred and
seventy-one of these children were admitted by the Department of Social Welfare
and 1,102 by the three Children's Aid Societies (see Table VHT). In looking at
the reasons for admission of children to care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
(see Table DC), is was found that of the increase of 376 children over last year, 245
more children were admitted for reasons of child neglect, desertion of parent, marital
problems, or child behaviour, and 110 more children due to our inability to place
the child in an adoption home.
For the past several years there has been a consistent increase in the number
of children being admitted to care. For example, in the fiscal year 1959/60, 2,025
were admitted, while in the year 1963/64 this number increased to 3,073. This
increase is partly due to the increase in general population, but is also due to the
factors referred to earlier in this report.
The Superintendent of Child Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies were
caring for 6,542 children as at March 31, 1964, an increase of 554 over the last
fiscal year. For the first time in compiling this annual report, the duplication created
by transfer of supervision of children from one agency to another has been eliminated
from Table IV (for explanation see footnote to Table IV). During this fiscal year
1,168 more children were cared for by the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
three Children's Aid Societies than during the previous year (see Table TV).
PLACEMENT RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN
This very large family of 6,542 children for whom the Superintendent of Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies share responsibility require a diversity
of placement resources because of their varying needs. As can be seen from Table
XH, the vast majority of children were cared for in foster homes. The remaining
children were cared for in institutions and adoption homes or were maintaining
themselves from their own income.    Four hundred and fourteen wards of the
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL
Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies were living in adoption
homes on adoption probation and 542 in varying kinds of institutional care.
Table XIII gives a breakdown of institutional care and shows an increasing
number of children cared for in small group-living homes operated by child-caring
agencies. As at March 31, 1964, the Department of Social Welfare had three
group-living homes for teen-age children—two for boys and one for girls, and each
to accommodate six to eight children. There were also eight receiving homes for
infants and four receiving homes for other children. Plans were under way to open,
in the coming year, three receiving and observation homes for eight children each.
One home is to be opened in Prince Rupert with the help of the Friendship House
Association, another in Fort St. John with the help of the Rotary Club, and the
third in Terrace with fhegrafetance of the Terrace and District Christian Welfare
Council for Social Resources. A fourth group-living home, for 16 teen-age boys,
was in the planning state and will likely be opened in the next fiscal year.
The very active participation of community groups in the development of
placement resources is an important new development in our placement programme,
and one that it is hoped will extend throughout the whole of the Province. There
is also a beginning of community participation in our educational programme for
foster parents. At the end of this fiscal year, with the help of a community committee, the Dawson Creek district office had plans well under way for a six-week
educational programme for foster parents. In Trail a volunteer group of women
is assisting in the recruiting and preliminary visiting of foster-home applicants. This
kind of joint effort between voluntary community service and professional staff is
one of the best ways of strengthening our service to children.
Because of the large number of children requiring special placement due to
the seriousness of their problems, and for the need to make the best use possible
of available resources and to encourage the development of others, a Special Placement Consultant was added to the staff of the Child Welfare Division in November,
1963. This was a Federal Welfare Grant project (shared in by the Province),
which has already proven its worth and will be a continuing one.
A new venture was entered into this year in collaboration with the Mental
Health Services. This was a carefully planned foster-home placement programme
for children either in The Woodlands School or on the waiting list for The Woodlands School. It is hoped that within this project 30 children can be placed in either
foster or group-living homes. The experience gained from this project will be a
guide to the extension of the programme throughout the Province.
MAINTENANCE GOSTSo'Jqo
The gross maintenance costs for children increased this year to $4,907,387
(see Table XTV). This is an increase of $620,514.14 over last year. A considerable portion of htis increase can be related to the increased number of babies admitted to care awaiting adoption placement. It is expected that in the next fiscal
year research can be undertaken by the Department into the factors relating to
admissions to care.
NEW LEGISLATION
Amendments were made to the Children of Unmarried Parents Act and the
Adoption Act during this fiscal year. The amendments to the Children of Unmarried Parents Act were of an aa_inistrative nature, while the major amendment to
the Adoption Act was the shortening of the year's probationary period to six months.
It is believed that six months is a long enough period of time to observe the child in
 j 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the adoptive home and to give whatever help is required to the adopting parents.
At the same time the lessening of the period achieves security for the child more
quickly through finalization of the adoption.
CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK
As can be seen from Table XVI, there was an increase of 482 children born
out of wedlock during the fiscal year 1963/64.   The highest percentage of increase
occurred in the 20-24-year-old age-group of unmarried mothers.
During the past year community concern has been expressed about the increasing number of unmarried mothers and especially in the younger age-group. It is
believed that sex education, properly given, and education for parenthood, as well as
family counselling, can have positive influence upon the prevention of unmarried
parenthood and the problems created by this.
FURTHER INCREASE LN SERVICES TO UNMARRIED
MOTHERS REQUIRED
As would be expected from the general increase in numbers of unmarried
mothers, more unmarried mothers were served by the Department of Social Welfare
and three Children's Aid Societies during this fiscal year than during the last year.
The increase was 589. A total of 3,307 unmarried mothers received service (1,556
by the Department of Social Welfare and 1,751 by the three Children's Aid Societies) (see Table XV). This increase in unmarried mothers affects our adoption
programme as more adoption homes are required to plan for the children born out
of wedlock.
Sixty-two maintenance orders, 60 agreements, and seven settlements were made
during this fiscal year.   The total amount of money collected was $117,034.67.
ADOPTION PLACEMENT PROGRAMME
Because of the critical situation created by the serious shortage of adoption
homes, special-emphasis was placed on adoption placement services this fiscal year.
In June, 1963, seven additional social workers were added to the Department of
Social Welfare staff and placed in those offices throughout the Province where there
were the greatest number of adoption applications awaiting study, and a Federal
Welfare Grant project was undertaken in one of the larger offices. A workshop on
adoptions was held with the three Children's Aid Societies and Department of
Social Welfare in January, 1964, and plans were laid for a Province-wide recruitment programme. Adoption Standards were reviewed in the fight of present supply
of children for adoption placement and demand for children by adopting applicants.
An adoption recruitment pamphlet was published and given wide distribution.
As a result of this planning, the backlog of adoption applications awaiting study
was eliminated by the end of this fiscal year, and a committee chaired by the supervisor of the Adoption Placement section of the Department of Social Welfare and
comprised of representatives from the staff and boards of directors of the three
Children's Aid Societies and from the Department of Social Welfare had plans well
under way for an active Province-wide recruitment programme. The Catholic
Women's League, which plans a Province-wide recruitment programme next year,
offered to co-ordinate its efforts with those of this committee. It is believed that
the full extent of the recruitment programme will not be felt for two or three years,
and that it will have to be maintained at high gear during that time. However, at
the time of writing this report the results are most positive and give rise.to optimism.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 43
During the fiscal year, 964 children were placed for adoption by the Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies, an increase of 23 over the
previous year. Six hundred and thirteen of these children were placed by the
Department of Social Welfare and 351 by the three Children's Aid Societies (see
Table XIX). While the increase in the number of placements was only slight, it
was achieved by the great efforts made by the Adoption Placement Section and
field staff of the Department of Social Welfare and the three Children's Aid Societies. It is also worthy of note that the number of Roman Catholic children placed
for adoption increased by 12, and it is believed that this trend will be accelerated
in the coming year.
ADOPTION HOMES AVAILABLE
There was a slight increase of 18 adoption homes available for placement at
the end of this fiscal year (Department of Social Welfare, 49 (see Table XVII),
and three Children's Aid Societies, 70).
CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
One hundred and fifty-five children with special heeds were placed for adoption
during this fiscal year. Sixty-seven of these children were of interracial origin or
origin other than white, 36 had health problems, and 52 were over 1 year of age
(see Table XXLU). The general pressure created by the lack of available adoption
homes affected the placement of children with special needs, so that less children
were placed this year than last year.
