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Province of British Columbia Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Report for the year ended December… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1983]

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 I       Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing
Report for the year ended December 31,1980
 British Columbia. Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing.
Report for the year ended December 3.... -1978
Annual.
Cover title: Annual report.
ISSN 0226-0476 = Annual Report — Ministry of Lands,
Parks and Housing.
1. British Columbia. Ministry of Lands, Parks and
Housing. 2. Land use — British Columbia — Periodicals.
3. Parks policy — British Columbia — Periodicals.
• 4y Housing policy — British Columbia — Periodicals.
HD319.B7A3 354.711067132
 To the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving
D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.
Lieutenant Governor
of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to present the Annual Report of
the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing for the year
ended December 31,1980.
-^^3-«>ws-«-e?    /\   .   //CjwB-gJ^!.
James R. Chabot
Minister of Lands, Parks and Housing
  To the Honourable James R. Chabot
Minister of Lands, Parks and Housing
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of
the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing for the year
ended December 31, 1980.
^ £ Q/^^
John C. Johnston
Deputy Minister
  As we detail the achievements of this young Ministry in our third Annual Report,
it is an appropriate time to recognize the efforts of everyone in the Ministry to
bring about these achievements. The output from any organization, whether in
the public or private sector, is largely the result of the input from those within it.
In this respect, I feel this Ministry to be very fortunate.
In a relatively short time, my Ministry has undergone extensive changes, changes
necessitated by the mandate the Ministry was given on its formation. These
changes have affected Ministry staff at all levels, in Victoria and in the regions
and districts throughout the province. I am proud to review in this report the
accomplishments that show how well the Ministry staff has met these
new challenges.
As the public desire for land for various uses increases along with the need for
housing and the desire for a superior parks system, so also will the challenges
that face this Ministry increase. I am confident that the staff of this Ministry will
continue to meet those challenges!
»
/\     .       /S\JBS&-Sts<^
Hon. James R. Chabot
 Table of Contents
The Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Page
Mandate 10
Acts and Regulations Administered 13
Organization Charts 14
Directory 21
Lands and Housing Regional Operations Division
An Overview 24
Cariboo Region 26
Kootenays Region 28
Lower Mainland Region 30
Omineca Region 32
Peace Region  34
Skeena Region  36
Thompson-Okanagan Region 38
Vancouver Island Region 40
Parks and Outdoor Recreation Division
An Overview 44
Research and Program Analysis  46
Planning and Design   46
Extension and Information 48
Operations 49
Kootenays Regional Operations 50
Lower Mainland Regional Operations 51
Omineca-Peace Regional Operations ■. .52
Skeena Regional Operations  53
Thompson-Okanagan Regional Operations 54
Vancouver Island Regional Operations 55
 Program and Management Services Division Page
An Overview 68
Public Relations 70
Housing Programs  70
Land Programs  75
Surveys and Land Records 76
Finance and Administration 76
Research  77
Legal Services 77
Professional Services 78
Special Projects Division
An Overview 85
University Endowment Lands Administration 86
Ecological Reserves Unit 87
Greenbelt Reserves 88
Pacific Rim National Park Land Assembly  88
Special Properties 88
Land Application Appeal Committee 88
Protocol Agreements  88
Crown Corporations
Provincial Rental Housing Corporation 90
Housing Corporation of British Columbia  90
British Columbia Housing Management Commission 91
 ! j|
I/77T
ii
Effete
fori
inistry of Lands, Parks a
Mandate
 using
*3S^S
"To manage and allocate
Crown lands in the Province of
British Columbia, to maintain
and improve a quality system of
parks, and to encourage the
best use of Crown land for
agriculture, housing, industry,
commerce and recreation within
the Province of British
Columbia. To manage and
develop housing programs to
serve British Columbians."
  Ministry of Lands,
Parks and Housing
Acts and Regulations administered
Acts:
Ecological Reserves Act
Greenbelt Act
Home Purchase Assistance Act
Housing Construction (Elderly Citizens) Act
Land Act
Home Conversion and Leasehold Loan Act
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Act
Mobile Home Act
Motor Vehicle (All Terrain) Act
Park Act
Park (Regional) Act
Provincial Home Acquisition Act
Recreational Land Greenbelt Encouragement Act
University Endowment Lands Administration Act
West Coast National Park Act
Regulations under:
Air Space Titles Act (Survey Regulations)
Canada Shipping Act (Boating regulations)
Coal Act (Survey regulations)
Land Registry Act (Survey regulations)
Mineral Act (Survey regulations)
Official Surveys Act (Survey regulations)
Petroleum and Natural Gas Act (Survey regulations)
Strata Titles Act (Survey regulations)
 B.C. Housing Management Commission
Mary Kerr, Chairman
Keith Davis, General Manager
Administrative Assistant
Hilary Hamilton
Assistant Deputy Minister
Lands & Housing Regional Operations Division
Thomas E. Lee
■Operations Assistant
iDon Goodwin
IRegional Director, Cariboo
I Earl Wamock
IRegional Director, Kootenays
I Frank Bertoia
IRegional Director, Lower Mainland
Ig. Al Rhoades
I Regional Director, Omineca
I Hank Boas
I Regional Director, Peace
I Donald Ross
I Regional Director, Skeena
Lack Hall
IRegional Director, Thompson/Okanagan
I Dennis G. Podmore
I Regional Director, Vancouver Island
Assistant Deputy Minister
Parks & Outdoor Recreation Division
Christopher O. Gray
(Manager, Research & Program Anal;
■Vacant
I Director, Planning & Design
I George Trachuk
[Director, Extension & Information
IJake Masselink (Acting)
I Director, Operations
I Charles Velay
 Director of Public Relations
Sybil Ainscough
it Deputy Minister
i & Management Services Division
umitage
iictor, Housing Programs
rglas Ausman
lisctor, Land Programs
hk Edgell
tector, Surveys & Land Records
Hge Wilson
lector, Finance & Administration
/cent Collins
Sector, Research
Pfister
Sector, Legal Services
Sdcolm McAvity
I'ector, Professional Services
{Sglas Rogers
Assistant Deputy Minister
Special Projects Divison
Robert H. Ahrens
.Co-ordinator, Ecological
1 Reserves
Dr. Bristol Foster
■ Manager,
Univ. Endowment Lands
Ronald O'Genski
Assistant Deputy Minister
Special Projects
David Borthwick
I Advisor, Indian Land
W. Fry
 Assistant Deputy Minister
Lands & Housing Regional Operations Division
Thomas E. Lee
— Operations Assistant — Don Goodwin
— Regional Director, Cariboo — Earl Warnock
|— Manager, Housing & Development — Joseph Loyer
I— Manager, Land Administration — Fred Baxter
I— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Rhoda Hunter
— Regional Director, Kootenays — Frank Bertoia
I— Manager, Housing & Development — Dick Roberts
I— Manager, Land Administration — Reginald Bose
*~" Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Dwaine Garner
— Regional Director, Lower Mainland — G. Al Rhoades
I— Manager, Housing & Development — Raymond Skelly
J—- Manager, Land Administration — Bob Gilmour
I— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Michael Smith
— Regional Director, Omineca — Hank Boas
I— Manager, Housing & Development — Peter Levy
k- Manager, Land Administration — Steve Mazur
•— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Helen O. Olson
— Regional Director, Peace — Donald Ross
I— Manager, Housing & Development — Eric Gunderson
I— Manager, Land Administration — Arthur Penner
1— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Dean Davis
— Regional Director, Skeena — Jack Hall
^ Manager, Housing & Development — Alistair Sanderson
|— Manager, Land Administration — Rick Potter
I— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Susan Risby
= Regional Director, Thompson/Okanagan — Dennis G. Podmore
E Manager, Housing & Development — Vic Hamm
Manager, Land Administration — Douglas Snider
Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Ken Kidd
— Regional Director, Vancouver Island — Douglas McColl
I— Manager, Housing & Development — Pat Grove
I— Manager, Land Administration — Robert Milton
L— Supervisor, Finance & Administration — Joan May
 I—""^ "^^~
ssstant Deputy Minister
irs & Outdoor Recreation Division
tutopher O. Gray
— Manager, Research & Program Analysis — Vacant
— Director, Planning & Design — George Trachuk
I— Manager, Planning — Gordon Mcnab
I— Manager, Resource Management—Vacant
I— Manager, Design — Don Shaw
— Director, Extension & Information — Jake Masselink (Acting)
I— Manager, Regional & Community Parks — George Broome
I— Manager, Production Services — B. McClelland (Acting)
1— Manager, Interagency Coordination — Dennis Moffat
— Director, Operations — Charles Velay
— Manager, Management Section — Ray Lowrey
— Manager, Capital Maintenance — Imre Klima
— Regional Director, Kootenays — Milton E. Goddard
— Regional Director, Lower Mainland — Ian Leman
— Regional Director, Omineca Peace — Tom O. Moore
— Regional Director, Skeena— D. E. (Herb) Green
— Regional Director, Thompson/Okanagan — Alan Campbell
—■ Regional Director, Vancouver Island — Joseph W. Gillings
 i recti
ri
i recti
b
i recti
b
Assistant Deputy Minister
Program & Management Services Division
Andrew Armitage
Director, Housing Programs — Douglas Ausman
Manager, Home Purchase Assistance — Harry Rounds
Manager, Community Housing — Hilary Stewardson
Registrar, Mobile Home Registry— Marion Price
Director, Land Programs — Frank Edgell
Manager, Land Use Planning — Gregory Roberts
Manager, Land Tenure Policy — Conrad Thomas
Director, Surveys & Land Records — George Wilson
Manager, Land Records — Warren (Buzz) Long
Surveyor General — Ronald W. Thorpe
Director, Finance & Administration — Vincent Collins
— Manager, Financial Accounting — Bill Edwards
— Manager, Budget Analysis — John Minkley (Acting)
— Manager, Mechanical Services — Mel Young
— Manager, Personnel — Gary Barnes
Director, Research — R. Pfister
Director, Legal Services — Malcolm McAvity
Director, Professional Services — Douglas Rogers
— Manager, Technical Services — George Goos
— Manager, Land Assembly — Wes Umphrey
Manager, Marketing — G. Porter (Acting)
Ski Coordinator — Dan Matthews
^— Director, Special Projects — Denny Zadak
 tsstant Deputy Minister
icial Projects Divison
)brt H. Ahrens
b
Co-ordinator, Ecological Reserves — Dr. Bristol Foster
Manager, Univ. Endowment Lands — Ronald O'Genski
iistant Deputy Minister
icial Projects
aid Borthwick
Advisor, Indian Land — W. Fry
  ftirl    ■■-   -
■                    MM
_■_
mi}}   Minis
»try of La
nds,
\£s   Park
s and Ho
using
fctory
te
s Chabot                        387-1221
Parliament Buildings
Acting Director, Extension & Information
Victoria, B.C. V8V1X4
Jake Masselink                           387-3069
1019 Wharf St.
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y9
1 tylnlster
1 Oslpton                            387-3397
1019 Wharf Street
Director, Operations
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
Charles Velay                             387-6491
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y9
1 :o*ublic Relations
lAlcough                              387-3502
1019 Wharf Street
Regional Director, Kootenays
Victoria, BC.V8W2Y9
Milton E. Goddard                       489-4333
828A Baker St.
Cranbrook, B.C. V1C1A2
fe'rojects
1 \i Deputy Minister
Regional Director, Lower Mainland
livens                        387-5710
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
Ian Leman                                     929-1291
1610 Indian River Dr.
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7G1L3
ditor, Ecological Reserves
Regional Director, Omineca Peace
I aiUJOSter                             387-1859
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y9
Tom 0. Moore                             562-8131
308-1011 4th Ave.
Prince George, B.C.
ic University Endowment Lands
V2L 3H9
aBnski                                 224-3251
5495 Chancellor Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T1E2
Regional Director, Skeena
D E. (Herb) Green                       847-4411
3794 Alfred Avenue
8 Housing Regional Operations Division
Smithers, B.C. VOJ 2N0
A: Deputy Minister
Regional Director, Thompson-Okanagan
il:E. Lee                               387-6269
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
Alan Campbell                             374-5986
101-1050 W. Columbia St
Kamloops, B.C. V2C1L4
Operations Assistant
Regional Director, Vancouver Island
11:. Goodwin                         387-3143
345 Quebec Street
Victoria, B.C. V8V1X5
Joseph W. Gillings                           754-4297
203-190 Wallace St.
Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 5B1
ol Director, Cariboo
V-nock                                  392-6261
172 North 2nd Ave.
Williams Lake, B.C.
V2G 1Zf
Program and Management Services Division
cl Director, Kootenays
Assistant Deputy Minister
tertoia                                489-4333
828A Baker St.
Cranbrook, B.C. V1C 1A2
Andrew Armitage                         387-6054
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y9
til Director, Lower Mainland
Director, Housing Programs
hoades                              438-5344
4240 Manor Street
Bumaby, B.C. V5G1B2
Douglas Ausman                       387-5381
838 Fort Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y5
(ll Director, Omineca
Director, Land Programs
bas                                   562-8131
1011-4th Ave.
Prince George, B.C.
Frank Edgell                               387-3987
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y9
V2L 3H9
Director, Survey & Land Records
i ll Director, Peace
George Wilson                            387-5600
345 Quebec Street
Victoria, B.C. V8V1X5
1 Ross                                   787-7766
220-9900 100th Ave.
Ft. St. John, B.C.
Director, Finance & Administration
V1J 1Y3
Vincent Collins                              387-1154
1019 Wharf Street
lai Director, Skeena
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
'all                                         847-4411
3794 Alfred Ave.
Acting Director, Research
Smithers, B.C. VOJ 2N0
B. Battles                                          387-3509
1019 Wharf Street
al Director, Thompson-Okanagan
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
i G. Podmore                     554-3144
348 Tranquille Road
Director, Legal Services
Kamloops, B.C. V2B 3G6
Malcolm McAvity                         387-5569
1019 Wharf Street
lial Director, Vancouver Island
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
is McColl                               387-5011
851 Yates St.
Director, Professional Services
Victoria, B.C. V8X1M1
Douglas Rogers                          387-1306
1019 Wharf Street
& Outdoor Recreation Division
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
Pant Deputy Minister
f Jpher 0. Gray                      387-3322
1019 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
B.C. Housing Management Commission
i Manager, Research & Program Analys
s
Chairman
Itfflster                                  387-1978
1019 Wharf St.
Mary Kerr                                   873-0313
206-515 West 10th
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y9
Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4A8
lar, Planning & Design
General Manager
leTrachuk                            387-5002
633 Courtenay St.
Keith Davis                                 873-0313
206-515 West 10th
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Victoria, B.C. V8W 1B9
Vancouver, B.C. V52 4A8
  The past year was one of consolidation and integration in the Ministry. As will
become apparent when this year's accomplishments are reviewed, it was one in
which we fully met the challenges of new organization and a new mandate.
1980 was a year in which we as a Ministry, with the staff and resources allocated
to us by government, responded to greatly increased demands by the people of
British Columbia. This increased demand was for all the resources provided by
the Ministry—for the allocation of Crown land to various uses, for the release of
land, for the establishment and management of our parks, and aid in meeting the
need for housing. With the ever growing public awareness of our Ministry and its
responsibilities, we have no reason to think these demands will lessen in the
coming years.
With this important need to respond to the demands of the people of our province
in mind, 1980 was also a year of identifying the challenges that face us as a
Ministry in the decade ahead and preparing now to handle them. It was a time of
long range planning, allocating resources in terms of staff and expenditures, and
putting in place the systems that will permit this Ministry to meet its
responsibilities most effectively in the future.
We look forward in the year ahead to achieving these goals which we as a
Ministry have set and must meet for the fulfillment of our mandate.
<^L
/biAA**
John Johnston
Deputy Minister
 Lands and Housing Region
An Overview of 1980 Activities:
The past year has seen an increased
awareness on the part of British Columbians of
the whole subject of land use allocation. While
questions of whether to put Crown land into
service for agricultural, residential, recreational
or other uses raised controversy in some
instances, this served the very real and
necessary function of informing people that
these choices must be made and made wisely.
This was particularly apparent with the release
of agricultural lands many of which contain
inherent resource values in addition to their
capacity to produce agricultural products.
Clearly, there is a strong interest in public lands,
for the Ministry received more inquiries and
applications for Crown land than ever before,
and these were dealt with more quickly and
efficiently than in previous years. A major
achievement was made in the area of
recreational cottage lots in which an inventory
of over 300 lots was developed for disposition.
In the area of housing, the Ministry last year
enjoyed some major successes in expanding
industrial towns such as Elkford and Logan
Lake. In general, the rural housing inventory
increased dramatically and the problems
focussed on the urban centres. Here, an
extraordinary demand created shortages in
spite of an exceptional year in new housing
construction. This problem will carry over as a
major challenge for the new year.
