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REPORT of the FOREST SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1964 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1965

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
I Hon. R. G. W-UUSTON, Minister R. G. McKee, Deputy Minister of Forests
F. S. McKlNNON, Chief Forester
REPORT
of the
FOREST SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1964
.§§$
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1965
  Victoria, B.C., February, 1964.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
VlAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
■Kerewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Forest Service
)f the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the calendar year
1964.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—There is submitted herewith the Annual Report on activities of the Foresl I
Service during the calendar year 1964.
R. G. McKEE,':;
Deputy Minister of Forests.U
 The Assistant Ranger station at Mile 73 on the Parsnip Forest Development Road,
established in 1964 for administration and fire protection in the area.
  CONTENTS
Page
1. Chief Forester's Report  11
2. Forest Surveys and Inventory Division  13
Field Programme  13
Forest Classification and Sampling  13
Growth Studies _^ .  13
Loss-factor Studies . 14
Special Field Projects __  14
Operations _ ,  14
Office Programme  14
Forest Mapping 14
Area and Volume Summaries  15
Mensuration Studies . _._ 15
3. Forest Research Division __ , 16
Experiment Station  16
Data-processing  16
Field Programme :  16
Tree Breeding and Genetics 16
Land Classification  17
Seeding and Planting __ 17
Spacing and Thinning 17
\. Reforestation Division_-..____  18
Forest Nurseries  18
Forest Tree Seed  19
Reconnaissance and Survey Work  20
Planting :  20
Permanent Improvements  21
Co-operation  21
Interdepartmental Rehabilitation and Forestry Programme  21
Working Plans Division  .. 23
Pulpwood Harvesting Areas  24
Other PubUc Sustained-yield Units.— - 24
Tree-farm licences  24
Certified Tree-farms  - 24
Farm Wood-lot Licen.es.___iS3         - 24
7
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1
Paob
6. Public Information and Education Division  25B
Communications Media !    2S
Press and Periodicals  2m
Publications and Printing '. _.  25
Radio, Television, and Theatre ,*__  26
Signs, Posters, and Exhibits '  26
Photography  27
Still and Motion-picture Production  27
Film Library .  28
School Lecture Programme  28
Library  28
7. Forest Management Division  29
Peace River Flood Basin 29
Columbia Flood Basin . 29
Wind-throw__ . 30
Spruce Bark Beetle 30
Market Prices and Stumpage Trends 3 J
Stumpage Prices — 31
Silviculture-  31
Scaling 33
8. Grazing Division : 34
General Conditions 34
Range 34
Hay       3f
Markets and Prices ' 34
Range Management 34
Range Improvements   33
Peace River Pastures  36
Co-operation 37
Administration 37
Grazing Permits   : 38
Hay Permits 38
Grazing Fees 38
Control and Enforcement    38
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 9
Page
9. Engineering Services Division _____  39
Engineering Section _U—  39
Development Engineering  3 9
Road Location .  39
Road Construction and Maintenance  39
Peace River Pondage Waterway Improvement Project 40
General Engineering  41
Mechanical Section  41
Building Construction and Design  42
Forest Service Maintenance Depot  42
Marine Work . 42
Prefabrication and Carpentry Shop  43
Machine-shop . 43
Transport Pool and Warehouse  43
Engineering Maintenance-shop  43
Radio Section  44
10. Forest Protection Division  46
Weather '  46
Fires 46
Occurrence and Causes -«—— 46
Cost of Fire-fighting  46
Damage 46
Protection Planning and Research  47
Fire Statistics  47
Protection Research ,  47
Visibility Mapping and Lookout Photography  48
Fuel-moisture Indicator Sticks  48
Insect Control 48
Fire-weather Records and Investigation  48
Fire-suppression Crews 49
Aircraft  49
Roads and Trails 49
Slash Disposal and Snag-falling  50
Fire-law Enforcement 50
 10 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Page
11. Forest Service Training-school . 5M
Extra Courses and Functions 52
Acknowledgments .—i 52
12. Accounting Division          53
Fiscal 53
Administration  53
13. Personnel Division 55
Communications and Training . 55
Establishment, Recruitment, and Staff Turnover         56
Classification, Salaries, and Working Conditions 56
14. Personnel Directory, 1964  58
15. Appendix—Tabulated Detailed Statements to Supplement the Report of  j
the Forest Service— £_. 63
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
CHIEF FORESTER'S REPORT
Implementation of the firmly established policy of full wood utilization was
Ee chief concern of the British Columbia Forest Service in 1964. The success of
Kir endeavours was manifested in the fact that adequate wood supplies were made
Mailable for six new pulp-mills stretching roughly along a line from Prince Rupert
m the Rocky Mountain Trench without impairing the perpetual sawlog yield.
This miracle—for miracle it was in terms of the wood that was once left to
waste in the forests—came about because of increased use of barkers and chippers,
the creation of two more pulpwood harvesting areas, and the establishment of a
new type of timber sale based on close utilization down to a 7-inch top in areas
where pulpable material too small for sawlogs is in preponderance. The new pulp-
wood tenures are described elsewhere in this Report. It is only necessary to mention
here that these accomplishments and others on which we were making progress as
the year ended are very largely responsible for the so-called explosion which is
making the pulp and paper industry so important to the burgeoning economy of this
Kovince. Among the others referred to are the fact that last year re-logging, an
Operation still in its infancy, produced 4.3 million cubic feet of wood in the Vancouver Forest District alone; that studies proved that if a typical Coast hemlock-cedar
sjand is logged to a 1-foot stump and a 4-inch top instead of a 2-foot stump and a
ffi.-inch top as is generally the case now, the wood harvested would increase by
60 per cent; and that by using poor-site Coast trees down to a 9-inch d.b.h. instead
of the present 13, scale volumes would be increased by 5 per cent. These auger
well for the future.
I The timber rights required for the six authorized pulp-mills were granted after
Series of six public hearings held by the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources. These placed a considerable additional burden on the Working Plans Division of the Forest Service, which in each case had to use basic data
available to check the feasibility of the proposed plans, advertise the hearings,
acknowledge and summarize all briefs and letters, and prepare key and display maps.
After the hearings the Division played a valuable part in the difficult task of formulating recommendations to the Minister—difficult because there is not always enough
Wood to go around.
[ The actual 1964 scale again surpassed that of any previous year, reaching a
total of 1,514,595,176 cubic feet, and again there was a slight increase, to 45.3 per
cpnt, in the proportion of the total that was harvested in the Interior of the Province.
The total was an increase of 2.8 per cent over that for 1963. The value of all
forestry production rose some 6 per cent to $900,000,000, a figure that reflects the
strong demand for raw material.
I This demand is illustrated by the drop in the volume of logs exported, to 52.9
million board-feet, and by log and stumpage prices. Using No. 3 grade hemlock
logs as an index, the average price quoted in the last quarter of 1963 was $48 per
thousand board-feet, which compares with an average of $60 for the last quarter
sf 1964. The average stumpage price bid for Crown timber increased over the
pear by 22 per cent, to $4.09 per 100 cubic feet, and there were some 8,700 upward
adjustments to the rates payable under existing timber-sale contracts.
 12 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In 1964 the Forest Act was again amended. Section 17 of the Act was alterecl
to impose a bidding fee, and this had a measurable effect in reducing excessive competition and nuisance bids. Seventeen sales were disallowed under authority of the
new legislation. Under the same section, provision was made for the carrying-out
of silvicultural treatment under the terms of timber-sale contracts, with payment
provided for by an offset against stumpage.
Section 118 of the Act was amended to require persons establishing a wood!
conversion plant on private as well as on Crown land to obtain a permit, one of the
terms of which provides for adequate fireproofing of the area. Section 132 was
amended to allow the outstanding forest-protection tax to be added to the Provincial
Collector's taxation rolls. Other changes were made in the Forest Act to facilitaff
administration.
All divisions of the Forest Service accomplished important, if not alwa_|
spectacular, forward strides.   The year saw 14,293,100 seedlings planted in the
ever-growing reforestation programme.   There is still a need for increased nursery
capacity and, with it, a great deal of site preparation to make unplanted areas
plantable.
The fire season was benign, and the costs of suppression were only $121,64.?
just 7.6 per cent of the 10-year average. Encouraging progress was made with a
device called—temporarily, it is to be hoped—sferics, used for lightning detection
It is still experimental, but there is some reason to believe that in future years it will
help to reduce the loss through fires caused by this greatest of all arsonists.
In conclusion I would like to express my thanks to those members of the Forest
Service whose ability, hard work, and devotion made 1964 another year of
memorable achievement.
F. S. McKinnon,
Chief Forester.   '
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 13
FOREST SURVEYS AND INVENTORY DIVISION
During 1964 the Forest Surveys and Inventory Division continued the programme of intensive unit surveys in public sustained-yield units. Between 1958 and
1963, field work was completed in 48 managed units, and maps and reports have
been published for this work. Maintenance surveys were carried out in 25 of these
units, with an area of approximately 21,000,000 acres, and unit surveys in the
(remaining 23, encompassing an area of approximately 23,000,000 acres.   In 1963
l£unit survey was also conducted in the Prince George Special Sale Area comprising
approximately 1,400,000 acres.   Maps and the report have been completed.
P  Financial assistance for the inventory programme was again received from the
I Federal Government through the agreement for forest inventory implemented under
the Department of Forestry Act.
| Growth, loss-factor, and volume studies continued, as did investigation of the
application of 70-mm. helicopter photography to forest sampling. In addition to
continuation of these programmes, a regeneration survey was undertaken and further
lauising was done for the Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance.
FIELD PROGRAMME
Forest Classification and Sampling
[ Forest inventories were completed for five public sustained-yield units in 1964
—the Soo, Okanagan, Cranbrook, Blueberry, and Burns Lake. Inventories were
also completed for two large sections of the southern half of the Hecate. This programme added approximately 12,700,000 acres to the area covered by unit
inventory surveys.
Growth Studies
I A continued growth-study programme in 1964 resulted in the establishment
I of 97 permanent growth plots in three Interior public sustained-yield units, dis-
Itabuted as follows: Salmon Arm, 20; Shuswap, 29; and Spallumcheen, 48. By
Iffflest types, 50 were located in Douglas fir-larch, 41 in pure Douglas fir, and 6
in Douglas fir-birch. Conditions sampled were as follows: Ages from 41 to 120
I pears, sites ranging from good to poor with the majority in the good and medium
:lass, and elevations from 1,100 to 3,500 feet.
E Other field work included the final remeasurement of two experimental plots,
sach of 1 acre size, in the Fernie and Okanagan Public Sustained-yield Units.
I Following the publication in 1960 of Forest Survey Note No. 6, there has been
in increasing demand for growth and yield information on a net-less-decay basis,
ind a growing emphasis on the importance of site in relation to productive capacity.
iWth some 10,000 additional inventory samples available, it is now possible to draw
'olume-over-age curves by site class for major growth types in the seven Provincial
»nes and in public sustained-yield units which have been adequately sampled.
I During the year the growth section has produced volume-over-age curves for
ill zones, based on sampling from the years 1953 to 1963, and for 30 of a possible
i7 Crown units for which enough sample information is currently available. For
-bast units and zones, curves are drawn at 9.1 inches plus and 13.1 inches plus
:(g.h., while for Interior units and zones they are drawn at 7.1 inches plus and
.1.1 inches plus d.b.h. Volumes are net for decay only, and based on a close
I itilization. Curves for the two diameter limits, Coast and Interior, are drawn on
me graph from which prints may be obtained, and age of culmination of mean
nnual increment is indicated (tangent method).   Since mean annual increment may
 14 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
be obtained at any age by simply dividing volume by age, the curves are actually
site-class yield tables in graphical form.
Loss-factor Studies
The loss-factor programme continued for the purpose of providing more
accurate loss factors for application to inventory field data. The second successive
summer of decay studies in the Soo Public Sustained-yield Unit saw this Division
fall and measure 1,903 trees on 58 sample plots, a total for the two-year programme
of 2,787 trees on 90 sample plots.
In conjunction with 70-mm. low-elevation photography research, seven photo
plots were felled and measured for volume and decay in the Okanagan PuBfic
Sustained-yield Unit.
Special Field Projects
At the request of the Department of Finance, 3,200 acres of privately held
forest properties in the vicinity of Squamish were cruised for the purpose of regl-
property assessment.
In conjunction with the Cranbrook forest inventory project, a regeneration
survey of 80,000 acres of logged and burned areas was completed to ascertain the
progress of natural restocking on yellow pine-fir association sites in the Rocky
Mountain Trench and in adjacent spruce-balsam associations at higher elevations.
A report is being prepared for the Reforestation Division.
An investigation into the application of 70-mm. helicopter photography to
forest sampling continued in 1964. Twenty-three multi-plot samples were established in the Okanagan Public Sustained-yield Unit. Following ground measure
ment the samples were photographed from approximately 200 feet, and seven of
these samples were felled and measured for volume and decay. An analysis of ^JJ4
tree heights measured on the ground, standing and on the photographs, indicjffes
that tree heights measured on the photographs are more reliable than conventional
ground height measurements of standing trees. Further analysis is being carriedput
to develop photo volume tables for six species and to determine the reliabihtv|pf
predicting tree diameters from the photo measurements.
Operations
In addition to the continuously employed field staff, some 80 student assistants
and other seasonal field staff were employed.
Helicopters again proved to be an invaluable aid in obtaining forest classification information and in transporting sampling and loss-factor crews to remote areas
Through their use, the intensity of information collected for inaccessible areas can
be greatly improved with little increase in field staff. Despite generally poor flyins
conditions, schedules were maintained for a Bell G3-B and a Bell G2, which wen
chartered for three months and flew a total of 725 hours. In addition, 150 hour.1
were expended on other local charters.
Both Division launches, the " B.C. Forester " and the " Forest Surveyor," wen
used on the Hecate project. Once more the 60-foot barge " L.C. 6," towed by th<
" Forest Surveyor," proved very successful as a floating helicopter base on remoti
coastal inlets.
OFFICE PROGRAMME
Forest Mapping
Map production in 1964 resulted in the completion of 567 interim base maplr
covering over 12,000,000 acres, of which 88 per cent were at 20-chains-to-l-ir-clj-
_____
  138e
136'
58°
56'
0Watson
lp  Lake
0 f*0      -^Port
Dundasl.f/ 0|_SljnpJOn
54e
52°
50'
I26c
124°
122c
l__u
112°
110c
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
FOREST  SURVEYS
AND INVENTORY DIVISION
MAINTENANCE SURVEYS 1958-1960   H
1. Babine
2. Barkley
3. Big Valley
4. Bowron
5. Cape Scott
6. Carp
7. Cottonwood
8. Creston
9. Crooked
10. Kyuquot
11. Lac la Hache
12. Longworth
13. Morice
14. Naver
15. Niskonlith
16. Purden
17. Quesnel Lake
18. Redonda
19. Robson
20. Sayward
21. Sechelt
22. Spallumcheen
23. Stuart
24. Williams Lake
25. Willow River
AVAILABLE INFORMATION
(a) Maps--majority at 1/4 mile to 1 inch;
balance at 1/2 mile to 1 inch.
(b) Statements--area statement for each map.
(c) Reports--for each P.S.Y.U. , a
maintenance survey report.
UNIT SURVEYS
(1961+)
1961-6., fieldwork)
13. Salmon Arm
14. Seymour
15. Shuswap
16. Smithers
17. Special Sale Area
18. Stum
19. Terrace (now in Skeena)
20. Texada
21. Westlake
22. Windermere
23. Yale
(a) Maps--all at l/4   mile to 1 inch except Dean,  Block 1.
(b) Statements--area and volume statement for each map.
(c) Reports--for each P.S.Y.U. , a unit survey report.
1
PRINC
RUPERT
av Po.%.
Charlotte
[Louise I.
jKunghit I.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
HONOURABLE R. G. WILLISTON, MINISTER
Scale
40    30    20     10     0 40 80 1?0
L2C
160 MILES
PROGRESS OF FOREST-COVER MAPPING
BASED ON MAINTENANCE SURVEYS AND UNIT SURVEYS
OF AREAS UNDER PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
as at 31 DECEMBER  1964
136c
I34c
132°
58<
56c
54°
52c
Caamano
.   Sound
Aristd-.abar
50c
Cape Scott
Po
Qugtsino
Quatsino _Si^-B-—__
CapeCook
Cape Flattery*.
(Port Renfrew _
vicjroRi
48°
I30c
128c
lPORT^NGELES^k      ^    )\gi&
126c
124°
122°
120°
1 l_c
  REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 15
scale.  In addition, 542 final forest-cover maps, based on the 1963 field work, were
completed.   Mapping of all the 1964 field projects is in progress, and maps and
HJports should be available by the fall of 1965.
, In response to requests received from various public and private agencies,
18,200 maps, 260 survey reports, 700 volume-over-age curves, and over 2,000
sample volume statements were distributed during 1964.
Area and Volume Summaries
', Nine unit survey reports were issued for those areas completely surveyed
the previous year. They included the Chilliwack, Dean (Block 1), Fernie, Harrison,
Kettle, Stum, Terrace, and Shuswap Public Sustained-yield Units, plus the Prince
George Special Sale Area.
|* Planimetry of unit survey maps exceeded 10,000,000 acres. In addition,
542 map-area and map-volume statements were printed, completing the inventory
figures for the above survey reports. Work is now in progress on the 1964 project
areas.
r There was a marked increase in the demand for detailed inventory summaries
in 1964. Twenty-nine were completed for Forest Service management planning
and access-road development purposes, and 70 were completed for the Lands
Service which involved applications to lease or to purchase within the special sale
area. These requests accounted for a total area of 33,000,000 acres and a net
timber volume of 37,000.000,000 cubic feet. Further to this, more than 30 pulp
investigations, involving much of the timbered area of the Province, were completed
by consulting and company foresters using the information available from the
Division.
r All of the 1,986 Provincial samples established during the 1964 field season
have been compiled on the basis of the 1962 Standard Cubic Foot Volume Tables.
The Provincial total, 1953 to 1964, inclusive, stands at 28,229, exclusive of permanent growth plots, and prints of any compiled sample statement in cubic feet
per acre are available upon request.
\ In addition to these sample statements, 70 per cent have now been presented
separately on a stand-table basis in a new compressed format which includes the
following: Tree species, d.b.h. in tenths of inches, compilation height in feet, tree
class by pathological condition, and quality class. Also included are sample-per-
acre factors, the basal area per acre, average diameter, and number of stems per
acre at several diameter limits. Copies of this information, by sample, are available
upon request.
^Increased use was made of the I.B.M. 1620 electronic computer and the 1401
data-processing card system.
Mensuration Studies
Mensuration studies continued and, though most of these are continuing projects, results of some are being applied. It is hoped that funds will be available to
carry out field checks during 1965, to determine efficiency of various sample designs.
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FOREST RESEARCH DIVISION
Details of the research programme for 1964 will appear in the annual Forest
Research Review, compiled at the end of the fiscal year.
EXPERIMENT STATION
The development of a research nursery and related facilities at the Cowichatl
Lake Experiment Station are proceeding satisfactorily. The site was improved by
the installation of sub-surface drains, a pump and mains to supply water for irrigaJ
tion, and by construction of cold-frames for seed-beds and completion of a soil!
storage shed. A transplant area was stoned and top-dressed with suitable soill
An additional 40 acres of forest are being cleared for use in progeny testing and
clone banks. These improvements will greatly enhance the usefulness of tha
experiment station for tree-breeding work and for a variety of research on nurserg
soil-fertility problems.
DATA-PROCESSING
A data-processing study was completed for the Vancouver Forest District
leading to a decision to install an I.B.M. 1440 system for scale-computing and
billing tasks.
Five general computer programmes were developed, and several I.B.M. library
programmes were adapted dealing with basic computations and tests commonly!
met in simple experimental designs. These programmes were used in over 400
individual analyses of 11 projects.
FIELD PROGRAMME
Tree Breeding and Genetics
In the spring, scion material from all Douglas fir plus trees selected in 196s
was collected and grafted into Forest Service clone banks. The search for phS
trees was continued throughout the summer, mainly on the Coastal Mainland.
Thirty-six trees were registered. The sixth Plus Tree Week, organized as a cooperative effort with the forest industry, took place in the Mission area with 30
foresters taking part. Sixteen trees were registered. Cruising by individual cooperating companies continued to provide additional trees for registration.
The first intra-specific crosses of Douglas fir were made in 1963. These were.'
continued in 1964 on a larger scale, the pollen parents being selected from the
Interior of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California.
The Douglas fir provenance study was delayed by an inadequate seed crop,
although some seed was collected from the Pemberton area on the Mainland and on
Southern Vancouver Island.
In connection with Literior spruce provenance studies, the immediate objective
was to provide data which will allow the breakdown of the complex spruce population into broad categories homogeneous for certain characteristics and thus provicS
a basis for more intensive provenance research. The ultimate objective is to delimit
the pattern of variation in spruce so that criteria will be provided for the establisHS
ment of seed transfer rules and the initiation of a programme of selection and
breeding. To this end, a mass collection of foliage and cones was made through?
out the range of white and Engetmann spruce for morphological study. Also,
studies of germination and growth of numerous spruce-seed lots were made in
______
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 17
■ffiorest Service nurseries and in a growth chamber in co-operation with the Faculty
__ffi Forestry. University of British Columbia.
Land Classification
In co-operation with Provincial and Federal Soil Survey and Forest Research
Evisions of the Departments of Agriculture and Forestry and the University of
jflfritish Columbia, studies on land classification are continuing, based upon the soil,
landform, and vegetation.   Projects were carried out in the Southern Interior and
the Prince George region.
Seeding and Planting
In a study to establish realistic culling standards for nursery use, it was found
that spindly seedlings (diameter less than 2.5 mm.) and those with weak multiple
tops did not survive well, but those with sUghtly damaged root systems or with
forked tops survived and grew as well as the control. This was confirmed in another
study on the effect of seedling density in nursery beds in which spindly seedlings
fesulting from dense sowing failed to survive transplanting as well as those grown
at lower density.
The results from direct-seeding studies in the Kamloops District were very
encouraging, though much of the success this year may be attributed to favourable
qjimatic conditions. Although spot seeding produced similar results to last year,
broadcast seeding was greatly improved. Further trials were conducted in the
mixed wet-belt type this year and will be assessed in 1965.
f The unusually cool summer was also favourable to survival of seeding and
planting experiments in the Nelson District. Trials to determine the optimum
season for spot seeding were continued at Trout Lake, Zincton, and Cedar Creek.
With the exception of white pine, spring sowings gave better germination and first-
season survival than fall sowings. Douglas fir sown late in July was particularly
successful, with as many as 92 per cent seed spots stocked. Germination and
survival of spot-sown Douglas fir under birch and aspen on an old burn at Zincton
was good and confirmed results of a 1962 seeding under similar conditions at
Mars Creek.
Spacing and Thinning
| A new project was initiated in the Prince Rupert District, concerned with
cleaning treatments (spacing) in overstocked juvenile stands of lodgepole pine.
The objective is to determine if the stagnation of potential crop trees can be
avoided, and any related effects of different spacing regimes on the growth habit
of selected trees. It is hoped this study may lead to practical techniques for producing merchantable crops from such overstocked stands.
I For details of research projects active in 1963, and of publications and unpublished reports, see Tables Nos. 11 and 12 in the Appendix.
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
REFORESTATION DIVISION
FOREST NURSERIES
Cool, cloudy weather similar to that enjoyed for the past few years favoured
growth in all nurseries. Although late spring frosts caused minor losses in most
nurseries, generally dull skies with near-normal precipitation later in the season
enabled trees to overcome this setback. Growing stock at Duncan, however, was
damaged severely, and inventories there are much lower than expected. The dull
weather also favoured crops of weeds, and weeding costs at most locations were
higher than in the previous year. A series of December storms brought a heavy
snowfall to the Coastal area, and this cover should provide a measure of protection
against over-wintering losses.
A new record of 4,448 seed-beds was sown in the spring. Germination wa|
generally good and initial growth has been satisfactory. Sowings carried out on
new ground at both Duncan and Green Timbers germinated well, but the first
year's growth at Duncan has been patchy and uneven. This condition is probably
due largely to previous cultural practices on this area. Soil analysis prior to sowing
indicated that the phosphorus level was adequate, and a routine fertilizer application was made to supply the approximate amount that the seedling crop would
remove. However, through the co-operation of the Research Branch of the Federal
Department of Forestry and the Experimental Farm at Saanichton, it has been fairly
well established by tissue analysis and a new technique of soil phosphorus determination that the deficiency of this element could have caused the poor growth.
While this condition can be corrected in the coming growing season, the need fcjf
further research to select soil analysis methods more closely correlated with the
nutrient requirements of forest tree seedlings is indicated. Although inclement
weather prevented a full schedule of autumn sowing, nurserymen managed to sow
a total of 659 beds.
