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Ministry of Municipal Affairs Report for the year eneded December 31, 1980 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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Full Text

 Province of British Columbia
Ministry of 39o.,pj
Municipal Affairs
Report for the
year ended
December 31, 1980
Honourable William N. Vander Zalm, Minister
 1
BRITISH COil
 To the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.
Lieutenant Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Ministry of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1980
WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, British Columbia
^L AFFAIRS
 The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Sm:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Municipal
Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1980.
J. P. TAYLOR
Deputy Minister
BRITISH com
 CONTENTS
Pace
Publications ill.r.  1
Activities .>,<*<  2
Legislation  4
Administrative Services  6
Financial Management ^^ ...g-.  14
Planning Services  24
Islands Trust^.'.«....':;„^-u;..E ±.,i,.:isi!.  32
|AL AFFAIRS
 Acts Administered by
Municipal Affairs
Municipal Act
Ministry of Municipal Affairs Act
Revenue Sharing Act
Municipal Finance Authority Act
Home Owner Grant Act (S.B.C. 1980)
Sewerage Assistance Act
Urban Transit Authority Act
Islands Trust Act
Metro Transit Company Act
Mobile Home Tax Act
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
Resort Municipality of Whistler Act
Local Services Act
Transit Services Act
New Westminster Redevelopment Act 1979
Dyking Authority Act
BRITISH COm
 Iinicipal Affairs
Honourable William N. Vander Zalm
iter of Municipal Affairs
Jaylor, Deputy Minister
L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Inspector of
Municipalities
Harkness, M.C.I.P., Assistant Deputy
Minister
jMoore, Assistant Deputy Minister and
Deputy Inspector of Municipalities
. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer
Beminiuk, C.G.A., Comptroller
. Swallow, Director of Personnel
Stephens, Education and Information
Officer
Thomas, Administrator, Downtown
Revitalization
icy and! Research Branch
MacLeod, Executive Director
l^alisser, Research Officer
r. Cubbon, Research Officer
aalbert, Research Officer
ministrative Services Branch
Callan, Acting Executive Director
R. Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer
&. Larter, B.Comm., Administrative
[Officer
A. McCrimmon, B.A., A.C.I.S.,
{Administrative Officer
tC Strachan, B.Comm., M.B.A.,
•Administrative Officer
O. Ferguson, Administrative Officer
[Tabor, Administrative Officer
lancial Services Branch
G. Topham, C.A., Executive Director and
pDeputy Inspector of Municipalities
| Thompson, C.G.A., Senior Financial
TOfficer
J. Tamblin, C.A.  Senior Financial
[Officer
p. Ballard, Financial Officer
H. Boyce, C.A., Financial Officer
DL. Clarkson, C.G.A., Financial Officer
[E. Eurchuk, B.Comm., Financial Officer
N. D. Goldie, C.G.A., Financial Officer
K. C. Jolley, C.A., Financial Officer
J. H. MacDonald, R.I.A., Financial Officer
Planning Branch
E. Karlsen, M.C.I.P., Executive Director
B. S. Jawanda, M.C.I.P., Director
W. J. Tassie, M.C.I.P., Director
E. Cull, Senior Planning Coordinator (Prince
George)
C. Hawksworth, Senior Planning Coordinator
L. V. Luchin, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Coordinator
T Maftechuk, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Coordinator
G. Paget, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Coordinator
C. Strong, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Coordinator
P. Walton, Senior Planning Coordinator
R. Addison, Planning Coordinator
M. Fumalle, Planning Coordinator
R. Ghosh, Planning Coordinator
B. Heayn, M.C.I.P., Planning Coordinator
A. L. Quin, Planning Coordinator
C. Gibson, Senior Planning Assistant
R. Lee, Senior Planning Assistant
Engineering Branch
A. MacTaggart, Liaison Engineer
F. Humphrey, Liaison Engineer
Building Standards Branch
J. Currie, Director
B. Emmett, Building Standards Officer
J. Moore, Buildings Standards Officer
J. Robertson, Building Standards Officer
W. Smith, Building Standards Officer
Publications
Annual Report
Municipal Statistics
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal
Governments
British Columbia Plumbing Code
Building Standards for the Physically
Handicapped
IPAL AFFAIRS
PAGE ONEl
 Ministry Activities
The provision of high quality local
government services continues to be the main
function of British Columbia's municipalities
and Regional Districts. Most provincial
guidance and assistance directed to the
benefit of local government is provided or coordinated by the Ministry of Municipal
Affairs.
Basic physical services, such as roads, waterworks and sewerage systems, are essential to
the formation and survival of modern
communities. The necessity for a wide range
of social, recreational and protective services
is likewise firmly established. Many local
and government services represent substantial
and increasingly costly capital investments.
The rising cost of capital development and
the accompanying increases in operating and
other costs are reflected in the expansion of
municipal revenue requirements. Readers are
referred to the Financial Services Branch
segment of this report, as well as to the
ministry's statistical publications, for detailed
information about local government budgets,
borrowing and taxation.
Although property taxes have increased, the
level of tax collection has for the past several
years remained stable at the point where
approximately 96% of current taxes are
collected during the year in which they are
levied. The matters of assessment and
taxation are dealt with more fully in that part
of the report relating to financial
management.
One of the principal statutory duties of the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs is the
supervision of municipal and regional district
long-term borrowing for capital programs.
This responsibility rests with the Inspector of
Municipalities and during the year under
review the total borrowing authorized for a
variety of projects amounted to in excess of
194 million dollars.
The Minister attended the annual meeting of
Provincial Ministers of Municipal Affairs
held in St. Andrews, New Brunswick, in
mid-August. The Minister was accompanied
by several senior Ministry officials.
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs maintains
regular contact with several Government of
Canada departments and agencies, includjhgi
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporaam
The Ministry is represented as often as
possible at inter-ministry or intergovernmental meetings affecting
municipalities.
Various senior staff members were involvea
in national conferences such as the MunicSal
Finance Officers and the Provincial Planning
Officers. A new Downtown RevitalizationlT
Program was introduced to assist
municipalities and business organizations*
The Ministry staff also participated in thej
annual conference of the Municipal Officers
Association of British Columbia.
The Union of British Columbia
Municipalities held its convention in PrincS
George, and senior staff members attended to
provide an opportunity for those interestedjo
discuss local problems. The Minister
addressed the convention and met withJB
representatives of the Executive of the Unffl
of British Columbia Municipalities on sevtj
other occasions.
..
Since the annual edition of municipal
statistics is an important source of
information to investment houses, financi^
institutions and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early as possible inffie
year. Municipal statistics include some 50
different schedules. Prior to publication, the
financial and statistical returns of the
municipalities and regions are closely edittS
to ensure conformity and adherence to
statutory and other requirements.
In 1980, the Minister and his senior staffi
conducted a series of presentations and !
meetings on planning issues and legislanol
The annual shield award presented by theB
Minister as an incentive to increase turn-offl
at municipal elections was bestowed on the
following municipalities in 1979:
Category
Cities and Towns
Districts
Villages
Recipient
Hope
Stewart
Kaslo
Voter "n^l
Out I Percentage)
71.5|
78.61
91.6
PAGE TWO
RRITISH rOUill
 lijpd place recipients were Rossland (cities
nlowns) with 68%, Hudson's Hope
iSict municipalities) with 72%, and
fay (village municipalities) with 80.5%.
ceinue Sharing
V a it came into effect in the fiscal year
a ining on April 1, 1978 the Revenue
Itiing Act replaced the existing $34.00 per
la grant under the Municipalities Aid Act
fell as the interim revenue sharing
jram. Under the revenue sharing formula
ifcnual combined dollar yield of 1
gial income tax point, 1 corporate tax
% 6% of renewable resource, nonstable resource and sales tax revenue is
lisibuted in the form of municipal and
ejjmal district grants. Under the authority
itjgulations 7 grants are funded by revenue
being as follows:
fhe basic municipal grant is a flat
B0,000 to each municipality regardless
gits size or fiscal capacity.
1 iVater Facilities grants are provided under
j formula which determines the provincial
Bntribution by reference to municipal
Ifebt servicing costs and assessment.
SJThe Housing Growth Grant, introduced in
#179, distributes $10,000,000 in
iiroportion to the number of housing starts
n each municipality and regional district.
4 Ihe Municipal Major Road Grants
Program will provide $15 million
innually. The 1980 budget total was
approximately $15 million.
5 Municipal Planning Grants are available
on an approved cost sharing basis.
6jr\dministration, Planning and Basic
.•Grants are available to regional districts.
■The basic grant is $30,000 per regional
■district. The administration grant is
■$10,000 per regional district. Geography,
'■population, development and planning
Jneeds determine the approval of cost
ishared planning grants.
fHthe unconditional municipal formula
Idistributes assistance according to
•population, expenditure and tax base.
1: Revenue Sharing budget for 1980-81 was
Proximately $176,000,000. This amount
flnpares to a 1979-80 estimate of
approximately $141,700,000. Total 1980
unconditional grants were approximately
$136,100,000, compared to a 1979 total of
approximately $110,000,000.
Sewerage Assistance Act
The Sewerage Assistance Act this year
provided assistance totalling $26,987,081 to
116 Municipalities and Regional Districts in
the Province.
Twenty-seven Cities received grants
amounting to $7,072,076.94, 31 Districts
received $15,726,135.90, nine Towns
received $936,266.82, 38 Villages received
$2,271,517.11, and 11 Regional Districts
received $981,084.48. The total value of
1980 grants under the Act exceeded last
year's total of $24,774,344 by 9%.
Municipal Commercial Vehicle
Licence Programming
A total of 129 municipalities participated in
the Municipal Commercial Licence
Programming during the 1980-81 licence
year. Sales of vehicle plates under this
program, which is administered by the
Ministry on behalf of the municipalities,
generated $815,205 in revenue during the
year. After payment of incidental expenses,
these funds will be distributed to participants
on a per capita basis. The municipalities
issued 62,215 licence plates during the year
under review.
Special Courses
During 1980 the Board of Examiners, on
which the Ministry is represented, granted 14
certificates of proficiency. The following
table shows the classifications of these
certificates together with the total number
which have been issued.
