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ANNUAL REPORT of the MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH FOR THE YEAR 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1965

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
MOTOR-VEHICLE
BRANCH ->.,
FOR THE YEAR
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1965
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Motor-
vehicle Branch for the year 1963.
R. W. BONNER,
A ttomey-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1964.
  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Motor-vehicle
Branch for 1963. The Report concerns the activities of the Branch in all its facets,
and includes the issuance of licences for the 1963 licence-year which ended on
February 29, 1964.
The Motor-vehicle Branch, under your direction, is charged with the administration of the Motor-vehicle Act, and is responsible for the maintenance of record
systems containing information for all Ucensed motor-vehicles and drivers in the
Province. The records of the Branch are continually being sought by enforcement
agencies and provide a valuable source of the records of Ucensed drivers to which
the Courts continually look.
The Department of Commercial Transport Act regulates the licensing of aU
commercial vehicles and names the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles as the
Ucensing authority. The Superintendent is the Ucensing authority for commercial
vehicles operating in British Columbia under the Uniform Vehicle Registration and
Reciprocity Agreement in international traffic which originates in one of the member States of the United States. The Agreement provides for a sharing of Ucence
fees between the jurisdictions in which a vehicle travels on the basis of percentage
of mileage traveUed in each jurisdiction compared to total miles traveUed in aU
member jurisdictions.
The year 1963 was one of marked industrial expansion in British Columbia,
and this reflected on the demands placed on the Motor-vehicle Branch. In communities where development is taking place, it naturaUy foUows that there is a
healthy increase in motor-vehicle registrations and the number of vehicle-drivers.
Additional vehicle licensing and driver examination services are essential to meet
the pubUc demands. In some areas during 1963 it was very difficult to provide for
adequate service to original driver s Ucence appUcants without considerable delay.
We look forward to additional staff in the future to be able to cope more adequately
with this aspect of the problem so as to provide a suitable level of pubUc service.
I feel it is my duty to again mention the fact that the faculties of this Branch
in Victoria are far from adequate. It has been apparent for several years that we
were not in a position to obtain maximum efficiency from our staff because of the
poor physical arrangements of the building which houses our headquarters office.
I appreciate that a considerable sum of money would be required to build an appropriate headquarters unit, but I am absolutely convinced that in the long run this
would be money well spent. It is unfortunate that the customer area in the building
is small and often cluttered with large quantities of suppUes which cannot be housed
elsewhere. It takes on the appearance of a warehouse rather than a Government
establishment, through the doors of which thousands of people pass each year to
obtain Ucences and transact other items of Government business. I do urge that
a replacement for the Motor-vehicle Branch building receive early consideration in
the development of new Government buildings in the Victoria area.
I also feel that it is my duty to again mention that an unfortunate situation stiU
exists in the storage of valuable records in a non-fireproof type of accommodation.
Much work is being done to place records on microfilm, but this can never encompass aU the records of the Branch.   We have been fortunate in that we have not had
5
 G 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a fire. Should such a misfortune faU upon the Branch, I assure you it would be
extremely difficult to re-estabUsh records, and this would be a matter of considerable
embarrassment to the Government and the Branch.
This Report deals with the operation of the Branch under the foUowing headings:—
1. Licences.
2. Accidents and Convictions.
3. Driving Safety.
(a) Safety ResponsibiUty.
(b) Examination of Drivers.
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme.
4. Encumbrance Registry Division.
5. School Buses.
6. Staff.
1. LICENCES
Motor-vehicle Ucences in British Columbia in 1963 reached the total of
657,174, an increase of 41,137 or 6.9 per cent over the 1962 total of 616,037.
It is of interest to point out that the rate of increase in British Columbia of 6.9 per
cent considerably exceeds the national average, which itself is in excess of 4 per cent.
An increase of 7.2 per cent was recorded in private passenger-type motor-vehicles,
with the 1963 registration reaching 531,116, an increase of 35,808 over the 1962
total of 495,308. The increase in commercial vehicles was 4.4 per cent over the
1962 total of 120,729, with the 1963 registration total of 126,058, an increase of
5,329 registrations.
The number of trailers Ucensed in 1963 totalled 62,116, a 10-per-cent increase
over the 1962 total of 56,434. The majority of the increase is the result of an
upward surge in the use of utiUty trailers, such as boat and house traUers. These
items are prominent in the expanding recreational activities of our citizens.
The comparative statement of Ucences, permits, etc., for motor-vehicles,
trailers, and chauffeurs covers the volumes in these categories during Ucence-years
1956 to 1963, inclusive:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963         G 7
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., Issued during the
Licence-years 1956 to 1963_ Inclusive
Licences Issued
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962     1963
Motor-vehicles—
Passenger (new) '—1	
Passenger (renewal)....	
Total passenger ,—__	
1
1
52,950   50,990   43,576
288,700|320,737|349,761
49,268
370,154
1               1
45,364|     48,348   56,822
400.686J   419,022|438,486
67,659
463,457
341,650[371,727]393,337|419,422
446,050|   467,370|495,3081531,116
Commercial (new)	
Commercial (renewal)
17,8271  15,685] 11,6761 12,985
91,016|l00,432|106,190,108,956
9,6031     10,5761  11,8861 13,830
104,618|   106,095|108,843|112,228
Total commercial
108,843|116,117|117,866|121,941
114,221|   116,671|120,729|126,058
450,493|487,844|511,203|541,363
560,271|   584,0411616,037[657,174
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle permits
Non-resident special motor-vehicle permits.
Non-resident commercial motor-vehicle per-
1,673
219
1,384
245
1,100
149
965
109
1,3021       1,343
198|         187
1,551
157
1,613
110
6,519
8,493
10,056
13,197
1
16,5251     15,831
344      2,471
12,069
1,772
Qttartffrly permits ,
	
2,241
Total
6,519]    8,493| 10,056] 13,197
16,8691     18,3021 13,8411 14,719
7.787
2,0481    1,822
11.575
13,333
18,100
1
^"mmffrcipl  .
•
16,2731     19,988| 20,490| 25,429
Total
7,7871 11,5751 13,333   18,100
24,0781    27,707] 29,222| 35,505
Transporter—
	
536
3.188
1            I
S
A__f_iMi.T_.__
Motor-cycles—
N..W
1                         1
63
•
602       577       678
3.112     3.464      3.450
6031         652
3.477         3.587
706
3.683
1,342
3-937
Totnl
3,724|    3,714|    4,0411    4.128
4,0801      4,2391   4,3891    5,279
48,658
748
989
40
16
1,008
224.037
Motor-dealers—
Original licences	
722       724|      730
995       9791      925
755
970
31
19
1,024
229.655
782
817
28
10
954
228.311
885
866
44
13
1,044
256.580
968
884
f^Binnl m^t-T-Trlf i*ffllrr If'"■TnT .■
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences
Transfers—
12|        11         15
7|          61          7
947|      908|      919
1
210.4631215.8961218.513
51
16
1,182
284.641
45.671! 46.5361 48.061
40,612|    41,800
2,750|      2,726
1,3181      1,510
43,610' 44,899
Motor-, y_.1i.
Trail _r«
2,9041    3,1731    3,1901   3,080
672]       830|    1,04.|    1,513
2,9761    3,349
2,8181   4,069
__58,967|265,570|269,285|282,309
268,717|   274,347|305,984|336,958
Chauffeurs—
1
4,978     5,251     5,207
4,243    4,269|   4,112
5,295
4,485
64,359
328,115
13,018
5,368
4.756
65,209
887,170
12,297
5,518
4,925
639,269
12.785
l{4»3,9i7 796,6871641,992
Safety responsibility insurance certificate filing
|
12,523   13,741   14,281
1
1            1
Drivers' Licences
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1963 licence-year totalled 52,653,
an increase of 12.5 per cent over the 1962 total of 46,806.   The increase in the
issuance of original licences of persons under 21 years of age totalled 22,907, and
original licences issued to adult drivers numbered 29,746.    It is inevitable that the
annual issuance of original drivers' licences is going to continue increasing at the
rate noted for 1963.   This must not be lost sight of in providing examination service
in the years to come.   Licensed drivers in British Columbia at the end of 1963
totalled 738,007, an increase of 30,667 over the 1962 total of 707,340.   The rate
of increase amounted to 4.3 per cent.    Male drivers totalled 497,523 or 67.4 per
cent of the total licensed drivers.    Female drivers totalled 240,484.    Again it is
 G 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
noted that the percentage of total drivers in the male category is gradually decreasing. This trend has been evident for quite some years, and there is every possibility
that it will continue.
The foll6wing'is a table setting out statistical information on the number of
drivers in the various age-groups. It is always interesting to note the number of
drivers in the top age category. In 1962 drivers of 85 years of age totalled 177; the
number in 1963 is 255. In all age-groups the percentage of drivers fall into a
regular pattern noted in the previous years.
Drivers' Licences—Statistical Information by Age-groups
Age
Year of Birth
Number
Per Cent
of Total
1_L__.y_._r_
1943-1947
1939-1942
1933-1938
1928-1932
1923-1927
1918-1922
1913-1917
1908-1912
1903-1907
1898-1902
1894-1897
1888-1893
1883-1887
1878-1882
1877 and prior
57,271
64,464
105,247
94,381
90,481
83,566
72,997
59,039
42,225
28,577
15,116
15,983
6,562
1,843
255
7.76
31-35
12.26
9.89
51 55
8.00
5.72
61-65
3.87
2.05
70-75
2.17
-n___-_9i..'-
81-85
0.25
Over 85
y_«_r_          1                                  '"*.
0.03
	
738,007
100.00
Number
407,52.1
• Per Cent     '
■jof Total *>..
67.41
Totals
738,007
100.00
Chauffeurs' Licences
The comparative statement of licences and permits shows that the number of
licensed chauffeurs in 1963 was 78,992, which is an increase of 4,633 over the 1962
total of 74,359. The increase reverses the trend which was apparent in the past
few years, which continued to show less licensed chauffeurs although there were
increasing numbers of Ucensed commercial vehicles. In the last Report, mention
was made of an apparent lack of enforcement of the Motor-vehicle Act provisions
requiring that commercial truck-drivers hold Class C chauffeurs' licences. The
increase in 1963 in the category amounts to 4,104 licences. We are convinced
that there is still a large number of unlicensed chauffeurs, and it is hoped that these
efforts will continue.
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The table entitled " Distribution of Motor-vehicles " shows the number of
licences issued in the various sections of the Province. The legend at the bottom
of the table needs to be read in conjunction with the st&__stics given in several of
the centres to reflect more accurately information on vehicle population. However, this table does provide a reasonable index of the distribution of vehicles
throughout the Province, and experience has been that the information is valuable
to groups concerned with community planning projects and development.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
G 9
The following table shows a summary of motor-vehicle licences issued during
the 1963 licence-year:—
Passenger Motor-vehicles
' .' Commercial Motor-vehicles
Issuing Office
Total
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Abbotsford	
175
608
5,861
6,644
29
213
2,210
2,452
9,096
AlhRrni"    .