The effect of the crisis in shortage of adoption homes has created a very
serious situation in our total placement programme due to the increasing number
of children being placed in temporary foster-home care awaiting adoption placement. As these children become older, their adoption placement becomes more
difficult and their stay in a foster home is unduly prolonged. For many years the
goal in this Province has been to place as many infants from hospital as possible,
as it is believed that early placement with permanent parents is of the greatest importance for the well-being of the tiny infant and his future development and
security. This year only one-third of the adoption placements made were from a
hospital. The Department of Social Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies
should be able to demonstrate during the next fiscal year whether the shortage of
adoption homes is a chronic situation or whether it is one which can be solved by
the searching-out of adoption homes through recruitment and adequate service to
adoption applicants and unmarried mothers.
COMPLETED ADOPTIONS
There was a slight increase of 49 in the adoptions completed in this fiscal year.
Nine hundred and fifty-two adoptions were completed by the Department of Social
Welfare and 506 by the three Children's Aid Societies. Of these adoptions, 70
were made privately and 463 were relative adoptions (see Table XXIV). While
the decrease in private placements was not significant, being only five, the trend
continues downward, and this is encouraging. The next fiscal year will be a difficult
one due to the shortening of the probationary period from one year to six months.
There will be a peak period during which the completion of the one-year probation
and six-month probation will overlap. Field staff of the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies and the Adoption Completion Section of the
Division will be hard pressed to cope with this situation, and the understanding and
patience of the legal profession will be sought and, I feel sure, obtained.
 J 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONCLUSION
During this year there have been increasing indications of community concern
and interest, and it is hoped that this interest will be intensified and made use of
during the next year. The causes of our social ills are so general that they must be
attacked and treated on a total community level through voluntary community
effort, governments, and professional disciplines. Co-ordination of research into
needs, planning for services to meet these needs, and the giving of the services is
most necessary. This calls for interpretation to the public of services which are
presently being given. It also calls for interpretation of the philosophy underlying
services to those in need of financial and personal services. Perhaps this can be
accomplished not only through broad publicity media, such as the press, but also
and perhaps most effectively through committee structure bringing together the
laymen, professionals, and Government representatives. It is hoped that by some
such means the emphasis in service will be shifted from palliative to preventive measures, and, as a result, we will be able to report an annual decrease in the number of
children removed from their own families rather than an increase. It is true that
children are a country's greatest responsibility and asset. It is evident by their
actions that many people in this Province not only believe this but are giving of
themselves through dedication to the goal of helping each child achieve his full
potential. To all of these I wish to express my deep appreciation and thanks.
A special thank you is given to the staff of the Department of Social Welfare,
municipal offices, and Children's Aid Societies, including the foster parents and
group-home parents, who are so vital a part of our services to children.
In concluding this report I must give very special thanks to the staff of the
Child Welfare Division, with whom I work so closely. Both clerical and social-
work staff have worked beyond the call of duty and have been motivated by their
own desire to ensure, in so far as they can make it possible, that the best is done
for each child for whom we are privileged to give a service.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 4J
STATISTICAL TABLES
List of Tables
Table I.—Family Services Cases.
Table II.—Services Related to Protection of Children.
Table HI.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division.
Table TV.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies.
Table V.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, Regions, and Societies.
Table VI.—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies (new table).
Table VII.—Children in Care by Age-group.
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care by Legal Status.
Table DC.—Reasons for New Admissions to Care.
Table X.—Number of Children"Dischargedirom Care by Legal Status.
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care.
Table XII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care (new table).
Table XLTJ.—Children Receiving Institutional Care.
Table'XTV.—Maintenance Costs.
Table XV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies (new table).
Table XVI.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia.
Table XVII.—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, Homes in Which
Placement Made, and Homes Closed.
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare by Type of Placement and by Regions.
Table XDC.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare by Religion of Adopting Parents and by Region.
Table XXI.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare.
Table XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Origin Other than White Placed
for Adoption.
Table XXIH.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption.
TableXXIV.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions.
 j 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance
from Department of Social Welfare) Served by Department of Social Welfare
during the Fiscal Year 1963/64 and as at March 31, 1964.
oSf
Opened
COS.
T£i
III
A rfl 1963
||
l
HI
i
1,352
S!i_________E___
im
Table II.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children, by Type of Service, for
the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64.
Service
Opting
Carrier
curing
EndmofYe_
.962/63
1963/64
,962/63
.963/64
1962/63
.963/64
Cus
l
|
jii
m
14
Tjgltim.tiAn             .     ■■    ,     1
6
289
387
352
461
74
Received during fiscal year	
Referrals pending April 1, 1963 ..
Total number of requests referred _
Referrals completed	
Referrals pending March 31, 1964 ..
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 J 47
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
■ the Children's A id Societies during and at the End of the Fiscal Year 1963/64
Superintendent of Child Welfare  5,829 4,024
;   VancouveSglffldren's Aid Society  2,124 1,371
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver   4~—      1,078 730
Victoria Children's Aid Society J     659 417
  3,861         2,518
Totals .  9.6902 6.5421
Table V.—Number of Children in Care* of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, Regions, and Societies as at
March 31,1964.
H
as
VV^
1!
££
Iff
Total
ggi";^ it
1
20
1
1
l
i
Region V               '._''._ ■   H     _'
Region VII
1
I?
den. of Child Welfare	
S
'3
Pi
J
.5.
9.
4.024
SK?~iA,dSoc,ay- ^com""
Children s Aid Societies*	
4,998
402
231
48
520
343
6,542
 J 48                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VI.1—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status,
Regions, and Societies as at March 31,1964.
%£
BcEe
&fc
P?"
j&
Xotal
Supertn^ofCWWeVare
|
1
1
I
365
SI:            —:
Tt£En£3 SSSjSStaSoiS W^
3 70,
*
54
330
■
- , ;•"   ',:;;■      '    , „, ir
,,02
■
»
151
w
,0
^4==tiw^i^
•4
1
J
20
697
g    ^SScSrSSi
668
63
.. 5^
20
756
|
»
36
48
326
249
14
38
50
351
5.277
4*7
243
54
551
6,532»
^B^^^^zl^S^S^^£B
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64         J 49
Table VII.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's
Aid Societies by Age-group at March 31,1964
«—
H
lj§
H
GsI:C
Total
Undr3
465
169
1
J
l
U :; §11
Totals	
4,024
1,371
730
417
6,5421
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the Fiscal Year
1963/64.
Sj
gig
V1S:
H
^
"si
^i§^BBBUM\
1.259       1       226
144
M
ll
Total of new admissions	
:H   |    i«?
"1
^
3'629
Total of new admissions and transfers-
2,294       |       806       ■
315
287
3,702
 Table IX.—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to the Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare during-the-Fiscal Year 1963/64
Neglect -  546
Desertion of one or both parents                       99
Illness of parent _ :  224
Death of mother   53
Rehabilitation of parents  65
Transient child  73
Minor unmarried mother  32
Behaviour of child _                                             188
Medical care  12
Physical handicap or mental retardation                      —  25
Education and training  27
Removed from adoption placement  4
Awaiting adoption placement .  364
Marital problem           - 172
At request of other Provinces  30
On transfer of guardianship  56
On change of legal status ... .             1
Total m
v admissions..
. 1,971
Transfer of supervision from other agencies	
Total new admissions and transfers _
Table X.—Number of Children Discharged from the Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the
Fiscal Year 1963/64.
wm
CnSr.
■3B
iftr
-IS-
Total
?^pl#s^s
528         J         313
.06
28
™
Apprehended but not presente,
	
045
Other Provinces' wards	
33
Total direct discharg
esfrom
'm     1      m
l
z
2 537
esand
lid          1
,806         (         749
342
268
3,1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1963/64 I 51
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1963/64
KeasonsforOischarge
CnSiEe
cKSd
ill
|
|p
Total
in
4.
I
3
J
159
WimtownfromCourt
-——
.93
,29                f _.     1
ii
NMei
165
Twentymo yeI°sTagf	
l
k
3
1
.
