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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-Third Annual Report 1963/64 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1965

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-third Annual Report
1963/64
By the Superintendent of Education
    To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-third Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1965.
  J. F. K. English, M.
  r
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1964
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., F.R.S.A.
Deputy Minister and St.
perintendent of Education:
3. F. K. English
M.A., Ed.D., LL.D.
1     Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
F. P. Levtrs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Chief Inspe
-tor of Schools:
E. E. Hyndm
an, B.A., B.Pffid.
District Superintendents, Superit
tendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
J.  I. Macdougall,  M.A.,  M.Ed.,  D.Paed.,
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
Kamloops.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops.
D. E. McFee, M.A., Kitimat.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Surrey.
D. B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superin
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
tendent, Vancouver.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Richmond.
D.   H.   MacKdrdy,   D.F.C.,   B.A.,   M.Ed.,
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish.
Smithers.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Victoria.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Sooke.
I. Chell, M.A., Assistant Superintendent,
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Oliver.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
C. Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., Nelson.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Penticton.
H. C Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Sup
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
erintendent, North Vancouver.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Pasd., Kelowna.
I. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
G. M. Paton, B.A., M.Ed., Prince Rupert.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
I. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superin-
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancou-
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Qualicum.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Ladner.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
F. I. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Courtenay.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Powell
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Pasd., Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., M.Ed., Langley.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Burnaby.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Pied., Kimberley.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Hcpe.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., Vanderhoof.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
W. E. Lucas, B.A.,B.Pa;d., North Vancouver.
9
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Pa;d., F.R.S.A., F
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.B
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, BA.
Assistant Registrars: E. A. Killough, B.Ed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec.), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), D
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, BA.
Ytrector of Tests and Standards: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pa
irector of Secondary School Correspondence: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pt
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report of the Superintendent of Education     13
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration)    41
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)    43
Report of the Director of Curriculum 47
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services 50
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests and Standards    52
Report of the Director of Home Economics    55
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
Secondary and Vocational Courses    57
Elementary Correspondence School 60
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts     61
Report of the Director of Visual Education 63
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch 66
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools 70
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment 76
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education 79
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch 101
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)  113
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations 116
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act.. 127
Statistical Returns 129
Information re Examination Papers  178
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School    13
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  — 14
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools.. 15
Teachers' Certificates  15
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  __ 16
Number of School Districts ——          17
Number of Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  . -—-    17
Number of Junior-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District _ 18
Number of Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  ———
Number of Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District	
r Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each Dis-
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel	
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils..
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School	
Classification of Teachers' Salaries ... •"
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1963—
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1963	
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1963	
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1963 by School District-
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts	
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades	
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1963/64
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-third Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1964.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
358,905 to 378,641, and the average daily attendance increased from 332,584 to
348,472.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 92.03.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown here-
TypeofScho
Number
ofPu
ilsEnro
ed
Municipal
Rura
Total
Senior second
I
g*r
3 218
Junior
secondary..
	
24,136
El___
^jmior
^___^	
	
2702.
224,818
Total..-.
;,...
10,71
1
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular
students (exclusive of the 6,212 officially registered in
other schools)  2,507
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students                 843
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction  !  82
3,432
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  7,587|
Night schools                                           _ 78,4612
Vancouver School of Art  259
Vancouver Vocational Institute  6,9813
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)   8,555
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  230
Carried forward     ...                                105,505
 14 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Brought forward               105,505
Adult education—Continued
Number of participants in recreational programme 1,016,632*
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)  78
University of Victoria .  1,1215
University of British Columbia  4,5006
;,127,836
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
iber of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
The following table shows the
for the school-year 1963/64:—
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the
number of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of
pupils per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Nu
mberofTcac
~-
23.
S
TypeorSCoo,
T_-?e_
ln.mi.tors
Total
•     .
of
l
_:E
j|
1
29 52
Junior-senior secondary	
30.90
2______^ES__S=
g
11,965
2,450
14.415
378,641
100.00
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the
number with or without university degrees:—
 N 16 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years sine
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:-
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT                                        N 17
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
1     expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1963/64:—     I
Rural school districts
27
100
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior secondary schools during the school-year was 3,218;
of this number, 1,992 were boys and 1,226 were girls.   The number of schools,
[      number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
— Number and Name
BB^jsPE—
f|§|
39  Vancouv
1                     37       i            51
I
.        |           109                   148
3,218
 N 18 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
JUNIOR-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior secondary schools during the school-year was
62,634; of this number, 32,201 were boys and 30,433 were girls.   The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
OistrictNumberandName
N£n.3s0f
"SSSS? 1 "ESS?
"*_£-
_s! Quesnel	
1
t
i
I
5.' _-Sc_° _f___Z
i 1   :.     s
__
i__li__^=
1     i.
1
1
75] Mission                                                    ~
|
Totals                          	
88 1 %(ai
2,801        j     62,634
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 19
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior secondary schools during the school-year was 24,436;
of this number, 12,585 were boys and 11,851 were girls.   The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
OistrictNumb-andName
N_ss>f
mi
1W£?
NW
T_n
\
8
1
601
2.
It
fil
_-_._	
60.
|
_™_!r	
562
__s___,y	
1       i            13
ll
 N 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior secondary schools during the school-year
was 36,509; of this number, 18,751 were boys and 17,758 were girls.   The number
of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 21
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior secondary schools during the school-year
was 27,026; of this number, 14,021 were boys and 13,005 were girls.   The number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
Maple Ridge	
	
Chilcotin	
	
UnaT_,hfdiS,tiC,S—
	
 N 22                                 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 224,818;      j
of this number, 116,305 were boys and 108,513 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1963/64 in each district are shown in the following table:—
O-rriCNurnberandName
*«*
«_?
_SSJ*
NW
_: j^_-r.ffi—                       ~
1
1
12. Grand Forks	
7       1            54                    58       |       1,791
2s! Quesnel ________
8
is
35
1
II
12       1          "l
a gssr
.              u
14
|fcW=
I
1        1
?   1     I
1: fSl-'^	
65. Cowichan.	
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
^.Number andName
NsSooU.f
N_$___f
•ass?
N^_.°f
Lake Cowichan
I
1
1
1059
70
Qualicum	
3 952
I
lS.sfc	
2016
i
Mtato;	
1,809
70
TT..,?__.. TV___	
M
92
1.055
6,895
7.431
 N 24
DK
2.
3.
7.
11.
15.
20.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
54.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
65.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
75.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
TRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL
PERSONNEL
       2
rJ^i   i
Nelson
       1
Slocan
1
Trail
       2
Penticton
Salmon Arm
       1
Vernon
Kelowna  	
Kamloops     —
       2
2
AhhnRfrvrrl
6
Surrey
10
...    29
16
       6
....    13
1
2
       1
5
McBride
 __      ..      1
3
Greater Victoria
—    21
2
Cowichan ... .
3
Nanaimo _.
6
Qualicum	
Courtenay ...
Campbell River _ _
5
Alert Bay	
Mission       	
Total....
   i
  220
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 25
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
___»__.._»_-
«.-
«.-
ttr.'
W
j
1111111
6. Agassiz	
1   04
<__£_*-
2.    |
: Unattached District.
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1963/64:—
Type.
lf»>
«_£.
2.
Nu
mberc
.Pupils
/_£_£_.
Total
Boys
Girls
_£_-£_*_%_.
■_..,
i
ii
||
i
30.43_
il
3SZSS&Z
!££S=
1,368
14,415
378,641
195,855
182,786
348.47_.33
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, si
ing principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,(
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
E_.p7oy.d
g
sHJ_.
MS"
6 895
IS
11M6
$7 688
Junior-senior sec.
ndary	
	
6457
Elementary-senio
r secondary	
	
6.610
Supervising Principai
Special Instructors
?,sj:n?_,ds_„_._
268.
ll
||
*.;.._
!:::;•; ,„.:.; ._._—- -_-=_-_
?:__.
8,489
 N 28                                    PI
Distribution of teacl
ing principals, and part-til
Under $1,200	
JBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
lers by $100 salary-groups, including principals
ne teachers:—
1
i, supervis-     1
!__;i68
_ 701
i 342
_ 327
.. 212
._ 157
_ 538
_ 192
_ 198
I 160
|    97
1 174
_ 120
| 106
.. 241
.. 162
_ 171
_ 119
.. 132
_ 125
_   71
.. 101
_ 116
_    51
_ 148
... 192
_ 161
... 434
...    82
_ 108
_   53
...   97
_ 156
... 107
1 358
1 119
... 131
._   79
...    41
...   68
..   64
...   42
_   47
_.   26
... 672
4                  5,700- 5,799	
1,300- 1,399	
1,400- 1,499	
1,500- 1,599	
1,600- 1,699	
__     6                  5,800- 5,899	
4                 5,900- 5,999	
7                 6,100- 6,199	
6                  6,?. 00- 6,299
1,800- 1,899	
1,900- 1,999	
2,000- 2,099	
8 6,300- 6,399	
9 6,400- 6,499	
_   12                 6,500- 6,599	
10                 6,600- 6,699
7                 6,700- 6,799	
7                  6,800- 6,899
15                    (.Qrvn- fiqqq
2,500- 2,599
.    13                 7,000- 7,099	
10                 7,100- 7,199	
7                  7,200- 7.9.QQ
16                 7,300- 7,399	
14                  7,400- 7,499
61                    7 500- 7,Sqq
3,100- 3,199	
__   81                 7,600- 7,699	
70                  7,700- 7,799     .
3,300- 3,399	
 68                 7,800- 7,899	
3,500- 3,599	
3,600- 3,699	
3,700- 3,799	
3,800- 3,899	
3,900- 3,999   ....
4,000- 4,099	
    88                  8,000- 8,099	
  142                 8,100- 8,199	
 271                  8,200- 8,299	
 204                 8,300- 8,399	
 275                 8,400- 8,499	
 228                 8,500- 8,599	
316                  8,600- 8,699
4,200- 4,299	
4,300- 4,399	
  251                  8,700- 8,799	
9.99.                     R.Snfl- R,899
4,500- 4,599-	
4,600- 4,699-	
4,700- 4,799	
4,800- 4,899	
4,900- 4,999	
5,000- 5,099	
5,100- 5,199	
5,200- 5,299	
5,300- 5,399	
5,400- 5,499	
5,500- 5,599-	
338                 9,000- 9,099	
 288                 9,100- 9,199	
200                 9,300- 9,399
296                 9,500- 9,599.   _     _
  290.                9,900- 9,999	
.—_ 273                  10,000 and over	
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 29
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1963
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts $150,790,702.00
Add—
Department of Education expenditures for
administration, grants to University of
British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University,
correspondence schools, adult education, vocational and technical schools,
services, etc. $22,353,781.88
Teachers' Pension Fund       3,804,784.30
Free texbooks, maps, etc         590,315.98
       26,748,882.16
Grand total expenditure , j $177,539,584.16
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1963
Grand total cost of education $1'
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue..    $1,864,346.00
Debt charges on school district debt    20,171,457.00   .
Department of Education expenditures,
grants to University of British Columbia, Victoria University, Simon Fraser
University, correspondence schools,
adult education, vocational and technical schools, etc. 20,738,104.86
Total operating cost $134,765,676.30
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 348,472 _ $386.73
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 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
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 N 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
EXPANSION IN EDUCATION
During the school-year 1963/64 virtually every aspect of education was affected   ]
and some outstanding developments occurred in the Provincial educational system,   j
The necessary changes in the elementary- and secondary-school curriculum   |
have been proceeding in an orderly manner since 1961, following the submission   j
of the Report of the Royal Commission on Education.   The academic-technical pro-   1
gramme for Grades XI and XII is now being finalized, while other programmes of a   1
vocational nature are in advanced stages of development.   In this connection, during   ]
the summer of 1963 workshops were held at the Burnaby Vocational School to draft   ]
new courses for the commercial, industrial, community services, and visual and   j
performing arts programmes.   During 1964 this work was continued and will be    j
completed by the summer of 1965, when attention will be focused on vocational
agriculture.   This will complete the original pattern for reorganizing or modifying
the curriculum for the senior secondary schools of the Province.   As a result of such
developments, the holding power or the retention of pupils in the secondary schools   |
should continue to increase.   The public-school system is already retaining about
70 per cent of its pupils to the Grade XII level.   It can confidently be expected that   '■
in the future all but a very small group of pupils will complete some type of programme by the end of Grade XII and the first students will graduate on it in June
of 1967.  All of these new programmes and courses at both the junior-and secondary-
school level are designed to give greater purpose and meaning to the studies of all
types of pupils in the secondary schools.
The Provincial regional vocational schools have the responsibility for specific
trades training, retraining and pre-apprenticeship training, rehabilitative training, and
up-grading in a variety of skills to meet the immediate man-power needs of industry
and commerce. Regional vocational schools are already in operation in Burnaby,
Nanaimo, Prince George, Kelowna, Nelson, and Victoria (pilot project), and Vancouver Vocational Institute in Vancouver. Plans are in hand for similar schools in
Dawson Creek, Victoria, Kamloops, and Terrace. These 10 regional vocational
schools, when completed, should serve the occupational needs of the Province adequately for some years to come.
The British Columbia Institute of Technology has been completed and will
admit its first students in September of 1964. It will accommodate approximately
1,500 students in a two-year programme and is designed to give secondary-school
graduates an opportunity to obtain training within the Province in some 17 technologies appropriate to their needs. The institute is a very new, significant, and
practical development in the field of post-secondary education.
Some progress has been made toward establishing district and regional colleges
in the West Kootenay and Okanagan regions and in the City of Vancouver. The
proposed Vancouver District College will admit its first students in 1965, while the
West Kootenay College expects to open in September, 1966. In the Okanagan
Valley initial planning is being done to establish a regional college in that area. All
of these colleges will offer two-year academic programmes as well as a variety of
other programmes of a post-secondary nature in keeping with the needs of the particular area to be serviced.
Three public universities—the University of British Columbia, the University
of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University—are engaged in building programmes in
various stages, while the private university, Notre Dame University of Nelson, is
likewise developing its facilities. In particular Simon Fraser University is making
rapid progress in the construction of new buildings in preparation for receiving its
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 37
first students in September, 1965. While these universities will expand their undergraduate programmes, the University of British Columbia has announced an increased emphasis in the area of postgraduate work and in the greater development
of its professional schools. It is anticipated that all four of these institutions will
develop their individual characteristics through diversity, yet they will retain sufficient uniformity through mutual evaluation and discussion.
In order to facilitate the work of the universities and the junior colleges, an
Academic Board was established in November, 1963. This Board will have the
responsibility for co-ordinating the various programmes and for research as to the
future needs of higher education in the Province. The Board is already making an
important contribution in advising the Honourable the Minister on various aspects
of higher education.
It would appear, then, that at all levels of public education much progress is
being made and that great care is being taken to see that all young people in the
Province receive the type of instruction most appropriate to their requirements, for
no educational system should neglect either the young person of low scholastic aptitude or the student who is capable of the most advanced postgraduate work. In all
these aspects of education the youth of British Columbia is being well served.
SPECIAL TRANSFERS AND SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
In June of 1964, Mr. G. W. Graham, formerly Assistant Superintendent
(Administration), and Mr. E. E. Hyndman, former Chief Inspector, transferred to
the field as District Superintendents of Schools, the former being assigned to School
District No. 38 (Richmond), and the latter to School District No. 62 (Sooke).
During the period they were in the Department each man, in his way, made a marked
contribution to education in this Province.
Mr. Graham, among his many and varied duties, was concerned mainly with
school planning and school construction in all its aspects. In this role he had the
respect of the School Boards of the Province by his honest and fair-dealing practices.
To a considerable degree he was also responsible for outlining proposed legislation
in respect to the public-school system of the Province. He was a loyal and cooperative member of the Department who will be greatly missed by his colleagues.
Mr. Hyndman, who became Chief Inspector in 1958, began his work by organizing the Province into supervisory zones in order to work more effectively with
District Superintendents and School Boards. During the six years he served as
Chief Inspector he won the confidence and esteem of the various groups with whom
he had to deal and was generally respected for his practical philosophy of education.
In addition to his regular work, he was responsible for setting up the annual Departmental conference and for directing the biennial principals' conference.
Both Mr. Graham and Mr. Hyndman will continue to be associated with the
Department, but in a different capacity. Their wide range of friends throughout the
Province will wish them well in their new responsibilities.
Dr. W. A. Plenderleith became Assistant Superintendent in charge of Administration in June, 1964, in succession to Mr. G. W. Graham. Dr. Plenderleith came
into the Department in 1933 as a Provincial School Inspector and was assigned to
the Peace River Inspectorate. He subsequently became director of the experimental
larger administrative unit in that area. He also served in a similar capacity as
director of the Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford and Nanaimo units. Following a short
period as Inspector of Schools for the Saanich and Sooke School Districts, he came
into the Department in 1954 as Co-ordinator of Special Services. Dr. Plenderleith
is a graduate of the University of British Columbia and holds postgraduate degrees
 1
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1
in education from the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto. He is
the author of the Plenderleith Report pertaining to New Brunswick, and on the basis
of the recommendations contained therein, that Province organized larger adminis-
Mr. Johann Phillipson, District Superintendent of Schools at Prince George,
replaced Dr. Plenderleith as Co-ordinator of Special Services. Mr. Phillipson, who
was appointed a District Superintendent in 1958, served as District Superintendent
of Schools in Prince Rupert until 1961, when he was transferred to Prince George.
Mr. Phillipson is a graduate of the University of British Columbia and later received
a Bachelor of Education degree. He is a past president of the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation.
Mr. W. D. Reid became Chief Inspector of Schools in June, 1964, succeeding
Mr. E. E. Hyndman. Mr. Reid joined the Department in 1956 and served as a
District Superintendent of Schools at Campbell River. In 1960 he was appointed
District Superintendent of School District No. 37 (Delta) and the University Hill
School District. Mr. Reid received his early education in Victoria and attended
Victoria Normal School. In 1946 he graduated from the University of British
Columbia and in 1961 received his Master of Education degree from the University
of Washington. He served in the Canadian Army overseas, holding the rank of
captain.
NEW APPOINTMENTS
Three District Superintendents of Schools were appointed in May, 1964. These
were as follows: Mr. Patrick Grant, principal of the Cranbrook Senior Secondary
School at Cranbrook; Mr. Douglas Feir, principal of the Grand Forks Senior Secondary School, Grand Forks; and Mr. John Leslie Canty, principal of the North
Delta Secondary School. These men have had many years' successful experience
in both elementary and secondary schools and come to the Department with excellent
records.
Other appointments made by the Department of Education include Mr. Ross
Hind as Director of the Secondary School Correspondence Branch. Mr. Hind was
formerly school principal and came into the Department in 1953 as Assistant Registrar. In 1963, upon the retirement of Dr. Edith Lucas, he succeeded to the directorship. Mr. Edward Killough was appointed Assistant Registrar in succession to Mr.