In summary, 1980 was a year of substantial
progress for the Ministry's land and housing
programs.
litter'.           3
^i
*Mf
vm"
Assistant Deputy Minister
Thomas E. Lee
 i perations Division
BRITISH COLUMBIA
District Boundary
Regional Boundary
Regional Office
Onelson Indicates
District
Office
Regions
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Cariboo Region
Regional Director, Earl Warnock
The Cariboo region has an economy based on
forestry, agriculture, mining and recreation.
During 1980, the healthy condition of the
agriculture and forest industries (despite a weak
timber market) resulted in strong and steady
growth, particularly in the Williams Lake and
Quesnel areas. As a result, there were more
people looking for homes, both in these towns
and in the surrounding countryside. The private
sector responded well, but there was still
considerable interest in Crown land for rural
residential use, and a shortage of urban lots in
Williams Lake itself.
A poor summer and increased transportation
costs kept the recreation industry from growing,
but there were many British Columbians,
particularly from the Lower Mainland, searching
for recreational lots in this beautiful region.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
A Senior Citizen housing project in Quesnel
reached the tender stage; a survey was begun
in response to a request from the Senior
Citizens' Club of Bella Coola for assistance; and
the Williams Lake and District Senior Citizens'
Housing Society applied for a five acre site for
the purpose of constructing needed housing for
50 senior citizens.
The Ministry provided 646 homeowners in the
region with a total of $1,920,000.00 in First
Home grants and second mortgages to help
them buy their own homes.
Road development for Moorehead Lake was
completed this year and hydro installation,
survey and appraisal begun. The staged
residential development of 566 hectares on Fox
Mountain adjacent to Williams Lake continued
with the first 25 lots nearing completion. The
development of recreational lots at Lynx
Peninsula, Horsefly Lake and Winkley Creek on
Quesnel Lake also continued. Studies
conducted during 1980 identified rural
residential lots for development at Frost Creek,
Riske Creek, Alexis Creek, Anahim Lake and
Cottonwood House.
I
Land Administration
Land use planning studies were underway il
1980 to determine the best use of Crown la)
in the areas of Dragon Mountain, Pantage I
Bouchie Lake area; and five parcels of land
were leased to local ranchers in the Gerimf
area. The Calvert Island Land Use Plan wet
completed, and land was designated for I
recreational and residential foreshore usel
commercial and industrial foreshore
development.
Regional staff processed 1,710 application!
Crown land, with another 35 outstanding at
year-end. Residential applications increasec
30% over the previous year. The number of
agricultural lease applications remained thi
same, but the average size of the applicatig
increased substantially.
Demand for gravel leases and permits in tfl
Williams Lake area reflected the increased
construction activity.
Two rural residential developments were I
completed and distributed via lot draw: 11 lol
averaging three acres, in Junction SubdivisJ
13 miles southeast of Williams Lake on theF
Horsefly Lake Road near 150 Mile House, a
for from $11,700.00 to $12,600.00 each; arg
three lots averaging ten acres in Pablo Crel
12 miles west of Williams Lake on the Chilg
Highway, went for $20,700.00 each. Nine
parcels of land totalling 1,079.64 hectares J
leased for agricultural use by auction
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Uboo Region
B& Foreshore Dispositions For Year
fld December 31,1980
srose
Tenure
Number
Total Value    Area—hectares
rulture
nmunity
Mtnercial
tiitrial
MJtorage
poation
Hjential—Urban
ffiential—Rural
Commercial Dev.
ellaneous
Land:
Lease
Cert, of Purchase
Lease
Direct Sale
Lease
Licence
Licence
Lease
Licence
Lease
Licence
Direct Sale
Lease
Licence
Cert, of Purchase
Direct Sale
Lease
Licence
Lease
Licence
Cert, of Purchase
Free Crown Grant
40
28
1
1
157
6
41
1
1
8
3
4
31
4
29
27
1
11
7
95
7
1
$ 1,206,000
552,000
20,000
20,151
6,003,000
72,500
62,000
5,000
46,000
50,000
39,000
56,000
465,000
40,000
203,000
348,665
45,000
121,000
125,000
760,000
52,000
17,000
504
$10,308,316
2,010.
1,840
6
2.
12,007
145.
41
11
16
5.
1.
0
32,
2
99.
39.
6
9.
66,
132,
113
5.
15
10
50
47
36
72
41
49
00
10
50
3117
00
40
09
1853
66
57
12
05
42
00
16,593.607
ESHORE:
imercial
istrial
jStorage
s:ellaneous
I Foreshore:
Lease
Licence
Lease
Licence
Lease
Licence
Licence
14,000
11,000
24,000
67,000
7,000
98,000
8,000
22
$     229,000
2.20
3.66
26.14
36.00
6.22
34.50
1.40
110.12
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Kootenays Region
Regional Director, Frank Bertoia
Mining and recreation exerted the two strongest
economic influences upon this region in 1980.
Announcements of two new mining sites at
Greenhills and Line Creek resulted in a short
term demand for 1,400 homes in Elkford,
Sparwood and Fernie. Interest in the Rocky
Mountain Trench by holidaying Albertans
contributed to increased development of
recreational facilities in and around Kimberley,
Panorama, Fairmont Hot Springs and Radium
Hot Springs.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
1,093 homeowners in this region received
$2,398,500.00 in First Home grants and second
mortgages.
Senior Citizen housing projects were completed
and opened in Cranbrook (20 units) and
Creston (26 units). Construction began on a 31
unit project in Fernie, and designs were
finalized and approved for projects in Grand
Forks (28 units) and Nelson (30 units). Two new
projects, for Revelstoke and Kaslo, were also
approved. Collectively, these projects provide
housing for about 300 senior citizens.
Four land servicing projects were completed,
resulting in the following lots being made
available to the public: in Golden (Mount Seven
Subdivision) 41 single family lots; in Kimberley
(St. Mary's Phase II) 18 single family lots, (North
Star Phase II) 12 single family and 6
multi-family lots, (Marysville Trailer Park Phase
II) 40 single family lots; in Warfield (Sleeman
Subdivision) 35 single family lots. Six other
projects, in Kimberley, Sparwood and Elkford
were underway, and two further requests from
the City of Kimberley were under review.
Subdivision development was completed at
Wilmer to create a five lot subdivision, and work
began on a 30 lot subdivision in an adjoining
area. A five lot subdivision was also created at
Appledale/Winlaw in the Slocan Valley.
Three replotting assistance programs were
undertaken: one in Castlegar, where 180 lots
should result; one in Creston with a potential of
38 lots; and a Rossland replot involving 330
lots.
A total of 16 Crown land lots were sold to th<
public for a combined price of $117,480,001
Land Administration
Land use planning studies were underway i:
the Southern Rocky Mountain Trench, the]
Cranbrook to Canal Flats area, and the j
Columbia Windermere Lakes area. The Migj
also provided input to the Ministry of Forests
proposals for designating the Cranbrook, da
Kootenay, Kinbasket and Creston Provincial
Forests by identifying Crown lands which wf
required for development in the next five yeal
In 1980, 561 new land applications were I
received, a 21% increase over the previousll
year. The large number of applications fori
residential use in the Nelson district reflected
the peoples' continued desire for a rural
lifestyle. Applications in the Cranbrook distill
for trappers' and guides' cabins and
recreational cabin sites resulted from the hid
recreational interest in this area.
A total of 41 Leases and eight Licences of
Occupation, involving 317.8 hectares, werefl
issued, 42 parcels of Crown land totalling 17
hectares were sold, and 20 Letters of Consa
for gravel and soil removal and other purpoa
were issued.
Crown land development 1980a
Kootenays Region
Lots
Project
Hectares
S/F Multi
Financ
1. Golden
8.1
39
1
$     601
2. Kimberley:
St. Mary's Phase I
North Star Phase I
St. Mary's Phase II
9.00±
59
12
745
North Star Phase II
Marysville Trailer
Park Phase II
1.65
40
—
190
3. Sparwood
71
187
66±
1,117
4. Elkford Phase VII
15.9
187
—
2,000
Phase VIII
80+
391
1
5,000
5. Warfield
4.05
35
—
66|
TOTALS:
189.7+
938
80±
$10,323
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
lsnays Region
Foreshore Dispositions for Year
December 31,1980
jase
Tenure
Number
Total Value    Area—hectares
I
t ture
lity
zig
itorage
■ration
Ritial—Urban
Ifritial—Rural
Isommercial Dev.
Ijaneous
End:	
ISHORE:
irial
tdo rage
Lease
Cert, of Purchase
Lease
Free Crown Grant
Lease
Lease
Lease
Licence
Lease
Cert, of Purchase
Lease
Cert, of Purchase
Licence
Lease
Licence
Cert, of Purchase
3
4
1
2
1
2
5
2
10
11
8
46
1
3
3
12
114
$146,000
124.27
37,705
128.28
7,500
1.34
150,000
7.84
50,000
32.38
23,000
46.31
71,100
35.24
2,500
2.69
32,190
5.10
82,624
5.20
45,010
4.01
239,778
35.45
2,725
0.25
18,000
32.65
8,000
1.34
48,620
19.56
$964,752
481.91
piation
lilaneous
eForeshore:
Licence
Lease
Licence
Lease
Lease
1,100
35,620
42,000
23,700
8,000
0.17
32.97
12.14
2.13
1.59
10
$110,420
49.00
I
 .fm*x
Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
1
Lower Mainland Region
Regional Director, G. Al Rhoades
High migration to this economically buoyant
region, and the soaring prices of land and
housing, created great demands in the Lower
Mainland in 1980. The construction industry
responded well, and housing starts in the first
ten months increased by 33% over the previous
year. The federal Capital Cost Allowance was
reintroduced near year-end, providing a further
stimulus for multiple unit construction.
The Minister responded to the need by
announcing an Urban Land Strategy for the
Lower Mainland to make Crown land available
for housing, particularly in the northeast sector.
Demand for recreational land was high in the
Squamish-Pemberton corridor, especially
around Whistler. Construction of the Coquihalla
Pass Highway is expected to bring an increased
demand for land in the area it serves, especially
for recreational and commercial purposes.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
In 1980, 6046 homeowners in the Lower
Mainland received First Home grants and
second mortgages totalling $14,283,000.00 to
help them buy homes. Work continued towards
meeting the needs of senior citizens for
housing. Haro Park Geriatric Centre in
Vancouver's West End opened with 64
self-contained apartments and 212 intermediate
care beds. Construction neared completion on a
16 unit project in Matsqui, three new projects
were approved (one in Delta, two in Vancouver),
and projects in Coquitlam, White Rock, Maple
Ridge and Matsqui were under review.
Three Co-operative Housing Associations in the
region received High Impact Grants to reduce
their operating costs in their projects' early
years, with the saving passed along to
Co-operative members.
In conjunction with the Provincial Ministries of
Health and Human Resources, regional staff
helped provide housing for handicapped
people. Rent subsidies were approved for a
total of 40 accommodations including both
individual homes and group homes with
attendants. Twelve conversion loans were also
granted to assist people in the modificS
existing housing to create 34 self-contan
apartments specially tailored for the  ]
handicapped.
Studies were conducted in the Powell Rj
Squamish-Lillooet and Sunshine Coasfl
and, as a result, Crown lands for resides
development will be made available nea
Creek, Gibsons, Pender Harbour, SpetS
and Brandywine Falls, and in the WoodN
Town Site of the Village of Belcarra. Fun<
made available under the Land Servicing
Program, for projects underway in Surra
Richmond, Pitt Meadows, Whistler and
Pemberton.
The Community Plan for the Riverview L
Coquitlam was approved by Council. Tfj
provides for development on Crown lang
to 1,050 homes. Discussions were held I
District of Coquitlam, Port Moody and thl
G.V.R.D. regarding the Westwood Plate!
with the Municipality of New Westminster
B.C.D.C. staff concerning the B.C. Penite
lands. The District of Squamish agreed 3
consider a rezoning proposal for TantaliT
hectare strata mobile home park.
Land Administration
Crown land plans were completed for Uq
Lillooet and the Lang Creek area.
There was a decrease of 14% in the nurr]
new land applications received. There wj
new applications, 873 field examination^
done, and 203 requests remained outstai
Over the year, the region issued 165 leas
seven letters of consent, and 56 gravel r\
permits. Crown land sales increased
significantly. 31 parcels suitable for residf
development were sold for a total of
$8,500,000.00, 29 leasehold lots were sr|
an inventory of 92 recreational lots was q
 te
Lands and Housing
w
Regional Operations
Division
/r Mainland Region
H: Foreshore Dispositions for Year
i December 31,1980
p;e
Tenure
Number
Total Value    Area-
—hectares
Hire
Lease
1
$           100
2.82
Licence
1
490
2.50
Cert, of Purchase
1
26,813
75.79
Crown Grant
1
10,918
3.68
unity
Lease
3
1,172
56.10
Crown Grant
3
52,628
4.75
Free Crown Grant
19
7,642,010
222.75
iiercial
Lease
7
22,442
152.23
Licence
1
25
0.09
Cert, of Purchase
4
114,579
1.58
Crown Grant
2
299,914
7.77
rial
Free Crown Grant
5
1,738,669
19.34
Lease
1
2,383
15.0
lorage
Licence
2
407
3.05
Rfion
Lease
33
55,891
24.53
Free Crown Grant
1
19,000
3.80
Ehtial—Urban              Lease
17
5,997
31.54
Licence
3
510
2.32
Cert, of Purchase
8
21,150
8.35
Other Sales
2
28,500
0.14
Ifntial—Rural               Lease
1
1,750
1.0
Cert, of Purchase
4
24,302
9.84
Crown Grant
1
18,250
5.67
Other Sales
18
153,900
1.46
antial—Other               Crown Grant
9
31,580
17.67
Other Sales
11
7,280,020
55.12
llaneous
Lease
6
4,595
13.63
Licence
1
100
0.14
Free Crown Grant
13
22,383,085
161.07
Land:
Crown Grant
6
69,723
1.76
185
$40,010,903
905.49
SHORE:
:ulture
Lease
2
$             100
3.76
iiercial
Lease
7
3,052
5.55
Licence
1
163
0.80
:rial
Lease
3
486
6.65
lorage
Lease
45
45,101
401.44
Licence
13
17,908
63.23
ation
Lease
3
150
21.40
llaneous
Lease
14
1,538
657.38
Foreshore:
Licence
11
600
17.95
99
$       69,098
1,178.16
 vzmm*
Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Omineca Region
Regional Director, Hank Boas
This region's economy is based on the forest
industry. Steady growth was experienced in
1980 resulting in an annual population increase
of 4%, double the provincial average. Possible
major mining developments in the Bowron
Valley, Fort Ware and the northeast coal block
could accelerate this even more. While
population increased, soaring interest rates
resulted in a decrease in new housing starts
and a shift to multi-family homes. In late 1980,
the former Omineca-Peace regional operation
was split into two with offices in Prince George
and Fort St. John, in order to provide a more
direct service to the public.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
First Home grants and second mortgages
totalling $2,678,000.00 were provided for 955
homeowners in the region.
A site was provided for the Fraser Lake Senior
Citizens home and the project, for 80 units,
approved. An 80 unit project for Prince George
and a 12 unit project for Fort St. James were
also approved, and a proposal by the Prince
George Community Resources Society for a
four unit group home for the disabled was under
review.
Through Crown land agreements, the staff was
involved in the development of 63 single family
lots in Prince George and 44 rural residential
lots at Gantahaz Lake. Preliminary feasibility
work was carried out on: an agricultural
development project at Wright Creek; rural
residential proposals at Fraser Lake,
Valemount, Vanway, Pineview, Tete Jaune,
McBride, Telechick, Beaverly, Vanderhoof,
McLeod Lake, Upper Fraser and Blackwater;
residential projects in Vanderhoof and West
Austin Road; recreation projects at Stuart Lake,
Chuchi Lake, Azu; and a recreational-
commercial subdivision in Prince George.
Land Administration
Major planning efforts were directed towards
the Prince George Special Sales Area study,
the Forest Reserves and Timber Supply area
review, and the Crown land agricultural land
planning disposition program.