4
!—
Transfer oSpSo'S—--
1,5282      1      m
^
2S      |     *«£
,.806         |         749
342
268         |      3,65
Table XII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care as at March 31,1964
 j 52                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIII.-^Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at
institution
Tota,
^Hn
yj
"^ E
|
1
1
1
5,
79
17
6
,03
1
D
1
!
i
66
4
7
79
|Mrgyrs^,_zzz=              :
!
%
1
i
!
1
"2
j
1
6.               46
20
19
146
i i
1
i
33
»
56
2                  I
,
I
C»CnirS and related correctional
117       |       57               57
MHggs&iiHE
_«
^aTsupV
£2S*.
Sfe
S
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMriNi? OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        f-93
Table XIV.—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare
Division foster homes ___'—'■ $2,244,665.00
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of
children in care of Children's Aid Societies    2,519,434.00
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Super
intendent -
26,877.00
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being
permanently planned for by Superintendent         45,311.00
Grants to sundry homes!...         71,100.00
Less collections !
Table XV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1963/64
Ma?
Opened—
F|fl
Fisldiear
pfcfSr
«g5^^^i
43*7
*ra
'fl
'SM
l
1,131
2,176
3,307
2,023
Table XVI.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia by
Age-group of Mother during the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 55
Table XVIII. Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare by Type of Placement and by Regions for the Fiscal Year 1963/64
Kegion
TypeofPiacement
Direct Placement
Foste
Home to Ad
option
SSK
&SS
E
In Another Home
Total
SSSSL
£££
«
i
a
\
is
f
124
To
195
1
32
374
li
Tflfi/e _/„.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Years 1962/63 and 1963/64
Vancouver Children's Aid Society _.
Catholic Children's Aid Society	
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare by Religion of Adopting Parents and by Region for the Fiscal Year
1963/64.
 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XXL—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1963/64
15 days but under 1 month —
1 month but under 3 months _
3 months but under 6 months _
6 months but under 12 months J
Table XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare According to Sex of the
Child and Religion of the Adopting Parent during the Fiscal Year 1963/64.
S»ofChild
ReWon
of Adopt*
K Parent
Male
Female
Tot_
Pr_r
egg
Total
*
J
5
1
I
Ma°ri ™« wUte .	
pillf^Sg ~
E
35
32
67
59
8
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J
Table XXIII.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption
Department of Social Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1963/64
Interracial origin and origin other than white *Mj*rfj 67
Health problems —£ 36
Over 1 year of age1. bovvi k: :       52
Total -
. 155
%g$&k%JV—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by
Regions and Children's Aid Societies, during the Fiscal Year 1963/64
ti£S
Type of
PUrcement
E
Rei
m
Total
,££.
Other
t
1
1
|
10
> IsJgTO
12
102
U2
274
359
111
16
20
925
410 (4
i3)   "
70
1,458
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.D., Director
During the past year, Medical Services Division has experienced a further
increase in the use of the services adniinistered under its programme. While endeavouring to cope with the increased demands, efforts have been made to improve the
quality of the programme.
To further improve the coverage of the dental programme, it was extended
during this past year to include the children in care of the three Children's Aid
Societies of the Province. Prior to this, each society had been responsible for
administering its own dental programme. By this extension, the aim is to provide
an equally high standard of dental treatment to all children in care.
By the volume of dental services provided to all categories, it would appear
that the programme is well accepted by the dental profession, and that, as a consequence,' many individuals and families are receiving an improved standard of dental
The need for transportation by welfare recipients requiring medical care
continues to increase as the population in northern centres continues to grow.
Until these areas secure more medical specialists and centres, this need to bring our
clients to Lower Mainland centres for medical treatment will continue. There is
every reason to believe that this situation will change in the near future as medical
resources improve, especially in the Prince George area.
Resources provided by voluntary organizations have been always of great
assistance to the social welfare recipient. It is hoped that such resources will continue to be used and will be further developed, especially in the rapidly growing
areas of the Province.
As noted in last year's report, the cost of the drug programme continues to
increase. This year a jump in the cost of drugs is evident despite an actual decrease
in the number of prescriptions. The generous drug provision is currently receiving
closer examination by the members of the Drug Advisory Committee.
Reference to Table VI shows a fairly marked increase in optometric services.
The medical care and optical services provided by the eye specialists is not included
in this table.
Unfortunately there is little indication in this report of the rehabilitative impact
of our services. Provision of medical treatment to the client on social assistance can
often result in his becoming once again a contributing member of society. For the
old-age pension recipient, the provision of a prosthetic device can mean many more
years of active and useful living that would otherwise have to be lived in a nursing
For the enormous amount of medical treatment made available through the
assistance of the family physicians and various specialists, we are constantly grateful.
As this part of the programme is administered by the medical profession on a per
capita basis, it is not outlined in tabular form in this report.
In January of this year the Division was fortunate to obtain the services of
Mr. Clifford S. Jones as Social Work Consultant. Mr. Jones fills the vacancy created
by the early retirement of Miss Aileen Mann in April of last year, after a long and
happy association with the Department.
In conclusion we must include a note of thanks to all organizations who have
co-operated with us in the past year to provide our clients with health service bene-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT [
F SOCIAL WELFARE,  1963/64
fits.   These include the professional associations, hospitals, and medical centres, as
well as the organizations who provide facilities for care and rehabilitation.
Appreciation is also expressed to the members of our Division as well as to
other members of the departments of our Government who have assisted us so
readily. Without their ready co-operation, very little of our programme could have
been implemented.
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table I.—Gross Costs for Fiscal Years 1959/60 to 1963/64
Fisca
Year
Medical
Drugs*
Dental
Optical
Tx-
Other
Total,
1QW/60
Hi
ill
lOWMS
%Vl%
1
§p#
$3 697,606.19
1963/64 _
'^Mrt«a
Table II.—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
FiscalYear
A&Sce
|
In
^°B_d0^d
A^nce
ISssL
TOHT
1QW/60
*
l
p
76,742
Tal
le IV.—Drug Costs
Number of Prescriptions
Costs of Medidn
B__S
Drug
.ores
To_
£__$
Drug-stores
Total
1959/60
■
ll
11
"sWmS
111!
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Dental Expenses
FiseaiYear
Prophylaxis
g
s
Dentures
Tota,
s
*65
1
111
$50fl',3!
nn»
Tafefe W.—Optica/ Costs
FiscalYear
|pf§§
||
Total
1<KO/«l
$15 589 00
ll
$79 632 04
iS
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 61
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
E. W. Berry, Chairman
GENERAL
The Provincial authority for the aetainistration of the Old-age Assistance Act,
the Blind Perso[ns{Act, and the Disabled Persons Act is a Board within the Department of Social Welfare consisting of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council.
In addition to being charged with the administration in British Columbia of
the above three Acts, including the consideration of applications for and the payment of assistance or an allowance, the Board is the central agency for the processing of all applications within the Province for Supplementary Social Allowance
and related health services, and grants these additional Provincial benefits where
applicable.
Social workers attached to the Board complete applications both in the home
and at the Board office for the categorial allowances and for Supplementary Social
Allowance from clients living in the City of Vancouver. Welfare workers from
the Board also complete annual visits within the city and throughout the Province,
where feasible, mainly in connection with the Supplementary Social Allowance
programme.
Effective December 1, 1963, the monthly payment in respect of the categorical
allowances increased from $65 to $75, and the maximum allowable annual income
limits were raised accordingly, although no change was made in the maximum Supplementary Social Allowance payment of $24 a month. Every effort was made by
the staff to adjust the rates in pay as quickly as possible, hence no delay in receiving
the increases was experienced by the clients.
The change in rate mentioned in the fiscal year under review was only one of
the many which have occurred in the-past few years, and to summarize these various
changes a table has been prepared on the following page showing the changes in
the monthly rates and when they occurred and other pertinent information.