138
613
6,520
7,271
12
168
1,423
1,603
8,874
Ashcroft
38
20
902
960
8
20
482
510
1,470
Burns TaV*
47
90
802
939
25
66
635
726
1,665
10,263
11,518
3,324
3,591
15,109
nr.v_*r_.!_|_*
383
835
15,720
16,938
64
274
4,513
4,851
21,789
f_____-t_»n._y
421
591
8,145
9,157
18
162
2,096
2,276
11,433
5,106
1,815
6,049
2,105
1,993
1,242
2,214
1,372
8,263
3,477
Crfrstnn
154
136
47
83
4,110
7,023
2,335
1,947
2,943
2,144
8,179
9,787
Dunr-in
149
471
7,643
22
175
Fernie	
200
121
1,293
1,614
118
50
722
890
2,504
Pnj+ St .Tnhn
631
467
3,745
4,843
276
387
2,768
3,431
8,274
Ciartrrra
11
	
677
688
10
2
282
294
982
2,113
1,758
1,347
1,036
1,658
1,103
4,489
3,073
fir_.ni. Fnrtr.
41
171
1,970
10
57
Kamlnnjw
330
1,070
8,095
9,495
79
409
3,556
4,044
13,539
T-jXjn
10
1
252
263
5
3
176
184
447
8,225
9,572
2,639
2,902
101
T tUnnct
33
17
780
830
4
9
477
490
1,320
106
Miaetnn
63
353
3,080
3,496
4
72
991
1,067
4,563
Nanaimo	
235
855
10,937
12,027
21
198
2,690
2,909
14,936
Nelson __
219
635
7,082
7,936
37
176
2,810
3,023
10,959
New Westminster* i
1,464
4,806
56,411
62,681
114
592
8,204
8,910
71,591
North Vancouver^	
555
2,748
18,557
21,860
19
189
_„>_.
2,798
24,658
65
2,056
36
991
1,039
3,231
Pf.ntir.tnii
406
901
7,042
8,349
65
206
2,105
2,376
10,725
PmiRp Pniip^S	
56
55
365
476
163
61
639
863
1,339
66
3,695
23
819
853
4,548
Prince Or^rEP
654
1,163
8,363
10,180
127
605
3,782
4,514
14,694
Prince Rupert	
101
427
3,182
3,710
12
78
911
1,001
4,711
17
111
38
168
742
2,592
797
2,871
3
38
21
124
424
1,511
448
1,673
1,245
Quesnel
4,544
Revelstoke
112
114
1,322
1,548
25
61
552
638
2,186
Rossland
17
5
891
913
5
13
195
213
1,126
Salmnn irm
156
194
2,577
2,927
32
59
1,387
1,478
4,405
52
215
1,630
1,897
15
118
1,150
1,283
3,180
76
165
295
682
1,864
5,684
2,235
6,531
13
15
166
79
1,011
1,217
1,190
1,311
3,425
Trail
7,842
Vannnnvpr* ,   ,
2,406
11,298
71,363
85,067
91
1,251
11,481
12,823
97,890
Vancouver East4	
1,559
5,362
43,937
50,858
99
1,685
6,514
8,298
59,156
Vancouver-Pt_ Grey4_
1,031
5,245
27,275
33,551
32
218
1,749
1,999
35,550
VanriVrhnnf         	
67
51
941
1,059
29
57
831
917
1,976
V-rnnp
318
803
7,296
8,417
77
255
3,387
3,719
12,136
VirtorlflS
1,967
4,610
74,526
81,103
104
1,409
15,380
16,893
97,996
Williams T-nir_>
151
325
2,751
3,227
50
210
1,987
2,247
5,474
Totals	
17,492
50,167
463,457
531,116
2,638
11,192
112,228
126,058
657,174
i New Westminster (includes issuance at Haney, a temporary office at Burnaby during rush period, and
mail-order issuance to New Westminster area from Victoria):   Passenger, 63,857;   commercial, 9,096.
2 North Vancouver (does not include 964 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 21,860;   commercial, 1,834.
s Pouce Coupe (does not include 221 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate
throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 476;  commercial, 642.
* Vancouver, Vancouver East, and Vancouver-Point Grey (includes issuance from Motor Licence Offices at
1730 West Georgia Street, 2410 Nanaimo Street, and 6237 West Boulevard, and mail-order issuance to Vancouver
area from Victoria; does not Include issuance at North Vancouver; issuance at Sechelt and Squamish, which
account through Vancouver, has been deducted):   Passenger, 181,093; commercial, 23,597.
0 Victoria (does not include mail-order Issuance to other areas; in addition to these totals, 1,263 passenger
and 4,012 commercial plates were issued for Provincial Government vehicles, 417 commercial plates were issued
for National Defence vehicles which operate throughout British Columbia, and 307 commercial plates were issued
to prorated vehicles):   Passenger, 57,453; commercial, 8,611.
 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mail-order Issuance
The volume of mail-order licence requests through the Victoria Motor Licence
Office continued to grow in 1963. Mail-order issuance in 1963 was 37,599 in all
categories, compared to 35,364 in 1962. Whilst jt is the desire of the Branch that
as much issuance as possible be carried on at the 90 issuing offices that service the
various communities of the Province, it is apparently inevitable that mail-order
issuance volume will continue to increase. Mail-order issuance of licences is more
expensive than the method of handling requests in the over-the-counter method
by personal application at a motor licence office. The following table shows a
synopsis of the mail-order issuance during the 1963 licence-year:—
1963 Mail-order Synopsis (March 1, 1963, to February 29, 1964)
Vancouver
New
Westminster
Vancouver
Island
and
Islands
Balance
*_fpf   |_
Province
Out of
Province
4,504
130
668
195
37
35
1
25
	
560
15
64
•& plates	
Provincial Government passenger—
Commercial plates	
Provincial Government commercial.
Farm vehicle "A" plates	
Farm tractor " F " plates	
Quarterly " T " plates	
Motor-cycle plates —
National Defence " N " plates	
Section 7 " X " plates	
" Ham " plates	
*   Totals	
4,992
1,229
355
3,992
12
2
35
417
202
36
14,273
7
11
4
39
638
73
2,139
527
3
5
1
21
142
17
134
28
11,272   I 15,871
1,364
27,197
1,229
2,615
3,992
59
53
6
122
417
1,691
218
340   | 37,599
 report of the superintendent of motor-vehicles, 1963    g 11
Revenue
The total amount of revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch during
1963 from licences, permits, and other services shows a 6.1-per-cent increase over
the 1962 collections. The total 1963 collection was $22,617,696.12, an increase
of $1,298,022.08 over the 1962 total of $21,319,674.04. The amount includes
$1,611,767.34 collected under the Social Services Tax Act on transactions involving buying and selling of motor-vehicles. Tax payments are required to be submitted to the Branch on vehicle transactions which do not involve licensed motor-
vehicle dealers. Sales tax for transactions in the latter category are paid directly
to the Consumer Taxation Branch, Department of Finance.   Sales collection in
1962 was $1,448,925.74. Motor-vehicle Branch offices collected 67.1 per cent of
the total collections, amounting to $15,165,519.63. This compares closely with
the percentage of collection by these offices in 1962, which amounted to 66.9 per
cent of the total revenue. The remainder of 32.9 per cent was collected through
the Government Agencies of the Department of Finance, which carry out licence-
issuance service for the Branch. These are in areas not served by Motor-vehicle
Branch offices.
The following are the locations of the Motor-vehicle Branch offices with the
1963 revenue collections noted for each office:—
Vancouver  $3,408,794.34
Victoria  !  3,095,404.16
New Westminster __.  2,157,045.16
Vancouver East >Tl° 2,031,797.62
Vancouver-Point Grey  944,998.32
Cloverdale __1*  691,236.53
North Vancouver  627,311.42
Chilliwack ___. __  549,909.85
Kamloops ... 518,211.61
Dawson Creek _____ !  441,832.50
Abbotsford  309,651.06
Trail  235,267.83
Mission  154,059.23
Total _   $15,165,519.63
Refunds
Legislation provides for refunding of licence fees in several instances where
licences are surrendered and the licences are returned to the Branch. Refunds are
made on unexpired years of drivers' licences, and these refunds arise either because
the licensee leaves the Province or discontinues driving. The policy is to provide
a refund for the unexpired year or years remaining in the licence. This need for
refunds exists because the term of the driver's licence in British Columbia being of
a five-year duration.
Other refunds all involve motor-vehicle licences, and principally involve
vehicles which are removed from British Columbia or are damaged beyond repair.
The Motor-vehicle Act provides for a refund of one-half of the unused portion of
the licence fee. Refunds continue to be made under a provision of the Motor-
vehicle Act on vehicles situated east of the Cascades where the operator desires
not to use the vehicle during the winter season. This refund condition has been
in existence for about 30 years.   It is interesting to note the number of refunds in
 G 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
this category is gradually decreasing. The 1963 total was 741, a decrease of 48
in the 1962 total of 789. Improved highway conditions and the use of vehicles
with more capability in dealing with winter weather problems has certainly reduced
the justification for these refunds. Little hardship would occur if this refund
provision were eliminated.
The following table sets out the number of refunds and amounts of money
refunded for the 1963 licence-year:—
*  Type of Refund Number Amount
Drivers' licences     1,744 $5,018.00
Motor-vehicle licences, general refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger      815 $7,940.22
Dealers' Ucences ._ 44 275.31
Department of Commercial Transport Act—commercial  5     385                     19,987.68
     1,244           28,203.21
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle _4c_—passenger  6,232 $36,752.68
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial      883 27,119.25
Farm commercial        54 723.05
     7,169            64,594.98
Seasonal refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger      311 $1,710.14
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial      384 16,549.86
Farm commercial        46 659.62
        741             18,919.62
Refunds on transfers—
Department of Commercial Transport Act-—
Regular commercial      300 $49,837.93
Farm commercial        56 1,241.25
        356            51,079.18
Totals _._ .  11,254 $ 167,814.99
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 13
2. ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor-vehicle Accidents
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1954 to 1963:—
'  Motor-
Number
Accidents
per 1,000
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles'
Fatal
Fatal
Accidents
Year
vehicles
of
vethicles,
Injuries
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Registered
Accidents
Regis- :
tered
Damage
dents
1954.
367,967
22,425
61.05
7,582 '
211
5.7
$325.67
7.38
181
6.33
1955
405,578
22,030
55.10
8,263
225
5.6
392.79
7.51
194
6.47
1956	
450,493
24,905
55.34
9,700
316
7.0
437.05
9.03
272
7.77
1957
487,844
25,976
53.24
9,521
252
5.1
482.76
6.70
224
5.96
1958   .__.
506,398
24,583
48.54
9,814
282
5.5
480.72
7.01
246
6.12
1959	
536,120
25,536
47.63
10,541
309
5.7
478.79
7.55
268
6.55
1960
566,144
26.091
46.08
11,311
294
5.2
474.78
6.73
253
5.79
1961
589.917
27.203
46.11
12,101  '
320
5.4
475.08
7.07
272
6.01
1962	
609,215
29,077
44.65
13,382
385
6.3
489.05
7.96
322
6.66
1963
648,303
30,924
47.82
14,585
360
5.6
503.65
7.00
309
6.01
The upward trend of motor-vehicle accidents continued in 1963. Accidents
resulted in a larger number of personal injuries, but the number of persons killed
dropped from 385 to 360, a decrease of 6 per cent.