Hind. Mr. Killough began his teaching career at Prince George Senior Secondary
School and subsequently taught at Windsor Secondary School, North Vancouver.
Mr. James Cairnie and Mr. John McLoughlin, of Victoria and Peace River
South respectively, were seconded to the Department of Education in June, 1964,
to assist in the work of curriculum development during the school-year 1964/65.
For the third successive year, personnel from elementary and secondary schools have
been loaned to the Department to help in curriculum revision during the period of
reorganization of the elementary- and secondary-school programmes.
RETIREMENTS
Two members of the Department of Education retired during the school-year—
Dr. Edith Lucas, Director of Secondary School Correspondence, and Lieut.-Col.
John Napier Burnett, District Superintendent of Schools, Richmond.
Dr. Lucas is a distinguished scholar as well as an administrator of note. She
obtained her B.A. degree with honours in French and Latin from the University of
British Columbia and upon graduation was awarded the Governor-General's Gold
Medal.   Later she attended the University of Paris under the terms of the Nichol
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 39
Scholarship and received the degree of Docteur es Lettres. Upon her return to
British Columbia she became principal of the Prince Rupert High School, and in
1941 she was appointed Director of the Secondary School Correspondence Branch
in Victoria. The Secondary School Correspondence Branch was greatly expanded
during her tenure of office and became known throughout the North American
Continent for its high standards. On a number of occasions her advice and judgment
were sought by other Provinces and States. In 1961 Dr. Lucas was granted leave
to go to Jamaica to establish a secondary-school correspondence programme in that
country. She was an indefatigable worker and was dedicated to education as few
people are. Her contribution stands as a lasting monument to her ability and
scholarship.
Following a period of activity in education of over 40 years, Lieut-Col. John
Napier Burnett retired at the close of the school term in 1964. His teaching career,
prior to his coming to the Department in 1939, was confined to Vancouver, where
he taught and was principal of a number of schools in that city. Although he was
appointed a Provincial School Inspector in 1939, because of his involvement in war
service he did not assume his duties until 1944. He served successively in Penticton,
Kamloops, and Richmond as Inspector and District Superintendent of Schools.
During his career in education he was president of the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation, president of the British Columbia School Inspectors' Association, and
president of the Alumni Association of the University of British Columbia. For
many years he was also assistant chairman of the board of management at Jericho
Hill School. He was always interested in the Parent-Teacher Federation and encouraged the programme of the federation in his various districts. Lieut.-Col.
Burnett has left behind him a very complete record of service to education, not only
in Richmond, but in the Province as a whole. Over the years his contributions have
been many and varied. His influence on education has been both beneficial and
permanent.
OBITUARY
During the year the Department of Education suffered a severe loss in the death
of John Robert Kirk, District Superintendent of Schools, Chilliwack. Mr. Kirk
obtained his early education in the elementary and secondary schools of Newton,
Cloverdale, and New Westminster, and later attended the Victoria Normal School.
He taught in various elementary schools in Surrey from 1933 to 1937. From 1937
until his appointment as a District Superintendent, he was on the teaching staff of
the New Westminster school system, where he was for one year principal of the
Duke of Connaught High School. In 1954 he was appointed a District Superintendent of Schools and served at Trail, Kimberley, and subsequently at Chilliwack,
where he had been District Superintendent for six years prior to his death. He was
a graduate of the University of British Columbia and obtained his M.A. degree in
education at the University of Washington. During his career he lectured at Summer
School sessions at the University of British Columbia and served on mathematics
revision committees, where his special knowledge and experience contributed to the
advancement of education. Mr. Kirk led a very active life and was prominent in
community affairs as well as in the professional field. His competence and leadership as a District Superintendent were widely acknowledged.
CONFERENCES
A successful three-day Departmental conference was held during the Easter
vacation, 1964.   The emphasis at this conference was devoted to various aspects of
 1
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1963/64
the new secondary-school organization and revised curriculum content. Representatives from the Colleges of Education participated in the conference along with
the District Superintendents of Schools and members of the Department. The major
responsibility for directing this successful event fell to the lot of Mr. E. E. Hyndman,
former Chief Inspector of Schools.
The fourth biennial conference of principals and vice-principals, held in the
summer of 1964, is included in this Report, since all of the planning and the arrangements for the conference were made in the previous school-year. As in the past,
four major groups involved in education — namely, the British Columbia School
Trustees' Association, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the College of
Education (U.B.C.), and the Department of Education—sponsored the conference.
Altogether, 85 principals and vice-principals were in attendance on the campus of
the University of British Columbia, where facilities were provided in terms of conference rooms, library, recreational facilities, and dormitory accommodation. The
central theme of the conference in 1964 was " The Role of the Principal in School
Organization." The credit for the successful direction of this conference must go
to Mr. E. E. Hyndman, Chief Inspector, and to Dr. Walter Hartrick of the College
of Education, University of British Columbia, who organized the programme which
provided a stimulating and informative experience for all those who were fortunate
enough to be in attendance.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The school-year 1963/64 was an exceptionally busy period, not only because
of the continuing reorganization of the elementary- and secondary-school programme, but also owing to developments in the field of higher education and in the
expansion of facilities in the vocational and technical field. Near the close of the
year some staff reorganization occurred within the Department, previously referred
to in this Report. In this connection I am deeply indebted to everyone for their
patience, understanding, and co-operation. Throughout the year an immense amount
of work was accomplished, and I am grateful for the contribution made by every
member of the staff.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION)
Provincial legislation places the operation and maintenance of the public
schools under the jurisdiction of the locally elected Boards of School Trustees of
the school district. There are 83 large school districts in the Province; these include
72 classified as municipal school districts because they include a municipality within
their boundaries, and 11 are classified as rural school districts. In the more isolated
sections of the Province there are 18 small school districts, commonly referred to as
unattached school districts. These include the Municipal School District of Zeballos.
With the exception of Tahsis and University Hill, each unattached school district
contains one school.
A School Board may be composed of three, five, seven, or nine trustees, as
determined by the Minister of Education. There are at present 15 Boards with nine
trustees, 38 Boards with seven trustees, 28 Boards with five trustees, and 4 Boards
with three trustees.   A trustee is elected for a two-year term of office.
The election of trustees within a municipality is in accordance with the Municipal Act, and the election of trustees within the rural area of a school district is in
accordance with the Public Schools Act. This allows rural trustees to be elected
at large in the rural area of the school district or in an attendance zone, or to be
elected by representatives who were elected at annual meetings of attendance areas.
There has been no appreciable trend toward election at large, and, as in previous
years, the Minister of Education has been called upon to appoint many attendance-
area representatives because of the failure of voters to elect representatives.
Five of the unattached school districts have School Boards, while the remaining 13 are administered by Official Trustees appointed by the Council of Public
Instruction.
School construction continues throughout the Province on the trend which
has been established over the past decade.
The Province meets at least 50 per cent of the capital costs of that which it
considers as essential for school-sites, buildings, and equipment. While the essential
requirements for schools have been determined for the sharing of costs, a School
Board may, when planning its building, add features and details for which the Department does not share the cost. Because capital funds are provided by the sale of
school-district debentures, two types of referenda are submitted to the electors; those
which are eligible for Government grant and those which are not eligible for Government grant. Funds provided under the respective classification are commonly referred to as shareable and non-shareable capital funds.
During the school-year 53 referenda were submitted for approval by Order in
Council. The electors of the respective school district approved 48 of these, totalling
$46,000,000. The number of school contracts let for this same period total $12,-
500,000.   The trend would indicate that the volume of school consrtuction will
The School Planning Division continues to provide Department plans for elementary schools when requested by school districts. The volume of work undertaken
remains fairly constant at approximately $2,000,000 per year.
 N 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
All pupils who live in isolated areas where neither school accommodation nor
transportation is available may apply for correspondence work from the Correspondence Branch of the Department. In conjunction with the Correspondence
Branch, and under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, if four or more pupils in
Grades I to X, inclusive, are assembled for the regular school hours and are tutored
by a qualified instructor, the Province may make a grant of $15 per month toward
the salary of the instructor for each pupil doing satisfactory work. There were 15
classes enrolling 77 pupils in operation this year. While it is required that instructors
of elementary grades must have completed secondary school and instructors of secondary grades must have a teacher's certificate or two years of university training,
it is very difficult to attain this standard.
The trend towards integration of Indian children into the public-school system
continues. Where such is undertaken by School Boards it is customary for the
Federal Government to contribute toward the capital cost of the accommodation
required. This is done through direct agreement with the School Board of the district. There are 2,200 Indian pupils enrolled in the public schools in 63 of the 83
large school districts, and in 8 of the 17 unattached school districts. The majority
of this enrolment is in the school districts along the Coastal area of the Province,
however, the enrolment of Indian children in the Interior school districts of Lillooet,
South Cariboo, Fraser Canyon, Merritt, Keremeos, Enderby, Barriere, and Chilcotin
is appreciable. When Indian children attend public school the Federal Government
pays a tuition fee of $25 per month per child as per the agreement between the Provincial and Federal Government.
Similar patterns of agreement exist between the School Boards, the Department
of National Defence, and the Province, when the pupils from National Defence Bases
attend the public schools.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES N 43
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Instructional Services
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions, each of which
has its own director and submits its own annual report: Curriculum; Tests and
Standards; Secondary School Correspondence; Elementary School Correspondence;
Visual Education; School Broadcasts; Home Economics; Jericho Hill School; and
the Textbook Branch. In addition, there are aspects of instructional services that
do not readily fall under any of the above-named divisions; these form the substance
of this report.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered 95 applications for accreditation,
accrediting 52 schools as follows: 6 for four years; 24 for three years; 8 for two
years, and 14 for one year. Three schools were accredited for the first time and
three returned to the list of accredited schools after suggested improvements had
been made. No school was dropped from the list. The total number of accredited
schools is now 108, a gain of 5 over the previous year. Consolidation of schools
accounts for the loss of one school in the total calculation.
Adult Education
On the interrupted general programme for adults, the offering of secondary-
school courses for credit was approved in various night schools and adult day schools
as follows:—
^T
Teacher Qualifications
The shortage of teachers fully qualified to teach in secondary schools is still
great and shows no major sign of diminishing. There were 167 teachers with only
elementary certificates (less than four years of training) teaching academic subjects
in Grade X and higher levels. Of these, all but 32 had improved their standing in
the last five years and 74 had taken one or more courses within the last year. Distribution of the teachers by certification is shown in the table below:—
 N 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Distribution of Grade VHI Pupils in Programmes
According to reports submitted by District Superintendents in June, 1963,
25,077 pupils in Grade VII classes were recommended for the regular Grade VHI
programme, 1,367 recommended to take the Occupational programme, and 1,758
were asked to repeat Grade VII. The comparable figures in 1962 were: 24,564,
1,550, and 1,821.
In September of 1963, there were 28,292 Grade VIII pupils on the regular
programme and, of these, 26,705 were receiving instruction in French 8. The
number on the first year of the Occupational Programme was 2,219. Comparable
figures for September of 1962 were:  27,850, 25,695, and 2,457.
Most Frequently Chosen Advanced Electives
The 10 advanced electives most frequently chosen by students were, in order
of rank: Chemistry 91, Biology 91, Mathematics 91, English 91, Physics 91,
Geography 91, English 93, History 91, Home Economics 91, and French 92. The
only change from the previous year was in the order of the first three, with Chemistry
coming up from third place to thrust down Biology and Mathematics.
Grade VII Departmental Examinations
Although most districts used their own examinations, the Department continued
to supply final examinations prepared by experienced teachers to those districts
asking for them.   The table below shows the number of Departmental examinations
English—        Sub)ect
Reading and literature	
Grammar, usage, composition	
Vocabulary, dictation, word study	
Mathematics—
Problems 	
Social studies
...    7,121
   11,402
..... 11,965
....    9,408
—    9,472
9,718
11,083
10,114
11,103
10,255
7,454
Science	
...     11,499
7,532
Organization of Secondary Schools
As the new organization began to take hold in elementary and junior secondary
schools and junior secondary schools, the trends to establish both full secondary
Senior secondary  4 4
Secondary  87 (54)        78
Junior secondary    46 (34)        24
Elementary and secondary  .73 (44)        81
Elementary and junior secondary  58 (17)        77
268 264
(The figures in parentheses show the number enrolling all grades in the categc
_n; for example, secondary VIII-XII inclusive.)
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES N 45
The size of schools, with reference only to their enrolment of secondary pupils,
is shown below:  Number of Schools
Ov.r2,000_  |        J J
1001-2000  -      2° z7
501-1000   80       °;
251-500  6° 66
101-250   39 39
51-100   23 25
Under 51   37 3i
268
264
The number of Grade VHI pupils in small elementary school dropped to 123
from 246 in the previous year. It is unlikely that this figure will decrease furtheir,
as there will always be some pupils taking Grade VHI correspondence courses in
isolated elementary schools.
The number of Grade VII pupils still enrolled in secondary schools dropped
to 8,449 from 12,902. There was also a significant drop from 26,647 to 15,787 in
the total number of elementary pupils enrolled in schools also housing secondary
pupils.   This is half the number of only two years ago.
The hypothetical median British Columbia secondary school enrols 387 secondary pupils and has a total instructional staff of about 17.5 teachers.
Grade XIH Enrolmei
In spite of increased accommodation at the
climb, as shown in the table below:—
these enrolments
Number of districts with Grade XIII _
Number of schools	
Enrolment  —
Kindergartens
n number and enrolment, as follows :-
Number of districts with kindergarten
Number of schools	
Enrolment	
e Occupational Programme
in its second official year, its expansion w
 1
N 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
With the provision of grants for kindergarten children, a new factor appeared
for the first time in enrolments of schools operated by the Association for Retarded
Children:—
As there were 376 pupils also enrolled in public day-school classes ii
districts, the total number of trainable retarded pupils in day schools w
compared with 814 in the previous year.
School Popul
ation Growth
chool populatic
n growth over cen
ain periods is shown
30
.     .                                  ....             .....          31
During the period 1957/58 to 1962/63, the 10 fastest growing school districts
were: Atlin, 209 per cent; Chilcotin, 149 per cent; Merritt, 130 per cent; Golden,
98 per cent; Fort Nelson, 89 per cent; Delta, 85 per cent; Coquitlam, 84 per cent;
Peace River North, 83 per cent; Muchalat, 83 per cent; Quatsino, 77 per cent.
Special Classes in Public Schools
Enrolments as reported on September 30 are shown in the following table:—
as
Number o
Tea
her.
Number o
Pupils
.963      |      ,962     |      1963     j      1962
Slow learners
I
i
It
Hospitals	
273
tP__!__,r_^Jf<:aPP
a	
23
____X1___dS__
332
348
322
^      t
 curriculum and general educational services
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed ii
visory and special capacities as at September 30th:— 1963 ]
Directors of instruction        20
Supervisors of instruction.      81
Teacher consultants  ._   19
Special counsellors_._     — 34
District teachers other than relieving teachers...  ....    45
Totals  199 1
Entitlement of Teachers
The total number of teaching positic
and the number established over _
September 30th, are shown below:— 1963
Teaching positions within entitlement  14,069.35
Teaching positions over entitlement        263.2
Totals    14,332.55 13,516.00
Additional Activities
Work in connection with the reorganization of the school system has been the
chief activity in this Branch.   Complete plans have now been issued, although much
still remains to be done in the fields of course planning and curriculum revision.
Most of this is covered in the Division of Curriculum report.
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
The year 1963/64 was a year of intensive work in the revision and reorganization of the curriculum for the public schools of British Columbia. Seventeen
specific subject revision committees met frequently during the year. In addition,
the two Professional Committees concerned with the elementary- and the secondary-
school curriculum met every month. A total of 133 persons were involved as
members of these committees. Over 150 meetings were held in the 10-month period
from September, 1963, to June, 1964. In terms of the total number of member-
hours, these meetings represent close to 3,000 hours of curriculum-development
work. These figures do not include the work of other committees, such as the
School Library Book Selection Committees, who work during the year on services
related to the curriculum. It may be of some significance to note that the assistance
given by members of all these committees is voluntary and for the most part is
given outside of the regular working-day.
The programme of revision and reorganization is under the general direction
of the Assistant Superintendent (Instruction) and the Director of Curriculum and
a small office staff. To assist in this work two special curriculum consultants were
engaged on a temporary basis with the co-operation of the Boards of School Trustees for the school districts of Vancouver and Burnaby. The two consultants were
Mr. J. S. Church (Vancouver) and Mr. E. L. Thomas (Burnaby).    Both Mr.
 N 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Church and Mr. Thomas gave invaluable assistance to the Division. Their contribution to education in co-ordinating committee work and in giving leadership to
particular revisions is very much appreciated.
Course Revisions and Textbook Changes
The following summarizes the particular revisions undertaken during the
(1) Revision in the programme for reading, spelling, writing, and composition
in Grades I to VII was begun. The Grade I year of this programme was
completed with new prescribed readers for September, 1964.
(2) Revision in the elementary-school arithmetic programme was continued
and a new course with a new prescribed text was developed for Grade VI
for September, 1964.
(3) A study of the schedule of time-allotments for elementary-school subjects
was undertaken and revisions were recommended to allow for increased
attention to the subjects of English and Arithmetic and for increased
flexibility in time-tables for particular classes.
(4) Revision of the secondary-school English programme was continued and
a new course with 10 new texts was completed for Grade IX for September, 1964.
(5) Revision of the secondary-school mathematics programme was continued
and new courses for Grade X and Grade XIH were completed with new
texts for September, 1964.
(6) Revision of the junior secondary-school science programme was begun.
(7) Revision of the junior secondary-school French programme was continued
and a new course was completed with new texts for Grade X for September, 1964.
(8) Revision of the Physics courses for Grades XI and XII was undertaken
and a new course for Grade XI was completed with new texts for September, 1964.
(9) Revisions of the Chemistry and Biology courses for Grades XI and XII
were begun.
(10) Revision of the courses in German for Grades IX to XII were begun.
(11) A new three-year programme was completed, called the Occupational
Programme, for pupils entering secondary school but unable to benefit
from the regular curriculum.
(12) Experimental work in the teaching of music was undertaken.
(13) A workshop was held for the purpose of developing new or revised courses
in general vocational fields as a part of the reorganization of the secondary-
school curriculum. A total of 17 such courses was prepared in draft
form under the direction of this Division with the assistance of the Division of Technical and Vocational Education.
Most of the foregoing revisions involved changes in prescribed textbooks.
A total of 30 new titles was selected, prescribed, and provided to schools. The
majority of these were replacing texts which were out of date or out of print. The
others were additional texts for new courses such as English.
Curriculum Reorganization
Some of the foregoing revisions and textbook changes were undertaken as part
of a continuing programme of keeping the curriculum up to date.   Most, however,
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES N 49
are directly related to the findings of the Royal Commission on Education. One
of the most significant recommendations of the Commission had to do with the
reorganization of the secondary school. A detailed plan for the new junior secondary school, Grades VIII to X, was completed in 1962. During the year 1963/64,
specific attention was given to planning the details of the new senior secondary
school. These plans were virtually completed and will be implemented at the Grade
XI level in September, 1965.