The basis on which the client's " need " for Supplementary Social Allowance
is determined was simplified, effective October 1, 1963, to coincide with the increase
in Old Age Security pension from $65 to $75 per month. From that date a fixed
amount was allowed to cover the clients' need for food, clothing, household operation, and miscellaneous expenses. Although this resulted in a complete review of
the total case load by the Board to determine what portion of the amount in pay
to the client was shareable with the Federal Government under the Unemployment
Assistance Agreement, it was anticipated that the time involved in completing future
annual reports in the field and in processing these field service reports at the Board
office would be decreased appreciably by utilizing the simplified approach.
In spite of the extraordinary volume of work entailing the use of overtime
sxperienced clerks are required to make adjustments), the percentage of staff
~~m continued to remain i '
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
si*
§
m
£
B    8SS
s
<
j
o
I
8
I
||21
EE      1
»! i
04
lip
Ml S,   SRI    IS    »
I
<
Q
>
1
W
w
Is!
jllll
Igia.MSl    II M
||Jf
1 1 II 1 1 1 If    1     1 1   SB 1     IB     iP
I
>>
1
S^ol
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 If     1     1 1   SB 1   8 1    S 1
J
J
JJ
H
I
si
6&
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1964
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received	
Applications granted —	
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, i
H
. 1,905 *
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia	
Reinstated	
Suspended  	
Deaths _
Transferred to other Provinces	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year_.
(b) Other-Province recipients-
Tansferred out of British Columbia -i.arn83 ~*?$a.
Transferred to Old Age Security __-      -■.        16
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year I ■ '<   mA yts.- 6,859
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not sufficient residence	
Income in excess: i	
Unable to prove residence _
Transfer of property ..
Ap^hcation<^thdrawn _.£2._
Applicants died-before grant _
JWheJeaboutS .unkno wn ,.
Over 70 years of age	
Assistance from private source
Receiving Old Age Security _
Miscellaneous	
 J. 64                                             'BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Male                   . .                                                     897
Female                                . - -    -          -                 1,008
47.1
52.9
100.0
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married                                 ...             .....     761
Single                                                 " -      288
39.9
15.1
20.9
5.7
14.8
3.6
Separated                                                                        281
Divorced                                              ..                          68
Totals                                                           1,905
100.0
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
12.4
22.1
19.7
0.4
9.6
Totals ....                                                  1 Q01
100.0
====
=
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Age 65 ..                                  559           636            1,195
Age 66                  .                  126           120              246
62.7
12.9
11.5
6.5
Totals ...    .  1,905
100.0
aooT     grll                            ..;„ ^
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Table VfHH^-Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65 —yitsy to y.It.        30 12
Age 66 3"M  :..-_n _ 48 20
Age 67 LI       44 18
Age 68 lh _... =        56 23
Age 69 - -        57 24
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Living with spouse and children _
Living with children	
Living with other relatives	
Living with others	
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In own home i 792 41.6
In rented house . 213 11.2
In children's home 207 10.9
In home of other relatives 56 2.9
In housekeeping room._
In single room (eating o
In rented suite	
In public institutions	
In private it
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250 _
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 __
$1,001 to $1,500 ..
$1,501 to $2,000 ..
$2,001 and up	
(b) Holding personal property of value-
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Totals	
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,1964,
Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta §_L_ .  34
Saskatchewan i 14
Manitoba  '__ 13
Ontario L_ J 23
Quebec ___     6
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
A mount of A ssistance Received (Basic Assistance, $75)
_. . .    _«__--JW               3.2
to $69
to $64
to $59
to $54
ln_Tr:               2.7
1.9
.____■ ______nn<fl6l
ln_j4liiod_3i«rt6>
"TrY
to $39
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.3
than$
T
0.5
otal
                   100.0
> Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applict
New applications received ..
Applications granted ..
Applications refused, withdrawn, e
Applications undecided	
Table 11.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended _
Reinstated .
Transferred to other Provinces	
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security ._
Deaths .
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia -
Retransferred to British Columbia _
Reinstated	
it of British Columbia or suspended _
Transfers to Old Age Security .	
Suspended	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not blind within the meaning of the Act...
Income ir
Applications withdrawn _
Died before grant	
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Widowed _
Separated .
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia :	
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 19
to 21
Ages 22 to 30
Ages 31
to 40
Ages 41
to 50
Ages 51
to 60
Ages 61
to 69
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Living with parents	
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children _
Living with children	
Living with other relatives	
Living with others._	
Totals	
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
T           home
12
In rented house
r4
in rented suite
.2
'H
Tn hr.™ r>f nthpr rplarivee
-..•....__ _*
In housekeeping room                                                        3
In oublic institutions                                                           5
j- private insfiriirinn<i
42
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipiei
(a) Holding real property of value—
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Totals	
(b) Holding personal property of value-r-
$1,501 to $2,000 ..
$2,001 and up	
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 71
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,1964,
Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
.   ..   2
.     _   7
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According t
of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
o the Amount
..    93.8
1.4
..     0.7
1.3
0.4
0.5
0.4
0.7
..     0.2
0.4
0.2
g  100.0
402
-     1901
..     235
$55 rr. $59 99
$40 rn $44 99
$35 rr. $39.99
$30 to $34.99      I
$75 tr, $79 99
$70 to $74.99
Total
Disabled Person's
Table I.—Disposition
New applications received
Allowances
of Applications
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
 j 72                                                BRITISH COLUMBIA' i
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
    161
Reinstated
106
26
.....     18
57
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended    _                              -■ -
New transfers to British Columbia
Transferred out of British Columbia or
Reinstated                               ___
1
30
suspended .....
3
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
91
—2,320
Table III.—Reasons Why Application!
: Not Granted
3.4
2.1
0.4
86.0
Mental hospital..                        .   ..
Hospital ....
'■%'
1.7
0.9
1.3
2.6
Not sufficient residence
War Veterans' Allowance	
Allowance under Blind Persons Act
3
1.3
0.4
100.0
Receiving Old Age Security....
j
Totals ._	
	
 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number PerO
Infective and parasitic diseases         9 4
Neoplasms 3 1
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases i  3
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs _.
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorderst—
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs	
Diseases of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues	
Diseases of the bones and organs of
Congenital malformations
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions _
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)-
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Male ...
1
Totals       _:
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married 	
Single	
Widow	
Widower ...
Separated .
Divorced _
41.6
100.0
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada	
British Isles —__	
Other parts of British Empire _
United States of America	
Other foreign a
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 19 _
Ages 20 to 24 _
Ages 25 to 29 ..
Ages 30 to 34 ..
Ages 35 to 39 ..
Ages 40 to 44 ..
Ages 45 to 49 ..
Ages 50 to 54
Ages 55 to 59 ..
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Ages 30 to 34 ..
Ages 35 to 39 ..
Ages 40 to 44 ..
Ages 60 to 64 ..
Ages 65 to 69 ..
Ages over 70...
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Table X.—With Whom Recipients __ve.IV/. _\A»
Living with parents _       99, 52
Living alone I ; _ .15 7
Living with spouse i—~       34 17
Living with spouse and children          8 4
Living with children s l :.        3 1
Living with other relatives ! G^--—       19 10
Living with others . ~ _  QQ0,_$ (    IG_? *>
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Tn p^r^tits' hornp'"^ 7J"* *C" ""'" !"i'~ ''v' '•>'
  .       99
52.1
In own house            . .                   	
         23
12.1
12;
6.3
15
7.9
2.1
Tn children's home
4
17
8.9
4 r_HM
3.7
Tn boarding home
5r;-
2.6
2.6
Totals
      190
100.0
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
Number
Percent
:'.'                       $0
16_\!
85.3
 _rf~        $1 tn $250
1
0.5
$251 to $500
0.5
$501 to $750
0.5
$751 to $1,000
-.0          $1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $7,000
$2,001 and up
I4V"
7.4
Totals
.     190
100.0
 e BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
(b) Holding personal property of value-
126
66.3
$1 to $250
$251 to $500                   . ...