Reportable accidents in 1963 totalled 30,924, an increase of 1,847 over the
total in 1962 of 29,077 or 6 per cent. Fatal motor-vehicle accidents decreased
from 322 in 1962 to 309 in 1963 or 4 per cent. The number of motor-vehicle
accidents involving personal injury rose sharply from 8,756 in 1962 to 9,470 in
1963, an increase of 8 per cent. The number of persons injured in these injury
accidents rose by 9 per cent, from 13,382 to 14,585.
The reportable property damage in motor-vehicle accidents in 1963 rose by
11 per cent to $15,742,907.87, an increase of $1,524,824.49 over the 1962 total
of $14,218,083.38.
Except in the fatality category, the Increase in motor-vehTcle accidents equals
or exceeds the 6-per-cent increase of motor-vehicles licensed in 1963 over the 1962
total. It is true that many more miles are being driven by our Ucensed drivers.
However, recklessness continues to be a very apparent factor of highway vehicle
operation. It is a very difficult problem to control. Far too often a person behind
the wheel of a motor-vehicle seems to.be entirely different from the same person
in another set of circumstances. Thig is a problemwhich wiU need continued study
and research. The driver-improvement portion of this Report wUl deal with the
activities of the Branch with this type of driver.
The following table sets out accident statistics of the various cities, municipalities, villages, and districts of British Columbia for 1962 and 1963:—
 G 14
crnES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
Per Cent
100.0
100.0
—100.0
100.0
—100.0
—33.3
—100.0
100.0
100.0
—100.0
-100.0
400.0
100.0
—66.6
—100.0
50.0
27.5
100.0
1
PerCent
100.0
TS..0"""
—IOO.O
100.0
—100.0
—33.3
-100.0
100.0
100.0
—100.0
—100.0
300.0
100.0
—66.6
—100.0
29
31
17
31
43
28
3
i u
8
57
8
64
8
95
26
375
141
43
66
87
31
73
60
13
1
1
28
3,938
40
508
28
33
2
36
20
24
34
40
2
5
11
8
81
92
11
134
16
459
148
66
44
61
52
94
44
16
7
5
24
4312
60
543
32
Percent
13.7
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
	
200.0
1
	
66.6
3
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
42.1
—100.0
43.7
37.5
1
1
2
1
7.
1
5
1
1
41.0
—38.4
1
4
1
1
22.4
4.9
53.4
3
2
3
2
—33.3
—29.8
67.7
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
28.7
—26.6
35.7
11.1
100.0
23.0
700.0
	
400.0
— 100.0
—14.2
29
1
9
37
1
9
1
28
1
9
38
1
8
1
9.4
50.0
6.8
14.0
60
69
15.0
58
67
15.5
5,893
6,516
10.5
MUNICIPALITIES
12
1
4
11
1
6
Percent
—8.3
SO.O
—2-U>
—40.0
-100.0
100.0
—IOO.O
133.3
—14.2
-66.6
—100.0
—66.6
—100.0
—7.5
100.0
-85.7
—66.6
7.1
50.0
11
1
4
4
4
2
11
1
3
PerCent
■^25.0
—25.0
—25.0
-100.0
100.0
—100.0
33.3
-14.2
—66.6
—100.0
—80.0
—100.0
—22.2
66.6
—80.0
—33.3
9.0
885
21
136
119
81
43
2
42
21
154
153
83
21
991
17
152
JOJJS
109
63
12
39
43
114
174
65
31
1
194
40
4
9
45
324
269
43
64
20
751
4
233
Percent
11.9
—19.0
11.7
4
5
3
3
3
3
3
21.8
34.5
46.5
500.0
3
2
3
7
3
6
3
2
3
7
3
1
5
6
—7.1
104.7
7
6
1
;4
6
1
1
—25.9
13.7
—21.6
47.6
1
6
2
100.0
167
49
1
9
42
280
216
29
91
13
705
148
16.1
—18.3
300.0
i
10
3
7
12
7
6
1
4
15
1
9
3
5
6
11
7
5
1
4
7.1
15.7
24.5
48.2
—29.6
53.8
14
12
6.5
400.0
West Vanr-"«Y_r
2
3
2
2
57.4
Tntol.
103
82
—20.3
87
70
—19.5
3,511
3,956
12.6
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963
G  15
the Province for the Calendar Years 1962 and 1963
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damag
3
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(_)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
PerCent
PerCent
Percent
PerCent
22
21
4.5
105
134
28.6
63
76
20.6
$35,758.48
$44,308.00
23.9
2
200.0
17
11
—35.2
11
8
—27.2
3,470.00
1,326.00
—61.7
25
25
	
177
181
2.2
99
104
5.0
32,758.91
36,717.75
12.0
13
16
23.0
94
137
45.7
54
76
40.7
24,179.52
31,672.22
30.9
23
16
—30.4
147
147
	
81
76
—6.1
31,304.50
35,201.15
12.4
32
22
—31.2
272
229
—15.8
1461     122
—16.4
62,147.77
53,570.00
— 13.8
19
31
63.1
140
195
39.2
79
116
46.8
34,381.70
44,171.85
28.4
2
200.0
15
19
26.6
8
11
37.5
1,630.59
13,885.00
751.8
2
5
150.0
26
41
57.6
16
21
31.2
5,085.00
7,407.00
45.6
8
8
40
42
5.0
22
25
13.6
13,218.00
3,970.00
10,034.00
—24.0
3
5
66.6
8
12
50.0
6
8
33.3
13,250.00
233.7
41
51
24.3
413      455
10.1
220
239
8.6
99,376.37
111,186.01
11.8
3
-100.0
13
4
—69.2
7
2
—71.4
5,300.00
700.00
—86.7
45
69
53.3
261
392
50.1
145
219
51.0
53,864.56
82,417.22
53.0
6
5
—16.6
56
56
30
33
10.0
8,462.46
15,253.74
80.2
65
92
41.5
414
594
43.4
219
322
47.0
95,465.05
131,387.97
37.6
12
11
— 8.3
112
116
3.5
61
64
4.9
39,782.82
30,655.69
—22.9
253
289
14.2
1,898
1,997
5.2
969
1,011
4.3
436,604.06
477,994.06
9.4
95
105
10.5
596
637
6.8
314
333
6.0
150,575.50
153,408.37
1.8
31
47
51.6
309
302
—2.2
170
175
2.9
73,465.34
71,337.74
—2.8
42
33
—21.4
319
334
4.7
176
183
3.9
72,579.47
80,307.90
10.6
41
44
7.3
230
219
—4.7
128
130
1.5
75,432.87
55,615.02
—26.2
25
27
8.0
118
146
23.7
70
82
17.1
29,198.24
38,968.66
33.4
45
65
44.4
494
594
20.2
258
316
22.4
121,183.13
144,005.78
18.8
46
38
— 17.3
317
305
—3.7
181
167
—7.7
64,817.13
79,459.50
22.5
10
12
20.0
100
102
2.0
52
58
11.5
21,024.40
20,248.70
—3.6
	
5
500.0
19
36
89.4
11
22
100.0
2,763.00
5,929.99
114.5
1
3
200.0
22
41
86.3
13
23
76.9
4,562.00
10,683.65
134.1
1
 §
—100.0
1
—100.0
1
-100.0
1,000.00
— 100.0
20
17
—15.0
165
154
—6.6
89
~~~84
-5.6
36,229.14
35,805.76
— 1.1
2,847
3,088
8.4
16,382
16,905
3.1
8,932
9,044
1.2
3,637,905.75
3,801,212.38
4.4
29
41
41.3
233
279
19.7
130
145
11.5
51,568.83
68,679.12
33.1
373
380
1.8
2,452
2,732
11.4
1,298
1,411
8.7
503,801.49
569,220.50
12.9
18
21
16.6
96
120
25.0
53
68
28.3
22,123.19
28,427.64
28.4
4,196| 4,596
9.5
26,061127,668
6.1
14,112|14,774
4.6
$5,854,989.27|$6,304,448.37
7.6
PerCent
PerCent
Percent
Per Cent
592
651
9.9
3,685
4,033
9.4
1,945
2,055
5.6
$887,550.34
$1,019,406.41
14.8
14
10
—28.5
69
64
—7.2
42
40
-4.7
22,141.85
22,870.15
3.2
81
88
8.6
414
451
8.9
259
291
12.3
139,645.06
138,020.12
—1.1
	
	
	
1
1
1          1
	
400.00
110.00
—72.5
81
98
20.9
506
561
10.8
277
313
12.9
118,019.48
160,338.21
35.8
54
56
3.7
241
288
19.5
157
181
15.2
90,985.81
89,574.42
—1.5
36
37
2.7
276
206
-25.3
153
114
—25.4
62,943.93
47,342.29
—24.7
1
6
500.0
14
28
100.0
5
14
180.0
3,420.00
5,726.00
67.4
21
22
4.7
89
117
31.4
66
80
21.2
38,644.65
46,809.37
21.1
16
31
93.7
132
194
46.9
81
114
40.7
46,027.76
61,109.56
32.7
101
66
—34.6
470
393
— 16.3
275
223
—18.9
125,232.50
127,042.35
1.4
97
111
14.4
507
485
—4.3
300
295
-1.6
148,226.31
157,681.06
6.3
50
47
—6.0
281
259
-7.8
163
161
—1.2
98,193.92
99,519.73
1.3
12
11
— 8.3
77
70
—9.0
47
49
4.2
23,647.45
31,923.90
34.9
	
1
100.0
1
3
200.0
1
2
100.0
85.00
1,276.00
139.4
122
135
10.6
637
776
21.8
361
430
19.1
174,480.89
205,839.73
17.9
36
33
—8.3
179
221
23.4
101
118
16.8
30,463.96
44,786.30
47.0
1
3
200.0
2
7
250.0
21        51
150.0
1,565.00
2,295.00
46.6
3
6
100.0
27
42
55.5
15
25
66.6
6,682.62
12,133.67
81.5
27
31
14.8
133
176
32.3
83
105
26.5
31,060.00
39,982.28
28.7
185
219
18.3
900
1,105
22.7
508
620
22.0
238,356.09
279,247.38
17.1
145
180
24.1
812
961
18.3
469
568
21.1
206,521.86
256,430.88
24.1
14
24
71.4
61
85
39.3
42
56
33.3
21,632.88
36,128.72
67.0
50
31
—38.0
191
142
—25.6
123
99
— 19.5
107,287.31
64,861.42
—39.5
8
12
50.0
58
86
48.2
37
52
40.5
18,385.00
24,041.55
30.7
441
456
3.4
2,262
2,163
—4.3
1,336
1,229
-8.0
662,486.97
583,020.06
—11.9
3
300.0
10
18
80.0
6
11
83.3
1,817.00
4,458.02
145.3
105
148
i       40.9
718
947
31.8
388
502
29.3
210,574.31
251,128.79
19.2
2,293| 2,516
9.7
12,753|13,882
8.8
7,2431 7,753
7.0
$3,516,477.95
$3,813,097.37
8.4
 G 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1962
1963
Increase
or (_)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(_)
Decrease
1
PerCent
100.0
—100.0
100.0
100.0
	
1
PerCent
100.0
—1-0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—100.0
-100.0
100.0
—100.0
—100.0
—100.0
-100.0
100.0
100.0
24
7
1
20
2
PerCent
—16.6
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
31
5
10
25
6
loo.o
—100.0
—100.0
300.0
—100.0
—100.0
—100.0
—100.0
100.0
1
8
6
3
15
2
5
5
1
14
1
2
3
1
19
24
27
5
1
2
6
24
9
1
5
2
39
arrptnn
	
1
2|   —66.6
1
1
1
1
1
3
	
3
3
9
28
51
3
2
12
5
2
28
10
3
6
1
	
1
	
J —100.0
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
16.6
88.8
—40.0
-TT-
 1
100.0
500.0
500.0
-66.6
1
	
1
16.6
3
3
11.1
200.0
20.0
1
—IOO.O
1
22
1
—43.5
100.0
100.0
	
2
4
11    —50.0
19
2
375.0
	
	
200.0
1
—100.0
4
1
1
1
5
1
3
-75.0
1
9
8
	
100.0
-44.4
WarfiflH
	
100.0
Srggr.