During 1980, 919 new Crown land appliS
were received. Applications for agricultJB I
increased by 60%. A total of 126 leases!]
rights-of-way were issued. 133 residents!
rural lots at Cranbrook Hill (Prince Georg'i
Mackenzie, Gantahaz Lake and German
Landing, 37 recreational lots at sites incliri
Cluculz, Purden, Naltesby, Neas, Bednffl
Berman, Crystal, Norman and Summit Lai
and one commercial lot at Tete Jaune wei
offered for sale, and 78 of the lots wereH
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
ieca Region
Dispositions for Year
j December 31,1980
ise Tenure Number       Total Value    Area—hectares
ilture                           Cert, of Purchase 78            $  317,709 8,503.72
Lease 20 704,500 2,580.79
mity                           Leasehold 1 100 28.65
Rial                          Leasehold 4 15,804 3.91
fal                               Cert, of Purchase 2 259,060 79.74
forage                         Lease 1 100 15.00
Stial—Urban              Cert, of Purchase 15 46,604 20.71
Sntial—Rural                Licence 28 42,000 45.0
Direct Sale 6 55,243 0.99
Agreement for sale 19 209,201 3.14
laneous 12 21,719 93.385
ghd:  186 $1,672,040 11,375.035
 R^OK **'
Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Peace Region
Regional Director, Donald Ross
Agriculture, oil and gas exploration, forestry and
hydro power all figure in this region's economy,
with coal mining as a major new initiative. The
diverse nature of these resources helped keep
the region's economy buoyant during 1980.
There was however, a general slowdown in
building, except in Fort St. John which
continues to experience residential
development. Elsewhere in the region a rural
residential lifestyle remains in much demand.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
First Home grants and second mortgages
totalling $1,090,500.00 were provided to 380
people to help them buy their own homes.
The North Peace Care Home Society's project
for senior citizens, providing accommodation for
50 seniors, was completed. A proposal for a 40
unit Senior Citizen Home in Dawson Creek was
under review, as was a second proposal for that
town, and one for Chetwynd.
Surveying and road construction were
underway on the Farrel Creek agricultural
parcels, and power, roads and surveys were
completed on rural development projects at
Wonowon, Mile 63.5 Alaska Highway, Lynx
Creek, Graham Halfway, Prophet River and Mile
311 Alaska Highway. The Mill Creek recreational
subdivision was completed, and initial legal
surveys commenced for a market garden
project on the flood plain at Fort Nelson.
Land Administration
Many land use and settlement plans were
underway or pending final approval. These
included plans for Fort St. John, Chetwynd,
Hudson Hope, Fort Nelson, Upper Cache
Creek, Charlie Lake watershed, Doig-Osborne,
Synder-Umbach, Nig Creek, Halfway-Chowade
Road, Beatton River Greenbelt, Fort Simpson
Trail, McConnachie Creek, Kobes Creek,
| Boundary West, Cecil Lake, Toms Lake-Tupper
Community pasture, J. Stewart Block, Jackfish
Lake Road and Moberly Lake.
New Crown land applications totalled 13m
an increase of 21 % over the previous yea||
89 leases and 16 licences were issued
and 20 Crown land lots sold. In addition, 3J
hectares of land were auctioned for agricf
purposes.
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
ae Region
[dispositions for Year
Si December 31,1980
pse Tenure Number Value    Area—hectares
Hire                           Cert, of Purchase             122           $  257,707 14,714
Lease/Licence                    86             2,482,850 14,605
|ffljjiity                            Lease/Licence                      8              1,227,600 198
llrcial                          Lease/Licence                     9             3,286,0001 530
?ig                                Lease/Licence                    11                 203,325 1,196
ration                           Lease/Licence                     2                  30,480 N/A
isntial—Rural                Cert, of Purchase                44                 212,186 3,366
838,200 N/A
llaneous                      Lease/Licence                                        786,160 127
87,657 129
Bpd:  354 $9,412,165 34,865
Lease/Licence
8
Lease/Licence
9
Lease/Licence
11
Lease/Licengej^
2
Cert, of Purchase
44
Lease
35
Direct Sale
20
Lease/Licence
9
Cert, of Purchase
8
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Skeena Region
Regional Director, Jack Hall
Mining, forestry and shipping all contributed to a
buoyant regional economy in 1980. Mineral
exploration and mining activity at Port
Clements, Alice Arm, Houston, Stewart, Cassiar
and Black Lake are leading to an increased
demand for land for all purposes. Activity in and
around Prince Rupert brought an increased
demand for housing. The introduction of a ferry
service to the Queen Charlotte Islands, and
upgrading of Highway 37, have stimulated
interest in these areas for land for recreational
and commercial use.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
First Home grants and second mortgages
provided 715 homeowners in the region with a
total of $1,631,500.00 to help them buy their
own homes.
During the year, a 12 unit senior citizens project
for Kitimat was approved.
Development was completed during the year on
16 lots in Terrace and four inventory lots in
Houston's Mountain View subdivision were
marketed. Another 18.22 hectares in Houston
were purchased for recreational development.
24 lots were developed and marketed in Port
Clements, and 174 lots were developed and 49
sold in Prince Rupert. Proposals for a 52 lot
subdivision in Kitimat and an 80 lot subdivision
in Houston were under review. Resurveying and
servicing improvements at the King City
subdivision in Port Edward resulted in 59 lots
being produced.
Construction began on a 26 lot subdivision at
Dease Lake. A feasibility study was completed
on an eight lot subdivision in fopley. Preliminary
survey work was completed on a 20 lot
subdivision in Atlin. A contract was awarded to
develop 36 lots in two subdivisions on the
Queen Charlotte Islands.
Design work was completed for a 15 lot
recreational subdivision on Nilkitkwa Lake, and
approval was given to proceed with the survey
of 40 recreational lots in the Cassiar area.
Construction began on a 19 lot commercial
subdivision at Dease Lake.
Land Administration
Two land use plans were adopted. The Gra
Island Plan provides Crown land for residl
and rural development within guidelines
established to preserve the unique lifestyli
enjoyed by Island residents. The Highway;
Corridor Report outlines disposition plans f<
Crown land along the 750 kilometre highwj
corridor, for commercial, recreational and
residential uses. Three other plans for Stetf
foreshore, Palling and Meziadan neared
completion and a new plan was initiated fd]
area near Atlin in anticipation of a growing
demand for land due to the opening of tha
Adanac mine.
Land application inspections increased by (
200 leases and licences were issued, andi
draws resulted in five lots being leased in |
Atlin Lake Recreational Subdivision; three]
being sold in Dease Lake Residential
Subdivision and 11 reserved for Forest Ser
one lot leased in Good Hope Lake and 12|
leased in Cablecar Subdivision, Kitimat
 Lands and Housing
BIEs**—
Regional Operat
ions
Division
ena Region
lei Foreshore Dispositions Year
ill December 31,1980
fse
Tenure                        Number
Total Value
Area—hectares
J:
ilture
Lease
14
$   507,100
922.0
Cert, of Purchase
25
N/A
1,744.7
Eiunity
Free Crown Grant
3
197,000
2.548
eiercial
Lease
6
163,000
163.075
Licence
4
7,500
7.321
fig
Lease
67
N/A
13,678.73
Licence
2
N/A
34.36
i rial
Lease
4
20,000
5.3411
Licence
1
4,900
1.321
:torage
Lease
1
30,100
13.88
I ation
Lease
13
130,000
7.5769
I ential
Lease
36
288,000
90.1972
Licence
1
800
0.5250
Cert, of Purchase
42
N/A
45.5787
Direct sale
18
229,540
—
Crown Land Agreement
22
1,523,700
12.0
I Jlaneous
Lease
17
73,000
287.9249
[Land:
Licence
8
2,000
22.41
284
$3,176,640
17,039.4888
ESHORE:
Storage
Lease
6
$   110,000
65.654
Licence
5
100,000
58.284
I llaneous
| Foreshore:
Licence
6
37,500
15.1779
17
$   247,500
139.1159
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Thompson-Okanagan Region
Regional Director, Dennis G. Podmore
A buoyant economic climate resulted in this
region from an upsurge of construction activities
and a renewed interest in mining. Interprovincial
migration to the Okanagan area, increased
economic activity around Kamloops due to the
expansion of Lornex and Valley Copper's
proposal for development at Highland Valley,
and anticipated coal-hydro development at Hat
Creek combined to create pressure on the
housing supply.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
A total of $4,594,500.00 was provided to
homeowners in First Home grants and second
mortgages.
In Summerland and Ashcroft, 35 units of
self-contained Senior Citizens' housing were
completed. Authorization for construction was
given to societies sponsoring Senior Citizen
housing in Okanagan Falls (11 units), Penticton
(40 units), Peachland (10 units), Kelowna (29
units), Winfield (30 units), Kamloops (60 units)
and Clearwater (six units). The need for
additional seniors rental accommodation was
established in Penticton, Summerland,
Kelowna, Vernon, Salmon Arm and Kamloops.
An agreement was concluded with Apex Alpine
Recreation Ltd. to make Crown land available
for 38 chalet lots and 46 strata lots at Apex
Mountain. Discussions continued with the Ski
Development Co-ordinator, project consultants
and developers at Tod Mountain, Big White and
Silver Star Mountains for expansion of their
recreational facilities. A recreational subdivision
was completed at Bonaparte Lake and 13 lots
were released to the public and one retained in
inventory. Crown land and interim financing
were provided to the Village of Logan Lake to
complete the servicing of a large residential
subdivision and almost all available sites were
sold by year's end.
1
Land Administration
A major review of log storage requiremlB
Shuswap Lake, and the Bush Lake recreat
site plan were both completed, and a dram
policy on foreshore development was pre!
Work began on a study to determine reca
use on Crown land in the Kamloops areal
plan for the Highland Valley, and a joint
region/headquarters pilot planning projecl
the Clinton District. Work continued on trS
Bay foreshore plan, and staff reviewed fi\j§
major ski area proposals and proposed
expansions within the Region.
Applications for Crown land were up 55% c
1979.
Crown land development 198
Thompson-Okanagan
Location
Funding
Type & # lots
Phase I (1980)
Logan Lake    $5,200,000.
Lillooet
$   588,342.
Single family
Mobile Home
Rural Res.
Multiple
Phase II (1981)
Single family
Single family
2151
100
38
3
100
311
 i
1 Lands and Housing
IB
1 Regional Operations
Division
Bipson-
Okanagan Region
ic Foreshore Dispositions for Year
§ December 31,1980
)se
Tenure
Number
Total Value
Area—hectares
[iture
Lease
12
$   635,501
288.55
Cert, of Purchase
3
1,825
50.08
iiunity
Lease
3
19,496
4.98
iiercial
Lease
6
125,968
6.64
Cert, of Purchase
9
690,849
17.79
*g
Lease
65
4,787
14,109.06
rial
Lease
7
56,300
29.74
Cert, of Purchase
2
171,720
3.25
1 ation
Lease
30
207,331
9.78
1 ffiitial—Urban              Lease
6
7,997
5.3
Cert, of Purchase
9
140,365
14.40
jntial—R
jral               Lease
8
122,501
9.9
Cert, of Purchase
17
20,165
19.58
Commercial Dev.         Lease
3
46,500
20.33
llaneous
Lease
10
202,620
14.94
Cert, of Purchase
9
10,425
9.91
:.and:
Free Crown Grant
1
49,740
2.52
200
$2,514,090
14,616.75
[SHORE:
1 lercial
Lease
1
$          810
1.00
lational
Lease
1
188
0.1
forage
Lease
5
8,200
63.38
llaneous
|roreshore
Licence
2
285
0.73
9
$       9,483
65.21
k
 1
!P«
Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
Vancouver Island Region
Regional Director, Douglas McColl
All urban communities on the island faced an
increased demand for housing owing in part to
immigration and in part to investment capital
seeking a hedge against inflation. Vacancy
rates for rental accommodation continued at
very low levels and production of new homes
was restricted due to high interest rates.
1980 accomplishments
Housing and Development
First Home grants and second mortgages
totalling $7,053,500.00 were provided to 2,990
homeowners in the region.
Senior Citizen rental projects were completed at
Union Bay (12 units,), Comox (29 units) and
Saturna Island (four units). A 70 unit project
began construction at Nanaimo, tenders were
called for construction of 16 units at Lake
Cowichan and four at Tofino, a 28 unit project at
Duncan was approved, and land was provided
for projects at Union Bay, Saturna Island, Lake
Cowichan and Tofino.
Four housing units were completed and sold in
Ucluelet under the Remote Area Housing
program, and construction proceeded on an
additional three houses in Ucluelet and eight in
Alert Bay.
Through Crown land agreements, 22 residential
lots were developed at Alert Bay, 41 at Tahsis,
and 23 at Zeballos, and another 60 lots were
designated for development in Ucluelet.
Forty-six residential lots developed under
Crown land agreements were sold by
municipalities: eight at Alert Bay, 34 at Port
Hardy and four at Port McNeill. Rural
development programs produced 14 lots in
Nanoose, and 28 were designated for Hyde
Creek and 10 for South Wellington (Nanaimo).
Land Administration
The Sooke Harbour and Basin Crown
Foreshore Plan was completed. This was the
first marine foreshore plan developed by the
Ministry. A formal Crown foreshore plan was
initiated for Ladysmith Harbour, and the Victoria
Lake Land Use Plan was begun to resolve
trespass problems on forest land. Urban and
rural residential land analysis for the regm
completed. Assistance and advice was m
to Regional Districts and the Islands TruW
The number of Crown land applications*
increased by 12.5% over the previous yeg
Major applications associated with the
expansion of log sorting and booming area
disposal sites and mill expansions were un
study. Crown land was released for a varie
uses ranging from marinas to school sitS^
housing and parkland.
 Lands and Housing
Regional Operations Division
luver Island Region
It Foreshore Dispositions for Year
{December 31,1980
use
Tenure
Number
Total Value    Area—hectares
Eire
Sfnity
ercial
Eial
liitial—Urban
pntial—Rural
•ational
nore
planeous
site Lease
.and
NIL
Leases
Licence
Leases
C.P.
Direct sale
Leases
Leases
Licence
Direct sale
Direct sale
Lease
Licence
C.P.
Direct sale
Lease
Lease
Licence
Direct sale
Direct sale
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
3
1
68
16
8
25
21
13
3
3
1
1
&   111,
2,
4
21.
455
197.
238.
48
40.
4,672.
203,
23.
259,
270.
000.00
000.00
000.00
541.00
000.00
211.00
573.00
038.00
929.00
000.00
235.00
000.00
926.00
240.00
66,963.00
152,443.00
8,551.00
1,675.00
560.00
6.96
.01
.03
3.487
4.1664
17.89
31.16
8.39
20.704
95.23
20.73
1.89
26.7987
17.63
16.00
8.417
2.44
.1011
5.05
176       $6,776,885.00
287.08
ISHORE:
lercial
i rial
torage
nunity
llaneous
foreshore
Lease
Licence
Leases
Licence
Lease
Licence
Lease
Licence
Lease
Lease
Licence
29
13
3
1
37
52
7
8
1
26
13
347,275.00
45.05
65,006.00
49.30
31,363.00
11.66
1,250.00
.81
1,081,725.00
388.27
420,529.00
207.33
26,151.00
55.79
21,286.00
46.41
964.00
.12
67,275.00
8.796
503,356.00
17.89
190       $2,566,180.00
831.42
 | Lands and Housing
* Regional Operations Division
Home Purchase Assistance 1980
First Home
Second
Grant
Mortgage
Tofa<
Province
#
11,817
2,910
I
$
21,099,500
14,550,000
35,6|
Cariboo
#
$
435
865,000
211
1,055,000
1,92(1
Lower
#
4,875
1,171
Mainland
$
8,428,000
5,855,000
14,2®
Kootenays
#
$
965
1,758,500
128
640,000
2,39«
Omineca
#
$
657
1,188,000
298
1,490,000
1
2,6|
Peace
#
$
262
500,500
118
590,000
I
1,091
Skeena
#
$
625
1,181,500
90
450,000
1,6a
Thompson/
#
1,539
363
1
Okanagan
$
2,779,500
1,815,000
4,594
Vancouver
#
2,459
531
r
1
Island
$
4,398,500
2,655,000
7,0l
!
  Parks and Outdoor Recreati
An Overview of 1980 Activities:
During 1980, the number of British Columbians
and tourists using our parks continued to
increase. To aid the Ministry in its work of
providing a quality system of parks that we and
our visitors can all enjoy, a special fund of $6.5
million was made available by the Legislature
for an enlarged three year development
program. This allowed the construction of much
needed facilities at various locations throughout
the Province.
One project was a 70 campsite campground at
French Beach Provincial Park, the first such
facility to be built on the West Coast of
Vancouver Island since Wickanninish Beach
Provincial Park was absorbed into Pacific Rim
National Park a decade ago.
A unique project under development at Porteau
Cove on Howe Sound will provide facilities,
including a man-made reef, for scuba and other
diving enthusiasts. This is the first site set aside
specifically for underwater activity, and it adds a
new dimension to our parks system.