Information and Related Services
In addition to specific revision and reorganization work the Division also undertook certain informational services, including the preparation and distribution of
curriculum guides, lists of recommended library books, and the preparation and
distribution of the regular curriculum, administrative, announcement, and teaching-
aid circulars of the Department of Education. The mailing list of those receiving
this material now numbers close to 2,000.
Related work included participation in the Canadian Education Association
Short Course for Superintendents, provision of addresses for various public and
professional groups, and occasional attendance at educational conventions and
conferences.
Acknowledgment
A specific word of acknowledgment and appreciation should be extended to
the members of the Department committees and the staff of other Divisions of the
Department. The assistance of these individuals has greatly facilitated the work
of this Division and has made a significant contribution to the improvement of the
curriculum.
 1
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P_sd., F.R.S.A., F.
CO-ORDINATOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES
The Conveyance of School-children
te details connected with the conveyanc
:hool-year 1963/64:—
ring the
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation-
2. Number of unattached districts providing transportation.-
3. Total number of vehicles	
(a) District-owned	
(.)  Contract .	
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)	
4. Total daily approved mileage (miles)	
(„) Average distance per vehicle (miles) .
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle	
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles	
Average distance per single trip (miles)—__	
6. Total number of pupils carried daily	
(a) Elementary   24
(6) Secondary 26
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle _
8. Average number of pupils carried per route .	
Transpo:
. Assista.
In addition to the operation of regular school transportation services, each
School Board is empowered to make a grant to parents who provide their own
transportation for their children. These grants are given in cases where there are
insufficient pupils beyond Departmental walk limits to establish a regular bus route.
During the school-year, 2,000 pupils from 67 districts utilized this means of
conveyance at a total cost of $302,159.
f Tra.
Cos
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditure and the total conveyance costs over the past eight years:—
«—*-
MS
Co^ce
, ''";"„;',/
1957—    ~  :     IZZ
111
ll
1
 School Dormitories
In many isolated rural sections of the large school districts, it is impossible for
the School Boards to provide transportation services for secondary pupils who desire
to attend centralized secondary schools. In order to enable these pupils to attend
secondary schools that offer a full high-school programme, authority to operate
school dormitories is given to School Boards.
The following table provides data respecting the dormitories that were in
operation during 1963/64:—
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitiza-
tion, the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under
this arrangement a pupil can receive up to $30 per month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the past school-year 1963/64, there were 619
pupils from 58 school districts who received a total of $183,850 in such boarding
allowances.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
This Board consists of representatives from the Deaf and the Blind Parent-
Teacher Association, the Vancouver School Board, and the Department of Educa-
The Advisory Board met once each school month during 1963/64 and provided
monthly reports to the Department respecting the operation of the Jericho Hill
School.
The accompanying report of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the Superintendent of the
Jericho Hill School, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in the
school.
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P_jd., DIRECTOR
In the school-year 1963/64 nine scholastic aptitude and achievement tests
were administered to 31,613 Grade VII pupils and 2,687 pupils enrolled in one
or more Grade XIII subjects. The Grade VII pupils that were tested included:
29,204 in the five categories of B.C. public schools that enrol Grade VII; 22 in
a boys' industrial school; 1,724 in B.C. private schools that applied to be tested;
406 in B.C. Indian schools; and 257 in schools in the Yukon Territory.
The scholastic-aptitude test that was actministered in Grade VH was the
Henmon-Nelson Test of Mental Ability, Grades 6-9, Form A; the achievement
tests were the reading comprehension, vocabulary, spelling, language, and arithmetic reasoning and computation sub-tests of the Stanford Achievement Test, Advanced Form L. In both cases B.C. pupils' scores were considerably higher than
those of the U.S. pupil population on which the tests were standardized. The
median M.A. on the Henmon-Nelson test was 14-9 on March 11th, the median
I.Q. was 112, and with a norm of 7.6 the B.C. achievement means ranged from
8.2 to 9.1 in terms of grade equivalents. The scholastic-aptitude norms were
almost identical to those obtained from the Henmon-Nelson Form B in 1962, which
indicates that a true population difference probably exists and that the two forms
are truly equivalent.
Within the Province the usual trend occurred from the south-west corner of the
Province in a northerly and easterly direction. Mean stanine value for geographical
regions were as follows:
British Columbia Grade VII Averages
Stanin
es) by Geographical Regie
Scholastic Apti_.de
Total Achievement
N
Meat.
Rat*
N
Mean |   Rank
|p^u!v^_
l
l
l
l
l
|
Total, British Columbia public schools	
28,294
4.99    |    _
28.342
4.97
The scholastic aptitude of Grade XIII students of 1964 proved to be almost
identical to that of the students tested in 1960, although the number tested increased
from 1,676 to 2,687. Two tests were administered this year to equivalent half
samples so that comparable data may be obtained in the future if either test is used.
The purpose of this testing, which is repeated at intervals of three or four years, is
to control over-all graduation standards and the relationship of one subject to
another. Remarkable consistency in the selectivity of different courses has been
shown over the 12-year period during which the testing has been carried on. For
example, making allowance for the 4.2-month interval in testing between 1960 and
1964, the following results were obtained:
 DIVISION OF TESTS AND
Selectivity of Certain Grade XIII Subjects as Indicated by Mean Scholastic-aptitude
Scores of Students Enrolled
Course
T^
"BW
_s_sS"
Mea
I.Q.
*§fr
November,
nsg-
November.
{"009
1
5?:_
II
119 5
Physics 10
Biology IK
112.0
The mean D.G.T.L.C. I.Q. of Grade XHI students was 115.8 in 1964, which
may be compared with the mean of 115.7 for Grade XIII in 1960 and the mean
of 115.1 obtained for Grade XII University Programme students in 1958.
An increasing tendency for those on the academic programme to make Grade
XIII the terminal year of secondary school rather than the first year of college is
becoming evident. Preliminary enrolment in September, 1964, is 3,686 versus
2,957 in 1963 and 1,383 in 1960. As this four-year increase corresponds only to
the first small expansion in the post-war elementary school population it is largely
the result of increasing retention rather than increasing population. While the
corresponding elementary grade base rose 27.5 per cent, Grade XHI retention has
risen 110 per cent. We now have 15.2 per cent of our elementary-school population entering Grade XIII. It is also interesting to note that B.C. Grade XIH enrolment plus " first-year " university in the fall of 1964 is approximately the same as
the June total of university-programme graduates. Obviously the number of students withdrawing after completing U.P. Grade XII is no greater than the number
of adults, repeaters, non-residents, and students with interrupted programmes who
Retention to Grade XII has also, of course, been rising rapidly. When this is
combined with the effect of the first post-war wave of births we may forecast that the
increase in enrolment in Grade XII in 1964/65 will be the greatest on record.
 |     GfoV_n     |    E"r°lmCnt °radeXn GradUateS
The revision of data-processing operations and programmes occupied a large
part of the staff time in 1963/64. The pre-existing I.B.M. 650 programmes were
made obsolete by the installation of 1403 and 1620 computers and some 30 pro-
 N 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1963/64
grammes and sub-programmes had to be rewritten and tested.   They cover a variety
of operations:  Assigning pupil-code numbers, calculating chronological ages, con-  j
verting aptitude scores to M.A.'s and I.Q.'s, converting achievement scores to
stanines, calculating percentiles, producing frequency distributions and class records,
and a variety of class, school, and school-district summaries.
Three emergency plans for scaling university entrance and senior matriculation examinations were prepared in June and early July, and with the assistance of
West Coast Data Processing Ltd. and the Provincial Data Processing Branch the
scaled scores were produced for 80,660 papers in 37 examinations for June and 17
for August. This represented an increase of 12 per cent over 1963 and, although
all scaling deadlines were met in 1964, the increase to about 94,000 papers expected
this year makes revision of marking procedures as well as further mechanization of
score-handling imperative.
 HOME ECONOMICS
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
During the 1963/64 session, the total number of pupils enrolled in Home
Economics courses in the public schools of British Columbia was 44,326, showing
an increase of 5,991 pupils (15.6 per cent) over the total number enrolled the
previous year.
aent by courses is as follows:—
5,057
The enrolment by courses is as follows:
Home Economics 8  13,443
Home Economics 30	
Foods and Nutrition 9,
Home Economics 31	
Clothing and Tex
Home Economics 32—
tiles 9                        10,695
Home Economics 91	
Home Economics 20     6,234
Home Economics 23	
Home Economics 21—      575
Home Economics 24—
Home Economics 22.__       292
Home Economics 26—
Occupational. 1,2, 3
Jericho Hill School     ...     —
32
In addition to the above totals, some senior individual pupils are enrolled in
Home Economics Correspondence Courses. Also, in some secondary schools
where the Home Economics teacher has limited training in the subject, Home
Economics classes are enrolled with the Secondary School of Correspondence for
their Home Economics courses which are carried on in the school under a supervising teacher. In 1963/64, all pupils taking Home Economics at the Alert Bay
Elementary Secondary School were enrolled with the Secondary School of Correspondence because District No. 73 (Alert Bay) had not been able to secure a Home
Economics teacher.
The number of public schools with Home Economics departments in operation
in the Province is 209. In the Coquitlam School District, one new school—Sir
Frederick Banting Junior Secondary—was opened in September, 1963, and a new
building with two Home Economics rooms, was opened and operated in conjunction
with the Port Coquitlam Secondary School.
The total number of Home Economics rooms in use in the schools was 419,
showing an increase of 16 over the total number for last year. The Home Economics
departments in the various schools varied in size from one to six rooms, the greatest
number of departments having two rooms in operation.
There were 389 teachers of Home Economics employed in the public schools
throughout the Province, showing an increase of 19 teachers over the previous year.
Of these, 225 held Bachelor of Home Economics or equivalent degrees in Home
Economics.
Fully qualified Home Economics teachers are still needed, the demand exceeding the supply.
Through the co-operation of the University of British Columbia and the Department of Education, Summer Session courses were continued for the Home Economics graduates wishing to take teacher-training through Summer Sessions, and
for certificated elementary or academic teachers wishing to become qualified to
teach Home Economics.   For part of each week of Summer Session, either the
 N 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Provincial Director of Home Economics or Miss Jean Campbell, Inspector of Home
Economics, was on campus for interviews with teachers and prospective teachers
of Home Economics.
Foods and Nutrition 9, and Clothing and Textiles 9, which were introduced ii
Grade DC in September, 1963, were prepared as semester-type courses to provide
flexibility in time-tabling. Each of these courses may be taken as an entire coursi
one year, or Part A of each course may be taken by Grade DC pupils and Part B of
each course may be taken by Grade X pupils. Cooking and Food Service 9 for boys
was also introduced at the Grade DC level in September, 1963. In September, 1964,
the use of the above courses will be extended to the Grade X level.
A Home Economics Curriculum Revision Committee prepared the Child Care
9 course outline, which is to be introduced in September, 1964. This is an electivt
course for pupils of Grades DC and X.
The third-year level of the occupational programme was introduced in schools
where this programme had been offered previously at the first- and second-year
levels. A unit on " Food Service " is included in the third-year level of the Secondary School Occupational Programme, 1964 (preliminary edition), to serve as a
possible model for development of units related to other occupational areas.
During 1963 and 1964 the Director of Home Economics acted on the Vocational Curriculum Committee as consultant, co-chairman, and chairman for the
Vocational Community Services Programme Committee. In 1964, Miss Jean
Irvine, Inspector of Home Economics, served as a consultant on the Community
Services Programme Committee.
The Advisory Home Economics Equipment List was updated in the fall of
1963, to meet the needs of the new courses of the junior secondary programme and
in consideration of current trends in Home Economics teaching methods. Copies
were distributed to District Superintendents of Schools, secretaries of School Boards,
principals, and teachers of Home Economics in the Province.
In September, 1963, the office of the Division of Home Economics was moved I
to 516 Michigan Street, Victoria.
The annual conference with the City Supervisors of Home Economics for
Vancouver and Victoria, was held in Victoria, in January, 1964.
On invitation, the Director of Home Economics met with and spoke to the I
Victoria Home Economics teachers, and the fourth-year Home Economics students I
and teacher trainees at the University of British Columbia.    The Director also
participated in teachers' conventions at Creston, Surrey, and Fraser Valley East.
Half-day conference-workshops have proven helpful in orienting teachers ii
the philosophy and objectives of the secondary-school Home Economics programme
and in assisting the teachers in organizing and implementing revised and new com
Conference-workshops were held in the following school districts: Abbotsford,
Campbell River, Castlegar, Courtenay, Chilliwack, Kamloops, Kelowna, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Penticton, Salmon Arm, Surrey, and Vernon.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS                                           N 57
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF J. R. HIND, B.A., B.P__D., DIRECTOR
The aims and regulations of the Branch are set forth in the booklet Regulations
I   and Detail of Courses, which is released annually in the month of July.
The Branch is committed to instruction by mail of persons in a number of age
1  and other categories who for a variety of reasons cannot obtain normal classroom
[   assistance at a grade level and in a particular subject-field, or are unable to attend
[   day or adult classes as conducted by School Boards.
The scope of the service during 1963/64 is indicated in the following:—
Enrolment
(a) By Age.—Range from 12 to 81 years:—       1962/63                1963/64
.   ..     8,694               8,555
  17.665               17.274
(b) By Residence.—" Outside " students lived in such distant places as Paki-
:    stan, Okinawa, Spain, South Africa, Chile, and Malaya:—
789
(c) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom
instruction in particular courses, as follows:—
Small secondary schools (fewer than 140 students in Grades
DC-XII)                                                                                       1,304
Large secondary schools (more than 140 students in Grades
DC-XII) .                                                                               3,445
.,?.(.
The reasons accepted as a basis for service
involved follow:—
Courses not offered in school    -___» M.
to these students and the numbers
        3,360
Failure in the course               .   ....
773
(d) By Grade.—Students were included
enrolled in four or more courses at a grade level
Grade VIII..   ..
in this grouping when they were
as follows:—
       382
Grade DC
Grade X
   1,267
Grade XI      „ .
Grade XH-   ....
Grade XIII....
 N 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
(e) By Special Arrangement.—Certain students were exempted from enrol- ]
ment fees in the value of $53,585. This service is an effort to overcome disparity I
in educational opportunity and is also a rehabilitation measure. It was extended j
as follows:—
Illness -—  478
Needed at home  15
Living too far from a school  .  493
Correctional institutions .                              1,020
Social Assistance  214
Unemployed persons  102
(f) Of Adults:
(i) This group comprised 49.5 per cent of the total enrolment.
(ii) The service included the evaluation of school documents in terms of the
University and General Programmes as they apply to adults. Approximately 6,000 such evaluations were prepared.
(iii) Adults in the 70-80 age-grouping frequently enrolled in Art, English, and
other courses for personal improvement generally.
(a) The highly competent instructional staff consisted of an inside staff of two
Grade VHI instructors and an outside staff of 93 responsible for one or more
courses as offered by the Branch.
(_) The outside staff consisted of 62 in the Victoria area and 31 in Vancouver. Included in the outside staff were three instructors responsible for assistance
to new Canadians.
(c) In 1963/64 209,837 papers were graded and corrected as compared with
203,513 in 1962/63.   This represented an increase of 6,324 papers or 3.1 per cent.
(_.) Course writers attached to staff were available at all times for counsel and
assistance to instructors and for adjudication of student-papers as required.
Courses
(a) The total number of courses offered was 120.
(_) New courses were prepared and introduced as follows: English Literature 8, English Language 8, Social Studies 8, Guidance and Health 8, Mathematics
8, Science 8, Mathematics 9, French I (9), English Language 20, and Latin 20.
(c) The work of course writing and revision was shared by four course writers
attached to the Branch and certain outside writers working on a temporary basis.
(d) A total listing of the courses offered by the Branch and the enrolment in
the subject-field follows:—
(i) Secondary-school Subjects:
Agriculture I (10), 20, 38, 39  ... 349
Art I (10), 20, 39  ... 493
Auto mechanics 20, 30  ... 743
Bible Literature      7
Biology 91     ... ... 250
Bookkeeping 34, 91   ... 649
Business Arithmetic 9 (formerly Mathematics 12)  ... 740
Business Fundamentals 24   ... 285
Chemistry 91, 101   ... 289
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
(i) Secondary-school Subjects—Continued
Clothing and Textiles I  _________
Diesel Engines 91	
Economics 92	
Electricity 20 	
English Literature 8, 9 (10), 20, 30, 40, 100 _
English Language 8, 9 (10), 20, Remedial, 30, 40, 101 ..
English and Citizenship 19, 29 	
English 32	
English 91	
English 93 (Business English) _
English 99 (Short-story Writing)	
Extramural Music I (11), 21	
Foods and Nutrition I 	
Forestry 30	
Frame-house Construction 20	
French 8,1, 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120
Geography 91 _
I (10), 20, 90, 91, 92, 110, 120 _
Guidance and Health 8, 9 (10), 20, 30	
History 91, 101, 102 	
Home Furnishing 23 ..
Homemaking 20, 30, 91
Latin I (10), 20, 91, 92, 110, 120 ..
Law 93 I
Mathematics 8, 9, 10, 20, 30, 91, 1C
Mechanical Drawing 8, I (10), 20 _
Physics 91, 101 _..._
Practical Arithmetic 9	
Radio and Wireless 30	
Record-keeping I (11)
Science 8, 9 (10), 20   .
Secretarial Practice 92	
Shorthand 21, 31 .
Social Studies 8, 9 (10), 20, 30, 32 __.
Spanish I (10), 20, 91, 92, 110, 120 J
Typewriting I (10), 20	
(ii) Vocational Non-credit Courses:
Air Navigation I and H	
Dressmaking	
Mathematics for Second-class Stationary Engineering  91
Spherical Trigonometry              9
Steam Engineering, Fourth Class  287
Steam Engineering, Third Class  107
Steam Engineering, Second Class  36
Stationary Engineering, First Class  19
Steam Heating for Plant Operators  68
 1                           1
N 60                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1963/64, school-aged pupils totalling 925 were registered in Elementary Correspondence School.    Of these, 806 were registered at 1
Victoria and 119 at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
The following tables show the active monthly enrolments by grades at each of  j
the two centres:—
Month
Grade
Grade
Grade | Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Tot,      1
September
|
£
i
l
90
l
IS
l
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
i
l
l
l
10
16
4
i
The number of papers of regular pupils marked at the two centres was as
follows:  Victoria, 113,634; Pouce Coupe, 16,784; total, 130,418.
In addition to above numbers, adult students enrolled in courses Grades HI to
VII, inclusive, totalled 230, and 7,121 papers were marked.
In all, courses were provided for 1,155 persons, and 137,539 papers were
marked.
The average number of papers marked per instructor was 11,003.    The
average number of papers submitted per pupil was 150, as compared with an
average of 133 in 1962/63.
As additional services, kindergarten kits were supplied to 126 pre-school-age
children, and instruction kits for teaching illiterate adults were sent in 29 cases.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence
instruction classes were established at 16 centres with a total enrolment of 82 pupils.
