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CORRECTIONS BRANCH ANNUAL REPORT B.G. Robinson, Commissioner For the period January 1, 1979 to March… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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 Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Attorney General
CORRECTIONS BRANCH
ANNUAL REPORT
B. G. Robinson, Commissioner
For the period January 1, 1979
to March 31, 1980
  I The Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, O.B.E., D.S.O., E.D.,
Lieutenant Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of Corrections Branch for the period January 1, 1979 to
■March 31, 1980 is respectfully submitted.
ALLAN WILLIAMS
Attorney General
Office of Attorney General
WDecember 1980
 Ministry of Attorney General
Corrections Branch
Victoria, B.C.
December 1980
The Honourable Allan Williams, Q.C.
Attorney General
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the 1979-80 Annual Report of Corrections
Branch.
This report has been structured to parallel the activities outlined in the
Estimates, in order to more clearly reflect the way in which the branch has fulfilled
its commitments. Thus, a complete summary of the branch's wide variety of
services is provided, together with the specific undertakings and achievements of
the reporting period. Problem areas are also noted, together with plans for their
resolution.
The renewal and upgrading of correctional facilities was continued with the
completion of major renovations at the Rayleigh Camp, the Lakeside Correctional
Centre for Women and the Victoria Youth Detention Centre. A new camp, in the
same area, replacing the Clearwater Forest Camp, was completed late in the fiscal
year. This new facility at Bear Creek and the Rayleigh Camp redevelopment are first
steps toward the redevelopment of the camp facilities throughout the Province. An
addition and renovations to the Prince George Regional Correctional Centre are due
to be completed later in 1980. Other small-scale upgrading efforts have been
achieved in centres throughout the Province.
Planning for the new Pretrial Services Centre adjacent to the Vancouver
Provincial courts has continued during the year. It is anticipated that construction
will begin late in 1980 with occupancy expected in 1983. This 150-bed unit for
remanded persons begins the long-awaited process of replacing the 600 beds for
remanded and sentenced men requiring the security of the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre.
In March 1980 an experiment was undertaken in the Lower Mainland which
was called Alternate Entry. This involved the admission of short-term prisoners
directly to the Alouette River Unit, in North Fraser Region, and the Chilliwack
Forest Camp Security Unit, in South Fraser Region, rather than to the Lower
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre. The objective of this undertaking was to
ensure that no one was placed in Oakalla who did not require its level of security.
Consequently, those placed in the North and South Fraser Units were interviewed and classified directly to the open institutions or forest camps in the area,
unless they required a security placement. If that was the case, they were then
returned to the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre (Oakalla). It is hoped
that this project will result in a continued reduction of the population of the Lower
 (f
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre, and ensure that short-sentenced offenders,
who are neither a danger to the community nor likely to run away, are housed in
facilities providing the appropriate level of security.
In addition, those parts of the Corrections Act dealing with the containment of
juvenile delinquents were declared ultra vires by the Supreme Court; an appeal has
been launched. The effect of this ruling was to remove the limitations on those
youths who may be admitted to the containment program. Serious overcrowding
was experienced within the program in January-February 1980. Additional community programs were developed in response to this overcrowding, and it is hoped
that they will ensure that similar levels of overcrowding will not be experienced in
the future. During the coming year both of these issues should be resolved by the
courts and we will then be able to ensure that the network of these services is
appropriate for the needs of all involved.
In late October 1979 the ruling of the Supreme Court, with respect to the
jurisdiction of the Provincial Court in Family Relations Act matters, had a significant effect on the work of Corrections Branch. The role of family court counsellors
in providing services to persons seeking the assistance of the Supreme Court in
resolving family matters was altered by this ruling. Until such time as the relative
roles and responsibilities of the courts are clarified through the appeal process, this
service will remain less integrated than would be desirable. Upon the clarification
of the relative roles of the courts, the Ministry's policy of developing unified family
courts throughout the Province can continue, further ensuring that an integrated
range of services is provided to those seeking assistance in family matters.
I wish to express my gratitude to those private citizens who have taken the time
and initiative to become involved with the corrections process. Supervisors for
community service orders were contracted in communities throughout the
Province, especially in the Northern Region. Without their assistance the program
could not be made available in the smaller communities. Additionally, volunteers in
all regions have devoted many hundreds of hours to working with both adult and
juvenile offenders. Their valuable contributions toward reintegrating the offender
in the community deserve recognition and thanks.
Lastly, I wish to acknowledge and thank all those who serve as staff members
of Corrections Branch. Their continuing effectiveness in their work is a testimony
to their experience, skills, and knowledge, but more especially to their dedication
and commitment to a most difficult area of work.
We all look forward to another challenging year.
Respectfully submitted,
BERNARD G. ROBINSON
Commissioner
  CONTENTS
Page
Letter from the Attorney General         (iii)
Letter from the Commissioner  (iv)
Corrections Branch Organization and Services  2
Figure 1 Corrections Branch Organizational Chart, 1979  4
Figure 2 Corrections Branch Administrative Regions  5
Table 1 Budgetary Expenditures for Fiscal Year 1979-80  6
Activity Reports
Secure Custodial Facilities: Activity Description  7
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Region Correctional Centre (VIRCC)  8
Victoria Youth Detention Centre (VYDC)  9
Vancouver Region
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre (LMRCC)  10
Lakeside Correctional Centre for Women  11
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre  12
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Security Unit  13
Interior Region
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre (KRCC)  13
Northern Region
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre (PGRCC)  15
Open Facilities: Activity Description  18
Vancouver Island Region
Lakeview Camp  18
Jordan River Camp  19
North Fraser Region
Twin Maples Correctional Centre  20
New Haven Correctional Centre  21
Alouette River Correctional Centre (ARCC)  22
Pine Ridge Camp _  23
Stave Lake Camp  24
Boulder Bay Camp  24
vii
 South Fraser Region
Mount Thurston Camp 25
Ford Mountain Camp       26
Centre Creek Camp..
Interior Region
Rayleigh Farm	
Bear Creek Camp	
Northern Region
Hutda Lake Camp..
26
27
28
Community-Based Programs: Activity Description 32
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Community Correctional Centre (VICCC) 33
Snowdon Work Release Unit (SWRU) 33
New Directions Program  34
Metchosin Camp    35
Contracted Services  35
Vancouver Region
Porteau Cove Camp  36
Bumaby Community Correctional Centre  37
Lynda Williams Community Correctional Centre (LWCCC) 38
Marpole Community Correctional Centre (MCCC) 38
Detention and Recreation Extension Program (DARE)  39
Contracted Services  40
North Fraser Region
Southview Place Community Correctional Centre..
Contracted Services	
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Community Correctional Centre
Developing Attitudes, Skills, and Habits Program (DASH)
Contracted Services	
Interior Region
Kamloops Community Correctional Centre	
Contracted Services	
Northern Region
Terrace Community Correctional Centre
Contracted Services	
40
41
41
42
43
44
44
45
46
Probation and Family Services: Activity Description.
Vancouver Island Region	
Vancouver Region
48
49
50
 Page
North Fraser Region  52
South Fraser Region  52
Interior Region  53
Northern Region  54
Management Support Services: Activity Description     56
Operations and Management Systems     56
Table 2 Actual and Projected Maximum, Minimum, and Average Utilization of Correctional Facilities by Setting, 1976
to 1981 "      57
Figure 3 Provincial Summary of Maximum, Minimum, and
Average Utilization of Correctional Facilities, 1976 to
1981     58
Figure 4 CCC Populations by Maximum, Minimum, and Average Utilization, 1976 to 1981     59
Figure 5 Open Institutional Populations by Maximum, Minimum, and Average Utilization, 1976 to 1981     60
Figure 6 Secure Remand Institutional Populations by Maximum, Minimum, and Average Utilization. 1976 to 1981     61
Figure 7 Secure Sentenced Institutional Populations by Maximum, Minimum, and Average Utilization, 1976 to 1981     62
Staff Development     63
Provincial Classification     64
Table 3 Initial and Reclassifications, Calendar Year 1979, with
Comparative 1978 Totals     65
Table 4 Federal-Provincial Exchange of Prisoners, Calendar
Year 1979     66
Information Services     66
Psychological Services     66
Religious Programs     67
Table 5 Religious Programs Section, Average Percentage of
Time, 1979     68
Medical Services     69
Table 6 Diagnosis of Patients Admitted to LMRCC Hospital
January 1 to December 31, 1979     70
Table 7 Out-Patients Seen at LMRCC Hospital, January 1 to
December 31,1979     71
Resource Analysis  '1
Table 8 Corrections Branch Establishment by Activity  72
Table 9 Corrections Establishment by Region, Fiscal Year
1979-80  73
 Pace
Table 10 Institution Populations, Regional Totals and Averages, Fourth Quarter 1979-80  74
Program Analysis and Evaluation    76
Table 11 Temporary Absence Statistics	
Inspection and Standards Division: Activity Description and Report 79
Annex: Corrections Branch Index_~ :... .w*i~.~s...  80
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 Corrections Branch
Organization and Services
The British Columbia Ministry of Attorney
General is responsible for the administration
of justice in the Province and for the
enforcement of laws for the protection of
persons and property. Included in the
administration of justice in British Columbia
is the operation of Corrections Branch. As
such, Corrections Branch is part of the
British Columbia justice system and its staff
works closely with courts and police to
effectively administer justice throughout the
Province.
Under the direction of the Attorney General,
Corrections Branch is administered by the
Commissioner of Corrections. The
commissioner's office is composed of the
commissioner, the deputy commissioner, and
three support staff.
The management of Corrections Branch
operations is carried out under a regional
structure of management. Each of the six
regions (see Figure 3) is headed by a regional
director. Each region is composed of several
districts, each headed by a district director,
while each facility and office within the
districts is headed by a local director. The
management of Corrections Branch
operations is assisted by nine support
sections. A complete list of Corrections
Branch regions, districts, facilities and
offices can be found in the Annex, pages
80-82.
The British Columbia Corrections Act
outlines Corrections Branch responsibilities
for providing services for those youths and
adults accused and convicted of violating the
law. The Corrections Act also refers to the
federal Juvenile Delinquents Act and the
federal Parole Act in outlining responsibilities
at the Provincial level. The British Columbia
Family Relations Act outlines the
responsibilities of the Branch for providing
services for families and married couples
who are separating.