Five new parks and one marine recreation area
were established during the year. An innovative
approach to meeting the needs of park users
was taken with the creation of two multi-site
boat access areas involving 14 sites on the
shores of Shuswap Lake Marine Park, and eight
sites at various locations on the Sunshine Coast
giving access to Sechelt Inlets Marine
Recreation Area.
Public-spirited individuals and organizations
made donations of parklands again in 1980,
notably the land for Roberts Memorial Provincial
Park near Nanaimo, and the Hemer property at
Yellow Point. These lands bring the total such
gifts to the people of British Columbia to more
than 60 since the inception of the park system.
Assistant Deputy Minister
Christopher O. Gray
Close liason was maintained with the prival
sector in the areas of ski operations and rij
rafting, and with many outdoor recreation
groups and associations. Funds were madjl
available to assist in the training of snowrrS
operators, and to encourage safety in out<||
activities.
 ision
«'s end, a bill to amend the Motor Vehicle
arain) Act was tabled in the Legislature, to
it more effective operating regulations and
jiapplication of safety standards for all
liway vehicles.
I: of a program to make more parks
rJition readily available, a publication
Ding the provincial park system was
Iped and put into production, and it will be
Iile early in 1981.
lance in provincial parks increased to
115 million recorded visits, in spite of poor
Jjr mid-summer.
l ss was apparent in all areas of the
ly's responsibility, from installing
pnal signs on Crown land, to aiding
M and winter recreationists, to renovating
storing Barkerville Provincial Historic
i co-operative venture with the Heritage
fi/ation Branch of the Ministry of
iial Secretary and Government Services.
ill, 1980 marked another milestone in the
icreasing popularity of British Columbia's
cial parks.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Research and Program Analysis
Acting Manager, Robert Pfister
This unit provides research and data services,
policy co-ordination services, and program
evaluation services.
1980 accomplishments
In 1980, with the University of Victoria, a
symposium was organized on "Applied
Research for Parks and Outdoor Recreation in
the 1980's" and participants attended from B.C.,
Alberta, Alaska, Washington, and Montana. In
conjunction with three other ministries
(Environment, Forests, and Energy, Mines and
Resources) a major study which included a
survey of 2,000 households was co-ordinated in
the east Kootenay region. The study was
designed to provide a solid base of information
for planning a management program that will
take into consideration both the outdoor
recreation potential and the fish and wildlife
resources in the region.
Data collection procedures were revised to give
monthly park attendance figures, and facility
and attendance information was provided
through the "Lands, Parks and Housing
Review" and the "Parks Data Handbook". A
visitor use study was conducted at Peace Arch,
and policies reviewed for underwater parks,
caving, and volunteers in parks.
A framework was developed for an internal
operational audit of Ministry operations and an
audit of the Kootenay parks region and district
offices was undertaken.
Planning and Design
Director, George Trachuk
This unit develops plans for park and
recreational land use; establishes priorities and
programs for capital investment including land
purchase; provides design, engineering and
drafting services; and develops policies, plans
and programs for the management of natural
and heritage resources on park lands.
1980 accomplishments
The planning section, representing the interests
of parks and outdoor recreation, became
involved in several inter-governmental projects
including: the Northern transmission lines from
Kelly Lake to Cheekeye, Creekside to Ingledow,
and in the Skeena-Prince Rupert area
Northeast Coalblock studies for Quintett
Sukunka; rail line proposals for
Anzac-Wolverine and Chetwynd-south ri
Fraser River and Howe Sound studies; 9
Forest Service and Forest Reserve studiej
Islands Trust planning.
A discussion paper was produced on
underwater parks policy, and preliminary!
completed for establishing an inventory of]
with recreation capability.
System plans were given interim approval)
the Duncan planning area, Mica Reserve-!
Adams-Seymour River drainages, Toba-Bi
Inlets, and Powell River Planning Unit. Pai|
proposals were approved for Halkett Bay,]
Kentucky-Alleyne Lakes, West Lake, Cap]
Scott, Goldstream addition, Kinaskan LaJ
Indian Islets, McDonald Creek, Whaleboa
Island, Premier Lake, Meziadin Lake, Tea
Creek, and Kettle River.
A master plan, containing a park develop
concept, objective and zone plan, was
published for Spatsizi. Fifteen other masfl
concept plans were completed and apprca
for Wasa, Athalmer, Bear Creek, Peace M
Chilliwack River, Kokanee Glacier, GardeJ
Jewel Lake, Meziadin Lake, Shuswap, El
Haynes Point, Blanket Creek, Canal Flati |
and Kikomun Creek. Also, a prototype ml
plan summary was prepared for Carp Lai
Provincial Park, and a zoning system for p
was finalized.
During 1980 park land was increased by |
hectares. Sixty-six new Use Permits wera
granted to individuals, groups and institutii
use parks and recreation areas for either u
purposes (pre-dating park creation), over!
provincial or national public interest, provij
public service, or extracting commercial
resources. Seventeen permits were termir
resulting in a total of 538 permits in effect!
12% increase over 1979. Revenue from pjjj
totalled $178,785.00 as compared to
$161,003.00 the previous year.
The design section prepared 259 design
packages for 137 sites. This involved 441j||
with a cost estimate for each package. Ma
complex designing included plans for Portj
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
bench Beach, Athalmer Beach, Bear
delta, Canal Flats, utilities at Barkerville
E'er supply at Manning Park. The drafting
Uoduced 120 key reference, public
rcion and report maps.
w was initiated of park wildlife policies,
■cessing procedures and wildlife-related
m permit administration. Wildlife surveys
[Inducts in Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness
tells Gray Park, and White Pelican Park,
iseel survey of rainbow trout sport fishing
pie in Carp Lake Park. The unit also
pd several wildlife research projects
lig a radio-telemetry study of caribou
Ipnts in Spatsizi Park.
toative advice was provided to several
■[forest insect activity, and procedures
ked for providing information on forest
*nd disease activity in parks.
Kr with the Canadian Forestry Service,
I developed and issued the publication
hazard Control in Recreation Sites in
^Columbia, Management Guidelines",
■was also provided to field staff regarding
Izard control at several parks.
|> were completed on fire management
s:s located in severe fire climate areas of
li/ince. The unit contributed to the
v of Forests' report on the condition of
lover at MacMillan Park.
K with the Heritage Conservation Branch
Rnistry of Provincial Secretary and
■ment Services, the unit drafted a
st plan for Fort Steele Historic Park, and
Gated in an interagency group preparing a
3 plan for Barkerville Historic Park,
lorial policy was drafted to guide
!ement of the Fort Steele artifact
Son, and a pilot project undertaken to
8>ry heritage resources in Vancouver
■Barks.
New parks established 1980
Classi
Name
fication
Hectares Location
Diana Lake Park
A
233     20 km S.E.
Prince Rupert
Shuswap Lake
Marine Park
A
460     Shuswap Lake
Roberts Memorial
Park
A
14     19 km S.E.
Nanaimo
Puntchesakut Lake
Park
A
38     32 W. Quesnel
Sechelt Inlets Marine
Recreation Area
Rec. Area
155     Sechelt Inlet
Tetsa River Park
A
115    70kmW.
Kledo Creek
Park
Other parkland acquired 1980
Location
Hectares         Description
Cinnemousun Narrows
26
Foreshore addition
Shuswap Lake Parks
9
Foreshore addition
Premier Lake Park
32
Addition
Stone Mountain
6
Addition
Canal Flats
1
For boat-launching
facilities
Mount Robson Park
16.4
Carr property added
Ft. Steel Historic Park
0.03
Matson property added
Prince George
30.4
Williams property,
for proposed new
lakeside park
Midge Creek
152
Proposed new park
for boat launching
and camping
Grohman Narrows
7.8
Donated by Ministry
of Highways
Hemer Property
90
Proposed new park
Provincial Parks
at December 31,1980
Classification
Number
Hectares
Class "A" Parks
Class "B" Parks
Class "C" Parks
268
6
53
2,824,188
1,343,906
1,695
Total Parks
327
4,169,789
Recreation Areas
Wilderness Conservancies
28
1
238,932
131,523
29
370,455
Total Parks, Rec. Areas,
and Wilderness
Conservancies
356
4,540,244
Nature Conservancy Areas
In "B" Parks
In "A" Parks
5
2
426,537
230,562
7
657,099
 !**A1C
Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Park land acquisition: Provincial
Funding & Outside Agency Funding
Ministry of Lands,       Outside
Year   Parks & Housing       Agencies
1980     $   935,309.00        $       —
1979
1978
1977
1976
1975
602,285.87
2,169,590.87
446,218.89
419,645.55
993,768.25
952.000.00
1,025,264.63
72,000.00
309,000.00
Total
$   935,309.00
1,554,285.87
3,194,855.50
518,218.89
728,645.55
993,768.25
Use permits issued 1980
Use permit purpose No.
Private purposes (pre-dating park creation) 173
Public service 128
Provincial or National Public interest 226
Resource extraction 11
Total 538
Extension and Information
Acting Director, Jake Masselink
This unit serves many functions. It provides
financial and technical assistance to regional
districts and communities wishing to establish
and operate a park. Working with groups and
organizations, it develops programs to
increase public awareness of safety in outdoor
recreation. It administers the Canada Shipping
Act on behalf of the federal government.
Standards, policies and regulations are
developed relating to outdoor recreation.
Informational materials and programs are
prepared to help people understand more about
our parks and so increase their enjoyment.
1980 accomplishments
In 1980, the ministry allocated $1.2 million to
11 regional districts to help them acquire and
develop land for regional parks. The grants
aided in the purchase of land for nine parks and
provided funds for 32 park development
projects. In addition, 18 local community park
boards received grants amounting to
$14,000.00 for development of their parks, and
12 grants of Crown land, involving a total of 328
hectares valued at $1.7 million, were made to
provide community parks.
To promote public safety in the outdoors, a
Wilderness First Aid Certification program was
developed, in co-operation with Capilano
College and St. John Ambulance. Safety
information programs were developed in
co-operation with the B.C. Snow VehicleM
Association, Four Wheel Drive Association
B.C. Motorcycle Federation and Profession]
Driving Center—B.C. Safety Councils; gran!
were provided to produce pamphlets (on sa
practices concerning avalanches, hang glidi
underwater sports, recreational boating), t|
mark deadheads under the "Flag-a-Snag'ij
program, to produce audio-visual teaching!
and a pamphlet on Hypothermia and
Hyperthermia and a manual on outdoor I
recreation programming were produced.*
In administering the Canada Shipping Act!
waterways were added to the restricted lisl
the result of requests, and a status list of I
restricted waterways was produced. In
conjunction with the River Outfitters Assoc!
of B.C. and the federal government, a nevw
schedule relating to commercial river raftir|
was prepared. Revisions were prepared to I
Motor Vehicle (All Terrain) Act to include si
vehicles as motorcycles, trail bikes and 4-ifl
drives, and an inventory of off-highway sits
closures and conflict areas was complete^
Policy papers were developed on caves, a|
recreational trails and rivers. Development]!
helicopter and snowcat ski policy was begij
Together with the Ministry of Environment,!
unit completed an inventory of commercial
heli-ski, snow-cat, and ski touring areas ins
province, and began preparation of an Outc
Recreation Capability Inventory.
A guide map of British Columbia's provinci|
parks was produced. Twenty-two new bookl
and pamphlets were published and 31 exist
publications were revised and updated. Ses
slide/tape presentations, several displays,!
for ski trails, and park map signs were
produced. Interpretive and information plaij
were devised for the Kootenay and
Omineca-Peace regions, and begun for the]
Lower Mainland, Barkerville and Fort Steele
Programs were provided to school groups n
provincial parks, and a prototype teacher*
resource kit developed for the GoldstrearrB
salmon run.
During the year, 839 volunteers assisted in
parks programs, an increase of 46% over to
previous year.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
si- and Awareness program
1:1980
nfction
Ustecreation Council of B.C. $ 1
i /el Drive Association of B.C.
Brcycle Federation
Baty Council: Professional Drivers Centre
aDfitters Association of B.C.
Baty Council: Underwater Section
inAmbulance (B.C.)
p Vehicle Association
teaser University
Bfe^ouncil
Uiag Program 2,:
TOTAL $60,925.00
Grant
,100.00
,000.00
,025.00
,500.00
000.00
000.00
500.00
,000.00
300.00
200.00
,300.00
rations
pr, Charles Velay
ngement Services
Miction assists regional offices with their
taons to ensure consistent operations
lijs and maintenance standards
Hiout the parks system.
Kcomplishments
Histration of camping fees was
itsfully introduced in 55 out of a total of
Irks where fees are collected. Camping
pre increased by $1.00, resulting in fee
He of $2.1 million (approximately 58% of
lit of operating the campgrounds).
■Broject to develop operational standards
icouver Island parks was completed.
stand occupational health committees
Hstablished and trained in all districts. A
H&ncerning commercial filming in parks is
Birafted and Park Act regulations were
■9d to ensure the protection of park
k;es and visitor enjoyment.
ethe Youth Crew program, 409 young men
Hpmen worked in 22 camps. (The cost of
fccjram in 1980 was $1,085,445.00).
c:al Maintenance
t lit is responsible for co-ordinating
Rjction and maintenance programs in
l|for ensuring a consistent use of
l|»s, and for supplying park furniture and
I ea's f°r development.
1980 accomplishments
During the year, a contract administration policy
and procedures were developed to ensure the
correct use of contracts in park operations and
in the employment of consultants. One hundred
construction contracts, valued at $1,100,000.00
were awarded, and 16 concession agreements,
with an estimated revenue of $138,000.00
made.
Capital maintenance projects on existing
facilities were undertaken at a cost of
$2.5 million.
The unit was responsible for co-ordinating the
first year of a proposed three-year development
program for new facilities, funded by the
legislature for a total of $6.5 million. A
procedure was developed for increasing the
consistency and accuracy of estimated
construction costs.
The Langford Workshop, which supplies park
furniture, upgraded its equipment and had a
very productive year. During 1980, the
Workshop produced:
680 picnic tables
484 fire rings
68 toilet buildings
22 traffic control gates
90 information shelters
1,600 painted or silkscreened signs
850 carved signs
5 canoes
40 marker buoys
and awarded contracts totalling $125,000.00 for
the production of:
1,300 fire rings and grates
400 bear-proof garbage container frames
200 hibachi stands
200 tables
2,000 table tops and seats.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Kootenays Regional Operations
Regional Director, Milton E. Goddard
Campgrounds in the parks of the region were
used by 263,526 visitors in 1980, an increase of
4% over the previous year. Day use declined by
11% overall: there were 1,405,819 visitors.
However, 331,588 people (an increase of 8%
over the previous year) visited Fort Steele
Historic Park and parking and eating facilities
were strained to the limit. Cross country ski use
increased in such parks as Nancy Greene,
Stagleap, and Kokanee Creek. One hundred
seventy-one volunteers worked in the
Kootenays parks in 1980.
1980 accomplishments
Services were expanded to Athalmer Beach
Park and day use areas increased at Saunders
Beach in Kikomun Creek Park. A joint Forest
Service/Parks communication system was
installed between Wasa and four back-country
parks. All campgrounds in the West Kootenay
District were converted to self-registering fee
collection; new collections began at Lockhart
Beach park, Johnstone and Boundary Creek
parks; and revenue in the district increased by
60% over 1979. Cutting and clearing of new
cross-country ski trails was completed in
Kokanee Creek and Nancy Greene Parks. A
draft concept plan and curatorial policy for Fort
Steele park were completed, and an
interpretation plan begun.
The regional office participated in studies and
planning concerning the Forest Reserve
program, south east coal block,
Columbia-Windermere Lake, Southern Rocky
Mountain Trench, and the Kootenay diversion.
Contributions were also made to the Mica
Reservoir, Slocan Valley and Upper Columbia
planning units.
Master plans were developed for Kikomun
Creek, Jewel Lake and Top of the World, and
development concepts for Grohman Narrows,
Canal Flats, Cottonwood Lake and Blanket
Creek.
Park proposals were prepared for McDonald
Creek, Texas Creek, Jewel Lake and five sites
on the Revelstoke Reservoir. Proposals for park
additions were prepared for Syringa Creek,
Moyie Lake, and Premier Lake.
Within a total construction budget of
$808,000.00, major projects were undertake
Athalmer Beach and Surveyor's Lake, thevS]
systems in Syringa Creek and Wasa were n
upgraded, day use improvements were man
Texas Creek and Cottonwood Lake, and be!
ramp improvements made at Moyie Lake.
Eighty-four boys and girls were employed Ltd
the Youth Crew program, and they worked ;H
parks, constructing hiking trails at Conkle L^
cross-country ski trails at Kokanee Creek a J
Nancy Greene, and a lake level control dand
Champion Lake.