Continued expansion of co-operative nurseries and favourable weather enabled
the transplanting programme to reach a new high of 2,083,000 trees. The existing
area at the Brannan Lake Boys' School was doubled, and an additional 4.5 acres at
Snowdon Camp, near Campbell River, was developed to receive transplant trees
next year. At Haney Correctional Institution, improvement of the original area
is now complete and further development is planned at another site. A transplant
nursery has also been approved for the Rayleigh Gaol near Kamloops.
Forest Service nurseries are likewise being developed to keep pace with the
growing demand for planting stock. Twenty acres of new ground were brought
into production at Duncan and Green Timbers, and final ground improvements
have now been completed at Telkwa. During recent years more attention has been
paid to the maintenance of soil structure and fertility at all nurseries. This year the
organic content of the fallow ground at the main Duncan Nursery was improved with i
the addition of 750 cubic yards of bog peat, and peat will also be applied to remaining areas when current tree crops are removed. At the Cranbrook Nursery, 10C
cubic yards of alfalfa compost were prepared for application to the soil next year.
This soil-improvement programme, combined with better irrigation and increased
mechanization, has resulted in higher production per acre of better-quality planting
stock.
Distribution of stock for field planting this year totalled 14,370,000 trees
slightly above the previous record estabUshed in 1963 (see Table No. 21 in the
Appendix).
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE; 1964
19
Douglas fir nursery beds at Green Timbers.
FOREST TREE SEED
t A fairly extensive flower crop appeared at lower elevations throughout the
Province in the spring, but the potential cone crop was destroyed by unusually late
spring frosts and heavy insect infestations. Consequently, at lower elevations, the
leed crop was sporadicaUy light to medium and crops at higher elevations were
legligible.
f Forest Service coUections for the Province consisted of 89 seed-lots, amounting
o 2,318 bushels of cones, of which more than half (1,258 bushels) came from the
kelson Forest District. Collections from Prince George and Kamloops Forest
SEtricts totalled 1,060 bushels. No collections were made in the Prince Rupert
-orest District.
1 The extraction of seed from the cones collected in 1963 (655 bushels) was
->mpleted early in the year and yielded 66.307 kilograms of seed, mainly lodgepole
line from the Prince George Forest District. Extraction of the 1964 collections
s presently under way.
■ At the Duncan Seed Centre, 127 germination tests were carried out and some
tarkilograms of seed prepared for sowing a total of 5,647 seed-beds at the various
Keries. Co-operative seed exchanges involved the handUng of 192 seed-lots for
Bgquests. The present stock of Forest Service and company seed on hand is
,346.6 kilograms, of which 70 per cent is Coast Douglas fir. There is, however,
^Etical shortage of high-elevation fir seed for the Mainland.
Co-operation with the Research Division continued on Project E.P. 623, an
lvestigation of growth behaviour of 40 white spruce provenances.
■Coast seed production areas produced 175 bushels of cones from 18 acres
allowing nitrogen fertilization in 1963.   This was the third crop stimulated by the
 20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1
appUcation of fertiUzer. On one experimental area, fertilized plots produced
exceptionaUy higher yields than did control plots. The reason for this unusual
response is not yet understood.
For the first time, pollen was artificiaUy appUed to a seed-production area by
means of a mist-blower.   The results of this trial are now being analysed.
There are now nine seed production areas (aU Douglas fir) in the Vancouva
Forest District and 14 in the Interior (nine spruce, four fir, one larch). These areas
total 77.6 acres. Fertilization of the Interior plots failed to bring on substantia
cone crops, but 56 bushels were collected from two of the production areas in the
Kamloops Forest District.
At the CampbeU River seed orchard, 855 grafts were made in co-operaticffl
with the Research Division. There are now 1,272 estabUshed ramets in the seed
orchard. The goal is 3,372. Survival of grafts has been very good, and current
growth on grafts made last year varies from 20 to 40 inches. This vigorous growth
is resulting in Uttle vegetative area being created for cone production, and various
trimming and pruning techniques are being tried on a limited scale to keep this
growth under control. To improve drainage in the orchard, some 2,500 feet of
drain-tile was laid.
A 4-acre holding area for scion material (a clone bank) was developed at tffi
new Duncan nursery, and 350 rootstock trees are now ready to receive grafts next
year.
RECONNAISSANCE AND SURVEY WORK
In conjunction with the Surveys and Inventory Division regular inventory of
the Cranbrook PubUc Sustained-yield Unit, supplementary surveys were carried
out to determine the progress of natural regeneration during the past 10 years on
areas denuded during the 1930's. Special studies were also made on the large
areas burned in 1960.
On the Coast, Reforestation Division survey crews examined 70,457 acres in
the Sechelt (begun in 1961) and Redonda PubUc Sustained-yield Units and the
Southgate River drainage. Of this, 54,045 acres were found to be fully restocked
or likely to restock, 2,065 acres are inaccessible and of low site, and 2,336 acres
have been previously planted. It is important to note that of the 12,011 acres
remaining, 8,147 acres (about 68 per cent) will require some form of site preparation before planting is possible.   A total of 3,864 acres is presently plantable.
PLANTING
The Province again had a cool, cloudy summer, which had a favourable
influence in newly estabUshed plantations. Late spring storms on the Coast brought
snow to higher elevations and delayed planting in some areas. However, the cool
moist weather which persisted until early summer enabled aU projects to be completed weU before drier weather arrived. In the Interior, spring planting commenced
two weeks later than last year. The faU planting season was shortened by early
snow in some locations.
Of particular interest are the spacing trials which were established in the
ChiUiwack VaUey and the Sayward Forest with the co-operation of the Research
Division and the Department of the Attorney-General. These plots wiU supplement
information on growth behaviour and stand development from similar plots established previously. In the Kamloops Forest District, the second stage of planting
trials with Douglas fir was carried out. The purpose of these plots is to asses;
survival and initial growth as influenced by season of planting, age of stock, grounc
conditions, and exposure.
jj
 r
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 21
"f During the past few years increasing interest has been given to hiring native
Indians for planting. These men are extremely adaptable to adverse weather conditions, and their cheerfulness and steady rate of production is ideaUy suited to this
Jbrk. In 1964 special arrangements were made with the Indian Affairs Branch to
obtain crews, with the result that 40 per cent of the planting work force was made
up of Indians.
I Planting of 14,293,100 trees by aU agencies established a new record this year.
Of this total, 16 per cent was planted by the Forest Service on Crown lands (see
Table No. 22 in the Appendix). In the Interior the number of trees planted on
Crown lands was almost double that of 1963, and for the first time this total
approached the comparable figure for the Coast.
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS
I In conjunction with the rotation schedule at Green Timbers 13,000 feet of
4-inch drain-tile was laid in Field No. 4 foUowing removal of planting stock in the
spring. The tree-storage faciUties here were doubled with the addition of a new
wing to the original storage building.
t At the Duncan " B " Nursery, acquired in 1963, the irrigation reservoir was
deepened, and a 25-horsepower electric pump and 1,500 feet of water-main have
I been instaUed to service new fields.   Further clearing was carried out, and 2,000
cubic yards of soil were hauled in for levelling.
■ At the East Kootenay Nursery, improvement work continued on the upper field.
The irrigation system was enlarged by the installation of 800 feet of " Skinner "
irrigation-line and 250 feet of 3-inch underground water-main. Seven hundred
yards of sandy loam were hauled and spread to improve the texture of the soil.
t A new portable cold-storage unit was completed in March and transported to
Prince George. This unit wiU facilitate the handling and movement of planting
itock in that forest district.
CO-OPERATION
r The Reforestation Division continued to take an active part in co-operative
orestry programmes. In August, the Division assisted in hosting a two-day sym-
losium sponsored by the Tree Improvement Board, at which an assessment was
nade of progress in tree-improvement work in the Pacific Northwest. Five Re-
orestation Division men took part in the Plus Tree Week cruising activities in June.
. uring a very successful workshop held under the auspices of the Tree-farm Forestry
Committee, many of the older plantations in the Sayward Forest were examined
: incl assessed by foresters from Government and industry.
£ In the Interior, staff members assisted in organizing the f aU reforestation work-
hop of the Inland Empire Reforestation Council and arranged for planting and
- -^preparation equipment to be exhibited at the workshop in October. EarUer in
he year the Division was represented at a conference on animal damage in planta-
ions, sponsored by this Council.
■ Combined Grazing and Reforestation Division crews continued stand-improve-
lent tliinning in the East Kootenay. The 59 acres treated this year brings the total
rea thinned to 855 acres. Reforestation Division crews feUed snags on 1,418 acres,
f which 895 acres were cleared in co-operation with industry.
► Interdepartmental Rehabilitation and Forestry Programme
The co-operative programme, conducted by the Forest Service and the De-
artment of the Attorney-General, continued to make favourable progress. With
amvations completed at Rayleigh Gaol (Kamloops Forest District), inmates com-
	
 n
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
menced stand-improvement work in the autumn. Clearing of the Hutda Lake camrj
site (Prince George Forest District) has prepared the way for camp construction
scheduled for 1965. The ChilUwack Camps are being graduaUy improved, and one
new camp is being buUt to replace an older one. Forestry training was continued in
aU camps, and 20 Correctional Officers attended a three-day course at the Foresfl
Service training-school.
In addition to routine road maintenance, ChilUwack crews improved 5 milS
of old grade and buUt one-quarter of a mUe of graded traU. The Mount Thurstoa
camp sawmill produced 182,000 f.b.m. of lumber for camp projects and 3,500.
stakes and posts. Tree shipments from the ChilUwack nurseries totaUed 410,000
trees of which 36,100 were planted by inmates, and a further 52,000 trees were
transplanted in the nurseries. The seed production area established last year on
Larsen's Bench produced 28 bushels of cones in 1964. Salvage operations from
rights-of-way and from blow-down areas continue to provide fuel-wood and raw
material for the sawmiU.
The transplant nursery at Haney Correctional Institution this year lifted and
shipped 60,000 2—1 trees, and 400,000 seedlings were transplanted in the area prepared last year. Institution trainees planted 5,500 trees on 8 acres in the Blue
Mountain Forest. Other crews carried out routine road improvements and thinned^
pruned, and weeded 210 acres on a stand-improvement project.
In the Sayward Forest, inmates from the Snowdon and Lakeview Camps slashen
out 15 nules of old grade and cleaned, repaired, or replaced the culverts. One
50-foot bridge was redecked and planked. An area of 5 acres near Snowdon Camp
was cleared and prepared for nursery development, and inmates from this camp
planted 8,650 trees on 25 acres. The seed production area at McNiven Lake was
cleaned and weeded, and later yielded 43 bushels of cones. Pruning of the 1939
plantation was continued, and 288 acres were treated.
Silvicultural work on the Heffley Lake rehabilitation project began in the i
autumn, and crews from Rayleigh brushed out approximately 25 acres preparatory
to planting next spring. Field examination and soil-sampling were carried out W
Forest Service personnel at Rayleigh with a view to locating a suitable area fM
growing transplants. A 10-acre block was selected, and part of it will be ready^H
production in 1965.
Approximately 60,000 f.b.m. of logs have been decked on the Hutda Lake
camp-site from the clearing operation during the year. This material wUl be hauffl
to a sawmiU at the Prince George Vocational School. Efforts to locate a suit^ffl
water supply for the proposed camp are continuing.
Organization and procedures in connection with the interdepartmental forestry
programme are now weU estabUshed, and the work programme for 1965 has been
drawn up and approved by the Headquarters Co-ordinating Committee.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 23
WORKING PLANS DIVISION
In addition to the Working Plans Division's regular activities of sustained-yield
planning, a considerable amount of time was spent during 1964 in coUecting and
compiling essential information for the Chief Forester and Assistant Chief Forester
in Charge of Planning in connection with pubUc hearings conducted by the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources under authority of sec-
wsns 17a and 36 of the Forest Act.
\ Each hearing involved a considerable amount of background work. Descriptions of the area appUed for were checked, advertising arranged, and all briefs and
letters received, acknowledged, summarized, and sorted as to stand taken with regard
to a particular hearing. Key maps of the various areas were prepared, and a display
map made for visual orientation purposes at each hearing. FoUowing the hearing,
copies of the decisions made were sent to everyone who contributed to the hearing
and the procedures estabUshed by the decisions put into effect.
I A third pulpwood harvesting area agreement was formaUy signed, granting an
option to Northwood Pulp Limited to purchase pulpwood from five public sustained-
yield units. A fourth pulpwood harvesting area, consisting of four pubUc sustained-
yield units in which Bulkley VaUey Pulp and Timber Limited is interested in an
option, was designated, but no formal agreement had been signed by the end of the
year. Four new public sustained-yield units were estabUshed and a fifth one in name
combined three others. A sixth unit was absorbed into a tree-farm Ucence reserve.
There was no change in the number of tree-farm Ucences. Two new tree-farm
jalnce reserves were declared.
l Three new Taxation Act tree-farms were certified. Five new farm wood-lot
licences were awarded and three farm wood-lots were canceUed. The managed units
of the Province now include four pulpwood harvesting areas covering 33 public
sustained-yield units and 50 other public sustained-yield units, altogether 83; 39
tree-farm Ucences; 28 out of a total of 42 taxation tree-farms which are not managed
as an integral part of the tree-farm Ucences; and 55. farm wood-lot Ucences, making
a total of 205 managed units.
I. The total area committed under working plans is 68,791,191 acres of productive
forest, with a total aUowable annual cut of 1,044,761 cubic feet. This is equivalent
to 69 per cent of the total Provincial scale for 1964. Of this aUowable annual cut,
100,000,000 cubic feet have been set up on the basis of a close utilization standard
with basic inventory sound-wood volume being specified at 7.1 inches and over,
diameter at breast height. The foUowing table lists the forms of units committed to
•fo|est management under working plans for sustained yield:—
Progress of Sustained-yield Programme up to 1964
Type of Managed Unit
Number
of
Units
Productive
Area
(Acres)
Allowable Annual Cut (M CF.)
Sawlog Close
Utilization      Utilization
'ublic sustained-yield units—
In pulpwood harvesting areas	
!J   Other public sustained-yield units—
Sawlog utilization	
XClose utilization	
k  Total public sustained-yield units
;re_-fanu licences-
17,980,621
37,829.539
5,150,147
179,720
377,270
■ree-fanns (excluding those in tree-farm
licences) _____	
:arm wood-lot licences	
■ Totals	
83
39
28
55
60,960,307
7,130,067
682,553
18,264
377,270
100,000
656,990
352,870
34,543
358
 24 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
PULPWOOD HARVESTING AREAS
The option agreement for Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 3 was formaUy rata,
fied by Northwood Pulp Limited and the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests J
and Water Resources on October 30, 1964. PubUc sustained-yield units included!
are Bowron, Longworth, Monkman, Purden, and Robson.
In his decision of August 26, 1964, with regard to the public hearings held in
April in the Prince Rupert Forest District, the Honourable the Minister designated-:
the area including the Smithers, Babine, Morice, and Burns Lake Sustained-yield
Units to be Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 4.   It was proposed, on evidence than
proper financing could be arranged, to grant an option agreement to purchase thS
pulpwood from the designated pulpwood harvesting area, subject to site locationj|
to Bulkley VaUey Pulp and Timber Limited. This agreement had not been formally
ratified by the end of the year.
Industry continued to study other Provincial areas as potential pulpwood harS
vesting areas.
OTHER PUBLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
Four other pubUc sustained-yield units were estabUshed during the year.  The?
Lardeau was estabUshed in the Nelson Forest District and has a productive acreage
of 703,028.  The Finlay and Peace were established in the Prince George Forests
District with productive acreages of 5,150,147 and 1,196,976 respectively.
The fourth unit was the BeU-Irving in the Prince Rupert Forest District with a
productive acreage of 456,193. No aUowable annual cut has yet been calculated
for this unit.
The Finlay PubUc Sustained-yield Unit is the first unit to be set up initially on
a basis of a pulpwood economy for which volumes wiU be determined to a closg|
utilization standard for trees 7.1 inches and over, diameter at breast height.
TREE-FARM LICENCES
No new tree-farm Ucences were estabUshed in 1964, but two new areas within
the Prince Rupert Forest District were reserved for two new tree-farm Ucences as
applied for by Skeena Kraft Limited and MacMiUan, Bloedel and PoweU River
Limited respectively. The reserve for the proposed extensions to Tree-farm Licences
Nos. 29 and 34 in the Prince George Forest District was retained.
CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS
Three new certified tree-farms were certified in 1964, bringing the total to 42
tree-farms under the Taxation Act. Of these, 14 are managed as portions of tree-
farm Ucences with a productive area of 300,562 acres and a total annual aUowatM
cut of 20,074,000 cubic feet. The tree-farms not included within tree-farm licences
total 28 and have a productive acreage of 682,553 with a total annual allowa^
cut of 34,543,000 cubic feet plus 386,740 Christmas trees.
FARM WOOD-LOT LICENCES
Due to the many time-consuming activities of the Forest Service, it has not
been able to keep up with the requirements of the many farm wood-lot licence
applications. Consequently the majority of these appUcations have been placed in
a low-priority classification and most of the effort has been devoted to those alreany
under way. This has resulted in five new farm wood-lots. Routine canceUatOT
due to change in tenure and f aflure to adhere to the management plan totaUed three.
The 55 farm wood-lots have a productive acreage of 18,264 acres and an annual
aUowable cut of 358,000 cubic feet.
For basic data on sustained-yield units, see Tables Nos. 31, 32, and 33 in the
Appendix.
  PUBLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
PULPWOOD HARVESTING AREAS
NO.   1
10.   Big Valley
18.   Carp
23.   Crooked River
1. Adams
6. Barriere
7. Barton Hill
12. Botanie
25. Eagle
43. Naver
44. Nechako
51.   Parsnip
45. Nehalliston
46. Nicola
47. Niskonlith
48. North Thompson
39.   Monkman
53.   Pur den
15.   Burns Lake
72.   Stuart Lake
78.   Westlake
81.   Willow River
56. Raft
61. Salmon Arm
6.5. Shuswap
71. Spallumcheen
59.   Robsor
40.   Morice
OTHER PUBLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
29. Granby
30. Harrison
31. Hecate
3Z. Kettle
33. Kinbasket
34. Kyuquot
35. Lac la Hache
36. Lardeau
38. Moberly
41. Nakusp
42. Narcosli
49. Okanagan
50. Ootsa
52. Peace
54. Queen Charlotte
55. Quesnel Lake
57. Redonda
58. Rivers Inlet
60. Salmo
62. Sayward
63. Sechelt
64. Seymour
66. Similkameen
67. Skeena
68. Slocan
70. Soo
73. Stum
74. Takla
75. Taseko
76. Tatla
77. Upper Kootenay
79. Windermere
80. Williams Lake
82. Yalakom
83. Yale
OTHER PUBLIC
S.S. A. Special Sale Area (o i c 2811/62)
K.R.    Kamloops Region
TREE-FARM LICENCES
1. Eagle Lake Sawmills Limited
2. Church Sawmill Limited
Skeena Kraft Limited
MacMillan,  Bloedel and Powell
River Limited
MacMillan,  Bloedel & Powell River
Industries Ltd.
British Columbia Forest
Products Limited
23. Celgar Limited
24. Rayonier Canada (B. C.) Limited
25. Rayonier Canada (B.  C.) Limited
26. The Corporation of the District
of Mission
27. British Columbia Forest
Products Limited
28. Shelley Development Limited
29. Eagle Lake Sawmills Limited
30. Sinclair Spruce Lumber
Company Ltd.
31. Upper Fraser Spruce Mills
Limited
32. Vernon Box & Pine Lumber Co.
Ltd.
33. Shuswap Timbers Ltd.
34. Church Sawmill Limited
35. B. C. Interior Sawmills Ltd.
36. F.  &R.   Logging Co.  Ltd.
37. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
38. Empire Mills Limited
39. MacMillan,  Bloedel and Powell
River Limited
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
HONOURABLE R. G. WILLISTON, MINISTER
Scale
0 40 80 1Z0	
4fi    3,0    20
STATUS OF SUSTAINED-YIELD FORESTRY PROGRAMME
as at
31 DECEMBER 1964
136c
134c
132'
130c
128°
126c
124°
122c
120c
116c
  REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 25
PUBLIC INFORMATION AND EDUCATION DIVISION
: The year 1964 was, in general, one of smooth and planned activity, thanks
primarily to a benign fire season which passed without excitement.
I The year saw a mutually profitable liaison extended between the Division and
persons working in similar fields, particularly with some of the forest industrial
implications.
■ It was, however, an extremely busy year with personnel being employed on
various projects that extended to the Peace River in the north and from the West
Coast to the Alberta Boundary.
I Some gratifying successes resulted, particularly in the exhibit field. Our own
Forest Service exhibits won three separate awards of merit in three different exhibitions. In addition, during National Forest Products Week, the Public Information
and Education Division gave assistance to an industrial exhibit that won a first prize
at the national level. This was particulraly pleasing since this co-operative effort
brought in the first prize for the third time in a row.
9 Equally pleasing has been the success of the small plastic hazard-rating signs
designed and distributed by this Division. These tiny signs, tried experimentally in
1963, went into general distribution in 1964. It is a matter of some pride to its
designers to learn that they have already been closely copied by two other Provinces
and are being favourably considered by others.
COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA
Press and Periodicals
The press facet of public infonnation activity continued to dominate the major
portion of the Division's work. Nearly 100 releases were issued, ranging from
special time-consuming articles for such publications as the " Truck Logger " magazine, the Toronto Globe and Mail, and the British Columbia News Letter published
in London to more routine releases such as the monthly timber scale and weekly
fire reports. Weekly submissions from the clipping service indicate that Forest Service releases are well received. They are used widely in the daily and weekly press.
? In addition, the Division was the source of many feature and picture stories
aafially prepared by outside writers who came here for their material. One such
picture story, on fire protection, appeared in the Illustrated London News.
Publications and Printing
■Erhe volume of material edited and published by the Division continued to grow
as new items were added to the standard number of publications produced annually.
Printing and publishing remains one of the most important duties of the Division.
Major important publications include the Annual Report, the Research Review, and
Management Notes. There are also the continuing processes of revising, amending,
and republishing standard pamphlets and publicity material. In this regard, for
-xample, 60,000 scribblers were distributed this year to school-children. The popular Illustrated Forest Activities series of four booklets was reprinted, with a press
ran of 3,000 copies each. An important new pamphlet, "Canada's Pacific Forests,"
was also published in 1964. It is based on a speech by the Deputy Minister, Mr.
R. G. McKee. Other new pamphlets include a " Do and Don't" for tree-planters
and a booklet on the Sayward Forest.  The.lat_er repaces a 1949 publication.
 26        department of lands, forests, and water resources
Radio, Television, and Theatre
The 1964 radio campaign of educational forest-protection announcements was
broadcast by tape recordings during June, July, and August by all 28 radio station!
in the Province. Each tape contained 12 individual 30-second announcements. In
all, 2,649 single announcements were broadcast during the standard schedule.
In addition, copy for special hazard flashes to be used during periods of highj
hazard was prepared and supplied to all stations. Their use was limited due to an
extremely mild fire season.
The willingness of the radio industry to broadcast on a one-for-one basis (for[
each paid announcement the station offers one gratis) can be attributed to the excellent work and co-operation between Forest Service district personnel and the local I
radio stations. This personal approach has enabled this Division to establish a satis-[
factory working agreement with all radio stations.
Paid television programming was restricted to supplying three sets of 35-mm.
slide presentations to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation network. Each set
of slides was accompanied by a prepared tape. A total of 26 transmissions was
scheduled, once each Thursday and Friday during the months of July and August.
In addition, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation presented 26 transmissions as
a public service.
All television stations in the Province were supplied with a specially prepared
hazard-rating sign which was designed to be affixed to the weather chart Four
stations were encouraged to develop special forestry programmes, and in co-operation this Division supplied slides, stills, and motion pictures in addition to printed
material.
Staff members participated in or arranged for numerous interviews on both
radio and television.
SIGNS, POSTERS, AND EXHIBITS
During the 1964 season it was extremely difficult to meet the demand for new
and replacement standard Forest Service signs. Lack of available funds prohibits
the proper production and maintenance of signs presently in use. As a result, the
issuance of the standard Forest Service boundary signs was suspended until further
notice. The entire sign programme is now under review, and it is anticipated that
present investigations will result in a more satisfactory method of sign production
and maintenance. A total of 890 individual standard signs is presently being displayed throughout the Province. The Division maintains eight designs in the sign
programme.
The Division's " Keep B.C. Green—Use Your Ashtray " highway programme
was continued for the 1 lth consecutive year. Due to radical changes in highway
road construction, which has resulted in increased speed-limits, many of our sign
sites have been abandoned.  Where possible, new locations have been established.