Junior
Senior Administration
Senior Finance
TOTALS
1980 To date
6 122
4 140
_4 130
14 392
The Board encourages applicants for
certification to avail themselyes of the
opportunities to enrol in local government
related courses offered by the Chartered
IflUj. AFFAIPy
PAGE THREE I
 Institute of Secretaries, the Certified General
Accountants Association, and various post-
secondary educational institutions. The
successful completion of such programs of
study is a major consideration, together with
the appropriate work experience and offices
held, when the Board is evaluating
applications for certificates.
To assist the Board in the performance of its
various duties, an Advisory Council has been
established. The Municipal Administration
Education Council performs the duties of the
Advisory Council to the Board of Examiners.
Continuing Education
The Ministry is involved, through its
participation in the Municipal Administration
Education Council of the B.C. Municipal
Officers Association in developing and
appraising appropriate levels of education for
municipal officials. The Ministry also holds
or participates in seminars or meetings from
time to time to assist local government
personnel in dealing with new legislation and
new or revised programs.
Scholarship Program
The scholarship program had its beginnings
in 1978 at the convention of the Union of
British Columbia Municipalities. The new
program of scholarships and fellowships was
announced to commemorate that
organization's 75th anniversary. The
program's annual funding level is $25,000.
The awards comprise scholarships for
professional development courses, whether
taken by correspondence or attendance.
Recipients are able to use the funds for such
purposes as attendance at extended seminars
or enrolment in post-secondary educational
institutions in or outside of British Columbia.
The purpose of the program is to foster the
development of administrative skills in local
government in British Columbia.
The scholarship and fellowship program is
administered by the Board of Examiners.
For the year ended December 31, 1980, 19
scholarships were awarded, ranging in value
from $81.00 to $1,872.00.
Research and Policy Branch
The branch provides policy support anjM
research services to the ministry. This
function requires the development of briej
working papers, and reports to assist th^
ministry in adjusting its policies and
programs to suit changing needs and
circumstances.
Branch staff at year end consisted of the
Director, three research officers, and a 1
secretary.
During 1980, the branch contributed to I
policy development in a number of fields.
Important issues involving regional and I
resource development were examined andf
reports submitted. The theoretical spatial
implications of fiscal policy were
investigated. The Branch also parficipatedli
program evaluations and examinations of
local government structures.
The branch was active in the realm of j
publications. A major report on Residential
Servicing and Site Planning Standards waS
issued. In addition preparations for a Home
Owner Grant administration manual werej
begun.
Legislation
A number of technical and substantive |
amendments to the Home Owner Grant Act,
the Municipalities Enabling and Validatinm
Amendment Act and the Municipal
Amendment Act were made during the 198(1
session of the legislative Assembly. A
summary of the more significant legislative!
developments follows by Act.
PAGF
Home Owner Grant Act
The Home Owner Grant Act was repealed
and re-enacted. The old Act, had evolved ■
since 1957. The new Act came into force on
January 1, 1981, but amendments to increase
the grant by $50 to certain persons, as well as
to permit assignees holding 99 year leases to
benefit from the grant, were effective for the
1980 tax year.
ti^ii rnia
 icipalities Enabling and Validating
ndment Act, 1980
Igkct was amended in various important
fncluding the following:
Smutting flexibility to bylaws providing
a drainage costs in the District of Kent.
nabling the Municipality of Richmond to
rvice additional areas with sewer
([stems.
uminating unnecessary documentation
ad delays in obtaining land use approvals
i various areas where development may
ike place.
S new section permitting the City of
Vancouver to refund money paid in
tdvance on account of taxes by Canadian
'acific Limited respecting a lease between
he National Harbours Board and
anadiaii Pacific Limited.
nicipal Amendment Act
Municipal Amendment Act was amended
pplement various new policies, including:
I The permitting of a tenant-occupier to
Bote in municipal elections.
Slarification that a person may vote in
more than one election in a regional
ajstrict where he meets the requirements.
5. statement that a person who files a false
or misleading application for registration
to vote commits an offence punishable on
summary conviction.
Clarification of certain characteristics
concerning the list of electors.
Kdlowing a municipality to permit horse
lacing on Sundays.
Exempting certain floating dry docks
pom municipal property taxes.
Permitting the council and regional board
to charge a fee for amendments to land
use contracts.
8. Permitting the making of a bylaw to
prohibit owners from allowing property to
remain untidy or unsightly.
Neighbourhood Improvement Program
1980 saw eight more NIP projects completed
and further advancement on the remaining 28
projects. This joint Federal/Provincial and
Municipal program has, over the years, seen
many worthwhile Improvement projects
undertaken. With the termination of the
Federal/Provincial agreement in 1978 the
close out of the accounts has been proceeding
on schedule with approximately $1 million of
Provincial funds paid out in 1980 and a
balance remaining for 1981-82 of
approximately the same amount.
Community Services Contribution
Program
The Province through the Ministry signed a
two-year grant agreement in 1974, with the
Federal Government to administer the CSCP.
The funds allocated to the Province for
1979-80 were 15.15 million and 25.25
million for 1980-81. 1980 saw 1980-81 funds
allocated to approximately 85 municipalities
and Regional Districts and payment of the
majority of the 1979-80 grants were
forwarded to municipalites requesting
progress payments.
Downtown Revitalization Program
1980 saw the passing of the Special Funds
Act 1980—The Downtown Revitalization
Program whereby the sum of $25 million was
established to provide loans and grants to
municipalities who requested designation of
their business core to receive benefits of this
program. By year end approximately 10
municipalities had been designated and it is
expected that the program will be well
established and under way during 1981.
CAT    »mmr
PAGE FIVE I
 Administrative
Services
New Incorporation and
Changes in Structure
In 1980, following a directive of the Minister
of Municipal Affairs under section 6 of the
Municipal Act, a poll was held on the
question of the incorporation of the New
Hazelton area as a district municipality. The
result of the poll was in the affirmative and
by Letters Patent issued October 16, 1980,
the District of New Hazelton was
incorporated. The same Letters Patent
provided for the dissolution of the New
Hazelton Improvement District.
The Minister of Municipal Affairs also
directed that a poll be held on the question of
the restructure of local government in the
Creston-Alice Siding area. This poll was also
in the affirmative and by Letters Patent issued
October 9, 1980, the restructured Town of
Creston was incorporated, effective
December 15, 1980.
A tiiird poll under section 6 of the Municipal
Act was directed by the Minister of Municipal
Affairs on the question of the restructure of
local government in Invermere and adjoining
areas. An affirmative vote resulted and by
Letters Patent issued November 7, 1980, the
restructured Village of Invermere was
incorporated, effective January 1, 1981.
A study by a local committee on the question
of incorporation of an area at Westbank in the
Okanagan resulted in a directive of the
Minister of Municipal Affairs that a poll be
held. The result of the poll was in the
negative.
As a result of a review of local government
structure in Merritt, the status of the Town of
Merritt was changed to a city municipality
under Letters Patent issued and effective on
May 15, 1980.
Because of interest generated locally, a
review of local government structure
continued in Williams Lake during 1980 and
studies were initiated on Bowen Island and in
Okanagan Falls, Lillooet, Tofino, Clearwater,
Sicamous and the Montrose-Fruitvale areas.
In addition, a feasibility study pertaining'^
the integration of the water systems withifflf
the Beaver Valley was undertaken.
Municipal and Improvement District
Boundary Revisions
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued*
during 1980 authorizing extensions and/or
revisions in boundaries for 21 municipalities
and 33 improvement districts. The
municipalities affected, together with the
resulting adjustments in area and changes in
population, are indicated in Table 1. A lcsal
census is taken in the extended area and ■
added to the original population established
under the 1976 census in order to arrive at a
new municipal population following
extension.
Ministerial Approvals
During 1980, 1,304 bylaws were advanced to
the Minister of Municipal Affairs for his
consideration and subsequent approval. OB
the 1,304 approvals made by the Ministe^B
723 were approved on behalf of
municipalities; 83 authorized the
abandonment and vesting of highways; 113
approved municipal rates bylaws for wate™
sewer and electricity; 57 provided for the
appointment of members of municipal Boards
of Variance; 190 authorized floodplaini*
approvals under section 187 of the
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
and 280 were for other municipal
requirements. Of the 542 approvals relatina
to regional districts, 431 were to approve■
subdivision, zoning and land use bylaws; 15
authorized appointment of members of the
regional district Boards of Variance; 12 we®
for building bylaws from various regionalB
districts and the balance of 84 met other m
legislative requirements.
In addition, a total of 39 bylaws were
reviewed and recommended for approval*
under the Islands Trust Act.
Bylaw Approvals
All village and improvement district bylaws
must be submitted to the Ministry for
registration in the office of the Inspector of
Municipalities. One thousand seventy-fotuM
bylaws were examined and subsequently I
 TABLE 1 — MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY REVISIONS 1980
3 roality
AREA
POPULATION
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
i rby
265.07
117.3
382.37
1,482
65
1,547
e
974.98
182.87
1,157.85
4,617
22
4,639
i St. John
1,681.33
78.2
1,759.53
8,953
	
8,953
) 3t. John
1,759.53
124.81
1,884.34
8,953
11
8,964
i Mberni
1,863.8
33.42
1,897.22
19,597
435
20,032
e Rupert
6,705.87
2,016.97
8,722.84
14,754
	
14,754
nel
2,303.37
32.85
2,336.22
7,664
82
7,746
in
1,934.48
3.71
1,938.19
17,658
6
17,664
i acts
bbell River
Hazelton (New
feorporation)
inland
lis
ox
Ion (Reincorporation)
En
yille
isville
lers
Pirns Lake
iges
wynd
~St. James
br Lake
Mile House
Edward
se Coupe
no
13,377.45
1,664.00
767.16
935.41
1,014.18
1,020.95
998.95
1,978.94
1,250.92
545.61
361.81
292.69
1,555.24
100.77
387.91
48.4
80.94
120.98
235.92
6.77
+ 19.83
-2.97
516.02
7.93
278.98
1,806.41
.42
7.15
16,832.