Adults who have been convicted of criminal
offences are termed offenders. In British
2
Columbia, boys and girls from age seven up
to the age of 17 (exclusive) who are
convicted of violating the law are said to have
committed a delinquency and are termed   i
juvenile delinquents. For these adults and I
youths, Corrections Branch provides a wide
range of facilities and programs that are
designed to assist each individual in
reintegrating with the normal life of society.
Not all offenders and juvenile delinquents are
sentenced to a period of incarceration. The
courts may order some to be placed on
probation for specified periods. The role of
Corrections Branch is to supervise
probationers and ensure they are living up tea
the conditions of the order. These conditions,
in addition to keeping the peace, may include
reporting regularly to a probation officer, or
carrying out a community service order. A
community service order is a supervised  1
work project performed for the community or
the victim of the crime. This provides an I
opportunity for the offender to make
reparation to the community.
Another condition of probation may be that
the probationer participate in an attendance
program. These programs consist of
supervised educational, recreational, or j
vocational activities to instil self-confidence
and self-reliance, and to encourage and foster
skills in relating to people.
For those persons accused of an offence and
remanded in custody to await trial,
Corrections Branch provides accommodation
at an appropriate level of security, as well as
counselling and assistance. This ensures that
the accused appears for trial and that the 1
accused is able to deal with the formal and
personal concerns arising from arrest and M
incarceration.
For the accused released on bail, Corrections
Branch provides supervision to ensure that
the accused appears for trial and does not
offend the law during that time. Bail
supervision enables individuals toremain
 Corrections Branch Organization and Services
I. ider community supervision within the
inditions of the Criminal Code (of Canada).
u addition, Corrections Branch, at the
■ quest of the court, carries out pre-sentence
Bfjuiries and reports on the background of
L e accused in order to assist the court in
Baking an appropriate disposition.
Btmily Services of Corrections Branch offers
unselling and assistance to families and
PJgoied couples who are separating, with the
objective of resolving conflict and assisting
parties in making a satisfactory settlement.
Investigations and reports for the court on
child custody and access, in the case of a
separation or divorce, are performed,
consistent with the aim of helping the couples
to reach a satisfactory agreement.
Thus, Corrections Branch provides a wide
range of services which are continually being
modified and adapted in response to the
needs of individuals.
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1
 FIGURE 2 CORRECTIONS BRANCH ADMINISTRATIVE REGIONS
See Map below for
Lower Mainland
Regional Areas
Rfon 1    Vancouver Island
Ron 2   Vancouver
R«on 3   South Fraser
I
Region 4   North Fraser
Region 5    Interior
Region 6   Northern
 TABLE 1 BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1979-80
Cost Activity                Activity
Code   Activity Sub-total'               Total j
050   Secure Custodial    20,177,69B
Island  2,965,823
Vancouver  12,705.139
South Fraser  468,879
North Fraser  —
Interior  1,799,002
North  2,238,846
052   Open Facilities     10,704,1!
Island  1,517,967
Vancouver Z	
South Fraser  2,172,210
North Fraser  5.262,366
Interior  1,099,690
Northern  651,898
054   Community-Based Programs       5.999.335|
Island  1,248.506
Vancouver  1,606,410
South Fraser    2,058,537
North Fraser  81,323
Interior  632,065
Northern  372,491
056   Probation and Family Services         11.856.841
Island^   1,782,245
Vancouver LZ.„  3,122,951
South Fraser  2,169,823
North Fraser  1,687,773
Interior  1,839,295
Northern  1,254,751
058   Management Support Services ;:.i.t      7.504.303
Island  580,466
Vancouver „  617,365
South Fraser  977,526
North Fraser  1.676,548
Interior _..   121,367
Northern    239.871
Commissioner's Office, Psychological and Medical Services  369,376
Information Services  „„„ .-.:„.:   86,125
Religious Programs  248,079
Provincial Classification  325,639
Staff Development    1,252.967
Program Analysis and Evaluation  225,448
Resource Analysis  313,245
Operations and Management Systems  248,527
Staff Relocation  201,518
Discretionary Funds  20,215
060   Inspection and Standards  174,061
Total Branch           56,416,364
1 Figures exclude decimal points and are rounded to the nearest dollar.
6
 (If
fctivity Reports
Secure Custodial Facilities: Activity Description
irrections Branch, as part of its
Jlffinistration of justice within the Provincial
j isdiction, maintains six secure institutions
a adults and two centres for youths in the
lirance, with a total capacity for 1,050
tr-sons. Secure custodial facilities for adults
ftjmde secure custody to hold two major
icegories of adults in conflict with the law:
jams accused of a crirninal offence and
iraanded in custody to await trial or
isitence; and adults sentenced to a term of
jtorisonment. Separate secure containment
Jpilities house accused youths remanded in
jc.tody to await trial, and youths found to
jnHcommitted a delinquency under the
J'enile Delinquents Act and committed to
ieitainment.
ijsure custodial facilities are designed to
tpitect citizens from offenders who may run
■ aiy or pose a threat to the safety and well-
bng of the community. They are also
d.igned to ensure that those accused persons
rnanded in custody appear for trial.
•Iiprisonment is thus the major function of
tsuie custodial facilities and security is a
•pnary concern. However it is Corrections
iEinch policy that imprisonment should be
:escted in as humane a manner as possible.
Ii physical condition of the facilities and
e lipment is therefore an important issue. In
oalition, within the institution, programs and
ia.vjties are provided in work, recreation,
fi'ication, life-skills and spiritual
d elopment to enable offenders to make the
nst positive use of their time during
Jurceration.
Cenders are placed in secure custody,
b ause they may be escape risks, or may be
..Ddieally unfit for open facilities or because
tlf may need protective custody or be a
diger to others. Those placed in custodial
jfliffies are held until the sentence expires,
i "il they are released on parole, or until they
••^ilify for transfer to open facilities or to
crununity-based programs.
-
Adult males are accommodated in five
correctional centres throughout the Province.
These are: Vancouver Island Regional
Correctional Centre (Victoria); Lower
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
(Burnaby); Chilliwack Security Unit;
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre; and
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre.
The classification and placement of adult
males is dependent on the severity of the
crime and the degree of secure custody
required. Male offenders from any region
who require secure custody beyond the
resources of the other regional centres, may
be transferred to the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre in Burnaby,
which has special facilities for this purpose.
These transfers are usually arranged on a
case-by-case basis.
There is only one secure custodial facility for
sentenced adult female offenders and women
remanded in custody to await trial. This is the
Lakeside Correctional Centre for Women
(formerly Oakalla Women's Correctional
Centre) in Burnaby. This institution shares
the grounds of the Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre.
Juvenile delinquents who require secure
custody (both boys and girls) are housed in
two centres: the Willingdon Youth Detention
Centre in Burnaby; and the Victoria Youth
Detention Centre. Temporarily, during a
period from January to April 1980, the
Chilliwack Security Unit was converted to a
male youth remand centre because of
overcrowding at Willingdon.
The activities and achievements of the secure
custodial facilities of each region, from
January 1979 through March 1980, are
discussed in the reports which follow.
 Activity Reports
Vancouver Island Region
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre (VIRCC)
In 1975, VIRCC was designated a facility
providing secure custody for men remanded
in custody to await trial. Since that time,
pressure on this facility has grown and it is
now providing accommodation for some
sentenced offenders as well. This has placed
a heavy strain on the staff and the physical
facilities of VIRCC, although the centre is
coping well, and there were no major
problems this year.
Security
Despite extreme overcrowding, VIRCC has
maintained high security standards. For .the
second consecutive year there were no
escapes. Perimeter security is maintained
with fencing and armed officers.
Facilities
The strain of accommodating a greatly
expanded population has led to a
deterioration in facilities and equipment at
VIRCC.
In 1975, it was projected that the population
of the centre would not exceed 60, and the
facility was equipped accordingly. Since
then, the facility has not only had to accept
sentenced offenders as well, but the
population has grown from a daily average of
68 in 1975 to a daily average of 113 in 1979,
with a peak population of 145. This
represents an increase of 67 per cent in
remanded men awaiting trial and 26 per cent
in sentenced offenders.
Kitchen and dining facilities are deteriorating
and much of the equipment is faulty. New
facilities are badly needed to segregate
sentenced offendersjrom those remanded in
custody to await trial. The need for bed space
is obvious, since the centre has been
accommodating at least twice the number of
inmates it was designated to hold.
The secure custodial requirement for the 1
Vancouver Island Region has now been set at
150. Feasibility studies and the design of J
renovation and expansion of VIRCC facilities
to this capacity are planned for the immediajf
future.
In spite of overcrowding, the gymnasium ana
games room provided for inmates at the endj
of April 1979 are still in good condition and,
with minimum maintenance, the universal!
gym machine should last for many years
Programs
Recreation programs at VIRCC include  i
exercise, fitness, movies, library and bingo.
They have been well attended, with exercise
and fitness being the most popular. Daily
visiting privileges for inmates at VIRCC are
provided.
The library (operated in co-operation with the
Greater Victoria Public Library) was well
received by inmates. A total of 680 books
were used; the loss of books was minimal (.3
per cent) and the service will continue in ■
1981. The universal gym has been very I
popular, providing inmates with a means of*
working off excess energy, or starting a m
fitness training program.
A work program employing VIRCC inmates
on temporary absences takes place at a forest
camp operated by the Ministry of Forests at
Camp Point.
This program, under a special administration
arrangement with VIRCC, has been
employing offenders cleared on temporaryj,
absence passes from VIRCC, as well as I
offenders from other Provincial and federal
centres throughout the Province who are ■
transferred through VIRCC. The work I
program at the camp consists of juvenile m
spacing, which involves selecting the best
juvenile tree in an eight-square-foot area *£
(approximately .75 square meters) and I
clearing out all other trees and growth with
chainsaws. Such spacing speeds up the ■
growth of healthy trees by 30 years and raises
the quality of the harvest. Offenders are paid
 (—
imtivity Reports
sgular wages for their work and also gain
aluable work experience in forestry.
'he camp was relocated in 1979 from
;edonda Bay, 40 kilometres (25 miles) west
f Campbell River, to Camp Point, some
2.4 kilometres (14 miles) north of Kelsey
ay. During the year the camp operated at
Imost full capacity with average daily counts
f 18 men, which is five more than in 1978.