The Forest Service's permanent exhibit in the British Columbia Building,
Pacific National Exhibition, Vancouver, was completely renovated. It was viewed
during the year by an estimated 750,000 persons.
In addition, the Division constructed three portable exhibits, one of which won _
a major award as the most interesting exhibit in the Victoria Exhibition.   British>
Columbia House, London, England, was supplied with a seven-panel exhibit depicting the duties and responsibilities of the Forest Service.
During Forest Conservation Week and National Forest Products Week, the
Division assisted numerous organizations to develop and promote exhibition material. One particular company which utilized Forest Service material won the top
award for merchandising during National Forest Products Week.
 Forest Service display won first prize in the " Most Interesting Exhibit" class
at the Victoria Jaycee Exhibition.
Forest Service exhibits were displayed at four fall fairs, five conventions, three
major exhibitions, and numerous special events such as educational days for students,
iunior forest wardens, and teachers.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Still and Motion-picture Production
■This year, production of prints totalled 11,314, little change from the previous
rear's total. Although less printing was undertaken for Engineering Services Divi-
lion, an increase was noted in the services to the Research Division.
KThe number of negatives taken during the year was 308, although, because of
i »its, the staff was forced to cut down on the number of colour negatives taken. The
.hotographic library added 381 black-and-white and 122 colour negatives. The
15-mm. slide library received 220 additional slides, a big increase over the previous
'ear's 91 additions. Approximately 300 duplicate colour slides were supplied to
'arious users, and increased use was again noted in the use of slides from our library.
V certain amount of work is now being done to provide black-and-white 35-mm.
lides of charts and illustrations, mainly for lecturing purposes.
Coverage was given to the Christmas-tree industry, at the request of the Nelson
orest District staff, and a comprehensive set of colour photographs and 35-mm.
lides was provided for the district's use. These photographs were obtained during
wo field trips.
Both members of the photographic staff undertook a field trip in December to
over experimental studies being carried on by the Engineering Services Division in
he Parsnip River area.    Both still photographs and motion-picture footage were
 28 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
obtained, although a certain amount of camera failure was experienced due to low)
temperatures.
Work was done on the permanent Forest Service exhibit in the British Columbia
Building at the Pacific National Exhibition, which was completely redesigned this
year. Photographic colour transparencies in various sizes were used, from colour
negatives taken by the staff.
The motion picture on slash-burning, " Fire, the Good Servant," shot in 1969
was edited, sounded, and released just before slash-burning got under way this yeas
Work commenced on re-editing " The Man in the Tower," the training film on lookout work. Some additional footage was shot and a script obtained for a shorter
general-interest film entitled " The Man on the Mountain." This film will be completed and sounded when the necessary funds become available.
Film Library
The year 1964 commenced with a slight reduction in the number of films in the
possession of the film library—from 152 to 147.
A total of 483 individual loans was made to the public. Total audience for
1964 was 107,006. This was a decrease due to a shortened school lecture season.
SCHOOL LECTURE PROGRAMME
The school lecture programme in 1964 was less extensive than in oreviqB
years due to the redirection of the Victoria headquarters lecturer to a variety of
other duties and the loss of the Prince George Public Information Officer to the
Canada Department of Forestry in mid-year. However, the Victoria lecturer did
cover 22 secondary schools in the Vancouver and Kamloops Forest Districts.
The programme is expected to right itself in 1965 with the acquisition of a
new full-time lecturer, made possible by the transfer of the Prince George Forest
District staff position to 'Victoria headquarters.
During the year some 50 talks were given by staff members to organizations i
other than schools.
LIBRARY
The librarian visited the Prince Rupert Forest District office to reorganize its
library, and at long last the library of the Management Division, Victoria, was cara1
logued by the assistant librarian.
Very full use has been made of the Xerox 914 copier, making a great deal ol
material available to foresters both in Victoria and the districts.
Much research was carried out to complete 180 inter-library loans from manj
libraries on the North American Continent.
The co-operation from the librarians of the Provincial Library, University fl
Victoria, Forest Entomology and Pathology Branch of the Canada Department^:
Forestry, and the Research Branch Experimental Farm of the Department of Agra,
culture is very much appreciated.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 29
FOREST MANAGEMENT DIVISION
GENERAL
The good markets that the logging industry has experienced during the past
few years continued through 1964 and were largely responsible for yet another
record year for production from British Columbia's forests.
I The total scale for all products from all lands was 1,514,595,176 cubic feet
(8,916,037,961 board-feet). The net increase was 41,171,805 cubic feet or 2.8
per cent, which was considerably down from the 9.6-per-cent increase the previous
year. The trend reported last year toward a larger percentage of the total production
coming from the Interior of the Province was again noticeable.
[ Timber sales continue to be the main source of production, contributing nearly
50 per cent of the total scale. Tree-farm licences were the second largest single
source of production, but only contributed 14 per cent to the total scale.
f Interest in the pulp-mill potential of the Province has been on the increase
during the past few years and took a very large step forward in 1964 with a number
of applications for pulpwood harvesting areas and announcements of proposed pulp-
mills throughout the Interior as well as on the Coast. This interest is very noticeably
reflected in the volume of wood removed under relogging at reduced royalty rates.
In 1960 the scaled volume in the Vancouver District was 1,976,000 cubic feet and
has steadily risen to 4,324,000 cubic feet in 1964.
{■ There was a considerable drop in the volume of logs exported from the Province in 1964, and it is thought that this also is a reflection of the upsurge of interest
in pulp material within the Province. The scale of 52,954,217 f.b.m. was the
smallest recorded since 1960 and was only 57 per cent of the 1963 scale.
PEACE RIVER FLOOD BASEST
f During the first half of the year the programme of cruising and auctioning
timber sales within the proposed Peace River flood basin continued, and a further
20 sales were awarded before a halt was called pending the processing and awarding
Df two special sales for pulp-mill development in the Finlay Sustained-yield Unit.
As soon as the contracts for the two sales have been finalized, the timber within the
remaining flood areas will be sold.
Data on Sales Sold to Date in the Peace River Flood Basin
I Number of sales  48
I  Acreage  81,850
^Estimated stumpage value $1,391,908
Cruised volume (M c.f.) 118,955
Scaled volume to date (M c.f.) 12,386
COLUMBIA FLOOD BASIN
■Most of the merchantable timber to be flooded by the Mica Dam was sold prior
o 1964, but during the year it was announced that the flood-line was to be raised,
ind this involved a very time-consuming job of rerunning the back line of timber
ales still active.
 30 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1
The sale of timber in the Duncan flood area has progressed only slowly during
the past four years, but this has been the result of the area being very remote and >
inaccessible, and there having been only one interested operator.
A start was made on selling the timber on areas to be flooded around the Arrofl
Lakes.
Data on Sales Sold to Date in the Columbia Flood Basin
Number of sales .  50
Acreage  30,332
Estimated stumpage value I !  $749,498   I
Cruised volume (M c.f.)  55,316
Scaled volume to date (M c.f.)  19,724
WIND-THROW
Heavy gale winds were experienced in the Flathead and Elk River valleys
north and south of Fernie in the spring of the year, causing extensive blow-down.
In order to try to recover the volumes before decay and insect damage occurred, a
concerted effort was made to map, cruise, and sell the timber involved. It was a
considerable undertaking, and with the first snows coming early, only part of the
blow-down was sold.   It is hoped to sell the remainder in 1965.
In the Prince George Forest District extensive blow-down occurred in the
spring in the area lying east of the main highway between Prince George and
Quesnel.   A total volume of 5,378,000 cubic feet was sold under blow-down timbei
SPRUCE BARK BEETLE
In the Prince George Forest District the spruce bark beetle continued to pose _
serious threat. The studies initiated in 1962/63 by the Canada Department of
Forestry in co-operation with the British Columbia Forest Service were continued
However, the main effort concentrated on the harvest of the more heavily infestec
stands. A priority cutting programme was developed in the Purden Lake Publit
Sustained-yield Unit and in the Aleza Lake Forest Reserve to remove the areas o:
high-density attack. Altogether, some 24 timber sales were made in connectioi i
with this programme. This entailed the sale of approximately 22,500,000 cubi<
feet.
The losses in the Prince Rupert Forest District continue to increase, althougl
the over-all population appears to be somewhat lower than in 1963. However, thi
1964 survey confirmed the fact that the mortality of alpine fir in the district™
exceedingly high. This appears to be due to a beetle-fungus complex. The wests?
balsam beetle attacks the trees and introduces fungi spores, some of whichra
pathogenic.
MARKET PRICES AND STUMPAGE TRENDS
The level of demand for forest products remained high, so that the manufactui
ing industry was able to market all that it could produce at stable high prices. Th
beneficial effect of demand for forest products on prices to the primary proc^gl
is illustrated in the log price table below. Using No. 3 grade hemlock logs as a
index, the average price in the Howe Sound market during the last quarter of 196
was $46.55 per thousand board-feet, which compares with an average of $58.6
per thousand board-feet for the last quarter of 1964.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
1964 Uncorrected Quarterly Average Dressed-lumber Prices (Interior)
31
Species
Basis
MB.M.
Average
Price
Apr-June
Basis
MB.M.
Average
Price
July-Sept.
Basis
MB.M.
Average
Price
Basis
MB.M.
Average
Price
I Fir-larch.
Spruce—
| White pine—
I Yellow pine-
157,357
247,176
16,405
4,972
3,452
$63.57
60.41
62.55
99.62
54.18
178,281
321,251
18.692
3.901
8,353
$65.15
61.81
63.12
96.20
58.94
200,831
292,641
14,496
4,897
8,110
$63.47
59.13
61.94
99.08
57.58
127,575
225,311
15,221
5,465
3,002
$61.48
58.14
61.00
100.34
60.56
1964 Quarterly Average Log Prices per M B.M. (Howe Sound Market)
No. 3 grade
Species
Jan.-Mar.
Apr.-June
July-Sept
Oct.-Dec.
$62.48
47.77
49.52
38.93
50.11
44.62
$65.58
54.54
54.76
40.47
52.13
45.37
$66.09
56.14
57.49
43.93
52.80
44.01
$66.09
ALL
GRADES
Pir
$74.59
53.98
51.82
48.52
60.70
50.82
$77.74
62.07
56.75
55.31
62.14
51.89
$78.75
62.15
59.38
56.17
60.59
49.66
$76.99
_>m1_r-_-
60.14
Whih, pin«
63.07
50.88
Stumpage Prices
1 The average stumpage price bid for Crown timber sales, including those sales
which were sold at salvage rates, increased in 1964 to $4.09 per 100 cubic feet for
all species, up 22 per cent over the $3.36 per 100 cubic feet average for 1963. The
comparable figures for 1959, 1960, 1961, and 1962 were $3.88, $3.53, $2.53, and
$3.01.
The weighted average stumpage price per 100 cubic feet for all species for the
Coast region was $6.18 and for the Interior $3.29, up from $5 and $2.80 respectively
in 1963.
t The average stumpage prices for all species, excluding " salvage value only "
rates, was $6.43 per 100 cubic feet for the Coast and $3.59 for the Interior, which
:ombine for an average of $4.43 per 100 cubic feet for the Province. The comparable figures for 1963 were $5.25, $3.22, and $3.69.
As a result of the general increase in log and lumber selling prices, there were
8,771 upward adjustments in the rates payable under existing timber contracts under
provision of the sliding-scale procedure.
SILVICULTURE
I The programme for 1964 included stand treatment, field studies, and road
ocation.
Following the trend established in past years, the principal activities were in
!he field of stand treatment. All districts were active in this field, and some 550
timber sales, principally in the Interior, received some form of treatment. This
nvolved the treatment of 151,296 acres.
_
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Stands were generally treated to attain either natural regeneration or incremeni
or, in some cases, a combination of both. The cutting methods most frequently
employed were single-tree selection, strips, groups, patches, or single seed-trees.
Although natural regeneration is dependent on several interrelated factors, a
satisfactory seed-bed and a suitable seed source can be regarded as prime requisites
The preparation of a satisfactory seed-bed may require either burning or scarifies!
tion. "lie past few years have seen an increase in this phase of the programme. To
date, some 35,789 acres have been scarified in the Prince George Forest District,
and similar programmes have been developed in the Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince
Rupert Forest Districts.   During 1964 some 7,519 acres were scarified.
Scarification appears to be achieving satisfactory results at a reasonable cost.
Regeneration surveys indicate that stocking following scarification ranges from 50
to 65 per cent stocked quadrats.
The cost of scarification varies from area to area and from year to year,
depending on the physical factors of the area and the prevailing weather conditions.
However, experience over the past few years indicates that the majority of areas
can be scarified for approximately $10 per acre.
Prior to 1963 most of the scarification was carried out following logging. ThS
is now changing, and a trend to pre-scarification is developing. This has in part
been occasioned by the increase in the spruce bark beetle population and the need
for the prompt removal of the high-risk stems.
In 1959 the first of a series of evaluation studies was initiated to determine the
results of the various forms of stand treatment. The results of these studies have
been published in the Forest Management Note series. To date three reports have
been published and a fourth, dealing with " The Results of Stand Treatment Following Seed-tree Marking in Dry Belt Fir Types," is being prepared.
I
Helicopter spraying Phytoactin on white pine blister rust.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 33
The blister rust control programme, which was initiated in 1960, was continued.
To date, in addition to the original basal stem applications of Actidione BR and
Phytoactin L440, some 5,505 acres have been foliar-sprayed with Phytoactin L318.
Che results are still being evaluated.
The Douglas fir bark beetle control programme mentioned in the 1962 Annual
Report is now in force and has been well accepted. Unfortunately the spruce beetle
has now replaced the Douglas fir bark beetle as a problem of major concern.
SCALING
Coast
Official scaling west of the Cascades was carried out with a staff of 150 official
scalers and 510 acting official scalers. The former were responsible for 95 per cent
of the total scale.
Scaling examinations were held during the year for the staff and the public.
Out of 143 candidates, 92 persons were successful in the examinations.
The Superintendent of Scaling at Vancouver reported an increased trend in log
movements to manufacturing centres by barge and bundle rafts, thus decreasing the
frequency of dispatching of scalers to remote areas.
Studies are continuing in scale computing and billing procedures through the
medium of electronic data-processing systems.
Interior
[ East of the Cascades, scaling continued under the licensed-sealer system with
supervision provided by the Inspectors of Licensed Scalers and the Ranger staffs.
Licensed-sealer examinations were held at various centres throughout the year,
resulting in the issuance of 190 new scaling licences.
Weight Scaling
fe With the current trend in the forest industry toward the use of smaller-diameter
logs and speedier logging and milling machinery, it has become obvious that some
method of measurement faster than individual-log scaling is necessary in order to
keep pace with modern methods of extraction and utilization. The projected pulp-
mill development plans throughout the Province, which are contingent upon the use
of large quantities of small wood, add emphasis to this fact.
I In recognition of this need, the Forest Service has been encouraging the
measurement of logs by weight as a basis for billing and allowable-cut control in
sustained-yield units, where considered feasible. The first approval of this method
was given in 1963 to two stud-mills in the Cariboo which use large quantities of
small-diameter timber.
During 1964 there was a growing interest in this form of measurement. By
the end of the year, approval had been given by the Chief Forester to 14 operations
in the Kamloops and Prince George Forest Districts to scale by weight as a basis
for official returns to the Government. Negotiations are continuing with other companies.
Weight-scaling equipment and techniques are such that there-will be many
situations not suited to this type of wood measurement. For instance, there has
been relatively little interest in the Coastal areas thus far, due in part to the difficulties
presented by the watering of logs prior to scaling. Nevertheless there is every
indication that the weighing of wood in the interests of efficiency will become increasingly popular with the forest industry.
 34 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
GRAZING DIVISION
GENERAL CONDITIONS
In many respects 1964 was a difficult year for the range live-stock industrw
Cattle prices declined markedly.  Cool, wet weather made haying extremely difficult
Ranges were very slow commencing growth in the spring, and severe winter weatheS
set in relatively early.   On the brighter side, range forage production was above
average.   The record number of stock using Crown range ended the grazing season
in generally good condition.
Range
Low spring temperatures resulted in ranges not being properly ready for use!
for from two to four weeks later than normal. It was not practical to delay turnout
of stock to this extent, and many ranges were grazed prematurely. However, exj
cellent growing conditions throughout the summer compensated for this situation
wherever reasonable management was practised. Total forage production was above
average.
As was to be expected, delayed forage growth resulted in some difficulties with
poisonous weeds early in the season. The cool, moist weather also produced a pros
longed period of high toxicity in timber milk vetch, a plant which is prevalent over
much of the forest range. However, stock losses from poisonous plants were not
unduly heavy. Losses due to predatory animals appeared to be about normal.
Highway accidents continued to take an increasing toll of range stock. A stepped-
up highway fencing programme is required to reverse this serious trend.
Hay
Hay supplies were generally sufficient for the relatively mild winter of 1693/64.
This was fortunate, as any shortage necessitating an earlier than normal range turnout would have had a devastating effect on ranges already suffering from retarded
growth. Summer haying conditions were very unfavourable due to the abnormally
wet weather. Although crops were good, the quantity harvested was much below
average in some areas and quality generally substandard. This situation, combined
with the early onset of severe winter weather, left the industry in a difficult position
at the end of the year.
Markets and Prices
Cattle prices dropped drastically. The weighted average price received by
cattlemen through the British Columbia Livestock Producers' Co-operative Association was $16.69 per hundredweight in 1964, compared to $20.01 in 1963, a drop
of $3.32. This follows a drop of $1.19 the previous year and reflects current overproduction of cattle in North America.
Prices for sheep and lambs were up slightly from 1963 levels.
RANGE MANAGEMENT
A high level of management is necessary to achieve maximum forage utilization, without jeopardy to the resource, on the dry, rugged forest and grasslam
ranges of the Interior. Most Crown ranges are stocked to capacity under presfH
levels of management, but many have the potential for greater utilization un<S
superior methods. Increasing numbers of live stock, combined with the continue?
diversion of range land to other uses, require that management be intensifiM
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
35
Achievement of this objective continued to be retarded by the lack of over-all land-
use planning and a programme to develop the necessary knowledge on the part of
range-users. A shortage of staff for range management and development planning
was also a factor. Nevertheless some progress was made. Many individuals and
small groups of permittees adopted more intensive management practices in 1964,
and the British Columbia Beef Cattle Growers' Association is now actively encouraging such action by its members.
During the year, efforts were continued to ensure that grazing by domestic
stock did not occur during periods where damage to Crown range would result.
Management plans were complicated in a few areas by minor outbreaks of disease,
necessitating the separating of herds. Numerous extensive range inspections were
carried out as a basis for dealing with current problems. More detailed surveys
were limited to relatively small areas where requests for intensive pasture development had been received.
Range Improvements
i During 1964, $66,565.39 was spent from the Range Improvement Fund.
Material to the value of $16,860.92 was on hand at the beginning of the year, and
material valued at $12,159.45 remained on hand and not assigned to projects at
the end of the year. Actual assistance to the range-improvement programme from
the Fund was thus $71,266.86, the highest of any year to date.
| The following projects, chargeable wholly or in part to the Fund, were constructed or extensively rehabilitated: 19 cattle-guards, 1 corral, 30 drift fences,
3 holding-grounds, 2 meadow improvements, 2 mud-hole fences, 2 pasture developments, 27 stock trails, 24 water developments, 1 weed control, 1 yellow pine thinning,
agd. range-seeding.
\
Grazing on upper grassland type north of Kamloops indicated multiple-use
capabilities of many areas of Crown lands.
 36 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1
Permittees also contributed extensively to most of the projects listed abovel
mainly in the form of labour. Further, during the year the following projects were
authorized for construction entirely at permittee expense: 14 breeding pastures, 9
bull pasture, 1 cattle-guard, 11 corrals, 35 drift fences, 3 general-purpose enclosures,
5 holding-grounds, 3 horse pastures, 11 stock trails, and 4 water developments. This
is by far the largest number of projects undertaken entirely at permittee expense in
a single year. Although some of these projects are primarily for convenience in
the handling of stock, most are also of distinct benefit to the range.
Field trials to determine the feasibility of improving range forage producticffl
were continued in 1964. Practices such as clearing, scarification, and seeding of
carefully selected areas of non-commercial forest-cover, spraying of brush-infested
ranges, and thinning of overstocked forest stands showed considerable promise.
However, techniques will need to be considerably refined to reduce costs, and these
practices will have only limited application for some time to come. On the other
hand, the attention which has been given to restoring depleted grassland ranges
through reseeding began to show results. A range-land drill, designed by the United
States Forest Service, was acquired and put through its initial trails late in the year.
This machine permits direct seeding without prior cultivation and can be used on
rough terrain. Although the results from the use of this machine are not yet conclusive, it appears that it will be a valuable tool for the rehabilitation of depleted
grasslands. A short trial on a natural-hay meadow indicated that it might also be
used to advantage in improving forage composition and production on this type of
site.
In spite of the growing importance of special practices, the installation of fen<?
ing, water developments, and trails to improve the distribution of live stock and
control of grazing continued to be the principal means by which range utilizatio'fi
can be safely increased. Methods by which the cost of such improvements might
be reduced and durability increased received considerable attention during the year.
The seeding of areas denuded in the course of logging and other activities on
Crown range continued to be a major part of the range-improvement programme.
A total of 42,114 pounds of grass and legume seed was distributed for sowing on
such areas during the year. This was a considerable increase over the 33,686
pounds distributed in 1963. There were no forest burns requiring seeding during
the year. With but few exceptions, actual seeding was undertaken by co-operating
permittees, with seed, equipment, and supervision being supplied by the Service.
Peace River Pastures
The expanded pasture-development programme in the Peace River area, commenced in 1963 as the result of Federal-Provincial cost-sharing agreements under
the Agricultural Rehabilitation and Development Act, was carried forward. The
extremely wet weather made work extremely difficult and increased costs to a certain
extent. However, where it was practical to break and seed early in the season,
excellent results were obtained. Wet conditions resulted in the bulk of the seeding
being delayed until late fall after germination was possible.
During the year the following work was completed: 18V_ miles of fencing i
14 stock-watering dugouts, 6_ miles of access road, 2 stock-handling corrals, 2,173
acres cleared, and 2,560 acres broken, fertilized, and seeded. Total cost of this
development work was $118,080.11. In addition, $3,088.49 was spent on maintenance of improvements installed earlier. The current phase of the developmen
programme is now virtually complete on four of the five projects involved. Th<
fifth will require one more year to complete.
 I
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 37
During the year 43 permittees grazed 1,280 cattle and 32 horses within those
portions of the projects which were ready for use.   When the developed areas are
complete and in full production, it is anticipated they will be able to accommodate
IB. least four times this amount of stock.
CO-OPERATION
Range live-stock association activity reached a new high in 1964. There are
now 62 such associations approved under the Grazing Act, two new associations
having been recognized during the year. A total of 178 local association meetings
were attended by one or more Forest Service officers to discuss range-improvement
and management programmes. With increasing grazing pressures developing, ever-
^ffi>ser contact with these organizations is essential to avoid abuses to the range and
insure equitable allocation of grazing privileges.
Contact was also maintained with the British Columbia Beef Cattle Growers'
Association and the British Columbia Sheep Breeders' Association on matters of
industry-wide importance. The former organization, in consultation with the
Forest Service, started a programme to encourage local range associations to adopt
improved management and development practices. The British Columbia Livestock Producers' Co-operative Association again supplied the live-stock price figures
necessary for the sliding scale of grazing fees. This producer-owned marketing
agency sold approximately 35.5 million pounds of beef animals during the year and
is the most reliable source of information on prices received by stockmen in the
range area.
I Close liaison was maintained with the Canada Research Station in Kamloops.
This agency is carrying out research on a variety of problems, such as range rehabilitation, carrying capacity, and improvement of native meadows, which are of
direct interest to the Forest Service. Joint investigations of problems associated
with pasture development in the Peace River area were continued with the Research
Station at Beaverlodge, Alta. Grazing officers again participated in a number of
events associated with the ranching industry, including meetings of the American
Society of Range Management and the University of British Columbia Faculty of
.Agriculture students' tour in the range area.
ADMINISTRATION
The number of stock on Crown range again increased. The more intensive
management and supervision required to safely accommodate the additional stock
on already crowded ranges greatly increased the administrative work load. It was
) possible to carry this load only because a particularly light fire season made it
practical to assign a larger amount of field work to the Ranger staff. A heavy fire
season would have resulted in a serious situation.
£. As the result of pressure which has been building up for several years, the
administration of the Grazing Act on Crown lands outside of pasture-development
projects in the Peace River area was started in 1964. Forty-five permits, authorizing
the grazing of 3,213 cattle, 512 horses, and 2,000 sheep, were issued on these
unimproved lands. An additional agrologist was appointed to handle this work
and the pasture-development programme referred to earlier in this report.