An interpretation and information plan was
completed for the region, and a plan for Foi
Steele begun. Interpretative programs were
offered at five parks and 142,863 visitors SI
part. Student programs at three parks werei
enjoyed by 6,693 students.
An amphitheatre was constructed at Chamlfl
Lakes, and a trail and amphitheatre site
roughed out at Moyie Lake. A self-guided
nature trail, using a carry-along brochure,™
put into operation.
Seven new park brochures were compilegjl
seven information packages constructed, a
61,261 brochures distributed.
The East Kootenay Regional District was
allocated $2,000 towards park developmens
Jf
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
>re Mainland
unal Operations
bul Director, Ian Leman
rane most heavily populated region in the
ibo, and the closest to visitors from the
felorthwest States. Consequently, the
IS the region are heavily used. More than
3@'isitors stayed overnight at Manning
Hpge, and over 200,000 patronized the
facilities. Nordic skiing at Manning Park
apyed by 55,000 people, an increase of
raSsr the previous year. Day use at Cultus
pirk was up 12%, and camping at
Witch Park increased by 33%.
B|I980, 274 volunteers worked at parks in
tepn.
bice
Accomplishments
campsite was roughed out at Lone
Wike. Hiking trails were extended into
pf Pass area, and a campground
pled at Garibaldi Lake. Fences were
k at viewpoints at Nairn Falls and
ntmchuk Narrows parks to increase safety,
Mew information shelter on parks of the
pie Coast was erected on Highway 101
r J)berts Creek Park. Seating was installed
open-air amphitheatre at Golden Ears
Hhe toboggan run at Mount Seymour Park
■located and tripled in size. Seven
p»ers of riding trails were developed in
hi;tion with the North Shore Horsemen
Mation. With the assistance of local
Uts, a 0.5 km trail was cleared at Cultus
aark on Watt Creek. The group
Bgund at Cultus Lake Park was doubled
|to accommodate 100 people. An
iitic lawn and garden sprinkler system
Stalled at Peace Arch Park.
sigional office participated in studies
Ining Howe Sound, Squamish Estuary
ipven Island.
J' plans were completed for Chilliwack
■«nd Garden Bay, Birkenhead, Harwood
|gid the exotic trees sites at Golden Ears,
[Qdies to determine park opportunities
feted for Jaffre Lakes, Burke Mountain,
lam Lake and Alexander Bridge. A study
H-itify new park areas and recommend
ippments in existing parks was completed
for Powell River region. Two new parks were
created, one at Sechelt Inlets on the Sunshine
Coast, the other at Porteau Cove on Howe
Sound.
New construction included 600 m. of beach at
Sasquatch Provincial Park, 100 campsites at
Hicks Lake, a group site and playing fields at
Golden Ears Park. A unique park was
constructed at Porteau Cove with 40 campsites,
boat launch ramp, picnic and day use area, and
a divers parking lot. Boats were sunk and a
concrete reef laid down to provide a fascinating
scuba trail. Trail construction was completed
from Alpine parking lot to Lions and
Unnecessary Mountain, and ski trails groomed
at Cypress Park and Seymour Park. Manning
Park Lodge was painted and landscaped, and
four duplex chalets had bathrooms and kitchens
renovated. Campsite pads at Hampton
campground were converted to drive-ins.
Sixty-five youngsters worked at four parks as
part of the Youth Crew program.
Interpretative programs provided during the
summer in five parks were enjoyed by 67,000
visitors. One park held a winter program which
attracted 9,423 people. At Rolley Lake Park a
program was established dealing mainly with
the history of logging. At Cypress Park, a
self-guiding program for Yew Lake Trail using
cassettes and tape recorders, was developed in
conjunction with the B.C. Institute of
Technology. Four hundred fifty-seven people
(28 of them visually impaired) followed the
program. A summer recreation brochure was
developed for Cypress Park, a new marine
parks display was constructed, and parks
displays were set up at four shopping malls, the
Vancouver Ski Show, and the Sportsmen's
Show.
Greater Vancouver Regional District received
$659,425.00 to assist in purchasing land for
Belcarra, Burnaby Lake, Kanaka Creek and
Campbell Valley, and $19,000.00 to help
development of Kanaka Creek, Capilano and
Campbell Valley.
Dewdney-Alouette Regional District received a
$9,000.00 grant to help develop Neilson Park.
Powell River Regional District was also
allocated $2,000.00 towards park development.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Omineca-Peace
Regional Operations
Regional Director, Tom O. Moore
This region includes one-third of the land
surface of the province. Within this vast area
are 45 parks and recreation areas, including
wilderness domains such as Mount Robson and
Bowron Lake parks, intensively used parks like
Ten Mile Lake and Liard River Hot Springs, and
historic parks such as Barkerville.
1980 accomplishments
Trail and camping facilities were improved at
Mt. Robson, trails constructed at Crooked River,
day use facilities expanded at Paarens Beach,
floats, stairs and a water system installed at
Carp Lake, firewood and road facilities
improved at Whiskers Point. Stabilization and
restoration work were carried on at Barkerville
and Cottonwood House, day use facilities
developed at the new Puntchesakut Lake Park,
and building construction was done at Bowron
Lake. Campgrounds were developed at Tetsa
River and Swan Lake and expanded at One
Island Lake and Moberly Lake, and boat launch
facilities and parking lots were constructed at
Beatton and Charlie Lake.
The regional offices participated in studies
concerning the Site C Reservoir, Foothills North
B.C. Pipeline, Liard River Hydro, Prince George
Special Sales Area, C.N.R. Twin Tracking in Mt.
Robson Park, and the northeast coal block.
Master plans were in development for West
Lake, Gwillim Lake, Dahl Lake and Purden
Lake, a Peace River area roles plan was being
prepared, and recreational capability studies
were undertaken for Monkman, West Lake,
Dahl Lake, Tudyah Lake, Sukunka Falls,
Titetown Lake and Stuart River Eskers.
Construction included: building a day use area
at Puntchesakut Lake and extending one at
Beaumont; adding a water system at Carp
Lake; building campgrounds at Tetsa River,
Swan Lake and Paarens Beach and enlarging
one at Moberly Lake; building two public
shelters at Bowron Lake Chain; extending
campground and day use facilities at One
Island Lake; and constructing boat launch and
parking facilities at Beatton. In addition, seven
information shelters were installed; the Rolj
River bridge was replaced; a staff log cabirl
built at Bowron Lake Chain; the service yail
was improved at Prince George district oral
roads were black-topped at Whiskers Point!
fire protection was improved at Fort McLeo
Historic Park and Theatre Royal, BarkeH
During the year, 113 youngsters worked in I;
parks as part of the Youth Crew program.
Interpretive programs were offered in six |
parks and two historic parks. Attendance all
programs showed a 43% increase over the
previous year. Guidelines were established
the development and delivery of interpret
programs in all the parks. Twenty-two park
guide displays were completed and ten insl
on shelters. A slide show on Bowron Lake \
produced, two new brochures developed®
portable information display produced, and
Mt. Robson Visitor Centre display upgradet
Fraser-Fort George Regional District receiv
grants of $20,000.00 for land acquisition an
$16,000.00 towards park development, anj
Peace River-Liard Regional District wasj
allocated a grant of $15,000.00 for park ]
development.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
ea Regional Operations
bill Director, D. E. (Herb) Green
4% of all provincial park land is in this
■There are 27 parks and three recreation
etid 300,000 people used and enjoyed
iii1980.
Biccomplishments
Bfnazard programs at Prudhomme, Red
raj Maclure Lake were completed, and
mendations prepared for tree hazard
ais at Lakelse and Exchamsiks.
Bed access was initiated for Anthony
m protect the artifacts, and security
H§ at Red Bluff and Maclure Lake were
fed.
Ijional staff was involved in studies
eling Red Hill Park, South Moresby, New
rline, and transmission and pipeline
Hans were completed for Spatsizi Park,
pn Lake and South Tweedsmuir Park.
I requests and site designs were
■ted for Pendleton Bay, Meziadin Lake,
BTipground, Red Sand and Kinaskan
llBroposals were completed for Meziadin,
u, Kleanza Addition, Kinaskan and
vs Landing.
^construction projects were completed at
■iake, Wistaria, Red Bluff and Seeley
Eacilities and a new access road were
|Kd at Red Sand Lake, as was a 42 unit
round at Kinaskan. Reconstruction of
l; Lake Park facilities, including a new
Iction yard, was begun.
: id girls in the Youth Crew program
I at two parks.
wpark brochures, two magazine articles
^audio-visual production were completed,
|EV. fillers were in production.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Thompson-Okanagan
Regional Operations
Regional Director, Alan Campbell
The region enjoyed a 6% increase in campers
and a 55% increase in boaters. Mahood Lake
campground was consistently full for the first
time since opening, and Murtle Lake was used
by more canoists. Public acceptance of the new
facilities at Green Lake was very positive, and
the Silver Star recreation area was a major
centre for winter recreation.
1980 accomplishments
Trails were groomed at Silver Star, weeds
cleared in the swimming area at Paul Lake, and
landslide and flood damage repaired at
Goldpan. The marine circuit parks became fully
operational. A new system of assigning
campsites at Shuswap Lake Park was
introduced and streamlined operations.
The regional staff took part in studies
concerning Spruce Lake (Tyaughton) Planning
area, ski areas and provincial forests.
Opportunities for park services in the Highway
24 corridor were identified, and a plan to identify
the division's role in the Okanagan progressed.
Plans for Silver Star recreation area continued.
Site plans were completed for eight capital works
projects, involving 75 campsites, two launch
camps, one group camp and improved day use
facilities. Co-ordination of five Young Canada
Works programs resulted in eight km of hiking
trails and two km of cross-country ski trails
being built.
Three properties were added to Okanagan
Mountain park, increasing parking and
lakeshore opportunities. Acquisition was
completed for Bear Creek property for future
campsite and day use development. Seventeen
properties were designated as part of a marine
park system on Shuswap Lake, and Apex
Mountain was redesignated from a "C" park to
a recreation area to allow planning for a winter
resort.
The reconstruction program totalled
$450,000.00 and provided improved facilities
including information shelters, picnic areas,
boat launches, flush toilets, reconstructed roads
and 20 new campsites. New construction
totalled $530,000.00 and included flush toil!
sani-stations, picnic areas, two boat launcfj
cross-country trails and 51 new campsites.!
Working under the Youth Crew program, 2<
youngsters cleaned up 10 trails and
reconstructed the Battle Mountain road brio
Interpretive programs were conducted in em
parks, with other programs in two parks. Ej||
poor weather, program attendance decreast
by 24%. Material for five information packal
and six new brochures was compiled. 1
Central Okanagan Regional District wa|
granted $194,483.00 for park land purchasj
$20,000.00 for park development. NortrW
Okanagan Regional District was allocate!
$5,000.00 for park land purchase and  I
$6,000.00 for development, and the
Okanagan-Similkameen Regional Districtjj
allotted $3,000.00 for land purchase ancF
$3,000.00 for development.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
nuver Island
final Operations
bill Director, Joseph W. Gillings
reon includes both the Island and the
•i3i Gulf Islands, and the parks and
him areas are well used year round. The
ptiam winter program attracted 6,605
usa 46% increase over 1979, and the
m program had 24,312 visitors, a 11.9%
Ts. The salmon run at Goldstream was
ml by 43,448 visitors.
accomplishments
iirew developments were completed at
le|3pit Marine Park, and a tree hazard
ra implemented in all parks. Six new
pwunters were installed in parks in the
Bidistrict. A major refit was given to the
Hjcthat services Gulf Island marine parks.
Waw self-serve fee collection systems
Installed in campgrounds. The ferry
poto Newcastle Island continued. A day
ara was completed at Tribune Bay, and a
O'jipment storage building constructed at
let Beach.
nil staff participated in the Sooke and
Ifclith Harbour plans. Draft plans were
Ippd for Victoria and West Coast and
a ere in progress for Nanaimo, Campbell
Wiewcastle Island, Cape Scott, and
IfljDna (including Forbidden Plateau and
\A Lake).
"npposals and designations were
Hted for Boho Bay, Whalebone Island,
a Spit, Tribune Bay foreshore additions,
Hathcona additions.
flew construction, with a $613,500.00
Hpcluded: a day use area, boat docking,
fltes and trails at Sidney Spit; a 70 unit
■round and a day use area at French
I high density group campground at
Jseam; and day use facilities at Tribune
^construction, for $434,823.00, was done
Side Beach, Elk Falls, Sproat Lake, and
file Island.
ttfour girls and boys, under the Youth
urogram, built trails and a bridge.
m
Interpretive programs were given both summer
and winter at Goldstream. Plans were
completed for interpretive programs for
Newcastle Island and Rathtrevor Beach. A
Special Events program was conducted in five
parks, and an astronomy program, in
conjunction with the H.R. MacMillan
Planetarium, was presented in six parks.
Seventeen information shelters were installed,
six brochures printed, and information
distributed to 20 tourist information bureaus in
the region. Three audio-visual programs were
produced, and an Edukit prototype program
developed for school use.
The Capital Regional District received
$130,082.00 for park acquisition and $91,000.00
for park development, and the Mount
Waddington Regional District was granted
$5,000.00 towards park development.
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Provincial Totals
1976
1977
1978
1979
Facilities:
Parks
Hectares
Campsites
Picnic Tables
Parking lot spaces
Boat ramps
Trails (km)
Park roads (km)
Use:
Overnight (visitor nights)
Day Use (visitor days)
Marine Use (visitors)
District interpretation
program (contacts)
Revenue:
Campground
Park use permits
Concession
Other revenue
Youth Crew:
Number of youths
339
340
346
352
31
4,529,132
4,538,374
4,534,420
4,538,943
4,539,9
8,416
9,222
9,281
9,696
10,01
3,644
3,860
4,081
4,177
4,1
20,296
21,276
24,159
24,799
25,7!
69
81
84
88
j
1,812
2,013
2,154
2,220
2,21
521
643
642
678
71
1,714,073
1,833,103
1,953,574
2,309,657
2,342,1
6,281,231
9,461,594
9,482,287
11,822,989
12,373,6!
94,971
138,626
161,802
180,538
196,7!
—
215,689
305,494
595,672
9559
$   930,496
$1,097,531
$1,221,027
$1,392,783
$2,194,6'
—
$     67,592
$   196,329
$   161,003
$   178,71
—
—
—
—
$   147,3
$1,560,555
$   831,855
$1,396,949
$2,042,112
$1,814,1
366
357
387
387
41
 JUBL Pwte anc' Outdoor
mm Recreation Division
Hlttendance/By Region
1978
1979
1980
% Change
1979/1980
M)son-Okanagan Region
■right use
e
ril
pjatation
517,181
1,838,138
13,273
55,423
577,939
2,127,892
18,125
70,366
612,666
2,282,322
28,669
53,715
+    6
+    7
+ 58
- 24
piay Region
itght use
Hie
rili
hetation
241,333
1,123,726
5,772
28,944
253,939
1,541,459
5,536
145,195
263,526
1,389,948
5,248
413,623
+    4
- 10
- 5
+185
iijjca-Peace Region
2rght use
3e
305,243
1,035,230
303,744
1,184,025
303,418
1,534,761
0
+ 30
pietation
Ilia Region
Bight use
pse
Iris
raretation
uiuver Island Region
raight use
pse
Me
sretation
nr Mainland Region
■light use
yise
le
3 iretation
i ncial Totals
night use
Jise
lie
eiretation
34,070
41,879
225,591
59,998
195,395
88,119
329,357
66,691
260,085
7,137
9,919
8,705
389,354
1,670,982
121,381
106,785
523,942
2,140,831
133,299
227,297
536,215
2,285,241
120,368
173,436
440,465
3,618,816
20,800
73,135
561,974
4,499,425
23,578
101,016
560,221
4,621,295
42,467
80,117
1,953,574
9,482,287
161,802
305,494
2,309,657
11,822,989
180,538
595,672
2,342,737
12,373,652
196,752
955,187
N/A
+439
- 24
- 21
N/A
- 12
+ 2
+ 7
- 10
- 24
0
+ 3
+ 80
- 21
+ 1
+ 5
+ 9
+ 60
 Parks and Outdoor
!R Recreation Division
-\
Region: Lower Mainland
1976
1977
1978
1979
ixj
Facilities:
Parks
46
46
46
46
I
Hectares
392,989
392,989
385,189
385,189
385t
Campsites
1,957
2,283
2,277
2,338
21!
Picnic tables
903
947
964
974
Parking lot spaces
7,200
7,486
8,026
8,176
|
Boat ramps
10
10
11
11
1:
Trails (km)
692
659
678
710
|:
Park roads (km)
172
209
208
204
j
Use:
Overnight
(visitor nights)
405,625
427,844
440,465
561,974
560:!