107.32
445.98
13,425.86
1,748.00
1,744.94
888.14
874.85
1,171.33
1,020.95
1,037.81
1.514.97
1,986.87
1,592.90
2,352.02
362.23
299.84
18,387.24
208.09
833.9
12,072
2,286
5,359
3,285
3,416
3,416
3,942
6,256
1.517
2,110
1,430
1,808
1,189
776
612
168
12,240
693
nil 2,286
nil
nil
nil
5
142
208
30
nil
5
3
5,359
4,128
3,285
3,416
3,416
3,947
6,398
1,725
2,140
1,430
1,808
1,194
776
615
jstered, including 829 village bylaws, 31
ional district bylaws and 614 improvement
Erict bylaws. Included in the total of 1,074
aws are the bylaws of the Resort
picipality of Whistler which are subject to
giroval by the Inspector of Municipalities
3r to adoption. Twenty-five bylaws from
l municipality were reviewed.
tters in Council
a variety of purposes 152 Minutes of
pcil were prepared and subsequently
approved by the Lieutenant Governor in
Council. Of this total 49 related to regional
districts, 53 related to improvement districts,
23 related to municipal boundary extensions,
three related to transit services and 21 related
to miscellaneous purposes. Also included in
this total were three Minutes of Council
which provided for the incorporation of the
District of New Hazelton, a change in status
from the Town of Merritt to the City of
Merritt and the re-incorporation of the Town
of Creston.
DArtc ecwufti
 Debenture Approvals
Certification by the Inspector of
Municipalities of debenture issues of
municipalities and regional districts may be
completed on request. Before such
certification can be completed, certificates of
approval to the bylaws or resolutions are
issued authorizing the issuance of debentures.
Four hundred and thirty-seven certificates of
approval to the bylaws or resolutions were
issued authorizing the issuance of debentures.
Three hundred eighty-eight certificates of
approval were issued in 1979. In 1980,
debenture issues were processed with a total
par value of $168,689,255.00 through the
Municipal Finance Authority and
$7,434,338.37 on behalf of individual
municipalities and regional districts. More
information on debenture approval and
related capital expenditure matters may be
found under "Financial Management".
Building Code
In June 1980, the Building Standards Branch
of the Ministry of Labour was transferred to
this Ministry.
This Branch provides a complete technical
advisory service on the use and application of
the Provincial Regulations and related
standards. This service includes an evaluation
of any changes proposed to the Building and
Plumbing Codes and an assessment of new
building and plumbing materials to be
submitted for approval for use in the
Province. In order to supply such a service
effectively, the Branch maintains close
contact with the federal government and with
standards branches in other provinces. The
technical advisory service is supplied to other
ministries in the provincial government and
to those members of the public connected
with building construction.
During the year, the Branch completed the
drafting of the new B.C. Plumbing Code
after consultation with designers, contractors
and inspection authorities throughout the
Province.
A member of the Branch acts as Chairman of
the B.C. Building Code Appeal Board,
which dealt with more than 100 appeals
during 1980. The Branch undertakes the
necessary research associated with thes9
appeals, and by providing technical op^fl
can sometimes settle disagreements and]
eliminate the need for more formal app^B
Staff members represented the Provinces
meetings and seminars across Canada deali
with a variety of code-related subjectsj^H
the Branch also provided guest speaker^!
workshop leaders for specific groups. I
Work continued on the preparation of the ji
correspondence course, designed to certify
building inspectors. In addition, a series®
video tape programs on the Building Code
were prepared and made available to
municipalities and construction
organizations. The initial broadcasts of thes
tapes and live lecture sessions were a
considerable success and indicate the inte|j
and need for such a service.
Building bylaws, Demolition bylaws. Mobi
Home Park bylaws and Minimum
Maintenance and Occupancy Standards
bylaws submitted by municipalities and
regional districts were reviewed. Suggested
changes and requests for information wertj
forwarded when considered necessary prior
to recommendations being made for apprqj
and registration.
The various publications which comprise fl)
building code in effect in the Province areT
made available from this Ministry. A totafr)
4,565 of these publications were sold to thes
public and distributed to various Province
Ministries.
Regional District Activities
During 1980 a resurgence in the activities a
all regional districts occurred with the resuj
some 23 new functions were granted the 2|l
regional districts. Table 2 summarizes thosi
assigned, while Table 3 sets out all function
undertaken to date.
In addition, 27 supplementary Letters Paten
were issued amending existing functions foij
such purposes as altering cost apportionmem
formulas and mill rate limitations, increasiffl
authorized borrowing for various capital m
projects and adding member municipalities!
I PAGE EIGHT
nnrrtcurVTilt
 TABLE 2
FUNCTIONS ASSIGNED TO REGIONAL DISTRICT DURING 1980
(Unless Otherwise Indicated, All Member Areas of the Regional
District Participate in This Function)
fc lomic Development Commission (Williams Lake,
100 Mile House, and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D,
E, F, G, H, I, J and K)
t Kootenay
pomic Development Commission (Nelson,
Creston, Kaslo, Nakusp, New Denver, Salmo,
Bilverton, Slocan and Electoral Areas B, C, E, G,
JrlandK)
Ktery Grant-in-Aid (Electoral Areas E and F)
Be Library Service (Salmo and defined portion of
Electoral Area G)
use Disposal (Nelson, Salmo and Electoral Areas
E, F and G)
tbia-Shuswap
port Facilities (Revelstoke and Electoral Area B)
idy and Unsightly Premises Qilectoral Areas B, C,
D, E and F)
fc-Strathcona
jnal Control (Electoral Areas E and F)
jweather Sports Track (Courtenay, Comox, Cum-
| berland and Electoral Areas A, B and C)
:han Valley
i Protection Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H
and I)
9 wey-Alouette
iter Supply (Mission and Matsqui)
Fraser-Fort George
Economic Development Commission
Greater Vancouver
Fire Protection (Belcarra and defined portion of Electoral Area B)
Urban Transit
Kootenay Boundary
Firearms Regulation (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D
andE)
Nanaimo
Firearms Regulation (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, G
andH)
Okanagan-Similkameen
Community Parks (Electoral Areas A, C, D, E and F)
Library Addition (Oliver and Electoral Area C)
Peace River-Liard
Recreational Facilities Grants-in-Aid (Electoral Areas
A, B, C,D andE)
Powell River
House Numbering (Electoral Areas A, B and C)
Sunshine Coast
Weed and Nuisance Control fFJectoral Areas B, C, D,
EandF)
Arena Deficit Grant (Sechelt and Electoral Areas B
andC)
Development of Subdivisions (Electoral Areas B, C,
D, E and F)
|^^EE4IRiL
PAGE NINE I
 TABLE 3
REGIONAL DISTRICT FUNCTIONS
Tl
x—indicates function
P—indicates application of function
—in part of Regional District only
9
J
1
03
<3
£
o
-2
"3
5
tj
£
o
s
as
1
a
s
o
5
£
■£
o
ill
*
Activity Centre
JL
Ambulance
X
JL
JL
JL
JL
JL
X
V
P
JL
x
Animal Control
P
JL
JL
p
Airport Facilities
P
P
V
Air Pollution
X
X
X
Cemetery Operation
JL
JL
JL
p
P
Chamber of Commerce Grant
P
Community Health Services
X
Community Parks
P
JL
JL
JL
X
p
•
Community Recreational Programs
Community Recycling Grant
P
Community Services
JL
X
Control of Gatherings
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
X
X
X
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X    X
]
Curfew Regulation
p
Development of Subdivisions
JL.
Development of Subdivisions and Housing
p_
p
JL
JL
P
P
p
JL
_p_
p
JL
J!:
P
p
p
JL    J
Dog Control
P
JL
JL
P
p
Economic/Industrial Development Commission
JL
p
JL
JL
X
P
JL
P
P
x
X
JL
x
X
P
p
p
p
JL
p
x
p
!
Elderly Citizens' Housing
JL
X
X
X
_E_
JL
Emergency Programs
x
x
X
X
£
Firearms
JL
X
JL
JL
p
JL
JL
JL
51
JL
X
JL
t
Fire Protection
JL
P
P
p
Fire Regulation
p
Fireworks
X
JL
X
X
X
JL
p
JL
X
JL
1
Flood Control
JL
P
Grants-in-aid
JL
p
p
J_
JL
i
Health Regulation and Centre
JL
X
JL
Home Nursing
P
House Numbering
P
JL
JL
P
JL
JL
P
Intermediate Care Home
JL
Joint Community Use of School Facilities
p
JL
p
JL
p
JLJL
Labour Negotiations
p
Land Assembly, Housing and Land Banking
x
p
Library Addition
JL
Library Study
_EJ
P
X
Marina Operation and Development
p.
Noise
P
JL
p
P
_   1
Nuisance Control
JL
JL
JL
JL
JL
P
P
JL
JL
X
!P
2
Okanagan Basin Water Board
X
X
X
Operation of Wharves
JL
Parks and Recreation Commissions
JL
P
Park and Green Belt Land Acquisition
P
p
JL
-
Pest Control
X
P
X
JL
x
P
p
P
JL
x
p
I    :
X
JL
JL
X
p
JL
JL
i    ■
Public Use Area Lighting
JL
_
_p_
JLi
JL
JL
p
P
JL
P
P
P
JL
P
P
JL
P
JL
JL
JL
JL
p
1
JL
X
JL
X
P
JL
JL
P
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
JLZ
x    I
x
x
X
JL
JL
x
P
P
P
P
p
JL
JL
P
P
JL
JL
JL
p
x
x   x
£
Regional Parks
X
p'
X
x
P
X
X
p
x
X
x
x
X
JL
JL  :
j
Resident Identification Cards
JL
Septage Disposal
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal
X
X
JL
P
Sewage Treatment and Disposal
Sewers
x
JL
JL
P
*
Sign Regulation
X
P
I    1
X
JL
P
JL
p
p
P
JL
p
P
P
P
JL
P
1
JL
JL
p
x
p
JL
JL   F
'JL
f
P
—   p
p
JL
P
p
JL
P
—   fl
Urban Renewal
JL
X
P
f
JL
P
—   |
Water
Water Supply Study
p
p
p
JL
p
JL
JL
i.    i
Weed Control
P
JL
TEN
BR
ITJ
SI
icoi
HMj
 ified Areas
jseven specified areas were established
Jaw in 1980. Of these areas 27 were
ushed by petition method and 29 after
roperty owners voted favourably on the
Sal. In addition, amendments in
jdaries to 19 specified areas already
Eshed were completed. Table 4
Barnes the specified areas established
■tered in 1980. Before regional
Ismment was introduced, community
aces administered locally in non-
KSpal areas were provided through the
Roration of improvement districts. New
■service needs for non-municipal areas
Ehe exception of water, irrigation and
Is are almost all provided and financed
■gh the facilities of regional districts.
ay of the specified areas have been
Mushed adjacent to municipal boundaries.