I A considerable number of requests for pasture-development projects under
the Agricultural Rehabilitation and Development Act were referred to the Forest
Service for investigation during the year. Most of these were in the Central Interior,
but the Kamloops and East Kootenay areas were also involved. Many of the
requests were nebulous, and investigations to date indicate most are impractical
 1
38 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
owing to conflicting land uses, cost of development, or poor soil quality.   Further,!
it is becoming increasingly evident that such pasture-development projects can only
be adequately considered within the framework of complete land-use studies.
Grazing Permits
During 1964, 2,104 grazing permits were issued authorizing the depasturing^
of 173,677 cattle, 6,231 horses, and 22,478 sheep on Crown ranges. This is an
increase of 153 permits over 1963. Cattle were up 14,837 head or 9 per cent and
horses 371 head or 6 per cent over the previous year. Sheep dropped by 2,888 head
or 11 per cent. Both the number of permits issued and the number of cattle are
the highest ever recorded.   (See Table 81 in the Appendix.)
Hay Permits
Extremely wet weather made the harvesting of hay from natural meadows on
Crown range extremely difficult. A total of 265 permits authorizing the cutting of
3,198 tons of hay was issued. Actual harvest was much below the authorized
quantity.   Hay-cutting fees remained at $1 per ton.
Grazing Fees
Grazing fees per head per month in 1964 were 20 cents for cattle, 25 cents for
horses, and 3 cents for sheep.  These fees represent a drop from 1963 of 1 cent ioa
cattle and VA cents for horses.   Fees for sheep remained the same.   Under the
sliding-scale formula, the changes in fees reflect the prices received by producera
the previous year.
In spite of reduced fees, billing- increased over the previous year to the highest
ever recorded due to the increased number of stock on the range.
Control and Enforcement
Rapidly growing numbers of live stock on Crown range make control of stoca
numbers and enforcement of proper management conditions increasingly important
to ensure that the range and associated resources are not destroyed. This poses
formidable physical problems, and the difficulties are being greatly increased by
unplanned land alienation in the range area. In many localities there is developing
a complicated checkerboard pattern of alienated land, much of which remains
unfenced. Control of grazing on the remaining interspersed Crown range is all but
impossible. In other situations, settlement is taking place on lands on which there
is no chance to build up a full-time ranching operation. The necessity of at least
part-time employment off the ranch almost invariably results in a low level of both
range and live-stock management.
In an. effort to control the situation, numerous stock counts were carried out
during the year. In a number of areas the field staff was authorized to seize stocH
grazing in trespass. This action had a salutory effect on the offenders and was
welcomed by the majority of permittees who comply with the regulations and permit
conditions. A number of horses, both abandoned and intentionally grazed in trespass during closures, were removed from the range. In an effort to distinguish
between trespassing and legitimate stock on the range, marking with an indelible dye
was tried on an experimental basis with but indifferent success. This technique
requires further investigation.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 39
ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
ENGINEERING SECTION
As in other years the largest part of the Engineering Services Division programme was the design and construction of forest-development roads under a
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing agreement. Bridges formed an appreciable part
of the construction programme, two being over 200 feet long. Navigational channels were the subject of considerable study and experiment in the Peace pondage
area, the land to be flooded by the Portage Mountain dam.
Field engineering crews were occupied in all five districts on assignments covering development engineering, reconnaissance, road location, and other duties.
Accident-prevention measures were organized further by forming a Divisional
Safety Committee charged with planning programmes, spreading information, and
looking into the causes both of accidents and of good safety records. During
the year the British Columbia Safety Council granted the following recognition to
Engineering Section work groups: One bronze-on-gold, one gold, two silver, and
five bronze awards of merit.
| An unwelcome factor in this year's operations was the persistent and heavy
rainfall.
Development Engineering
p One field crew was assigned to each forest district. Between them they carried
out engineering studies in 16 areas. In the Prince Rupert Forest District these were
development of the drainages from the east into the Skeena, between Terrace and
Cedarvale; are-evaluation of the Babine-Shedin Creek area; and a study for timber-
sale layout on Kagan Peninsula. In the Prince George Forest District a general
study was made of the newly formed Takla Public Sustained-yield Unit, with special
emphasis on water transport of logs to Fort St. James. This was a continuation of
work begun in 1962. In the Kamloops Forest District the subject was road access
to the north end of Anstey Arm on Shuswap Lake and into Bone Creek in the North
Thompson area. In addition, the reconnaissance work started in 1963 was continued in the Chilcotin area. Work in the Nelson Forest District included route
reconnaissance into Greely Creek, Canyon Creek, Glenogle Creek, and Glacier
Creek. Five studies for protection and management were carried out in the Vancouver Forest District.
ft Haul-road studies included reconnaissance of 103 miles of route, and covered
260,000 acres of productive forest with a sawlog volume of 390,000,000 cubic
feet. In addition, 174 miles of route were reconnoitred to provide access chiefly
for protection and administration.
Road Location
During the field season, 212.7 miles of road were located on the ground, 63.2
miles being primarily to provide protection access. Terrain classification based on
air-photo study is becoming an important part of the pre-field work and is saving
time and money in the field.
Road Construction and Maintenance
e A total of 80 miles of forest-development road was built, on 13 separate projects. The work involved the site preparation of 700 acres of right-of-way, the
movement of 1,430,000 cubic yards of common excavation and of 131,000 cubic
yards of solid rock, and the installation of 16,900 lineal feet of culvert pipe.
 40
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Construction of bridge over Flathead River on Flathead Forest Road.
This work represents only about 80 per cent of the achievement of the previous
year, mainly due to heavy and continuous rain, particularly in Prince Rupert Forest
District. Besides a general slowing effect, rain so interrupted some projects that
they could not be completed during the 1964 construction season.
In December, 1964, a contract was awarded, and construction begun, on 4.6
miles of the Owikeno Lake Forest Development Road.
Bridges featured prominently in the year's construction work. Eleven permanent bridges and five local-material bridges were erected by Forest Service crewd|
One, a permanent bridge with an over-all length of 207 feet, replaced a temporary
structure over the Willow River south of Prince George, the latter being condemned
in the spring of 1964 as a result of ice damage. Another, of 215 feet over-all length,
was built over the Flathead River south of Fernie, to provide access to large areas
of blow-down timber in the Flathead and tributary valleys. Authority to build the
second bridge was received in September, and it was completed on November 30th.
Maintenance was carried out over some 774 miles of previously constructed
roads. In order to organize the maintenance programme and handle the increased
maintenance responsibilities, an area superintendent and a small crew was established in each of the five forest districts. Late spring run-off combined with heavy
rains caused considerable flooding and damage to roads and drainage structures
in the Central Interior of the Province. Repair was effected by the maintenance
crews with a minimum of delay.
A major maintenance project was the completion of a 1963 contract to replace
one pier of the Kingcome River Bridge, washed out in the abnormal floods of 1962.
Peace River Pondage Waterway Improvement Project
Early in 1964 work began on the design and development of navigation
channels which will be needed on the body of water which will form behind the
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 41
Portage Mountain dam. Main arteries for industrial traffic were considered, and
also branches for access to the future shoreline. The design work consists of three
basic steps: the updating of vertical control, to ensure that channels can be positioned correctly for safe navigation; field examination of these channels; and, finally,
specifications and estimates to develop the areas.
, So far work has been concentrated on the first two steps. A field crew under
the Topographic Division of the Lands Service undertook the necessary field work
and the Air Division obtained all necessary photographs. As this was being done,
55 miles of industrial channel were established in the Parsnip River area of the new
lake, and specialized area inventory was completed over some 12,000 acres.
Later in the year, experimental site preparation was begun near Finlay Forks
and also toward the southern end of the Parsnip River area. The results will be
used in preparing future estimates. Near Finlay Forks some 950 acres were
cut and piled ready for burning. At the southerly location, however, early snow
and below-zero temperatures closed work down before effective production was
achieved.
General Engineering
Designs, plans, and specifications were completed for nine pressure-creosoted
timber bridges and for seven log spans. Tentative sketches and estimates were
made for 27 proposed bridges and also a number of large culverts.
Some other commitments of the Design Subsection were inspections and reports
on existing bridges and the design of sub-drainage for a new field at the Green
Timbers nursery. Also, foundations were investigated at several bridge-sites using
the Division's power-auger and rental equipment.
Engineering supervisors and other senior engineers made 17 inspections of
roads for timber-sale administration.
Road-design work in the office received appreciable help from a computer
programme, the first to be used in the routine work of the Division. This programme had been devised to print out, in accordance with the cruising data supplied,
costs and quantities for each of the five different methods of site preparation in
common use.
MECHANICAL SECTION
I Additions to the motor-vehicle fleet during 1964 consisted of nine four-wheel-
drive and four two-wheel-drive passenger vehicles. This increase was due largely
to personnel electing to give up driving their own cars on a mileage basis in favour
of using a Government car.
New lighting-plant demands continued despite the increase in Ranger stations
supplied by the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. In this connection,
it is perhaps significant that requirements were for the larger sizes of portable power
units.
Two 15-kilowatt motor-generators, complete with synchronizing equipment,
were purchased and mounted in a self-contained trailer power-house for use in the
Peace River pondage area. A system of regular oil analysis was established and is
providing a good degree of control over electric generating problems.
A new light-weight power-saw was tried out, with very satisfactory results.
The trend appears to be toward smaller and lighter saws, which generally are much
more reliable than their larger and older predecessors.
I An additional 23 trail motor-rcycles were purchased, with general satisfaction
being expressed by the field staff. This type of unit may have a limited scope, and
it is intended to acquire only a small number until experience shows to what extent
they can be used with efficiency.
	
 42 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In the heavy-equipment category, the Engineering Section purchased twol
truck-mounted loader back-hoe machines for road maintenance. They have proven
very satisfactory, particularly for ditch-cleaning operations. For general road
maintenance, a 150-horsepower grader and a 225-horsepower tractor were obtained.
The Prince George Forest District was supplied with a 1-yard rubber-tired four-
wheel-drive loader for its road-mainteance programme, and the Reforestation Division acquired two farm-type wheel tractors of identical size for general nursery
operational purposes.
In the instructional field, the Mechanical Section conducted the usual courses]
at the Forest Service Training-school and the Engineering Section conducted some
trailer-towing instructional work in April.
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN
Tables Nos. 93 and 94 in the Appendix list the work undertaken during the
year, with emphasis again on improving the accommodation at our older Ranger
stations in keeping with the changing role of the Ranger staff.
Assistance to the Research and Reforestation Divisions continued in nursery
development, with irrigation, seed extraction, and cold-storage extensions playing
a prominent part.
Field inspections throughout the year were increased due to more contract
activity in conjunction with the over-all programme.
In addition to the normal assessment and consultation activities, 42 miscellaneous jobs were completed and 82 contracts were awarded for prime and subcontract work.
During the year 66 additions were made to the Engineering Services Division
library.
Although the Forest Service museum is still in the embryo stage and still lacks
a permanent display area, articles from it have been shown in such places as the
rotunda of the Legislative Buildings, the Forest Service training-school at Greem
Timbers, and at some district headquarters and Ranger stations. In addition to
these displays, five large " flitches " of Coastal wood specimens have been loaned
indefinitely to the newly formed Cowichan Valley Logging Museum at Duncan.
These huge pieces of wood originally displayed at the 1939 San Francisco ExhibS
tion, were reconditioned by the Parks Branch and erected beneath a shake roof on
a permanent concrete slab.
FOREST SERVICE MAINTENANCE DEPOT
Effective July 1, 1964, the administration of the maintenance-shop for heavjf
equipment, the warehouse, and the transport pool of the Engineering Services Division were amalgamated with the units formerly known as the Forest Service Marine
Station under the new name, Forest Service Maintenance Depot. A significant
increase in efficiency is expected from the integration, making it possible to handle
a mounting work load without unduly increasing staff and costs. However, estals
lished work patterns and procedures cannot be changed overnight, and the full
effect of the reorganization may not be measurable for some years.
Marine Work
Forty-five annual refits and 19 minor overhauls were completed on marine
craft, necessitating 60 dockings on the ways. The M.V. " Forest Surveyor " and
the M.V. " Poplar Ftl" were re-engined with modern diesel engines as both these
1
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 43
boats will be in service next year on the northern coast, where unprotected waters
make dependable power a requisite. Another major project was the renovation
of a former Highways Department ferry on Kootenay Lake, which was renamed
Bie " L.C. 10." This craft, which will be of inestimable value in the event of fire
-in the forests adjacent to Kootenay Lake, was powered with a reconditioned Harbour-master unit, and a new wheel-house and accommodation prefabricated at the
Maintenance Depot were installed by a crew from the depot who travelled to Nelson
i|or the purpose. Other work accomplished included the repair of some 43 river
boats, dinghies, and small boats.
Prefabrication and Carpentry Shop
Over the years the Forest Service has acquired trailers of many types including
175 units used for personnel accommodation. In addition, there are 64 Porta-
(buildings providing similar temporary field accommodation. The remodelling,
.■renovation, and general maintenance of this fleet of mobile buildings is fast becoming a major problem and necessitated a realignment of the work programme for the
carpentry crew. Hence the most significant production effort was the rebuilding of
12 trailer and Porta-building units to new condition. Other items produced in
quantity included 271 signs of various types and sizes, 37 pieces of office furniture,
and 227 boxes and crates.
Depot maintenance and improvement also occupy the time of the five-man
carpenter crew to a significant extent. In this connection, the installation of doors
and closing in of the floor space used for the repair of heavy equipment is an
improvement which will pay high dividends by increasing the efficiency of the
mechanics who formerly had to work under adverse conditions.
Machine Shop
The regular overhaul work load in the small-engine repair-shop was slightly
lower than usual, with only 379 pumps, outboard engines, chain saws, and lighting
plants overhauled, crated, and shipped. However, 181 new units were tested and
shipped to the districts. The usual service in welding, plumbing, and electrical
work continued to be supplied to the trailer rebuilding and repair programme. The
machine-shop also carried out the machining and assembly from castings of 25
paper-punches, 25 hand-winches, 3,060 hose, pump, valve fittings, and miscellaneous items, which completed the major portion of this work load.
Transport Pool and Warehouse
; The Transport Pool operates three 30-ton tractor-trailer combination diesel
trucks and two 5-ton gasoline trucks. Transportation service was supplied to 17
engineering projects and all five forest districts. A total of 250 long-distance
hauling assignments was completed, which included the movement of 11 bridges
from Vancouver prefabricating plants to various projects throughout the Province,
from the Flathead in the south-eastern area to the Upper Kispiox River north of
Hazelton. The total distance travelled was approximately 150,000 miles, and an
estimated 3,000 tons of freight were handled. In conjunction with the above transportation of material, the warehouse handled, stocked, conditioned, and repaired
all construction-camp equipment for various Engineering Services Division projects.
Engineering Maintenance-shop
I The maintenance and servicing of the Transport Pool fleet is an established
function of the workshop.   The annual overhaul and storage of 40 %-ton trucks
 ]
44 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
and two 3-ton crew buses was completed.   Heavy equipment, used in various projects, received extensive repairs, which included three road graders, five D-8 crawled
tractors, four scrapers, one gravel-crusher, and three grid-rollers.   Installation of
three 20-kilowatt lighting plants in mobile trailers was carried out and transported
to various sites.   Complete modification and overhaul of four four-wheel-drivel
trucks for A-frame use on projects completed the major portion of the year's word
load.
RADIO SECTION
New radio transmitting equipment purchased in 1964 was as follows:—
A.M.—
Portable 48
Fixed station (14-80 watts)  15
Fixed station (80-200 watts)     2
General service band portable     8
Total A.M. . 73
F.M.—
Portable    24
Fixed station (60-80 watts) ___  .  21
Fixed station (10-30 watts) ...      11
Mobile    33
Total F.M. ...      89
Total, all types  162
Written off during 1964     15
Net increase 147
In addition to the above, two 150-watt Civil Defence A.M. units were installed
at Penticton and Enderby. The general trend continued to be toward increasing
the amount of A.M. equipment available for forest-protection use, particularly in
portables. Forest-protection communication showed a definite improvement during
the year, partly due to a fight fire season, but to a large extent to better pre-organ-
ization and more equipment. This branch of communication is still our weakest
link, with insufficient portable and mobile equipment to meet the needs of a really
bad fire year. Trunk systems, as mentioned later in this report, will in many cases
improve fire to Ranger station communication due to the greatly increased range
of mobile units.
The F.M. repeater trunk system previously planned for the Prince Rupert
Forest District was installed during the summer, giving V.H.F. communication
between Ranger districts from Bums Lake to a point half-way between HazeltaS
and Terrace. Being a trunk system, all repeaters transmit and receive on one
common pair of frequencies, allowing any mobile to work through any repeater. It
was originally planned to have the system extend beyond Terrace to Prince Rupert,
but tests made during the year have shown this plan to be impractical at present.
In the Prince George Forest District, with particular reference to the Peace
River pondage area, the first use was made of thermo generators operated by propane gas to supply power for F.M. repeaters where a power-line, diesels, or gasoline i
generators would normally be required. The pondage area now has mobile coverage from Finlay Forks almost to McLeod Lake, though some conflict exists between
this system and the Prince George Forest District circuit.   Correction of this mutual
 I
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 45
interference will be made in the spring. Extension of the Prince George F.M.
system beyond Fort St. John was postponed due to failure to obtain permission
from the Federal Government to use or even test certain necessary repeater-sites.
1 In the Kamloops area it was intended to extend F.M. coverage up the North
Thompson to Blue River, but here, too, withholding of permission to use repeater-
sites caused cancellation of the project for the time being. Trunking of the Kamloops repeater system was completed, thereby greatly increasing the range of all
mobile units. Toward the end of the fire season an extensive overhaul of all Kamloops AM. stations took place. Grounds and aerials were replaced or improved,
aid a general upgrading of A.M. signals was noted.
i In Vancouver an experiment in improved radio traffic management was carried
out by establishing a sub-control station at Campbell River which was made responsible for the A.M. traffic, while Vancouver Radio simultaneously handled the F.M.
Campbell River, Vancouver Radio, and the Marine Building were interconnected
by teletype, and messages collected by Campbell River could be sent by this medium
directly to the Marine Building. The superior A.M. reception at Campbell River
and the time saved at Vancouver Radio justified the expense of the half-time (12
hours daily) rent of the teletype circuits for the duration of the fire season.
f The Victoria section had a busy year designing, building, and evaluating new
equipment and installing the new Prince Rupert repeater chain. With Department
of Transport regulations becoming more stringent every year, the Forest Service is
faced with the problem of suppressing spurious signals produced by every A.M.
transmitter. Experimental work is at present in progress to discover a reliable
method of suppression. One Victoria technician has been relieved of normal duties
to develop a method of detecting and plotting the course of thunder-storms by means
of a radio direction-finding device with visual recording. Radio staff increased by
one temporary technician replacement at Victoria and one permanent technician
appointment each at Vancouver and Prince Rupert.
 46 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FOREST PROTECTION DIVISION
WEATHER
The 1964 forest fire season will be remembered as cool and wet throughout thl
Province.
A spring hazard started to build up in the Fort Nelson-Peace River area, but
by the end of May the district was experiencing weather conditions similar to the
rest of British Columbia. Throughout the summer there were no periods of ex-,
tended hazard build-up, and any incipient dry period soon ended.
This favourable forest-protection weather allowed the fire season to be terml
nated by Order in Council on September 30th.
Temperatures from April to September were 1 to 6 degrees below normal at
most stations, with the greatest deviation from normal being generally in the south!
east portion of the Province and particularly in the Kootenays.
Precipitation was greater than average during the summer at most points. In
April the exceptions were the Lower Mainland and the Peace River areas. In May
both the east coast of Vancouver Island and the south-west portion of the Provincd
enjoyed less than average rainfall.
June and July saw most stations receiving more than average rainfalls, with
some establishing new highs for July. August and September continued the estate
lished pattern of more than average rainfall.
FIRES
Occurrence and Causes
The cool, damp summer influenced fire statistics favourably. The total of
1,120 fires recorded in 1964 was well below that of last year, and below the 10-year
average of 1,963. Lightning remained well in front as the leading individual cause
of fires, at 36.6 per cent. During the previous four years, 1960 to 1963, inclusive,
lightning was responsible for 44.8 per cent of all fires. (For details see Tables Nos.
109, 110, and 111 in the Appendix.)
Cost of Fire-fighting
Average fire-suppression cost per fire to the Forest Service was 34 per cem
below that of last year. The total cost of suppression, at $121,645, very markedly
reflected this, being only 7.6 per cent of the 10-year average. (See Tables Nos.
116, 117, and 118 in the Appendix.)
Damage
The area of forest-cover burned, at 6,309 acres, was the smallest ever recorded
in Forest Service history. In only one other year, 1954, was there less than 10,000
acres of forest-cover burned. This compares with the 10-year annual average of
365,480 acres of forest-cover burned.
Damage to forest products cut was sUghtly lower than the 10-year average, but
damage to buildings and logging and sawmilling equipment was considerably lower.
(For details see Tables Nos. 114. 115, 116, and 117 in the Appendix.)
M
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 47
PROTECTION PLANNING AND RESEARCH
Fire Statistics
Plotting of 1964 forest fires on the Provincial Fire Atlas has been completed,
and a summary of key fire information has been entered in the fire statistics ledgers.
The current method of maintaining the Atlas, inaugurated in 1960, combines fire
plotting and fire classification, and has received favourable comment. This system
was made possible with the availability of Province-wide coverage by the Surveys
and Inventory Division 2-mile base maps, and will be considerably improved when
the present black-and-white maps are revised to show water surfaces in a blue
overprint.
'■   Preparations were made to expand the fire data recorded on punched cards to
three cards per fire, and this programme will be proceeded with in 1965.
Sn experimental model of a sferics receiver designed to show the direction of lightning
■ activity by receiving low-frequency waves that are generated at the time of each strike.
Protection Research
Equipment development and experimentation were continued, including work
on hose winders and carriers, emergency rations, propane burning-off torches, plasti-
cised fire-finder maps, and plastic axe-guards.
! Two special field projects were the installation of green-tinted windows in one
lookout in each forest district and field testing of a sferics receiver developed as a
lightning direction finder. Both these projects will be continued and extended
during 1965 on the basis of favourable initial field testing.
I A comprehensive slash-burning research programme was undertaken in cooperation with the Canada Department of Forestry in the Interior Wet Belt.
 48 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
]
A study of range fires in the Chilcotin was completed and a report written.
From this study two educational pamphlets are being prepared—one on " Meadow
Burning," and other on " Game and Fire."
A feasibility survey was made of utilization of Indians for forest fire-fighting on
a regional basis.  Plans are being formulated to initiate a pilot programme in 1965k
A series of statistical and graphical summaries of fire occurrence by Ranges
districts was prepared for the Kamloops and Prince George Forest Districts in addition to other protection planning aids, including lightning occurrence and lookoiM
coverage overlays.
Visibility Mapping and Lookout Photography
One two-man crew, both experienced university students, combined the worB
of both lookout photography and visibility mapping. Both these endeavours are
dependent on good weather conditions and suffered thereby as a result of the genetJ
ally adverse weather that prevailed. One compensating factor was the maximum
utilization of helicopters, made more readily available because of lower than usual
fire-protection demands, thus permitting quick advantage to be taken of breaks in
the weather.
Photographs were taken at some 20 established lookout sites, and four potenS
tial lookout points were examined and visibility-mapped.
Fuel-moisture Indicator Sticks
The number of requests for the 100-gram fuel-moisture indicator (hazard)
sticks continues to increase. This year, after spring field testing, 715 sets were
distributed, 485 sets to industry in British Columbia, 215 sets to be used by the
Forest Service, and the remainder to the Federal Government and the Province of
Alberta.
The co-operation of the Forest Products Laboratory at the University of British
Columbia, allowing the use of the kiln and facilities plus the assignment of a staff
member to assist full time while the Protection Division's representative was there,
is gratefully acknowledged.
Insect Control
An experimental heUcopter spray project, using phosphamidon, was conducted
in July over 1,705 acres of the Queen Charlotte Islands against an infestation of
green-striped looper. This was a joint project by industry, Canada Department of
Forestry, and British Columbia Forest Service. The British Columbia Fish and
Game Branch conducted tests of possible effects of this chemical on birds and small
mammals in the spray area.
Another small experimental phosphamidon spray project against the western
hemlock looper was carried out on 100 acres near Enderby. This project was essentially a joint undertaking by Vernon laboratory and Kamloops Forest District.   ]
Fire-weather Records and Investigation
The appointment of a meteorologist by the Department of Transport to the
position of Forestry Meteorologist at the Vancouver Forecast Office has greatly
improved the quality of the fire-weather forecasts for both industry and the Forest
Service. The degree of accuracy and the usefulness of these forecasts to the variotis
forest districts were favourably commented upon, and were directly proportional to
the quantity and quality of weather data submitted by them.
 n
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 49
The requests for slash-burning forecasts were all handled by the Forestry
Meteorologist, leaving our seconded meteorologist, who is on educational leave, to
carry out other special activities, which included a paper to the International Union
of Theoretical and AppUed Mechanics at Ann Arbor, Mich., and the preparation
of studies of weather conditions associated with the "Dean" fire of 1960 and the
Sprove"fireof 1961.