Day use
(visitor days)
2,307,437   3,803,145   3,618,816   4,499,425   4,621:
Marine use
(visitors)
23,414
6,890
20,800
23,578
42:
District interpretation
programs (contacts)
46,932
73,135
101,016
80,
Revenue:
Campground
$   213,546 $
261,359 $
304,542 $
351,268 $
512,
Park Use Permits
$
61,
Concessions
$
99,
Other: Gibson Pass
$   394,697 $
83,617 $
371,446 $
322,318 $
363,
Cypress
$   175,331 $
106,408 $
124,414 $
442,437 $
231
Manning Park Lodge
$   750,808 $
500,766 $
819,663 $1,218,019 $1,175,
Kilby Historic
$
833 $
1,700 $
1,
Youth Crew:
Number of youths
60
61
65
65
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Attendance % Change
^Mainland Region 1978 1979 1980 1979/1980
■jver District
mht use — — — N/A
je 837,953 1,707,062 1,599,521 - 6
— — — N/A
rotation 21,502 26,244 9,465 -64
Itildi District
light use 99,234 123,309 119,360 - 3
Ie 632,653 506,051 572,579 +13
20,800 23,578 42,467 +80
dotation 6,487 5,349 6,474 +21
I District
Jightuse 110,810 148,944 132,563 -11
g;e 438,582 749,427 854,448 +14
\\. — — — N/A
netation 2,675 15,955 16,232 + 2
mg District
light use 108,154 138,941 175,555 +26
fee 996,828 882,612 973,207 +10
W — — — N/A
Iptation 34,344 36,755 27,282 -26
ttte District
light use 87,343 113,417 98,394 -13
|se 466,617 429,569 462,210 + 8
13 — — — N/A
fetation 8,127 16,713 20,664 +24
us Arch Park
light use — — _ N/A
Jse 246,183 224,704 159,330 -29
Ie _ _ _ N/A
sretation — — — N/A
ling Park Lodge
[light use 34,924 37,363 34,349 - 8
K|e — _ _ N/A
Iretation —-    N/A
l_
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Region: Kootenay
1976
1977
1978
1979
191
Facilities:
Parks
Hectares
Campsites
Picnic tables
Parkling lot spaces
Boat ramps
Trails (km)
Park roads (km)
Use:
Overnight
(visitor nights)
Day use
(visitor days)
Marine use
(visitors)
District interpretation
programs (contacts)
Revenue:
Campground
Park Use Permits
Concessions
Other:
Fort Steele
Youth Crew:
Number of youths
58
59
60
61
284,772
284,776
287,713
287,726
1,085
1,305
1,304
1,327
667
690
744
740
3,382
3,512
3,612
3,556
13
18
19
22
351
511
522
521
55
89
89
94
287
197,963       221,959       241,333       253,939 26c
852,441    1,171,174    1,123,726    1,541,459    1,388
2,327 6,349 5,536
22,358         28,944       145,195 413
I 97,458 $   113,416$   120,994$   136,751$ 251
$ |
$ 21
£ 94,700 $     58,597 $     34,606 $     29,607 $ 22
84                84                75                75
Park Attendance
Kootenay Region
West Kootenay District
Overnight Use
Day Use
Marine
Interpretation
East Kootenay District
Overnight Use
Day Use
Marine
Interpretation
Fort Steele District
Overnight Use
Day Use
Marine
Interpretation	
1978
1979
1980
1979
%C@
83,062
601,521
6,349
23,813
158,271
297,008
5,131
225,197
92,262
988,704
5,536
34,492
161,677
280,599
7,037
272,156
103,666
113,958
842,475
5,248
40,238
149,568
250,390
13,538
297,084
359,847
 Mfe Parks and Outdoor
MP Recreation Division
H: Omineca-Peace
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
ps:
42
42
44
44
46
HIS
763,624
763,410
763,889
763,889
658,251
fetes
1,846
1,771
1,641
1,807
1,816
Babies
428
457
533
553
637
p lot spaces
2,933
2,955
3,189
3,255
3,370
limps
12
15
16
18
18
|m)
93
137
146
159
161
Bads (km)
55
81
80
86
87
Hjht
anights)
275,997
288,818
305,243
303,744
303,418
ue
Hays)
428,053
1,083,128
1,035,230
1,184,025
1,534,761
c use
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
i interpretation
|ms (contacts)
26,793
34,070
41,879
225,591
sue:
ground
$103,292
$136,587
$145,322
$161,758
$291,926
) se Permits
essions
p
Iville
[Crew:
B;r of youths
$ 11,852
$ 24,740
$104,854    $ 79,144    $ 45,987    $ 28,031     $ 15,774
87 75 104 104 113
attendance
|?ca-Peace Region
1978
1979
1980
% Change
1979/1980
siel District
sight use
pse
I'-
fetation
hi George District
bight use
pse
m
pretation
in River District
3iight use
fese
re
gretation
85,944
228,514
8,839
94,217
318,973
25,231
83,213
193,865
92,429
286,094
14,106
153,065
625,358
27,773
58,250
272,573
93,040
346,115
192,697
135,814
993,129
25,566
74,563
195,517
7,328
+ 1
+21
N/A
+ 1266
-11
+59
N/A
- 8
+28
-28
N/A
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Region: Skeena 1976 1977 1978 1979 19jt
Facilities:
Parks 31 32 34 35
Hectares 2,240,167 2,240,488 2,240,562 2,240,643   2,346
Campsites 425 525 473 4961
Picnic tables 181 257 268 283
Parking lot spaces 862 870 910 1,092
Boat ramps 7 10 10 10
Trails (km) 134 128 125 108
Park roads (km) 29 53 53 35
Use:
Overnight
(visitor nights) 39,897        57,875        59,998        88,119       66!
Day use
(visitor days) 74,309      398,402       195,395      329,357      26GI
Marine use
(visitors) N/A N/A N/A N/A
District interpretation
programs (contacts) 3,243 7,137 9,919
Revenue:
Campground $23,580      $35,790      $35,162      $39,608
Park Use Permits
Youth Crew:
Number of youths 39 51 39 39
Park Attendance % §■
Skeena Region 1978 1979 1980 193
Ldk&lsG District
Overnight use 36,835 45,546 28,963
Day use 149,646 241,619 190,683
Marine — — —
Interpretation 3,600 6,161 4,770
Babine District
Overnight use 23,163 42,573 37,728
Day use 45,749 87,738 69,402
Marine                                                             —                 — —
Interpretation 3,537 3,758 3,935
 l^g-          *m
^M^^BflBc
Parks and Outdoor
IB Recreation Division
AS: Vancouver Island
1976            1977            1978
1979
1980
aiis:
<B
79
77                81
85
86
tas
250,296       258,389       258,486
262,895
262,907
sates
1,335
1,535           1,602
1,608
1,702
rtjables
656
669              666
720
756
ttti lot spaces
3,086
3,401           3,546
3,546
3,972
:mps
8
9                  9
9
8
fs;m)
159
176              184
198
239
i rads (km)
55
83                86
96
91
rrjht
tonights)
345,712       355,996       389,354
523,942
536,215
ue
Jddays)
1,333,195    1,379,980    1,670,982
2,140,831
2,285,241
jnuse
f)
66,792       118,556       121,381
128,585
120,368
Irj interpretation
3ms (contacts)
64,662       106,785
227,297
173,436
sue:
hiround
$209,516    $241,305    $294,916
$345,294
$483,177
ase Permits
$    7,269
lessions
$         60
HCrew:
nlir of youths
66
63                80
80
84
Hittendance
% Change
luver Island Region
1978
1979
1980
1979/1980
Bat District
light use
143,427
197,152
223,658
+ 13
gse
780,832
1,099,350        1,069,313
- 3
ii}
64,967
72,227
74,618
+ 3
fetation
42,612
76,229
81,743
+ 7
Smith District
light use
140,293
184,643
173,853
- 6
sse
762,386
767,476
818,902
+ 7
13
36,053
39,155
27,638
-29
aretation
12,731
92,194
43,420
-53
aicona District
Slight use
101,634
142,147
138,704
- 2
(ise
127,764
274,005
397,026
+45
ie
20,361
21,916
18,112
-17
Iretation
51,442
58,874
48,273
-18
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
83
84
81
81
7,284
598,322
598,581
598,601
1,768
1,803
1,984
2,120
809
840
906
907
2,833
3,052
4,876
5,174
19
19
19
18
383
402
499
524
156
128
146
173
Region: Thompson-Okanagan 1976 1977 1978 1979
Facilities:
Parks
Hectares ■   / ,. .■■'..v^      "■/;■:..■"..        /,   '
Campsites
Picnic tables
Parking lot spaces
Boat ramps
Trails (km)
Park roads (km)
Use:
Overnight
(visitor nights) 448,879      480,611       517,181       577,939      61
Day use
(visitor days) 1,285,796    1,625,765    1,838,138   2,127,892   2,§|
Marine use
(visitors) 4,765 10,854 13,273 18,125
District interpretation
programs (contacts) 51,701 55,423        70,366
Revenue:
Campground $283,104    $309,074    $320,081     $348,103    $£|
Park Use Permits
Youth Crew:
Number of youths 30 24 24 24
 M9L P^ks anc' Outdoor
mm Recreation Division
^tendance
oson-Okanagan Region
1978
1979
1980
% Change
1979/1980
isiache District
hiht use
ri
rotation
65,898
125,612
73,030
162,085
82,662
60,081
+  13
- 63
N/A
N/A
«an District
mht use
H3
H
pitation
148,874
653,723
2,445
14,777
173,616
713,874
1,309
13,236
175,920
834,771
2,499
14,146
+    1
+  17
+ 91
+    7
nap District
T)ht use
H
ptation
122,048
562,766
10,827
34,582
143,856
751,965
16,816
46,807
154,816
638,295
21,568
29,446
+    8
- 15
+ 28
- 37
Haray District
mhtuse 46,554 49,219 59,674 + 21
ue 52,766 39,791 163,793 +312
— — 4,602 —
ptation — — 2,763 —
aison River District
ight use
lie
nation
 Parks and Outdoor
Recreation Division
Regional district
Capital
Central Okanagan
Dewdney-Alouette
East Kootenay
Fraser-Fort George
Greater Vancouver
Mount Waddington
North Okanagan
Okanagan-Similkameen
Peace River-Liard
Powell River
TOTAL
Regional Park Assistance
Grant for
acquisition
$   130,082.00
194,483.00
20,000.00
659,435.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
$1,012,000.00
Program, 1980
Grant for
development
$ 91,000.00
20,000.00
9,000.00
2,000.00
16,000.00
19,000.00
5,000.00
6,000.00
3,000.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
$188,000.00
Total gn
$   221,ffl*
214.4IU
Mr
2,1
36,f
678,1
5,0()
11,®
6,00
15,®
 2j)
$1,200jj
  tff
Program and Managemei
Assistant Deputy Minister
Andrew Armitage
 rvices Division
Ibrview of 1980 Activities:
BJstry's second year was one of real
gmd creation of identity. People who felt
tei when we came together now feel
U/ less so and the Ministry as a whole is
Ding as an entity. This has contributed
BJnlvely to the programs administered. In
a our diverse public relations and
Bffcations programs have increased
awareness of the Ministry and its work.
Hir, the Ministry, together with the credit
bi the Province, offered the Housing
lis Program, under which $200 million
al to individuals for the construction of
Bsmes in British Columbia. This
■ful program also served to give the
it industry a needed stimulation.
<y, a policy manual was created for the
■ration of land in the province, and the
1's decision to apply market prices and
Bate the administration of land was put in
3, computer system was installed in
Bi and Land Records and this will not only
B place of archival records, but further
iip retrieval of information, and response
iublic.
|ffihas been one in which there has been
mange in the Ministry's personnel
k re-organization and promotion. The
siel section made a major contribution to
ping good employee relations.
 a.
A*
Program and Management
^
SI Services Division
Public Relations
Director, Sybil Ainscough
This unit keeps the public informed of the
Ministry's activities, and provides information on
various Ministry programs. The unit also
provides information to Ministry staff to increase
awareness of total Ministry activities.
1980 accomplishments
In 1980, 187 news releases were prepared and
issued as compared to 131 in 1979. Eleven
brochures describing various segments of the
Ministry's new Crown land disposal program
were published and distributed, and two more
prepared to draft stage. A portable display
concerning Crown land was prepared and used
at the HUDAC home show in Victoria, and
copies of the display were placed in regional
offices in Victoria, Burnaby, Cranbrook, Prince
George, Kamloops and Fort St. John. The
Ministry also participated in the Home Show in
Vancouver, with a booth featuring the Mobile
Home Registry. Housing program brochures
were updated, and the Ministry's annual report
produced.
A large number of both project and land display
signs and newspaper advertisements were
produced to identify Crown land and Ministry
project sites, and to inform the public of Crown
land auctions, sales, tenders and leases.
The Ministry's internal newsletter "Forum" was
revised and updated, and four issues published.
Work commenced on an employee
orientation kit.
Housing Programs
Director, Douglas Ausman
This branch formulates and develops policies
and procedures relating to housing, represents
the Ministry in relations with the Federal
government on housing matters, and
administers Ministry housing programs.
The branch processes home purchase and
conversion assistance grants to help the people
of British Columbia acquire homes. It aids
non-profit societies in the provision of senior
citizen housing, helps provide housing for the
handicapped and for low income families in
remote areas where affordable housing isn't
available from the private sector, provides;
operating assistance to co-operative ho||
associations, and operates the Mobile Hoi.
Registry.
1980 accomplishments
First Home Grants, Family First Home Grji
and Second Mortgages were provided to
homeowners and families, bringing the tot
recipients to date under the Home PurS
Assistance Act to 32,309 at a total cosj
$109.6 million. 34,025 mortgages, totalB
$105.6 million, remain outstanding undeji
Home Acquisition Act.
During 1980, 25 loans totalling $660,220$
were provided under the Conversion LrJH
Program to produce 55 additional housH
Under the Housing Initiative Program, 2,2'
home mortgages were approved, provida
homeowners with first mortgages at 93^L\
three years, with a maximum price for lane
improvements of $95,000.00. Under thej
program, 98 projects designed to produS
rental units received first mortgage funta
three year term on a sliding scale of 93fl
first year, 10%% the second and HWOT
third, on a maximum price per unit of
$50,000.00.
New commitments under the federal-proS
Assisted Home Ownership Program ceaa
1978, but benefits of $185,671.00 werep
families in 1980. Benefits paid under theT
Assisted Rental Project (also halted in 19/
amounted to $7,912,094.00.
A total of $5,627,342.00 was committed di
1980 to assist 14 societies in the construa
534 senior citizen housing units. Nine pr3
representing 240 units were completed, ei
projects for 257 units were under constrffl
and 21 projects representing 655 units we
the design stage. Sites were acquired foj
of the projects at a cost of $650,800.00. C
project received a Crown land grant value
$105,000.00. Under the Provincial Assisfl
Program, rental supplements of $4,000.(1
provided to senior citizens in 205 units iW
buildings; and under the National HousiBj
a provincial rent subsidy of $2,863,500.00
provided for 6,227 seniors in 135 project!
 Wj Program and Management
Services Division
waiovernmental committee was formed of
li f the Ministry, Canada Mortgage and
■Corporation and the City of Vancouver
ornate and expedite provision of
provincial housing assistance for the
esped. 17 group homes were approved
il3 rent subsidies to 64 tenants, and
Hiortgage financing was provided to one
uient supplements were also provided
wrapped tenants in 116 specially
pe units in various community housing
rcince provided $1 million as its share in
Hal-provincial Remote Housing Program,
pjbsidize mortgages on 58 units,
fefor this program has fallen due to
pie among local government and
Mi to public housing, and the province's
pent that need for such units must be
instantiated.
He Co-operative and Non-profit Rental
■Bssistance Program, High Impact
j.yments of $930,405.19 were made
I
Sliile Home Registry had a busy year.
Be 4,966 new registrations, 16,649
3; of ownership, 9,248 security
nrnts registered, 5,294 security
Kits discharged, 8,923 transport permits
■20,041 searches, and 10,302 copies of
llsd documents issued. Preparation of a
pome park inventory continued.