Buemand for further services develops,
Hsnd will be toward the incorporation of
e: areas within present municipal
Rmaries. Those specified areas in more
Bfed situations will probably retain their
xmunicipal status.
Irovement Districts
Ministry presently administers 311
|)vement districts incorporated under the
W Act and the Municipal Act. Two
Ired and sixty-six of the districts have
tworks as their main function but may
provide such services as fire protection,
Slighting, parks and playgrounds,
munity halls, sewers, garbage collection,
pg, drainage and cemeteries. A further
Istricts provide fire protection as their
i object, with a further object of street
Big in some instances.
it new improvement districts were
fporated in 1980 for waterworks or
©d purposes and eight improvement
lets were dissolved; five of these became
:ified areas of regional districts, one was
jrporated as a district municipality, while
paving no assets or liabilities and being
Eve for a number of years, were
Rved outright. Supplementary Letters
Patent were issued during 1980 authorizing
extensions and/or revisions in boundaries for
33 improvement districts plus six
amendments authorizing additional objects,
and one amendment authorizing deletion of
an object.
The Inspector of Municipalities registered
614 bylaws on behalf of improvement
districts and administrative staff made 17
field trips to attend both public meetings and
meetings of improvement district trustees
dealing with administration, finance and
regulatory matters.
Engineering Support
Under agreement the Ministry of
Environment continues to provide
engineering support in the administration of
improvement districts. This takes two basic
forms: advice and recommendations to the
Ministry, and technical support and guidance
to improvement districts as requested by the
Ministry.
In 1980, the technical aspects of 90 bylaws
were examined, recommendations were made
on 35 requests for release of special trust
funds, and the viability and technical
implications of 14 proposed incorporations
and boundary adjustments were examined.
Also in this category, 68 miscellaneous
investigations and reports were made on such
things as complaints and enquiries regarding
service, subdivision, system extension
proposals, supply agreements, system
capacity appraisals and well tests.
In the second category, proposals for major
projects were appraised, or engineering
studies undertaken for 37 improvement
districts. These included a feasibility study of
water availability for Anmore Valley.
Engineering support service was also
extended to include the review of 21 projects
submitted by municipalities and regional
districts for assistance under the Sewerage
Facilities Assistance Act and under the
Revenue Sharing Act waterworks program.
These included water and sewer studies for
Fort Fraser and Windermere.
J- AFFAIRS
PAGE ELEVEN
 1
TABLE 4
REGIONAL DISTRICT SPECIFIED SERVICE AREAS ESTABLISHED DURING IS
Bulkley-Nechako
Water System (Fort Fraser)
Sewer System (Fort Fraser)
Street Lighting (Fort Fraser)
Domestic Animal Control
Community)
(Fort Fraser Local
Capital
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Magic Lake Estates)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Magic Lake
Estates)
Cariboo
Water System (Lac La Hache)
Fire Protection (Red Bluff)
Central Kootenay
Community Centre Grant-in-Aid (Fauquier)
Fire Protection Grant-in-Aid (South Slocan)
Water Supply and Distribution System (South Slocan)
Street Lighting (South Slocan)
Central Fraser Valley
Water and Sewer Feasibility Study (Huntingdon)
Central Okanagan
Community Park (Ellison)
Street Lighting (Deldor and Mayrus Roads)
Public Parking Lot (Westbank)
Columbia-Shuswap
Fire Protection (Falkland)
Fire Protection (Swansea Point)
Dog Control Program Unit (Revelstoke Rural)
Television Rebroadcasting Grant-in-Aid (Electoral
Area "A")
Fire Protection (White Lake)
Refuse Disposal (Sicamous)
Refuse Disposal (Falkland)
Comox-Strathcona
Refuse Disposal Service Unit (Pidgeon Lake)
Street Lighting (Venture Road)
Fire Protection (Fanny Bay)
Waterworks (Willow Point)
80    I
East Kootenay
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Canal Flats)
Sewer System (Radium)
Fire Protection (Radium)
Waterworks (Radium)
Street Lighting (Radium)
Garbage Collection and Disposal (Radium)
Waterworks (Windermere)
Street Lighting (Windermere)
Fraser-Cheam
Water System (Yale)
Fire Protection (Popkum and Vicinity)
Kitimat-Stikine
Dyke (New Remo)
Kootenay Boundary
Water System (Columbia Gardens Industrial Paffl
Mount Waddington
Sewer System (Coal Harbour)
Water System (Coal Harbour)
Nanaimo
Water Supply and Distribution System (Westffiay
Estates)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Nanoose)
Street Lighting (Columbia Beach)
Water Supply and Distribution System (French Creek)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Crown Eot)
Peace River-Liard
Bulk Water Supply (Fort Nelson)
Sewers (Munch Subdivision)
Water Supply (Munch Subdivision)
Water Supply (Mile 292 Subdivision)
Natural Gas Distribution System (M
Subdivision)
Fire Protection (Charlie Lake)
Skeena-Queen Charlotte
Fire Protection (Queen Charlotte City/Skide®e
Landing)
Library Service (Queen Charlotte City/Skide«
Landing)
Water System (Queen Charlotte City)
Sewer System (Queen Charlotte City)
Sunshine Coast
Street Lighting (Creekside Place)
29.
PAGE TWELVE
BRITISH COJB
 x udments to Established Specified Service Areas
I lg 1980
vage Collection and Disposal (Wildwood) and extension of boundaries
rbage Collection and Disposal (108 Mile) and reduction of boundaries
| Protection (100 Mile House) and extension of
boundaries
ara/ Kootenay
b Protection (Robson and Raspberry) and reduction
of boundaries
iter Supply and Distribution System (Ymir) and extension in boundaries
^ Protection (Electoral Area G) and reduction of
boundaries
%al Okanagan
get Lighting (Clearwater Division) and extension of
boundaries
ieet Lighting (Pritchard Drive) and reduction of
boundaries
fybia-Shuswap
re Protection (Rilkland) extension of boundaries
Comox-Strathcona
Water Services (Black Creek-Oyster Bay) and extension of boundaries
East Kootenay
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Edgewater) and reduction of boundaries
Kootenay Boundary
Fire Protection (Anaconda) and extension of
boundaries
Nanaimo
Water System (Madrona Point) and extension of
boundaries
Sewer System (French Creek) and extension of
boundaries
Fire Protection (Errington) and extension of boundaries
Okanagan-Similkameen
Sewer System (D6) and extension of boundaries
Sunshine Coast
Sewer System (Sechelt) and extension of boundaries
Squamish-Lillooet
Fire Protection (Bralorne) and extension of boundaries
Thompson-Nicola
Cemetery Operation (Electoral Area D) and extension
of boundaries
gAL AFFAIRS
PAGE THIRTEEN
 1
Financial Management
The Financial Management Division is
responsible for the financial analysis and
review of local government borrowing
proposals, utility rates bylaws, annual'
financial statements and preparation of
statistical data. Several ministry programs,
including revenue sharing are administered
by this Division.
During 1980 Financial Management made
113 field visits not including those for a
specific purpose. These visits, which include
a review of financial procedures, provide an
opportunity for a better understanding and
appreciation of the problems experiencedibjf
Municipal Administrative staff.
Assessment and Tax Collection j
The major revenue source for municipalises i
in British Columbia continues to be the real
property tax. The growth in assessed valffis
of real property and revenue from taxation!
these properties over the past 16 years is
illustrated in the following table. It will be [
noted that revenue from this source of
taxation in 1979 totalled $l,012,467,000lc
this total $477,923,000 represented taxatfp
for general municipal purposes, and
$534,544,000 represented taxation for sc^oi
purposes.
TABLE 5
GROWTH IN COMBINED ASSESSED VALUES AND TAXES
IN MUNICIPALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
GROSS ASSESSED
ASSESSED VALUES
VALUES
ACTUALLY TAXED
Tax H
All
Taxable
Year
Properties
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Thousands)
1964	
4,118
3,534
2,878
2,295
154,074
1976	
12,782'
17.6802
10,642'
12,0622
8,691
11,542
792,536
1977	
         13,345'
18,1262
11,087'
12,4742
9,030
11,895
853,847
1978	
12,020'
18,2322
9,890'
14,9782
9,890
14,379
949,417
1979	
13,286'
19.7232
10,867'
16,1082
10,867
15,453
1,012,4®
1980	
14,287'
21.7412
11,704'
17,9062
11,704
17,240
1,1 ROM1
1 School Values
a Municipal Values       3 Estimated
The following table (Table 6) provides a
further analysis of the assessed value of real
property and indicates the distribution of
1980 assessed values by class of
municipality, with the percentage increase!
over 1979.