^Eng peak production periods, average
aily count was 20. Eight offenders walked
ivay from camp, but there were no
Dnsequences.
here is a definite need to develop a wider
nge of programs in work, life-skills
aining, education and recreation for
Sliders at VIRCC.
ictoria Youth Detention Centre (VYDC)
lis centre is one of only two institutions in
eprovince providing secure custody for
■Jinquent youths committed to containment,
id for youths remanded in custody to await
al.
icated in Victoria, the centre is leased from
5 municipalities of Oak Bay, Saanich,
ctoria, and Esquimalt, who built it in 1963
a detention home. BCBC (the Crown
ntporation responsible for the management
1 all British Columbia government real
■tate) carried out negotiations during the
;ar for the purchase of the building for the
ovince.
r three months during the summer VYDC
is closed to permit renovations to the
ilding. Youths remanded in custody to
'ait trial, together with sentenced juvenile
'linquents from the Victoria area, were
located to Metchosin Camp. Sentenced
cyenile delinquents from other parts of
ncouver Island and the mainland were
located to Willingdon Youth Detention
itoire.
Overcrowding, followed by renovations at the
centre, created security and accommodation
problems this year. Nevertheless, difficulties
are being surmounted and it is hoped that
next year will be more stable.
Security
Security was a major concern at VYDC
during 1979. An increased number of escapes
from escorted group recreational programs
were reported. Screening procedures for
youths allowed out of the centre for
recreation were tightened and fewer
recreational outings were permitted. Security
was also affected by renovations at the centre
which required the transfer of youths
remanded in custody to Metchosin Camp, an
open facility. High-risk youths in this open
setting became difficult to control and there
was a number of escapes. On return to the
newly renovated centre, problems quickly
developed with fire escape doors and locks
which proved insufficient to withstand
constant forcing by the youths. Sliding bolts
had to be installed and doors locked and
auxiliary staff had to be hired to provide extra
surveillance. BCBC has consulted an RCMP
security expert on security measures to be
taken, and appropriate new doors and locks
have been ordered.
Facilities
Major renovations to the centre took place
this year, as one of the Branch's priorities.
The work was carried out by BCBC from
June to October, for a total cost of $450,000.
The renovations included bringing the
building up to fire standards and
improvements to residents' rooms, the
visiting and recreation area, interview rooms,
and the office area. Seven new program
facilities were added, including a classroom,
an arts and crafts room, a recreational area, a
games room, a woodworking shop, and a
new kitchen and dining room. Building
security still requires upgrading.
Improvements in this area are planned for
1980, at a cost of $200,000.
 Activity Reports
Programs
A school program is offered to sentenced
youth offenders to enable them to continue
their schooling while at the centre. Courses
can be chosen from academic, vocational, or
remedial programs, and classes are held at
the centre. However, a lack of teaching staff
prevents the program being available to
youths on remand.
The services of an arts and crafts teacher
have been contracted, to increase the range of
programs offered to residents.
One hundred citizens participated actively as
volunteers at the centre during 1979,
averaging 2,250 hours of service per month.
Under the supervision of one staff member,
who screened and trained volunteer
applicants, they assisted staff in outings, in
arts and crafts, and in the schooling of
residents. The volunteers were also
invaluable on a one-to-one basis, supervising
youths from the centre on temporary
absences. Volunteer service has allowed
VYDC to considerably expand their program
activities with youths in detention.
Vancouver Region
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre (LMRCC)
This centre, located in Burnaby, is the largest
of the secure custodial facilities, with a
capacity of 512.
LMRCC serves as the secure custodial
facility for the Lower Mainland Region, but
its facilities also accommodate special cases
from all over the Province. Many centres are
not equipped to provide the kind of secure
custody required for these men, who include
escape risks, protective custody cases, and
very difficult offenders.
There is also a hospital at LMRCC equipped
to provide medical attention to inmates.
Sentenced offenders who are physically
disabled or who have medical or psychiatric
problems are also accommodated here.
10
Security
Standards of security showed a marked
improvement this year, with only 16 escapes,
down from 32 in 1978. Measures have been!
taken to tighten security in those areas from
which the inmates escaped, such as the
kitchen, the officers' canteen and garbage I
areas. The decrease could be attributed to a I
lower daily average population, smaller worn
crews, and better supervision by staff. Many
escapes were attempted but prevented
through continuous security checks, frisking,
and alert, intelligent supervision. Close cooperation with police forces helped to
forewarn staff of impending escape attempts.
There were two sit-in demonstrations
involving both remanded and sentenced
inmates. Both were peaceful but required I
many hours of overtime supervision by staff*
A four-day hunger strike was held by inmates
of the south wing. All incidents were well-
handled by staff, and serious problems were
avoided.
Facilities
The centre continues to accommodate a
population at or in excess of capacity.
Although there has been a decrease since last
year, the daily average population was still
over the designated capacity. The
overcrowding of the west wing, designated
for men remanded in custody, required   !
housing them in the east wing among
sentenced offenders.
It is planned to eventually replace the centre.
Until that time, interim measures are needed
to maintain reasonable standards. A first step
has been taken with the complete overhaul by
BCBC of faulty plumbing in one wing
(Westgate B). The overhaul is costing
$300,000 and will be completed next year. B
addition, BCBC insulated the main roof to
reduce heat loss. Planning is underway to
provide segregated accommodation for
inmates requiring protective custody. Other
measures that should be taken include space
and equipment to provide indoor recreation
programs for men remanded in custody. An
■.
 r
Rrtivity Reports
men family visiting area is needed so that the
rym does not have to be used for this
Jiurpose. Schoolroom facilities for sentenced
nmates could be improved and expanded to
irovide educational upgrading to more
Inmates.
v staff room is being built in the west wing,
nd should be completed in 1980. Other
ffiilities, such as washrooms, lockers, and
Dtinges, could be provided to improve staff
Wiring conditions.
'rograms
rograms for inmates at the centre are very
i mited considering the number of inmates
oused here. Efforts must be made to
evelop more activities to provide inmates
iffii constructive ways to use their time.
or men remanded in custody, movies,
^vision, games, and magazines are
rovided and a limited library service has
'so been set up. Phones are available to
lese men to keep in touch with their legal
ipresentatives, families, and friends. Several
'e also continuing their education through
jrrespondence courses from the Ministry of
ducation.
©sentenced inmates, the centre is running
■small educational upgrading program.
ICJT provides interested inmates with
lucational counselling and course placement
ter incarceration. Langara College offers
i rtitude testing.
ver the summer and fall, two students were
red to provide organized sports activities
r sentenced inmates.
t >rne work programs at LMRCC are also
ailable. For men remanded in custody,
sre is a cleaning and maintenance group
ffi'ing about 25 inmates. There was also a
tall work group formed to paint the centre.
t sentenced offenders, productive work
ograms have been provided for inmates
th the re-opening in June 1979 of three
tju^pped shops—a tailoring shop, a sock
shop and a sheet metal shop. These shops
provide inmates with experience that may
lead to trades training on release.
In addition, janitorial and maintenance work
groups were organized for sentenced
offenders to assist in upgrading the
institution. The gatehouse was renovated, the
officers' canteen and the fences and railings
were painted, and all the windows were
washed. Plans for next year include
renovating the visitors' waiting room and the
visiting area and painting all living units.
There were 395 applications for temporary
absence passes but only 55 were approved by
the temporary absence panel, as would be
expected, given the population profile of
those accommodated.
Inmates with behavioural problems need
special programs to help minimize their
difficulties with other inmates. In addition,
the boredom and frustration of men awaiting
long-delayed trials can be much alleviated by
new programs of constructive work,
education and recreation activities.
Many tours of the centre and speaking
engagements were arranged for various
groups, including police, nurses, and
criminology and law students, during the
year. Court-ordered tours of the centre by
juvenile offenders were conducted as a
deterrent to further crime. These groups
totalled 481 persons during 1979 and had a
mutually beneficial effect on both inmates
and visitors.
Lakeside Correctional Centre for Women
Lakeside is the only secure custodial facility
in the Province for women. In October 1979,
the Oakalla Women's Correctional Centre
was renamed the Lakeside Correctional
Centre for Women. New staff are being hired
according to stringent standards of physical
fitness, education, stress tolerance, and
communication skills.
Located within the LMRCC main compound
in Burnaby, the centre relies on LMRCC for
 Activity Reports
such services as gatehouse, medical
attention, night nursing, vehicle
maintenance, stores and supplies.
Renovations and new programs at Lakeside
during 1979 have already resulted in a greatly
improved centre, and there has been a
substantial decrease in escapes. It is expected
that these improvements will continue.
Security
Security has greatly improved at Lakeside,
with escapes down to one in 1979 from 18 in
1978.
Facilities
Lakeside is undergoing a number of
renovations as recommended in the 1978
report of the Royal Commission on the
Incarceration of Female Offenders. The main
building is being completely redecorated and
the beauty parlour redecorated and
refurnished. Four trailers have been installed
to serve as administration offices, library,
school and staff lounge, while the area in the
main building previously used for
administration offices will be used as an
additional visiting and interview area. A
perimeter fence has been constructed to
enable inmates to use the library and the
school without escort and to enjoy outdoor
activities. An existing Pan-abode building is
being converted to a storage area.
Programs
A number of new activity and training
programs have been developed for the
inmates. Educational programs are being
expanded to include academic and vocational
training. A life-skills program began in
January 1980. Training in food services is
also available to inmates.
Recreational programs have greatly expanded
with the hiring of a full-time recreational
officer and the purchase of new equipment.
The centre now offers exercise programs,
plays, volleyball, disco dances, movies,
12
bingo, pool, bands, concerts, and a camera
club.
Additional services are provided by a number
of outside agencies such as Legal Services*
Society, Native Court Workers, Salvation
Army and the Elizabeth Fry Society. The
Elizabeth Fry Society has recently expanded
its services to include paralegal advice,  1
counselling, and assistance to inmates in the
development of release plans.
Willingdon Youth Detention Centre
(WYDC)
This centre is one of two secure custodial
facilities for juvenile delinquents (boys and
girls) located in Burnaby, British Columbia.
The centre provides accommodation for 1
youths remanded into custody and for
juvenile delinquents committed to
containment.
Facilities
This centre suffers from chronic
overcrowding; its facilities, staff and
programs are strained to the limit this year
with a total daily average population of 59
youths, as compared with 44 in 1978. The
total number of youths admitted was 807
(786 in 1978) and the average length of stay
was 27 days (23 in 1978).
Programs
Major programs at this centre are
educational, offered in conjunction with the
Burnaby School Board. Qualified tutors were
hired this year to provide remedial assistance
to youth offenders with learning disabilities.