Bfctry participated in meetings
Bed by the Manufactured Housing
ation to encourage municipalities to
Inobile homes.
 wg^ ]g Program and Management
WH^m Services Division        1
1
Housing Programs Activity
in 1980, by Regions
1. Home Purchase
Assistance
First Home
Grants
Family First
Home Grants
B.C. Second i
Mortgage
#
$
#
$
#
(
Kootenay
363
$   363,000
529
$ 1,322,500
128
$     640X
Lower Mainland
2,189
2,189,000
2,369
5,922,500
1,171
5,855)
Cariboo
127
127,000
280
700,000
211
1,055)
Omineca
269
269,000
354
885,000
298
1,490)
Peace
78
78,000
159
397,500
118
590)
Skeena
221
221,000
371
927,500
90
450>
Thorn pson-Okanagan
622
622,000
827
2,067,500
363
1,815)
Vancouver Island
1,053
1,053,000
1,293
3,232,500
531
2,655]
Provincial Total
4,922
$4,922,000
6,182
$15,455,000
2,190
$14,550:
a
2. Conversion Loan
Program
Approved
During 1980
Approved
Since Inception
Loans          Units
Loans
Units
~%
Kootenay
—
—
2
2
$   3o:
Lower Mainland
14
25
146
230
2,55|
Cariboo
—
—
—
—
1
Omineca
—
—
—
—
Peace
—
—
—
—
Skeena
—
—
—
—
j
Thompson-Okanagan
—
—
—
—
Vancouver Island
11
30
75
185
1,856
Provincial Total
25
55
223
417
$4,441
 WW
w
Program and Management
Services Division
gmg Programs Activity in 1980, by Regions (Cont'd)
osing
give Program
Owner-Occupied Home
Mortgages Approved
Rental Project
Mortgages Approved
$
Projects
Units
eay
Mainland
»
a
son-Okanagan
iver Island
127
1,182
189
269
460
$    7,000,000
70,000,000
10,000,000
14,000,000
24,000,000
13
26
20
12
27
157
1,079
505
279
831
& 4,000,000
33,000,000
11,000,000
6,000,000
21,000,000
:ial Total
2,227
$125,000,000
98
2,851        $75,000,000
ijiior Citizen Housing
Capital Grants Approved
New Projects
Units
may
eMainland
to
jica
la
ifon-Okanagan
^ver Island
|sial Total
4
1
14
61
199
107
139
28
534
$   593,924
2,170,000
1,101,000
1,448,900
313,518
$5,627,342
 L;'ft?-affl
w
i^^jI Program and Management
M
Services Division
Housing Programs Activity in 1980, by Regions (Cont'd)
1
5. Housing for the
Handicapped
Group Homes Approved
Specially Designed Apartp
Units Approved
#
Subsidy Units
ApartmentU
Kootenay
Lower Mainland
Cariboo
Omineca
Peace
Skeena
Thompson-Okanagan
Vancouver Island
Provincial Total
15
5
20
25
6. Remote Area Housing
#
Kootenay
Lower Mainland
Cariboo
Omineca
Peace
Skeena
Thompson-Okanagan
Vancouver Island
11
15
21
11
Provincial Total
58
J
 "wrw
Program and Management
Services Division
pfrograms
la Frank Edgell
in provides policy direction on Ministry
■concerning the allocation and best use
a land; and policy, procedure and
n management services for land
a. of under the Land Act. Legislative
Bents made to the Land Act in 1980
gated revision of disposal policies and
K3S.
accomplishments
regional Crown land plans were
Ml, with major attention directed to the
leorge Special Sales Area Crown land
Rub-regional plan for the Clinton land
isration district was begun to provide
aiagers with a better information base
mining Crown land use. Terrain and soil
jps were developed, together with the
ns of Municipal Affairs and Environment,
si as training exercises for regional staff.
c participated in a study of log handling
Environmental impact and in project
Kby Metal Mines Steering Committee,
EAdvisory Committee, Linear Guidelines
[^Guidelines. Discussion papers were
Eon the Ministry's role in foreshore
jiration, and Ministry policy regarding
lei planning and forest planning. Policies
ling the Crown land disposal program
[provincial forests program were
Id and as a result the concept of
[planning areas developed in
Bon with the Ministry of Forests, as well
Implication of the sub-district planning
■or determining trade-offs where there
rlicts between forest and agricultural
wis.
To comply with changes to the Land Act, and
reflect the new Crown land pricing policy
established by the province, Crown land
disposition policies were modified for
agricultural, residential, quarrying and log
storage use. The new pricing policy is based on
principles of neutrality, comparability, market
value, due process and ease of administration.
The new policy had a major effect on the
following:
Residential land: established at a fixed price
and offered by public lot draw. Unsold remaining
lots are sold by regional offices across the
counter to qualified applicants.
Agricultural land: offered by auction at an
upset price reflecting market value of the land.
The right to remove standing timber under a
licence to cut is administered by the Ministry of
Forests.
Successful applicants enter into a lease-
develop-purchase agreement with a 10 year
term and incentives to promote agricultural
development are built into the agreement.
Log storage tenures were reviewed in
co-operation with the Council of Forest
Industries. A new policy created designated
zones with standard base values, which will be
reviewed annually to ensure equitable return to
the Crown.
New sand and gravel tenures require a
percentage of the estimated royalty fee be
prepaid for the term of the lease or licence.
A new policy and procedures manual was
developed and distributed to field offices.
Tenure documents were also redesigned to
streamline processing.
h land tenures issued: 1980
Agricultural
wer Island —
Mainland 1
Iran Okanagan 2
say 3
38
s:a
*ial Total
52
57
84
237
Residential
Quarrying
Log Storage
3
1
13
8
7
32
13
4
4
18
1
6
34
15
10
34
4
3
6
—
39
12
149
41
77
  r
^^jd ProSfr3111 2J?cl Management
7^
Services Division
Surveys and Land Records
Director, George Wilson
1980 accomplishments
Hardware for a computerized Crown land
Information System was installed, and an
operator training program begun. Work began
on reviewing material recorded in the Land
Registers and coding it for key punching. The
program requiring all government ministries to
deposit duplicate Certificates of Title with the
unit continued.
Nineteen rural settlements were added to the
Crown land Inventory, bringing the total number
of communities inventoried to 282. Twelve maps
were revised and 101 community profiles
updated.
733 Crown grants were issued under the Land
Act, and 21 Crown grants were issued to the
B.C. Development Corporation with a land
value of $2,659,016.00.
Demand for Crown land requiring survey
remained high with a total of 716 survey
instructions issued, and many plans examined
and processed.
Microfilming of vault records continued, and
vault security was tightened. Assistance was
provided to the office of the Ombudsman in two
cases of survey related problems. 33
assignments were completed by field staff, 20
for regional offices and 13 for the B.C. Land
Commission, the B.C. Building Corporation, and
the ministries of Education and Forests. The
value of authorized survey monuments stocked
totalled $41,382.00.
Finance and Administration
Director, Vincent Collins
This branch is responsible for a broad range of
services affecting the financial, personnel,
equipment and general office resources. The
past year has seen continued development of
new systems, policies and procedures
particularly in the accounting, budget
development and personnel areas.
1980 accomplishments
A Union-Management staff committee was
formed to assist in resolving individual
situations where there was a change of
classification or location.
Organization and staffing of the Lands &
Housing Regional Operations Division to
achieve greater decentralization was largely
achieved.
Classification and staffing in the Surveys an
Land Records Branch was undertaken, affd
classification study completed of the regrar
documents examiner series.
An organizational review of the Professiona
Services Branch was completed.
The Ministry's first staff training and
development plan was prepared and
implemented and assistance was provided
central personnel agencies including
Professional Association bargaining, safety
training, employee development and
classification of Licensed Science Officer
positions.
A municipal accounting system was
implemented for the University Endowment
Lands and accounting and management
reporting systems, based on private enterpi;
operations, were implemented for Ministry
enterprises at Manning Park Lodge, Cypres
and Gibson Pass ski areas and the Univeg
Endowment Lands Golf Course.
A revised accounting system was implernl
for the Crown Land Fund and an account™
policies and procedures manual developed)
distributed to all regional offices.
Use of the Crown Land Fund was expande:
include non-recoverable transactions sucffl
purchase of park land and environmental
reserves, and to fund Land Act disposition
Major modifications and enhancements we
begun to upgrade the Land Act accounts*
receivable system, and a signing authority
policy and expenditure and commitment co
system were initiated.
The budgeting system was enhanced bw
implementing a computerized estimates]
development package.
A quarterly financial and program revievWi
system was implemented to identify progffl
date on stated objectives, and to identify*
possible over or under expenditures.
  Wi.-i
4*
&!
*»*    /•«. =9
*^=SK
Program and Management
{ rrwjrcim mm mcii
~M Services Division
Professional Services
Director, Douglas Rogers
The branch provides professional and technical
services to regional offices to promote
development and marketing of Crown land.
Services provided include appraising,
engineering, planning, architecture, marketing
and conveyancing of land.
Technical costs are reviewed including
construction contracts, residential subdivision
development and land servicing agreements,
and professional advice provided to the
Executive in formulating policy.
The acquisition of land for provincial park
purposes by purchase, exchange or donation,
acquisition of private lands within Part III of the
Pacific Rim National Park and jointly
determining with the Ministry of Forests the
timber tenures within Pacific Rim National Park
boundaries are new responsibilities. Assistance
is also provided to Heritage Trust and Heritage
Conservation Branch in valuing and
acquiring land.
1980 accomplishments
Appraisals were completed for 660 properties
with a total value of $49,717,714.00.
An analysis was prepared for the engineering
and appraisal reports on three abandoned
railroad rights-of-way, one on Vancouver Island
and two in the interior.
Negotiations were completed and conveyance
documents nearing completion for the province
to acquire 255 properties now jointly owned by
the federal and provincial governments.
Seven parcels of private land containing 294
acres were purchased for $3,582,000.00.
Ninety seven properties valued at
$2,650,000.00 were acquired from other
ministries or government corporations.
Thirteen legal surveys including perimeter,
reference, consolidation and subdivision plans
were completed at a cost of $15,704.00.
Six properties costing $950,000.00 were
acquired for provincial park purposes.
During the year a total of 659 properties were
offered for sale and 247 sold with a value of
$6,497,984.00.
152 lots in 16 leasehold subdivisions were s|
leaving a balance of 235 unsold leased lots J
a value of $2,920,000.00.
The Rural Development Program was desigj
to provide residential and recreational lots a
small commercial agricultural acreages in
unincorporated areas. Developments were
designed to provide basic services such as
proven water supply, hydro, telephone and
gravel roads. During 1980 eleven projectsmj
undertaken. Eight projects were completed
providing 126 rural development parcels am;
recreational lots ready for marketing. Thrffl;
other projects were started to produce 17
commercial lots, 26 residential lots and eigh
rural development parcels.
Under the Urban Crown Land Program.E
communities where developments were
proposed and Crown land agreements inifja
in 1980 were:
Whistler $2,500,000.01
Fort Nelson $1,134,287.(1
Elkford $5,000,000.00
Logan Lake $5,200,000.(1
Mackenzie $   631,202.08
Prince Rupert $   470,000.03
Warfield $   665,000.00
Communities where developments wereBJ
approved for interim financing were:
Prince Rupert $4,500,000.00
Kimberley $   190,000.01
Land servicing agreements are currently irl
effect in the following communities for a tote
$20,392,180.00:
Comox $       53,900.00
Matsqui $     555,O00.E
Richmond $ 4,169,280.8
Surrey $10,121,000.E
Whistler $     892.000.E
Pitt Meadows $    601,000.01
Port Moody $ 4,000,000.0|
The Replot Program was designed to prov|
financial assistance to municipalities to chai
unsatisfactory legal subdivisions to increase
availability of serviced lots. Assistance was
being provided during 1980 in Sechelt,   |
Coquitlam, Rossland, Castlegar, Kelowna
J
 i Program and Management
Services Division
iakelopment projects were undertaken
y\i year ranging from major resort
inijto developing Ministry policies relating
/apment.
Jts in 1979-80 totalled 1,793,297, a 6.7%
jaiover the previous year. The number of
SDansions and new projects in the
Sector amounted to 10 projects with a
sivestment of $73.5 million.
©hold Sales
December 31,1980
imam
twind
■Ison
ie
stops
Bizie
uu
:hirdy
■fcNeill
^George
etoke
sish
icona
ais Lake
1
29
4
13
4
4
3
1
2
9
22
3
3
18
317,125
30,316
101,830
20,000
37,683
18,170
7,560
22,050
58,340
247,754
26,010
76,005
174,825
115
$1,137,668
n Grants Issued: 1980
Recipient
Number
Hectares
r land purchases
Hot purchases
Imptions
lesite leases
Ecial Crown Corporations
wcipal and Regional Districts
3/ays
tellaneous
525
94
3
3
35
55
10
8
29,709.50
157.93
17.633
361.5641
884.0427
194.8497
9.719
>AL
733
31335.2385
 i
  WsE^Sj Program
r*->r   JM Services
and Management
Division
Legal Surveys Production 197
5 to 1980
1976
1977
1978
1979
198
Functions in Support of the Crown
land Application Process
1. Applications cleared (for leases
& purchases)
3270
3688
3279
4598
58S
2. Survey instructions issued
331
403
343
660
71
3. Survey plans examined
207
278
265
269
36
4. Lots confirmed on an Official Plan
(under Sec. 63 Land Act)
269
300
371
491
|
5. Examination sketches, Crown
grant and lease tracings prepared
6601
2908
1795
1541
16E
Functions Related to Reference Map
Maintenance and Updating
1. Reference Maps compiled or
renewed
53
41
30
0
2. Reserves added or amended
(exclusive of map notations)
269
332
189
331
3. Cancellations from maps
(Reserves, Rts-of-way and
Forest deletions)
1722
664
461
689
3C
Functions In Support of Land
Survey Management
5!
I
1
1. Land Title Office plan check
1926
1985
1701
1632
2. Crown land subdivision and
R/W plan check
335
437
363
394
3. Well-site plans checked and
recorded
153
328
474
524
4. Vault documents used
36179
37908
36651
36195
409
5. Statutory Application Procedures
100
127
155
152
1
i
 Wa Program and Management
liUi Services Division
aer of Crown Grants Issued—1975 to 1980
^^
1975                  1976                  1977                  1978                  1979                   1980
  ferview of 1980 Activities:
ghe year the Division's activities at the
sty Endowment Lands focussed on
Bbction with the Lands, in terms of land
aility needs and administrative practices.
Hal management reporting system was
Jed which will provide the residents of
Evvith better information on the operation
rommunity. In addition to maintaining
ie services for the community, major
fi/vere undertaken on many outstanding
■King the Lands and their impact on the
fe's role in administration. These include
roosed regional park, proposals for
r, operation of the golf course and the
grtment. Policy issues have been
rj for consideration of the Provincial
Bent.
e new proposals for ecological reserves
feared through other government
BI, and four new reserves received the
Hof the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
Eion is continuing with its work on
'ding a policy for greenbelt reserves, but
won and management have been
fired to the Lands and Housing Regional
Bons Division of the Ministry.
Eique land projects are proceeding
ne Division's guidance—the purchase of
Iple and timber tenures for the Pacific
jjtional Park, purchase of three
<ned railway rights-of-way, and
foment of Lakelse Lake Hotsprings.
leant accomplishment of the Ministry in
Hfirear is reflected in the fact that of 6,140
BEjications, only 33 appeals were lodged
I regional decisions. Such favourable
lean be attributed to the efforts of
|il staff to ensure that applications are as
Be as possible and accurately fall within
>/ guidelines for Crown land acquisition.
 \ji2S5:
Special Projects Division
University Endowment Lands
Administration
Systems of enterprise accounting for the golf
course and Municipal Fund accounting for the
administration were both installed during the
year, together with revisions in budgetting
and inventory control.
A relief sewer line was installed eastwards
from Wycliffe and Acadia Roads and detailed
planning was undertaken for construction,
through British Columbia Buildings
Corporation, of a new public safety building to
house fire and police protection services.
Construction commenced in December.
Reconstruction by the Ministry of
Transportation and Highways of 16th Avenue,
a major throughway continued, as did work
on a children's park on Drummond Drive.
Negotiations with lessees were begun to
encourage revitalization of the Village
commercial area.
Consultants were engaged to undertake a
study of the condition and adequacy of the
existing storm/sanitary sewer system and a
study of the adequacy of existing street
lighting was produced.
Ministry Personnel Services Branch
completed a preliminary review of the fire
department operation.
Development plans were begun for
improvements to the Westward Ho Golf
Course and UEL public works yard.
Negotiations initiated by the G.V.R.D. Transit
Department were underway for placement of
electric trolley lines along University
Boulevard, to provide improved transit
service to UEUUBC.
A proposal by the Greater Vancouver
Regional District for a major regional park to
be located on UEL land was under reviewB
and the community recreation program
completed another successful year. Grants
were received from government and othejE
agencies, and the assistance of many |
residents is gratefully acknowledged.