During the school-year, entirely new courses in Grade m Arithmetic and
Language and in Grade I Reading were written.   Minor revisions were made in
three other courses.
Effective September 1, 1963, the Secondary School Correspondence Branch
took over the administration of Grade Vlll courses.   Two instructors were transferred from Elementary Branch to Secondary Branch in August, 1963.
Since September, 1963, therefore, the Victoria staff of this Branch has consisted of a Director, 11 instructors, and a clerical staff of five; at Pouce Coupe, one
instructor and one instructor-clerk.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
id, production supervised
. 100
Western regional programmes (planned and prepared content, supervised production, and evaluated results)    43
Western regional programmes (analysed scripts and evaluated results)   27
National programmes (gave suggestions and advice in planning, and
evaluated results)  ~ 49
Total number of.radio programmes made available for
classroom and home student participation 219
Television
Western regional (British Columbia was responsible for 13 of the 28
telecasts) 28
National (assistance given in advice, in evaluating, and in the distributing of guide material) 83
Total number of telecasts available 111
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
. 12,000
. 40,000
Calling Young Canada (distributed only)  _.   7,000
Demonstration Classes
id summer courses in Victoria and
Extent of In-school Participation in British Columbia
(From records incomplete up to August 3, 1964.)
Number of schools reporting       1,186 84.71
Number of reporting schools using radio broad-
Divisions of reporting schools using radio broadcasts        3,434
Students of reporting schools using radio broadcasts  108,648
 ;2 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1963/64
Number of reporting schools using television Nun
broadcasts ____  16i
Divisions of reporting schools using television
broadcasts  63_
Jse of School Broadcasts
(From 1962/63 (August 14) to 1963/64 (August 3).)
Schools using —
Classes using	
Students using __
Extra Activity
This office, at the request of the Federal Department of External Affairs, hosted
Mr. George Smalling of Jamaica during the months of June and July. The purpose
was to allow Mr. Smalling to observe procedures in programme planning and preparation for educational television.
 DIVISION of visual
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1, 1963, to August 31, 1964.
. Cranbrook I
. Kimberley ...
6. Kootenay Lake I
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan       '•" - !
9. Castlegar 	
12. Grand Forks 	
13. Kettie Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke     	
20. Salmon Arm 	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen _
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna 	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake  .
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32. Fraser Canyon I
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
40. New Westminster _
41. Burnaby	
 N 64                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
1,068
2,085
298
105
719
920
35
591
235
177
225
207
62
34
157
707
96
833
73
448
395
207
1,117
8
64
307
589
279
670
117
176
356
146
161
76
77
145
291
692
529
34,884
the Province
46. Sechelt .                                                                  288
47. Powell River     -                                           -      905
72. Campbell River                                                 755
73. Alert Ray                                                                             IgQ
74. Quatsino                                                                     177
76. Agassiz                                                                     96
77. Summerland ..                                                        157
78. Enderby    ...                                                               203
79. Ucluelet-Tofino
80.  TCitimat                                                                                  175
81. Fort Nelson                                                              17
82. Chilcotin
83. Portage Mountain                                                     41
— Unattached                                                  732
— Miscellaneous                                            1 162
Totals ....                                                    35 913
The library contains 3,500 motion pictures and 7,620 filmstrips.
Eleven hundred and eighty-six out of 1,412 public schools in
registered for service.
  PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
Once again this year the Textbook Branch has had a successful year in that all
purchase orders and requisitions for " Free " and " Rental Plan " textbooks received
were promptly completed.
During the school-year 1963/64, 4,957 requisitions for free books and supplies
required for the use of students enrolled in Grades I to VI in the schools of the
Province were received and completed at a total cost to the Free vote of $569,850.25.
This is a slight decrease of approximately 2 per cent in the number of requisitions
received and the total expenditure for books and materials supplied.
In the same period 22,209 purchase orders were received and completed; the
value of these orders being $1,056,500.39.
During the year 2,973 requisitions were received for textbooks to be issued on
the Rental Plan in Grades VH through XIII, this being only 14 requisitions less than
the number of requisitions received and serviced last year.
Collections for textbook rental fees, books lost or damaged and paid for by
students, and remittances covering fire losses amounted to $821,235.32, which is
an increase in moneys collected of $34,732.30 or 4.42 per cent.
Refunds of rental fees to students who left the British Columbia school system
increased by $1,329.90 or 14.67 per cent to a total of $10,392.35.
The Library Service Division received and serviced 619 purchase orders for
19,717 library books, supplementary reading material, wall maps, and globes. These
orders were received from the various school-district offices throughout the Province.
To complete these orders, 1,548 purchase orders were placed with numerous
publishing houses throughout Canada and the United States. To carry out this part
of the operation, four people are employed on a permanent basis, and are assisted
from time to time, as the occasion warrants, by other members of the staff.
Four warehouse men are employed in the shipping room on a permanent basis,
and were assisted by a maximum of 24 men during the peak periods.
The total weights and quantities shipped via various general shipping agencies
are shown in the following tabulation:—
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH N 67
Because of the very large numbers of textbooks being loaned to students
throughout the schools of the Province, it is inevitable that some of these books may
be slightly damaged or may start to come apart for one reason or another. Teachers
are encouraged to salvage these books and send them in to be repaired. During the
year 1963/64, books to the value of $284,509.68 were recovered at a cost of $124,-
375.69.   These books were then re-issued to the schools.
Once again I wish to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation
for the willing co-operation that has been given by each member of the staff, and to
f express my thanks for the help and consideration that we have all enjoyed from the
f school authorities throughout the Province.
Balance-sheet, March 31, 1964
Imprest Account—Cash on hand  $100.00
Inventory—Stock on hand  744,939.03
Consigned textbooks $2,279,630.22
Less depreciation1 1,124,374.53
  1,155,255.69
Accounts receivable  9,507.13
Outstanding publishers' credit notes  16,828.63
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $270.33
Treasury advances for petty cash Imprest Account  100.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund 1,926,260.15
 public schools report, 1963/64
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1964
Textbook Branch Operations—Sales
Net sales $1,064,465.06
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31,1963 $762,162.57
Purchases for year (cost, freight,
duty)   917,896.69
  $1,680,059.26
Inventory, March 31,1964       744,939.03
Cost of sales       935,12(
Gross profit $129,34'
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages  .       $41,928.12
Packing and general expense  3,522.01
Freight and delivery  11,3 8 8.11
Sundry expense  272.39
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH N 69
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1964—Continued
Textbook Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected jj $806,441.54
Opening rental inventory at March 31, 1963  $1,112,890.03
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty)     1,166,740.19
$2,279,630.22
Inventory, March
31, 1962  $1,074,096.79
Less three years' depreciation at 3 3._
1,074,096.79     $358,032.25
Inventory, March
31, 1963  $1,132,286.65
Less two years' depreciation at33>/3
num       754,857.76       377,428.89
$377,428.89
Inventory, March
31, 1964 $1,166,740.19
Less one year's depreciation at 3 3 V_
num 388,913.39       388,913.39
$777,826.80
Closing rental inventory, March 31,
1964  1,155,255.69
Total depreciation for
year 1963/64 $1,124,374.53 $1,124,374.53
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages       $53,363.04
Packing and general expense  4,482.55
Freight and delivery  14,493.96
Sundry expense  346.68
         72,686.23
     1,197,060.76
Excess of expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year
ended March 31,1964 ..____ $390,619.22
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
The 1963/64 school-year provided more than the usual number of incidents,
problems, and opportunities.   Because this division reports on the work of instruc-   j
tion for nearly 400,000 pupils in public schools and the supervision of 14,650
teachers it can only indicate the general trends and the more significant developments as they have been observed or reported by the District Superintendents.
Organization
Fifty-five Provincial District Superintendents and six officers of equivalent rank
employed by the Vancouver School Board served in the dual role as field officers
of the Department of Education and as educational leaders for their School Boards.
The number was increased by two over last year to compensate for the supervision
of 800 additional teachers. The three new appointments, including a replacement
for Mr. C. E. Clay, who retired, were Mr. A. J. Longmore, Mr. C. A. Bruce, and
Mr. D. N. Weicker, who were placed in their superintendencies at Vanderhoof,
Revelstoke, and Fort St. John respectively. Transfers of District Superintendents
were made with the participation of the School Boards, resulting in the selection of
Mr. L. A. Matheson by the Penticton School Board and Mr. W. B. Fromson by the
North Vancouver School Board. This procedure, in which the School Boards choose
their District Superintendent from the 55 highly qualified and richly experienced
candidates, ensures effective leadership at the local level. The fine relationship
which exists between District Superintendents and their School Boards is an indication that the procedure should be continued. All the District Superintendents
assigned to districts were appointed executive officers by their School Boards in
accordance with section 11 of the Public Schools Act and received administration
allowances.
The headquarters and field staffs were shocked by the sudden deaths of Mr.
John G. Kirk, District Superintendent for Chilliwack, in February, and Mr. A. E.
Henderson, Inspector of Schools for Vancouver, in March. Both were outstanding
educators in this Province and were making contributions that will be greatly missed.
Severe illnesses handicapped two other members of the field staff but, fortunately,
they returned to regular duties during the year. To meet these emergency situations,
Mr. A. Turnbull was recalled from retirement to serve again as a District Superintendent of Schools. Mr. D. N. Weicker, District Superintendent in Fort St. John,
was asked to include McBride in his superintendency for several months. Mr. W.
J. Logie added the West Coast Unattached Schools to his regular assignment. Temporarily, Mr. Gurney included School District No. 70 (Alberni) in his Qualicum
Superintendency and the Chief Inspector was assigned to School District No. 79
(Ucluelet-Tofino) in addition to his regular duties. The Chief Inspector was also
assigned to Chilliwack for two months until the School Board made the selection of
a replacement for the late Mr. Kirk. Mr. D. G. Chamberlain completed the year in
the Chilliwack Superintendency.
In-service Education
Annual Departmental Conference.—This division has been responsible for the
organization of the annual conference to integrate the work of the headquarters and
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES N 71
[ field staffs and to bring understanding of their special problems. The three-day
conference held in the S. J. Willis Junior Secondary School in April had one day
f each assigned to the topics: School Organization, Curriculum, and Special Educa-
i tion. Papers were prepared by Superintendents of Schools, Messrs. Lucas, Mac-
Kenzie, Marriott, Grant, McKenzie, Pritchard, and Stibbs; by teaching and supervising personnel, Dr. Wormsbecker and Messrs. Cullen, Welch, Heisler, and
Thomas; by University representatives, Drs. Foord and Hartrick and Deans Scarfe
and Gilliland. Headquarters members who prepared papers included Dr. English
and Messrs. Levirs, Graham, and Meredith. This conference served a very useful
purpose in clarifying the developments in public education for those senior officials
who are responsible for making the changes effective in the schools throughout the
Province.
Arithmetic and Reading Workshops.—In co-operation with the publishers of
the Arithmetic Text for Grade IV and the Readers for Grade I, together with the
B.C. Teachers' Federation, workshops were arranged throughout the Province in
September and June. Mrs. Irene Richmond, consultant and arithmetic specialist,
addressed teacher groups in a number of centres to prepare teachers for the new
Elementary Arithmetic course which was begun this year. Miss Barbara Sibbald,
a reading specialist, spent two weeks in a series of meetings from Northern British
Columbia to Vancouver Island and gave an introduction to the new Grade I Reader.
Workshops in Special Education.—The Retarded Children's Association requested assistance in arranging workshops in special education for four areas of the
Province. The programme was broadened to include speakers and consultants for
the trainable retarded, the educable retarded, and the occupational classes. Workshops in Nanaimo, Kelowna, Prince George, and Trail were given good support and
were well received both by those who attended from the public schools as well as
those from the Association schools. This first effort to integrate the work of teachers
in these three areas was valuable and a credit to Mr. K. Jackson, chairman of the
Education Committee, and Dr. D. McGann, consultant of the Retarded Children's
Association.
Seminars in Vocational Education.—Changes in terminology, curriculum, or
organization place an obligation on the educational leader to make others aware
and ensure public understanding of the proposed programmes in the secondary
schools. This division was associated with a seminar on vocational education that
was organized in Kamloops, where misconceptions had led to the failure of a
referendum. The afternoon and evening sessions encouraged attendance of administrators, trustees, teachers, counsellors, and interested parents. The purpose of these
seminars to distinguish between the roles of Provincial Vocational Schools and the
vocation programmes in secondary schools was achieved.
Zone Conferences of District Superintendents.—Fall and spring meetings of
superintendents were held in six areas of the Province. During the past school-year,
groups convened in the following centres: Prince Rupert, Prince George, Kamloops,
Langley, Courtenay, Nanaimo, Abbotsford, Nelson, Creston, and Salmon Arm.
These meetings proved to be effective in providing a liaison between headquarters
and district staff. Two meetings were attended by Mr. G. W. Graham, Assistant
Superintendent of Education (Administration), and one by Mr. F. P. Levirs,
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction). Several professional studies were undertaken by the superintendents through their zone meetings: Teacher recruitment,
pupil retention, criteria for organization of junior secondary schools, zone Grade
VII examinations, and others. The meetings were invaluable for providing explanations of new developments in education and opportunities for discussions on local
problems.
 N 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Biennial Conference for Principals.—Under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Education, the Teachers' Federation, the Trustees' Association, and the
University of British Columbia, the conference was held on the University campus  j
in the last two weeks in July.  Since the theme was " The Organization of Schools,"   ]
it provided a timely study of the changing curriculum and school organization in   ]
this Province.   It gave valuable opportunities for almost 80 principals, representing   f
most parts of the Province, to study in depth the new school organizations, their   '
purposes, and their structures.   Dr. Walter Hartrick, as director of the conference,
gave effective leadership and was able to obtain the assistance of outstanding visiting
professors of education.   Three members of the Department gave papers:  Mr. F.
P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent; Mr. W. J. Mouat, District Superintendent; and
Mr. E. E. Hyndman, Chief Inspector of Schools.   Mr. K. F. Alexander, District
Superintendent for Mission, was secretary, and Messrs. Marriott and Paton were
consultants.
Conferences of School Administrators.—Organizations of principals and school
administrators have been established under their professional association in a number
of areas of the Province. Each year members from headquarters are requested to
attend conferences and to give addresses on matters of current interest. This
provides a challenging opportunity for the Department to give leadership in professional matters. During the past year this division was associated with the Cariboo-
Main Line Conference of School Administrators while other Department officials
addressed meetings of the Northern British Columbia Administrators, the Okanagan
Administrators, the Metropolitan Administrators and the Kootenay Administrators.
Conferences and Workshops in Physical Education.—An active interest in
Physical Education by the College of Education, the School of Physical Education,
and the Community Programmes Branch was responsible for several in-service
education projects. Professor Lome Brown of the College of Education convened
a Conference on Physical Education and Health on the University of British Columbia campus. This utilized the resources of the University, outstanding teachers, and
representation from this division to discuss problems and procedures in Physical
Education.
The Community Programmes Branch provided assistance in a workshop
organized by the District Superintendent for teachers of the Nelson elementary
schools. The use of College of Education instructors and experienced teachers and
supervisors of Physical Education gave a stimulating experience to these teachers
and was emulated in several other school districts.
Supervision
School District Survey.—A school district evaluation was made and a report
was prepared on the total operation in School District No. 27 (Williams Lake) at
the request of the Board of School Trustees. A total of seven District Superintendents, the Co-ordinator of School Services, and the Chief Inspector of Schools
examined the administrative practices and the instructional procedures throughout
the whole district. An evaluation was made of all aspects of local public education
and suggestions and recommendations were made to guide the Board, the administrators and teachers in their activities. The report was considered to be valuable
by the Williams Lake School Board and its officers. In addition, the format and the
criteria used in this team approach have proved to be interesting and useful to other
District Superintendents and School Boards.
Evaluation of Teachers for the Department of External Affairs.—For the
second year this division has co-operated with the Federal Department by ir
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES N 73
ing and screening applications for appointment under External Aid. Forty-five
candidates were interviewed by a committee which included Lieut-Col. J. N.
i Burnett, Superintendent of Schools, Richmond; Mr. S. Evans, Assistant General
Secretary, B.C. Teachers' Federation; and the Chief Inspector. The quality of
applicant for service in underdeveloped countries was most noteworthy. Many
teachers in British Columbia indicated a willingness to serve mankind at personal
sacrifice.
Inspection of Teachers in Other than Public Schools.—(a) Indian day schools,
on the request of the Federal authority, are visited and reported on by the District
Superintendents. There is a noteworthy trend toward integration in those areas
where public schools are close at hand. However, many of these schools are quite
isolated and must continue to operate as separate schools. Following one or more
visits to these schools, 89 reports were written during the past school-year by District
Superintendents.
(6) Supervision of teachers in public institutions is normally the function of
the closest District Superintendent. The academic teachers in the Haney Correctional Institute were inspected by the District Superintendent in Haney. The
teachers in the Jericho Hill School came under the direct supervision of the Chief
Inspector. Academic teachers in H.M.C.S. Naden were inspected by headquarters
staff. Reports were prepared for the two academic teachers in the Willingdon School
for Girls by the Chief Inspector.
(c) Teachers in private schools who sought permanent certificates were visited
on request and their suitability for certification was reported to the Registrar.
Approximately 20 such inspections were made this year either by the District Superintendent or the Chief Inspector.
Reporting on Teachers in Public Schools.—In the last few years there has been
a significant change in the formal reports on teachers both in their purpose as well
as in their nature. The written report is a part of the total supervisory programme
which includes in-service education, consultation, and a wide range of assistance
to the teacher. The report, therefore, is being written to help improve instruction.
In essence, it describes " what " exists in the learning situation (the organization,
the procedures, the achievement, etc.), "why" it exists, and "how" it may be
strengthened. Treatment is more difficult than diagnosis. Usually the report follows
several visits and discussions with the district supervisory staff and the principal of
the school. The resources of the district are thus integrated to provide assistance.
Nevertheless, there has been no change in the responsibility of the District Superintendent for the quality of instruction in his district. In order to ensure that
effective assistance is given, he must know where the weaknesses lie and what difficulties exist. There is a limitation to the amount of delegation that may wisely be
given to district supervisory staff and school principals.
During the 1963/64 school-year, 3,903 formal reports on teachers were
submitted. This represents slightly more than one-quarter of the teachers. While
every teacher in her probationary year received a report, relatively few of those on
permanent staff did. When it was noted that some districts were having difficulty
in maintaining even this proportion of reports, the relieving District Superintendent
gave assistance. The appointment of Directors of Instruction, effective on September 1st, will make it possible to provide more reports on teachers in Coquitlam,
Burnaby, Abbotsford, Kelowna, and South Peace River.
 n 74 public schools report, 1963/64
Significant Developments Reported by District Superintendents
Recruitment of Teachers.—This major concern of the School Boards in many    I
parts of the Province, but particularly in Northern British Columbia, has been
reported by the District Superintendent of Schools.   The aim of many of these    i
Boards has been to increase the pool of available teachers by drawing graduates into    I
the profession by various inducements.   Others sought to attract teachers to their
districts by a programme of internship.   One School Board, with the co-operation
of the Department of Education, sent the District Superintendent to the United
Kingdom to recruit teachers.   In addition, representatives of these School Boards
met with the Department of Education and the Schools of Education for three
universities to make known their problems in recruitment.