OAdSi CrvtPTEEM
BRITISH 1
 TABLE 6
ASSESSED VALUES BY CLASS OF MUNICIPALITIES
GENERAL MUNICIPAL GROSS
ASSESSED VALUES
ASSESSED VALUES ACTUALLY
TAXED
All Properties
Taxable Properties
School
Municipal
($ Millions)          %
8,515          9.43
9,645       12.19
214         2.39
i|j    503       15.63
($ Millions)           %
7,073        10.95
7,945       12.89
178         2.30
399       14.00
($ Millions)           %
3,243         8.03
5,391         8.30
204         0.49
396       10.92
$ Millions)          %
6,916        11.21
s :ts	
vii	
1 es	
7,613        13.42
167          2.45
379       14.50
!ubtotals..
aiuver	
18,877        10.90
2,864         6.03
15,595       11.90
2,311         6.45
9,234         8.13
2,470         6.15
15,075        12.29
2,165         6.76
Totals
21,741        10.23
17,906       11.16
11,704         7.70
17,240       11.56
result of the continuing rapid growth in
jban communities, it is anticipated that
:eds from real property taxation for
B and general municipal purposes in
Iwill reach $1,114,000,000. This would
lent an increase of approximately 64 per
ever the revenue of five years ago. The
assessed values actually taxed for school
oses in the Province in 1980 amounted to
557,000,000, an increase of approx-
ly $1,067,000,000 over 1979. Of this
Snt $11,704,000,000 or approximately
|r cent, represented assessed values in
Sty, District, Town and Village
I icipalities.
! Collection
1 tax collection picture in municipalities is
raered to be the primary indicator, not
ti of the efficiency of the administration,
but also of the ability of the taxpayer to meet
the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year
under review, tax collections have shown a
slight increase over the collections of 1978
and continue to maintain a very high level.
The collection of current taxes in British
Columbia continues to be among the highest
among the provinces in Canada publishing
statistics of a comparable nature, while the
percentage of arrears is among the lowest.
Economic factors may have contributed
substantially to the favourable position
indicated in the property taxation field;
however, municipal treasurers and collectors
are to be congratulated for their continued
efforts in maintaining this high rate of tax
collection.
Tables 7 and 8 reveal information relative to
tax collection by class of municipality for the
years shown.
PAGE FIFTEEN
 TABLE 7
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Current Taxes Collected
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939 ,	
1972	
1973	
            81.10
            97.05
97 36
99.10
100.62
100.69
99.38
99.03
100.04
99.99
100.41
100.48
40.16   1
3.88 i
3.39 1
3.95
4.68 I
4.49 1
4.89 J
4.65 1
4.36  1
1974	
1975	
            96.71
96.28
1976	
96.50
1977	
96.26
1978 -.....-..
96.25
1979	
96.66
Vancouver
1939	
91.00
103.10
99.79
100.82
98.68
98.99
99.26
99.78
100.04
100.39
30.06 1
5.19 1
3.51
4.78  1
5.08  i
5.18   j
5.08 1
4.78 1
4.47 1
1972	
96.20
1973	
97.03
1974	
•   1975	
 ...*,.*...-          96.15
            96.02
1976	
96.13
1977	
96.45
1978	
96.68
1979	
97.06
Districts
1939	
            77.60
95.80
100.39
100.82
98.88
99.42
99.53
100.23
99.65
100.43
34.81
1972....„	
1973	
1974	
            96.88
            97.51
            96.62
3.96   j
1975	
            96.68
4 23 1
1976	
            96.40
4 51  1
1977	
96.80
4 24 1
1978	
96.63
4 36
1979	
            97.13
3.89 1
Towns
1958 .
            89.55
97.06
102.05
100.69
98.78
99.30
100.03
100.30
100.26
101.34
13.62  1
1972 .
96.25
5.37   :
1973	
            96.75
4.48   1
1974	
            95.44
5.65
1975
            95.73
5.14
1976
95.88
5.19  1
1977 .
            96.77
4.42   1
4.31   j
4.18   J
1978
96.64
1979	
.^....s            96.75
PAGE SIXTEEN
BRITISH Cji
 TABLE 7
	
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
—Continued
Current Taxes Collected
Total Collections
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
as a Percentage
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
/ijges
j 1939	
            76.50
98.30
38.71
:  1972	
             97.11
101.01
4.09
3 1973	
            97.02
100.41
3.95
i 1974	
            95.94
98.85
4.96
1975	
            96.02
99.52
4.88
1976	
            96.01
99.36
5.00
1977	
            96.07
100.09
5.23
B978	
            96.19
100.15
5.06
1979	
            96.45
100.65
4.71
TABLE 8
COLLECTIONS, 1979 (WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1978)
Current Taxes Collected as a Percentage
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
1979                             1978
1979
1978
m	
            96.66                      96.25
4.36
4.65
ricts	
            97.13                      96.63
3.89
4.36
Bs	
            96.75                      96.64
4.18
4.31
ages	
            96.45                     96.19
4.71
5.06
Total	
            96.93                      96.48
4.09
4.48
pouver	
            97.06                     96.68
4.47
4.78
•Grand Total
            96.96                     96.52
4.17
4.55
m AFFAIRS
PAGE SEVENTEEN
 It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding
the fact that property taxes are increasing, the
level of tax collections remains high.
School Assessment and General Municipal
Assessment
(1980 Assessments)   '
It should be noted that the difference between
the school assessment and the general
municipal assessment is the result of a
number of municipalities using assessed
values determined on the basis set out in
Section 26 (19) (d) of the Assessment Act,
i.e., general municipal assessments are based
on 100 per cent of actual market value, while
the school assessments are at the percentage
of actual market value fixed by the
Lieutenant Governor in Council.
The following municipalities apply Section
26(19)(d)—
Kamloops Summerland
Langley (City) West Vancouver
Nelson Whistler
North Vancouver (City) Cache Creek
Penticton Clinton
Port Coquitlam Cumberland
Prince George Granisle
North Vancouver (District) Lytton
Stewart Tahsis
Use of Section 26 (19) (d) resulted in a
difference of $7,536,000,000 between School
Assessment and General Municipal
Assessment as follows:
Millions  Millions
$ $
General Municipal Assessment  17,240
Less Adjusted School Assessment
School assessment  11,704
Deduct
Commercial and industrial
machinery    1,205
Utility values including B.C.
Hydro       795
    9,704
Difference  7,536
Revenues and Expenditures
The 1979 audited financial statements
indicate that British Columbia municipalitiffl
continued to maintain a favourable financial
postition. Gross revenues from all sources,*
including collections for other governmental
during 1979, exceeded $1,562,000,000,1
which represents an increase of
$136,000,000 over the previous year.
The major revenue sources, with comparatS
figures for 1978, were as follows:
1979       1978    InflM
Millions Millions Millions
$ $ $
General municipal taxation     478 452 2(1
School taxation     534 497 3«
Transfers from other Governments      193 171 23
Revenue from own sources    357 306 5H
1,562 1,426 13j
The home-owner grant payments increased
by $49,000,000 in 1979 to a total of
$197,000,000. When this is offset against th<
school tax levy of $534,000,000, a balanrj
of $337,000,000 remains of this levy to bel
borne by the property owner.
The major expenditure items incurred during
1979 with comparative figures for 1978,
were:
1979       1978    IncrS
Millions Millions Million
$ $ $
General Government       77 71 6
Fire protection       80 71 9
Administration of justice... 104 93 11
Public Works  112 104 8
Sanitation and waste removal       48 44 4l
Social welfare       28 27 fl
Recreation and culture  109 97 12
Education  535 498 3|
Debt charges  133 120 l|
Capital expenditure from
revenue       99 75 241
Other*  237 226 11
1,562 1,426 13a
♦Includes public health, environmental development, utilities, and contri
butions to reserves and other funds.
PAGE EIGHTEEN
BRITISH COD
 TABLE 9
TRENDS IN FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
COMPARED TO POPULATION AND INCOME EXPRESSED AS INDEXES
1   Year
Population
Total
Revenue1
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personnal
Income
■t
§1...	
100.00
      136.55
100.00
306.45
337.75
390.48
446.36
'545.53
640.80
690.83
774.75
849.83
100.00
384.97
414.34
602.31
614.20
794.96
571.87
843.64
802.21
1,060.51
100.00
137.00
145.75
157.18
175.76
217.07
254.04
306.37
328.21
366.07
100.00
209.69
252.93
286.97
345.80
364.06
375.33
396.89
476.57
512.52
100.00
270.56
12	
p 	
§4	
143.60
153.30
160.06
       173.25
303.03
353.18
412.32
497.00
H....~.	
EL	
BL	
156.88
163.10
       167.05
588.21
677.82
740.06
£'9	
       170.40
840.49
'Includes general municipal revenues, collections for other governments and revenues of regional districts but excludes revenues of utilities.
"serves and Surpluses
total statutory reserves and operating
Iferves and surpluses held in all accounts of
I municipalities was $626,551,414. This
Presents 54.21 per cent of the total revenue,
Suding school taxes, of the municipalities.
Jfeiis total, $435,131,587 is held in liquid
Hm or in investments authorized by statute,
:ad a portion of the surplus is represented in
raears of taxes and other receivables.
Hitutory reserve funds of various
^micipalities have again shown an increase
ter the previous year. At the end of 1979
these funds, held for a variety of purposes,
amounted to $163,638,424, an increase of
$36,596,000 over the previous year, after
giving effect to the fact that approximately
$27,000,000 was expended on capital works
from reserve funds during the year 1979.
Over the last seven years the amount held in
these reserve funds has increased from
$61,000,000 to the current figure of
$164,000,000, an increase of 169 per cent.
The following table provides an analysis of
these reserves and surpluses by class of
municipality:
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES—1979
Reserves
$
Surpluses
$
Total
$
Total1
Revenue
%
■ties .„ ;::,    105,299,706
^micts	
iwns	
Ullages	
Eional Districts..
163,509,376
1,743,059
5,310,004
3,237,523
31,689,455
62,296,335
4,178,584
7,043,698
7,452,315
136,989,161
225,805,711
5,921,643
12,353,702
10,689,838
41.98
52.83
27.74
34.13
8.14
1 Subtotal	
1 incouver2.. .