Following 11 years as manager of the UEL,
R. P. Murdock left to become General
Manager of the Provincial Land Commissior
Mr. Ronald R. O'Genski, formerly Manager,
Land Development with the Ministry, was
appointed as replacement.
 Special Projects Division
.j'tjical Reserves Unit
o£al Reserves are established for
am and educational purposes. The
srvs serve as banks of genetic material
(Aide baseline records for land
agment. The mandate of the Unit is to
gaie system of Reserves needed for
Jince, survey the Province for new
djls, and pilot these through resource
■scrutiny to designation by the
teiint Governor-in-Council. Once
b$ied, the Reserves must be managed,
■eludes protection and arrangements
tii/. Public awareness of the Ecological
lis Program must also be fostered.
ms occurred in all these facets of the
rai during 1980.
m new proposals for reserves were
rri through agencies with natural
|ej'ib interests and administrative
iffliibility for the lands concerned,
ass can now be recommended to
ir|:.
aline biogeoclimatic zone, one of twelve
BJbiotic zones of the Province, was
Inn detail and some proposals were
Bra as a step toward securing
mntation of this zone in the Ecological
sies system.
*w reserves were created during the
aace Rocks (220 ha), a rich marine
stem; Chilliwack River Forest (86 ha),
Bitanding example of virgin climax
aim the Lower Mainland including
slnt examples of red cedar, grand and
Is fir, Engelmann and sitka spruce; Pitt
S(269 ha), a "relict bog" near Haney
iftynes Lease Reserve near Osoyoos
IB for semi-arid communities,
iltfeer warden program was begun to
Manage reserves. Some 20 volunteers
teen appointed and are assisting by
Ijig over reserves in their regions to
Baiy activity which detracts from the
lie of the reserves. As well, other
iiment agencies, notably the Ministries
lists and Environment, have indicated
11 by instructing their field staff to
|ir what is happening to the reserves.
During the summer research began on the
tufted puffins of Triangle Island by Ms. Anne
Vallee of U.B.C. Dr. Tom Reimchen and
Shelagh Douglas continued their work in the
Drizzle Lake Reserve ecosystem.
Work was completed during the year in
contributing to production of a new film by the
National Film Board, entitled, "Keeping the
Options Open: the Ecological Reserves
Program in British Columbia". This is the third
film on the Ecological Reserves Program
produced by the N.F.B. in co-operation with
the Province. The film is intended to broaden
public awareness of the Program.
 Special Projects Division
Greenbelt Reserves
Policy direction for the Greenbelt Reserve
Program is still under development. With
commencement of the Conservation Trust Fund
program, the Ministry of Environment has
begun to take up responsibility formerly under
the Greenbelt Program for acquiring and setting
aside land for habitat conservation and
intensive wildlife or fishery management.
However, greenbelt acquisitions underway were
completed at: Ladner Marsh—74 hectares of
critical fish and waterfowl habitat; Sturgeon
Bank—two properties totalling 16.61 hectares
making five of seven properties in the planned
greenbelt now acquired; Englishman River—88
hectares of riverfront protective strip acquired
by land exchange; Fanny Bay greenbelt—
increased by 3.05 hectares.
Three greenbelt properties were cancelled for
allocation to better use. At Fort St. James, a
greenbelt of 2 hectares was made available for
a Village Park. The Roberts' greenbelt of 13.35
hectares near Yellow Point was converted to a
Provincial Park in accordance with the donor's
wishes. A 1.88 hectares greenbelt adjacent to
Patricia Bay Highway was cancelled as being
unsuitable for the purpose.
Pacific Rim National Park Land
Assembly
1980 witnessed detailed review and updating by
the Provincial Government of remaining actions "
required to complete the Pacific Rim National
Park land assembly project. Decision was
reached and funding was provided to proceed
with purchase of all remaining fee simple
properties. Negotiation with owners will
continue in 1981.
During the year the basis for Federal-Provincial
sharing of the cost of extinguishing timber
tenures from Pacific Rim Park was developed
by the Province. An accord with the
Government of Canada on this issue is to be
negotiated in 1981.
Special Properties
1. Lakelse Lake Hotsprings—Under the]
Federal-Provincial Travel Industry Developrrt
Subsidiary Agreement, a study was contract
to investigate and report on developmeraB
alternatives for Lakelse Lake HotsprinasW
recommended form of development, market
analysis and viability assessment of the
development recommended, disposition of
existing property improvements, and propos
for executing development. The study report
was completed in October.
2. Retired Railroad Rights-of-Way—
Negotiations were opened by the Province fi
acquisition of the Cowichan Subdivision R/V
Canadian National Railways as well as the
Carmi and Osoyoos Subdivisions of CP Rail
Land Application Appeal Commit
In 1980, 33 appeals against adjudications or
land applications were lodged. Of these, I
27 were accepted for review and five were
redirected to Region offices for further attem
at resolution. Of the 27 appeals subject to
formal review process, 14 were upheld and
13 were denied by the Minister following I
Committee review. Of the five directed back
Region, three were resolved. One applicaffi
was reinstated and one is still under discus
During this year the Ministry received 6,140
applications to acquire land.
Protocol Agreements
Inter-agency agreements designed to en|
co-ordinated efforts in land-related matted
between the Ministry and other agencies we
concluded with the following:
The Island Trust—this related to planning ai
administration of land within the Trust Area;
Fisheries and Oceans-Canada, Councilof
Forest Industries—B.C., Ministry of
Environment, Ministry of Forests—
implementation of interim guidelines for the
review and processing of Coastal Log hanjj
applications; and
British Columbia Development Corporations
Agreement of June 5,1979 on the adminisj|
of Crown land sought for industrial use was
revised effective April 21,1980.
  '
Crown Corporations ai
Provincial
Rental    I
Housing
Corporation
Provincial Rental Housing Corporation
Directors:
Hon. James R. Chabot
Hon. Evan M. Wolfe
Hon. Robert H. McClelland
John C. Johnston
Officers:
Hon. James R. Chabot, President
John C. Johnston, Secretary
Andrew Armitage, Assistant Secretary
Fenton S. Dawson, C.A., Treasurer
Housing
Corporation
of
British
Columbia  I
Housing Corporation of British Columbi
Directors:
Hon. James R. Chabot
Thomas A. Toynbee
Lawrence I. Bell
Alan S. Spiro
Officers:
Thomas A. Toynbee, Chairman of the BoS
Lawrence I. Bell, President and Secretaa
 ommissions
lish
Jumbia |
using
nagement
unission
Clumbia Housing Management
son
commissioners:
I Chairman
s5 Armitage
ivison
Jjon
Bison
llslsey
IbDougall
$39
 —"1
11
Crown Corporations
and Commissions
Provincial Rental Housing
Corporation
Directors
Hon. James R. Chabot
Hon. Evan M. Wolfe
Hon. Robert H. McClelland
John C. Johnston
Officers
Hon. James R. Chabot
President
John C. Johnston
Secretary
Andrew Armitage
Assistant Secretary
Fenton S. Dawson, C.A.
Treasurer
The Provincial Rental Housing Corporation was
designated as a Housing Corporation under
Section 6 of the Department of Housing Act by
Order-in-Council 986 dated March 23, 1976.
The Corporation is wholly owned by the
Province, and holds the provincial interest in all
public rental facilities designed for low income
families and senior citizens. Funds necessary
for the purchase of these properties were
provided by loans at interest from the Housing
Fund and Canada Mortgage and Housing
Corporation.
At December 31, 1979, the Corporation held a
total of 99 properties, comprising 7,803
individual dwelling units. The total investment
amounted to $89.9 million against which loans
totalled $80.3 million, leaving an equity on cost
of just under $9.6 million.
The Corporation's revenue is produced by
annual charges to the relevant rental operations
administered by British Columbia Housing
Management Commission, and, after providing
for loan interest expense and other
administrative costs, the Corporation has
produced a net revenue of $8.3 million during
its period of operation. This revenue is regarded
as a recovery of investment cost.
Housing Corporation of British
Columbia
Directors
Hon. James R. Chabot
Thomas A. Toynbee
Lawrence I. Bell
Alan S. Spiro
Officers
Thomas A. Toynbee, Chairman of the Board t
Lawrence I. Bell, President & Secretary ■
The Housing Corporation of British Columbiaj
was incorporated March 17,1967 under the '■.
Companies Act of the Province of British
Columbia. It is a Crown-owned company thai
operated both in the housing and developme
market and as a development and service
contract agent for the Ministry. In September
1978 a decision was made to dispose of the j
Corporation's assets and cease operations.
Since that date an orderly wind-up of theBJ
Corporation has taken place.
At the end of the Corporation's fiscal year I
(October 31, 1980) assets totalled $10.9 mil
the majority of which were held as bank term
deposits and mortgages receivable. Net I
earnings for the year totalled $1.4 million.
During the year the Corporation declared
dividends to the Crown in the amount of $7
million, leaving the shareholder equity at
$7.7 million.
It is anticipated that during 1981 the activity
the Corporation will be at a point where form
winding up can commence under Sections 2
and 292 of the Companies Act. Until that tffi
the remaining administrative functions will^
handled by the Corporation's accountant^
 m
j$3| Crown Corporations
and Commissions
si Columbia Housing
apment Commission
Q Commissioners
K«r, Chairman
Jw Armitage
jS'idson
■Kson
aprdison
dkelsey
EJcDougall
iiigg
Ejce: Suite 206, 515 West 10th Avenue,
pr, B.C.
Eavis, General Manager
I Cochrane, Director of Community
A
loznick, Director of Financial &
ijrative Services
ibinson, Director of Housing Operations
rlil Managers
Eancouver East—
R Mahood (Burnaby)
Eancouver West—
pthy Wilson (Burnaby)
liB.O—
3 Scott (Prince Rupert)
h B.C.—
It Proudlock (Penticton)
per Island—
|3in (Victoria)
British Columbia Housing Management
Commission is an agency of the Province
authorized by Order-in-Council No. 2388, dated
September 7, 1978, and is accountable to the
Minister of Lands, Parks and Housing.
The main purpose of BCHMC is to manage
provincial and federal/provincial rental housing
and property and to administer the Province's
Rent Supplement Program in three sectors:
• housing managed by the Commission
• housing operated by non-profit societies
• housing owned and operated in the private
sector (Assisted Rental Program projects)
Property Management Highlights
BCHMC is responsible for: 3,851 family and
4,116 senior citizen units in 130 projects. The
Commission manages 150 units of scattered
housing and 1,000 acres of land banked
property, and accommodates about 20,000
people in 48 municipalities. Total estimated
operating maintenance and administrative
expenses are $11.6 million, with amortization of
original project capital costs at $13.7 million.
Municipal grants in lieu of taxes amount to
$3.4 million. The Commission achieved 98%
rent collection in 1980. The smoke alarm
installation program was completed, the Skeena
Terrace renovation program budgeted at $1.3
million over a two-year period was begun, and
the Glenshiel Hotel was taken over as of
December 1, 1980.
Rent Supplement: BCHMC
• Estimated total tenant rentals $12.1 million.
• Federal/Provincial contributions $19.7 million.
Rent Supplement—Non-profit Societies
44(1)(b)
BCHMC will have paid out $6,222,738.50 to 135
societies (6,227 units).
Rent Supplement—Private Sector 44 (1) (a)
BCHMC will have paid out $2,200,628.29 to
858 units in 103 buildings. 44(1) (a) non-profit
will have paid out $44,389.00 to 19 units in 7
buildings.
 Crown Corporations
and Commissions
Provincial Rental Assistance Program
(PRAP)
First senior citizen units came on stream in
1980. $3,849.00 was paid out to 225 units in
13 buildings.
High Impact Grant (HIG)
Assistance to co-operatives, $930,405.19 was
paid out to 1,883 units in 30 co-operatives.
Highlights
• Distribution of Property Management Guide
for Non-Profit Senior Citizen Societies to
all Societies throughout the Province.
• Publication of a rent supplement brochure—
A Brochure for Building Owners and Their
Representatives.
• Provision of Property Management
Consulting Services to Non-profit Senior
Citizen Societies by the Commission's
Regional Managers.
Housing Allocation Highlights
Administered files for 3,878 senior citizens
and 4,162 family applicants. Represents a
1.5% increase in senior citizen files and 41%
increase in family applicants. In the fourth
quarter, there was a 4.3% increase in senior
citizen applicants and 3.4% increase in family
applicants over the previous quarter. This
results from a 22.8% increase in senior citizen
applicants in Victoria, 3.8% in Greater
Vancouver and 5% in Northern B.C. Region.
Reasons for Senior Citizens Applying:
Majority because of inappropriate
accommodation or health reasons.
Reasons for Family Applying:
In the Greater Vancouver region, 46.8%
because rent in excess of 25% and 35.6%
because of inappropriate accommodation.
Number of Persons Housed:
455 senior citizens and 918 families: 86.8%
families were provided with accommodation
equal to or larger than existing
accommodation. 59.6% were single parents
85.4% of single senior citizens were housed
in same size or smaller dwellings: 81.8% vw
previously in rental accommodation and
60.8% paid more than 25% of income torn
shelter.
Refusals and Decline in Senior Citizen
Applications:
SAFER not only contributed to the numH
senior citizen refusals of which 62% were
single persons but may also have contributi
to the minor senior citizen application
increase over the past year.
 Crown Corporations
and Commissions
5,603
51
1,974
44
102
28
256
1
12
1
—
6
1
7,947
132
jEssion Portfolio and Programs at December 31,1980
Housing Projects/
Units Societies
rnprty Managed Portfolio
■,:fibtion 40, NHA
ffction 44, NHA
• Biolly Provincial
rilsntwood House
ifirke Mountain
Lid Parcels (2,343 acres)
. a<else (Skoglund Hotsprings) (305 acres)
TOTAL
rate & Non-Profit Supplement Programs
Jction44(1)(a)NHA:
4 Receiving 855 110
I  (Eligible) (   877) (110)
.ilction44(1)(b)NHA:
Receiving 6,227 129
(Eligible) (8,066) (135)
rlgh Impact Grant:
| Receiving 1,392 22
j   (Eligible) (1,883) ( 30)
.'.iiovincial Rental Assistance 225 13
TOTAL 8,699 2J4
ial Programs
Jasction 40—Vancouver City Managed 292                               3
tjsctiorj 44—Vancouver City Managed 168                               2
Jay-Cam Co-op. Centre —                           —
qjral & Remote Housing —                           —
TOTAL 460
GRAND TOTAL 17,106
wr Programs
■ffirendered Property Repairs
flpn-Profit Society Consulting Services
li
 Crown Corporations
and Commissions
Housing Applicant Activities 1976-1980: Senior Citizens
J
Q.
Q.
<
450
420
390
360
330
300
270
240
210
180
150
120
90
60
30
0
JFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ
^y^
^^
1976 1977
Housing Applicant Activities 1976-1980: Families
380
360
340
320
300
280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
JFMAMJJASONQJFMAM
1Q7R
J    J    A
1977
SONDJFMAMJ
m
 #
if3j Crown Corporations
J£ and Commissions
New Applications
Cancelled
Housed
Bfmamjjasonqj
O  N
a*L F MAMJJASONDJ
450
420
390
360
330
300
270 >
o
\/
\/
1979
1980
■L
Y""         \
1  u\                                                                                                          r
E  \                                                                                 **
•"  "•
\     ■!£&: .
bS           /
,-—-""''     \         J
--
%\ /'
""•--•i j           • V'                              5     /
1/    \y\      v
.,—^   ■. • ■
240
210 §■■
180 w
150
120
90
60
30
0
380
360
340
320
300
280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
1979
N  Q
1980
 TjMil Crown Corporations
Pli&il and Commissions
Housing Allocation Statistics
January 1,1980 to November 30,1980
Greater Vancouver
Northern
Southern
Vancouver
Island
B.C.
B.C.
Region
Region
Region
Region
TC
Applicants as of January 1, 1980
Seniors
3,249
157
101
312
3
Families
1,873
409
461
207
2
Add New Applicants
Seniors
1,678
167
83
117
2
Families
2,194
703
679
298
3
SUBTOTAL:
Applicants January 1,1980 to
November 30, 1980
Seniors
4,927
324
184
429
5
Families
4,067
1,112
1,140
505
6
Less Applicants Housed
1
Seniors
333
35
15
37
Families
349
193
181
114
Less Applicants Cancelled*
I
Seniors
1,445
62
52
56
Families
1,058
318
342
121
1
■
NET:
Applicants as of November 30,1980
Seniors
3,149
227
117
336
3
Families
2,660
601
617
270
4
*Primary Cause for Cancels in Greater Vancouver Region from
January 1, 1980 to November 30, 1980
Seniors
Families
Found other accommodation or moved from locale
1,297
1,003
1

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