Integration of Indian Day Schools.—Since the first integration of an Indian
day school and a public elementary school in Port Essington in 1947, the process
has continued steadily. It is interesting to note that the reports this year indicate
that no less than seven districts have extended the integration. These include Lillooet (Mount Currie), Howe Sound (Seton Lake), Ucluelet, Cowichan, Alert Bay,
Quatsino, and the Queen Charlotte Islands. The trend of Indian education throughout the Province was expressed in one report: " At present all Indian children in
School District No. 74 are being educated in public schools if they are within commuting distance, and only one Indian day school exists."
Curriculum Developments.—In the final analysis the District Superintendents
are responsible to both the Department and their School Boards for ensuring that
their teachers understand the new programmes and are prepared to carry them out.
The extraordinary amount of curriculum change has resulted in unprecedented
demands on the local facilities. There have been gratifying illustrations of co-operation by the locals of the teachers' professional organizations, the School Boards, and
the local supervisory staffs. The activity of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation in fields of in-service education can only be appreciated by observing their
activities over the whole Province in co-operation with their local associations. They
have demonstrated a high level of professional responsibility. Equally noteworthy
has been the eagerness with which individual School Boards have assisted, both
financially and otherwise. This climate of goodwill has encouraged the growth of
in-service programmes in most of the 83 school districts. Extensive programmes
are noted in the Vancouver, Coquitlam, Prince George, Richmond, and Trail reports.
Richmond has organized an in-service programme " for all curriculum courses that
are to be revised in 1964/65." The preparation of teachers for the newly established
kindergartens in Coquitlam was reported. The Superintendent of Schools for Vancouver emphasized the importance of in-service education for parents and the
general public; " the entire community must be made more aware of the changes
in secondary education and the advantages to the students if they select their programmes wisely."
Experimentation.—It has been said that the vigour and vitality of a school
system will only continue where there is opportunity for growth and experimentation.
At no time have there been more formal or informal experimental projects in British
Columbia schools. These include evaluating textbooks, trying out time-tables and
school organizations, testing teaching procedures, developing new courses, and trying out new equipment. Several districts have been experimenting with continuous
promotion for the elementary grades; the late Mr. J. G. Kirk initiated a study which
other districts found useful. A few of the experimental projects reported were:
Programmed learning in Vancouver; team teaching in Prince George, Castlegar,
and Vancouver; television in Kamloops and Langley; the Folkner method in short-
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES N 75
hand in Vancouver; the International Teaching Alphabet in Belmont Park; and
language laboratories in Kitimat, Vancouver, and Prince George.
Studies, experimental in nature, are being made by principals in fields of programming and time-tabling for the junior secondary schools. There is much more
ingenuity being manifested both to ensure effective use of school time as well as to
provide qualifying options in a wide choice of programmes for the new senior secondary school.
There is ample evidence to support the viewpoint that the Provincial outline
for school organization, curriculum, and teaching procedures provides room for
local ingenuity and experimentation. There is evidence, too, that teachers and administrators have the professional sense of responsibility to ensure the experiment
is worth while and is not prejudicial to the children. The Superintendent of Schools
for Burnaby reported, " Controlled experimentation and individual teacher initiative
will continue to be encouraged as long as such activities contribute to and do not
detract from the welfare of the pupils involved."
Conclusion
A noteworthy development in education has been the increasing participation
of District Superintendents in Provincial projects. With the consent and support of
their School Boards, who recognize that this participation is a means of giving a local
influence, the District Superintendents have been appointed to committees in
curriculum and administration that are Provincial in nature. District Superintendents are represented on both Elementary and Secondary Curriculum Advisory
Committees. They are serving as chairman on the Secondary Vocational Planning
Committee, the Commercial Curriculum Committee, the Fine Arts Curriculum Committee, and the Language Arts Curriculum Committee. They filled significant
positions on the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation Examination Marking
Committees, as Officer in Charge of Administration, chairman and members of
adjudication committees, and chairman of marking committees. In addition, they
served on a number of ad hoc committees which had a Provincial rather than a local
purpose.
This development is significant not only because the talents of these experienced
educators are being fully utilized but also because the District Superintendents provide a practical and local viewpoint.
Although difficulties and problems have inevitably developed in a few of the
many classrooms during the year, nevertheless, there is an excitement and an enthusiasm among teachers that is gratifying. Not only are the new programmes and
organizations being readily accepted but the professional challenge to prepare themselves for their duties has led to an unprecedented amount of in-service education.
There is good reason for pride and satisfaction in the teachers of this Province.
The zeal with which teachers have accepted their responsibilities has been
matched by the School Boards in their eagerness to provide the means for the new
programmes. Without exception the reports of the District Superintendents compliment their trustees on their fine accomplishments and dedicated interest in education.
My personal associations during the past year with teachers, principals, trustees,
District Superintendents, secretary-treasurers, College of Education personnel in
both the University of British Columbia and Victoria University, the administrative
staffs of the B.C. Teachers' Federation and the B.C. School Trustees' Association,
the Retarded Children's Association, my colleagues of the Department, and the
Deputy Minister, have been pleasurable and satisfying. Sincere appreciation is felt
for many courtesies and kindnesses, for co-operation and assistance, for encouragement and inspiration.
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
Future Teachers Clubs
it obviously productive part of the work of teacher n
;s of Future Teachers Clubs. In general, these are made up of Grade
XH or Grade X1H pupils who are interested in exploring the possibility of entering
the teaching profession. Ordinarily a school staff member acts as club sponsor, but
in a number of cases school principals have undertaken this important work.
Of the 165 senior secondary schools in the Province, 109 had Future Teachers
Clubs this year, one more than the year previous. Total club membership was 2,001
at year end, a year's increase of just over 10 per cent. Official club meetings were
generally held during the noon hour, average number being about 12. The focus of
club activity is usually a programme of classroom visiting. In this, club members
observe, question, and sometimes participate in classroom activities. An average
of approximately five hours was spent by clubs in classroom visiting, although only
just over half the clubs made only one visit.
A valuable feature of this kind of pre-training familiarization is that pupils are
enabled to determine more exactly whether or not they should choose teaching as a
profession. If a pupil discovers prior to graduation from senior secondary school
that he might be better suited in some other occupation, he saves himself and the
university both time and money. It is significant that this year about 73 per cent
of club members indicated their decision to enter a programme of teacher
preparation.
In order to assist Future Teachers Clubs, the Department of Education prepared and distributed to each member a booklet entitled " Teaching in British
Columbia." This contained such basic information as general details of the teacher
preparation programme, costs and possible financial assistance, as well as notes on
qualities desirable in a teacher, the advantages and rewards of teaching, and other
details. A club handbook was also made available to club sponsors and officers,
giving suggestions for forming and conducting clubs and developing club
programmes.
Other materials such as membership cards were also supplied to club members,
and a kit of informational and programme material was sent to each club sponsor.
During the year three issues of a club newsletter went to all club members. This
aims at keeping members up to date and giving programme suggestions. A central
Future Teachers Club library was also developed, to provide further resources for
club members.
Material prepared for the use of Future Teachers Clubs was further used in
promotional work during the year. Many inquiries come from all over the Province
as well as from other parts of Canada and the world, concerning opportunities for
teaching in British Columbia. In many cases such material as " Teaching in British
Columbia " is sent out in reply. This booklet was also supplied in quantity to the
University of British Columbia, the University of Victoria, and the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation, for use in counselling. In addition, school trustees were for
the first time provided with copies. School guidance departments were also supplied
with copies.   At least 4,000 copies of this booklet were distributed in total.
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT N 77
This Branch participated in the Provincial Future Teachers Conference held at
the University of British Columbia, January 24 and 25, and the Co-ordinator helped
arrange a programme for club sponsors at that time. He also assisted in the organization of the Greater Victoria Conference held at the University of Victoria on the
afternoon of May 4. In addition he attended and addressed an East Kootenay
Future Teachers Conference at Cranbrook, May 9. In addition to these, he visited
and spoke to 13 individual clubs.
Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment
There were three meetings of this committee which includes representatives of
the universities, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the British Columbia
School Trustees Association, and the District Superintendents of Schools. The
committee serves as a clearing house for information on recruitment activities and
as a source of ideas for further consideration and action.
Survey of Potential Teacher Material
As a result of a brief presented to the Joint Board of Teacher Education by the
School Board of School District No. 57, a committee was set up, under the chairmanship of Dean N. V. Scarfe, to study teacher supply. Following a preliminary
report, the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment was added to the committee and
requested to conduct a survey to discover the Province's potential supply of people
with a suitable university degree, who might be interested in teaching. This was
done, with the assistance of the Registrar of the Department of Education. A preliminary count revealed 495 persons who were interested in teaching. However, for
such varied reasons as lack of continuing interest or incomplete university prerequisites, this number was reduced to 111. The major obstacles to training for respondents proved to be inability to take a full year of university work at one time, inability
or unwillingness to move to those parts of the Province most in need of teachers, or
lack of necessary finances. The assistance of District Superintendents of Schools
was enlisted in obtaining specific and detailed information from respondents, but
since little time remained in the school-year, there were still a number of gaps in the
survey as the year closed. It was anticipated that further information would have
to be obtained before a final report could be given.
Information for University Students
During February and March addresses were given to 22 groups of undergraduates at the University of British Columbia regarding the need for teachers and
opportunities in teaching. The Co-ordinator also participated in " Trustee Day "
activities, both at the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria.
For two weeks in the summer, interviews were arranged with students attending
the Summer Session, and anxious to have information about teacher-education programmes, certification, and available teaching positions.
Teacher Certification Survey
As had been noted in former years, certification of British Columbia teachers
continued to show improvement.   The following data are extracted from the complete survey:—
 "1
'UBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1
Apart from the PA certificate, greater increases can be noted in the higher cate-
;s than in the lower ones.   In fact the EC category is tending to disappear.
s survey was conducted during July and August t<
areas of greatest shortage of teachers.   The situation proved particularly critical in
1963, especially in some school districts and in certain specialist areas of teaching.
Teachers' Scholarships
Scholarships were awarded to the following, for outstanding contributions to
classroom teaching: T. B. A. Beames, Lake Cowichan Secondary, Lake Cowichan;
J. H. House, Balmoral Junior Secondary, North Vancouver; and D. V. Parker,
Lansdowne Junior Secondary, Victoria.
Guidance
Two guidance bulletins were issued to counsellors and guidance teachers during
the year, and just under 50 separate items of occupational and other guidance
material were also sent to schools. In addition, a great many individual questions
were dealt with. Visits were made to guidance teachers and counsellors at 11
schools. Assistance was given the Division of School Radio and Television Broadcasts regarding a projected television series dealing with problems of entry into the
world of work. Assistance was also given the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade in planning and presenting two " Business-Education " conferences, the aim being mutual exchange of questions and information between school
counsellors and representative businessmen interested in the school supply of
potential employees. This is a continuing project which may be expected to develop
further.
The Co-ordinator was privileged to be able to initiate and conduct a course
in group-guidance methods at the University of Victoria during July.
Sundry other meetings and conferences were attended during the year with the
general aim of developing an understanding of the implications of the school guidance programme.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
Adult vocational and technical training, all of which constitutes a huge programme under the joint Federal-Provincial Training Agreement, continues at a rapid
and ever-increasing rate across Canada as a whole, and the Province of British
Columbia is playing its full part in providing more and more facilities both to meet
existing demands and to cater for estimated future needs. In addition to the construction and operating of Provincial regional vocational schools, vocational training
facilities are provided at the secondary-school level and plans have either been
completed or are in process to provide or expand such facilities in Alberni, Vancouver, North Vancouver, Penticton, Trail, Nanaimo, and Richmond. Other areas are
in the early planning phase.
The extension to the British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo was
opened early in the school-year, and the addition to the Prince George School progressed toward its planned opening in the 1964/65 year, as did the new school at
Kelowna, which opened its doors in January, 1964. Construction of the British
Columbia Institute of Technology was well in hand, and enrolments reflected considerable interest in this new area of training in British Columbia. The first class
commenced in May in the field of Medical Laboratory. Further details of enrolment
are provided later in this report.
Finally, an ex-R.C.A.F. site at Dawson Creek was acquired, and plans are
under way to transform and develop this into a new vocational school.
Report of Inspectors of Technical Classes
New facilities for teaching Industrial Education classes have been provided in
Surrey, Saanich, Delta, McBride, Hope, Ucluelet, Coquitlam, and Vancouver.
During the past year the revised courses for junior secondary schools have been
in use for the first time. The courses include Woodwork, Metalwork, Electricity,
Power Mechanics, and Graphic Arts. To make these courses effective, our equipment lists had to be brought up to date to include the additional equipment required.
Shop plans were redrawn to provide better teaching and working conditions.
In July of 1963, course-writing teams met to plan the new courses for the senior
secondary schools, to be ready for use in September, 1965. During July of this
year the teams will meet again. It is hoped that the courses can be completed,
equipment lists revised, and, if necessary, new shop plans prepared.
Since 1956 our teaching staff has increased by over 200 teachers. The number
of Industrial Education teachers required to staff our schools is now 515. Forty-five
men were trained this year as Industrial Education teachers. Several will continue
training this fall at the University of British Columbia, and the remainder have
accepted teaching positions.
Tourist Services Training
Various courses were conducted in relation to this area of training as follows:
Waitress Training at Chilliwack, Revelstoke, Courtenay, Vancouver, Penticton,
Victoria, Port Alberni, and Duncan; Catering Management at Hope, Kamloops,
 N 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Duncan, Nanaimo, Courtenay, Chilliwack, and Vancouver; Bartenders at Victoria; |
Food Preparation and Menu Planning at Vancouver; Tourist Counsellors Course j
at Burnaby; and Room Maids at Victoria. Enrolments: Room maids, 12; wait- |
resses, 165.
In several cases, and in spite of certain local requests to conduct some courses,
a lack of trainees forced cancellation of the proposed classes.
Supervisory Training
Fundamentals of Management
The Fundamentals of Management is a programme offered to industry and
business at the middle management level and is aimed at meeting the needs of the
management team.
During the past 12 months the programme has enjoyed the fullest co-operation
from private and corporate business and industry, from associations and Government agencies, and from departments at Federal, Provincial, and municipal levels.
The need for training the foreman, the superintendent, the department manager, and other specialized people such as engineers and technicians in the matter
of handling people effectively continues to exist. This need is being experienced
by management each time the courses of this programme are offered. Because over-
enrolment for each course occurred during the fall and spring programmes, it was
necessary to schedule extra sessions to meet the demand.
The Work Study Course, covering one week of appreciation of this new and
vital subject, is now extremely popular in the industry and business groups. It is
here that many company engineers and technical people are taking the opportunity
of this one-week exposure to the techniques of Work Study. The British Columbia
Institute of Technology is offering extended training in its regular curriculum for
technicians. Some forecast on this subject would indicate that work study departments will be set up by many large and small businesses throughout the Province
during the next five years. Some training is essential at the supervisory-middle
management level is the over-all programme is to succeed, and this is being met by
the one-week Work Study programme. For information write to the Conference
Chairman, Department of Education, 3650 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby 2, B.C.
The following is a summary of attendance:— Number of
Communications and Human Relations             4 92
Work Study  ....   4 73
Company-operated courses   21 248
Totals   29 413
Small-business Management Training
This new programme, launched during the year, became immediately successful. The response from small businesses throughout the Province indicates the need
for help in training in the courses offered—Management Accounting, Record-keeping, Purchasing, Retailing, and Marketing.
To initiate the programme, three-day training seminars were organized in the
Lower Mainland-Vancouver Island area, the Kootenay District, and the Prince
George area. Attending these sessions were the local representatives of business,
including Boards of Trade and service clubs. Also in attendance were the Directors
of Adult Education and selected instructors for the individual courses.   Following
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION N 81
se orientation and instructor-training programmes, each area commenced to offer
irses to small business.   The attendance at these was as follows:—
Seminars: Attending
Vancouver  !    26
Nelson    25
Prince George      29
Courses: NCo_SL°'     Attendance
Management Accounting I
A special one-day seminar was held in Vancouver on June 2nd for review of
this material. In attendance were all those who had instructed the course and some
new instructors who plan to teach the course in 1964/65.
Forestry Training
This training is held at the Green Timbers School, North Surrey, by the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, and is assisted financially under the
Federal-Provincial training programmes. The courses extend from a three-day
course to a two-month course.
Automotive Air Brakes
Thirty-eight candidates successfully gained their certificates in this course.
Court Reporters
Courses Under Development
Requests are received from many sources to establish new courses of training,
and it is the duty of the Co-ordinator of Technical and Vocational Training to investigate such requests and needs. The following courses were reviewed with the
several interested agencies; for example, Department of Labour, National Employment Service, and Department of Indian Affairs:—
(1) Basic Training for Skill Development in Vancouver, Prince George, Port
Alberni, and Penticton.
(2) A Commercial Course in Kamloops.
(3) A Beverage Dispensers Course in Victoria.
(4) A Building Maintenance Course in Burnaby.
(5) A Service Station Attendants Course in Burnaby.
(6) A Draughting Course in Burnaby.
(7) A Diamond Drillers Course in Nanaimo.
(8) Waitress Training Courses in various centres throughout the Province.
(9) A Log Loading Course in Nanaimo.
 REPORT, 1963/64
(10) A Meat Cutting Course in Burnaby.
(11) A Taxi Drivers Course in Vancouver.
(12) A Social Workers' Assistants Course in Vancouver.
(13) A Food Service Supervisors Course in Vancouver.
(14) A Tire Repair Course in Nanaimo.
(15) A Recreational Supervisors Course in Nanaimo.
(16) Expansion of the Power Sewing Course in Vancouver.
(17) A Professional Housekeepers Course in Vancouver.
Of these, a course in Basic Training for Skill Development has been initiated
at the British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George, in School District No.
15 (Penticton), School District No. 70 (Port Alberni), and continued at the British
Columbia Vocational School—Victoria and the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Enrolments not recorded by schools elsewhere in this report are shown as
follows:—
Basic Training for Skill Development: Enrolled    completed
Penticton School District 23 15
Port Alberni School District 17 11
Commercial: Kamloops Business School  42 7
Beverage Dispensers:  British Columbia Vocational School
—Victoria    39 39
The Draughting and Meat Cutting Courses will commence at the British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby in September, 1964.
In addition, indications are that approval will be sought to operate a Tire
Repair Course at the British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo.
Further, the following courses are part of a continuing programme, and the
involvement of the Co-ordinator is in an advisory capacity: (1) Waitress Training,
(2) Room Maid Training, and (3) Power Sewing.
