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Thirty-eighth Annual Report of the PURCHASING COMMISSION JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 1980 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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 Province of British Colur
Thirty-eighth   Annual   Report   of   the
PURCHASING COMMISSION
JANUARY  1  TO DECEMBER 31
1980
 British Columbia Catai
British Columbia.    Purchasing C
Vol. for 1943 covers Apr. 19 to Dec. 31.
ISSN 0701-6921 = Annual report of the Purchasing
Commission (Victoria)
1. British Columbia.    Purchasing Commission.
2. Government purchasing — British Columbia.
JL435.Z32 354.7110071'2
s of this document n
obtained from:
'urchasing Commissic
914 Yates Street
/ictoria, B.C. V8V 11
 tnourablc HuglllSujjUgGl
r of Finance,
:e of British Columbia,
. W. CHARLTON
R. P. MURDOCH
  r
Thirty-eighth   Annual   Report   of   the
Purchasing   Commission
January 1 to December 31,1980
The total value of the purchase orders placed by the Purchasing Commission
Curing 1980 increased to $250 million from $229 million in 1979, or approximately
9.2 per cent.   At the same time, the number of purchase orders placed decreased
B>y 1 per cent, from 52,983 to 52,354 in 1980, largely due to continued efforts to
consolidate orders.
Purchase Order Placement
Number
Value
1979
1980
1979
1980
■Purchasing Commission	
Ministry of Education Publication
I    Servir.p.<:
Provincial Secretary—
43.137
769
1.304
7,582
191
52,983
39,007
1,152
1,130
10,814
251
$
206,980.157
9,672,542
63,950
12,601,000
171,787
$
227,382,487
8,803.366
40,513
14,196,204
Library Services	
228,992
Totals    _	
52,354
229,489,436
250,651,562
The British Columbia price preference policy up to a maximum of 10 per cent
^continues to be followed, using the amount of British Columbia input in terms of
labour and material in determining the rate of preference.
Where preference is given to local suppliers, equal quality is required and
reasonable price differential with back-up service must be available, where
appropriate.
[ The provincial preference policy is regarded as sound policy. It is nonetheless
a form of subsidization at public expense and the Purchasing Commission regards
it as a policy that requires continued and careful control.
r Good liaison with suppliers and with clients has been maintained by Purchasing Commission staff who made a total of 345 visits to suppliers and 527 visits to
clients during 1980.
The Business Machines Repair and Maintenance Division was augmented by
the establishment of one-man repair shops at Kamloops and Prince George. Government offices in and near these communities are already benefiting from the
Ecalized service.
 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Progress was made in the consolidation under one roof of the Langford WaW
house and the Surplus/Loan Furniture and Audio-Visual Loan and Repair ui
The move was completed on January 31, 1981, to warehouse facilities on <L^_
Street.   This is a 10,000 square-foot facility, part of the British Columbia Buildings
Corporation warehouse operation.   The new facility offers improved safety features f
access to stock and easier inventorying.
It is to the credit of the staff that interest in their own development continm
at a high level, with Mr. Fred Leonard, Chief Purchasing Agent, Vancouver [
awarded the Professional Purchaser Diploma of the Purchasing Management
Association of Canada.    Other staff members also improved their value tc
government by completing shorter purchasing courses, or by advancing ii
Purchasing Management Association of Canada course.
At year-end there were 99 staff members of the Purchasing Commission.
Studies have been carried out during the year, preparing the way for introffl
n of word processing and data processing. The effects of the new technolffl
11 be to reduce paper handling, speed up the turnaround of necessary documeng
n, and further improve service to ministries and Crown corporations.
BUSINESS MACHINES DIVISION
The appointment of two skilled technicians to Kamloops and Prince GeoS I
has provided a much needed and efficient service to these two rapidly growing 	
Previously, maintenance and repairs were done from the Victoria and Vancouve I
offices.
During 1980, staff of the Business Machines Division completed 7,299 fiej|
preventive maintenance inspections and 12,167 field and shop repairs.
It is our continued aim to eventually provide similar service to all Interio I
communities and to bring maintenance service in Victoria and Vancouver
even higher standards.   With the establishment of the new maintenance cenl
Kamloops and Prince George in 1980, we hope to achieve this aim in the'n
distant future.
A number of staff members in this Division completed courses of theory I
practical and vendor-provided training.   Employees also enrolled in more advancg
courses in electronics technology, preparing themselves for servicing of the nr
advanced business machines coming into government.
The Business Machines Division continues to recondition surplus i^--—
one ministry for use in another ministry for an overall cost saving in the purch|
of new equipment.   The Division also provides machines on short-term loans!
many ministries with a resultant saving in outside rental fees.
increase of 3,129 office machines on inve
 REPORT OF PURCHASING COMMI
Business Machines on Inventor
ll,301i
10,369
9,468
2,486
12,1512
11,668
10,228
2,706
Adding machines and calculators
Mispp.llaneoiis
Totals         ...... 33,624
36,753
fT^relectric.
Purchase and Disposal of Business Machines During 1980
GoKffl
coSSm 1
IZI
SrCHASES:
i Typewriters—Manual	
Electric	
m Adding machines and calculators    -
I   Dictation/Transcribers	
■  Miscellaneous (including duplicating
Total purchased
1,042
1,452
822
217
23
42
31
1,065
1,521
259
3,551
165
3,716
IISPOSALS (sale or redistribution):
238
222
80
39
238
222
80
39
Electric-	
I  Adding machines and calculators
Dictation/Transcribers	
Miscellaneous (including duplicating
Total sold or redistributed ......