In spite of this, additional teaching staff and
classroom space are required to cater to the
increased youth population.
Volunteers are providing a valuable aid to the
centre. An evaluation study is presently being
conducted to improve the system of
recruitment, selection, training, and
retention. The centre's chaplain provides 200
volunteers; another 10 to 15 volunteers are
university and college students.
 pr
Activity Reports
;3oalsfor 1980 are:
• the expansion of facilities to provide
better living conditions and programs;
• an additional supervisory and teaching
Hstaff and remedial tutors; and
• a program to upgrade volunteers'
capabilities.
i iouth Fraser Region
i Chilliwack Security Unit
'his 30-cell security unit provides dormitory-
tyle accommodation for 20 men, with five
I ells for protective custody inmates and five
ells for segregated custody.
'he unit serves as a regional reception centre
jr the Fraser Valley Alternate Entry
srogram, accommodating offenders directly
•om courts in centres from Langley to Hope.
I lere, the offenders are classified according
> the degree of secure custody required and
iien sent immediately to the appropriate
1 icility. The unit also temporarily holds
ffenders from open facilities who have
i roven to be disciplinary problems and need
:i be reassessed as to the degree of secure
lstody required or to prove that they can be
-i loved back into an open facility without risk
i i other inmates or the community.
rom January through April 1980, this unit
: as redesignated for juvenile delinquents on
i imand in order to ease the pressure on
iWillingdon Youth Centre. It was designated
ick to adult males as of April 25.
uring the reporting year the average daily
; >unt was 15 and there were no major
oblems.
iicurity
i uring the year, four offenders escaped
rough the ceiling by removing a ceiling
?ht fixture. To increase security, light
Mures have been reinforced with heavier
)lts and bars have been installed across the
lenings. One offender escaped while on
cort.
Facilities
Facilities are generally in good condition and
sufficient to handle the requirements of a
regional reception centre and secure custodial
back-up for open facilities.
Programs
Recreation and work programs at this unit are
limited. However, this unit was not designed
for inmates to serve sentences, and
limitations help to encourage the inmate to
improve his behaviour so that he may be
placed in an open setting.
Inmates housed at the unit are required to
take part in a work project which consists of
cutting and bundling stakes for the Ministry
of Forests. This project is carried out in a
small, fenced compound adjacent to the main
building. Maximum inmate income for this
work project is one dollar per day,
considerably lower than in an open setting.
A secure, fresh-air recreational area provides
space for the inmates to exercise. Indoors,
there is a small library and a games room for
evening recreation.
Interior Region
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
(KRCC)
This facility is located near Kamloops and
provides mainly dormitory-style
accommodation within a fenced area. The
official capacity is 90, including 26 secure
cells available for offenders requiring more
secure custody. Offenders requiring secure
custody beyond the capacity of this centre are
transferred to the Prince George Regional
Correctional Centre.
During 1979, the daily average population at
KRCC was 102. In spite of this
overcrowding, and the need for upgrading
and eventual replacement of the facility, the
centre is continuing to cope, employing
sentenced offenders in worthwhile work
projects and making available opportunities
for personal development whenever possible.
13
 Activity Reports
Security
There were 10 escapes from the centre this
year, the same number as last year.
Facilities
Replacement of the centre is one of the goals
of Corrections Branch. In the meantime
however, some interim measures should be
taken to expand and improve facilities to hold
an increased population. In addition,
improvements are still needed in the gym to
ensure offenders' safety.
Programs
Recreation programs include library, movies,
baseball, gym (including weight-lifting and
boxing) volleyball, floor hockey, bingo, and
hobbies such as leatherwork, woodwork and
copperwork. There was an increase in
attendance at all sports and hobby activities
during 1979, with volleyball and floor
hockey leading in popularity. The centre
acquired a good supply of recreational
equipment during 1979, including handballs,
catching mitts, a punching bag and boxing
gloves, floor hockey equipment and
shuffleboard. Hockey and handball
equipment are of better quality and should
last longer than in the past. The hobby shop
is popular and there are many requests for
power tools. Twenty-six movies were shown
and another 26 were ordered for 1980.
During the year, sports tournaments were
arranged and enthusiastically received. Three
Christmas concerts for inmates were held by
outside groups and a new project was
undertaken: a Christmas party at the centre
for the residents of Tranquille Farm, an
institution for the mentally retarded. This
event was planned and organized entirely by
offenders, using their own imagination and
initiative. This new approach to activity
programs resulted in a very successful event.
Despite heavy losses, the Thompson-Nicola
Library system continues to supply the centre
with books. The centre also received
donations from the North Kamloops Library
14
and the Eight-track Book Exchange Shop.
The centre now has a total of 900 volumes.
Offenders are also provided access to
Ministry of Education correspondence
courses, and there was a slight increase in the
number of inmates taking these courses thiE
year.
An impaired drivers' course is held at the m
centre for offenders from both the centre and
Rayleigh Camp, an open facility. During the
year, attendance in the course decreased and
it was cancelled during the summer months,
but resumed again in September.
Alcoholics Anonymous also holds weekly
evening meetings in the gym at the centre.B
Attendance at these meetings has increased*
Offenders serving their sentences at the I
centre are employed in a variety of work
programs. Besides maintaining the grounds,
and the flower and vegetable gardens, work
crews also participate in a number of projects
outside the centre.
The Ministry of Forests sponsors several
work programs for offenders. One of these
involves splitting, bundling and shipping
stakes for fences. The demand for these
stakes has increased and it is anticipated that
approximately one million stakes will be 9
required. It is estimated that 12 offenders will
be required for two years to fill this demand,
and the project has become high priority for
1980.
Another forestry project involves clearing out
burnt brush and trees in the Monte Lake area.
Trees which are not too badly burnt from
forest fires are cut and hauled to the centre
where another crew cuts and splits them into
cordwood. Offenders also help the local I
ranger station in seeding, road repair, and
general clean-up.
Assistance in harvesting the potato crop to
prevent early frost damage was provided to
Tranquille residents during 1979. Offenders
 JKtivity Reports
lso helped with the hay harvest at Rayleigh
:amp, an open facility. The hay is used to
ff livestock raised at the camp.
,Mrew from KRCC worked on the
Ktruction of a women's hostel in
(Sntown Kamloops. This was a new project
)llthe centre and was a great success, the
ffenders' contribution creating a very
Baurable impression in the community.
iorthern Region
rince George Regional Correctional
Mre (PGRCC)
his secure custodial facility is the second
irgest in the Province. It accommodates all
intenced offenders from the Northern
egion as well as inmates from Kamloops
utroiring more secure custody than that
aitre can provide.
i'taking conditions for staff and living
lifflJitions for offenders were made extremely
fficult during renovations this year.
owever, everyone coped with the situation,
id much progress has been made.
'.curity
i uring 1979, nine offenders escaped.
IsBKity was improved through the
placement of worn-out locks, and
tstallation of additional bars and other
echanical devices. A security screen was
it in the van between the driver and
mates, and the inside back door handles
sre removed to ensure the secure
insportation of offenders.
number of escapes were attempted by
mates cutting bars and one attempt was
ade from the city hospital. These escapes
:re prevented through vigilant supervision
d checks made several times per week.
spite of a hunger strike, a sit-down strike
d other difficulties which could have led to
rious disruption, these tense situations were
ndled carefully and brought under control
thout injury to anyone.
U_
Facilities
Major renovations to the centre, totalling
$1.9 million, began in July. On completion
next year, the new facilities will include:
• a school-size gymnasium, equipped
with a stage, bleachers, and a "global
gym" machine;
• a large, attractive open-visiting area;
• a secure visiting room for offenders
under maximum secure custody;
• a modern administration area, including
a large conference room;
• a modern security system, with
electronic doors, camera equipment,
and an inner security fence;
• a medical unit, equipped with modern
dental machinery; and
• a greatly expanded stores complex.
In addition, new kitchen and office
equipment was purchased and fire-hazard
mattresses were replaced with fire-resistant
ones.
Plumbing was upgraded throughout the
building and additional showers were
installed. Sewers backed up but were
repaired. The roof was also repaired and
broken windows were replaced in all units.
Further upgrading and standardizing of
equipment and buildings is required and
these proposed changes have been built into
next year's budget.
Programs
Programs offered at PGRCC for offenders'
personal development include a school
program and an alcohol awareness program.
The school program was started at the centre
in 1977 (with the help of the College of New
Caledonia in Prince George), with one full-
time and one part-time teacher. The program
provides academic upgrading for adults,
equivalent to grade 12 standard, and is a
designated General Educational Development
(GED) exam centre. Since its inception, the
program has steadily grown. The number of
students enrolled in 1978-79 was 56 (up
from 49 the previous year). The number of
15
 Activity Reports
students writing GED exams was 24 (up from
20 in 1977-78). The percentage pass for
GED was 98 per cent (up from 85 per cent in
J 977-78) and offenders have shown a very
favourable attitude toward this program,
displaying good work habits and developing
good relationships with teachers. A college
committee evaluated the program and
recommended that it be continued.
The committee also recommended that
vocational training and life-skills courses be
developed for the centre. In November 1979
a qualified instructor was hired part-time to
supplement a program of life-skills at
PGRCC; however, shortage of space and
videotape equipment created difficulties. It is
hoped that the completion of renovations and
the arrival of equipment in 1980 will make
the program more successful.
An alcohol awareness program was started at
the centre in early 1978 for inmates with
alcohol problems. Many community services
and individuals contribute to the program,
including local clergy, doctors and lawyers.
In 1979 three films on alcohol counselling
were purchased to improve the course.
Certificates of completion were issued to all
successful participants and they were asked,
to fill in an evaluation questionnaire. Most!
evaluations were positive and the volunteer)]
instructors were pleased with participants
progress.
Work programs at the centre during 1979J
emphasized work for the community. The!
centre received a $1,000 Provincial grant fol
a Year of the Child project, co-ordinated whj
the Ministry of Human Resources. Under
supervision, the offenders constructed specif
equipment for playgrounds at two homes foj
retarded children in Prince George. Thef_
equipment was much appreciated by both 1
children and the staff and it was an excellerj
opportunity for inmates to contribute
something worthwhile for children during
this special year.
At senior citizens' homes, the inmates
mowed lawns, painted fences and porches!
and did general clean-up during the falls""
They also painted the Child Development
Centre and the Aurora Activity Centre.