$501 to $750
34
6
<•      . .          9
          1
17.9
3.2
4.7
0.5
6
3.2
1
0.5
$2,001 and up,
7
190
3.7
100.0
6
7
8
Ynlrnn                                                                                                                                              1
E      Total
33
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
$70 to $74
991
$65 to $69
99
$60 to $64
99
$55 to $59
99
$50 to $54
99
$45 to $49
99
$40 to $44
99
$35 to $39
99
$30 to $34
9.9--. -
$25 to $29
99'
$20 to $24
99
$19.99 and
T
less
Otal .
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 77
General Information re Old Age Security Category
Disposition of Applications
New applications received	
Reapplications received	
Applications granted ——
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, dead, f
. 776
Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance
as at March 31,1964
British Columbia cases 23,639
Other-Province cases .       756
Total , 24,395
Distribution According to Five-year Intervals of Birth Year of Married and Single
Supplementary Social Allowance Recipients (70 Years of Age and over) on
Pay-list as at March 31, 1964 (Includes Other-Province Recipients of Supplementary Assistance Living in British Columbia).
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many
outside agencies.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA' '
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
I beg to submit the annual report for the Brannan Lake School for Boys for
the period ended March 31, 1964.
The following table shows the statistics for the fiscal years 1954/55 to
1963/64:—
BscalYear
1
8
l
1
l
1
j
2
i
i
Number in Crease Clinic, April lst_
Number in Provincial Mental Hospi-
'_
139
129
M
164
162
l
i
3
190
Sjmb_ on P__e! April _______
m
|
~1_
l
l
j
_g
i§_li«£§«
1
=__
	
IZZ
a__£ l,",^ho°1;,M°_13Ist	
3f
5f
"I
j
P
193
___S_S__5 _J__^__
66,«)6
During the fiscal year there were 357 admissions and 103 recidivists, making
a total of 460 admitted to the School. There was a 22.4 percentage rate of recidivism. Seventeen of the recidivists were committed for the third time and eight for
the fourth time. Three hundred and fourteen of the boys admitted were Protestant,
142 Roman Catholic, and 4 of other religion. Seventy of the total number of boys
admitted during the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age upon Admission
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Provincial Probation Branch	
Department of Social Welfare ..._	
Indian Department	
Vancouver Probation Service	
Victoria Family and Chidren's Court..
Children's Aid Society ..
Catholic Children's Aid Society _
Family and Children's Service ....
New Westminster Police	
Province of Alberta _
Provincial Probation Branch and Indian Department	
Provincial Probation Branch and Department of Social Welfare _
3
Of this number, 35 were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, 10 of
the Family and Children's Service, 6 of the Children's Aid Society, 3 of the Catholic
Children's Aid Society, and 1 of the Province of Alberta.
Four hundred and sixty boys were committed from the following Juvenile
Courts and 12 boys were held on remand:—
Hazplton
Armstrong
Ashcroft
Kamloops
Bella Coola
Kaslo
Campbell River	
Kimberley
Langley .
Chemainus
fTiilliwarlc
Masse.t
Cloverdale	
26
Matsqui	
Golwood 	
Merritt ....
Mission City
Nanaimo
Courtenay
Cranbrnolc
Nelson
fYestnn            w 3VOCJ 1
New Westminster
Cumberland	
* I   ____, Vancouver .       .    .
Duncan
Penticton
Fort St. James.
Port Moody
Fort St  John-": —»
Prince npnrgp.                      r
Prince Rnpftrt
Qualicum Beach    ' w*w n»
Grand ForRs ...
 '/BRITISH COLUMBIA :;
Queen Charlotte City     1 Squarmsh   4
Quesnel 3 Summerland     1
Revelstoke 6 Terrace .— —    3
Richmond 10 Trail      2
Salmon Arm     1 Vancouver .—   69
Sechelt   3 Vanderhoof     4
Smithers 3 Vernon       1
Sooke  2 Victoria   51
Spences Bridge     1 West Vancouver     2
Of the 460 boys committed to the School during the year, 353 were committed
for offence against property, 22 against persons, and 85 for other offences which included incorrigibility.
Of the 357 new admissions during the year, 51 of the boys were never tried on
probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before the
Court.
There were 410 boys released from the School during the year.   The average
length of stay of boys in the School was 5.3 months.
Seventy-six boys accounted for the 117 A.W.O.L.s.   The difference between
the figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two or more
times during the year.
Seven hundred and twelve individual boys were worked with in the School
during the fiscal year.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Fillings 1 947
Partial dentures ■. ;___ _ ;'  ' '    1.1
Complete upper dentures _ :  2
Complete lower dentures .    . I L  2
Denture reline ! _  1
Dentures repaired ___. !  10
Prophylaxis  !     '    ' '  5
Root canal fillings    6
Trimming  1
Scaling . " 'j^ j  5
One hundred and ninety-two boys received the above dental care.
This spring we had an influenza epidemic, and 109 boys were hospitalized at
our School; some were really quite ill.  I am glad to say there were no complications.
Four hundred and sixty-six boys had admittance physical examinations, as
against 411 last year.
Four hundred and -forty-one boys were tuberculin-tested; of these, 46 were
positive.   However, X-rays revealed no active tuberculosis.
One hundred and twenty-two boys had oral polio vaccine in November. The
usual large number of boys was treated for minor ailments and accidents; these
were kept on record.   •
There were two cases of staphylococcal pneumonia, one chronic nephritis, one
rheumatic fever, two operations for archedopeny and inguinal hernia, three tonsillectomies, and one appendectomy.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1963/64
Travelling expense __..,,, _v/ ■■—. -.  144
Office furniture and equipment  85
Heat, light, power, and water _ 27,532
Medical and dental services . . r  12,074
Clothing and uniforms .  15,034
Provisions and catering  62,945
Laundry and dry-goods  13,784
Equipment and machinery _ !—2___  822
Medical supplies -.    . .   :  !.942
Maintenance of buildings and grounds _.__2_H__  6,257
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,874
Transportation :>_jM»t*-  5,833
I Motor-vehicles and accessories  2,173
Incidentals and contingencies I  3,901
Repairs to furnishings and equipment .  424
Training programme expense ,   4,817
Less-
$463,395
$7,776
3,245
219
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory at March 31, 1964
Inventory at March 31, 1963
Add Public Works p.xpenditiirft
        5,690
$16,607
13,049
        3,558
$454,147
$56,939
      56,027
Per capita cost per diem: $510,174-^66,0O6=$7.73.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts $443,348
Add—
Maintenance receipts $3,473
Salary adjustments     10,884
Public Works expenditure  $56,939
Less rentals 912
    56,027
      70,384
 _ BRITISH COLUMBIA
As in the past few years, large numbers of boys assisted service clubs with
inity projects, including cleaning up of old cemeteries and church grounds,
beaches, and parks.
As in previous years, a large number of toys were renovated and repaired by
boys of the School and taken to the Salvation Army for distribution with their
Christmas hampers.
Various service clubs in turn made arrangements for large groups of boys from
the School to take part in local entertainment.
The forest nursery has been expanded, and clearing has been commenced on
an additional 3 acres of land which will be used to expand both the nursery project
and our vegetable garden.
We have had a large number of visitors during the year—representatives of
teacher counsellor groups, members of the ministerial association, and persons from
other Provinces who are working in the correctional field.
We have continued to enjoy the closest co-operation and help from the various
church and service club groups of Nanaimo, also civic authorities and the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police.
I wish to thank clergymen, service clubs, civic officials, members of both the
Federal and Provincial departments of Government, including the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, private agencies, and School staff members who have assisted in
the rehabilitation of boys. Their assistance has been appreciated by the School
administration.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OJfeSQ.CpAL WELFARE, 1963/64
W1LLBNGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
Miss Winnifred M. Urquhart, Superintendent
I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Willingdon School for Girls
for the fiscal year ended March 1, 1964. March 1, 1964, marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of British Columbia's first Provincial training-school for delinquent girls. During this half-century since the first girl was committed at the
age of 14 for a term of seven years, more for protection than correction, many
changes have taken place in the Province's programme for the care of children who
come before the Court.