A map was maintained daUy throughout the 1964 fire season showing in a
colour legend the danger index rating for a number of selected stations throughout
the Province, producing a Province-wide picture on one sheet. It is expected that
this will be revised to include the drought index next year.
A field trip to visit aU Ranger stations in the Nelson Forest District was undertaken by the meteorological assistant. Weather-station sites and the use made of
the Model 8 burning index were checked, and it was found that a great deal of
modification, based on local knowledge, is used in interpreting results.
Eire-suppression Crews
Owing to the Ught fire season the 16 suppression crews fought only 173 fires
in the three southern forest districts. Seventy-six per cent of the fires fought by
these crews were held to less than 1 acre. The locations of two suppression camps
in the Vancouver Forest District were moved from Duncan and Campbell River to
Pemberton and Squamish to handle the changing and increasing protection problem
in those areas. Two suppression crewmen were retained at Campbell River and
formed the basis of the " heUtack " crew.
Eight Indians were successfully employed on four crews in the Kamloops
Forest District. One Indian was appointed as safety officer on one crew, which
worked out very weU. Crewmen were used as " heUtack " crews and for bentonite
mixing at the bomber bases in the Nelson Forest District.
It is becoming more evident each year that the position of sub-foreman should
be set up for each suppression crew. Many Rangers are dissatisfied with the present
method of purchasing food suppUes for suppression-crew camps, and it is hoped that
a better system may be worked out for next year.
Aircraft
P Thirty-eight aircraft were supplied under contract, two more than in 1963.
The new contract did not include a Beaver-type aircraft at Prince Rupert as there
are now suitable local machines available for hire.
The second Beaver-type aircraft at Kamloops was also dropped from the
contract, but the flying-time was supplemented by two Ught patrol aircraft—one at
Williams Lake and one at Kelowna.
Two light patrol aircraft were employed out of the Smithers base in addition
to the two patrol aircraft in the Peace River area. Because the fire season was so
favourable, Uttle use was made of the air tankers. For statistical information on
the use of contract and non-contract aircraft, see Tables Nos. 120 and 121 in the
Appendix.
Roads and Trails
The construction and maintenance of forest-protection roads and trails was
made more difficult due to the very wet season. It was necessary to replace many
small bridges and culverts, especially in the northern areas, due to extremely heavy
rains in the early summer. It was necessary to rearrange the road programme in
many cases so that effective production could be carried out in the drier, graveUy
type areas.   See Table No. 102 in the Appendix for further information.
 1
50        department of lands, forests, and water resources
Slash Disposal and Snag-falling
In the Vancouver Forest District the generaUy damp weather conditions which!
prevailed throughout the season hampered and curtailed the fall slash-burning programme. An acceptable standard of hazard abatement was achieved by operators!
over some 44,000 acres in the district, but the weather influence resulted in non-
acceptable results in many other instances. It was found that slash on northern
exposures and in sheltered drainages, particularly hemlock-balsam types, did not
dry out sufficiently to permit effective disposal, even during the relatively favourable
burning period from mid-August to mid-September. Some satisfatcory abatement
was achieved in isolated areas above 2,500 feet elevation in early October, when a
drying trend became apparent at that level.
The trend toward more broadcast burning and less spot burning continued in
1964, with 91 per cent of hazard reports carrying broadcast recommendations, as
compared with 81 per cent in 1963. For details of slash disposal in the Vancouver
Forest District see Tables Nos. 105 to 108 in the Appendix.
The slash-disposal film produced by the Public Information and Education
Division has been generally well received by both industry and our own field staff,
and it is felt that this film wiU be of particular value to operators who are encountering Forest Service slash-burning requirements for the first time.
Interest in prescribed burning in the Interior districts has accelerated with the!
rapid maturing of an integrated forest industry. Many experimental burns have
been conducted, and valuable information and experience are being gathered. Some
9,000 acres of slash were disposed of by burning in 1964, with Forest Service crews
completing some 3,600 acres.
Forest Service snag-falUng in the Vancouver Forest District saw some 3,300
acres completed under contract, 185 acres under "minor" projects, with reforestation crews completing approximately 480 acres under this programme. For details!
see Table No. 104 in the Appendix.
FIRE-LAW ENFORCEMENT
For the third successive very Ught fire season, during which only a few firefighters were impressed, not a single forest closure was imposed under section 122
of the Forest Act. There were only 10 prosecutions for fire-law infractions. This
was fewer than one-fifth of the average for the last 10 years.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 51
FOREST SERVICE TRAINING-SCHOOL
The 13th class of advanced trainees (Advanced Course No. 13), consisting of
20 men, graduated April 7, 1964. This was the first class to graduate from a six-
month course under the new programme. Graduates from the Advanced Course
(Ranger Course) now total 275.
The third class of basic trainees (Basic Course No. 3), consisting of 20 men,
commenced training on September 21,1964, and graduated on December 22, 1964.
Graduates from the Basic Course now total 60.
Subjects covered during the year were as foUows:—
Advanced Course No. 13, Final Term—Spring, 1964
Subject Days Allotted
PubUc Speaking  AV2
Management Policies and Procedures  8
Pre-suppression  4V_>
Fire Suppression  8
Mensuration  5V_.
Photogrammetry '. ____  2Vi
Scaling (Coast)  14
Scaling (Interior)  2
Ranger District Organization  5
Navigation 1  2
Mechanical Equipment ___  1 V_s
Fish and Game Branch __S f  1
Vancouver Island field trip !  4
Visitors, speakers, spares, trips  2_
Total days 65
Basic Course No. 3—Fall, 1964
Subject Days Allotted
Forest Protection PoUcies and Procedures    4
Forest Management PoUcies and Procedures 6Y2
Pre-suppression Studies    7_
Fire Suppression 14
Forest Measurements .    7V_s
Mathematics    2_
Forest Surveying     5 V2
Silviculture 3
iMechanical Equipment Maintenance and Operation  10
Photogrammetry.                   3
I Opening, closing, exams, clean-up     l1^
Total days 65
pFirst Aid: Two hours per week in evenings for 9 weeks.
Typing: One hour per week for 13 weeks.
^Physical Education: One-half hour per day.
 52 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
EXTRA COURSES AND FUNCTIONS
Training-school faculties were used for two weeks in April by the Department j
of Recreation and Conservation for an in-service training course. Average atten-j
dance was 32 men for 14 days.
The usual course for lookoutmen for the Vancouver Forest District was given
to 15 men from May 5th to 8th.  For the first time the trainees were hired following
the course.  This gave the staff an opportunity to decide who were best for thel
positions available. This system should be repeated.
Staff members assisted with instruction to lookoutmen and dispatchers in the
Nelson Forest District, and also took an active part in the Aircraft Observer Course|
at Kamloops.
Two reading courses are now available to the staff in limited quantities—one]
on the Forest Act and another on mathematics.
Subject outlines and lesson plans have been developed for school subjects.
A type of prospectus for the school was completed, which wjU be printed and dis-J
tributed as soon as possible.
During the summer, assistance was given the Victoria Protection Research
Section with experiments in mixing and dropping Gelgard fire retardant. Experimental work was done with propane torches for burning out fire-lines and slash-
burning. A new type of torch was made up for operational testing in the field.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Appreciation is expressed to speakers and lecturers and for equipment provided by the foUowing agencies: Forest Entomology and Pathology Branch, Canada
Department of Forestry; Air Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, Lands
Service, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources; University of British
Columbia; British Columbia Forest Products Limited; Weldwood of Canada Limited; Burnaby Parks and Recreation Commission; Surrey MunicipaUty; as well as
lecturers from other divisions and districts of the Forest Service.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 53
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
FISCAL
Expectations that 1964 would be another good year for the forest industry were
more than fulfiUed, and the resulting financial return to the Forest Service was
considerably higher than estimated. The total scale of wood harvested again reached
a new record, and there was an absence of prolonged work stoppages or a serious
fire season, but the major factor governing increased revenues was the continued
buoyancy of market conditions. The good prices obtainable for forest products
throughout the year were reflected in higher stumpage prices coUected on timber
sales and cutting permits under the sUding-scale formula.
The percentage increase in the total volume of timber scaled over the 1963
total was 2.8 per cent, but the total of amounts charged to logging operations rose
by 25 per cent to a record $44,970,934 (see Table No. 142 in the Appendix). The
percentage increase by forest districts varied considerably from the situation in 1963.
The Vancouver Forest District, which registered the smaUest increase in 1963,
gained a substantial 40.6 per cent, while the Kamloops Forest District, which recorded the largest increase last year, gained only 1.1 per cent in 1964. Prince
Rupert, Prince George, and Nelson Forest Districts gained 26.7, 19.1, and 13.0 per
cent respectively.
Forest revenue coUected soared to an aU-time high of $42,148,434 (see Table
No. 141), an increase of 20.8 per cent over 1963. The largest single revenue category, timber-sale stumpage, contributed $37,221,058 or an increase of 23.2 per
cent, while the related items, timber-sale rentals and fees and timber-sale cruising
and advertising, were up 1.6 and 26 per cent respectively.
| Timber royalties charged on timber cut from old Crown tenures and Crown-
granted royalty-bearing lands increased moderately by 4.4 per cent to $2,610,292.
Timber-Ucence rentals and fees were down sUghtly by 1.6 per cent and timber-berth
rentals and fees declined 9.9 per cent, but timber-lease rentals and fees rose by 7.5
per cent. These old tenures are graduaUy being eliminated as they are logged, and
the increase is probably due to advance payment of some 1965 rentals and fees.
Forest-protection tax was practically unchanged at $522,672, a reduction of only
0.02 per cent, while misceUaneous revenue again increased, this year by 21.4 per
cent to $210,330. Grazing permits and fees dropped 8.4 per cent, but this should
be offset by late payments in 1965.
Tables showing charges, revenue and expenditure totals for the fiscal year
1963/64 also appear in the Appendix (see Tables Nos. 143, 144,and 145). Details
of expenditure can be found in the Public Accounts, published by the Department
of Finance.
The Federal-Provincial Forestry Agreement was extended for one year to
March 31, 1965, and it was anticipated a further extension or signing of a new
agreement would follow. This had not been decided by the end of 1964.
ADMINISTRATION
Arising out of discussions at the biennial District Foresters' meeting in January,
the Chief Forester directed this Division to conduct a survey of methods practised
in all Forest Service offices with a view to modernization and streamlining. This
was undertaken by the ComptroUer and Chief Accountant, and aU five forest districts
were visited during the year to review procedures at both district headquarters and
Ranger office levels.   It is not anticipated the survey will be completed until late
 54 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1965 as further visits wiU be required to aU districts as well as Victoria divisionS
and their field offices.
However, an interim report was submitted in October making recommendations for certain changes in the expenditure accounting structure.   As a resulfl
effective April 1, 1965, Treasury Board has approved the merger of five administrative votes—salaries, expenses, management, office furniture, and protection—into
a single vote entitled "General Administration, Management, and Protection of
Forests."   This should effect a considerable reduction of paper work on aU levelsj
particularly in the field, and aUow for greater flexibjUty in the expenditure of administration funds.   A merger was also effected of the Engineering Services and Forests
development Roads votes, which should assist in streamlining paper work in the
Engineering Services Division.
Early in 1964 arrangements were made to centralize the preparation of claims
under the Federal-Provincial Forestry Agreement in this Division instead of each of
the four divisions preparing a separate quarterly claim. This proved advantageous
as claims were submitted eariier than in past years and the corresponding payments
from Canada received sooner. By December 31st it was possible to submit a claim
for the balance of the full amount of $1,804,461 payable by Canada.
No changes were made in the organization or personnel estabUshment of the
Division during the year. However, aU sections were kept fuUy occupied to cope
with the expanding volume of work stemming from both the general growth of buss
ness and the need to institute new accounting procedures as required by changes
in poUcy.
As indicated under " Fiscal" above, billing of Crown charges on timber cut
increased substantially, but district offices were able to maintain the improved collection position noted in last year's report.   Most cases requiring Uen action to j
enforce coUection were of a minor nature.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 55
PERSONNEL DIVISION
There were no major personnel changes in the Forest Service during 1964,
and general administration again proceeded without any disruption. Staff turnover
increased over 1963, but the number of applications for employment was sUghtly
below that of the previous year. A general reclassification of professional forester
and professional engineer positions took place, involving approximately 150
foresters and 35 engineers, and while this did create a few anomalies, it was in
general weU received.
In the matter of employee relations, the Deputy Minister and Personnel Officer
met with the British Columbia Scalers' Association in an endeavour to solve some
minor points of grievance. A similar meeting was arranged where the Chief
Forester and Personnel Officer met with the Society of British Columbia Forest
Officers. This meeting was of an exploratory nature, being the first official contact
between the society and the Forest Service, and resulted in a much better understanding of the poUcies and practices on both sides.
One formal grievance was heard by the Chief Personnel Officer of the Civil
Service Commission concerning the lay-off of an employee. The hearing proved
that there was insufficient cause for the lay-off, and the employee was reinstated with
fuU pay back to the date of lay-off. One complaint was received from the Employees' Association, which was resolved by the association representative and the
Personnel Officer at the Departmental level. A general salary increase involving
all employees became effective April 1st.
COMMUNICATIONS AND TRAINING
A District Foresters' meeting was held in January and provided an opportunity
for discussion of common problems throughout the Service, as weU as specific
problems with the headquarters division concerned. FuU-scale Ranger meetings
were held at Prince Rupert, Prince George, and Kamloops, and Ranger zone
meetings were held at Nelson and Vancouver. The district Protection Officers held
a three-day meeting with the headquarters Protection staff in Victoria. The Engineering Services Division held its annual pre-season meeting of engineers. A combined Forest Management and SiUviculture meeting was held at the Forest Service
training-school, with aU district staffs and Victoria headquarters staff participating.
The Personnel Officer and Assistant Personnel Officer, as weU as a number of
other Forest Service officers, took part in vocation-day programmes sponsored by
various schools throughout the Province, and the Service was represented on a
programme of instructive interviews jointly sponsored by the Victoria Chamber of
Commerce and the National Employment Service.
Four men were selected for the ninth class of the course in pubUc administration under the Executive Development Training Plan sponsored by the Government.
In 1964 the administrative responsibility for this programme was transferred from
the University of British Columbia to Victoria University. Class IX of this course
is for employees in the Victoria and Vancouver areas and includes from this Department three foresters and one engineer. Three employees—one forester, one
engineer, and the Personnel Officer—graduated from the sixth class of the programme. A number of field employees took first-aid courses at various levels
throughout the Province, and benefit was gained by several headquarters employees
from Civil Defence sponsored St. John Ambulance first-aid courses in Victoria.
The informal training continued for junior engineers and foresters.
 56 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ESTABLISHMENT, RECRUITMENT, AND STAFF TURNOVER
The permanent Civil Service estabUshment of the Forest Service was increased
from 860 to 863 with the estabUshment of a new forester position in the Reforestal
tion Division to take up the duties of the forester now working in Uaison with the
Corrections Branch of the Department of the Attorney-General on the establishment
and operation of forestry prison camps, and of two radio technician positions for
the Prince Rupert and Vancouver Forest Districts. These two technicians were
required to ease the load on the present technician in these two districts where travel
and communication are difficult.
During the year 63 persons obtained Civil Service appointments and 82 left the
permanent service. Sixteen 25-year service certificates and badges were earned.
There were seven retirements and 107 transfers of permanent staff. Thirteen graduate foresters and five engineers left the Service, and 10 graduate foresters and Hires
engineers were hired.
Turnover of Civil Service appointed staff, including fuU-time casual staff, was
11.6 per cent, up from 9.8 per cent last year and 10 per cent in 1962. The Prince
Rupert Forest District suffered the greatest disruption with 16.4 per cent, followed
by Victoria headquarters and Vancouver with 13 and 12.6 per cent respectively.
The Prince George Forest District had 11.1 per cent turnover, and Nelson District
9.1 per cent. Vancouver Scaling had a turnover of 8.8 per cent. Kamloops Forest
District was lowest at 7.7 per cent.
Professional-staff turnover was 7.5 per cent up from 6.7 per cent last year, ana
technical-staff turnover went from 4 per cent in 1963 to 7.6 per cent in 1964.
Total office-staff turnover at 18 per cent was up only sUghtly, from 17.7 per cent
last year, but stUl much too high for the efficient performance of this important
function.
There were two fatal accidents involving employees during the year, but there
is some doubt in one case as to whether the employee was on duty at the time. In
the matter of discipline among permanent staff or during probationary periods, there
were no employees released by Order in Council and only one disciplinary suspension. No annual statutory merit increases or permanent appointments were withheld.
There were 595 written appUcations for employment processed in the Personnel
Office, in addition to those handled by the district offices and divisional staffs.
Promotional examinations were held as usual for draughtsmen and mapping
assistants, and screening examinations were held for two other positions in accounting and pubUc information. Oral examinations were employed at panel interviews
to fill 32 positions. The Personnel Officer and Assistant Personnel Officer particle
pated in the fiUing of 142 other positions. At the annual spring examination for
Technical Forest Officer 1, 289 candidates sat and 104 qualified. Since there were
only 23 vacant positions for Assistant Ranger, this examination provided an excellent eUgible list for Technical Forest Officer 1 positions in other areas, as well as
any further vacancies for Assistant Ranger.
CLASSIFICATION, SALARIES, AND WORKING CONDITIONS
In addition to the general reclassification of 185 foresters and engineers, 78
requests were received for reclassification of other positions, and of these, 65 were
forwarded to the Civil Service Commission for review. Of this group, 59 were
approved, four were rejected, and two were still tinder review at the year's en(9B
Seven employees were registered as professional foresters and five as professional engineers, one employee receiving registration in both professions.   Working i
! J
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 57
Conditions in general remain unchanged, and although some progress is being made
in the study of special Uving aUowance for northern areas, no decision has yet been
Deceived.
The Service's accident and prevention programme appears to be producing
some results in fewer accidents and fewer time-loss accidents. During the past year
there was a total of 237 accidents, of which 78 were time-loss. The previous year
showed 279 accidents, with 115 causing a loss of over three days. In 1964 the
time-loss accidents were only 33 per cent of the total accidents, while in 1963 time-
loss accounted for 40 per cent of the total number.
 58 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
PERSONNEL DIRECTORY, 1964
(As of December 31st)
VICTORIA HEADQUARTERS
R. G. McKee Deputy Minister of Forests
F. S. McKjnnon Chief Forester
L. F. Swannell Assistant Chief Forester i/c Operations Branch
J. S. Stokes Assistant Chief Forester i/c Planning Branch
Staff Division Heads:
Cooper, C.  ------ Forest Counsel
Hicks, W. V.        --------       Departmental Comptroller
Park, S. E.  -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -    Director, Public Information J
McKeever, A. E. -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -    Personnel Officer
Operations Branch Division Heads:
Forse, H. B.        -------       Forester i/c Protection Division
Greggor, R. D.    -        -       -       -       -       - Forester i/c Engineering Services Division
Hughes, W. G. -       -       -       -        -        -     Forester i/c Management Division
Pendray, W. C. Director, Grazing Division
Robinson, E. W. -       -       -       -       -      Forester i/c Forest Service Training School
Planning Branch Division Heads:
Pogue, H. M.       -       -       -       -       -       -        Forester i/c Working Plans Division
Young, W. E. L. -       -       -       -       -     Forester i/c Surveys and Inventory Division
Silburn, G. Forester i/c Reforestation Division
Spilsbury, R. H.  -       -       -       -       -        -       -       - Forester i/c Research Division
FOREST DISTRICTS
Vancouver Forest District
I. T. Cameron District Forester
J. A. K. Reid      ---- Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Lorentsen, L. H. (ChilUwack); McDaniel, R. W. (Hope); Wilson, R. S. (Harrison Lake);
Webster, J. B. (Mission); Mudge, M. H. (Port Moody); Cairadice, I. H. (Squamish);
Chamberlin, L. C. (Sechelt); Northrup, K. A. (Pender Harbour); Hollinshead, S. B. (Powell
River); Hannah, M. (Land); Stefenac, G. (Thurston Bay East); Nelson, J. N. (Thunton
Bay West); Doerksen, V. I. (Chatham Channel); Teindl, A. I. (Echo Bay); Moss, R D.
(Alert Bay); Neighbor, M. N. (Port Hardy); Carr, W. S. (Campbell River); Antonelli,
M. W. (Courtenay); Norbirg, H. (Parksville); Howard, W. G. (Nanaimo); Sykes, S. I.
(Duncan); Bertram, G. D. (Ganges); Jones, R. W. (Langford); Thomas, R. W. (Lake
Cowichan);  Haley, K. (Alberni);  Doerksen, H. G. (Tofino);  Gill, D. E. (Pemberton).
Deputy Forest Rangers:
Hewitt,E. W. (Hope); Ferrier, D.M. (Lund); Elder,N. (Ganges); Archer, W. C. (Alberni).
Prince Rupert Forest District
N. A. McRae District Forester
Lehrle, L. W.      ------       ...       Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Simmons, C. F. (Ocean Falls); Brooks, T. (Queen Charlotte City); Hamilton, H. D. (Prince
Rupert); Lindstrom, W. C. (Terrace); Gorley, O. J. (Kitwanga); Antonenko, J. (Hazelton);
Hawkins, R. M. (Smithers); Clay, W. D. (Telkwa); Berard, R. K. (Houston); Mould, J.
(Pendleton Bay); Mastin, T. (Burns Lake); Harvie, T. (Bella Coola); Pement, A. T.
(Southbank); Dodd, G. F. (Lower Post); Crosby, D. N. (Topley).
Deputy Forest Rangers:
Barge, V. H. (Telkwa); Jaeger, J. (Hazelton);  Quast, H. W. (Smithers);  Smith, W. H.
(Houston); Waldron, W.C. (Lower Post).
 REPORT OF THE FOREgT SERVICE, 1964 59
Prince George Forest District
A. H. Dixon District Forester
Young, W. --..        Assistant District Forester
^Forest Rangers:
Ward, J. G. (McBride); McRae, M. A. (Valemount); Meents, G. E. (Prince George);
Gibbs, T. R. (Prince George); Ford, C. (Fort St. James); Keefe, R. R. (Quesnel); Barbour, H. T. (Dawson Creek); Amonson, D. A. (Aleza Lake); Graham, G. W. (Vander-
hoof); Espenant, L. G. (Fort St. John); Griffiths, P. F. (Fort Fraser); Waller, T. G.
(Summit Lake); York, G. M. (Fort Nelson); Magee, G. E. (Prince George); Wallin, D. F.
(Hixon); Pearce, F. (Quesnel); Rohn, K. (Quesnel); McQueen, L. (Chetwynd); Magee,
K. W. (Hudson Hope).
Deputy Forest Rangers:
Barton, M. H. (Prince George); Macalister, J. S. (Quesnel); Kalau, W. O. (Fort Fraser);
Marynovich, S. R. (Quesnel).
Kamloops Forest District
W. C. Phillips     -..- District Forester
Boulton, L. B. B.       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -        Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Hopkins, H. V. (Lumby); Ivens, J. H. (Birch Island); Wittner, D. J. (Barriere); Hill, A. F.
(Kamloops (S.)); Paquette, O. (Chase); Gibson, C. L. (Salmon Arm); Jones, G. G.
(Sicamous); Cameron, A. G. (Lillooet); Kuly, A. (Vernon); Scott, E. L. (Penticton);
Baker, F. M. (Princeton); Petty, A. P. (Clinton); Hamilton, T. J. (Williams Lake); Donnelly, R. W. (Alexis Creek); Hewlett, H. C. (Kelowna); Noble, J. O. (Ashcroft); Janning,
H. A. W. (Merritt); Huva, G. G. (Blue River); Collins, B. G. (Enderby); Schmidt, J. T.
(100 Mile (N.)); Weinard, J. P. (Kamloops (N.));  Craig, V. D. (Horsefly);  Monteith,
«M. E. (100 Mile (S.)).
Deputy Forest Rangers:
Cawston, R. L. (Birch Island); Perry, W. R. (Kamloops (S.)); Lynn, J. F. (Chase); Wanderer, J. (Penticton); Ross, B. A. (Alexis Creek);  Dearing, J. C. (Ashcroft);  Reiter, D.
(Merritt); Jones, W. H. (Kamloops (S.)).