      279,099,668
      222,721,716
112,660,387
12,069,643
391,760,055
234,791,359
41.56
110.22
■ Total	
      501,821,384
124,730,030
626,551,414
54.21
Bpncludes general municipal revenues, revenues of regional districts and utilities but excludes collections for other governments.
|2 The total for Vancouver does not include the balance in the Property Endowment Rind which amounted to $180,373,562 at December 31
■PAI    AFEAtPQ
PAP.F NINFTFFrl
 Capital Programs
The value of capital projects undertaken
during 1979 by municipalities amounted to
$613,000,000. Of this total program,
$451,000,000 was completed during the
fiscal year, leaving a balance of works in
progress of $162,000,000 at year-end. In the
total capital program, municipalities were
able to provide $100,000,000 from current
1
general revenue, and sewer and utility
revenue funds, $30,000,000 from reserveL
funds, and approximately $40,000,000 frtffl
grants-in-aid from the Provincial and Federal
Governments. The balance of the amounM
expended was financed by debenture loans,
temporary bank loans, and other methods of
financing. The activity in this area over the
past five years is indicated in Table 10
following.
TABLE 10
CAPITAL PROGRAMS
Year
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
SOURCE OF FUNDS
Revenue            Reserve
Funds              Funds
Grants
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979	
$
424
500
603
535
613
$
329
388
488
401
451
$
95
112
115
134
162
s              $
71               33
78               23
81               27
76              46
100              30
$1
25
40
42 *
37
40
Figures shown above are millions.
Five-Year Capital Expenditure Programs
Summary
The programs submitted by municipalities
and regional districts during 1980 and
covering the five-year period ending 1984
continued to provide meaningful information
and guidance, not only to the local
government bodies involved, but also to the
Ministry, other levels and Ministries of
government, and various financial
institutions. Reviewing each of these
submissions and offering constructive
criticism, where necessary, has achieved
maximum consistency in the format of these
programs and has proved beneficial to all
concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure
Programs by year is provided in Table 11.
Included in the "General" heading under'
"Classification of Expenditures" are all
capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks,!
public buildings, recreational facilities, lag
and other capital projects not related to eitra
water or sewerage systems. As in the past
municipal councils are attempting to finan|
a large portion of their capital works out of
current revenue and reserve funds, althougj
the availability of Federal-Provincial loans]
and the infusion of capital funds via specif]
purpose grants have had a direct effect on
this policy.
PAHB TWEMTV
flprrtcu mil
 TABLE 11
FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMS SUMMARY BY YEAR
FOR ALL MUNICIPALITIES (INCLUDING VANCOUVER,
EXCLUDING HARRISON HOT SPRINGS)
CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES
Sewer
General
  107,438,190 96,374,679 449,095,146 652,908,015
1 ^  49,904,280 61,407,222 318,069,181 429,380,683
¥,..„., n  40,868,654 50,966,772 262,533,578 354,369,004
I „  34,277,167 39,683,303 222,524,677 296,485,147
| „;,  39,867,905 29,491,748 227,608,850 296,968,503
Dtals.
272,356,196   277,923,724    1,479,831,432   2,030,111,352
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
General
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1  158,095,533
K  111,806,546
1  101,555,484
I  106,283,090
'A..  104,485,653
SBtals  582,226,306
65,340,404
57,371,822
27,162,130
12,574,866
14,308,319
122,247,771
71,609,694
56,447,759
40,565,048
44,455,628
$
6,187,150
603,000
730,500
433,000
685,500
301,037,157
187,989,621
168,473,131
136,629,143
133,033,403
652,908,015
429,380,683
354,369,004
296,485,147
296,968,503
176,757,541    335,325,900
3,639,150      927,162,455   2,030,111,352
growing
jing 1980, Council and Regional Boards
Rinued to meet a substantial demand for
miicipal services, and 185 term-borrowing
Rws were approved by the Inspector of
Kicipalities and subsequently adopted by
ii local governing body that provided the
st vice.
■trowing of $194,522,737 (Cdn) as
Rrharized in Table 12, is $55,984,111
Are than was authorized in 1979. Most of
11: increase is in the classification of water
li sewer projects. Completion of the various
f jjects authorized will be phased over a
Imber of years, and the demand for funds
ID follow the pace of construction. Included
in the authorized borrowing is $3,808,817 in
short-term loans which, under the Municipal
Act, are subject to a per capita limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not
required to approve the borrowing of the City
of Vancouver and the Metropolitan Water and
Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is, therefore,
not included in Table 12.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated
amount of $22,210,917 was approved for
local improvement works. A number of
municipalities have established special
improvement funds to finance local works;
these have not been included in the figure for
preliminary borrowing approval.
'AL AFFAIRS
PAGE TWENTY-ONEl
 1
L
TABLE 12
BORROWING AUTHORIZATION, 1980
Regional
Purpose                      Districts Cities Districts Towns Villages Total
$ $ $ $ $ $ |
Waterworks  15,662,300 13,509,100 41,891,636 5,055,200 7,013,200 83,13fc
Sewers  16,646,150 37,095,786 7,237,475 1,512,500 7,373,536 69,8«
Parks and Recreation     3,137,200 3,295,000 5,554,714 1,200,000               13,18fiH
Civic Buildings       450,000 1,150,000 2,521,520                                 4,12M
Equipment (including
fire protection)       505,000 24,000 36,000 - 79,440 644,1
Other Tangible Assets*        165,000 14,441,780 8,581,200             385,000 23,57»
Totals  36,565,650   69,515,666   65,822,545   7,767,700    14,851,176    194,522,73
* Other tangible assets include land assembly, road improvement and sidewalks, and storm drainage.
Debentures terms of indebtedness in the total amourij
WM ,    , $181,731,634 (Cdn) were approved
Details of debenture issues and other
securities that have been approved in In 1980, no municipal debenture issues ^
principle at the time of adoption of loan guaranteed by the Province tinder the
authorization bylaws are specified in security- Municipal Assistance Act. Details on the]
issuing bylaws; 214 security-issuing bylaws issues guaranteed as at December 31, 198
authorizing the issue of debentures and other are shown below in Table 13.
TABLE 13
OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES GUARANTEED, 1980
Municipal Municipalities
Act1 Aid Act2 Total!
$ $ $
Cities (Excluding Vancouver)    3,717,700 2,762,500 6,4801
Districts                                               742,400 3,408,009 4,150]
Towns                                                     -.rv?v          10.500 200,000 2101
Villages        819,000 1,872,222 2,69j
Regional Districts       510,000       J|     	
5101
Subtotal    5,799,600            8,242,731 14,0421
Vancouver „ 1                                1,065,000 1,0651
Greater Victoria Water District                                   150,000 1501
Greater Nanaimo Sewer District                                   604,000 604,1
11,212,000 11,212,01
Greater Vancouver Water District
Total    5,799,600 21,273,731 27,073,3:
1 Debt from improvement districts assumed by municipalities, formerly issued under the Improvement Districts Assistance Loan Act.
2 R>rmerly known as Municipalities Assistance Act.
PAGE TWENTY-TWO  BRITISH t 01
 Etion to the totals shown in Table 13 of
173,331 as debenture debts guaranteed
; Province, a total amount at the end of
ar of $15,795,000 was guaranteed
Jhe Greater Vancouver Sewerage and
mge District Act.
debenture debt as at December 31,
, of all municipalities, including the City
of Vancouver, is shown in Table 14
following. The debenture debt of the Greater
Campbell River Water District, the Greater
Nanaimo Water District, the Greater
Vancouver Water District, Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District and the
Greater Victoria Water District is not
included.
TABLE 14
TOTAL DEBENTURE DEBT, DECEMBER 31, 1979
Sold
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
cts..
i 5	
res	
Bal Districts..
206,320,958
364,569,342
20,070,957
43,625,725
111,553,364
77,773,344
110,750,722
6,597,339
16,314,015
69,417,794
284,094,302
475,320,064
26,668,296
59,939,740
180,971,158
Subtotals.
i suver ,
746,140,346
199,491,151
280,853,214
1,026,993,560
199,491,151
|>tal    945,631,497
280,853,214
1,226,484,711
mture sales for all municipalities
inted to $146,072,685 for the year 1979.
I iresulted in an increase of $94,277,511
h total outstanding debenture debt of all
rcipalities for 1979, after giving effect to
etirement of debentures maturing during
Ear.
percentage of current revenue expended
gvice debenture debt (excluding water
jes) increased in 1979 in Cities, Districts
[owns, and decreased in Villages and the
M Vancouver. These figures for 1979 are
shown on the following table, with the 1978
comparative figures.
Per Cent
1979 1978
Cities    6.09 6.03
Vancouver    8.01 8.66
Districts    7.51 7.40
Towns jga; x    7.88 6.67
Villages    8.33 8.36
The debenture debt of water utilities is
serviced almost entirely by revenue derived
by consumer charges and frontage taxes.
1
L AFFAIRS
PAGE TWENTY-THREE
 •
Planning Services
Division
Role and Structure
The Planning Services Division is
responsible for supporting and advancing the
community and regional planning process as
it relates to local government as well as to
Provincial planning responsibilities. The
Division is also responsible for co-ordinating
the development and implementation of
Provincial settlement policies and programs.
The Division is organized into two principal
staff groups: Plans Co-ordination and Policy
and Program Planning. In addition, the
Division is supported by a Technical Services
group providing mapping, cartographic and
statistical compilation services, as well as
assistance in defining and meeting local
government mapping needs.
With the dissolving of the Environment and
Land Use Committee Secretariat in the Fall of
1980, six planners and three secretaries were
transferred to the Division. Reorganization of
the Division to integrate the new staff into
the Division began in late 1980. The
Division's staff organization at the end of
1980 consisted of the Executive Director,
Associate Director, 15 Professional Planners,
six Technical Assistants and five Secretarial
staff. The Division has a regional office in
Prince George managed by a Senior Planning
Co-ordinator.
Policy and Program Planning Activities
1. Proposed Legislation
The Division continued work on
legislation to improve and refine the land
use planning system in the Province. A
green paper "was produced and
summarized in an audio-visual
presentation that was discussed at nine
special meetings held throughout the •>
Province.
The proposal has been reshaped and
redrafted in response to concerns raised
by other Provincial ministries, Crown
Corporations, local1 governments and the
1
general public. Written reports of theL
meetings, letters and briefs were revieSI
in detail. The Ministry responded to om \
115 submissions. The resulting consenlfsj
has been drafted as legislation for the
consideration of the government.