1
1
—62.5
12
12
—
12
10
—16.6
322
342
6.2
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 17
Province for the Calendar Years 1962 and 1963—Continued
Injury At
cidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damag
B'
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or (-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
PerCent
PerCent
Percent
Per Cent
16
13
—18.7
89
95
6.7
49
56
14.2
$20,347.10
$14,990.42
—26.3
6
2
—66.6
13
7
—46.1
8
5
-37.5
1,424.00
1,903.00
33.6
1
.ft
-100.0
2
13
550.0
1
7
600.0
600.00
3,225.00
437.5
3
300.0
11
19
72.7
6
12
100.0
993.50
2,554.87
157.2
16
24
50.0
97
182
87.6
58
97
67.2
23,687.88
47,910.27
102.2
3
4
33.3
40
40
22
21
-4.5
6,707.38
12,692.59
89.2
	
2
43
2
26
1
1
450.00
175.00
6
4
2
—50.0
35
18
—48.5
20
12
-40.0
7,506.35
3,608.00
—51.9
3
1
—66.6
19
14
—26.3
11
9
— 18.1
2,900.85
4,453.00
53.5
14
12
— 14.2
136
143
5.1
73
76
4.1
32,277.50
31,215.73
—3.2
2
1
—50.0
8
3
—62.5
4
2
-50.0
960.00
700.00
—27.0
4
2
—50.0
15
4
—73.3
8
3
-62.5
1,891.50
845.00
—55.3
4
6
50.0
30
34
13.3
21
22
4.7
7,765.00
18,540.00
138.7
1
*~
—100.0
5
11
120.0
3
6
100.0
2,600.00
5,415.00
108.2
10
4
—60.0
41
43
4.8
24
23
-4.1
10,334.76
10,234.00
-0.9
1
3
200.0
8
25
212.5
5
15
200.0
1,290.00
7,432.00
476.1
1
2
100.0
4
9
125.0
3
6
100.0
1,900.00
2,432.43
28.0
1
3
13
-100.0
2
— 100.0
— 100.0
4
12
6
—50.0
78
82
5.1
44
46
4.5
17,020.00
18,753.25
10.1
17
15
— 11.7
101
105
3.9
62
57
-8.0
23,592.45
32,233.06
36.6
16
25
56.2
120
125
4.1
63
72
14.2
28,294.67
60,432.95
113.5
4
3
—25.0
21
23
9.5
12
13
8.3
4,455.00
4,896.10
9.8
1
2
100.0
11
20
81.8
7
14
100.0
1,123.97
3,897.19
247.0
2
4
100.0
15
21
40.0
8
11
37.5
2,297.50
8,465.00
268.5
	
4
400.0
27
40
48.1
16
23
43.7
6,242.00
11,687.00
87.2
4
1
—75.0
19
11
—42.1
11
7
-36.3
8,207.50
1,915.00
—76.6
16
16
138
110
—20.2
75
—2.2
14.2
8
31
—100.0
19.3
5
20
— 100.0
10.0
2,110.00
13,382.03
9,741.02
—100.0
7
8
37
22
—27.2
1
3
200.0
35
58
65.7
20
29
45.0
4,621.10
14,016.88
203.3
3
5
66.6
30
38
26.6
19
22
15.7
6,985.00
7,143.12
2.2
2
-100.0
— 10.0
6
153
-100.0
-9.1
4
84
-100.0
-5.9
— 100.0
20
18
139
79
32,648.61
42,492.96
30.1
1
100.0
3
300.0
2
200.0
600.00
600.0
2
1
-50.0
24
9
—62.5
12
6
-50.0
3,596.68
2,353.30
—34.5
4
8
100.0
63
97
53.9
34
57
67.6
18,119.00
22,742.90
25.5
2
200.0
-100.0
3
5
300.0
2
4
200.0
33.3
1,900.00
1,020.00
1,900.0
1
5
3
715.00
42.6
2
1
—50.0
6
3
-50.0
4
2
-50.0
1,750.00
550.00
—68.5
1
8
4
10
6
25.0
50.0
4
3
5
5
25.0
66.6
2,930.00
745.57
1,463.00
1,700.00
—50.0
1
128.1
1
3
100.0
—25.0
1
14
100.0
$5.5
1
10
100.0
11.1
4
9
9
1,925.00
2,760.00
43.3
1
100.0
2
4
100.0
2
3
50.0
450.00
2,650.00
488.8
6
2
—66.6
30
45
50.0
16
25
56.2
10,647.00
10,792.93
1.3
218
217
—0.4
1,558
1,701
9.1
890
968
8.7
$363,528.34
$469,400.83
29.1
 G 18
UNORGANIZED
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
S..C.M.P. Detachment
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
-.uOrjO-a).
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
3
2
3
1
2
PerCent
—66.6
-100.0
400.0
—85.7
200.0
150.0
-100.0
500.0
-50.0
300.0
-100.0
—75.0
-70.0
400.0
100.0
200.0
66.6
50.0
-100.0
—100.0
200.0
—66.6
—50.0
3
2
2
1
1
4
1
Percent
-66.6
—50.0
— 100.0
400.0
—75.0
64
4
9
14
36
68
22
15
23
44
Percent
6.2
450.0
66.6
64.2
22.2
—40.0
—12.5
3.7
-12.5
300.0
—100.0
5.5
4
1
7
4
10
24
27
16
6
21
28
14
3
2
5
2
1
2
4
200.0
100.0
—100.0
400.0
—75.0
300.0
—100.0
2
1
2
2
4
1
4
1
36
52
45
24
26
7
40
126
2
66
61
38
57
78
75
28
6
19
10
62
4
82
25
17
16
47
30
14
38
108
66
46
103
9
132
22
13
17
2
2
5
2
4
38
51        —1.9
4
1
2
4
1
2
25
22
32
25
48
112
~62
54
13
45
65
96
21
14
30
16
79
5
105
_    28
12
10
57
34
39
43
115
40
42
112
10
[ tio
35
5
-. 16
—44.4
—8.3
23.0
257.1
20.0
— 11.1
-100.0
—6.0
—11.4
-65.7
—21.0
—16.6
28.0
-25.0
133.3
57.8
60.0
27.4
25.0
28.0
12.0
—29.4
—37.5
21.2
13.3
178.5
13.1
6.4
—39.3
—8.6
8.7
11.1
— 16.6
59.0
—61.5
. . 33.1....
4
10
1
3
4
7
1
1
3
—75.0
—57.1
100.0
200.0
100.0
100,0
300.0
2
2
4
1
6
5
3
2
2
1
4
4
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
2
2
1
31        50.0
	
-100.0
-100.0
200.0
-66.6
Pi.-...
2
1
3
2
1
3
8
4
7
4
—42.8
-100.0
300.0
—100.0
-Oo.o
66.6
-25.0
-66.6
50.0
—100.0
100.0
	
—100.0
400.0
—100.0
500.0
200.0
—33.3
50.0
-100.0
—28.5
2
1
2
1
4
1
3
10
3
1
9
4
1
2
3
1
4
1
5
.1
5
21
6
2
9
7
6
3
6
1
7
1
6
4
3
6
1
2
1
7
innMi.ftWiMic«
Kasln
5
1
6
—100.0
100.0
50.0
—75.0
— 100.0
100.0
—50.0
—75.0
—100.0
—88.8
—33.3
5
2
3
1
1
3
1
1
7
—100.0
100.0
—66.6
— 100.0
100.0
-33.3
—100.0
—85.7
—33.3
38
21
5
11
22
17
16
10
66
13
22
100
7
21
14
3
22
19
15
12
26
12
35
36
15
15
96
—42.1
-9.5
—100.0
36.3
—45.4
52.9
—25.0
250.0
—45.4
15.3
—31.8
—4.0
1
1
2
1
2
3
4
3
1
4
4
2
9
1
MnWridn
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
NnVi.sp
Nanaimr.