The Social Workers' Assistants Course, Food Service Supervisors Course,
Recreational Supervisors Course, Professional Housekeepers Course, and the Taxi
Drivers Course are still being investigated, and at the present time there is not enough
data available to state positively that these courses will be proposed for acceptance
to the responsible authorities.
Division of Vocational Curriculum Development
The work of the Division during 1963/64 was primarily directed toward the
development of courses and instructional materials for the regional vocational
schools.
Course Outlines
Courses were developed in the following areas: Heavy-duty repair (pre-
apprenticeship and apprenticeship training), cook training, parks gardening (pre-
apprenticeship and apprenticeship training), timekeeping, auto-body repair trade
(pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training), travel counsellor's training, plastering, machine-shop training (first draft only), machinery-repair trade (draft only),
beauty culture, diamond-drill operators (pre-employment and trade extension),
building and service workers, millwright (apprenticeship training), and log-loading
and shovel operators.
The Division assisted in the development of vocational programmes for the
senior secondary schools in the commercial, industrial, and community services
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION N 83
Examinations and Achievement Record Books
In co-operation with the Apprenticeship Branch, an interprovincial examination was developed for the bricklaying trade for use in all Provinces in Canada.
Achievement record booklets were printed for use in 27 different areas, and instructional materials of a wide variety were produced in 16 different areas, some of these
being distributed across Canada.
In co-operation with the Tourist Services Consultant, several informational
materials were produced; for example, a Quantity Recipe Manual and a Waiter-
Waitress Manual.
Publicity Materials
In co-operation with the Vancouver Vocational Institute, a prospectus outlining the programmes was developed, and 12,000 copies were produced. In addition,
approximately 7,500 flyers for each of 30 different courses were designed and
printed, and a press release kit folder was designed and produced for the British
Columbia Institute of Technology.
Publicity materials produced by this Division are distributed to District Superintendents, principals, counsellors, and Industrial Education instructors throughout
the Province. In addition, selective distribution is made throughout Canada. The
mailing list comprises over 2,000 names.
The booklet " Vocational Schools Announcement," outlining programmes in
each regional school, was produced, and 15,000 copies were distributed.
The Division designed and produced programmes for official openings of the
following British Columbia Vocational Schools: Nanaimo, Nelson, Prince George,
and Kelowna.
The library facilities of the Division continued to grow during the past year.
The services have been widely used by persons preparing course outlines, instructors
preparing instructional materials, and students of the British Columbia Vocational
School—Burnaby.
The Division participated in the development of a booklet depicting outsand-
ing Industrial Education projects. The booklet is distributed to all Superintendents,
principals, and Industrial Education persons.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
Student enrolment increased from 546 to 745 during the last school-year.
This increase was the result of the addition of Cook Training, Beauty Culture, and
Secretarial Courses, as well as a 50-per-cent increase in the number of apprentices
going through the school. The percentage ratio of drop-outs increased slightly,
from 4.9 to 5.3 per cent. This was caused by the fact that we allowed almost any
person who appeared eligible to take the Industrial First Aid and Timekeeping
Course. As a result, we found it was necessary to terminate the training of 16 of
these people after a short try-out in the course. Drop-outs in Upgrading and Pipeline Welding have not been counted for obvious reasons.
A pilot programme in Shovel Operating and Log Loading was started in May,
1964. It would appear that this course should provide the same service to industry
that the other courses at this school are doing.
Placement this year has far exceeded our expectations, as can be seen from the
statistical table. The number shown as placed are the actual known placements.
There will be others who did not notify the school when they found employment.
In this regard it should be pointed out that both business and industry are beginning
to appreciate the British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo as a source of
 Commercial, British Columbia Vocational School-
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION                        N 85
1   supply for their requirements in filling vacancies on their staff.   In most cases they
1   rely on our judgment to select a person to suit their needs.
The new buildings are now in use and greatly appreciataed by both staff and
1   students.   They have provided for a further expansion and an increase in the calibre
of our training programme.
Courses in Log Loading, Front End Loading, Tire Repair, and a second
General Welding Class are definitely planned for 1964/65.   The former two courses
are being put on under Programme IV for the logging industry and the longshoremen of British Columbia.   The automotive and heavy-duty apprentice programme
will be expanded from the 21 classes offered this year to 33 classes in 1964/65.
Student Enrolment
US™
PrcS,o,
Pre-apprentice
Upgrading
Appren.ce
I
j
1
1
i
1
|
1
i
j
1
1
i
§
A   .   P                  MM
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i
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46
?"r7ADU^^rentiCeSUP	
—
—
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l
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--
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Log Loading —                                             Z
Air-trac Operators .	
jNII-
=F
pp_i	
tiv
=FFF
-
-
a
-
E
2
Note.—The placement figures are positive known placements.
British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna
The Honourable W. A. C Bennett, Premier of British Columbia, officiated at
the opening ceremonies for the British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna on
Saturday, June 27, 1964.   However, the school had been in operation since September 30, 1963.
The school has a student capacity of approximately 400 day students.   The
staff consisted of the principal, nine instructors, two clerical staff, a truck-driver, and
a storeman.  Total student enrolment on opening was 103.   Five pre-employment
and three pre-apprentice classes commenced training in the new vocational school.
As a result of a number of requests, courses commenced in November in Arc
Welding, Oxy-acetylene Welding, and the popular Automotive Refresher Course.
Later a third Welding Upgrading Course was added to the night-school programme.
As of June 30th, 287 students have attended day school plus 63 night school,
for a grand total of 350 in the first nine months of operations.  A few students found
that their selected course required skills beyond their capabilities and therefore
dropped out or transferred to another more suitable course.   However, the great
majority of students found vocational training a real challenge to their interests and
 N gfi PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
abilities. With this training they have something the employer will buy. To the
best of our knowledge, every graduate from this school is now employed at his trade,
the majority in British Columbia.
Commencing August 31st, pre-apprentice carpentry students will start their
training in this school. The equipment has been ordered, and a trained instructor
has been engaged. Applications for this type of training, as for other courses, are
being received daily.
Surveys for possible new courses are being conducted. The Basic Training for
Skill Development Course is now under study. This course is designed to assist
those who left the public-school system with less than a Grade X education, the
minimum requirement for admission into most vocational courses. Such a course
would be beneficial to many who are having difficulty retaining steady employment.
After obtaining academic upgrading, they would have the necessary qualification for
entrance to vocational institutions.
This school operates a 5V_-month Auto Body Repair Course and an 11-month
Machinery Repair Course. These are unique in that they are not offered in any of
the other British Columbia Vocational Schools. The first class of Auto Body Repair
started with 13 applicants, whereas the Machinery Repair had only eight. These
numbers are to be expected until the courses become known. For this fall we have
received sufficient applicants for full classes, and more applications are being received. Possibly the Machinery Repair is one of the finest courses offered to potential mechanics. This is a basic course in gasoline, diesel, and air-cooled engines,
transmissions, running-gear, hydraulics, and 70 hours in both arc and acetylene
welding. Following the training period, the graduates may take employment as
apprentices in automotive, heavy-duty mechanics, welding, or machinery repair.
The course is geared to establish a sound foundation before specialization. Young
men under 20 years of age and mechanically inclined are urged to give this course
due consideration.
Student Enrolment
0nSe||T
*ar
J2&S.
1 Pr«mpIoyment:
gg*
I
1
(.) Pr«.pprentlce:
WAA_Sft__. Repair (o
eto four .ears)	
57
mHtScnool
m
~
During the year the principal visited, at least once, all secondary schools jn the
Similkameen, Okanagan, and Mainline areas.   In most schools a 20- to 30-minute
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
N 87
talk on vocational training was given to the Grade X-XII group. Vocational information was left at each school. The principal has spoken to several Chambers of
Commerce, Rotary Clubs, and similar groups in regard to the vocational-school
programme. Numerous organizations, groups, and individuals have toured the
school during the day or evening. Several schools have sent bus loads of students
to tour and obtain first-hand information.
The equipment and training facilities are modern, extensive, and of superior
quality. The best is being provided, and the standard of graduates to date appears
to be attaining the qualities which meet the aims of vocational training.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nelson
Delay in construction prevented the opening of this school until January 20,
1964. On that date, however, classes began and operated continuously to the end
of the school-year.
Student Enrolment
Enrolment
BH
«_
s
r H
1
10
I
■
p°«T__cn.,__;	
	
25
131
79
10
Although there was no possibility of offering night classes during this half-year
of operation, the school made itself felt in the community in several ways, including
exhibitions of art work, both local and on exchange with other art schools and circuits; by demonstration to welders in the region of advanced welding techniques; by
provision of accommodation for Advisory Committee and Selection Committee
meetings; by staff participation in meetings called by various organizations to inform
the public about the school; and by tours of the school.
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
Phase 2 of the school was ready for classes in September, 1963. New courses
offered included Commercial (General), Commercial (Secretarial), Practical Nursing,
and Millwrighting. The welding class was able to move into its new shop at this time.
In February, 1964, a Basic Training for Skill Development Course was added
to the school's programme.
Night-school courses offered in 1963/64 included Lumber Grading (sponsored
by the Northern Interior Lumbermen's Association), Third Class Stationary Steam
Engineering, Automotive Theory (preparatory to the tradesmen's qualifying examination), Draughting and Blueprint Reading, and Welding (including arc, gas, inert
gas procedures, and upgrading).
A considerable expansion of the night-school programme is planned for the
coming year. In response to public demand, new courses in commercial subjects,
telecommunications, industrial first aid, and other subjects will be established.
Placement of students in employment has been good. Not more than three or
four of the school's graduates are unemployed as of June 30, 1964. Most graduates
have been placed through the school, the National Employment Service, and the
 "1
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
apprenticeship counsellor.   Employer satisfaction is good, and several employers
have requested additional students when they are available.
Course Activities
As part of the training programme, some of the classes are able to undertake
projects of use and value to the community or the school. Some of the more pertinent of these projects are listed below.
Heavy Equipment Operators.—Several road-building projects for the Department of Highways; clearing and grading of two school grounds; clearing and grading
of a parking-lot for the Prince George Regional Hospital (to be completed in the
fall of 1964); earth-moving for construction of a Soap Box Derby hill; grading and
topsoil-spreading at the Anglican Church; excavation of United Church manse basement, including clearing and grading; and clearing and grading of two playgrounds.
A programme subsidiary to the Heavy Equipment Operator's Course was
established in January, 1964. To assist the instructor, two students were accepted
as heavy equipment maintenance and repair trainees. Their work was successful,
and four more suitable men began training in this programme between April 1st
and June 1st.
A short Heavy Equipment Operator's Course, which was offered from April
1st to June 30th, was highly successful, mainly because most of the equipment was
available for the period required. Without the service provided by the Maintenance
men, the school would not have been able to offer an adequate Operator's course.
No difficulty was experienced in placing the Maintenance men in employment.
In fact, some local employers had to be persuaded to allow these men to complete
the programme before hiring them.
Automotive Mechanics.—During the year 105 job orders have been issued.
These include all types of automotive service, from lubrication and wash jobs to
complete mechanical rebuilding. All the vehicles issued to the school have been
kept in first-class condition by the Automotive classes.
Heavy Duty Mechanics.—All the engine work necessary on school equipment
has been done by Heavy Duty Mechanics classes. Some difficulty has been experienced in finding suitable projects for this class because of the expense involved in
idling this type of equipment.
Millwrighting.—This class built a complete sawmill under the direction of its
instructor and a representative of the supplier. Additionally, a portable mill,
owned by the Provincial Gaol (Prince George), was rebuilt as a training project.
Several smaller projects were also done for local firms.
All the shop courses have been able from time to time to provide consultative
services to local industry to solve problems that might otherwise have involved them
in considerable expense. All classes, both classroom and shop courses, have been
able to undertake a limited number of field trips, whilst instructors have also invited
local experts to visit classes as guest lecturers, for the mutual benefit of both visitors
and students.
Lumber Grading.—Additionally, two classes in Lumber Grading were sponsored and directed by the Northern Interior Lumbermen's Association, and 78 men
were trained.   About one-half passed the final examination successfully.
The first tradesmen's qualifying examination held in the Interior of the Province was given at this school on April 28th and 29th. Exact figures have not been
supplied by the Department of Labour, but over 40 men wrote the examinations at
that time. A supplementary examination was held in July, and an additional 31
men wrote that examination.   All the night-school students who had completed the
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION N 89
Automotive Theory Course were able to attend one of these examinations.   The
number of successful candidates is not available at this time.
Principal's Activities
Nine schools were visited during the year, and addresses made to senior classes
with the object of recruiting suitable candidates for courses at this school, and addresses made to 14 different service and other groups.
In addition, many local groups toured the school and included most of the local
P.-T.A. groups, service clubs, interested parties, and many individuals who wished
to see the facilities available. No precise figures can be given on the number of
visitors to the school, but a conservative estimate would be over 2,000. This does
not include at least 400 people who toured the school during the official opening.
The principal also visited all four of the hospitals presently training practical-
nursing students during the year. These are Prince George Regional Hospital;
St. Joseph's Hospital, Dawson Creek; G. R. Baker Memorial Hospital, Quesnel;
and Cariboo Memorial Hospital, Williams Lake.
For a short time, students were placed at the Vanderhoof Hospital, but this
proved to be too small to offer the necessary training, and the students were
withdrawn.
Official Opening
The official opening of this school was held on June 17,1964. The Honourable
Ray Williston, Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, opened the school
in the presence of the Honourable Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of Education; the
Honourable William Chant, Minister of Public Works; Mr. J. S. White, Director,
Technical Branch, Department of Education; and other Departmental and Governmental officials.
Conclusion
Enrolments in all courses have been good, and job placement of graduates has
been very satisfactory.
Considerable public interest has been shown in all the courses offered by the
school. Some thought has been given to expanding the number of student places
available in the Commercial (General) and Heavy Equipment Operator's Courses.
Day-school Enrolment
Registration
Completed Training
»
Termi
Sept.
Feb.
May
Otter
Feb.
May
Otter
nated
Auto Mechanics	
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74
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25
 REPORT, 1963/64
D.P.W. No. 1 -
D.P.W. No. 2 _
D.P.W. No. 3 _
D.P.W. No. 4 ..
Municipal gas -
Downhill	
Night-school Enrolment
Stationary Engineering (Third Class) _
Arc Welding:
September	
October 	
November	
December	
January 	
February	
March	
Total	
Gas Welding:
September	
October	
November	
December	
January	
February	
March	
Total	
Class "A" Chauffeurs Course __
Draughting and Print Reading I
Automotive Theory	
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
Day-school Enrolment
Pre-appren.ee
Appren.ee
-_3f
Upgrading
Name of Course
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570
287
29
\
 Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION N 93
Night-school Enrolment
.Course
Apprentice
Technician
Upgrading
!
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 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Pilot Programme, British Columbia Vocational School—Victoria
Day-school Enrolment
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Vancouver Vocational Institute
Day-school Enrolment Report, July 1, 1963, to June 30,1964
Pupil Enrolment, July 1,1963, to June 30,1964
1963 1964
July 878               January  1,606
August 693               February  1,783
September 1,182               March  1,603
October 1,386                April              1,666
November          '  1,434               May  1,568
December 1,328               June  1,389
Night School
Number of classes  175
Number of students  3,405
  TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION N 97
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Day-school Enrolment
Medical Laboratory Technology:   Number enrolled May 4,1964, 36; number
withdrawn to June 30, 1964, 2; number enrolled June 30, 1964, 34.
Applications for enrolment in the following technologies are being received and
evaluated with a view to acceptance of up to the following maximum number of
I   students by the opening date, September 8, 1964:—
Science Technologies:
Bmlding    30
Electrical and Electronics—
Electrical Option	
Electronics Option ....
Food Processing	
Forestry ..
Business Technologies:
Business Management _
Broadcast Communications—
Production Option	
Technical Option	
Hotel, Motel and Restaurant Manage
Medical Radiography Technology (opening date October 5th)	
Staff recruitment is proceeding satisfactorily, and the new buildings a
equipped for the opening of classes.
Programme 5
Provincial Schools and Vancouver Vocational Institute
Farm Machinery Repair _
Practical Nursing	
Welding—General _______
Upgrading	
Beauty Culture _
Chef Training _
Heavy Duty Mechanics	
Heavy Equipment Operator
Timekeeping	
 ~l
98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Boatbuilding	
Bricklaying	
Carpentry ___	
Electronics	
Painting and Decorating	
Sign Painting _
Building Servic
Service Station
Basic Training for Skill Development	
Auto Body Repair	
Auto Mechanics	
Barbering	
Building Construction and Cabinet Making ..
Dental Office Assistants	
Draughting	
Electrical	
Stationary Engineering	
Engineering 1	
Fishermen	
Graphic Arts	
Machine Shop	
Navigation	
Power Sewing	
Radio Telecommunications	
Shoe Repairing	
Waitress Training	
Commercial (Secretarial and General) _
Beauty Culture	
Medical Laboratory Technicians	
Radio Electronics	
Industrial First Aid and Timekeeping _
ic Training for Skill Development  2
Watchmaking  1
Market Sales      1
Comptometry  1
Totals: Number enrolled, 2,633; number completed, 1,253.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Programme 6
Provincial Schools Number
Basic Training for Skill Development _
Heavy Duty Mechanics	
Timekeeping and First Aid	
Beauty Culture ..
Private Schools
Physical Education Instructor I
Teacher Training	
Hoffman Press Operator _
Commercial	
Print Shop Operation	
Stockroom Clerk	
Radio Officer	
Grade XHI	
Medical Laboratory Technician _
Power Saw Mechanic _
Social Worker	
Cleritype	
Commercial Art	
Lumber Tallying and Shipping _
Watchmaking 	
Upholstery _
Auto Body I
Medical Office Assistant	
Basic Training for Skill Development _
Electricity	
Stationary Engineer	
Commercial Art	
Power Sewing	
Welding	
e also included in the
 public schools report, 1963/64
Vocational Day and Night Classes in School Districts
Vocational Day Classes in Secondary Schools
Night Schools (Excluding Provincial Schools and Vancouver Vocational
Institute and School of Art)
Commercial    6,088
 community programmes branch
COMMIJNITY PROGItAMMES BRANCH
J. H. PANTON, M.Sc., DIRECTOR
The unprecedented development and growth of adult education, and the expansion of services to sports and fitness as a result of the National Fitness and
Amateur Sports Act, confronted the Community Programmes Branch with its major
problems of 1963/64.
Although the number of Recreation Commissions did not increase greatly,
leadership services and the addition of a Provincial summer school greatly expanded
the work of the Branch. The leadership services expanded in all phases of Community Programmes Branch work; this was most apparent during the past year in
adult education and sports and fitness.
Growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March 31,
1964, follows:—
1954    86 1960    281
1955 140 1961 .
1956 183      1962   332
1957  216      1963   351
1958 250      1964 359
1959 266
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) Fitness and Amateur Sports Division, which provides special service to
sports organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division, which provides grants, consultation, clinics, and
conferences to School Board adult education divisions.