Settlement Planning Policy and ResearW J
The Division continued to develop its
program of settlement policy research f
number of areas:
,.,
The Division continued to examine th|
organizational and financial requiremS
for the planning and development of
either new communities or the radicaM
expansion of existing communities. Tffl
objective is to ensure that the Ministry^
in a position to respond quickly and
effectively to a wide range of
development situations.
,
This work received impetus because a
anticipated coal mine developments in the
Northeast Sector which would require^!
new community.
Research and Policy development   *
continued in other areas, in many case™;
conjunction with the Research BranchH
the Ministry. Areas of focus included^B
• Fiscal impacts of resource developirffl
and appropriate financial policies^H
• Tax base sharing;
• Financial risk exposure in resource™
based communites;
• Land allocation policies.
Urban fringe policy; work continued on
development of policies for urban fringe
areas. These have involved studies of the1 i
impact of provincial cost shared program :
on fringe areas and surveys of fringe ana)'
residents.
Research has continued on a range of
policy issues related to settlement/ j
community development including:
• Rural residential development;
• Social needs and requirements relateM k
to radical expansion of small
communities;
• Municipal finance problems and
policies.
 ,
-EAGF-QYFNTY-FnUL
BRIT1
1SH(
 Wttlement Impact Assessment
fhe Division serves as the lead agency for
Bmprehensive reviews of proposed
Evelopment projects in terms of their
Bplications for existing communities,
egional settlement patterns and for
i >roposed new communities. Development
i >roposals that were under continuing
^view during 1980 included:
i(i) Coal development projects under the
Provincial Guidelines for Coal
Development, including:
• B.P.—Sunka (Northeast);
• Petrocan—Monkman (Northeast);
• Denison—Quintette (Northeast);
• Teck—Bullmoose (Northeast);
• Elco—Elk River (Southeast);
• B.C. Coal—Greenhills
(Southeast);
• Crows Nest Resources—
Line Creek (Southeast);
• Rio Algom—Sage Creek
(Southeast);
• Luscar-Sterco—
Quinsam (Vancouver Island).
|(ii) Metal Mine projects under the
Provincial Guidelines for Metal
Mine Development including:
• Coldstream (Revelstoke);
• Valley Copper (Logan Lake);
• Brussiloff (Canal Flats);
• Consolidated Cinola (Port
Clements);
(iii) Energy Projects;
• B.C. Hydro (Site "C");
• Foothills Pipeline;
• Hat Creek Coal Liquefaction.
Special Programs
The Division was in 1980 actively
preparing for development of the new
eommunity of Tumbler Ridge to serve
northeast coal development. This
Eivolved:
• Updating of the social, physical and
financial plans for Tumbler Ridge;
• Design of an organizational structure
to deliver the new community;
• Finalization of a resource
management/land use plan for the
townsite and its environs;
• Preparation of a mobilization plan to
guide implementation of the
community.
The Division continued to provide
technical support to southeast
communities, impacted by coal
development in particular, the Village of
Elkford. In 1979 the Ministry initiated the
establishment of a Project Co-ordinating
Committee comprised of the Village, the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs and the
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing to
assist Elkford in planning for expected
coal developments. A number of
community development programs which
have received assistance from the
Committee are currently underway,
including:
• Off-site services construction;
• Residential land development;
• Town centre development;
• Industrial park development;
• Environmental management measures.
The Division, in response to a need
expressed by the public, the development
industry and local and provincial
government officials, commenced
preparation of model land use control
bylaws. The objective is to provide a basis
for local government land use bylaws and
to achieve a degree of consistency and
standardization in these bylaws
throughout the Province. The primary
focus is on a standardized format and
construction, rather than the substance or
regulation themselves. The Division is
also looking at the development approval
procedures and the possiblity of
standardization of bylaws.
 Plans Co-ordination Activities
1. Planning Grants Program
General
In 1980 the Ministry continued the annual
planning grants program initiated in 1978.
Municipalities and regional districts were
encouraged to prepare official plans as
well as implementing bylaws following
adoption of those plans. The program,
established under the Revenue Sharing
Act, provided $1 million for grants to
municipalities and $1 million for grants to
regional districts. The individual grants
were determined on a cost-sharing basis
with the maximum amount available to a
particular local government determined by
the 1976 census population of the area.
Municipalities
Shareable planning grants were available
to municipalities for the preparation of
official community plans and related
planning programs. These shareable
grants paid for two-thirds of the costs
incurred in the preparation of those
Ministry-approved portions of the total
planning program for the municipality.
Grants were made on the basis of $1.00
per capita with a minimum grant available
of $15,000 and a maximum of $75,000
depending on the municipality's 1976
population. Municipalities submitted
applications to the Ministry to receive
approval of their planning programs that
were eligible for a grant.
Regional Districts
Under the planning grants program each
regional district was eligible for a portion
of the $1 million fund available to
regional districts provided there was an
undertaking to prepare Official Regional
Plans, Official Settlement Plans or j
implementing bylaws. These grants paid
for two-thirds of the costs incurred in me
preparation of those Ministry approved!
portions of the total planning program of
the regional district. The amount eacm
regional district was eligible to receiver
as follows:
$1.00 per capita for the first 10,OOOB
population;
$ .50 per capita for the next 20,OOoB
population;
$ .25 per capita for the next 30,OOOH
population;
$ . 10 per capita for the remaining    !
population.
In addition to the planning grants*
program, annual unconditional grants
were paid to regional districts for gen™
planning purposes. These were calculated
on the basis of population—$ .20 peW
capita—with a minimum of $7,000 and
maximum of $10,000.
Approved 1980 Grants
Following are tables showing those
municipalities and regional districts^
which had planning programs approve
in 1980 for the purpose of receiving a
planning grant. In 1980, 91
municipalities undertook approved 1
planning programs. Regional districflM
were involved in 75 Official Regions™
and Settlement Plan programs and 10
implementing bylaw projects.
J
 APPROVED MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1980
	
npality
Planning
Grant
Municipality
Planning
Grant
■V
Masset
8,000
Btlegar
$15,000
Midway
6,000
ifortenay
11,743
Montrose
6,000
fiinbrook
15,000
New Denver
15,000
i wson Creek
13,333
Oliver
1,833
; flerby
1,400
100 Mile House
3,400
and Forks
13,250
Osoyoos
5,500
mloops
33,477
Pemberton
15,000
lowna
30,667
Port Clements
11,333
mitt
3,448
Port Edward
9,133
naimo
20,000
Pouce Coupe
15,000
lson
15,000
Salmo
15,000
w Westminister
20,000
Sayward
14.000
>rth Vancouver
14,000
Sechelt
15,000
ttticton
3,800
Silverton
2,000
rt Alberni
19,585
Tofino
4,667
rt Moody
15,000
Ucluelet
6,667
nee George
24,533
Bee Rupert
6,000
Districts:
Island
til
15,000
Abbotsford
$12,000
13,200
Burnaby
40,000
ncouver
60,000
Central Saanich
7,733
rnon
17,546
Chilliwack
35,120
Koria
33,333
Coldstream
2,333
lite Rock
10,000
Coquitlam
31,467
is:
Delta
119,333
eston
$    956
Hudson's Hope
14,387
mceton
2,200
Houston
15,000
Sney
15,000
Matsqui
26,667
Ethers
15,000
Mission
15,000
illiams Lake
11,667
North Vancouver
Oak Bay
29,820
17,568
|es:
Peachland
9,055
ihcroft
$15,000
Pitt Meadows
8,667
ffcarra
13,223
Port Hardy
11,667
rase
2,400
Powell River
15,000
Etwynd
11,667
Richmond
24,000
kford
15,000
Saanich
44,467
rt Nelson
15,000
Salmon Arm
7,967
jrt St. lames
2,533
Spallumcheen
2,000
Gitvale
7,200
Sparwood
15,000
bsons
8,667
Squamish
15,000
bid River
14,667
Stewart
15,000
ranisle
15,000
Summerland
2,333
Krison Hot Springs
3,333
Surrey
54,660
azelton
12,000
Terrace
15,000
aslo
sremeos
Uooet
6,000
1,500
5,000
Whistler
15,000
1
Total number of Municipalities:
91
1
Jgan Lake
15,000
Total Municipal Planning Grant
$1,307,105
 APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1980
Regional District
Planning
Grant
Program
Alberni-Clayoquot
Bulkley-Nechako
Capital
Central Okanagan
Columbia-Shuswap
$20,208 Official Settlement Plans for:
Long Beach
Cherry Creek
Zoning Bylaw Text Amendments
20,060 Official Community Plans for:
Granisle-Topley Landing
Southbank
Revision of Zoning Bylaws to Implement ThreeW
Official Settlement Plans
Subdivision Bylaw
Development Permit Bylaw
46,911 Complete Western Community Cost-of-Growth Report
Develop Regional Growth Alternatives
Alternative Future Road Network Plans
Collect Background Data on Operating Exnendims
Assemble Baseline Data on Regional AgricultuSB
Implications for Land Use Policies
Analysis of Present and Future Regional Food Needs
Cariboo
23,853
Official Settlement Plans for:
Quesnel
Williams Lake
Interlake
100 Mile House
Eagle Creek
Consolidation of Zoning Bylaws
Central Fraser Valley
31,553
Official Regional Plan—update
Central Kootenay
23,799
Castlegar Fringe Area Official Sett
adoption
Creston Official Settlement Plan
Implementation Bylaws
28,149 Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "A"
Lakeshore Westbank—adoption
Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw—adoption
20,971 Adoption of Official Settlement Plans for:
Sicamous
Revelstoke
Deep Creek-Ranchero
Salmon Valley
North Shuswap
Blind Bay/Notch Hill/Sorrento
Seymour Arm
 APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1980—Continued
District
Planning
Grant
Program
Strathcona
ran Valley
ey-Alouette
"otenay
Cheam
i Fort George
a Vancouver
t-Stikine
hay Boundary
: Waddington
1
Okanagan
23,437 Official Settlement Plans for:
Comox Valley
Quadra Island
Oyster Bay—partial
Research and Printing Land Status Map
22,998 Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "C"
Electoral Area "E"
24,427 Official Regional Plan—update
23,229 Official Settlement Plans for:
Canal Flats
Radium Hot Springs—partial
Edgewater
24,000 Official Regional Plan—update
28,291 Official Settlement Plans for:
Valemount
Chilako River-Nechako
Tabor Lake-Stone Creek—partial
Crooked River—partial
Zoning Bylaw for Electoral Areas "A" and "C
108,667 Official Regional Plan—update
20,658 Official Settlement Plans for:
Kitwanga
Hazelton—partial
Thornhill—adoption
20,341 Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "D"—adoption
Electoral Area "A"—partial
10,638 Official Settlement Plans for:
Hyde Creek—adoption
Holberg
26,267 Official Settlement Plans for:
Cedar, Cranberry, Bright
French Creek
Nanoose Bay
Shaw Hill-Deep Bay
6,750 Adoption of Official Settlement Plan
 APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1980—Continued
Planning
Regional District                                     Grant
Program
Okanagan-Similkameen               24,143
Official Settlement Plans for:
Penticton
Keremeos
Naramata
Okanagan Falls
Peace River-Liard                         22,810
Official Settlement Plans for:
Chetwynd Area
Fort Nelson Area
Powell River                                14,500
Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "A"
Electoral Areas "B" and "C"
Zoning Bylaw for Electoral Area "A"
Skeena-Queen Charlotte               15,422
Official Settlement Plans for:
Queen Charlotte City-Skidegate Landing
Dodge Cove
Squamish-Lillooet                        11,928
Squamish-Pemberton Corridor Study
Sunshine Coast                             10,963
Official Settlement Plans for:
Halfmoon Bay-West Sechelt—partial
Pender Harbour—partial
Elphinstone—partial
Thompson-Nicola                        31,800
Official Settlement Plans for:
Clearwater—adoption
Barriere—partial
South Thompson Valley and Pritchard Area Incluffif
the Fringe Area of City of Kamloops
Zoning Bylaw 57—review
Total:                         $686,773
^^^^                   DDITtSH colil
 ficial Plan and Bylaw Review
I Bvision continued to perform its
it ary responsibility of reviewing land
Maws and Official Plan bylaws
itted by local governments for
I yal of the Minister. The review of
al settlement plans was facilitated
( gh the distribution of the Division's
5 lical Guidelines for the Preparation
glial Settlement Plans.