1
Mnfnl
9        28.5
29        38.0
3
2
3
2
5
3
—64.2
	
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963
G 19
Province for the Calendar Years 1962 and 1963—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
PerCent
PerCent
Per Cent
PerCent
31
41
24.3
149
170
14.0
113
132
16.8
$63,960.92
$79,565.52
24.3
1
9
800.0
6
26
333.3
4
18
350.0
1,600.00
11,582.00
623.8
4
«
50.0
37
49
32.4
22
34
54.5
18,725.00
27,250.00
45.5
6
11
83.3
27
53
96.2
20
39
95.0
10,842.00
25,897.35
138.8
16
23
43.7
113
75
—33.6
76
57
-25.0
53,987.60
47,371.30
—12.2
	
	
1
3
200.0
1
2
100.0
200.00
310.00
55.0
6
6
	
30
50
66.6
22
35
59.0
12,612.00
19,262.00
52.7
14
10
—28.5
95
124
30.5
63
81
28.5
41,067.85
47,451.31
15.5
18
18
	
79
93
17.7
57
66
15.7
51,837.00
48,646.78
-6.1
9
9
	
37
33
— 10.8
26
22
—15.3
15,185.23
11,967.00
—21.1
	
2
200.0
8
5
-37.5
5
3
—40.0
1,560.00
1,175.00
—24.6
1
-100.0
2
6
200.0
2
3
50.0
600.00
1,085.00
80.8
19
20
10.5
93
117
25.8
68
85
25.0
35,039.45
51,648.10
47.4
30
30
	
153
179
16.9
105
113
7.6
59,124.38
68,475.67
15.8
28
16
—42.8
134
87
—35.0
88
64
—27.2
64,125.58
39,860.88
—37.8
13
11
-15.38
43
48
11.6
31
36
16.1
18,570.50
28,885.00
55.5
16
18
12.5
88
91
3.4
61
61
30,605.72
39,071.53
27.6
4
12
200.0
20
29
45.0
16
21
31.2
7,793.00
12,220.00
56.8
19
27
42.1
110
140
27.2
73
96
31.5
49,504.11
64,000.93
29.2
77
53
—31.1
393
336
— 14.5
247
203
—17.8
143,739.82
111,101.51
—22.7
2
34
33
-100.0
—2.9
5
159
—100.0
14.4
3
111
-100.0
9.0
619.00
-100.0
49.0
182
121
61,107.93
91,087.14
34
32
—5.8
137
128
-6.5
103
94
—8.7
80,887.46
68,326.00
—15.5
17
10
—41.1
66
49
—25.7
47
32
—31.9
25,390.10
22,759.55
—10.3
26
29
11.5
140
130
—7.1
100
102
2.0
66,572.42
45,809.77
—31.1
53
33
—37.7
225
150
—33.3
153
99
-35.2
117,208.84
90,112.50
—23.1
42
52
23.8
204
258
26.4
133
162
21.8
72,744.72
90,468.62
24.3
18
15
— 16.6
69
59
—14.4
55
43
—21.8
21,296.00
20,755.41
—2.5
5
9
80.0
35
39
11.4
26
29
11.5
24,135.00
14,203.00
—41.1
17
16
—5.8
82
72
—12.1
68
53
—22.0
34,687.00
28,615.32
— 17.5
5
10
100.0
21
56
166.6
15
41
173.3
11,718.50
27,019.00
130.5
39
47
20.5
196
166
— 15.3
135
117
— 13.3
113,444.41
104,243.50
—8.1
4
2
—50.0
18
31
72.2
12
21
75.0
4,235.00
12,204.61
188.1
43
61
41.8
213
279
30.9
145
176
21.3
133,919.53
131,396.41
— 1.8
12
16
33.3
52
58
11.5
31
40
29.0
19,025.80
23,940.00
25.8
8
10
25.0
33
44
33.3
22
32
45.4
11,509.50
9,933.00
-13.6
10
8
—20.0
52
53
1.9
39
36
—7.6
19,775.83
16,703.08
— 15.5
27
34
25.9
145
194
33.7
97
137
41.2
98,278.86
125,709.41
27.9
15
22
46.6
77
104
35.0
56
82
46.4
34,070.59
45,295.54
32.9
7
14
100.0
73
62
— 15.0
52
48
—7.6
44,517.45
34,115.00
-23.3
17
24
41.1
90
90
69
65
—5.7
43,016.85
58,556.50
36.1
55
53
—3.6
247
247
170
166
—2.3
125,032.00      174,694.15
39.7
32
20
—37.5
166
180
8.4
118
127
7.6
87,001.33|       73,263.78
-15.7
27
26
—3.7
196
173
— 11.7
131
119
—9.1
85,446.79       93,568.69
9.5
55
63
14.5
272
285
4.7
197
213
8.1
___U17,-Ql---2
 Ki_U__l____S2
20.1
5
7
40.0
26
36
38.4
20
25
25.0
9,535.00
13,689.00
43.5
76
60
—21.0
265
299
12.8
164
185
12.8
89,333.54
130,270.34
45.8
16
18
12.5
69
68
—1.4
51
54
5.8
28,635.75
132,493.67
362.6
11
4
—63.6
65
61
—6.1
51
47
-7.8
30,664.92
21,952.53
—28.4
10
8
—20.0
33
31
—6.0
26
26
	
19,255.00
18,724.00
—2.7
18
13
—27.7
87
91
4.5
55
59
7.2
47,605.54
30,496.46
—35.9
11
13
18.1
68
45
—33.8
44
38
—13.6
33,401.93
39,104.85
17.0
4
4
-100.0
125.0
21
35
53
-loo.o
51.4
11
27
— 100.0
33.3
6,103.07
15,304.30
-100.0
66.7
9
36
25,515.54
9
5
—44.4
55
48
—12.7
37
37
28,842.00
19,358.00
—32.8
13
18
38.4
65
52
—20.0
48
39
—18.7
26,928.92
35,200.00
30.7
5
7
40.0
29
23
—20.6
23
17
—26.0
17,304.48
8,892.92
—48.6
4
3
—25.0
22
18
— 18.1
18
15
—16.6
7,955.69
5,738.65
—27.8
29
24
-17.2
105
98
-6.6
81
80
—1.2
45,326.30
40,456.39
— 10.7
7
7
23
37
60.8
16
26
62.5
6,580.34
15,367.00
133.5
16
9
—43.7
91
72
—20.8
58
48
—17.2
34,125.00
24,325.66
—28.7
45
61
35.5
206
252
22.3
129
154
19.3
75,722.16
92,860.63
22.6
5
6
20.0
26
47
80.7
18
33
83.3
8,224.00
20,725.00
152.0
14
21
50.0
64
102
59.3
50
74
48.0
38,304.00
44,414.87
15.9
10
5
-50.0
38
35
—7.8
28
22
—21.4
14,490.00
8,960.00
-38.1
1
3
200.0
7
14
100.0
5
10
100.0
5,390.00
1,775.00
—67.0
 G 20
UNORGANIZED—Continued
BRITISH COLUMBIA
! Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
R.C.M.P. Detachment
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
PerCent
400.0
—100.0
-100.0
—50.0
-100.0
100.0
—100.0
-61.5
—33.3
100.0
100.0
—40.0
50.0
.......
	
PerCent
25
21
33
3
38
35
178
4
53
106
129
7
36
38
20
74
4
43
24
229
4
79
71
78
Per Cent
52.0
—4.7
124.2
33.3
13.1
—31.4
28.6
49.0
—33.0
—39.5
1
5
1
4
300.0
—100.0
—100.0
—50.0
—100.0
100.0
-100.0
—33.3
3
1
8
1
1
1
13
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
6
1
	
4
2
5
1
4
2
4
1
Queen Charlotte	
—66.6
100.0
100.0
10
47
1,000.0
30.5
53.3
200.0
— 18.1
Revelstoke
3
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
I
1
15
6
22
11
26
42
40
31
10
56
2
5
23
18
18
1
2
5
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
50.0
50.0
200.0
100.0
-50.0
50.0
121          9.0
36
33
58
29
13
46
8
38.4
—21.4
45.0
—6.4
30.0
—17.8
— 100.0
60.0
35.5
—40.9
27.2
9.0
—21.0
26.6
85.7
100.0
60.0
—40.0
—100.0
—37.2
—22.5
— 12.5
200.0
100.0
—50.0
50.0
100.0
100.0
250.0
—50.0
100.0
100.0
—33.3
300.0
100.0
-100.0
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
100.0
200.0
—50.0
100.0
50.0
—33.3
250.0
100.0
— 100.0
2
2
7
1
1
6
1
1
45
44
11
33
38
45
49
5
15
1
43
80
80
61
26
14
36
30
57
91
1
8
9
27
62
70
2
6
2
4
4
8
2
6
2
3
4
7
	
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
210
197
—6.1
165
162
—1.8
3,656
3,771
3.1
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 21
Province for the Calendar Years 1962 and 1963—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
1962
1963
or(-)
Decrease
PerCent
Per Cent
PerCent
PerCent
16
23
43.7
73
85
16.4
48
61
27.0
$24,474.34
$31,042.28
26.8
12
11
—8.3
64
67
4.6
49
52
6.1
23,912.50
34,296.00
43.4
18
30
66.6
83
122
46.9
57
84
47.3
41,236.93
48,719.67
18.1
3
2
—33.3
15
14
—6.6
11
10
—9.0
6,350.00
4,620.00
—27.2
20
21
5.0
90
114
26.6
64
77
20.3
52,024.00
.  51,303.00
—1.3
19
18
—5.2
79
65
-17.7
58
49
— 15.5
23,956.41
21,203.71
—11.4
103
134
30.0
516
669
29.6
352
452
28.4
222,283.31
348,277.60
56.6
1
1
7
17
202
142.8
5
11
120.0
1,910.00
10,335.60
441.0
33
43
30.3
146
38.3
112
156
39.2
105,978.45
161,091.75
52.0
62
40
-35.4
224
188
—16.0
150
127
— 15.3
99,581.76
87,999.36
— 11.6
70
52
—25.7
264
266
0.7
188
191
1.5
122,604.65
106,154.58
—13.4
6
4
—33.3
18
28
55.5
14
20
42.8
14,875.00
9,980.00
—32.9
	
6
600.0
6
40
566.6
4
25
525.0
1,750.00
11,530.55
558.8
19
28
47.3
111
154
38.7
89
108
21.3
61,139.61
79,513.75
30.0
11
22.2
2
52
li
-100.0
1.9
1
37
40
—100.0
8.1
325.00
— 100.0
9
21,190.00
31,038.00
46.4
5
12
140.0
43
67
55.8
27
47
74.0
19,488.00
29,292.00
50.3
10
12
20.0
66
61
—7.5
52
48
—7.6
27,633.13
28,780.95
4.1
9
6
—33.3
42
35
— 16.6
33
24
—27.2
17.830.93
21,608.25
21.1
15
17
13.3
56
85
51.7
43
58
34.8
29,988.19
68,156.48
127.2
21
20
—4.7
83
84
1.2
44
52
18.1
31,967.29
26,701.21
— 16.4
27
27
113
149
31.8
83
109
31.3
49,445.00
63,127.01
27.6
18
19
5.5
93
102
9.6
68
73
7.3
29,498.05
36,233.88
22.8
2
9
350.0
34
34
25
29
16.0
13,008.00
20,300.00
56.0
36
30
— 16.6
114
139
21.9
88
104
18.1
89,556.27
71,182.23
-20.5
1
— 100.0
4
3
_25.0
4
3
—25.0
2,375.00
1,600.00
—32.6
4
5
25.0
17
38
123.5
12
24
100.0
9,180.00
17,335.00
88.8
43
86.9
1
158
182
—100.0
15.1
1
113
— 100.0
22.1
400.00
— 100.0
23
138
58,000.43
103,084.62
77.7
15
14
-6.6
56
67
19.6
41
48
17.0
22,739.13
26,923.20
18.4
6
10
66.6
44
42
-4.5
33
35
6.0
17,814.00
—1_,567.88
—7.0
24
22
-8.3
150
157
4.6
87
90
3.4
39,333.00
4-W62.97
7.7
23
17
—26,0
85
94
10.5
62
69
11.2
37,536.86
67,726.12
80.4
29
33
13.7
156
182
16.6
115
133
15.6
53,445.53
71,362.40
33.5
31
45
45.1
215
283
31.6
152
199
30.9
107,379.07
180,198.13
67.8
1
4
100.0
—20.0
3
15
1
21
-66.6
40.0
2
11
J
16
-50.0
45.4
350.00
-100.0
5
2,800.00
8,889.00
217.4
8
6
—25.0
40
33
— 17.5
28
22
21.4
25,342.91
9,180.00
-63.7
1
— 100.0
4
1
—75.0
4
1
—75.0
1,561.00
500.00
—67.9
28
20
—28.5
101
84
— 16.8
67
57
— 14.9
54,320.52
35,738.93
—34.2
38
35
-7.8
235
220
—6.3
108
104
—3.7
59,623.87
57,827.81
-3.0
50
48
—4.0
312
305
—2.2
142
131
—7.7
115,695.35
78,635.39
—32.0
2,049
2,141
4.4
9,981
10,838
8.5
6,832
7,429
8.7
$4,483,087.82
_5.__5_9_1.3Q
15.0
 G 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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s
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 23
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
2.                   HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1,193
954
680
419
278
261
311
947
1,376
897
1,023
1,281
1,316
1,392
1,643
2,115
2,793
2,744
1,711
1,990
1,620
1,324
1,252
1,403
1
16
11
13
8
8
6
7
4
7
8
6
9
10
9
371
321
220
123
80
64
80
246
424
232
279
366
372
410
447
190
191
945
657
738
934
1,120
1,436
1,970
1,826
1,137
1,277
1,093
933
22
17
26
19
32
16
12
23
12
657
806
892
555
681
511
379
405
481
6 to  7 p.m.