The following tables show the movement of population, age range, charges,
and Courts from which the girls were sentenced during the year:—
FiscalYear
j
|
1
|
1
1
!
g
i
s
1
Nu br jjj _rtnoI _ ifj jnj
~
2
£
__!
___
|
i
1
87
Number in Oakalla, April 1st-	
i
j
	
Number of new admissions	
47
I
_ii
jj
304'
SgS^S^iis:
^r" ?_,Pr0bati0Dary re,MSe'
^^__f£!rtoClal Mental H°SPi"
r'"'"' ''"   h ■' ;,"-h ''  —
868T
To_llew!oX.1_to6fccS0y_?i-
K_
Range of Age upon Admission
Charges were as fol
Unmanageability _
Breach of probatioi
Theft ..
Infraction of liquor laws	
Unlawful possession of liquc
Sexual immorality	
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vagrancy	
Breaking and entering _—!—-
Possession of stolen goods ;	
Creating disturbance in a public place _
Wilful damage 1—
Total-
e committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Alberni  1 Merrirt  2
Alert Bay  12 Nanaimo  1
Burnaby  8 New Westminster  1
Chemainus  1 North Vancouver  5
Chilliwack  1 Port Coquitlam  1
Cloverdale  1 Port Moody  1
Cranbrook  2 Port Alberni  1
Dawson Creek  5 Powell River  2
Duncan  4 Prince George  2
Fort St. James :  2 Prince Rupert  7
Fort St. John  3 Sechelt j  2
Hazelton ■ .... 2 Smithers  1
Invermere  2 Squamish  1
Kimberley  1 Terrace  2
Kitimat  1 Trail  2
Ladner  1 Vancouver !  22
Lytton  3 Vernon J  1
Masset 1 .  1 Victoria.  7
Matsqui ,  3 Williams Lake  2
A slight increase is noted in most areas. Although the average daily population has only risen 6.7 per cent, there were periods during the year when all cottage-
were filled to capacity. The average length of stay has shortened by almost two
months, which may or may not be particularly significant as it can be affected by
either a very short or long stay of one or two girls, but the drop is in keeping with
the general trend in teaining-schools and perhaps bespeaks an increase in the casework services to families and the teen-agers by the community agencies.
The percentage of recidivism about doubled over the all-time low of last year,
but at 12.8 per cent is still low for a training-school. The new training-school legislation making a provisional release legal is gradually proving valuable as it makes
possible the use of the school by the agencies as a deterrent by providing short return
periods for the girls who require one or two sharp reminders of controls to help
them in their full rehabilitation.
The school programme has continued with only minor changes during this year.
Every effort is made to provide activities to broaden the girls' outlook and stimulate
their desire for further training. The regular academic, hairdressing, and sewing
classes have continued to provide excellent training. The extra courses, which the
girls attend in their free time on a voluntary basis, have continued to be very popular.
This year we added a course in baby-sitting and started issuing wallet-size certificates
to all who completed both the waitress course and baby-sitting course.   St. John
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 85
Ambulance first-aid and home-nursing courses give valuable training. We are
fortunate to have capable instructors among our cottage supervisors who are able
and willing to provide these courses as part of their daily work. The physical education programme is always popular, and is also used as a medium to help the self-
conscious girl find her skills and finally be able to participate with the crowd. The
annual gymnasium and swimming display was held in May, with a capacity audience.
Red Cross swirnrning awards and Royal life-saving bronze medallions and awards
are still keenly strived for and earned through a stiff examination after much hard
work. A total of 104 swimming awards was received during the year. It is most
heartening to see girls who, when they arrived at the school, could not care less about
achievement and leave having earned by their own efforts credits in a variety of
The staff has remained as stable as in former years. There was a change in the
elementary-school teacher, and one social worker was transferred in November to
another division and not replaced during this year.
The health of the girls has continued to be good, with only minor illnesses.
A survey examination of all the girls to determine necessary dental work was carried
out by Dr. Conchie, Public Health Director of Dental Services, through Dr. P. W.
Laundy, Department Medical Director. It was agreed that, for the most part, we
should only be providing an emergency service plus dental work and dentures which,
for health and cosmetic reasons, would help in the rehabilitation of the girl. The
Cambie Clinic and Dr. T. C. MacKenzie still provide excellent service. We have
continued to receive psychiatric services from the mental health clinic. We were
sorry a change in psychiatrist was necessary when Dr. Menzies went into private
practice, because over the years he had become familiar with all the staff and the
programme and was providing a valuable service to the School. This service was
somewhat curtailed for several months until another psychiatrist, Dr. Davis, could
be appointed, and it took him a little while to learn and appreciate the type of programme required.
Our volunteer friends still continue to work with us, providing a valuable
service and adding much to our programme, both in entertainment and religious
guidance. It would be impossible to provide as varied and well balanced a programme without their co-operation. I take this opportunity, without naming them
individually, to express our sincere gratitude to all our volunteers for the many
favours and hours given for our girls.
Community groups have continued to visit the School, and approximately 50
hours of senior-staff time was spent during the year speaking to and showing these
visitors around. In October the Elizabeth Fry Society held one of its larger meetings
at the School, and a light luncheon was served, consisting of fancy sandwiches made
by a group of the girls who had received instruction over a period of weeks from one
of the staff in the art of sandwich-making.
I take this opportunity to express my appreciation to all senior administration
and all members of our staff and others who have assisted and co-operated in the
operation of the School during the year.
 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1963/64
Salaries        $206,050
Office expense    jy>q _ vrsutoo ___ •  1,90,3
Travelling expense L_li—_£_____—I—  1,317
Office furniture and equipment 'J2t—___£______ ____— 644
Heat, light, power, and water                              : onr. mu 25,260
Medical and dental services                                    - E-'i.ti 3,915
Clothing and uniforms !   .—j=J 6,087
Provisions and catering  '.  g-l:"''n !_!  39,925
Laundry and dry-goods _:____Ii___ _____-- 409
Good Conduct Fund                ..  1,717
Equipment and machinery  865
Medical supplies ...   1,989
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  2,470
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,491
Transportation  2,822
Vocational and recreational supplies J  2,619
$1,536
2,160
        3,696
$295,867
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31, 1963 _. $10,030
Inventory at March 31, 1964 _|      9,672
       $358
Public Works expenditure     33,916
       34,274
$330,141
Per capita cost per diem: $330,141-=-31,735=$10.40.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $288,058
Add—
Maintenance receipts $1,293
Salary adjust!
Decrease in inventory ..
Public Works expenditu
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
The following is the annual report for the Provincial Home for the Aged and
Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1964.
From this report it is noted a rise in the per capita cost of 53 cents, due to
lesser inmate-days by 3,272, and a rise in expenditures of $8,072. During the year
76 applicants were admitted, 37 took leave of absence or a discharge, and 42 residents expired, showing a loss of 3.
Improvements for the comfort of our residents consist of both maintenance
and equipment. The painters redecorated the poolroom, music-room, main entrance and lower corridors, and the hallways of Wards 1, 10, and 11. Our drug-
supply room was completely remodelled. A new freezing unit was installed for the
walk-in cooler. Water and waste lines were replaced in Wards 1, 10, and 11.
Hostess chairs and high-back rockers are being tried and are very popular. Individual lawn chairs for outdoor comfort are available.
Physiotherapy at the Home has been introduced, with the physiotherapist from
CARS administering regularly. The location is in the basement, and this is practical, comfortable, and convenient. Presently there are seven therapy tables.
Equipment consists of two walkers, one with crutch attachments, a quadriceps boot
with bar and collars, with weights from one-quarter to 10 pounds, head halter with
spreader bar and Zimmer aqua-trac bag, and two infra-red lamps. This therapy is
controlled by doctors' orders.
Medical services continue to be supplied by the Irving Clinic, along with
specialists outside its clinic. City hospital services are used when necessary.