(4) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library—materials and advisory services.
(7) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, regional
schools, and a Provincial summer school.
(8) Grants-in-aid to Recreation Commissions on behalf of full-time recreation
directors, and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) Responsible for educational sessions and resource personnel at Annual
British Columbia Recreation Conference.
(10) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
 ;__—™
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
REPORT, 1963/64
s' salaries.
Adams Lake	
♦Alert Bay	
Alexandria 	
Alexis Creek	
Argenta-Johnsons Landi.
     $300.00
300.00
_______     '300.00
        240.00
ng 300.00
Crescent V_ll_y
360.00
T.a_snn Creek
600.00
Arrowhead-Sidmouth ...
Arrow Park West
 180.00
1800(1
.    1,020.00     1
Avola 	
 240.00
Departure Bay
420.00
Barnhart Vale	
Barnston Island	
Barriere	
Bear Creek	
       240.00
       240.00
        240.00
Dewdney	
        420.00
     1,800.00
-       600.00
District of Matsqni
District of Salmon Arm	
♦District of Surrey
        600.00        1
.    1,000.00
tDragon Lake
R_".nnBB.r"C°rra L'nn
Bouchie L__T___Z____
Bowen Island	
Bridesville	
Brisco	
 420.00
        240.00
        600.00
        240.00
Elk Valley
Emerald Mines
240.00
180.00
Fall-land
300.00
Burns T_.ke
480.00
Ferndale
300.00
Canal Flats
Nn grant
Cape Mndge
420.00
Francois Lake
300.00       1
tFraser Lake.
Chetwvnd
300.00
Christina Lake
-      300.00
♦Comox Community
576.00
r.ranrl Fnrks
Great Central
600.00      1
300.00     1
Cowichan Indian Band
       540.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
N 103
$300.00
180.00
360.00
1    tHaida Masset	
I      HalfmoonBay                	
Happy Valley-Glen Lake !—
I      Harrison Hot Springs	
Moose Heights	
300.00
_.       300.00
_       480.00
McConnell Creek
420100
300.00
600.00
2,100.00
420.00
McLeese Lake	
Nakusp	
j      Hazelton   ....
300.00
Hope
tNarcosli Creek
Natal                              	
360.00
240.00
1,200.00
240.00
360.00
No grant
No grant
360.00
360.00
480.00
600.00
600O0
480.00
360.00
loco
1       Jeune Landing	
480.00
300.00
New Masset
New Westminster
420.00
Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount.
[         Kaslo
420.00
North Cowichan
480.00
North Shore (Nelson)	
Oak Bay                        	
600.00
Kingfisher
300.00
240.00
300.00
tKootenay Bay
1        Ladysmith
540.00
+T_idlaw
Lakeview Hpljhts
300.00
Palling	
Parksville	
Paul Creek	
Peachland	
300.00
360.00
600.00
No grant
300O0
360.00
180.00
600.00
♦Langley
Lantzville
.    1,200.00
600.00
Lavington-Coldstream	
Lillooet
        600.00
Lister
Little Fort
300.00
Pendleton Bay
tT_me Riitff.
—   -r^rr
Pleasant Valley  i	
420.00
360.00
1,200.00
420.00
216.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
540.00
420.00
300.00
480.00
1,500.00
2,550.00
420.00
Mahatta Riv.r
420.00
*Port Alberni
Mahood Falls
P°rtC^lam___
Marvsvill_
tMerritt
240.00
300.00
48000
Pouce Coupe	
1         Michel
Midway .
_    3oaoo
♦Prince George
360.00
 N 104
PUBI
IC SCHOOLS
$480.00
1
REPORT, 1963/64
tSq.ian.ish Indian Hand                                                 1
480.00
300.00
180.00
„       300.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
2,700.00
300.00
tStikine (Telegraph Creek)                       ...
Queen Charlotte —
Sunnybrae   ___       180.00
Sunrise-Two Rivers                           180 00
Tarrys and i.istri_t                                  300 00      j
Tatlayoko T.ake                                 120.00     i
fTe.lkw.
300.00
Te.ada                                                           300 00
Terrace                                                  600.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
♦Trail-Tadanac    3,075.00
Union Bay       480.00
600.00
600.00
420.00
♦Vancouver Board of Parks    7,800.00
Vanderhnnf                                                  1X0 00
Vav. nhy                                                             740 00
300.00
480.00
_       300.00
240.00
540.00
240.00
_       240.00
Village of Mission                             600 00
.70 Mile House and >
Vatch Lake
Shawnigan Lake	
West Bench       300.00
W. sthHHg.                                                     300 00
Skidegate Mission _
	
White Lake                                        300.00
Songhees Indian Bai
id	
480.00
420.00
360.00
420.00
240.00
240.00
180.00
420.00
creation Con
mity support
q personnel.
tYale
Ymir                                                  300.00
7_h.11.™                                                              470.00
missions were inactive or not receiving a
for several reasons, such as inadequate
However, in most cases they return to
Inactive Recreation Commissions receive
Spences Bridge
Sprnat T akp
During the year 43 Re
grant.   A Commission bee
leadership and poor commi
active work with a change i
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH N 105
Community Programmes Branch information and special attention from the field
staff.
Information taken from Recreation Commission reports is indicative of the
importance attached to recreation in most communities. Because the reports do not
include many areas of recreation, such as private agencies, clubs, commercial
recreation, and all activities not under the jurisdiction of Recreation Commissions,
any figures from the reports are not a true picture of total community recreation.
The activities reported numbered 6,591 and 1,016,632 participated. The number
of participants includes many who would be in several activities and is not the
number of different people.
Although a true picture is difficult to obtain, and there are many discrepancies
in reporting, the reports do indicate the interest and importance attached to community recreation programming.
Community grants are based on such factors as size of community, personnel
employed, type of programme, activity of the Recreation Commission, and financial
contribution by the Recreation Commission.
Staff
There was only one staff change during the year.   Mr. D. J. Gillies resigned
in March of 1963, and Mr. M. E. Gordon was appointed effective June 1, 1963.
Mr. Gordon is a recreation graduate of the University of British Columbia and is
located at Nelson to serve the Kootenay region.
In March the Community Programmes Branch consultants were given the
responsibility of organizing Centennial Committees throughout the Province. They
will be associated with Centennial work on the Community Organizations Committee until 1968; this will greatly increase their work.
The seven members of the field staff have large areas to cover and many communities to serve. Their duties require many week-end meetings, much night work
and travel. The growth of Community Programmes Branch services and the additional load of Centennial organization will be a strain on the Branch for the next
three years.
In 1963/64 the field staff made 1,388 visits to communities and travelled
67,632 miles. They are effectively discharging ever-increasing duties, which are the
consequence of an expanding programme. The Community Programmes Branch
staff and their locations are as follows:—
A. L. Carrier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
T. Ruben, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt.
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—Central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island.
D. M. McCooey, Smithers—North-west British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
R. C. Davis, Quesnel—North-east British Columbia.
M. E. Gordon, Nelson—Kootenays.
Miss A. F. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
The Community Programmes Branch provides its most important service
through leadership activities.   This has been greatly expanded through the Adult
Education and Sports and Fitness offices.   The necessity for skilled leaders, both
volunteer and paid, cannot be over-emphasized.    The Branch has developed a
 N 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Provincial system of regional workshops and clinics; there are numerous local
clinics and conferences designed to discuss and promote leadership.
A Provincial summer school for recreation leaders was held in Kelowna from
July 8th to 13th, inclusive. The school was designed to encourage and promote
a better approach to leadership in recreation, and to give community leaders an
opportunity to acquaint themselves with new trends, obtain information, and discuss
the philosophy and leadership of community recreation.
Recreation leadership training is the most important area of Branch responsibility, and it requires the attention of governments at all levels. The Community
Programmes Branch continued to give priority to the development of these services.
Leadership Statistics
«
Co,
N.
|
$239.40
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Course
iSS&
gssss
a-___p___t.____-.-_.
..
1
3
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $6,904. One hundred and six communities received this aid. One hundred and two aquatic and 33 playground programmes
were assisted. These grants are provided to encourage community activity in these
extremely important aspects of recreation.
The Annual Provincial Recreation Conference is also a major project for the
Community Programmes Branch. The Branch is responsible for the educational
sessions and the resource personnel. The conference is also part of the B.C.R.A.
annual meeting and provides excellent learning opportunity for professional people,
Recreation Commission personnel, and municipal councillors with recreation responsibilities. The 1963 conference was held in Courtenay, and was attended by
195 people representing 88 Recreation Commissions and communities.
Library Services
The film library is located in Vancouver and maintained by the Visual Education Division.   The book library was kept up to date with 195 new additions.
New books purchased _
New films purchased _
Publications
The Community Programmes Branch bulletin, which is published quarterly,
has become an important reference source and provides a very good medium of
communication with Recreation Commissions. Six hundred copies of each issue
are published and distributed to each Recreation Commission, School Superintendents, Adult Education Directors, and a mailing list of over 75.
The Community Programmes Branch guide and brochure were revised in
March of 1964.
Provincial Advisory Board
Members of the Provincial Advisory Board on Adult Education and Recreation are as follows: Mr. B. M. Baker, Kelowna (Chairman); Dr. B. E. Wales,
Vancouver; Mr. A. T. Alsbury, Vancouver; Mrs. W. Saxton, Ucluelet; Dr. A. W.
Mooney, Vanderhoof; Mr. P. F. Mclntyre, Victoria; Mr. L. J. Wallace, Victoria;
Mr. R. H. Reeve, Victoria (term concluded December 31, 1963); Prof. R. F.
Osborne, Vancouver; Mr. E. Whitehead, Vancouver (term concluded December
31, 1963); Dr. J. F. K. English, Victoria.
 N 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
The Board met twice during the fiscal year—September 17, 1963, and Febru-   j
ary 14, 1964.
The Board was appointed to act in an advisory capacity to the Department of   j
Education concerning policy and procedure as related to the Community Programmes Branch.   The Board meets periodically to hear reports from the Com-    i
munity Programmes Branch, which outlines problems and requirements.    The
Board then discusses any aspects of the Branch it deems necessary and submits
recommendations to the Deputy Minister.
Drama
Drama continues to flourish in British Columbia. The trend in adult clubs is
to leave the one-act field and concentrate on three-act plays, with the result that
drama festivals in the more populated areas of the Province tend to have fewer
entries. However, in the outlying districts where there are more inexperienced
groups, the one-act play continues to dominate the picture.
School festivals are on the increase, due in part to the interest inspired by visits
of groups such as Holiday Theatre and the Bastion Theatre. Also, more teachers
with experience are keen to impart their knowledge and enter festivals for adjudication and competition.
Drama festivals continue to be a stimulus, and this spring 35 were held—12
for participation by schools, 15 for adult entries, and 8, combined with music,
drama, and speech arts, were open to all ages and groups.
Major festivals and activities were as follows:—
(1) Provincial One-act Festival at Nanaimo. Won by Vernon Little Theatre.
Adjudicator—Mr. G. Peacock, Edmonton.
(2) Dominion Drama Festival Three-act Regional in Vancouver. Won by
North Kamloops P.-T.A. Theatre Wing. This group took part in the
Canadian finals in Charlottetown.
(3) Provincial tours by Holiday Theatre and the Bastion Theatre in Victoria
with programmes for schools, the latter on the Island only. The programmes were a great help to school drama.
The Drama Division of the Community Programmes Branch appoints adjudicators for all drama festivals held in British Columbia. An extensive service for
leadership training is supplied through clinics and workshops, which are included
in the statistics for this service under leadership. This is an invaluable asset to the
promotion of drama in the Province.
The British Columbia Drama Association, under the chairmanship of Mr. W.
J. Zoellner, is a parent body to the drama clubs throughout the Province. The
Community Programmes Branch works closely with the British Columbia Drama
Association in festival and leadership promotion.
The drama library, with its 15,000 books, is in constant use. Groups continue
to borrow plays and books on theatre for production and study. Over 8,000 books,
pamphlets, magazines, etc., were sent to the schools, teachers, organizations, individuals, etc. This vital service is especially appreciated where there is little money
for purchase of necessary books. Stage equipment (curtains, lights, rheostats) is
still required by small unequipped schools and halls, although most groups are
purchasing the necessary equipment with profits from their productions.
Well over 200 adult and school drama groups produce from one to six plays
throughout the year. Many also present to the community an annual concert,
pantomine, or other form of ei
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH N 109
A very significant development in British Columbia drama is the increase in
drama facilities. Several communities now have their own buildings, such as Vernon, Kelowna, White Rock, and Chilliwack. The growth of community drama will
be greatly enhanced through facility development.
The Drama Division of the Branch is closely associated with all drama in the
Province, and the library resources are available to both professional and amateur
groups.
Adult Education Division (Night Schools)
(A. L. Cartier, M.A.)
In the past five years the enrolment in public-school adult education programmes has doubled from 39,000 to 78,000. The total enrolment increased last
year by 11 per cent. This increase is accounted for by a 37-per-cent increase in the
number of adults taking academic courses for credit, and by a 23-per-cent increase
in the number enrolled in vocational classes. A breakdown of enrolment figures is
given below.
Adult Day Schools
The King Edward Adult School in Vancouver has inspired interest and similar
initiative across Canada. Here in British Columbia, similar full-time day schools
have been established in Kamloops, Penticton, Victoria, and Port Alberni. Plans
are under way for similar developments at Terrace, Prince Rupert, and Vernon.
These classes are organized to use existing facilities, usually on a second-shift basis.
They provide an opportunity for adults to use leisure time to prepare themselves for
better future employment or for further education.
Small-business Management Programme
The small-business management programme, a joint project with the Federal
Department of Labour, was started in September of 1963 and built up to 41 classes
with over 1,000 owner-managers enrolled.
In order to prepare Adult Education Directors to develop the programme
locally and to train instructors in appropriate instructional techniques, regional
workshops were held in Vancouver, Nelson, and Prince George.
Mr. Cartier, who acts as Provincial supervisor of the small-business programme, attended a two-week workshop for Provincial supervisors in Ottawa in
Programme for Indians—Leadership and Community Development
Native Indians are beginning to participate more and more in the regular
night-school classes.   However, special classes have been organized for them in
Duncan and Hazelton.   These classes have been in basic education and home-
making.
The Community Programmes Branch has also collaborated with U.B.C. Extension in conducting a series of leadership workshops for Indian Affairs Branch staff
and for Indian chiefs and counsellors. Three such workshops have been held this
year on Vancouver Island, one at Merritt, and one at Prince Rupert.
During the year an arrangement for a community development project at Port
Simpson has been negotiated. The Port Simpson Band, the Federal Indian Affairs
Branch, and the British Columbia Department of Education will share equally in
the cost of providing a community development consultant for the area for a period
of three years. His function will be to help the band members to discover how they
can best use all the resources at their command in order to improve their standard
of living and thus become self-sufficient.
 N no                               PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
In-service Training of Directors and Instructors
One and two-day conferences for Adult Education Directors were held at   j
Creston, Nelson, Williams Lake, Nanaimo, and in the Fraser Valley.   These confer-   1
ences have been concerned with developing better administrative practices and improving adult education programmes.   A new development this year has been the
organization of workshops for instructors in order to train them in good instructional    '
techniques in the teaching of adults.   Workshops for instructors were held last year,
in Victoria, Vancouver, Penticton, Surrey, Terrace, and Kelowna.
Community Leadership Training
A start has been made in conducting courses or workshops in leadership skills     1
for community leaders, especially in the areas of recreation and voluntary organiza-     1
A successful week-long leadership training programme formed part of the     1
Community Programmes Branch summer school in Kelowna.   Some shorter week-     1
end leadership workshops are planned for the fall in the Cariboo and Peace River     1
areas in conjunction with Community Programmes Branch regional recreation     1
conferences.
Summary Showing Trends in Number of School Districts Participating,
Number of Instructors and Classes
Y...
£n£
N_TSf
gjgg
N_S"    1
«__-«_
£
||
1
_!_19
1963/64	
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Year
as.
£___£
^s*   1
,„,,/,-
!!.m
1
1
1961/62 .	
1963/6411
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
10„/«
28^387
1
1
,«_/-                        	
iS?%
l.6V^~~                                                                      —
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
"ff
2ESS5
Enrolment
Bus'    . M      err
l
1
2 365
B™^!rand F°reStiy	
1594
?___*£*"	
''§3
M_^i°___ceParat0ry	
2sf_
1,002
880
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Academic (for credit)
|
?H
n"m^^_ _____ ■ —	
484
R(«rft_iti"nn and Fitness.,    .,
lit
3,054
2,574
The continued growth of adult education, particularly in the vocational and
academic fields, is an indication of the growing emphasis which our society is putting upon serious adult education. Through adult education we make better use
of our educational facilities, develop the talents of our people, and build a society
that passes on to the coming generation a sense of the value of learning.
Amateur Sports and Fitness Division
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E., Co-ordinator)
Although agreements between the Federal and Provincial Governments were
not signed until late in the year, and subsequent problems precluded approval of
projects until late in the fiscal year, the Sports and Fitness Office of the Community
Programmes Branch was able to provide extensive aid to sports bodies.
The interest of sports people and the number of activities aided throughout the
Province through this office indicates a new era of sports and fitness growth in
British Columbia.
Communications
A large volume of information sent to sports bodies and Recreation Commissions resulted in a great increase in requests for aid. Twice the volume of mail was
handled over the previous year.
Many sports groups used the office for mimeographing; compilation of information; typing of minutes, constitutions, brochures, etc. This has proven to be a
greatly appreciated service in British Columbia.
 N U2 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Bursaries and Scholarships
Three thousand five hundred dollars was made available tc
enrolled in physical education and recreation courses at Canadia
Conference
Two hundred and fifty sports and recreation people attended the Second
Annual Sports and Fitness Conference in New Westminster. The major accomplishment of the conference was the establishment of a steering committee to work on the
formation of a British Columbia Sports Federation.
The total cost of the conference was $3,007.43.   This was a Federal-Provincial
Physical Education Workshops
Five elementary-school Physical Education Workshops were organized through
this office and the School District Superintendents. The statistics are included in
the leadership section of this report.
The Physical Education Workshops were conducted by highly qualified Physical
Education personnel and met with enthusiastic approval. Miss Wiseman, of the
University of British Columbia; Miss Ririe, of the University of Utah; and Mr. E.
Mansouri, of Nelson, were the resource personnel.
Research
: S. R. Brown, of the University of British Colui
conduct fitness tests on students at Shawnigan Lake School.   Compilation
was not possible until conclusion of tests in May of 1964.
Total cost of research aid was $202.30.
Leadership Clinics and Workshops
(Not Including Physical Education Workshops)
Activlt,
Communis
Cos,
SS?
Synb   nlzed     1     in
.         „,_„_■_• rtah
||
B__Te__! rrferera" __°!__________Z
TgSfiZ^&SSZa*** :
100
Wom_!;r_^eCtba-UP(w'-'l«S-rw. one clinic)_
_!„"," ?"" Unh,era"y—
-
Cranbrook	
ss,—
n
?™ian	
Qucsnel	
50
ggssasrto.