9to.0p.rn
11 *t\At rim     |                                                                                 1
910
30,924                  309
3.                    DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1     Ctmrfay
4,378
3,953
3,876
3,568
3,881
5,019
6,248
1
51
32
45
29
39
1,448
1,146
1,136
1,091
1,125
1,555
1,969
2,879
2,448
69
1
30,924                  309               9,470       |     21,145
4.           TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved. ,
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
46,835
307
80
4
3
4
2
1
14.124
1,605
135
142
32
187
5
1
32.404
6,117
364
400
113
229
24
7
4,432
■x   ___.<_
225
255
*.    ""Drive: VniirspTf *
77
40
18
R    Amfinltinrw
6
Totaft
54,089       |          401       |      16,231,      |     37,457
5.                    RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
I     Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
58
3
18
1
1
40 ;
2
....  __^_ _
1
5
2
1
	
5
7, Not stated ..
2
To ... *          	
71       |              1
20
50
 G 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Personal
—Injury	
Property
Damage Only.
1. Angle collision—|	
2. Head-on collision or head-on side-swipe.
3. Rear-end collision-:	
4. Backed into other vehicle..	
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction—
6. Not stated- _-:	
11,562
4,606
8,052
642
1,434
4,628
101
101
15
3,133
1,582
2,619
43
171
1,922
8,328
2,923
5,418
599
1,262
2,615
.30,924
21,145
DRIVERS INVOLVED, DESCRIPTION OF
Number of Drivers
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
2. Female ..___.
3. Not stated—
45,478
8,217
394
365
33
3
13,416
2,761
54
31,697
5,423
337
Age of Driver."
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 20 years __
2. 21 to 24 v-.a.y	
3. 25 to 30 years ___
4. 31 to 40 years	
5. 41 to 50 yam .., -r
6. 51 to 60 years.-—:
7. 61 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years____
9. 70 years and over_
7,244
7,312
7,062
12,091
9,920
6,280
1,795
923
1,043
67
61
45
17
15
12
2,200
2,266
2,149
3,615
2,957
1,878
530
270
312
4,992
4,969
4,861
8,409
6,902
4,357
1,248
638
719
Driving Experience
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1    T . .<: than 3 mnnth.
1,105
786
637
.    10,441
40,703
417
18
10
1
69
300
3
335
231
200
3,225
12,182
58
752
545
436
7,147
28,221
356
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
-Personal-   -
Injury
- -Property-
Damage Only
51,437
499
162
417
1,169
227
178
313
13
5
3
38
28
1
15,414
194
62
126
357
42
36
35,710
?.   F-vtreme fatign,.;
292
95
288
774
157
141
Licence of Driver
|     Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
51,429
672
1,609
379
346
22
30
3
15,493
191
495
52
35,590
? ' T!. '.T .*"*.!             ,.       ...
459
1,084
4. Nnt stated !         **'
324
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 25
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Personal
- Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No improper driving— 	
2. Driving off roadway ,	
3. Did not have right of way	
4. Car standing in roadway (not parked)_
5. Following too close	
6. On wrong side of road	
7. Falling to'signal ,	
8. Through street—did not stop	
9. Passing at intersection •__	
10. Exceeding speed-limit	
11. Careless driving	
12. Cutting in :	
13. Car ran away—.	
14. Passing on curve or hill :	
15. Passing on wrong side——:———:—
16. Hit and run 1	
17. Railroad—did not stop __
18. CutHngleft corner- .—_	
19. Parked legally	
20. Driving through school-zone	
21. Driving through safety-zone—l	
Totals	
26,216
2,475
4,447
4,398
2,627
1,322
626
914
262
740
4,917
445
422
104
79
657
117
271
2,841
22
12
182
61
6
3
48
32
8,140
743
1,271
1,607
866
371
144
304
58
228
1,697
68
52
22
13
103
41
49
378
12
17,894
1,671
3,170
2,788
1,760
910
482
607
204
464
3,188
377
370
80
65
545
76
221
2,453
10
53,914
37,339
TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Injury
Damage Only
1. No control present	
2. Police officer .	
3. Automatic traffic signal
mA. Stop signs
5. Warning signs, slow signs, etc..
Totals	
22.242
272
4,046
3,019
1,121
270
3
1,439
926
381
15,405
181
2,596
2,085
725
30,700 307 9,401
20,992
PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Personal
a
Injury
5
79
10
220
10
132
7
176
7
107
8
99
23
100
6
106
1
27
36
	
9
1
9
3
10
3
8
7
106
1
2
1. Not known	
1. Crossing at intersection—no signal..
3. In street, not at intersection
Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle—
. Crossing at intersection with signal-.
Crossing street diagonally, not at intersection...
Walking on or along highway	
Playing in street _
' 9. Crossing at intersection against signal-
10. Not on roadway ___
11. Getting.on or off another vehicle-.
12. Riding or hitching on vehicle	
13. Working on car or roadway__L_
14. Crossing intersection diagonally	
15. In pedestrian crosswalk—	
16. Standing on safety-Isle	
Totals	
Condition of Pedestrian
1. Apparently normal	
2. Extreme fatigue _	
3. Had physical defect...
4. Confused by traffic	
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
Number of Pedestrians
1,048
I
16
61
63
19
110
1,318
Personal"
Dnjury . h
991
1
15
45
52
17
105
 G 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
11.                       CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal—
Injury
1     Pace_nj,_—o
7,128
5,915
1,318
356
166
15
47
116
143
92
8
1
7,012
5,772
1,226
165
14,945
360       |     14,585
12.                               NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
4,622
323
73
1,491
7,707
443
193
23
35
20
13
2
108
28
109
3
87
2
1
19
1
4,622
215
45
356
193
21
34
1
12
2
Totals
14,945
360       |     14,585 ■
13.                     LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number o
Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal"
Injury
Property
Damage Only
17,796
9,055
1,747
1,873
373
80
134
143
9
13
10
5,357
2,794
640
532
124
23
12,305
6,118
1,098
1,328
.    Artificial light—poor
239
57
30,924
|           309
9.470        1     21.145
PROPERTY DAMAGE.—Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $15,742,907.87;
amount for same period last year, $14,218,083.38.
15.                 CONDITION OF VEHICLES
Number of Vehicles
INVOLVED
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
50,851
882
782
249
106
380
128
205
40
53
333
80
367
1
4
7
1
2
1
2
3
10
3
15,341
177
237
92
34
118
51
58
-      -  7
10
78
28
35,143
704
541
150
71
260
77
146
31
40
It. Other defeats
245
1?    Not stater!                               j
49
Tntal«
54,089
401
16,231
37,457
elatoT
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 27
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
16.                 DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
32,965
6,710
2,944
2,428
705
2,911
517
106
333
2,904
138
596
712
120
288
30
29
4
4
21
2
3
5
1
2
11
1
10,364
1,813
696
860
80
783
50
16
90
1,065
23
162
206
23
22,313
4,867
2,219
1,564
.   Turning right
2,107
1,834
54,089
401
16,231
37,457
17.                         ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal          Property
Injury        Damage Only
15,532
11,010
2,293
906
920
115
148
184
91
17
8
9
5,002
3,455
476
251
197
34
55
81
30,924
309
9,470
21,145
18.                       ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal '
Injury
Property
Damage Only
27,723
390
274
417
136
1,862
122
281
5
8
2
10
3
8,610
116
71
121
35
477
40
18,832
269
203
288
99
1,375
7. N_t stated   ..   .
79
30,924
309
9,470
21,145
19.                         TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
15,126
2,339
13,031
274
14
110
30
136
24
146
1
1
1
4,448
572
4,350
67
5
18
10
10,542
1,743
8,535
206
8
91
7. Not stated                          	
20
30,924
*    309    *
9,470
21,145
 G 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1963—Continued
20.                  WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number o
: Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
16,279
8,203
4,202
959
883
113
285
189
53
47
9
8
1
2
5,028
2,553
1,268
303
179
32
107
80
Total*
30,924
309
9,470
21,145
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December 31,1962—609,215;
motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December 31, 1963—648,303.
Convictions
Motor-vehicle Branch records include an individual file setting out the driving
record for each person licensed to drive in this Province; and for those whose
licences have expired or whose driving privilege is under suspension. The files
include Magistrates' reports of convictions of driving offences which are received
from aU the Courts in the Province. These reports form a valuable basis for our
Drivers' Improvement Programme. I am pleased to again comment on the very
high level of co-operatioii which exists with the Courts in the providing of conviction
reports and related information necessary to deal with the driving records of persons
subsequent to Court action. The remarks passed on to this Branch by the Magistrates provide a constructive lead to the course of action to take in our attempts to
cope with problem drivers.
Reports of convictions for traffic offences in British Columbia during 1963
totalled 105,524, an increase of nearly 20,000 over the 1962 total of 86,642. This
increase is very significant in that it shows evidence of an increased level of highway
traffic enforcement. It is also a significant sign of the driving problems which result
in our high accident level. In our 1962 Report it was noted that there was not a
like increase in 1962 over the 1961 total of convictions although total accidents had
increased sharply. It is encouraging to note the enforcement agencies are placing
greater emphasis on the problems of highway traffic.
The following table summarizes the convictions under the various Statutes
dealing with highway traffic. A marked increase in convictions is registered for
speeding offences and for impaired driving. These two types of offences are a
major cause of highway accidents.
The table includes mention of convictions from out of Province. These are
convictions entered against British Columbia drivers whilst travelling in other jurisdictions, and the conviction reports find their way to the drivers' records of these
persons. We deem this to be invaluable because it is felt to be essential that a British
Columbia driver must drive in other jurisdictions as he is expected to drive in British
Columbia. A similar arrangement exists whereby the reports of the out-of-Province
drivers convicted in British Columbia are sent to the State or Province in which
they reside.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 29
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1960-63
Under Criminal Code of Canada—
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec 192-
Causing bodily harm by criminal negligence, sec. 193	
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle, sec. 221 (1)_
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 221 (2)	
Dangerous driving, sec. 221 (4)_
Driving motor-vehicle while intoxicated, sec. 222__
Driving motor-vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol or drugs,
sec. 223	
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec.
225 (3) .	
Motor-vehicle equipped with apparatus for making smoke screen,
sec. 226 „  	
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle without consent of owner, sec. 281 ...
Under Motor-vehicle Act—     I
Falling to obtain or display motor-vehicle licence or permit as required, sees. 3-10, 57.	
[Falling to notify re change of address, sees. 11, 18 (11) 	
Failing to report change in motor-vehicle, sec 12	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc., sec. 14
Failing to notify of removal or destruction of motor-vehicle,-s_c 16 (1)
Failing to register as a tourist, sec. 17	
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1), (2)
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sees. 18 (6), (7), (8)	
Driving without having driver's licence in possession at time, sec. 19—
Driving while right to obtain licence Is under suspension, sec 20 .—
Driving as a chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit, sees.