i Seal Services
)ivision's Technical Services group
ained an ambitious program during
including the provision of:
iew composite base maps at standard
ferric scales and air photo mosaics for
Knicipalities;
ew or revised composite base maps at
andard metric scales for selected
uprovement Districts, Specified Areas
nd Local Communities;
raps and graphics for various reports/
Rblications of the Division and the
unistry for a variety of planning projects
filiated or co-ordinated by the Division's
anners;
egal descriptions for new incorporations
ffamendments to the boundaries of
municipalities; electoral areas; specified
and defined areas, improvement'districts
and community planning areas;
• Processed municipal and regional district
applications for mapping to be considered
under the Large Scale Base Mapping
Program of the Ministry of the
Environment;
• Co-ordinated Provincial response to a
wide variety of requests for Provincial
mapping and air photo material initiated
by municipal and regional district
planning offices.
Publications
The following reports prepared by the
Division or under its direction were published
during 1980:
• The Planning Act: A Discussion Paper;
• Resource Community Planning: Guide to
Computer Programs Population—
Housing and Municipal Finance;
• Resource Community Planning Economic
Implications for Resource Developers of
Settlement Options;
• Problems and Responses Resource
Community Development (Reprint);
• Residential Services and Site Planning
Standards.
B. AFFAIRS
PAf.F THrPTV-AMB
 n
Chairman
Vice-Chairman
Vice-Chairman
Manager
Chief Planner
Planner
Planner
Technical Assistant
Technical Assistant
Research Officer
Administrative Officer
Clerk Steno 3
Office Assistant
Islands Trust
Officers and Staff
John Rich
John Gaines
Gordon Wallace
Tony Roberts
David Morris
Chris Foord
Deane
Strongitharm
Edward Pickard
Rixon Briggs
Lorna Barr
Mary Lee
Carmen Thiel
Janet Chu
Introduction
The Islands Trust is an Agency established in
1974 by an Act of the British Columbia
Legislature. The Islands Trust Act gives the
Trust the responsibility of preserving and
protecting the unique amenities and
environment of the Trust Area for the benefit
of the people of the Islands and the Province
generally.
In 1977 the British Columbia Legislature
amended the Islands Trust Act to transfer
authority for all land planning matters on the
islands to the Islands Trust from the Regional
Districts.
Organization
General Trust—There is a General Trust
Committee for the entire Islands Trust Area.
The General Trust Committee oversees the
operation of the Trust office, and considers
and decides on land planning matters which
affect more than one designated group of
islands. Three General Trustees make up the
General Trust Committee and they are also
members of each Local Trust Cornrnitteeft
The General Trustees are elected from among!
the Local Trustees.
Local Trust Committee—There is a Local    |
Trust Committee for each of 13 groups of
designated islands. The main island in each \
of the 13 groups is listed below with the
bracketed number indicating the numbeiBi
associated islands.
Bowen (5)
Denman (5)
Gabriola (22)
Galiano (10)
Gambier (24)
Saturna (12)
Thetis (15)
Hornby (2)
Lasqueti (24)
Mayne (2)
North Pender (2fS
Salt Spring (28) I
South Pender (2) I
Each designated island group elects two
Local Trustees, who serve a two-year term
They serve as two members of a five-membe
Local Trust Committee for that island group.
It is responsible for all local planning, egl
zoning, community plans and local policy.
There are approximately 40 non-designated
islands, not under the jurisdiction of Local
Trust Committees. They are under the
jurisdiction of the General Trust.
Sub-Agencies
Advisory Planning Commissions: 13 have
been appointed mostly after local elecnmB
These Commissions involve 65 residenHB
owners in addition to the Local TrusteeSH
They advise the Local Trust CoiTimitteeSH
planning matters referred to them.
Board of Variance: 13 Boards of VarianfflJ
have been set up based on three groups of
three persons.
Council: This is an informal quarterlJM
meeting of two days at which all 26 Trustee: I
meet to discuss a wide range of subjects of
more than local importance.
.BRITISH COM
 iy-Statistics
Jil Trust Committee
reetings Held
eral Trust Meetings
Ed
pcil Meetings Held
Rvs Passed
J Bvs in Process at Year
Sp
J Bvision Applications
eviewed
ij aning Applications
eceived
3 ^n Lease Applications
eceived
ig Permits for Hornby
and Denman
[cultural Land Reserve
fpplications
1c Hearings Held
ra of Variance
gplications
elopment Permit
pplications Received
1979   1980
78
26
4
35
23
157
24
74
66
24
3
36
32
155
30
96
53      115
34
17
25
18
11
19
Eh
Erk in Government Student
ffinent Program provided the Trust with
Br-sons who were mainly responsible
development of design concepts for
)|s on Salt Spring Island and the
fibn of an inventory of wildlife and
m resources for the Trust Area. These
rdies resulted in reports now available
gublic. A report on the water resources
Hi Pender Island was also produced.
lal Policy Formulation
SI developed by the General Trust with
act of all Local Trustees, primarily
E Council and its Committees. The
ffirce of Trust Area policy will be the
Sal Plan which is required under the
roaZ Act. The process of preparing the
mtinued in 1980 and involved a
Etee of Trustees, staff and technical
R/ith other Ministries. As part of the
tlial Plan program a draft background
awas produced.
The following Committees of Council
provide an indication of the subjects which
are of general concern to the Trust:
Taxation, Environmental Impact
Assessment, Oil Spills, Wildlife,
Energy and Utilities, Coastal Zone
Management and Transportation.
Among the major issues facing the 1980
Trust was the proposal for an open pit
molybdenum mine on Gambier Island. This
was firmly opposed and prompted a request
for a general reserve against exploration and
mining throughout the Trust Area.
Community Planning
The community planning process is largely
based on the Community Plans and
implementing subdivision and zoning
bylaws. All 13 main islands have operating
Official Community Plans and Zoning and
Subdivision Bylaws. Most work has been
related to revisions and amendments in 1980.
Finance
The 1980-81 Budget for the Trust is
approximately $435,000. This is partly
financed by a 0.75 mill levy in the Trust Area
which raised $75,000. The remainder is
provided directly by the Province. The Trust
shares with the other sections of the Ministry
of Municipal Affairs some accounting and
personnel services.
Public Involvement
The Trust encourages public involvement in
planning for the islands. In addition to the
100 Islanders directly involved in committees
and commissions, the general public
participate at meetings held on the islands
and obtain information from newsletters,
publications, notices on island notice boards
and newspaper advertisements. The Trust's
Zenith number is used extensively. An
example of a publication is "A Guide to
Planning, Zoning and Subdivision Control in
the Islands Trust Area" issued early in 1978
and revised in 1979.
Seven meetings were held on the islands to
involve the public in Regional Plan
preparation.
I Affairs
PAP.F THIRTV-THRBB
 Tl
List of Trustees
Bowen Island
Richard Greenwood, John Rich
Denman Island
Harlene Holm, Glen Snook
Gabriola Island
Nelder Boulton, Jim Tyhurst
Galiano Island
William Duncan, Ron Thompson
Gambier Island
Elspeth Armstrong, Beverley Baxter
Hornby Island
Carol Martin, Betty Smith
Lasqueti Island
Laurence Fisher, Mike Humphries
Mayne Island
Joan Sprague, John Mundie
North Pender Island
Emile LeBlanc, Gordon Wallace
Salt Spring Island
Leonard Kreissl, David Lott
Saturna Island
John Gaines, Jim Money
South Pender Island
Joan Noble, Bill Norton
Thetis Island
Bill Dickie, Dick Nixon
Queen's Printer for British Columbia <1
Victoria. 1981
 D«rcTUH>TVi:niiD
BRITISH CEMA

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