University* British Columbia	
24
Gymnasac^allsthenlca	
Richmond	
200
The expansion of service to sports and fitness i
this office, has resulted in greatly increased interest i
As a result, most Provincial sports governing bodies an
clincs, workshops, schools, clerical and advisory service
. British Columbia, through
t sports leadership training,
requesting increased aid for
 JERICHO HILL SCHOOL N 113
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Day
Resident
Total
-,„„._.„, l|J!jffffj}Sj
I
I
106
151
■    18S
Nineteen blind pupils were from the Province of Alberta. Of the total enrolment, 127 pupils were boys and 159 were girls. During the course of the year, 31
pupils graduated, transferred, or left for one reason or another.
General Remarks
School reopened with nine new teachers and three resident instructors. Mrs.
Ada McGregor retired as nurse-matron and was succeeded by Miss A. G. Pert.
Mr. Eric Cardinall exercised part-time supervision of the resident instructors at
the outset and was replaced later in the year by Mr. Glenn Parkinson.
The number of Jericho Hill School graduates attending Gallaudet College was
increased this past year by one. Miss Ellen Hughes, of Port Coquitlam, was accepted for full freshman standing, as had been the other three in the preceding year.
Four seniors from this School and two from regular secondary schools successfully passed the spring Gallaudet College entrance examinations. This brings
to 10 the number of British Columbia students who will be attending the college
for deaf in Washington, D.C., this fall.
Mr. Theo Thomas, a teacher of the blind in New Zealand, spent four days
visiting our school en route home after an 18-month tour of schools for the blind
in Europe and this continent. He has since been appointed headmaster of the
school for the blind in Auckland.
The need for services of a counsellor for deaf adults and senior pupils received
serious consideration and was discussed at length with Mr. Jack White, Director
of Technical and Vocational Education. It was decided to continue with the services available through Mr. Clarence Bradbury's rehabilitation department and the
British Columbia youth counselling service. If and when the vocational school for
handicapped becomes operative, a special counsellor would then be considered.
Concern was expressed by a few staff members of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind with regard to some elementary blind children not in Jericho Hill
School who do not have all the books required to keep up with sighted classes in
public schools. After due consideration, the following two major decisions were
reached with respect to this problem:—
(1) Because of curriculum changes and the importance of learning special
braille in Grade X for algebra and chemistry, along with geometry study
procedures, students on the Academic Programme should not transfer
to sighted schools until completion of Grade X.
 Teaching geography to the visually handicapped, Jericho Hill School.
 JERICHO HILL SCHOOL N 115
(2) Where other than senior secondary pupils are attending sighted schools,
the Canadian National Institute for the Blind may deal with the blind
client as it sees fit, and the School will assist according to its capabilities,
as heretofore.
Around the beginning of February, work was commenced on the construction
of a 20-classroom Home Economics-Industrial Arts building for the deaf. This unit
is to be completed early in 1965.
The new boys' residence was officially opened on February 29th and named
Tyler House, after Mrs. Annie B. Tyler, who served the school as supervisor and
matron from 1923 until retirement in 1949. In addition to living-in accommodation, there are craft rooms, a recreational room, hobby rooms, a television room,
study areas, and a meditation room where personal problems may be resolved in
quiet surroundings.
The opening ceremony was not confined entirely to the new residence. Recognition was given to Miss Mabel N. Blake, teacher and vice-principal from 1922 to
retirement in 1952. The present building for blind students, previously referred to
as the Braille Building, was named Blake Hall.
Tyler House was officially opened by the Honourable W. N. Chant, Minister
of Public Works. Special guests included the Honourable Robert A. Bonner,
Attorney-General; the Honourable Ralph Loffmark, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce; Dr. William Plenderleith, Chairman of the School
Advisory Committee; Col. J. N. Burnett, Superintendent of Richmond School
District; Mr. A. E. Webb, Deputy Minister of Public Works; Rev. Francis Bruce,
president of Vancouver and District Council of Churches; Dr. C. E. MacDonald,
Superintendent of Jericho Hill School; Mr. D. McEwen, president of the P.-T.A.
Deaf Department; and Mrs. W. Chilton, president of the P.-T.A. Blind Department.
Early in the spring a 6-foot steel mesh fence was erected 10 feet in from our
property-line along Eighth Avenue and along the west boundary of the school
grounds. A portion of the south-west corner is on loan to Vancouver Parks Board
as a public viewing area.
Amongst our seniors this year, we had seven graduates from the Deaf Department. In addition, there were five " leavers " and five blind and two deaf to be
transferred in September to sighted secondary schools or to other schools for the
At the close of school, our blind pupils' band, under the direction of Mr. Cliff
Bryson, was flown to Los Angeles to play at the 49th International Kiwanis Convention. The reception accorded them was tremendous. For our children it was
truly a dream come true.
I wish to thank the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee, and
staff for splendid support received throughout the school-year.
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION
OF EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual
record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past 10 years, and indicates that the number of individual service
records to be maintained has increased by over 91 per cent in this period.
1	
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
.957/58
195S/59
1959/60
1960/6l|,96t/M
,962/63
1963/64
%	
7S
8S
8'l76
»g
10»?
"ill
11,547
™£
ia.8,5
"•S.
141?2
lEEr
St
l
l
H8
^
*¥,
1
l
n
1
'40.
5b__Z|      19.8 |     217
ti£
19 0
19 8
n
16.9
17.9
18 5
18.8
In 1963/64 there was an increase in the number of temporary certificates o
letters of permission issued, reaching its highest point in numbers, but with a per
centage of teachers employed less than in some years. Many of these persons si
employed had undertaken a year of teacher-training but had not qualified fully for
certification. The number of drop-outs rose significantly for this year, as did the |
numbers of teachers employed.
II. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried |
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the University
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since I
1956/57 such training has been in the faculties of education of the universities, and |
enrolment figures are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher ,
training programme as enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts |
however, covering some 14 years, permit of useful comparisons.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS        N 117
|
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/6.
,961/62
UK2/63
.963/64
M
J
T
M
*•
T.
M
£
T
M
FT
F.|T
M
l
T
M
a
|
F-
T.
H
l
z
I
350
l
|
I
1
3
l
12
z
|B
|
E
•"..1
i.—
1
l
E
236
i
. .n?
£zz
i
_Jl,451
a|j._
1 *"
^Its
S
1
l
1
1
1
'^
ZZ
S
|
1
SS
 N 118 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
III. The following table shows the certificate classifications awarded those in
the ttaining-college in the year shown who were teaching in November of the year
following; that is, actual supply from the training-college. Note that E-C supply
dropped from 221 in 1959 to 99 in 1963, whereas E-B and E-A supply rose respectively from 292 and 68 to 357 and 199. Similarly, P-C and P-B supply rose from
58 and 155 to 133 and 256 respectively. (It should be noted that these figures
include certificated teachers who may have left teaching to return for further winter-
M      F.      T.       M.     F.      T.     M      F.        T.       M      F.        T.       M      F.        T.
IV. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in the
training-college in the year shown who were not teaching in November following.
E-T and S-T indicate that had the individual taught a letter of permission would have
been required. The figures do not include those who would not have received a
certificate or been considered for a letter of permission nor those in programmes not
normally leading to certification; for example, first-year elementary, various years
secondary. Note that the numbers of persons eligible for a certificate who did not
enter teaching the September following rose from 201 in 1959 to 539 in 1963, and
that in the same period the level of certificate classification of these individuals rose
significantly. The figures reflect the decision of trainees to undertake extended
training for higher qualifications before commencing teaching, evident in other figures
available. The process, temporarily at least, is aggravating numerical supply in
terms of demand but fortunately is creating a pool of longer-trained persons who
may be expected to enter teaching within the next year or two, thereby increasing
numerical supply and quality supply.
1958/59
1959/60
,960/6,
1961/62
1962/S3
M
I
T.
M
s
T.
M
F-
T.
M
f
T.
M
|
T.
1=
1
z\
I
1
1
IS
|
l
l
t
ii
»6
I
l
l
T<Safe|itel^L
68
,64
232
112
333
480
206
308
602
204
462
666
To_!t;s-t__
2
,0
1,
l
70
99
35
100
,35
62
*
,50
29
,08
,37
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
V. From the preceding tables
colleges as a percentage of demand:
1 be calculated supply from the training-
1
l
1
K
1
1
I
i
s
s
i
649
if
(?)
920
1
1
i
is
1
i:S
1,733
VI. The employment of teachers with temporary certificates in 1959/60, ai
October 31st, was as follows:—
Of the 369 persons with temporary certificates (letters of permission) in
1959/60, 335 were in regular public schools. In 1960/61 the total was 327, with
285 in public schools, in 1961/62 the total was 254, with 228 in public schools; in
1962/63 the total was 336, with 312 in public schools; and in 1963/64 the total
was 376, with 345 in public schools.
VII. Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School
Boards to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and in 1955 to 1960, inclusive,
sent an interviewing officer in the early spring to select and recommend individuals
for appointments. The procedure changed in 1961, and no interviewing officer
proceeded overseas. An extensive file of material is provided to each applicant, with
information concerning specific vacancies. Certification and experience are recorded and assistance given to applicants and Boards to assist in appointments. The
numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as follows:—
School-year
U55/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
Secondary	
41
l
I
30
l     ■
|
|
i
|
Totals—
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
34
46
 N 12o PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
VIII. Teacher-exchange apphcations proceed through this office. The numbers of apphcations from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange
positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as shown:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
,958/59
1959/60
1960/61
,961/62
,962/63
,963/64
asast
!
1
1
1
.
28
|
1
22
Totals-
29
31
25
29
28
30
25
23
23
DC. Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certification or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces
or countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do
not arrive. General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in
the thousands. In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers
for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning of
specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Since 1958 an individual teacher-docket system has been possible, leading to
significant improvement in correspondence handling. There is some difficulty in
keeping up with significant annual correspondence volume increase.
Division of Examinations
I. There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
University Programme (Grade XI-XH) and for the June and August Grade XIII
examinations. Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible
for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of records.   The following tables give significant data:—
Number of Markers
1953/54
1954/55  1955/56 1956/57   1957/58
.958/59
1959/60|l960/6.
1961/62
1962/63
,963/64
AnguSZZ
|.
22o|        234
2:?
l
290
301         343
|
s
5!6
A_w«taita
S88.400
$90.00o| $96,00o|$„3,000
S,2_,000$153.(-_
S,68Js,79 00O
1
52,2,50OS210,000|J251,50O
Number of Candidates (June)
_!Sz
|
|
l
.0.924
,3.0,4
14J33
ll
-£%£
20,03
Toll
25,793
Totals—
9,360
10.812J    11,183|    12,489
14.8„|    17,137
23,700
26,455
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS        N 121
Number Completed in June
1953/54
1954/55
,955/56
,956/57
1957/5
1958/59
1959/60
,960/61
,96,/62
,962/63
,963/64
in
2,594
3,139
3,60
3.433
4.025
4,215
4.720
5.65,
5,779
6,827
7.840
Totals-.
2,898
3,538
3,570
3,816
4,366
4,679
5,307
6,271
6,438
7,667
8,649
Papers Marked in June
1__5_2._
	
20,311    21,042    24,024
29.765
36,36
Hi   46,227
49,318    54,488    62,654
Totals-.
23,280|   25.980|   27.070J   29.67,
36,153
44,291
51,714|   58,201
63.130J   70.137J   78,649
Marked in August
[
d SJ'
9,236
P.
Totals_
4.663
4,914
5,185
5,789
7,031
8,571j   10,800
11,725
10,761|      1,943
2,018
Number of Candidates (August)
Year
1958/59   |   1959/60   |   1960/61    |  1961/62   j   1962/63
1963/64
University Entrance	
i.!2
ill
6,245
5,878     |     ___
___
Tnt.l,
—7,782-
mMmBm
—.'.a—
Number Completed
n Augus
TTn.v
ersityEntranc
m
161
—I-
m
j
884
189     j        219
Total University Entrance and Grade XIII papers for June and August,
1953/54 to 1963/64, were as follows: 1953/54, 27,943; 1954/55, 30,894;
1955/56, 32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862;
1959/60, 62,514; 1960/61, 69,926; 1961/62, 73,891; 1962/63, 72,080; (with
University Entrance August examinations discontinued);   1963/64, 80,667.
II. For 1963/64, examinations were prepared for June in 21 University
Programme subjects and for June and August in 19 Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1964, 186 regular and 10 special examination centres were established in the
Province and 45 outside British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being
in Germany, Thailand, and Taiwan.
HI. There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for
evaluations of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia
secondary schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete
requirements, as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter
 N 122                               PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
similar professional courses.   A very large number of persons has sought evalu-   I
ations and permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students.
These numbers are increasing rapidly every year with expansion in the number of   I
areas offering academic courses through night schools.
IV. Scholarship Awards, 1964.—For many years the Department of Education
announced, on behalf of the University of British Columbia, the names of winners
of the 15 General Proficiency Scholarships for University Entrance awarded jointly
by the University and Chris Spencer Foundation. It also announced the winners
of the six Royal Institution Scholarships for Grade XHI. In 1964 and following
years such announcements are made by the University of British Columbia.
The top-ranking scholarship candidates for 1963/64 on Departmental exami-
nations appear below in academic order:—
|
Percent         1
^^nJZTJ:fr^ Govern,,    ^^^^
ll
aMI_^^= iSs^^==
l£2SS__z__zzzzz
l55JSen">rsecond"y
_S-5£Snu>,?S_isburg
_CS_?a %____*
StB3*I^L          — hS«iL^
Tetsuolnouye Z__                              ~~~   V?nop,s«<'°d"y	
r_|li^^E_____E
VWor<tesS,_dMCOndary	
iitirBaH___zzzz
BK=
£aSS__s_zzz	
W_tv_tcSduv2; Senior Secondary.	
Bradley Clarence Richardson	
M___ vraSZ tate Secondary ZZ
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Name
School
Percent
GraJeXlU-C
ontinued
■*_££££_..
Gordon Allan Filek	
ry	
85.300
John Wilfred Scott
Kamloops Seconda
?dary	
85.000
__ibIrnfrasr_fct°S_
"i61™"*Centre—
1
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to secondary-school graduates, Grade XIII
students, and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College.
To qualify to receive an award in 1964, candidates must be domiciled in the Province, are required to apply, and must undertake a full-year winter-session undergraduate programme at the University of British Columbia or University of Victoria
or in Grade XHI in public secondary schools of the Province, or approved full-year
winter-session undergraduate programme at the Notre Dame University of Nelson.
Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final examinations of Grade XII or
Grade XIII or of the Universities of British Columbia or Victoria or Notre Dame.
There are two awards—first class, for all students who obtain an average of 80 per
cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class, available for up
to 2,500 top-ranking students with high second-class standing. The second-class
awards are divided among GradeXII (University Programme), Grade XIII, Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Notre Dame undergraduate students, and among
the various faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class
awards amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate study,
and second-class awards similarity to one-third the tuition fee. An average of at
least 70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for
a second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and
faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and has
continued similarly annually with an increase in 1963 from 2,000 to 2,500 for
second-class awards and with broader provision made this year for awards for study
to be taken at Notre Dame University.
Candidates writing University Programme or Grade XTTT examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, and university students through their respective Universities. All application are then considered by the Scholarship Selection
Committee, representative of the Universities of British Columbia and of Victoria,
and the Department of Education, chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all
candidates is made from the Registrar's office, with cheques issued through the
Departmental Comptroller.
 N 124                               PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based     1
on applications received:—
B^tion
Original Applications
Final AWards
K.S
BO**.
s
■S3.
jj§
ss
sasd
Amount
1O«/f0
ts
s
1
1:§
l
i
1
Hi
UNIVERSITY PROGRAMME EXAMINATIONS
1958/59
1959/60
1960/6.
1961/621,962/63
1961/62 j 1962/63
1963/64
First class (80 to 100 per cent)
s?
Z
l
l
»
HI
Total applicants
876
1,93
1,373   |   1,287
1,414
1,563          j
GRADE XIII EXAMINATIONS
First class (80 to 100  ercent)
104   1      g
m
3U
173
Bt
230    |       340
473
529
485
537
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools con-
cerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates were provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
In 1964, using I.B.M. tabulations, listed were distributed showing all scholarship
candidates in the school district, arranged by schools.   Successful candidates were
arranged in academic rank and non-successful candidates alphabetically.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Govern-    1
ment, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake    1
further training.   An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of    1
financial need.    Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $100 to $150.   These awards may be made available to    1
those undertaking undergraduate university studies within the Province (Universities    1
of British Columbia, Victoria, and Notre Dame), recognized nurse's training in the   1
Province, and for recognized university study outside British Columbia in under-
graduate courses of training not available in this Province; for example, veterinary
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the universities and chaired by the Registrar,
determine awards.   Notification to all candidates is made from this office, with
cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.   .
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline.   A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS        N 1
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
g|
Eligihie
Nu.rn.er
Amount
tow
||
l
H
$82 650
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance. By
amendment to the British Columbia University Act, authority was given for establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to $2,000,000. A joint committee,
composed of two representatives of the University and two representatives of the
Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the Departmental Comptroller), authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides loans.
Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at the University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, the Vancouver School of Art, or
recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such training is not available in British Columbia.   Loan awards have been as follows:—
1959/60 .  843 $397,570
1960/61   842 435,130
1961/62                                ■ 875 475,186
1962/63  694 389,378
1963/64  844 457,239
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for
proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp
at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets
attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district superintendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by
the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60
six on 1960/61, five on 1961/62, five on 1962/63, and five on 1963/64.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education.   The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Com-
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
representative on the Executive
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for
Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates
authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates
issued were as follows: 1955, 57; 1956, 62; 1957, 16; 1958, 18; 1959, 10;
1960, 17; 1961, 10; 1962, 40; 1963, 7.
 EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT N 127
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
TO THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1963/64 a total of 389 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, 53 were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes. Three
hundred and thirty-six applications were approved for grants, an increase of 93
over the previous year.
Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 89; Grade X, 87;
Grade XI, 98; Grade XII, 56; Occupational II and III, 6. During the year 15
students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $80 for the year; the
balance received $70.
    STATISTICAL RETURNS
ro_F
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 UBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1963/64
»■?
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0        |B0
 EXAMINATION PAPERS
Separate booklets of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, including complete sets of papers for each year, may be
obtained from the Director, Textbook Branch, Parliament B
uildings, Victoria,
B.C.
Prices for booklets that are STILL AVAILABLE are
as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952.
Price, 74 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1960.
Price, 74 cents
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1961.
Price, 74 cents
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1962.
Price, 74 cents
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1963.
Price, 37 cents
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1964.
Price, 37 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952.
Price, 53 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953.
Price, 53 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1960.
Price, 53 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1961.
Price, 53 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1962.
Price, 53 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1963.
Price, 32 cents
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1964.
Price, 32 cents
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