21-23,25, 27,28 	
Operating as dealer without licence, misuse of dealer's plates, etc,
sees. 29, 33,34
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit,
sees. 36-39
Operating vehicle not properly equipped, sec. 40 . ■—
Failing to obtain replacement of licence or chauffeur's badge if mutilated, sees. 41,42 ,	
Improper disposition of licence plate, dismantled vehicle, sec. 45	
Failing to report accident, etc, sec. 54 	
Making false statement, permitting another to use licence, etc., sec. 55
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc.,
sec. 56	
Failing to stop on request of police or state proper name, sec. 58	
Altering number plates and using fictitious plates, sec. 59	
Responsibility of owner when not driver, sec 68.
Permitting person not properly licensed to drive motor-vehicle, etc.,
sec. 69 _	
Failing to surrender licence on suspension, sec. 99.
Removing or releasing impounded vehicle without authority, sec 100
Producing invalid financial liability card, etc., sec. 102	
Improper operation of emergency vehicle, sec 123.
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 122, 124
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127,128,152	
Defacing traffic-control devices by advertising or removal, etc., sees.
129, 131, 136 .	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees.
132-135, 137 —1Z _—__	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139 .	
Exceeding maximum speed-limit, sec 140 — —
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec 141	
Exceeding speed-limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142—.	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143 .	
Infractions of " lane" driving, sees. 144-146 .—.	
Leaving highway other than at intersection, sec. 147—	
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151,153,154_
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-159,
160-162	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167-
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172-
Failure by bicycle operators to obey rules, sec 173—
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at Intersections, sec 177 —
71
513
98
2,936
920
20
1,604
272
2
26
1
3,044
1,305
46
398
19
20
195
79
177
26
9
250
2
26
21,130
31
3,661
23,686
2,503
32
113
3,154
1,300
2,369
1,461
1,142
234
6,158
7
2
72
610
32
79
634
242
94
3,587
956
7
58
633
278
87
3,837
968
27
4,558    |   4,518   |    5,588   |   5,892
1,475
108
2
29
1
8
4,807
2,991
1,259
93
359
54
24
158
55
132
29
9
22
15,192
55
3,287
23,522
1,710
72
145
3,023
1,157
2,359
1,556
1,320
5
198
4,821
1
36
12
3,568
2,846
843
123
428
24
28
3
184
79
137
35
12
284
6
8
2
1
82
17,915
1
277
3,261
19,161
1,557
46
152
3,587
16
1,335
3,062
1,467
1,237
." 172
5,541
2,044
81
28
3,729
3,291
878
163
466
35
56
228
92
162
46
12
26
16,335
346
3,686
33,097
2,166
75
247
3,058.
13
1,575
2,909
2,472
1,697
~_5o
6,410
 G 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1960-63-
Continued
Under Motor-vehicle Act—Continued
Illegal stopping or parking, sees. 178-181-
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182...
Illegal parking on private property, sec 183—
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 18
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec 185-
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186,187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190	
Driving on sidewalk, sec 191	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194—
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195-
Transporting explosives, sec. 196...
'Failing to carry adequate safety equipment, sees. 197,198...
Illegal use or defacement of signs, sec. 201	
Motor-vehicle Act miscellaneous	
Under Motor-vehicle Act regulations—
Operating defective Vehicle after ordered off road, sees. 2.02,7.09	
Number plates, sec. 3 „—_	
Driving without proper head-lamps, sees. 4.01-4.06	
Driving without tail-lamps, reflectors, other required lamps, sees.
4.07-4.10
Driving without clearance lamps, lamps on projections, etc., sees.
4.11-4.13_. . .	
. Driving without proper parking-lamps, spot-lamps, turn-signal devices, etc., sees. 4.14-4—2 ——_
Driving without adequate brakes, sees. 5, 6	
Driving vehicle with defective horn or miscellaneous equipment, sees.
7.01, 7.02 !	
Driving vehicle without muffler, sec. 7.03	
Driving vehicle .without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear view,
sec. 7.04 !	
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc, sec. 7.05 	
Driving vehicle without mud-guards, sec 7.06	
Failing to have proper connection between motor-vehicle and trailer,
sec. 7.07 .	
Falling to obtain temporary permit for moving motor-vehicle or
trailer from place to place, sec 14	
Failing to sign driver's licence, sec. 15 —
Parking prohibited at yellow curb, sec. 18.01	
Oversize loads, sec. 19.01-19.03_
Inadequate tires,  insecure loads,  excessive  speed  with unloaded
trailer, sec. 19.04 , ,	
Excessive weight, sec. 19.05
_ Failure to report for weight inspection, sec. 19.06__	
Failure to obtain overweight or oversize permits, sec. 19.07	
Failure of a dealer to maintain security while carrying on a business,
sees. 20.01,20.14	
Miscellaneous infractions- . —
Summary—
Criminal Code of Canada...
Motor-vehicle Act-:	
Motor-vehicle Act regulations—
• -Vancouver City by-laws____
Juvenile Delinquents _4cr_____
Total of all convictions in British Columbia-
Convictions from out of Province	
Grand tota__ _____
29
25
10
55
184
7
136
203
954
1,072
206
84
1,400
38
278
204
120
99
34
41
4,558
80,129
5,687
2,236
2,368
959
482
368
12
32
20
16
31
3
172
1,100
628
6
371
11
19
13
13
29
77
4
192
6
4
1,443
871
■•' 5
536
14
41
1,129    [ 72,498    | 71,644   | 89,471
18
111
793
87
1,144
45
238
193
110
2
111
270
24
139
5,687    |   5,153
4,518
72,498
5,153
943
2,047
94,978   | 85,159
24
131
715
487
135
26
652
55
1,264
321
150
2
5
160
382
96
471
28
234
14
130
749
110
13
917
128
1,746
179
328
155
218
590
102
278
267
1
5,554
7,010
5,588
71,644
5,554
964
1,892
5,892
89,471
7,010
1,090
2,061
85,642   1105,524
2,978   |   3,047
88,620   [108,571
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 31
3. DRIVING SAFETY
(a) Safety Responsibility
Proof of financial responsibility must be submitted in accordance with the
Motor-vehicle Act by owners and drivers of motor-vehicles as a result of failure to
satisfy judgments resulting from motor-vehicle accidents, serious driving infractions,
and unsatisfactory driving records. In all cases where proof of financial responsibility was required to be submitted by private individuals, it was given by the certificate of a duly authorized automobile insurance company. The Safety Responsibility
Division received 15,948 British Columbia Financial Responsibility Insurance Cer-
tijjjcates for filing in 1963 and accepted 13,991 certificates. This is an increase of
2.8 per cent over the 1962 total and is honpal in relation to the ever-increasing
number of drivers on the British Columbia highways. A summary of filing- and
cancellation of British Columbia Financial Responsibility Certificates is given in the
following table.
Comparisons of Financial Responsibility Certificates Received,
Filed, and Cancelled in 1962 and 1963
Increase    Decrease   Per Cent
Total number of certificates received    _
Total number of certificates filed	
Total number of certificates returned        r	
Owner's policy certificates and garage and sales agency
_ j certificates filed i —	
Driver's policy certificates filed .
Owner's policy certificates filed (public and limited)	
Certificate cancellations | ;	
Filing fees .	
15,614
15,948
1
334
13,616
13,991
375
1,998
1,957
	
10,330
11,404
1,074 |
1,291
1,603
312
1,995
984
14,051
13,587
27,232
$27,982
$750
1
1,011
464
2.1
2.8
—2.1
10.4
24.2
-50.7
—3.3
2.8
An alternative method of submitting proof of financial responsibility, by way of
a bond of a guarantee or surety company, by a deposit of security with the Minister
of Finance, or by satisfying the Superintendent of Insurance that they could be
classified as self-insurers, was taken advantage of by some of the larger corporations
in this Province. Upon receipt of appropriate certificates and bonds, 649 financial
responsibility cards were issued.
On June 1, 1963, an amendment to the Motor-vehicle Act came into effect
and repealed the law requiring that motor-vehicles be impounded when an accident
occurs and the owner or driver of a vehicle is unable to give proof of financial responsibility. Instead of impounding the motor-vehicle the police are required to immobilize the " uninsured " vehicle by demanding the surrender of the licence and
corresponding number-plates at the time of the occurrence. Up to and including
May 31, 1963, 875 motor-vehicles were impounded, and during the last seven
months of 1963, 1,176 owners were affected by the new legislation. The total
number of motor-vehicles involved in accidents in 1963 in this manner is 14 per
cent less than the total number of these occurrences in 1962.
Approximately 65,000 persons are required to maintain proof of their financial
responsibility if they wish to enjoy driving privileges and retain or obtain licences.
In order to maintain an effective control of these owners and drivers, a cardex wheel
system is operated, and all new vehicle registrations, Ucence transfers, and new
driver's licence appUcations are continually scanned. In 1963 this operation involved
the making of 900,000 name checks. There were about 35,000 drivers whose
Ucences were under suspension at the year-end, and the names of these persons are
 G 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Usted monthly and the Usts widely distributed to licence-issuing officers, enforcement
agencies, and administrators in aU other Canadian Provinces.
The following tables indicate the various causes for suspension of Ucences of
persons coming within the scope of the safety responsibility legislation in 1963.
Also included is a table showing the various action categories where proof of financial requirements had been made.
Suspension of Drivers' Licences by Court Orders and Recommendations, 1963
Months
Years
.fl
5
Under
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
1       2
3
1
Death by criminal negigence—Acci-
2
1
21
49
1
38
20
3
2
25
8
7
3
61
200
1
1
24
6
1
145
139
18
46
25
3
7
36
140
1
2
2
2
71
36
19
8
38
9
18
2
5
119
301
.' _ ■'
9
4
14
112
70
44
9
11
2
3
29
85
4
12
6
5
1
3
5
2
2
1
2
8
2
3
45
11
28
5
8
138
323
2
14
1
13
84
39
36
8
1
6
2
1
1
14
49
7
1
3
1
41
10
31
3
14
121
280
8
29
1
1
1
43
8
21
2
1
2
2
8
8
13
3
8
35
86
1
6
1
7
1
3
1
3
14
14
13
7
5
42
104
3
16
2
7
5
15
1
4
Criminal negligence—
5
8
Failing to remain at scene of acci-
218
Dangerous driving—
Accident
67
127
Driving while intoxicated—
A_._-i_t_.n_
No accident	
Driving while ability impaired	
20
44
618
1,619
Driving while under suspension—
17
68
Conviction and judgment outside the
32
Suspension by Superintendent	
Unsatisfactory driving record	
Driving without due care and attention—Accident .	
Exceeding speed-limit—Accident	
Adjudged juvenile delinquent	
Misretlanpons
42
2
534
324
166
78
137
685
352
755
158
25
744  1    85
615
182
255
3,993
Offence
Careless driving—Accident _
Dangerous driving—
Accident	
No accident - "■'■'■- "■■'
Criminal negligence—
Accident _i*	
No accident	
Drunken driving—
Accident	
No accident	
Impaired driving—
Accident . ..