In our hospital ward, stainless-steel equipment has been added, plus two triple-
top bedside cabinets. An exhaust fan has been installed, which helps control
temperature.
Protection against fire-hazards is constantly studied. The City of Kamloops
Fire Chief and the fire prevention officer make regular inspections, and also hold
fire drills.
Entertainment for the residents has been varied, with television most popular.
The religious denominations also fulfil a great need for the men. Outside organizations continue to supply many happy hours.
Four aged men were transferred from Essondale and have taken to the Home
quite nicely, applying themselves to available services.
We contihuallly strive to help patients to help themselves—to get them up and
out of bed daily, dressed, and fully groomed whenever physically possible, also to
take them out of their rooms to the sitting-rooms or, when warm enough, outside
on the verandahs and lawns.
Some experts indicate that the elderly are robbed of their dignity and identity
in institutions, but we strive to restore this by helpful care and understanding, having them work and help in certain areas, encouraging variety in clothing, creating
outlets of recreation, proving old people are real people, thus indicating a continued
usefulness in society for institutions.
We will continue to have the problem of an ageing population and of finding
the best way to care for our ageing citizens, so we must find the best kind of
facilities and the proper level to meet their needs.
I wish to thank all who have assisted in the operation of the Home and the
care of our residents during the past year.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INMATE-DAYS
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1963 _
Inmates admitted during the year —_
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1963/64
Salaries $113,683
Office expense  576
Medical services  9,966
Clothing and uniforms  4,040
Provisions and catering  29,415
Laundry and dry-goods  6,821
Equipment and machinery  1,527
Medical supplies .  3,676
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  965
Maintenance and operation of equipment  455
Transportation  1,199
Burials :  4,200
Incidentals and contingencies  2,024
Rentals ..
Add Public Works expenditi
Per capita cost per diem: $186,082-M0,375=$4.61.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $90,832.
 F THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts I
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Transfers  from  Provincial  Home  Trust
Account     14,438
Receipts from Government of Canada
under the Unemployment Assistance
Agreement      43,773
Salary adjustments       5,268
Add Public Works expenditure	
Add proportion of excess of receipts over disbursements
for Tranquille Farm	
Less pensioners' comforts I
 j 90 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WELFARE mSTITUT-ONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act
for the year 1963.   As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this
report covers the period from January 1, 1963, to December 31, 1963.
LICENCES
A total of 892 licences was issued during the year, of which 746 were renewals
and 146 were new licences. Eighty licensed homes either closed or changed ownership, requiring new licensing. There were 244 new applications, and 236 pending
applications were closed, these consisting of approved licences and licences refused
or applications withdrawn. Case load at December 31, 1963, totalled 1,022, of
which 812 were licensed institutions and 210 files pending.
BOARD MEETINGS
Eleven regular meetings and three special meetings of the Welfare Institutions
Board were held during the year.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
There was no change in the number or function of these institutions during
the year.
Number of institutions licensed in 1963  9
Number of children cared for        306
Total days' care        65,657
Private Boarding Homes
Licensing of private boarding homes for children continues to be carried on
with the co-operation of the two Children's Aid Societies in Vancouver and the
Family and Children's Service in Victoria. There are very few commercially
operated boarding homes throughout the rest of the Province, and these are supervised by the Department of Social Welfare.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1963  19
Number of children cared for . .         55
Total days' care 10,664
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Day Care
The majority of foster day-care homes in the City of Vancouver are supervised
by the Child Care Centre, but a few are still visited and inspected by this Department.
In an effort to establish one standard of inspection, we are working closely with both
the agency and the foster day-care mothers to have them all accept the Child Care
Centre as the supervising agency.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1963  33
Number of children cared for        192
Total days' care  ..... 15,529
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 91
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
There is a continuing increase in the number of both privately operated and
co-operative kindergartens throughout the Province, despite the fact that many
kindergartens are now operating in the public schools.
The majority of kindergarten supervisors are now fully qualified, or in process
of taking the required courses for qualification.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1963  311
Number of children registered 1 i  —       15,720
Total days' care  1,349,595
Schools for Retarded Children
Three new licences were issued during the year, and one licence was cancelled
when there were no longer enough children to operate the school.
Number of schools licensed in 1963  30
Number of children registered  !        610
Total days' care 81,576
MATERNITY HOMES
There was no change in the status or programme of the three maternity homes
serving the Province.
Number of homes licensed in 1963  3
Number of mothers cared for        433
Total days' care 26,049
AGED-CARE
The number of boarding homes for elderly persons continues to increase
rapidly, but we are now noticing a trend toward new construction for these homes
rather than the conversion of older-type dwellings.
There was an increase of 37 licences issued over the previous year, and we
believe we have now taken care of practically all those homes which were brought
within the scope of the legislation in 1961.
Number of homes licensed during 1963  325
Number of persons cared for . 6,776
Total days' care 1,481,205
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
There was no change in the number or function of these institutions during the
year.
Number of homes licensed during 1963  6
Number of persons cared for 16,349
Total days' care 46,201
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL DISCHARGEES
This programme continues to develop, with the majority of the former patients
living in boarding homes with other types of guests. A member of the Mental
Health Services staff is attached to this office to co-ordinate the work of the two
departments.
 J 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The figures shown are those for the homes which are licensed specifically for
this purpose.
Number of homes licensed during 1963  5
Number of persons cared for —__ 37
Total days' care ___ 11,410
SUMMER CAMPS
Owing to poor weather conditions, many camps did not have as many enrolled
as in previous years. In spite of this, however, there was an over-all increase in the
number of summer camps licensed and the number attending. Total camping-days,
however, showed a considerable decrease, due largely to the fact that children who
might normally stay for two or more sessions remained for only a single camping
Number of summer camps licensed in 1963  93
Number of persons attending 29,106
Number of attendance days 236,768
CONCLUSION
i extended to all who helped with the
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 93
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed
Institutions and Pending Applications, 1963
JESS — I |     I     1     1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE 1963/64
PART V_=I|i_K_AL WORK SERVICES
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL AND
PEARSON POLIOMYELITIS PAVILION
Mrs. M. Titterington, Supervisor
In last year's annual report it was mentioned that the decline in tuberculosis
mortality and morbidity rates had levelled off, and it is significant that WHO has
named as slogan for next World Health Day, April 7, 1964, " No truce for TB."
While it is 20 years since the discovery or the first of the effective anti-tuberculosis
drugs, there are still more than 2 million new cases of tuberculosis a year and
deaths still number between 1 and 2 million annually. Naturally the greatest
number is in the densely populated areas of the world where there is poor nutrition,
poor sanitation, and overcrowding, but it is stated by the experts that the highly
developed, less densely populated countries are farther from conquest than some
think. No country has reached the recognized standard of control established by
WHO; that is, when a country can report that not more than 1 per cent of the
children reaching 14 years of age have been infected by tubercle bacilli, the country
will have control of tuberculosis but still be a long way from eradicating it. In
British Columbia 4.7 per cent of 14-year-olds tested have a positive skin test.
Highlights from the report of the Director of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control for the calendar year 1963 are as follows:—
(1) Known cases of tuberculosis excluding Indians, about 16,000, of which
about 15,000 are inactive, but among which there is a high rate of breakdown (one-half to 1 per cent break down annually and require further
treatment).
(2) Known cases of Indians, about 4,800, of which slightly over 4,000 are
inactive (treatment and supervision are under the Medical Services Directorate of the Department of National Health and Welfare).
(3) Number of new cases of tuberculosis: (_) Pulmonary, 476; (b) non-
pulmonary, 105; total, 581.
(4) Number of admissions to Willow Chest Centre and Pearson Hospital,
excluding polio and excluding review cases and transfers, 384, of which
275 were first admissions and 109 readmissions. Of the achriissions,
nearly 51 per cent were over 50 years of age, and of the patients in
hospital, 59 per cent were over 50 years of age. Of this group, 87 per
cent were male and only 13 per cent female. Of the total sanatoria
population, 79 per cent were males and only 21 per cent females.