Furniture was manufactured for the-children
ward of the Prince George Regional Hosp
and the YM-YWCA.
16
  Open Facilities: Activity Description
Open facilities are minimum security centres,
semi-isolated forest camps, farms, or
ranches. They provide separate controlled
residential accommodation for adult and
youth offenders who are not escape risks or a
danger to the community and who are
physically fit enough to take part in rigorous
work and training programs.
Convicted youths and adults who are
sentenced to secure custodial facilities can
transfer to an open facility only after being
screened by classification officers.
Temporary absence passes may be granted to
qualified residents of open centres, usually to
enable them to take up training or
employment.
The work and training programs at open
facilities vary with the setting; nevertheless,
they are all designed to carry out the sentence
imposed by the courts, and to provide
opportunities for offenders to participate in
useful work and program opportunities.
Programs include forest management and
maintenance, sawmill operation, wilderness
survival, crop raising, animal husbandry and
salmon rehabilitation. Many programs are
operated in conjunction with Federal and
Provincial agencies such as the Ministry of
Forests, and Environment Canada. These
programs provide offenders with valuable
work experience.
During leisure time, offenders are
encouraged to pursue hobbies,
correspondence courses, sports, games and
other pastimes and to become involved with
community groups like the John Howard and
Elizabeth Fry societies and other self-help
organizations.
Although offenders housed in open facilities
are not dangerous, the number of offenders
who walk away (escape lawful custody) or
are found to be absent without leave is a
concern.
18
The condition of facilities is regularly
assessed to ensure the maintenance of
appropriate standards of accommodation.   ;
However, it is the work and training programs
at open facilities that are of primary
importance and they are monitored for their
effect on offenders.
Corrections Branch administers a total of 14
open facilities with an over all capacity of
726. For men, there is Jordan River Camp,
Alouette River Correctional Centre, New
Haven Correctional Centre, Stave Lake I
Camp, Pine Ridge Camp, Ford Mountain
Camp, Mount Thurston Camp, Bear Creek*
Camp, Rayleigh Farm, Hutda Lake Camp,
and Boulder Bay Camp.
Twin Maples Correctional Centre is the only
open facility for women, while delinquent
boys may be placed in Centre Creek Camp I
and delinquent boys and girls are
accommodated at Lakeview Camp.
Vancouver Island Region
Lakeview Camp
Until June 1979, Lakeview Camp, which is
located near Campbell River, operated as an
attendance centre for boys and girls (under
17) on probation. Then the camp was
declared an open facility containment centre
for juvenile delinquents committed to
containment on court order.
In 1979, 15 youths were absent without
leave; in the first quarter of 1980, three I
youths were found absent without leave.
Facilities
The camp consists of three dormitory huts
used for living quarters for the youths, in
addition to an office area and a gym.
In the summer of 1979 the youths cleared
brush to make a ball field, which enabled
them to participate in field sports.
 I—
ctivity Reports
\lograms
liring 1979, a compulsory school-work-
uireation program was operated for the
'Uths. A flexible activites schedule
irmitted youths to engage in personal
tsrcise and plan other activities.
'e school program consisted of the regular
iiool curriculum and levels of education
aong the youths ranged from grades four
tough 12.
j special voluntary training program on
ilderness survival was also held. This
lining was conducted on seven different
\ekends, and diplomas were awarded. The
tm that completed this training is permitted
laid the Comox Search and Rescue Team.
ie regular work program consisted of camp
lintenance, vehicle cleaning, kitchen
cies, and laundry.
iscial work programs sponsored by the
litish Columbia Ministry of Forests and the
Inistry of Lands, Parks and Housing
t|uired setting up small satellite camps for
fys in isolated areas. Under supervision,
1/s cleared beach fronts for camp sites at
Is Lake, 27.2 kilometres (17 miles) north
cthe camp, and at Rebecca Spit on Quadra
Imd.
/special work program for the girls involved
t nufacturing novelty items under contract.
ley were paid on a piece-work basis and the
era pocket money was a good incentive for
t girls.
lily recreation consisted of one hour of
sirts and exercise and another hour of arts
al crafts for which an art instructor was
bd.
U978 the Lakeview Youth Camp staff
d'eloped a citizens' advisory board
cnposed of people of various backgrounds
f m Campbell River who acted as a
ssening and approval group for all
.aences. Now that the camp has been
BSignated as a containment centre, the board
; sves in an advisory capacity for the
r'grams and policies.
Jordan River Camp
Located 10 kilometres (16 miles) west of the
Jordan River on the southwest coast of
Vancouver Island, this open facility consists
of trailers with a capacity to house 40 men.
In 1979, six men were absent without leave;
in the first quarter of 1980, seven were absent
without leave.
Facilities
The isolated location of the unit restricts the
availability of community resources for
offenders. This has been overcome by the use
of temporary absence passes. However, to
meet regional needs and provide a more
diversified range of programs for inmates, it
is clear that some upgrading should be
undertaken and additional facilities should be
provided.
The camp water supply system must be
upgraded to provide a regular, trouble-free
supply of water. The gymnasium, destroyed
by fire in 1978, should be replaced to provide
indoor exercise and recreation, especially in
the winter. A laundry, hobby room, and extra
office space would much improve existing I
programs.
Programs
Outdoor work and training programs at the
Jordan River Camp are varied, but the
concentration is on bush work. This serves as
good training for offenders hoping to obtain a
temporary absence pass to Camp Point where
the Ministry of Forests pays regular wages
for this kind of work.
For the fifth year in succession, staff and
offenders were involved in the Province-wide
Salmonid Enhancement Program jointly
undertaken by Environment Canada and the
British Columbia Ministry of Environment.
Activities centred around the San Juan River
watershed area of Port Renfrew. Sixteen
miles of stream were cleared and salmon
incubation boxes were expanded from a
capacity of 50,000 to 1,250,000 eggs.
19
 Activity Reports
In August and September, inmates helped
clear and construct two heliport radio sites
for the RCMP Telecommunications Branch.
The RCMP contributed funding for the
project to enable the inmates to be paid.
The men also helped clear the highway from
Port Renfrew to the camp for the Provincial
Department of Highways.
For the Ministry of Forests, the men
participated in a spacing project near the
camp, clearing scrub to allow the healthy
growth of new timber stands.
The inmates also cleared beach trails for
public access to Mystic Beach and Sombrero
Beach on nearby land owned by Rayonier of
Canada.
In addition, the men cut and delivered
firewood for old-age pensioners in Sooke and
devoted a few months to cleaning, clearing
and rebuilding Girl Guide and Brownie
camps at nearby Shirley Hill.
Recreation and hobbies included
woodworking, canning and leatherwork. The
men sold and gave away their craftwork to
visitors and relatives at camp.
North Fraser Region
Twin Maples Correctional Centre
Located in Maple Ridge, Twin Maples is the
only open facility for women. It has a
capacity for 30 women, ages 17 and up. Most
of the women at Twin Maples were sentenced
directly.
In 1979, 24 women were absent without
leave; in the first quarter of 1980, only eight
women were absent without leave.
Facilities
Twin Maples consists of four wooden
buildings on approximately 145 hectares,
(350 acres) of land. There is a dining hall, a
recreation hall and a tailoring shop and the
living units accommodate two or three
women in each bedroom. The approximately
20
145 hectares supports Rusk in Farm, where
livestock and hay are raised as part of the
work program.
These facilities have proven quite satisfactory
so far and farm equipment is in good repair,
the buildings and grounds have been well
maintained by inmates.
During 1979 a tennis court was built by ■
inmates. Asphalt surfacing was paid out of
the inmates' welfare fund. The tennis court*
now provides an extra recreational activity
for the women.
Programs
Programs at TWin Maples during the
reporting year provided the women with a
wide range of choices.
A woman may choose from a number of
different work programs: kitchen duties.
farmwork, greenhouse tending, the security
and maintenance of the centre and its
grounds.
Five women were employed in kitchen 1
duties, rotating responsibility for baking,
cooking, cleaning, dishwashing and pantry
duties.
Four women were employed on Ruskin Farm,
driving the tractors, tending 350 head of beef
cattle, 2,000 chickens and two Clydesdale
horses, and doing other farm chores. The
farm supplied eggs for the centre and for all
of the forest camps as well as Alouette River
Correctional Centre. Beef was also supplied
to all centres requesting it.
Others were employed in the greenhouse and
on general maintenance, while 12 women
were employed in the tailoring shop. Here
they were paid on a piece-work basis, and.
earned up to $18 per day. They sewed isst»-
green work shirts and trousers for the Haney
Forest Camp inmates, white clothing for
Essondale and Riverview, and drapes for I
several government departments.
Some women were also employed as
waitresses, kindergarten teachers, and I
teaching assistants in the Maple Ridge 1
 —
ctivity Reports
immunity. Others volunteered to help with
iitients at Park Ridge Hospital (an extended
ce home) and at Woodlands School for the
nntally retarded.
1 ucation programs were held outside the
titre in local community institutions such as
hple Ridge High School, Pacific Vocational
I.titute, and Douglas College, where
i nates took mostly educational upgrading
urses. One woman studied languages.
I creation for the women consisted of sports
d games. The Twin Maples team became a
r mber of the Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows
(mmunity Baseball League. A sports day
\s held in which Twin Maples residents and
a Alcoholics Anonymous group
ftksipated.
Iree women had babies while at the centre
ring 1979. Showers were held for them and
1 ettes were sewn at the tailoring shop. The
rthers were permitted to keep their infants
vh them during their time at Twin Maples.
Isre is a high level of support in the
cnmunity for the centre. During 1979, an
cm house was held three times, for which
anission was charged; raffles were held,
al tea and sandwiches were served. These
ejvts proved very popular and all proceeds
vnt to the inmates' welfare fund. Farm visits
vre also held by the women for
kdergarten groups. An Alcoholics
/onymous group held meetings at the
citre twice a week. An average of 10
vmen attended the sessions. Legal aid was
aj provided and a Native Fellowship group
o;red assistance on a regular basis to native
Iiian women at the centre.
IV Haven Correctional Centre
I:ated in Burnaby, this centre
aommodates up to a maximum of 80 young
mi between the ages of 17 and 22 who are
ffing their first adult jail sentence. Many
a offenders with poor academic records.
I: centre also operates a special activity and
inning program.
There were 31 young men absent without
leave in 1979, the highest number since 1974
when there were 34. During the first quarter
of 1980, there were only four absences
without leave. To date, all have been
apprehended and placed in secure custody.