Nelson Forest District
J. R Johnston District Forester
Isenor, M. G.    ---------        Assistant District Forester
Barest Rangers:
Taft, L. G. (Invermere); Humphrey, J. L. (Fernie); Anderson, S. E. (Golden); Gierl, J. B.
(Cranbrook (E.)); Ross, A. I. (Creston); Allin, G. B. (Kaslo); Benwell, G. L. (Lardeau);
Robinson, R. E. (Nelson); Jupp, C. C. (New Denver); Raven, J. H. (Nakusp); Wood,
H.R. (Castlegar); Reid, E. W. (Grand Forks); Uphill, W. T. (Kettle Valley); Cartwright,
G. M. (Canal Flats); Russell, P. F. (Arrowhead); Loomer, I. M. (Edgewood); Benwell,
W. G. (Elko); Bellmond, C. N. (Spillimacheen); Bailey, J. F. (Cranbrook (W.)); Hamann,
L. 0. (Beaverdell); Webster, G. R. (Slocan City); Jackson, R. C. (Revelstoke).
Deputy Forest Rangers:
Perdue, J. E. (Invermere); Peterson, E. E. (Creston); Drew, R. A. (Kaslo);  Osborne, H.
(Nakusp); Thompson, H. B. (Kettle Valley); Pistak, W. O. (Edgewood);  Budden, A. T.
(Cranbrook (W.)); Lussier, R. L. (Revelstoke).
    REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 63
TABULATED DETAILED STATEMENTS TO SUPPLEMENT
THE REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE
CONTENTS
Research Division
Tablb
No. PA0E
11. Tabulation of Research Projects Active in 1964     U. .     66
12. Research Publications, 1964    67
Reforestation Division
21. Nursery Stock Distributed, 1964 !1     67
22. Summary of Planting, 1955-64     68
Working Plans Division
31. Summary of Basic Data for Tree-farm Licences (Private Sustained-yield
Units)    69
32. Summary of Basic Data for Certified Tree-farms (Private Sustained-yield
Units)     71
'33. Summary of Basic Data for Farm Wood-lot Licences (Private Sustained-
yield Units)    73
Public Information and Education Division
41. Motion-picture Library, 1955-64     74
42. Summary of Coverage by School Lecturers, 1955-64    75
43. Forest Service Library, 1955-64     76
Forest Management Division
51. Value Added by Manufacture, 1964     77
52. Water-borne Lumber Trade (in M B.M.), 1955-64 fi      78
53. Total Amount of Timber Scaled in British Columbia during Years 1963
and 1964: (A) in F.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet       79
54. Species Cut, All Products, 1964: (A) in F.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet     80
55. Total Scale, All Products, 1964 (Segregated by Land Status and Forest
Districts): (A) in F.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet     81
56. Timber Scaled in British Columbia during 1964 (by Months and Forest
Districts)     82
57. Volume of Wood Removed under Relogging at Reduced Royalty and
Stumpage, 1955-64, in Thousands of Cubic Feet       83
58. Number of Acres Operating under Approved Annual Allowable Cuts,
1955-64     84
59. Total Scale of All Products from Areas Operated under Approved An
nual Allowable Cuts, 1955-64  —    85
60. Logging Inspections, 1964 U     86
 64 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table
No. Paoi
61. Trespasses, 1964 =__ E_-_-_3  87
62. Areas Examined by the Forest Service for Miscellaneous Purposes of
the Land Act, 1964  88
63. Areas Cruised for Timber Sales, 1964  88
64. Timber-sale Record, 1964  88
65. Competition for Timber Sales Awarded, 1964  89
66. Timber Sales Awarded by Forest Districts, 1964  90
67. Average Stumpage Prices as Bid, by Species and Forest Districts, on
Timber Sales during 1964, per C C.F. Log Scale  9l|
68. Average Stumpage Prices Received, by Species and Forest Districts, on
Saw-timber on Tree-farm Licence Cutting Permits Issued in 1964  93
69. Timber Cut and Scaled from Timber Sales, 1964  93
70. Saw and Shingle Mills of the Province, 1964  94
71. Export of Logs (in F.B.M.), 1964 gm. I  95
72. Shipments of Poles and Other Minor Products, 1964  96j
73. Summary of Export of Minor Products for Province, 1964  ^
74. Timber Marks Issued, 1955-64  97
Grazing Division
81. Grazing Permits Issued    97
Engineering Services Division
91. Forest Road Programme, 1964 ; 98
92. Forest Service Mechanical Equipment, 1964 99
93. Building Construction Undertaken during 1964 100
94. Trailers Designed in 1964 101
95. Small-boat Purchases, 1964 101
Forest Protection Division
101. Forest-protection Expenditure by the Forest Service for the Fiscal Year 1
1963-64 102
102. Construction of Protection Roads and Trails, 1964 lffl
103. Reported Approximate Expenditure in Forest Protection by  Other j
Agencies, 1964             102
104. Summary of Snag-falling, 1964, Vancouver Forest District 103
105. Summary of Logging Slash Reported in 1964, Vancouver Forest District m
106. Acreage Analysis of Slash Disposal Required, 1964, Vancouver Forest '\
District ; 103
107. Analysis of Progress in Slash Disposal, 1964, Vancouver Forest District- 104
108. Summary of Slash-burn Damage and Costs, 1964, Vancouver Forest ■
District IO4
109. Fire Occurrences by Months, 1964 105
110. Number and Causes of Forest Fires, 1964_U___ 1Q5
111. Number and Causes of Forest Fires for the Last 10 Years Sff>
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 65
TabU-
No. Paob
112. Fires Classified by Size and Damage, 1964  107
113. Analysis of Suppression-crew Fire-fighting Activities, 1964  108
114. Damage to Property Other than Forests, 1964  108
115. Damage to Forest-cover Caused by Forest Fires, 1964—Parts I and n  108
116. Fire Causes, Area Burned, Forest Service Cost, and Total Damage, 1964 110
117. Comparison of Damage Caused by Forest Fires in Last 10 Years  111
118. Fires Classified by Forest District and Cost per Fire of Fire-fighting, 1964 112
119. Prosecutions, 1964  113
120. Contract Flying, 1964  114
121. Use of Aircraft in Fire-fighting (Non-contract), 1964  114
Training-school
131. Enrolment at Advanced Course, 1964 _.  115
132. Enrolment at Basic Course, 1964  116
Accounting Division
141. Forest Revenue, 1955-64  116
142. Amounts Charged against Logging Operations, 1964  117
143. Amounts Charged against Logging Operations, Fiscal Year 1963/64  118
144. Forest Revenue, Fiscal Year 1963/64        119
145. Forest Service Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1963/64  119
146. Scaling Fund  120
147. Grazing Range Improvement Fund  120
148. Peace River Power Timber Salvage  120
Personnel Division
151. Distribution of Personnel, 1964  121
 66 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(Hi TABULATION OF RESEARCH PROJECTS ACTIVE IN 1964
Experimental
P ro j ec t No.
Title
Region
62-66
283
343
364
384
429
435
468
474
479
482
483
492
497
500
502
513
528
534
537
538
541
554
555
560
570
572
573
581
582
585
586
589
591
592
594
595
599
602
603
605
606
607
609
610
611
613
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
626
628
629
630
631
632
633
Douglas Fir Thinning Experiments-
Douglas Fir Thinning Experiments __
Red Alder Thinning—
Thinning Experiments in Douglas Fir	
Experimental Thinning in Lodgepole Pine...
Spacing Trials of Pure and Mixed Coastal Species..
P onderosa Pine Thinning	
Cone-crop Studies. ,—.	
Inbreeding Experiments with Douglas EitJ
Plus-tree Selection for Douglas Fir Seed Orchards	
Climate and the Altidudinal Distribution of Conifers..
Record of Introduced Species in Plantations	
Douglas Fir Thinning Experiments	
Thinning Studies in Engelmann Spruce	
Hardwood Arboretum
Plantation Trials—
Intra- and Inter-specific Crosses within the Genus Pseudotsuga—
Influence of Time on the Effectiveness of Scarified Seed-beds	
Spacing Trial of Douglas Fir	
White Spruce Spacing Study—
Seed Dissemination and the Influence of Weather Conditions-
Natural Nurseries . . ,, ,,	
Thinning Experiments in Douglas Fir—!
Germination and Survival of Western Hemlock and Associated Species-
A Study of Methods of Planting Ponderosa Pine	
Sitka Spruce Spacing Study	
Planting Trials with Ponderosa Pine-
Planting White Spruce throughout the Growing Season-
Planting Study of 2-f-O Douglas Fir Culls..
Cold Storage of 2+0 Douglas Fir in Multi-wall Bags .
Plantation Studies-
Plan ting-stock Comparison Trials	
Comparison of 2-f-0,2+1, and 1+2 Doulgas Fir on High-site Lands-
Regeneration Study in Cut-over Lodgepole Pine Stands	
Direct-seeding Trial, Mars Creek-
Brush Control, Coastal British Columbia	
Outplanting of Different Fertilized Stock	
Problem  Anlaysis:    Approach  to  Provenance  Experimentation in  Coastal
Douglas Fir	
Lodgepole Pine Problem Analysis	
Study of Some Hand-planting Methods In White Spruce _.
Determination of the Optimum Season for Direct Seeding—-—.. ,	
Direct Seeding of Douglas Fir and Engelmann Spruce _!
Ponderosa Pine Spacing Trials	
A Study of Forest-land Classification, Quilchena.
Photoperiodic Response in White and Engelmann Spruce—
Jennis Bay Reforestation Trials	
Western Hemlock Spacing Study-
Study of Regeneration Problems in Decadent Hemlock-Cedar Stands	
The Effect of Seed-bed Density on the Survival and Initial Growth of 2+0
Douglas Fir Seedlings	
Cone Production in the Interior of British Columbia	
Douglas Fir-Engelmann Spruce Planting Study, 1963
A Study of Forest-land Classification, McGillivray Lake	
Problem Anlaysis:   Genetic Variation and Its Assessment with Reference to
White and Engelmann Spruce——	
Factors Affecting the Germination Behaviour of Interior Spruce	
The Growth Behaviour of Interior Spruce in the Nursery -
Geographic Variation in Spruce Cone Scale Morphology J
Engelmann Spruce Planting Trials, 1964 J
Forest-land Classification, Bear Creek-
Classification of Soil Capability for Forestry	
Spacing Effects on Increments of Individual Trees in Overstocked Juvenile
Stands of Lodgepole Pine
Planting Trials of Douglas Fir, 1964-65	
Exploratory Direct Seeding Trials in the Wet Belt Type of the Southern Interior-
Coastal Douglas Fir Provenance Studies ,	
Vancouver Island!
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Islandl
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
East Kootenay. fl
Kamloops.
Vancouver Island!
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island
British Columbia.
Vancouver Island.-
Kamloops.
Vancouver Wand.;;
Prince Rupert
Vancouver Island.
Prince George, fl
Vancouver Island]
Prince Rupert fl
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert fl
Vancouver Island,
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert fl
Nelson.
Prince George.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.'
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert fl
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island,
Prince Rupert ^M
Prince Rupert fl
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince George.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert.
Kamloops.
Vancouver Island.
Interior.
Kamloops.     ]
Kamloops.    j
All districts,  fl
Prince George.
Prince George.
Prince George.
Nelson.
Okanagan.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert
Kamloops.
Kamloops.
Coast
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
67
f__. RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS, 1964
Ebell, L. F., and Schmidt, R. L. (1964): Meteorological Factors Affecting Conifer Pollen
Dispersal on Vancouver Island. Canada Department of Forestry Publication No. 1036,
Ottawa.
Unpublished Manuscript Reports
•:, Clark, M. B.:  Planting Trials with Ponderosa Pine.
• Clark, M. B.:  Cutting Methods in Overmature Spruce Alpine Fir.
SBs, S.: Garman, E. H.; and Ebell, L. F.:  Relation between Cone Production and Diameter
Increment of Douglas Fir.
Hetherington, J. C:   Seed Dissemination and the Influence of Weather Conditions on This
Process on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.
Hetherington, J. C:   The Germination and Survival of Western Hemlock and Associated
Species on the West Coast of Vancouver Island,
mingworth, K.: Planting Trials with Ponderosa Pine.
Orr-Ewing, A. L.: An Analysis of the Breeding Program for Coastal Douglas Fir.
Roche, L.:  Genetic Variation and Its Assessment with Reference to White and Engelmann
I   Spruce.
Sprout, P. N.; Lacate, D. S.; and Arlidge, J. W. C.: Forest Land Classification Survey, Southern Interior of British Columbia, McGillivray Lake.
(21)
NURSERY STOCK DISTRIBUTED, 1964
Age Classes
Total
for Field
Planting
Nursery
1-1
2-0
2-1,1-2,
and 2-2
1-0 and 3-0
Trees Transplanted
.      -
20,000
4,650
4,723,300
3,528,200
3,257,650
289,400
347,750
35,800
88,000
211,700
95,910
88,800
102,100
47,000
387,750
243,000
46,200
~2,000
620,150
91,900
26,000
4,723,300
3,741,900
3,973,710
490,100
449,850
47,000
428,200
357,000
46,200
1,600
43,400
r-i_ph.ll River
109,000
165,000
504,000
52,000
303,000
479,000
195,000
64,000
1,600
43,400
212,000
Tnt-l.
24,650
12,315,100
1,222,460
740,050
14,302,260
2,083,000
 68
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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69
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 70
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Allowable
Annual
Cut(M
3,600
800
1,500
2,500
550
o   "
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2,000
1,260
800
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1,500
30,000
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 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
71
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS
(PRIVATE SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)
Within Tree-farm Licences
Tree-farm Number
and Licensee
Productive Area (Acres)
Immature
N.S.R.
and
N.C.C.
Total
Area
(Acres)
Mature
Volume
(MCu.
Pt)
Present
Allowable Cut
(MCu.
Ft.)
Estimated
Productive
Capacity
(MCu.
Ft.)
ZaJVancouver Forest District
8. T.FX.No.2	
12. T.F.L. No. 17	
13. T.F.L. No. 20	
KT.FX. No. 21	
-MK TJPX. No. 22	
20. T.F.L. No. 19	
BjOC-Pi. No. 39	
25. T.F.L. No. 37	
.JS. T.F.L. No. 6	
__JWr.F.L. No. 25	
31. T.F.L. No. 25	
Prince George Forest District
41. T.F.L. No. 29	
Nelson Forest District
|b| T_F.L. No. 23	
37. T.F.L. No. 13	
Totals	
Grand totals within
tree-farm licences	
204
51
26,792
10,695
6,119
2,440
24,442
2,964
2,286
3,344
10,095
51,891
179
45,714
17,448
11,849
1,793
12,104
5,884
1,961
13,546
10,477
1,761
259
12,783
2,279
4,446
501
2,216
1,079
425
3,452
2,307
53,856
489
85,289
30,422
22,814
4,734
38,762
9,927
4,672
20,342
22,879
61,959
1,230
93,524
32,691
24,719
5,683
40,249
11,331
4,964
25,151
26,715
135
91,508
37,441
44,515
6,447
96,532
16,040
10,680
10,318
44,947
21
4,242
1,405
1,285
277
1,777
749
282
1,727
2,008
),832 | 172,846 |   31,508 | 294,186
328,216
3,473
504
1,254
4,618
504
5,447
504
1,055 |     3,977
90 |     5,122
5,951 |
210 |
91,010    177,491
I
I
32,061     300,562
I
359,104
3,089
22
4,732
1,742
135
336
2,316
836
530
2,299
2,700
358,563 |    13,773 |      19,887
130
20
Not Included within Tree-farm Licences
Vancouver Forest District
1. Thomas G. Wright—
„. H R Nliftann
m
43
841
383
3,689
235
113
80
129,460
244
165
8,167
20,985
1,982
4,406
4,741
2,037
157
4,002
139,244
2,274
779
1,888
749
106
1,282
27,818
4,735
1,161
657
3
1,534
3,150
287
1,373
1,559
247
165
9,744
24,976
2,652
9,468
6,535
2,150
157
4,679
296,339
2,299
1,010
1,898
749
106
1,437
32,805
4,980
2,335
1,090
305
180
10,347
27,386
3,568
10,303
7,566
2,561
163
4,945
313,479
2,458
1,010
1,947
788
106
1,699
34,706
5,533
2,476
1,090
68
1,045
1,208
1,713
12,176
935
31
9
358
44
10
4. MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Ltd	
5. Western Forest Indus-
430
1,749
6. British Columbia Forest
125
282
100
30
22
29,500
135
7. Victoria Plywood Ltd.	
9. Robert J. Filberg	
10. Canadian Forest Prod-
606
492
141
597
27,635
25
231
10
155
4,774
47
985
178
17
17. British Columbia Forest
248
1,105,704
266
19. MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell RivprTtt..
21,456
22. Merrill&Ring	
23. W. & W. Holdings Ltd.-
2^ Merrill & Ring-Canadian Properties Inc.	
2g£ Merrill  &  Ring-Canadian Properties Inc.
32. SavarylslandHotelsLtd.
and A. B. Christopher —
197
111
(I)
213
198
189
255
59
151
5
16
65
175
67
5
90
39. Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd
347
348
160
160
1,470
42. John C. Cowan—.
250
44.Friedrich W. Fuerst zu
WM
180
45. Erbprinz Von Hohenzol-
lfim
60
Totals
135,699
227,579
42,543
405,821
432,616
1,124,322
30,543
27.9S1
 72
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS
(32i (PRIVATE SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)—Continued
Not Included within Tree-farm Licences—Continued
Productive Area (Acres)
Total
Area
(Acres)
Mature
Volume
(MCu.
Ft)
Present
Allowable Cut
(MCu.
Ft)
Estimated
Tree-farm Number
end Licensee
Mature
Immature
N.S.R.
and
N.C.C.
Total
Productive
Capacity
(MCu.
Ft)  1
Nelson Forest District
26. Kirk Ltd.
27. The  Crow's Nest Pass
96
25/157
31,646
33,804
370
16,999
77,301
2,931
24,048
848
52,808
4,480
3,349
17,095
106,107
2,931
26,030
32,494
86.612
22,362
236,807
3,230
28,835
33,632
139341
6,061
(488,762)
37,627
(79,066)
(1,072,896)
85,572
66,839
6,558
(194,235)
1,510
(18,496)
(174,009)
945
1,370
175
(42737a
33. Elk-torn Ranch & Emerald Christmas Tree Co.
36. J. Hofert Ltd.	
38. William T. Joyce Co_   .
40. Kootenay Lake Logging
(73,275)
(651,050)
1,029
1360
1,982
43. Donald D. MacDonald—
613 j     5/163
245
Totals
91,373
179,415
5,944    276,732
1
470,268 |     196,596 |      4,000 1        4,077
|(1,640,7_!4)|(386,740)|(1,U1,7^
Grand totals not within tree-farm licences.
227,072
406,994
1
48,487 1 682,553
1
902,884 | 1,320,918 |   34,543 |     32-0-9
1(1,640,724) |(386,740) | (1,151,700)
Numbers In parentheses are Christmas trees.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
73
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR FARM WOOD-LOT LICENCES (PRIVATE
(33) SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)
Farm Wood-lot Number
and Licensee
Productive Area (Acres)
Crown       Private      Total
Total
Area
(Acres)
Total Mature Volume
(M Cu. Ft)
Crown     Private     Total
Allowable
Annual
Cut(M
Cu. Ft)
Vancouver Forest District
1. Copley, G. R_
5. Thompson, A. R_-
»8. Heiltkla, E	
17. WeUs,G.E	
K2. Kirkelund, P	
26. Dawson, C.	
34. Morris, F	
40. Courchene, R. O..
Jgl. Jones, T. E. D—
43. Evans, L. W.	
44. Wilson. M. R	
46. Williams, G. C._
49. Fail.J.S.T.	
52. Dawson, H	
57. Me-lor, J. G	
§p. Kokaska, A	
- 78. Plckard, G.	
Totals	
Prince Rupert Forest District
28. Priest C. V.	
42 Nysven, K.	
66. Grainger. B. H	
70. Burt, A. H	
73. Sprigler, L. F.	
77. Hewett, H. F .
Totals	
Prince George Forest District
14. Macallister, J. M.	
31. Mvers, A. P	
ESHUler, W	
38. Miller, A. B	
45. Douglas, E. C.	
Hj. Sanford, J	
■53; Hiller, B	
54. Teichman. O	
BSKKienzle, C. W.	
59. McCauley, H. K	
61. Kaska, M. G	
63. Walsh, G. D	
67. Higdon, J. and K	
68. Aiken, E.F.	
74. Caron, L. A
75. Lavally, E. I	
76. Paley, W. J	
79. Windt T. E	
Totals	
Kamloops Forest District
3. Myers, J. A.      	
"ag. Black, W.	
29. Hankey, A	
39. Kershaw, R. T	
48, Durrell, J. M	
72. Law, D. A	
Totals	
§V Nelson Forest District
7. Bombini, S	
1.8 Siska, C.	
21. Sahlstrom, G. O	
60. Stevenson, J., and Boyd,
R.A.___	
62. Braisher, O.	
65. Johnson, B. P	
69. Davidson, D. G.	
71. Carey, F. H	
Totals	
Grand totals	
107
70
135
101
70
190
174
122
29
235
152
75
253
198
186
122
115
7
62
19
130
145
143
139
70
197
236
130
29
249
152
113
253
198
202
122
134
150
232
159
199
92
274
494
223
69
304
282
189
321
202
202
136
138
308 | 2,642 | 3,666
143
353
321
343
296
336
110
240
37
253
593
358
343
384
336
640
927
824
480
825
350
258
400
292
222
283
154
240
240
240
200
245
218
289
225
202
243
138
281
28
353
400
292
250
283
157
240
240
240
250
274
218
289
225
202
243
191
284
428
404
299
251
302
166
240
240
240
250
274
226
290
256
202
249
193
286
4,370 |  261 | 4,631 | 4,796
236
142
154
320
499
417
110
48
236
252
202
320
499
453
260
276
326
160
540
724
31
35
86
66
640
419
72
143
374
195
316
343
550
362
576
106
74
60
35
118
66
640
430
80
143
414
195
349
343
550
362
576
106
4,388 |   153
354
178
616
372
365
214
698
372
392
387
550
321
785
170
186
263
648
645
642
261
332
427
381
429
540
370
387
271
91
641 |
321 |
785
3
173 1
186 1
6
269 1
648 |
645 1
642 |
261 1
332 ;
427 ]
381 !
429 |
_
540 |
370 1
387
5
276 j
98
176
126
162
154
238
564
515
147
13
90
147
382
379
27
118
245
189
216
309
536
617
591
633
254
195
270
333
567
617
601
633
2,033 | 1,303 | 3,336 [ 3,470
12,297 | 2,541 | 14,838 | 18,264
286
27
127
112
865
235
286
45
127
112
865
235
153
176
123
193
160
443
243
24
2
96
46
109
240
19
122
155
272
169
302
400
462
251
544
2,133
17,532   |      953   | 18,485
3.0
6.0
1.0
6.0
2.6
9.0
6.5
2.5
2.0
5.0
4.0
8.0
4.5
10.0
7.0
10.0
8.0
10.0
8.0
6.2
4.0
8.3
6.2
io.o
8.0
10.0
9.5
6.0
5.5
10.0
10.0
10.0
5.0
5.0
7.0
4.5
7.0
9.0
5.9
7.0
4.0
6.0
10.0
7.5
18   |    1,670   |     40.0
4.9
3.4
6.0
6.7
9.4
4.2
 74
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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75
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 76 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(43) FOREST SERVICE LIBRARY, 1955-64
Items Catalogued and Indexed
sir?
III
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
55
190
94
136
141
1,090
37
179
170
151
177
1,321
45
266
109
155
48
177
159
133
43
142
165
130
302
1,502
39
123
200
115
274
999
31
92
135
134
375
878
29
113
140
151
378
911
23
191
110
151
370
1,165
30
146
92
151
380
1,263
Government reports and bulle-
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1371
Serials	
References indexed.
214
1/117
230
1,139
284
1,168
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
77
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 78
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
■3 uS
,727
,225
91
,129
,337
068
89
,406
,458
,853
117
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79
TOTAL AMOUNT OF TIMBER SCALE BILLED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
DURING YEARS 1963 AND 1964 IN F.B.M.
(53A)
(All products converted to f.b.m.)
10-year Average, ,
Forest District 1955-64
Decrease     Net Increase
-Vancouver	
'Prince Rupert (C).