(5) Number of discharges, 391 (plus 41 deaths). Forty-four discharges were
against medical advice and two were disciplinary discharges.
(6) The active-case register, which includes all cases classified as active and
quiescent, all those inactive less than two years, as well as all cases on
anti-microbial therapy and all cases that are suspect, had about 2,000
cases. Over 1,000 of these were patients on anti-microbial therapy
outside of hospital. All these cases are closely supervised, which makes
it possible for treatment to be continued outside of an institution.  "
tti al^fnAbout 20 per cent of the people in British Columbia have been infected
with tubercle bacillus, and it is established that 5 per cent of these (or
about 20,000 people) will develop active tuberculosis sometime during
their lifetime if present trends c
 J 96 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(8) Prince Rupert and Terrace are areas of high incidence in British Columbia
and have been given special attention by the Mobile Surveys and Travelling Clinic.
Because of the higher percentage of susceptible people, there appears to be an
increased danger from the undiagnosed case of tuberculosis. As B.C.G. vaccination
only gives protection for a limited period—about two years; it is not practical to
vaccinate all people who have negative tuberculin tests unless it is known that they
are going to be exposed to active tuberculosis. However, some individuals who
have had negative skin tests and then convert to positive, due to exposure to an
active case, may be treated with anti-microbial drugs as a prophylactic measure.
There are many problems to be worked out regarding preventive measures, including
the use of B.C.G. and prophylactic chemotherapy. Drug-resistant infections, as well
as resistant people, add to the problems. Good nutrition and adequate housing are
still important in the control of tuberculosis.
In a drive for detection of active cases and for prevention, the British Columbia
Tuberculosis Society, in co-operation with the Division of Tuberculosis Control, has
been conducting a massive " Operation Doorstep " survey in Vancouver, and indications are that over 200,000 people will be tested. While the survey has not been
completed as of March 31st, over 100 cases of tuberculosis had been found, the
majority of which required treatment. In addition, there were a number of suspects.
Many other chest conditions are being discovered, such as lung cancer, significant
heart conditions, Hodgkin's disease, bronchiectasis, and emphysema.
There were no new poliomyelitis cases admitted in the past fiscal year. Three
patients were discharged to home care, with the co-operation of many agencies,
including the British Columbia Poliomyelitis and Rehabilitation Foundation, and
with the provision of adequate equipment. Other patients have periods at home
when their families are able to care for them for short intervals. A few could
probably be discharged to home care if their f amilies had not lost interest. However,
care of a paraplegic patient is a heavy burden and must be shared with hospital
authorities, even in cases where the families enjoy having the patient home. There
are, of course, many patients who could not be discharged.
As fewer beds are required for the treatment of cases of tuberculosis, the
decision was made this year that Provincial Infirmaries patients would be transferred
to Pearson Hospital when the necessary structural changes could be made. Since
the public announcement there have been constant inquiries, and an Admissions
Committee has been set up to screen and evaluate applications. The Social Service
Department is represented on this Committee.
The Social Service Department had 1,838 interviews with over 500 patients
and their families, as well as 3,874 interviews with other professional staff and
community agencies on their behalf. The problems presented involved family
counselling, foster-home care of children, housekeeper or homemaker service, personality problems, psychiatric consultation, discharge planning, particularly with
geriatric and paraplegic patients, legal aid, and the administration of funds for
elderly and other patients incapable of handling their own funds. The Social Service
Department also endeavours to interest patients in the use of educational facilities
and rehabilitation resources when these are essential to their future adjustment.
Sometimes the role is that of emotional support to help the patient remain in
hospital until medically discharged or to face surgery. At other times it is emotional
support over a critical period when husband or wife deserts and the patient finds it
hard to face life alone.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64        J 97
Seventy-one tuberculosis patients and 12 poliomyelitis patients received comforts allowances for varying periods of time. These allowances totalled $4,455.25,
less a few refunds. In addition, the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society, the
British Columbia Poliomyelitis and Rehabilitation Foundation, and the Municipal
Chapter of the I.O.D.E. granted funds for special needs throughout the year, and
other groups granted assistance at Christmas.
Staff members have assisted again in the educational programme of the nursing
students that come to the Division for the tuberculosis affiliation programme, as
well as other special students who were assigned to Pearson Hospital or Willow
Chest Centre from time to time.
I wish to thank the agencies and groups who have helped financially throughout
the fiscal year, as well as express my appreciation for the co-operation extended by
the private and Governmental agencies in helping our patients.
 j 98 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The gross expenditure by the Department of Social Welfare in each of the fiscal
years 1961/62 and 1962/63 was approximately $56,000,000. However, in the
fiscal year 1963/64 the gross expenditure of the Department of Social Welfare
increased by $3,245,900 over that in 1962/63 to $59,216,400. The services and
allowances provided by the Department's expenditure of $59,216,400 during the
fiscal year 1963/64 are detailed by the various divisions of the Department of Social
Welfare within the Annual Report; however, this report of the Accounting Division
will include a table of expenditures and related services for the whole Department.
The first three sections of the expenditure table covered by the service headings
"Administration,'' "Institutions," and "Field service" have varied very little in
relation to percentage of gross welfare expenditure as shown in the previous fiscal
year; however, dollarwise these sections show a rise in spending of $254,000. The
main reasons for this rise were an upward revision of salaries, amounting to
$107,756, and the provision of additional staff and resulting expenses.
The largest increase in expenditure for a main service was for maintenance of
dependent children. The increase was $620,500 or 14.5 per cent, and was due to
the greater number of children placed in foster homes, despite the fact that the
number of children placed for adoption was up also. The total number of paid
days' care in foster homes amounted to 1,724,773, or an increase of 15 per cent
over the previous fiscal year.
The section " Medical services, drugs, optical, etc.", has increased $354,200
over the fiscal year 1962/63. From a review of this section of expenditures it is
found that purchase of drugs accounts for approximately two-thirds of the increase.
The service " Social Allowances, etc.," has increased $1,370,000 over the fiscal
year 1962/63, giving a total gross expenditure of $29,614,100. This section of
welfare expenditure provides for assistance to needy persons not covered by Old-age
Assistance, Blind or Disabled Allowances, or Child welfare programmes. Social
Allowance is largely administered by the Provincial and municipal offices provided
throughout the Province.
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances,
and Supplementary Social Allowances for the aged and handicapped have increased
in expenditure over the fiscal year 1962/63 by $644,200. The increase is largely
due to increased rates paid to pensioners under legislation and regulations governing
Old-age Assistance, Blind and Disabled Allowances.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1963/64 J 99
Under the Unemployment Assistance Agreement with the Federal Government,
the Provincial Welfare Accounting Division during the fiscal year 1963/64 has
prepared claims and received reimbursement of sums in excess of $16,000,000. We
have found the Federal Government auditors to be both helpful and co-operative in
assisting the Division.
As of January 1, 1963, an arrangement was made with the Indian Affairs
Branch of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration whereby assistance was
granted to Indians living off the reserve but who had not established residence
outside the reserve. This arrangement involved a number of meetings and discussions with the committee representing the Federal and Provincial Governments.
Payments to Indians are now made by the field offices and reimbursement is obtained
from the Federal Government by the Accounting Division.
The Comptroller, with the Superintendent of Child Welfare, met with the
directors of the Vancouver Children's Aid Society, the Vancouver Catholic Children's Aid Society, and the Victoria Family and Children's Service, and the Vancouver Community Chest and Victoria Community Chest, to discuss budgets for the
following fiscal year. The societies presented excellent and detailed budgets which
formed the basis of the societies' current-year operations.
The Payroll Section of the Accounting Division has met the change of pay
from once a month to twice a month without any increase in staff and is settled in a
well-regulated schedule due to the competence of the staff within the Payroll Section.
The Accounting Division has experienced an increase in accounts presented
for payment, and much has been done to increase efficiency and speed the processing
of accounts payable.
 

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