Facilities
Situated on 25.5 hectares (approximately 63
acres) of land, the centre consists of several
buildings. The living unit provides
dormitory-style accommodation for the men
and there are three shops providing trades
training and experience in metal working,
woodworking and welding. The area also
supports a small farm where inmates raise
hay and livestock as part of the work
program.
These facilities have proven adequate for the
needs of the program. However, the gym
requires new flooring. It was temporarily
converted into living quarters while a new
living unit was being constructed two years
ago and this ruined the surface, making it
unsafe for recreational use.
Programs
The programs at New Haven are organized
into four one-month stages which focus on
gradual acceptance of responsibility. At each
stage, the young man must prove his capacity
to live up to certain standards before passing
on to the next. The first stage stresses
personal responsibility, such as neatness,
cleanliness and punctuality. The second
requires him to prove his responsibility to the
group by helping others to live up to the
standards of behaviour expected. At the third
or senior stage he must prove his capacity in
a group leader or group service role. The
young men are organized into four teams and
a captain and assistant are appointed for
each. Others are appointed foremen for the
laundry, kitchen, farm or shops, or put in
charge of the chapels, sports equipment, or
library.
Throughout the program, the young men are
employed during the day in the shops, on the
21
L
 Activity Reports
farm, and around the main building. Three
nights a week, one hour is given to
educational upgrading with the aid of a
contracted teacher who assists the men in
attaining a basic level of education. An
average of 16 inmates attend. This is
followed by one hour of physical education.
One night per week is devoted to inter-team
sports events, such as Softball and volleyball
games. Sports teams from the community
often participate.
On successful completion of these three
stages, the young man then becomes eligible
for the final stage, which is parole or a
temporary absence pass whereby the social
skills and responsibility he has learned in the
program may be tested in the community.
During 1979, 47 young men at New Haven
were judged eligible for a temporary absence
pass to enable them to take up jobs. The
British Columbia Borstal Association, a
community organization which closely
monitors their progress through the New
Haven program, helped to place these young
men. Fifteen others began education
upgrading (grades six to eight) at Pacific
Vocational Institute and at Vancouver City
College. Nine successfully completed their
courses.
This past year, offenders' volunteer work for
the community consisted of making lawn
furniture, flagpoles and other items for
donation to Little League sports groups in
Surrey and Richmond to aid them in raising
funds.
There were also a number of visits by
community groups such as the Vancouver
Justice Council, and Burnaby Justice
Council, as well as the Burnaby mayor and
several aldermen and other groups and
dignitaries.
Alouette River Correctional Centre
(ARCC)
This facility for men is situated in the
municipality of Maple Ridge. It has a total
capacity of 151 and is designed for offenders
who show evidence of chemical dependency,
especially alcohol. They may be sentenced
directly to the centre for impaired driving or
may be classified from a more secure facility,
having displayed general problems with
chemical dependency.
Alouette River Correctional Centre also I
serves as a secure back-up facility for
offenders displaying behaviour problems at
Haney Forest Camps. In addition, the centre
participates in the North Fraser Alternate
Entry Project.
During 1979, absences without leave totalled
48. In the first quarter of 1980, there wereM
seven absences without leave.
Facilities
Alouette River Correctional Centre provides
dormitory accommodation in three buildings.
As well, dining and recreational areas are
contained within these buildings. The   ;
facilities have proven adequate for the needs
of the program to date, although scheduling
of program activities would be much
improved by extra space.
Programs
Most of the program effort at Alouette River
Correctional Centre is aimed at offenders
with a chemical dependency, particularly
those dependent on alcohol, who form 90per
cent of the residents. The program for new
residents lasts a few weeks.
During the first week, four hours per day are
devoted to a comprehensive orientation of the
offender to the institution, including their
rights as a resident, services available, rules
and restrictions, temporary absences and how
to qualify and apply for them. This
procedure, though time-consuming, ensures
that each man understands what is expected
of him as a resident and it has been found to
be very effective in gaining the residents cooperation.
A counsellor is then assigned to each man,
and the next four days are devoted to an
awareness course, during which the men are
 Itltivity Reports
Hit, through oral instruction and film
Jgions, about all chemical substances that
ract human reasoning and the body. During
ISe four days a man's assigned counsellor
orks with him to assess his readiness for
irticipation in a two-and-a-half-week
llmntary program designed to introduce him
the Alcoholics Anonymous type of
liatment. This program consists of
iiunselling sessions with the aid of
lunteers. On completion of these three
tograms, a resident is felt to be sufficiently
cepared to be escorted by volunteers to
tjracipate in the community Alcoholics
Iffiymous sessions. All three sessions are
Iffit by instructors who were alcoholics
umselves, ensuring the credibility of the
pgram.
('iroughout the compulsory program, which
iheld for half a day, the residents are
quired to work in the community or on the
punds.
iliring 1979, residents of ARCC worked on
Btgral cleaning and maintenance of
lildren's playgrounds in the community, and
mearby Golden Ears Park. They also
\irked on odd jobs and did repairs such as
pmbing, new roofing, and painting.
Iter that year, ARCC residents began
jrroipation in the Federal-Provincial
jjfromid Enhancement Program. Eight to 12
t n worked to clear and maintain spawning
itinnels and built incubators holding 60,000
smon fry which were to be released in May
BO. This has led to the camp residents
eablishing a very favourable reputation with
I local community.
Fie Ridge Camp
Pe Ridge Camp, one of the Haney Forest
Cnps, is located near Maple Ridge
c imunity and has a capacity of 52 men.
Ill 979, 30 men were absent without leave,
wile in the first quarter of 1980, there were
* en absences without leave.
'	
Facilities
The camp consists of huts providing
dormitory-style accommodation, a dining
hall, a gymnasium and a sawmill for the
work program. There is a large field for
outdoor sports.
During 1979, the huts and visiting area were
renovated to provide a more acceptable
standard of accommodation. The grounds
were upgraded; construction of an arts and
crafts building was begun and was well
underway by the end of the reporting year.
Renovations to the dining hall were also
started.
Programs
Programs at Pine Ridge focus on logging and
operation of the sawmill. In 1979, Pine Ridge
Camp obtained rights to a stand of timber in
the Blue Mountain area north of Maple Ridge
at the south end of Alouette Lake. The
Ministry of Forests provided the equipment
required for logging, and sawmill production
totalled 300,000 board feet by the end of
1979.
In addition to the regular work program, the
men carried out a number of volunteer work
projects in the community. These included
clearing beaches and cutting firewood for
campers at Golden Ears Park, preparation and
clean-up of Maple Ridge fair grounds before
and after the annual three-day fair, and
cutting trails for the Maple Ridge Horse
Trails Society. The men also upgraded
neighbourhood parks in Maple Ridge. In
return for these projects, the camp was given
passes for residents to use such community
resources as tennis courts, skating rinks and
swimming pools.
Some men also attended trades training night-
school classes at Pacific Vocational College.
For recreation, the men played floor hockey,
volleyball, basketball, racquetball and
badminton in the gym, and soccer and
23
 Activity Reports
Softball on the playing field. Men were also
taught boxing, and competitions were held
with Maple Ridge Inter-Boxing Club. Camp
sports competitions were held with other
camps in the North Fraser Region such as
Alouette River Correctional Centre, Twin
Maples Correctional Centre, Boulder Bay
Camp and Stave Lake Camp. On weekends
and holidays, canoe races were held, and the
men went fishing and swimming at Big Lake
nearby. "Logging days" were also held, with
competitions for logging skills.
The men also were given time to pursue
hobbies, mostly woodworking. They were
accompanied into the community to buy
supplies and made such things as coffee
tables, work tables, and waterbed frames for
their personal use.
Stave Lake Camp
Stave Lake Camp, another one of the Haney
Forest Camps, is located 32 kilometres (20
miles) east of Haney on the shore of Stave
Lake and it has a capacity for 55 men.
During 1979, there were five absences
without leave but during the first quarter of
1980, there was only one absence without
leave.
Facilities
Like Pine Ridge Camp, Stave Lake Camp
consists of wooden huts in a wilderness
setting.
Upgrading of the camp is a continuing work
program and during 1979 much was
achieved. Construction of a new garbage hut,
a staff changing room and an arts and crafts
building were completed. A ball field was
also completed, new flooring was installed in
all huts, and the entire camp was painted. A
16.4 metre trailer was moved from the closed
Cedar Lake Camp to provide space for an
office, meeting room and storage area. This
permitted an increase in camp capacity from
48 to 55 inmates.
24
Programs
The regular work program consists of logging
and clearing Stave Lake Basin to make a
public recreation area. The Parks and
Outdoor Recreation Branch of the British
Columbia Ministry of Lands, Parks and m
Housing, the British Columbia Ministry of
Forests and Mission Tree Farm have been
providing financial support since 1971 when
the camp was first constructed.
With equipment, financing and support from
British Columbia Hydro, inmates carried out
a clearing project. By the end of 1979. they
had cleared about 55 hectares (approximately
135 acres) of stumps and burned eight  1
hectares (approximately 20 acres) of debris.
Experts from Mission Tree Farm assisted
with blasting when necessary. An excellent
relationship with British Columbia Hydro
was maintained through the year.
Boulder Bay Camp
Located at the north end of Alouette Lake,
this camp is the third of the three Haney
Forest Camps. It was built to accommodate
51 boys, ages 13 to 17, and is accessible only
by boat. The work and training program is
designed for physically fit boys who have
committed their first offences and are serving
sentences of nine to 15 months.
Nine boys walked away from the camp in
1979, but in the first quarter of 1980 there
were no absences without leave.
Facilities
Facilities at Boulder Bay are similar to the
other Haney Forest Camps.
Upgrading of the camp's facilities forms a
continuing part of the work program. By
October, all living units had been insulated to
conserve heat and this resulted in burning
only half as much wood during the winter of
1979-80. By spring, the kitchen had been
renovated and a complete overhaul of the
ablution hut was completed, with new 1
counters, ceilings, tiled showers, floors, new
 Itivity Reports
Bfions, doors, and heating equipment,
ork was also begun on construction of a
ijfeation hall and renovation of the dining
11.
shneral improvements were made to the
junds and the fire protection was brought
to required safety levels. Three boats were
srhauled and a new ramp was built at the
ck.
iigrams
■je program at Boulder Bay is based on the
(tward Bound model of wilderness survival
tining. The stress is placed on physical
cimtioning, self-sufficiency and teamwork.
i motorized equipment is used, everything
ilone by hand, and discipline is geared to
p/sical conditioning (25 push-ups instead of
ilation).