Totals, Coast—
5'Prince Rupert (I.)_
trPrince George	
Kamloops	
.Nelson	
3,610,774,804
445,010,261
4,246,691,460
I     640,847,064
4,392,978,408
577,798,368
4,055,785,065 | 4,887,538,524 | 4,970,776,776
271,369,917
831,400,389
1,133,862,895
614,270,920
394,162,098
1,079,231,863
1,466,537,891
848,361,446
412,424,707
1,165,780,823
1,449,044,609
918,011,046
Totals, Interior-
Grand totals—
2,850,904,121 | 3,788,293,298 | 3,945,261,185
6,906,689,186 I 8,675,831,822 I 8,916,037,961
I
18,262,609
86,548,960
156,967,887
— I 240,206,139
TOTAL AMOUNT OF TIMBER SCALE BILLED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
DURING YEARS 1963 AND 1964 IN CUBIC FEET
(Conversion factors:   Coast—6 f.b.m.=l cu. ft; Interior—5.75 f.b.m.=l cu. ft.)
ff) (All products converted to cubic feet.)
Forest District
10-year Average,
1955-64
1963
1964
Increase
Decrease
Net Increase
601,795,801
74,168,376
707,781,910
106,807,844
732,163,068
96,299,728
24,381,158
Prince Rupert (C.)_
10,508,116
675,964,177
814,589,754
828,462,796
13,873,042
Prince Rupert (I.)	
47,194,768
144,591,372
197,193,547
106,829,725
68,549,930
187,692,498
255,050,068
147,541,121
71,726,036
202,744,491
252,007,758
159,654,095
3,176,106
15,051,993
12,112,974
3,042,310
495,809,412
658,833,617
686,132,380
27,298,763
1,171,773,589
1,473,423,371
1,514,595,176
41,171,805
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80
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS,
FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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TOTAL SCALE OF ALL PRODUCTS BILLED IN 1964 IN F.B.M.
(SEGREGATED BY LAND STATUS AND FOREST DISTRICTS
Prince
Rupert
(Coast)
Prince
Rupert
(Interior)
Prince
George
Kamloops
Special timber licences
Timber berths	
Timber leases	
Pulp leases	
Pulp licences —.	
Farm wood-lots	
Timber sales	
No mark visible	
Tree-farm licences	
Miscellaneous	
K Sub-totals, Crown
C    lands	
Federal lands	
Crown grants—
To 1887	
1887-1906	
1906-1914	
1914 to date	
Totals	
941,320,962 315,180
79,391,208
94,640,310
53,937,024
19,354,446
334,758
1,302,922,356|233,141,958
128,808,6421	
568,095,816|197,170,356
4,138.I64|   5,846,862
15,743,339   28,295,
39,484,531   55,576,
18,984,342
67,520,724
42,148
281,602,305
663,849
1,003,189,948
110,355,397
1,964,752
64,117,779
14,542,072
185,725
1,021,112,422
71,931,505
19,087,200
3,192,943,686 522,979,422
20,131,686   14,086,998
977,943,708
79,994,694
21,482,310
393,966,902
2,662,779
202
504,153,
216,609.
10,202.
1,000,
174,
94.
72
86
1
4,346.
128.
1,228.
821,524
452,123
,640,310
.921,366
.875,170
428,857
122,434
.808,642
,280,017
,781,275
1,097,657,457 1,167,544,722 815,039
251,062     53,769,187    4,318
40,245
3,516,9961 396,146
6,649,980|    2,954,482
100,482,324| 30,564,972[ 12,404,153
166,687 46,186,777
147,091 23,450,231
5,666,464 29,691,833
61,892,062 128,401,859
4,392,978,4081577,798,3681412,424,707
1,165,780,82311,449,044,609
529 7,19%
181      95,
131,718
219,893
10,745,853
49,704,115
13,695,827
24,507,541
1,035,083,270
157,209,273
80,140,896
358,252,911
918,011,04618,916,037,961
I
TOTAL SCALE OF ALL PRODUCTS BILLED IN 1964 IN CUBIC FEET
(SEGREGATED BY LAND STATUS AND FOREST DISTRICTS)
(55B) (Conversion factors: Coast—6 f.bjn.=l cu. ft.; Interior—5.75 f.b.m.=l cu. ft.)
Land Status
Prince
Vancouver      Rupert
(Coast)
Prince
Rupert
(Interior)
Prince
George
Kamloops
Nelson
Total
Special timber licences.
156,886,827
.13,231,868
52,530
400
2,633,706
2,737,972
6,866,875
4,921,032
9,665,458
167,232,467
29,764,201
15,773,385
8,989,504
3,225,741
55,793
217,153,726
21,468,107
94,682,636
689,694
3,164,057
11,253,454
38,856,993
W30
48,974,314
12,153,561
14,479,195
Farm wood-lots	
Timber sales
115,452
174,467,817
32,300
177,584,769
35,196
87,678,860
246,071
744,716,479
21,468,107
Treo-farm licences——
Miscellaneous	
32,861,726
974,477
19,192,243
341,696
11,150,918
2,529,056
12,509,827
3,319,513
37,671,159
1,774,300
208,068,509
9,628,736
]   Sub-totals, Crown
; glands	
Federal lands
Crown grants—
T0 18R7
532,157,281
3,355,281
87,163,237
2,347,833
68,515,983
463,092
190,896,949
43,663
28,989
25,581
985,472
10,763,837
203,051,256
9,351,163
8,032,483
4,078,301
5,163,797
22,330,758
141,746,005
750,988
1,868,844
8,644,194
2,381,883
4,262,181
1,223,530,711
16,312,020
172,927,933
1887-1906
1906-li>t_
13,332,4491       586,166|         68,895
3,580,385    1,108,330       513,823
16,747,054|   5,094,162|   2,157,244
26,735,586
13,733,690
61,355,236
Totals
202,744,491
252,007,758
159,654,095
1,514,595,176
 82
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 83
I. OLUME OF WOOD REMOVED UNDER RELOGGING AT REDUCED ROYALTY
AND STUMPAGE, 1955-64, EST THOUSANDS OF CUBIC FEET
(57) (1955-63—Vancouver Forest District only.   1964—Vancouver and Prince Rupert.)
Salvage Wood Salvage Wood
Year (MCu. Pt) Year (MCu. Ft)
1955 1,209 1960 1,976
1956 1,795 1961 1,813
1957 3,663 1962 2,580
1958. 1,427 1963 3,217
[    1959 1,257 1964 5,2241
i Prince Rupert, 901 M cu. ft
Ten-year average, 1955-64, 2,416 M cu. ft.
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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85
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 86 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(60) LOGGING INSPECTIONS, 1964
Forest District
Type of Tenure Operated
Timber
Sales
Leases, Licenses, Crown
Grants,
and Other
Tenures
Number of Inspections Made
Timber
Sales
Other
Tenures
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert	
Prince George __-_—___
Kamloops	
Nelson	
Totals, 1964 ___
Totals, 1963	
Totals, 1962	
Totals, 1961	
Totals, I960	
Totals, 1959	
Totals, 1958	
Totals, 1957	
Totals, 1956	
Totals, 1955	
Ten-year average, 1955-64.
1,228
609
1,653
1,862
1,205
1,600
305
2,084
1,609
962
2,828
914
3,737
3,471
2,167
4,654
2,631
4,474
3,565
2,465
3,727
692
5,508
1,442
1,942
6^57
6,560
6,926     |
7,249     |
6,892     I         5,765
1	
13,117
17,789
13,311
18,602      |      6,353
18,330     |     6,242
C1)
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10,277
C1)
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12,657
.381
323
982
,007
,4071
,100
2101
__5J
572|
-5i|
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5,253
_7>38~
2*355]
5,239
1 No breakdown made prior to 1961.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
87
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 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
AREAS EXAMINED BY THE FOREST SERVICE FOR MISCELLANEOUS
(62)
PURPOSES OF
THE LAND ACT, 1964
Forest District
Applications for
Foreshore Leases
Applications to
Purchase
Miscellaneous
Total
Number
Acres      Number
Acres
Number
Acres
Number
Acres 1
Vancouver .—-
Prince Rupert	
25
14
473             1
213             9
15
211
9
15
23
449
35          511   j
38     1     873
Totals.
39
686            10
226
24
472
73     1   1,384
AREAS CRUISED FOR TIMBER SALES. 1964
Forest District
Number
Cruised
Saw-
timber
(M C_F.)
Pit-props,
Poles, and
Piles
(Lin. Ft.)
Shingle-
bolts and
Cord-
wood
(Cords)
Railway*
ties
(No.)
Car-stakes,
Posts.
Shakes,
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert —	
Prince George	
Kamloops . .—
Nelson  —
Totals, 1964	
Totals, 1963	
Totals, 1962-—	
Totals, 1961	
Totals, 1960	
Totals, 1959	
Totals, 1958	
Totals, 1957	
Totals, 1956	
Totals, 1955	
Ten-year average, 1955-64
509
231
338
405
226
112,796
63,591 |
166,420
200,173
118,841 |
256,391
145,638
297,649
293,635
114,115
1,709 |  661,821 | 1,107,428
1,862 j 716,699 j 1,165,976
1,871 | 615.500 I  921,710
1,892 | 720,144 | 1.027,243
767,351 I 1,142,479
2317    |     681,550 |     877,370
1,922   j    609,563 |    890.285
2.582
781,748 I 1,171,283
1.095,150 | 1,273,970
1,077.986 |  1,131.521
772,751
4,000
833
2,500
1,949,000
987,671
I
12,816
7,345
634
2,258
2,101
104,670
7,650
50,000
2,944,004 |   25,154 [        |    478,52g|
3,887,525 I   32,519 | |    656,68(8
|    564.865J
7,687,920 |    14,798 I   24,000 I 1,395,285 |
8,807,614 |   29,050 |   13,809 | 1,405,370
7,387,960 |   27,753 |   26,875 | 1,124,400   !
8,772.888 |    24,316 |    34,430 | 1,146,719    I
16,099,489 |    39,254 |    95.209 | 1,149,133
13,981,856 j   44,287 | 128,432 | 1,916,510
9,885,451 |    16,819 | 145.525 |    501.820   1
9,796,279 I   27,329
46,828 I 1.033.93-1
I
(64)
TIMBER-SALE RECORD, 1964
Forest District
Sales           Sales
Made          Closed
Total
Sales
Existing
Total Area
(Acres)
Area Paying
Forest-protection Tax
(Acres)
Total   1
10-per-cent
Deposits
Vancouver	
I                   1
583                533             1,731
267                231             1,043
404      1         360             1,242
450               415             1,643
192      j         167      |         664
611,899
411,122
689,799
1,007,911
612,941
569,358
377,886
604,131
970,585
573,107
$6,353,607.60   1
1,679,922.70   .
Print.!. fi«.Tgft
Kamloops	
2,526,772.55   1
3,676,938.76
1,982,985.30   E
Totals	
fnefi ...leu
1,896      |      1,706
385      |
6,323
3,333,672
3,095,067
$16,220,226.91   .
	
,2-        |     .        .
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 94
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
a
o
a
•s
00
1
a
a
V.
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MBJP.
«,
rf    OO    vn    fS    Ov    rt
rt    —    ^o    Ov    rf    Ov
co  p.  n  in  Ov   m
ci   to  p.   rt   rt  in
VO   Ov   O   CO   CO   Oi
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3
Z
in     |-HtJ-   vO   OV   ^   CN   »
1
(-
CO
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
npwt fi  vn  oc- eo ^h
©CMTtC-Ov    to    ov   n   n   00
CN ^" InC. m    O   rf   CM   v-O   CO
S  S  S  2  oo  eo
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g
2
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00   00    —   Ov   O    rt
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3
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Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
oo CM
sO
1 VOrrf   O   CO   rt   p.   ©
CO          <_   O   OS    n   m
vo  ©  m   Ov  os
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1
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013 M
111
3_3_3
Qt     j V
Os       1
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MBJ*.
7,465
2,216
7,987
7,674
3,523
28,865
29,339
28,234
29,025
29,432
O   _■ CM  O vo  cM
00    OS    VI    CO     —    p-
CS    vO   C-l©^   ©   rf
cs c* ct es cs  cm
I
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in  o  in  in  Ov  O
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ts" cs" es es cm rt
Forest District
_
c
s.
_  eo cm ri q
SO   vo   sO   vo   vO
Ov   Ov    Ov   Ov    OV
Br 1959
s. 19S8
8,1957
s. 195fi
8, 1Q55
/car average, 1Q55-64
Vancouv
Prince R
Prince G
Kamloop
c     O     O     O    O     O
5 H H H H H
Z
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H H H H H H
 1(71)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
EXPORT OF LOGS (IN F.B.M.), 1964
95
Species
Grade No. 1
Grade No. 2
Grade No. 3
Ungraded
Fuel-logs
Total
212,599
39,599
9,179,035
2,250,489
429,094
201,988
12,221,384
8,473,331
641,693
253,013
23,920,347
10,953,754
3,375,570
1,612
11,232,701
11,426
2,519,166
167,353
762
62,581
21,491
-
3,354,079
1,040,432
1,612
7,770,484
2,421,785
487,026
815
385,969
10,000
1,691,717
2,574,712
3,748,377
14,590,533
30,789,610
3,740,863
84,834
52,954,2171
Totals "-I
3,468,986
16,149,811
62,790,210
10,274,991
107,529
92,791,527
B Totals, 196?. -
3,773,734
11,215,447
46,151,663
13,143,092
696,436
74,980,372
Totals, 1961           .-   .
9,216,534
28,611,982
48,009,763
12,202,800
3,311,119
101,352,198
1,391,803
5,351,398
20,872,330
11,805,419
890,260
40,311,210
Totals, i<™
486,685
2,601,653
19,608,208
3,999,901
1,839,030
28,535,477
Totals '<"_
734,991
3,727,452
16,164,689
3,715,124
3,762,411
28,104,667
Totals 1Q57
524,180
3,987,443
22,016,2.1
5,625,910
3,421,354
35,575,178
Totali, 1956
183,859
2,933,129
27,433,037
12,929,722
3.530,479
47,010,226
Totals, 1955
906,141
7,468,949
58,863,477
16,974,165
4,754,796
88,967,528
K? Ten-year average, 1955-64.
2,443,529
9,663,780
35,269,927
9,441,199
2,239,825
59,058,260
iOf this total, 2
24,507.549 f.b.m. were
8,446,668
exported
f.b.m. were
under permit
exported from Crown-granted lands carrying the export privilege;
from other areas.
 96           DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(72)         SHIPMENTS OF POLES AND OTHER MINOR PRODUCTS, 1964
Forest District and Product
Quantity
Exported
Approximate
value,
F.O.B.
Where Marketed
United
States
Canada
Other ■
Countries
Vancouver—
Pnlwi                                                    Hn. ft
5,171,912
1,354,842
3,064
33,692,484
20,000
31,020
4
2,614,920
26/140
16,473
27,799
275
1,133,945
17,090
865
460,991
1,547,490
52,353
175,300
47,844
2,983
21
18
1,147,1_3
630,957
179,302
$2,781,057.45
478,838.76
919.20
2,695,398.72
3,000.00
40,842.00
88.00
993,669.60
10,600.40
5,930.28
6,393.77
453.75
362,862.40
4,2-_0
34,600.00
278,594--)
693,472.00
6,282.00
5,259.00
478.00
149,150.00
525.00
144.00
917,706.00
100,953.00
21,516.00
561,525
232,129
3,913,186
35,489
3,064
33,615,702
697,201
1,087,224
~ 76,7-iH
"f~.«Tici»-pn_t«                                      pipi.(..
Cedar shakes
Shako blanks.                             „
20,000
31,020
4
1,568,952
21,640
Pulpwood                               _■___•__.*
Prince Rupert—
Poles lin. It
Prince George—
Pn1«                                                    Hn «
1,045,968
4,800
16,473
27,799
 '1
ppnpr-.pni.ti.                                      pifffn
275
438,097
 M
Kamloops—
CfAar pn1r>c                                      Hn  ft
Poles ani, piling                                       fJ
Posts cords
Christmas trees pieces
Nelson—
Poles and piling lin. ft
Vflnn rtmhcrc                                             f
i*_re.hflrrt-.prnp«_                                      „
rnrral-rfl.lt.                                            „
Fence-posts cords
Shingle-bolts                               ,
695,848
17.090
865	
25.004             435.987
758,735
52,353
788,755
1
175,300
47,844
2,438
21
18
160,599
22,380
51,5-7
545
986,534
608,577
1_7,785
Christmas trees                      .pieces
—_.
Palings and pickets „
	
$9,591,006.43
1                     1                 ■
Total value, 1963	
$11,378,235.23
1
SUMMARY OF EXPORT OF MINOR PRODUCTS FOR
C73J                                                      PROVINCE, 1964
Product
Quantity
Value
Per Cent of
Total Value
8,947,217     j     $4,148,189.85
1,371,315                 484,769.04
1,564,580      j           697,744.50
52.353                      6,282.00
175,300                     5,259.00
47,844      1                 478.00     1
33,692,484     j       2,695,398.72     I
650.957      1           103,953.00
1,639,419               1,235,596.35      |
179,302      |             21,516.00
30,863      |               7,312.97
3,848                183,750.00
4      |                   88.00
18      |                  144.00
21                       525.00
43.2508
5.0544
7.2750
0.0655
0.0548
0.0050
28.1034
1.0839
12.8829
0.2243
0.0762
1.9159
0.0009
0.0015
0.0055
.pieces
r.r*p1.(trn-prnpB
_*T-i4_r eh _V_-
TJMipft-rM.««
-    ,.
TWinw-prnrw
<i.rnffii-i_.itc
$9,591,006.43
100.0000
*_._
 (74)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
TIMBER MARKS ISSUED, 1955-64
97
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
10-year
Average,
1955-64
Old Crown grants	
609
480
320
215
299
315
268
300
313
356
348
Crown grants, 1887-
1906 .	
218
207
108
93
103
115
121
150
125
148
139
Crown grants, 1906-
. 1914...        	
171
172
97
93
125
123
121
164
161
164
139
Section 58, Forest Act..
653
655
460
362
524
•517
470
589
608
672
551
Stumpage reservations
95
82
59
89
108
116
117
109
141
149
107
Pre-emptions.	
2
6
1
1 H--
3
9
13
7
4
10
10
7
7
9
4
4
Indian reserves	
31
46
23
9
21
15
8
20
18
27
22
3,130
2,859
2,239
1,900
1,926
2,136
2,141
1,991
2,183
2,281
2,279
Special marks and
rightsof-way	
43
71
74
80
85
113
91
90
97
121
87
gulp leases _	
6
1
1
7
1
1
5
5
3
	
	
	
2
	
4,968
4,589
3,389
2,855
3,201
3,456
3,349
3,441
3,671
3,934
3,687
Transfers and changes
_f mflrVc
867
873
615
598
669
794
691
809
725
802
744
GRAZING PERMITS ISSUED
Number of
Permits
Issued
Number of Stock under Permit
Cattle
Horses
Sheep
1,322
467
310
5
139,666
21,396
12,535
80
3,816
1,212
1,203
18,307
1,808
2,363
Vancouver
	
Tntalv,, 10-1
2,104
173,677
6,231
22,478
T_l.lv,, 106.
1,951
158,840
5,860
25,366
Totals, 1067
1,924
146,830
5,007
23,370
Total.:, 1961
1,825
132,749
4,985
21,309
Totalis, 10611
1,726
127,148
4,504
19,460
Totals, 10 .0
1,683
124,425
4,377
20,604
Totals, 1958
1,571
122/189
4,169
20,927
Total., 1057
1,640
128,978
3,886
20,693
Totals, 105R
1,776
127,182
3,667
22,310
Totals, 1055
1,705
121,284
3,575
22,560
 ^
98 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(91) FOREST ROAD PROGRAMME, 1964
Project
Regulation Unit
Reconnaissance
Location
Construction    j
Vancouver Forest District
Yale P.S.Y.U.	
Harrison P s v it
Miles
5
14
11
3
7
27
46
12
14
4
23
40
39
9
11
7
5
Miles
13.2
8.6
3.0
1.0
6.0
3.0
2.7
10.6
7.3
1.1
37.7
8.1
14.6
8.4
24.8
10.3
2.0
13.7
14.9
4.3
9.1
Miles
Rrnllphlnn P .. V II
V.l.P   . VII
Harriovn P S Y II
P.mii.til_n P   . V TI
...h.ltP   . VII
H.n__PSVI!
Bi-,fH_v P   . Y It
Vat.   P   . V 11
WPSV1I
..__ P .. V II
Vat.   P. VII
Prince Rupert Forest District
..l_..n. P   . V 11
St""'» <! VII
:-W— a P .. V il
<__»_.-l P . . V II
Prince George Forest District
fa— P .. V II
N_vA_.i-r._ii TJr_ T_
Naver P.S.Y.U. and
Stuart Lake P.S.Y.U	
Wltl-v. _!«—P.VTT
0.2
Kamloops Forest District
Astin-la P .. V II
22.0
V.I.WvmPSVll
9.4
Craigellachie-Anstey Arm	
.h,--.r P   . Y II
TasAV- P .. Y II
Parri.-. P   . V II
11.3
Nelson Forest District
Arm__PSVTI
10.8
WhiteHinRP.R, , ,
1Ipprr Kootenay P K V TT,
0.1
277
4,080
212.7
1,909.7
80.4
774.2
gramm.*, 1O^0_»54
4,357
2,122.4
854.6
F.D.R.__Forest-development road.
P.S.Y.U.=Public sustained-yield unit.
F_R.=Forest Road.
 (92)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
FOREST SERVICE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT, 1964
99
Type
Sedans ■	
Suburbans, station wagons, sedan deliveries	
Panel deliveries :	
, Four-whe«l-__ve passenger types	
I Four-wheel-drive pick-ups, power wagons, panel deliveries-
5,000-10,000 G.V.W. pick-ups, _i and 1 ton	
B4,000-24,000 G.V.W. trucks, 2, 3, and 4 tons	
124,000-40,000 G.V.W. heavy-duty trucks	
Kire-nghting tank-trucks	
Total vehicles ,—
Trail motor cycles	
Tractors	
Graders-
Scrapers—self-propelled	
Scrapers—not self-propelled...
Shovels—power-
Loaders—self-propelled	
Outboard motors —	
Fire-pumps—various 	
Fire-pumps—portable tanker	
Bean fire-fighting units—high _>reS-Ure_.
Borate mixer pumps	
Chain-saws J
Lighting plants	
Snow sedan—prope_or-_riven_
Speeders—railway	
Trailei-—low and high bed	
Trailers—dwelling and bunk house .
Trailers—miscellaneous	
Air-compressors	
Range-land drill	
iRock drill—gas-powered—
Muskeg and snow tractors (personnel carriers)..
Crushing plants	
Mechanical wheelbarrows	
Welders	
Cement-mixers	
Augers—power, planting
Fork-lift trucks	
Total
Units,
Jan. 1,
1964
46
1,16
70
118
288
174
55
2
2
2
393
826
108
34
10
384
101
1
14
9
166
245
9
Removed
from
Service
6
16
16
19
48
25
4
1
2
25
26
80
4
New
Purchases
10
15
19
28
43
29
3
2
1
23
1
3
38
34
17
73
6
5
39
2
1
Total
Units,
Jan. 1,
1965
50
115
73
127
283
178
54
5
3
65
43
18
4
2
2
3
406
834
125
34
10
377 '
103
163
284
20
12
7
3
2
 .
100 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(93) BUILDING CONSTRUCTION UNDERTAKEN DURING 1964
Location
Project
Construction
Agency
Progress
Carry-over of 1963/64 Programme
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces__
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces.
Own forces
Own forces	
Own forces.
Own forces	
Own forces.   .
Own forces	
Contract	
Own forces. _
Own forces	
Own forces—
Own forces.   -
Own forces—
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces. .
Own forces	
Own forces—
Own forces—
Own forces—
Contract	
Own forces	
Contract—__
Contract	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Contract _
Contract .
Own forces—
Contract -
Contract —
Own forces-
Contract -
Contract —
Contract	
Own forces	
Contract	
Own forces	
Own forces	
Contract -
Own forces—
Own forces	
Own forces-
Own forces .
Own forces	
Design proceeding.
frrmrrn TimViM^
Mesachic T ot«
Completed.
1964/65 Programme
Wr.lt.Hri II in C
Renovations to seed-extracting plant-
Design proceeding.
Extension to cold-storage building	
Firtfnjrion to irrigation system
Design proceeding.
Design proceeding.
Extension to irrigation system	
Completed.
Completed.
Par.nip Binw
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Vr__.i-.np ft._-il_.i_>..
Wril-Hrillinp
Tender called.    1
Work proceeding.
Completed.
Electrical renovations	
Work proceeding.
Work proceeding.
Work proceeding-
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Writs
Completed.
 iff*)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
TRAILERS DESIGNED IN 1964
101
Type and Size
Used by—
District or Division
32-foot river-boat trailer-
26-foot jet-craft trailer—
Dwelling, 8' x 14'	
Dwelling, 8' x 14'_
DweHing, 8' x 14'_
Office bunkhouse, 10* x 35'—
Dwelling, 8' x 21'	
XC-toofchouse-diner, 8' x 30*	
Engineering office, 10* x 40'_
Wash-house, 10' x 40*	
Cook-house, 10' x 30*	
Dining-hall, 10'x40'_
Storage and cook's quarters, 10' x 30'...