Drivers' Licences
Suspended Reinstated
1,980 1,878
85
        170
  17
13
  20
_._____.  52
        802
No accident     2,445
Failing to remain at scene of accident _-j       495
49
63
10
26
14
21
699
1,586
328
 REPORT OF THE SUPEBUNTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 33
Offence
Driving under suspension—
Accident	
No accident	
Drivers' Licences
Suspended
Reinstated
15
22
93
61
1,972
2,017
14
18
159
21
135
88
53
107
275
153
1
3
1
•3,8611
t 3,397
135
4
Suspension due to accident     1,972
Speeding—Accident ,	
Unsatisfied judgment—Accident .___
Conviction and judgment outside Province   —    -
Unsatisfactory driving record	
Suspension by Superintendent -'-._-—Vr
Proof of financial responsibiUty requested by Superintendent - - . - -   -
Death by criminal negligence	
Bodily harm by criminal negUgence ...-.;-.•
■' Further or additional proof of financial responsibiUty
Adjudged jUVenUe delinqnenf .    	
Totals,  _-_-_-  12,793 10,565
(6) Examinations of Drivers
The total number of persons given drivers' examinations in 1963 was 122,458,
an increase of 10,118 over the 1962 total of 112,340. Examinations given to
applicants for original drivers' Ucences totalled 63,010, compared to 56,652
totaUed in 1962. The upward trend in the number of original drivers' examinations conducted in 1963 is certainly what can be looked for in the years ahead.
Again the industrial expansion of the Province brings in large numbers of persons
who desire to drive, either in earning a Uving or for various other obvious reasons.
Another point which cannot be lost sight of is the fact that increasing numbers of
our population are reaching the driving age, and this is going to reflect very noticeably in an increased number of licences and examination^,
AU of this makes it important to realize that the Motor-vehicle Branch will
not be able to maintain its standard of drivers' examinations in the face of the
continuing increase in the work load without additional staff of driver examiners
to serve the pubUc.
The Branch continues to conduct examinations on a daUy basis in the major
centres of the Province. The smaller communities are provided service by travelling units on a monthly or weekly visit to these communities, depending entirely
upon the demand for examinations.
The Drivers' Examination Programme is closely co-ordinated with the Drivers'
Improvement Programme, which places emphasis on the re-examination of drivers
who have been involved in traffic convictions or accidents evidencing an unsatisfactory driving record. The Branch continues to re-examine Ucensees over 70
years of age on a regular basis and requires that evidence of medical fitness be
produced in all re-examinations of persons in this category.
The foUowing tables provide a summary of examinations to appUcarfts for
original drivers' Ucences. They show that 11,263 failed some part of the examination, but the majority of these persons did subsequently qualify by taking additional
examinations.
 G 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 41
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B.'S
 G 42 BRITISH COEOMBIA
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme
The Drivers' Improvement Programme was designed to deal on a constructive
basis with the driver who shows evidence of being accident-prone, and who seems
to have difficulty abiding with traffic laws. Whilst the strong weapon in this programme is to suspend a Ucence, it is regarded as the measure of last resort. The
programme endeavours to point out the shortcomings of the driver, and then to
encourage him to improve his driving habits, either by sending him a warning letter
or by requiring him to appear for a personal interview with one of the staff members
of the Branch.
British Columbia's Drivers' Improvement Programme has a flexible factor,
which is deemed to be important. It is different from other programmes which
require that after certain convictions there is a fixed suspension assessed. The
experience in this Province has shown there is a great deal of merit in being in a
position to take corrective action in some instances before poor driving habits
become too deep-rooted, as is the case of early action with young drivers. There
have been instances with other drivers where suspensions have not been made so as
to alleviate family suffering which otherwise might arise. When this type of action
js taken, the responsibility is placed squarely on the driver to realize that clemency
shown him must be reciprocated on his part by a distinct change in his driving
habits. In many of these attempts, success has been achieved in that repetition
of the driving problem has not occurred.
The following table sets out statistically the number of drivers who were dealt
with in the Drivers' Improvement Programme in 1963. It is unfortunate to note
there is still a substantial number of repeaters, but it must be realized that this is
the hard core of problem drivers that we are dealing with. Mention js also made
of the fact that 105,073 records were adjudicated during 1963. In all, about 13,000
drivers required special attention of the programme, whichJs a relatively small percentage of the over-all driving population. Unfortunately our programme still faces
the incorrigible driver, and this person is not only a problem to the Motor-vehicle
Branch, but to the rest of society. He exhibits all the factors of bad citizenship.
He goes to gaol for driving while under suspension, but this does not deter him.
However, it is some consolation that this type of person forms a relatively small
percentage of the driving population.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963      G 43
Warning Letters, Interviews, and Suspensions, January to December, 1963
Age
16-20
21-24
25-30
31-40
41-50
51-60
61-64
65-69
70 and
Total
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Over
Warning letter*
1,702
1,272
1,102
1,030
639
314
70
55
45
6,229
20
Class B chauffeurs	
15
24
21
18
8
1
87
Female
96
42
34
46
49
21
3
2
2
295
Notices of intent to suspend.
950
1,041
814
793
465
235
35
24
6
4,363
20
i*_« Tt rh_i_Tfinr_
5
24
Previously warned	
255
353
243
163
95
27
4
1
2
1,143
Previously suspended
91
125
113
80
43
18
3
1
474
Interviews and hearings	
667
447
362
395
175
101
24
9
7
2,187
Class A chauffeurs	
1
4
5
2
12
Class R chauffeurs
2
2
4
3
11
Female	
7
7
7
9
2
1
33
Result of notices to suspend,
interviews, and submis
sions—
T.ir*_tc._c_ suspended
665
865
556
562
308
143
15
14
5
3,133
Class A chauffeurs
1
1
[_1
1
4
9
16
9
2
36
Tfemal.,
7
12
7
9
2
37
Previously suspended
141
269
166
177
84
37
9
3
1
887
Previously warned	
180
286
168
104
48
20
5
2
813
Previously on probation	
106
202
108
101
49
19
1
2
588
Driver's licence placed on
probation
477
472
386
381
223
110
32
17
9
2,107
2
1
3
6
4
4
1
6
3
7
2
4
~~
9
28
•  Impaired: First, 3,251; second, 1,000.
Records adjudicated, 105,073.
4. CENTRAL REGISTRY
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles also carries the title of Registrar-General
and is responsible for the operation of the Central Registry. The Central Registry
is the location for the registering of documents under the Bills of Sale Act, the
Conditional Sales Act, the Assignment of Book Accounts Act, and Mechanics' Lien
Act, which concerns all types of personal chattels. The establishment of the Central
Registry in 1961 made it possible to search in one location in the Province to learn
of encumbrances which might be against personal chattels. Prior to that time,
documents registered on chattels other than a motor-vehicle were filed in the various
County Court Registries.
A very important programme of the Central Registry is its microfilm storage
of documents. Not only has this aided in reducing the need for costly filing space,
but it has also provided for speedier availability of information and has eliminated
the difficulty of misplaced documents, which exists in other filing-systems.
Documents filed in the Central Registry in 1963 totalled 157,882, an increase
of 24,336 over the 1962 total. Search fees collected in 1963 amounted to $80,974.
The problem of searches is considerable when one realizes that the requests can be
by telephone, telegram, letter, and by personal appearance at the counter. The need
for instant information is important, and the Central Registry staff has worked
hard to develop procedures to make information readily available. Revenue
collected for services in the Registry amounted to $547,087, over the 1962 total of
$498,926, an increase of 9.6 per cent.
 G 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
5. SCHOOL BUSES
The Motor-vehicle Act places the responsibility with the Superintendent for the
control over equipment used in school bus transportation to and from public schools
in the Province. Standards for construction of school buses set by the Superintendent are used as a guide-line, and school buses are regularly inspected by the
mechanical inspectors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Motor Carrier
Branch of the Public Utilities Commission. The inspection programme ensures
that vehicles are maintained at a safe level and serves as a guide to School Boards
in detennining the need for replacement of the buses.
The number of vehicles authorized for use as school buses to December 31,
1963, was 719, compared to the 1962 total of 698. It is important to note that the
number of school-bus accidents, which occurred in nearly 8,000,000 miles travelled
by the school buses in 1963, totalled only 24. Five students were injured in these
accidents. One accident involved a fatality, but the fatality was not a passenger
in a school bus, but a passenger in the other vehicle whose driver ignored an
important traffic-signal device.
6. STAFF
At December 31, 1963, the total number of employees of the Branch was 296,
compared to 294 at the same date in 1962. Permanent-staff employees totalled 258.
There were four unfilled permanent-staff positions at that date, but replacement
requisitions were in the hands of the Civil Service Commission. The authorized
complement of permanent employees at December 31, 1963, was 262. Temporary
employees at the end of 1963 totalled 38, which is an increase of five over the same
date in 1962. The increase is entirely attributable to early receipt of returns for
the 1964 licence issuance. In previous years this extra staff was hired early in
January.
Throughout this Report, mention is made of increased work volumes. These
extra work loads have been handled without commensurate staff increases. This
again reflects on the ingenuity of our staff, wherein new methods continued to be
devised to handle larger work volumes with the same work force. It is with a great
deal of pride we draw to your attention the work achievement of our loyal and
faithful employees. May I take this opportunity in expressing to all staff members
my sincere appreciation for jobs well done.
CONCLUSION
The future will present to the Motor-vehicle Branch further challenges in
coping with the ever-increasing nlulHphcities of highway traffic problems. It is
apparent to all that greater emphasis will need to be placed on such facets as vehicle
and driving safety. The former can be given a tremendous assist by mobile vehicle-
inspection units which are planned for introduction in 1964. Whilst it will be
physically impossible to examine every vehicle in the Province, the plan will at least
provide incentive for people to keep their vehicles in good mechanical condition
from a safety point of view.
The problems of drivers will increase in their complexities, and the Branch
will need to extend its efforts in driver education so as to reach the large numbers
of drivers who seem to be incapable of driving within the confines of the law, and
who exhibit all too frequently a lack of moral responsibility to others on the highway.
We cannot overlook the need to provide some form of driver-training for the
youth of our Province.  They are the drivers of the future, and it seems very obvious
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1963       G 45
that if they can be properly trained, their training will reflect in lower accident
frequencies and fewer traffic violations.
It is sad to note that a large percentage of traffic fatalities are pedestrians, and
unfortunately many of these pedestrians are senior citizens. Here again is another
area where increased education is a necessity. Senior-citizen groups and other
community groups are doing much along this line, but more will be needed to
reverse the trend.
May I express my sincere gratitude to all who have assisted this Branch in its
varied efforts. The assistance given by your Departmental members has been a
tower of strength. Their advice is often needed, and it is always freely and willingly
given. Of great assistance has been our close liaison with the Judicial and Magisterial Benches of the Province, and the high level of co-operation we enjoy with the
members of the law society. The enforcement agencies throughout the Province
have been ever willing to assist us when called upon to do so, and I wish to express
appreciation to the Officer Commanding and other officers and members of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and to the chiefs, officers, and members of the
various municipal police departments. Finally, I wish to express appreciation to
the business and community groups of the Province that have worked towards the
goals of highway safety so that our roads and streets may become safer avenues
of life.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE LINDSAY,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1965
410-964-9243

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