Is program lasts four months; a new
pigram starts each month so that the camp
crates all year.
E:h of the four months corresponds to a
sge in the program, and features intensive
p/sical training, instruction in first aid,
v:er safety, rappelling, search and rescue,
al fire-fighting, a heavy work program, and
orununity service projects.
Ering the year, Parks and Outdoor
Bireation and the Ministry of Forests
snsored several heavy work projects for the
bs such as cutting firewood, stakes, fence
pts and shakes. For their community
mm projects, the boys spent most of their
tie clearing and cleaning up church and
stool playgrounds in Maple Ridge and Pitt
^adows.
Gnbing equipment such as boots, ropes,
pins and harnesses, was replaced to meet
s;:ty standards.
T're was a good community response this
yr—a total of 300 visitors attended
giuation ceremonies, and 160 special
v tors came to Boulder Bay Camp including
3' Scouts, elementary school students,
-
probation staff in training, and staff from an
Oregon wilderness program.
Three of the older boys who completed the
program in 1979 went on to jobs teaching
children wilderness survival and emergency
rescue procedures in Kamloops, Quesnel and
the Hudson-Hope area.
The Justice Institute of British Columbia
made a film of the Boulder Bay program for
training of newly recruited probation and
correctional officers and for general public
education. It will be revised to include the
winter training program.
Simon Fraser University Criminology
Research Centre is currently carrying out a
study to assess attitude changes of
participants during the program and a follow-
up of participants subsequently granted
parole.
South Fraser Region
Mount Thurston Camp
Mount Thurston Camp, one of the Chilliwack
Forest Camps," was designed to accommodate
50 men.
During 1979, absences without leave totalled
18, while in the first quarter of 1980,
absences without leave totalled four. All have
been apprehended.
Facilities
Mount Thurston facilities are similar to the
other Chilliwack Forest Camps. They consist
of five huts providing dormitory
accommodation. There are separate buildings
for gymnasium, kitchen and dining hall,
laundry, and administration. The camp also
maintains a carpentry shop, a vehicle
maintenance shop and a butcher shop; the
latter servicing all the Chilliwack Forest
Camps with beef supplied by the open
facility farms. A sawmill, sponsored by the
Ministry of Forests, forms part of the work
program.
25
 Activity Reports
Since residents are employed in general camp
maintenance, these facilities are continually
being upgraded. A significant upgrading was
the change from wood stoves to propane gas
stoves, which are easier to control and less of
a fire hazard. Under supervision of a camp
carpenter, the men built a new addition to the
camp church.
Programs
The work program is varied. The men
worked in the sawmill and carried out forest
maintenance, including logging. The butcher
shop, carpentry shop and vehicle
maintenance shop provided interested
residents with on-the-job training and
experience in trades that may help them in
getting a job on release. They also performed
bush work for the Ministry of Forests,
including thinning, pruning, spacing and
cone picking.
In addition, the men carried out work
projects in the community. This included
minor construction and upgrading of parks at
Fairfield Island, Vedder Crossing and
Abbotsford.
TAvo men began correspondence courses from
the Ministry of Education. One man took
auto mechanics, while the other took a
mathematics upgrading course for carpentry.
For recreation, the men played baseball,
soccer, volleyball and basketball and groups
from the local churches and the Bible
College came to the camp to participate.
Hobbies and crafts included woodwork,
drawing and painting and petitpoint
needlework. Every effort has been made to
provide modem tools.
Volunteers also accompanied men out of the
camp for Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in
the community. The local chaplain has been
instrumental in attracting volunteers to work
with inmates, but a much greater volunteer
effort is required.
26
Ford Mountain Camp
This camp is also one of the Chilliwack I
Forest Camps and is located near Mount
Thurston Camp. It is designed to hold 51
men.
During 1979 the number of offenders absent
without leave totalled 26. Of these three are
still at large. In the first quarter of 1980 no
offenders were absent without leave.
Facilities
Late in 1978 most of this camp was burned to
the ground. Only the gym, outdoor
swimming pool, library and hobby shop were
preserved. Since then trailers have provided
temporary accommodation for inmates and
office work. It is hoped that plans to rebuild
the camp will go ahead next year.
Programs
Programs at the camp are limited, due to the
lack of facilities for planning and organizing
activities. However, offenders worked on a
spacing project sponsored by the Ministry of
Forests, clearing brush to assist in the growth
of healthy trees. Offenders also carried out
regular maintenance of the camp and its
grounds.
A small crew of offenders was trained in fire
fighting and serves as the stand-by
emergency crew for the district office of the
Ministry of Forests.
Recreation consisted of soccer, softball, and
other sports, as well as swimming in ihe
summer in the outdoor swimming pool. Pool
and bingo were popular indoor games.
Offenders also used the library and did
woodwork in the hobby shop.
Centre Creek Camp
Designed as a containment facility for boys
between the ages of 14 and 17, this camp is
located some 40 kilometres (25 miles)
southeast of Chilliwack. 1979 was the fust
year of operations.
J
 —
icthity Reports
I:hat year there were 79 boys absent
r»hout leave and 56 in the first quarter of
1!0. All were apprehended, and 33 were
pirned to secure custody.
f.ilities
bi camp consists of several one-storey
jb dings in a wilderness setting. These
;b .dings include administrative offices, a
khen-dining hall, a hobby hut with laundry
nm, a recreation hut with pool table,
slrfleboard, and a library, school building,
.gmasium, and five cottages, each with a
baroom.
Cap upgrading forms part of the regular
wk program and in 1979 construction of a
ta field was begun, to be completed late in
1!0. The boys also hauled topsoil to make
la is for the camp.
ftqrams
.8 ic to the management philosophy of
^Jtre Creek is the involvement of the
pfnaSLwith staff in the monthly program
oflanning sessions. The boys are
anuraged to make suggestions for new
grains, to formulate the rules and
^dilations governing those programs and the
feis ofipiscipline. This procedure has been
Mid to be effective not only in maintaining
ccrol, but also in teaching teamwork and
operation and in eliminating
information on camp operations.
A isic school upgrading program is offered
igtjentre Creek. This includes math, reading,
idling and spelling, to the grade 10 level,
jrtbdys with grade 10 education, this
^Eramis not compulsory. Otherwise, a boy
mi attend this program for a minimum of
n and-a-half hours per day, five days per
mti This minimum attendance period was
m: luted because it was found that many of
Jiooys without grade 10 education had
Jevioural problems and learning
rjiiomtiesUhat limited their attention span
intolerance levels. Those who wish to
lM school for longer periods may do so
19 rding'to their abilities.
1
Two teachers contracted from the Chilliwack
School Board taught the program during the
reporting year, with an average class size of
six to eight students.
The work program at Centre Creek
concentrates on maintenance, upgrading and
minor construction projects around camp.
However, the boys carried out a number of
work projects in the community, both with
and without supervision, depending on the
boy's level of responsibility. These projects
included landscaping for the YMCA
maintenance around the Chilliwack Coliseum
for the local Civic Properties Commission,
playground construction for the Sunshine
Drive School for retarded children, and
Participark construction in Abbotsford.
The camp has also begun placing boys in
jobs in the community, beginning at a
minimal wage. Seven boys began work,
helping out local farmers with haying and
other farm work. Another boy began working
with a local garage.
Another successful new initiative was an
eight-week first-aid course at Fraser Valley
College. Ten boys attended and received their
certificate.
For recreation, the boys played volleyball and
basketball and also jogged with staff around
the one-and-a-half mile track on the ball
field. They also went to ball games and
hockey games, and went ice skating and
roller skating in Chilliwack.
Planning directions for next year include
more on-site activity and training programs
to assist the boys in formulating constructive
release plans.
Interior Region
Rayleigh Farm
Located near Kamloops, Rayleigh Farm is
designed to hold 30 men.
During the year, four men were absent
without leave, the same number as last year.
27
 Activity Reports
During the first quarter of 1980, one man
was absent without leave. All were
apprehended.
Facilities
Rayleigh Farm Camp was considerably
upgraded this year. The main administration
building and the dormitories were completely
renovated, equipped with smoke alarm
systems and all exteriors were stuccoed. New
sewage disposal and water supply systems
were installed.
A new tractor was purchased and two new
haywagons were ordered. Except for a
broken blade in the cutter, all other
machinery was kept in good repair. In
addition, the potato root cellar was
completely revamped.
Programs
The farm continued to be an integral part of
the work program, utilizing manpower
instead of machinery wherever possible and
entrusting selected offenders with special
responsibilities, such as the safety and
maintenance of the farm equipment, animals
and buildings.
Farm activities included the production of
silage hay, raising beef cattle, potatoes and
other fresh vegetables for use by corrections
facilities around Kamloops. There was a total
of 269 beef cattle at the farm during the year;
60 were slaughtered for use by the Interior
institutions. With local needs met, eight head
were shipped to Chilliwack Forest Camps.
Offenders also assisted Ministry of Forests
personnel on various projects, such as tree
thinning and slash burning at Hedley Creek,
and cleaning and upgrading the beach and
campsites at Paul Lake Park. Salvaged logs
were provided to the Dick Hart Memorial
Park to construct a children's play fort.
Inmates also painted and cleaned up the
grounds of Adonis House, a local volunteer
drug and alcohol treatment centre.
28
An average of eight offenders took part in the
four-week impaired drivers' course held at
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre, ■
accompanied by a staff member. Alcoholics
Anonymous meetings were also held at the
centre every week. Total attendance was 24*
Recreation included movies, television.
hobby shop, ceramics class, softball, and a
variety of games and tournaments, especially
during holiday weekends.
There is also a special group for native Indian
offenders at the farm. In January 1979 theva
received a grant from the First Citizens' Fund
to hire arts and crafts instructors and to buy
crafts supplies. Members of the group were;
taught many forgotten crafts such as carving,
weaving, beadwork, netting, and leather
work. Films on native Indian culture wereP
also shown to the group.
Bear Creek Camp
Bear Creek Camp is located near Clearwater
and was designed to accommodate 30 men.
In 1979, there were nine offenders absent
without leave; in the first quarter of 1980,
there were no offenders absent without leave.
All of the previous nine offenders were I
apprehended.