Bunk-house (two), 10' x 50'	
Recreation and first aid, 1C x 40*	
Cruising crew	
Survey crew	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Project crew	
Field planning crew_
Field planning crew—
Field planning crew—
Field planning crew—
Field planning crew_
Field planning crew...
Field planning crew—
Prince George—headquarters.
Engineering—headquarters.
Prince Rupert—Terrace.
Nelson—Slocan City.
Nelson—SpiUimacheen.
Prince Rupert—Dease Lake.
Prince George—McLeod Lake.
Prince George—headquarters.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
Engineering—pondage clearing.
SMAIJL-BOAT PURCHASES, 1964
Size and Type
District or Division
9-foot inflatable	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
12rfoot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum	
13-foot inflatable	
14-foot aluminum	
14-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum	
16-foot aluminum (canoe)..
18-foot aluminum	
8-man life-raft	
10-man life-raft	
10-man life-raft	
Planting crew.
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Silviculture crew-
Ranger staff	
Survey crew	
Ranger staff -
Ranger staff —
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff	
Ranger staff—	
Silviculture crew_
Ranger staff	
Log-boom scaling crew_
Log-boom scaling crew...
Log-boom scaling crew...
Reforestation—Coast.
Prince George—Quesnel.
Nelson—Kaslo.
Prince George—Fort Fraser.
Prince Rupert—Lower Post.
Prince George—headquarters.
Vancouver—Port Hardy.
Prince Rupert—Smithers.
Kamloops—Clinton.
Engineering—headquarters.
Prince Rupert—Ocean Falls.
Kamloops—Lillooet.
Kamloops—Shuswap.
Vancouver—Port Hardy.
Prince George—Hixon.
Prince George—Horsefly.
Nelson—Lardeau.
Nelson—Kaslo.
Prince George—headquarters.
Kamloops—Adams Lake.
Vancouver—" B.C. Scaler."
Vancouver—" B.C. Scaler."
Vancouver—" Tamarack."
 1
102
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(101)     FOREST-PROTECTION EXPENDITURE BY THE FOREST SERVICE
FOR   THE   FISCAL YEAR 1963/64
Travelling expense .	
Clothing and uniforms	
Equipment rental (aircraft)	
Equipment and machinery	
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment	
Acquisition or construction of buildings and works..
Motor-vehicles and accessories ,	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Slash and snag disposal	
Wages and expenses, seasonal staff !	
Increased protection, Peace River	
Insect control .	
Total.
$23,342.86
6,056.15
636,105.79
286,480.07
267,891.66
320,821.39
184,240.77
128,966.59
27,713.65
60,215.07
1,473,968.00
197,494.49
17,237.35
$3,630,533.84
Fire-suppression expenditure by the Forest Service for the fiscal year
1963/64 $430,872.73
CONSTRUCTION OF PROTECTION ROADS AND TRAILS, 1964
Light         Medium
Heavy
Total
1
Mil-.    1     Mile.
29              58
1.336            546
Miles         Miles
RnaH T-_i_li>n_nl>i.  ,,
202            2.084
and maintenanc
1,365     |      604
1
6
138     j
13
46
19                 38
69               358
and maintenance
144     1       159
1
88               396
m      \
REPORTED APPROXIMATE EXPENDITURE IN FOREST
<m>                                        BY OTHER AGENCIES,1 1964
PROTECTION   a
Expenditures
Forest District
Patrols and
Fire
Prevention
Tools and
Equipment
Fires
Improvements
Total
$73,418
154,256
2,400
1,200
143,190
$475,023
34,845
42,600
9,025
132,177
518,760
3,130
3,825
6,266
14,437
$50,100
37,541
18,500
6,100
38,680
$617,301
Prinr.-. RnpArt
Prince George ,,, .
229,772
67,325
22,591
328,484
Tntnls                            ,   .
$374,464
$693,670
$46,418
$150,921
Sl,265,42_-
Ten-year average, 1955-64-
$336,539
$467,752
$335,598
$312,963
$1,452,852
i Principally forest industry.
—
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 103
(104) SUMMARY OF SNAG-FALLING, 1964, VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres
Total area logged, 1964, Vancouver Forest District 100,590
Logged in small exempted operations1 _'   196
Assessed for non-compliance, less 251 acres subsequently felled  1,144
  1,340
Balance logged acres snagged, 1964  99,250
Snags felled, 1964, by Forest Service contract  3,485
Snags felled, 1964, by Forest Service Reforestation Division  1,418
Total area snagged, 1964 104,153
1 Exemption granted under subsection(3) of section 116 of the Forest Act.
SUMMARY OF LOGGING SLASH REPORTED IN 1964,
(105) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres
Total area logged, 1964 100,590
Area covered by full hazard reports . 65,708
Covered by snag reports but exempted from slash disposal  17,504
Covered by acreage reports only (exempted from slash and snag disposal) i 196
83,408
Slash created and not reported in 1964 17,182
1 Exemption granted under subsection (3) of section 116 of the Forest Act.
ACREAGE ANALYSIS OF SLASH DISPOSAL REQUIRED, 1964,
(106) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres of Slash
Prior to 1964 19641 Total Acres
Broadcast burning 27,379 32,580 59,959
Spot burning 3,435 2,314 5,749
Totals  30,814 34,894 65,708
1964 reports not recommending slash disposal 17,504
1964 slash on very small operations exempted without special examination. 196
  17,700
Total area of slash dealt with, 1964 ——- 83,408
1 Does not include the estimated 17,182 acres (see Table No. 107) created too late to be dealt   with in 1964.
 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ANALYSIS OF PROGRESS IN SLASH DISPOSAL, 1964,
VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Total disposal required (see Table No. 106).
Typc of Disposal
Spring broadcast burning	
Spring spot burning—
Fall broadcast burning
Fall spot burning	
Acres of Slash
1964
Total burning completed	
Burning by accidental fires	
Lopping, scattering, land-clearing, etc.
Total	
Balance reported slash not yet abated	
Slash created, 1964, acres assessed	
Plus slash created too late to be dealt with, 1964..
Acres
- 65,708
44,677
21,031
25
17.182
Total area of slash carried over to 1965 for disposition 38,238
Actual area burned in spring spot burning, 10 acres.
Actual area bumed in fall spot burning, 765 acres.
The above figures do not include 1963 slash-burn reports received too late for inclusion in
1963 Annual Report, 1,858 acres.
SUMMARY OF SLASH-BURN DAMAGE AND COSTS, 1964,
(10S) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Total acres of forest-cover bumed in slash fires, 1964	
362]
Net damage to forest-cover	
Net damage to cut products	
Net damage to equipment and property-
Total damage	
_ $7,414.88
_      604.001
_ Nil
$8,018.!
Cost of Slash-burning as Reported by Operators
(_) Spring broadcast burning-
(_■) Spring spot burning	
(c) Fall broadcast burning
(<-) Fall spot burning	
Total Cost
$4,865.00
3,330.00
136,378.69
9,851.41
Acres
492
31
38,398
5,682
Cost per
MB_>.
$0,247
3.58
.090
.057
Cost per
Acre I
$9.89
107.42
3.55
1.73
 (109)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
FERE OCCURRENCES BY MONTHS, 1964
105
Forest District
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
Total
Per
Cent
1
1
5
23
20
8
2
11
8
66
30
34
100
23
28
17
17
60
40
36
5
49
160
125
55
8
6
68
35
40
8
4
11
6
2
7
1
248
77
124
433
238
Prince Rupert-	
Prince George	
Kamloops2	
6.9
11.0
38.7
Totals       	
30   |      49   |    253   |     162
375
172   |      69
10   | 1,120
100.0
r    Per cent
2.7   |     4.4   |   22.5   |    14.4
33.5
15.3    j     6.2
1.0   | 100.0   |
■   Ten-year average,
1955-64.
33    j       88    1     304
276
601
479
154
28    1 1,963    1    .
I Percent— .—
1.7    |     4.5   |   15.5    |    14.1
30.6
24.4    |      7.8
1.4   | 100.0   |   .	
Railroad-tie fires	
1
1
102   1      24
1
77
80
82
	
365   1
1
* Excludes 248 railroad-tie fires.
-2 Excludes 117 railroad-tie fires.
NUMBER AND CAUSES OF FOREST FIRES, 1964
W  Forest District
fcO
ri
o E
c. _.
—>
a
•s
o.
O
•o
o
p.
-t
o
e
-1
_>
c
_8
on
9_.r
._ « >v
III
M
!
I
-
o
-■aft
|I|
!_-C_
_°|
III
(-ho.
a
o
_
O-
1. M
Is
—
c
1
si
o _
u _
go
-1 9
8*
- o
_
s
s
0
a
.
o
c
n
D
o
as
[SI
■H  O
_.<£
Si!
"85
S.S
0,1.
12
2
46
96
121
47
20
20
45
12
6
2
4
14
25
47
5
6
57
14
28
6
9
15
8
4
9
62
4
4
3
1
3
18
8
14
21
20
1
4
4
34
2
62
12
3
78
23
23
11
8
8
9
248
77
124
433
238
22.1
6.9
Prinrt. 0«v.r pe
Kam1f.(.p.2
11.0
38.7
21.3
277
144
51
129
66
79 |     11
81
45
178
59
1,120 |100.0
Per cent	
24.7
12.9
4.6
11.5
5.9
7.0 |   1.0
7.2
4.0
15.9
5.3
100.0 |
re Ten-year average,
1Q«-fi_
719
210
110
246
80
92
33
149
39
225
60
1,963 1._
Per cent	
36.6
10.6
5.6
12.5
4.1
4.7 |    1.7
7.6
2.0
11.5
3.1
100.0 |	
I   365 I          1
1          1          1
l
-
	
	
365
- 1 Excludes 248 railroad-tie fires.
2 Excludes 117 railroad-tie fires.
 106 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(ill) NUMBER AND CAUSES OF FOREST FIRES FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS
1961
1963   1964
Total j
Lightning	
Recreational (campers, etc.)_
Railroads operating!	
Smokers.
Brush-burning (not railway or right-
of-way clearing)	
Range-burning-
Road and power-, telephone-, and
pipe-line construction	
Industrial operations (logging, etc)—
Incendiary.
Miscellaneous known causes-
Unknown causes	
307
170
85
182
120
75
131
190
18
30
246
204
53
34
310
253
94
33
1,166
241
245
257
82
1,426
269
154
336
36
194
49
290
83
1,144
221
65
220
82
95
24
141
62
250
7,184
2,104
1,100
2,462
795
920
333
1,491
386
2_52
599
1,252 |1,855   1,249
3,058 11,474 12,635 13,102
Railroad-tie fires..
1,536 12,345 |1,120 |19,6_6
132 I   955 I   370
1,0621   536 11,478 11,489
I 1 I
2,479
528 I   365 I 9,394
l Excludes 9,394 railroad-tie fires.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
107
ooo'i$ »*o
■■+
r- vo    ;
£
vo
0
§
_>
I
1
000' 1$ pn»
001$ uas/i-j-a
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0
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r-
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001$ Japua
co _ r~ 0 ov
(. V OVDN
c.     v-i m c.
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31
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o
ss_D sjqx ur
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 108 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ANALYSTS OF SUPPRESSION-CREW FIRE-FIGHTING
(113)
AcnvrriES, 1964
. of Fire When Attacked
Number
of Fires
Subsequent Spread (by Number of Fires)
Over .4
Acre to
1 Acre
Overl
Acre to
5 Acres
Over 5
Acres to
50 Acres
Over 50
Acres
Spot (up to W acre)	
Over .4 acre and up to 1 acre—
Over 1 acre and up to 5 acres—
Over 5 acres and up to 50 acres-
Over 50 acres— 	
Totals	
112
30
20
10
1
106
3
6
19
DAMAGE TO PROPERTY OTHER THAN FORESTS, 19641
Forest District
Forest
Products
Cut, Logs,
Lumber, etc.
Buildings
Railway,
Logging,
and
Sawmill
Equipment
Miscellaneous
Total
Pet Cent
of Total
Vancouver
$4,857
$10
1,200
230
$20,000
$5
$24,872
1,200
103,000
21,974
292
16.4
0.8
Prince George
68,000
14
92
35,000
21,200
68.1
530
200
14.5
0.2
$72,963
$1,440 |         $76,200
$735 |      $151,338 |     100.0
48.2
1.0 |               50.3
0.5 |           100.0 j
Ten-year average, 1955-64__
$86,334
$31,967 |       $175,034
$23,753 |      $317,088 I     __§
27.2
75 1            100 0 1
1 Does not include intentional slash burns (for this item see Tabic No. 108).
DAMAGE TO FOREST-COVER CAUSED BY FOREST FIRES, 1964-
(115,Parti) PART I1
Forest District
Merchantable Timber
Net Area
Killed
Total
Volume
Killed
Solvable
Volume
of Timber
Killed
Net Stumpage
Loss
Immature Timber
Net Area
Killed
Present
Value
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert—	
Prince George _.
Kamloops	
Nelson	
Acres
60
14
13
182
24
MCu.Pt.
133
44
37
83
9
MCu. Ft.
100
11
$
1,000
949
655
1,167
256
Acres
13
15
234
471
128
$
673 .
506
5,559
4,700
1.395
293
4,0272
861     |      12,8332
3.8
15.6     |
Ten-year average.
Per cent	
59,010     |     82,904
1,270,914     |     57,409     | 1,17 .318
42J
1 Does not include intentional slash burns (for this item see Table No. 108).
2 The dollar value of losses in merchantable and immature timber represents only stumpage loss to the
Crown. Actual payroll loss to the Province is 10 times these figures.
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
109
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113
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 114
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
CONTRACT FLYING, 1964
Fixed-wing Aircraft
Forest District
Base
Type of Aeroplane
Hours Flown
272
897
777
811
400
Prince Rupert	
Prince George	
Kamloops	
Super Piih anri varinna
Prince George and Fort St John
Kamloops	
Super C!"h anri Rftawr
T___v«f
3,157
Helicopters
Forest District
Base
Type of Helicopter
Hours Flownf
Vpni-nnvw anrl Campbell Hivf>r
Smithers and Terrace	
Prince Rupert	
Prince George	
Kamloops
Hfllersl2E	
197
Nelson and Cranbrook..-        _.,... _
2,157
Am Tankers
Forest District
Base
Type of Aeroplane
Hours Flown
Prince B__p_»r+
Prince George	
RrV-i'.-irra
Princo ftrnrfi*
154
500
(121)      USE OF AIRCRAFT IN FIRE-FIGHTING  (NON-CONTRACT), 1964
Fixed-wing Aircraft
Reconnaissance
Transportation of
Men and Supplies
Water Bombing
Total
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
Vancouver	
121
8
$5,294
178
1.4
125-.
$36
~3l
IV-        $36
$5,560
246V-I   10,854
$2,996
i
Tvj.u_n
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39   1    3,174
T__.lv,
129
$5,472
127
$5,596
31
$2,996
287   | $14,064
Helicopters
Prince George_
17        $1,618
I	
17       $1,618
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964                                 115
ENROLMENT AT ADVANCED COURSE, FOREST SERVICE
(131)                                          TRAINING-SCHOOL, 1964
Er ■ Forest District
Forest
Assistants,
Cm isers, -
Etc.
Rangers
Acting
Rangers
Assistant
Rangers
Clerks
Total
Graduations
Class 13
2
1
2
-
-
3
2
3
3
4
-
5
3
3
5
4
5
3
3
5
4
Prince George 1—-—
Attendance, 1964
Attendance, 1963	
Attendance, 1962._	
■*   Attendance, 1961
V Attendance, 1960	
*— Attendance, 1959	
Attendance, 1959	
1     Attendance, 1958	
Attendance, 1957	
Attendance, 1956	
Attendance, 1956	
Attendance, 1955	
Attendance, 1954.
Attendance, 1953	
Attendance, 1953
Attendance, 1952.
Attendance, 1951. .
Attendance, 1950	
Attendance, 1949	
Attfnr.9nni>   .<_-_).
to Attendance, 1947
Attendance, 1946
Total graduates to December
31. iQfid
5
—
-        1        15
_
20
20
5
_        |        15
20
—
3
17
20
20
3
—
17
20
_
4
—
—
17
_
21
21
4
_
—
17
_
21
	
21
21
21
_
21
_
21
_
4
26
30
30
4
26
_
30
3
18
_
21
21
3
_
18
21
B
_-
20
_
20
20
_
_
21
21
_
20
20
20
20
_
20
3
3
15
_
21
21
__
3
3
15
21
21
3
2
16
21
4
2
12
2
20
20
8
12
_
20
20
2
9
9
20
20
-
-
-
-
275
Note.—Since 1949/50 until 1962 the course was of nine months' duration, spread over lV_t years.   From 1946
to 1949, and commencing with Class 13,1963, a six-month course is involved, spread over one year.
 116 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ENROLMENT AT BASIC COURSE, FOREST SERVICE
TRAINING-SCHOOL, 1964
Forest District
Forest
Assistants,
Cruisers.
Etc.
Rangers
Acting
Rangers
Assistant
Rangers
Clerks
Total
Graduations
Class 3
Vancouver —
1
1
1
1
1
1
-
3
2
3
4
2
-
3
3
4
4
3
1
1
1
.
4
3
1
1
1
Kamloops 1—
Reforestation	
Research	
-
Attendance, 1964
6                _
-
-   i   «
—       |       20       |      20
Attendance, 1963	
7        |        —
_
1       13
|       20              20
Attendance, 1962	
3        |        —       1       _
-       |       17
20              20
Total graduates to December
31,1964	
—
-
-
-
_                60
1
Grand total of graduates, both courses, 335.
(141)
FOREST REVENUE, 1960-64
12 Months
12 Months
12 Months
12 Months
12 Months
10-year
to Dec. 31,
to Dec. 31,
to Dec. 31,
to Dec. 31,
to Dec. 3d,
Average,
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1955-64
Timber-licence    rentals
and fees	
$363,597.80
$366,600.53
$352,418.29
$357,175.79
$362,707.84
$365,038.54
Timber-berth rentals and
" 17,3_1.70
15,639.09
19,210.57
Timber-lease rentals and
f_«i
76,493.46
59,071.23
73,139.35
63,629.77
68,446.06
70.181M
Timber .ale rentals and
fees	
452,788.69
480,803.23
500,208.12
502,317.68
510,469.54
433,015.47
Timber-stale stumpage	
26,374,420.04
24,554,147.30
26,315,940.41
30,199,623.94
37,221,058.19
25,784,850.03
Timber-sale cruising and
n_v_rtt_ng
277,345.73
yn,ixj»
346,627.67
386,735.44
487,503.76
310,039:99
Timber royalties	
2,281,028.09
2,245^13.71
2,433,175.10
2,499,842.31
2,610,292.87
2,125,327.98
Grazing permits and fees
101,240.36
119,876.87
137,118.26
152,200.70
139,313.50
103,556.43
Forest-protection tax-
Mine_ltfli.-t.nv*
456,4.1.27
121.46..T2
569,749.95
134,824.47
550,949.16
161,447.52
523,598.00
173,192.07
210,330.47
145,283.03
Totals
$30,523,579.97
$28,930,072.21
$30,890,819.83
$34,875,IS77.40|$42,148,434.02
$29,356,504.74
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
117
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 118
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
3
0
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$16,746,612.30
3,621,310.83
4,559,385.13
8,595,753.98
3,534,362.85
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-i H
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964 119
(144) FOREST REVENUE, FISCAL YEAR 1963/64
Ten-year Average
Timber-licence rentals and fees $358,075.60 $370,825.61
Timber-berth rentals and fees 17,723.05 17,905.65
Timber-lease rentals and fees 62,780.14 69,899.02
Timber-sale rentals and fees 504,985.86 403,056.95
Timber-sale stumpage 31,916,392.53 23,063,281.68
Timber-sale cruising and advertising         415,614.50 277,623.17
Timber royalties 2,535,088.43 2,164,659.17
Grazing permits and fees         158,621.97 89,000.37
Forest-protection tax 527,461.69 (i)
Miscellaneous 186,567.84 134,100.23
$36,683,311.61 $26,590,351.85
i Formerly credited to Forest Protection Fund.
|(7«. FOREST SERVICE EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1963/64
Salaries  $3,498,366
Expenses  1,124,116
Reforestation and forest nurseries  583,981
Forest managements  679,594
Forest research  220,186
Public information and education  111,726
Forest Service training-school  115,030
Grant to Canadian Forestry Association  15,000
Office furniture and equipment  25,327
Engineering services I ~— 533,198
Forest-development roads  2,748,143
Forest protection  3,630,532
Fire suppression  430,873
Forest surveys  1,188,023
Silviculture  1,530,681
Grazing Range Improvement Fund1 —_ 55,143
Peace River community pastures— . —:  6,536
$16,496,455
Less contribution from Federal Government -—     1,831,428
Total $14,665,027
l Statement provided elsewhere.
 120 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(146) SCALING FUND
Surplus, April 1, 1963 $148,721.69
Collections, fiscal year 1963/64 1,208,571.23
$1,357,292.92
Expenditures, fiscal year 1963/64 1,385,281.27
Deficit, March 31,1964 $27,988.35
Collections, nine months, April to December, 1964 1,075,970.68
$1,047,982.33
Expenditures, nine months, April to December, 1964 1,151,335.72
Deficit, December 31,1964     $103,353.39
(1*7) GRAZING RANGE IMPROVEMENT FUND
Deficit, April 1,1963 $17,287.15
Government contribution (section 13, Grazing Act) 67,871.59
$50,584.44
Expenditures, fiscal year 1963/64      55,119.52
Deficit, March 31,1964      $4,535.08
Government contribution (section 13, Grazing Act) 79,310.98
$74,775.90
Expenditures, nine months, April to December, 1964      41,080.18
Surplus, December 31, 1964 $33,695.72
W) PEACE RIVER POWER TIMBER SALVAGE
Expenditures, fiscal year 1963/64  $870,794.47
Recovered from British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority 870,794.47 j
Balance Nil
H
L__J
 (151)
REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1964
DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL, 1964
121
Vancouver
Prince
Rupert
Prince
George
Kamloops
Nelson
Victoria
Continuously Employed
Deputy Minister, Chief Forester, and Assistant Chief
E   Foresters—_—_	
Division Foresters—	
Directors of Grazing and Public Information	
Forest Counsel and Personnel Officers	
District Foresters and Assistant District Foresters	
^Foresters and Foresters-in-training	
Agrologists and Agrologists-in-training	
Engineers and Engmeenv-n. training	
^Forest Protection Officers	
Supervisors of Rangers	
Rangers—Grades 1 and 2	
Superintendent of Scaling and Assistants	
Scalers, Official	
I Scalers, Official, temporary	
Comptroller, Accountant, and Audit Assistants	
Engineering, Mechanical and Radio	
Technical Forest and Public Information Assistants —
Reforestation, Research, and Survey Assistants	
Nursery Superintendents	
Draughtsmen and Mapping Assistants	
Clerks, Stenographers, and Messengers	
Superintendent and Foremen, Forest Service Marine
■ Station	
Mechanics, Carpenters, and Technicians	
Launch Crewmen	
Assistant and Acting Rangers	
Dispatchers	
Cruisers, Compassmen, and Silviculture Crewmen.	
Truck, Tractor, and Equipment Operators	
Foremen	
Miscellaneous	
I   Totals, continuous personnel	
Seasonally Employed
Assistant and Acting Rangers	
Patrolmen	
Lookoutmen	
31
12
76
87
4
6
47
18
25
6
1
2
13
5
4
9
1
5
32
12
59
1
3
2
1
3
30
3
4
13
1
5
30
2
11
2
2
3
31
3
1
51
19
57
49
12
24
2
174   |   238   |   253
Dispatchers, Radio Operators, and Clerks	
Fire-suppression Crewmen	
Reforestation—Snag-fallers, Planters, etc	
Cruisers and Compassmen..
Truck, Tractor, and Equipment Operators	
Student and Survey Assistants and Engineering Aides
Silviculture Crewmen	
Foremen	
Miscellaneous :	
9
1
2
20
29
1
4
~2t>
2
5
5
	
2
1
3
11
33
63
20
Totals, seasonal personnel-
Totals, all personnel	
136   |     39
3
lt
109    |   144~
"347
1
6
40
10
45
~~6
30
7
83
37
53
4
31
120
6
38
3
10
12
36
53
27
170
3
15
66
2
3
10
153
9
38
14
14
144
23
77
103
7
102
79
53
329
28
228
70
193
22
40
82
18
11
160
29
160
256
8
73
170
5
35
213
216   |    494   | 1,138
399   I 1,140
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1965
1,860-165-2070

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