587
587
2,964
165
J.129
SURPLUS DISPOSAL SALE.
1   The sale of surplus government assets to the public
jtal of $2,592,871.48.
this year has pr
oduced a
I  Of this amount, $618,325.41 has been credited to
racellaneous Sales Account; $1,941,426.55 has been cr
Es; and $33,119.52 remains in the suspense account.
the Sundry Services and
-dited to individual minis-
 british columbia
Revenue Summary
Credited to Sundry Services and Miscellant
on Social Service Tax ...
Total ____ZkLt_ZZ
Credited to Mini
Provincial Secretary and Government Services ..
47,898.40
Finance  (Purchasing Commission,
advertising
Consumer and Corporate Affairs
1,488.38
1,313.98
520.00
496.04
1,925,139.37
16,287.18
Sales Ac-
1,941,426.55
Sundry Services and Miscellaneou
618,325.41
2,559,751.96
33,119.52
2,592,871.48
 REPORT OF PURCHASING COMMISSION 9
RELOCATIONS
^^^Rl§ 1,092 units of furniture and equipment was transferred to offices
Operations of various ministries throughout tfi^^Bgnce during 1980.    Re-
^ffifrom offices in the Interior are increasing.   Due to the increased amount of
Bousing space, the Purchasing Commisswn is able to keep in surplus stores
Br variety of goods and thus provide a wider choice.
OFFICE FURNITURE INVENTORY
More than 1,900 inventory checks were processed during 1980. Government
^B^^Kidually visited, inventoried and the results are used to amend the
er Record in Victoria. A high degree of accuracy in inventory is maintained
^ffipigle clerk who includes this task among her other duties. During several
E:hs of 1980, she was assisted by four students under the Work in Government
Program.
OFFICE FURNITURE LOAN SERVICE
Requests for loans of office furniture increased during 1980 and the loan
as able to fulfil most of the requests with the addition of newer and more
Hfurniture.   Acquisition of suitable furniture by the loan service is a coning project.
■frota! savings in rentals over the year to all ministries as a result of the loan
e calculated at $39,940.
AUDIO-VISUAL LOAN AND REPAIR SERVICE
,- A growing trend to the library concept for audio-visual equipment among
mt ministries has resulted in significant savings during 1980.   Ministries
^Soming increasingly aware of the wide range of equipment which is available
ugh the Purchasing Commission's audio-visual loan service and this is reflected
(increased use of borrowed over purchased equipment.    Savings resulting
 pan of audio-visual equipment throughout government are estimated at
f740 during 1980.   Audio-visual equipment is available for loan at two offices:
Totals $8,000 $47,740
The loan library expanded into video loan equipment during 1980, with an
mat response from ministries. Consideration will be given to purchasing
:: video equipment in 1981 in order to fulfil increasing needs. Donations of
End surplus equipment from government ministries are welcomed, as inclusion
^Equipment into the loan library benefits all areas of government.
jEJuring 1980, the audio-visual repair section serviced more than 300 units of
ffiient. Service ranged from cleaning, calibrations and adjustments to major
jffiiuls and rebuilding of equipment.
 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Equipment parts are supplied from the repair service stock, '
paying only for the more expensive components not kept in stock.   It is estimated
$19,625 was saved in labour costs to all ministries in 1980 through operatioi
the audio-visual repair service.
A preventive maintenance program has been started in the Victoria a
allowing audio-visual equipment to be sent to the Victoria shop at low-use th
for servicing. Preventive maintenance on these units is a necessity and will el
nate much down-time when done on a regular basis.
VANCOUVER OFFICE
Continuation of a major project to improve systems and procedures in
Vancouver office during 1980 resulted in a marked reduction in paper volume
an increase in time allotted to meet with suppliers and clients.
The volume of requisitions and quotations processed during 1980 dropprffll
by approximately 15 per cent from the preceding year, largely due tc
tion of more standing contracts.
This timesaving feature resulted in a 62 per cent increase in purchasing^M I
meetings with clients and suppliers. During 1980, staff members based ii
Vancouver office made 124 visits to suppliers' plants and met with 175 governmeffl
clients.
A remarkable 80 per cent of the Vancouver purchasing staff took partE
courses leading to the Professional Purchaser Diploma offered by the Purchasing
Management Association of Canada. One staff member was granted the diploma
in 1980; others are likely to be awarded diplomas in 1981 and 1982.
Retirements and family reasons caused a larger than usual turnov
Vancouver office, but the five new staff members have adjusted well and tf
operation has been strengthened considerably.
LANGFORD WAREHOUSE
The warehouse was used extensively by
total value of goods processed at $1,499,928
the last year.
Consistent ordering procedures by the various ministries, the assistance of the
purchasing agents and staff at the Commission, and the work of the Langf^H
staff are a few of the reasons for the productive year. Requisitioned stock and
emergency material were available at all times, with few or no back orders ana
no delay in delivery.
CONCLUSION
We are again indebted to our client ministries
and staff of the Purchasing Commission will in turn j
an entirely satisfactory service.
In particular, we recognize the delegated purchasing services performed by
the Queen's Printer; by the Director of Publication Services, Ministry of Education*
and by the Legislative Librarian, the Provincial Archivist and the Director of the
Library Services Branch, Ministry of Provincial Secretary and Government ServicgB
Finally, the cooperation of the Geotechnical and Materials Engineering Branwl
of the Ministry of Transportation and Highways in produc
research and advice, has been of inestimable value.
  

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