Facilities
Construction of Bear Creek Camp was I
completed this year. Staff and inmates moved
from the old Clearwater Forest Camp in
November. Clearwater Camp, consisting of
old wooden huts with sagging roofs and dry
rot, was so dilapidated that it was beyond a
cost-effective repair. In addition, it was as
dangerous fire hazard. Those buildings have
now been dismantled and the property is
being left to grow over for use as additional
cattle pasture in the future.
,
The new camp consists of cement-blockL
dormitory huts with cubicle accommodatioo.
Each is metal-sheeted and self-contained with
its own heating system and bathroom. There
is also an excellent high school size gym.
with a poolroom and two pool tables,   j
 Activity Reports
here have been the usual minor problems
tithnew buildings, such as settling, which is
Erecting the plumbing. However, these are
eing resolved as they arise. A big advantage
f the new camp is its location next to the
amp sawmill, which eliminates the need to
arisport inmates back and forth each day to
le sawmill for the work program.
rograms
he regular work program at Bear Creek
amp centres around the sawmill and logging
I Derations, by which offenders learn the
isic skills required for employment in the
I irest industry. Wood products such as sawn
r mber, stakes, fence droppers and firewood
ere supplied during the year for the
ilinistry of Forests, Parks and Outdoor
recreation Branch, Corrections Branch and
<e Ministry of Environment.
ear Creek Camp also provides summer
iisture for 20 to 40 head of beef cattle from
ayleigh Farm. This permits Rayleigh Farm
grow a hay crop to feed the cattle during
j e winter. The men worked on irrigating,
r rtilizing and clearing land for additional
aisture and repairing fences to keep the cattle
r te men also carried out voluntary work
ojects in Kamloops, clearing snow,
:i ndscaping and generally cleaning up at such
ntres as the local hospital, the cemetery,
]e Sports Plex, Dutch Lake Park, senior
rtizens' homes, and the Tourist Information
r'.ntre.
ae to an exceptionally dry summer in 1979,
■ men were granted temporary absence
sses to work with fire suppression crews in
I Blue River and Clearwater districts of the
inistry of Forests. Sponsored by the
jiiinistry of Forests, 49 men took part in
tual fire suppression, and five were cooks
d cooks' helpers from May through
ptember. They helped to suppress at least
o major fires in the district.
! ice a week the local Alcoholics
v lonymous group holds meetings for the
la at Bear Creek Camp. An average of
HI
seven attend and there have been good results
from this program.
Correspondence courses from the Ministry of
Education were available to offenders;
courses being taken were mostly for
education upgrading.
For recreation, offenders used the gym for
sports, pool, and hobbies such as
leatherwork, woodwork, macrame and
petitpoint. A feature film is shown every two
weeks and the camp has obtained
authorization to use the local lake for
swimming during the summer.
Northern Region
Hutda Lake Camp
Located in an isolated area some 42
kilometres from Prince George, Hutda Lake
Camp is designed to accommodate 50 men.
There were 15 offenders absent without leave
in 1979, an increase of 13 over the previous
year, while in the first quarter of 1980, there
were no offenders absent without leave from
this camp.
Facilities
A gymnasium will be built to provide year-
round indoor recreation, especially during
winter. Bids for the gym are out and building
should start in early spring.
A water pressure pump is being installed to
improve fire protection, all hut ceilings were
enclosed, and a sauna was built.
Programs
Most of the work programs at Hutda Lake
Camp centre around forestry activities in cooperation with the British Columbia Ministry
of Forests.
Bush crews were employed in general forest
management and maintenance, including log
salvage, clearing and cutting stakes. Six men
were hired by the Ministry of Forests on
29
 Activity Reports
temporary absence passes to carry out
juvenile spacing as part of the Intensive
Forestry Program of the Ministry of Forests.
The results of their work were highly
satisfactory and it is expected that the
program will continue through 1980.
The men also manned three secondary
lookouts during the fire season for a total of
172 man-days. Their performance was
excellent, with no problems whatsoever.
Offenders and staff also fought a forest fire
during the fire season and reports from the
Ministry of Forests were very complimentary.
The men were also escorted into Prince
George from camp on four Saturdays to
perform general maintenance for two senion
citizens' homes.
A native court worker and a John Howard]
representative came out from time to time;
the offenders' request. The most popular
summer recreation activities were swimminij
boating, fishing and softball. Other activitij
were horseshoes, badminton, croquet and
jogging.
In winter months the men went ice fishing |
and snowshoeing, but there is little doubt th
the new gymnasium will provide a much|
needed facility for exercise during bad   j
weather.
Games were also available, including chess
crib and checkers, pool, and also weight-
lifting and television.
30
 >a
 Community-Based Programs: Activity Description
Community-based programs operated by
Corrections Branch include community
correctional centres for adults and attendance
programs, which are special education and
activity programs, mostly for juvenile
delinquents but also for some young adult
offenders.
Community-based programs also include a
variety of contracted services such as private
residences—known as community-based
residential centres (CBRC's)— impaired
drivers' courses, and supervision for
offenders ordered to perform community
service work. These contracted services
provide a great opportunity for agencies,
service clubs and private citizens to assist
offenders in living within the limits of the
law.
Community correctional centres and
community-based residential centres provide
supervised accommodation for offenders
within their own communities, or at least as
near as possible. The aim is to permit those
individuals who have been serving sentences
in institutions of greater security to make a
gradual re-entry into the community. Only
those who do not pose a threat to their
community, who have proven themselves
responsible and motivated and who would
most benefit from the educational and
employment opportunities available to them
in the community, are permitted to reside in
these centres. People in these centres have
been classified from court or have been
cleared on a temporary absence pass from an
open or secure custodial facility. These
centres may also house those serving
intermittent sentences—usually on
weekends. Most people in these centres go
out daily to a job or a training program, then
return to the centre. Each person is assigned
chores to be performed in the centre, with
leisure time made available for hobbies and
other recreational activities. The Branch has
developed CBRC's for juvenile delinquent
placement under court order.
Those residing in these centres are
encouraged to participate in volunteer worfw
projects, and sports and recreation activities
in the community, accompanied by staff or
volunteer escorts. Those who find regular
employment in the community are charged
room and board and are assisted in managing
their finances to pay debts, make restitutions
payments for damage done, support their 1
families or build a savings account.
Attendance programs for youths and young
adults, including those operated by the
Branch and those run privately under contract
to the Branch, focus on education and
activity programs. These programs usually
focus on remedial education, life-skills j
training, confidence-building, improved self-
discipline, and developing a sense of
responsibility. Many of the programs use the
wilderness as the setting for such training.
Impaired drivers' courses are held in centres
throughout the Province. Those who are I
convicted of impaired driving are required to
attend these courses as a condition of their
sentences. The purpose of these courses is to
deter convicted impaired drivers by
informing them of the medical, social and ^
legal effects of driving while impaired. 1
Community-based programs also involve
many service clubs, agencies, and
individuals who are contracted each year to
provide supervision for those adults and ■
youths on probation who are required by the
court to carry out a community service order.
This is a work project performed by the
offender for the victim or the community and
is designed to compensate the victim or the
community for the offence and/or damage
done.
 Kivity Reports
ancouver Island Region
ancouver Island Community
!orrectional Centre (VICCC)
Bcentre, located in Victoria near
i ancouver Island Regional Correctional
entre, accommodates up to 25 men.
acilities
he centre consists of two older homes, the
Blue House" built in 1913, which provides
ving quarters, offices and space for
ijaceation, and the "White House", built in
940, which provides the dining and kitchen
|Ministrative facilities.
<his accommodation is ideal and has plenty
:room for the needs of the centre, but,
I :cause of the age of the buildings, the
1 jollities require continual attention. During
e reporting year, BCBC renovated the
tchen, dining, and washroom areas,
stalling new equipment which was
elcomed by both staff and residents. The
> Hidings also need a new coat of paint, new
oors, and some minor upgrading to make
em easier to keep clean.
•ograms
esidents were assisted in finding jobs
rough counselling and placement, jointly
idertaken by Canada Manpower and the
: hn Howard Society in conjunction with the
aff of the centre.
>r those men unable to find immediate
I nployment, a variety of volunteer
i immunity work projects was arranged,
ley did repairs, landscaped and painted the
on's Crippled Children's Centre, assisted
ith unloading operations at recycling plants,
eaned and cleared Layritz Park, cut and
lied lawns for lawn bowling clubs, assisted
building operations at Gorge Road
ospital, helped to care for children at
lendale Hospital, and, through the Ministry
: Human Resources, assisted in moving
	
people on welfare. For those on intermittent
sentences, weekend work was arranged with
the Salmonid Enhancement Program. An
average of four men each weekend built
incubator boxes and cleared streams at
Goldstream, Colquitz and Sooke.
In 1979, six men successfully completed
basic educational upgrading courses to grade
10 level at Camosun College. Three others
were sponsored by Canada Manpower in
vocational courses, including welding and
cooking. In early 1980, two men were
sponsored in hairdressing and automotive
training courses.
Once a week for two hours, VICCC operates
an alcohol treatment program, with the
assistance of volunteers under the supervision
of the program officer. To date, 327 inmates
have attended and the program has had
encouraging results.
Many agencies were utilized in assisting the
men with emotional and health problems,
including the John Howard Society, the Eric
Martin Institute, the Saanich Health
Department and the Ministry of Health.
Volunteers continued to provide invaluable
assistance in counselling, tutoring, and
transporting and escorting men to job
interviews and community work projects.
The centre is also used for pre-parole
placement, in co-operation with the new
British Columbia Parole Board, Corrections
Probation Services and the National Parole
Board. This involved placing the candidate in
the community on a temporary absence pass
prior to parole.
Snowdon Work Release Unit (SWRU)
Located 12.8 kilometres (eight miles) from
Campbell River on Vancouver Island,
Snowdon Work Release Unit can
accommodate up to 30 men. Many of the
offenders are on temporary absence passes
from Jordan River Camp.
33
 Activity Reports
Facilities
SWRU consists of five living units and
separate buildings for kitchen and dining
facilities, gymnasium, laundry and weight-
lifting room, chapel and office.
The buildings were constructed in 1963 with
a 10-year life expectancy. Consequently, dry
rot is spreading in the wooden structures and
it is hoped that new living units and office
can be built next year.
Programs
Most of those who are cleared on a
temporary absence pass to SWRU from
secure and open facilities were assisted in
finding employment with private forestry
companies to work in isolated forestry
camps, instead of in the community. Many of
them obtained employment with the Rayonier
and Weldwood companies at IWA union
wages and were flown out to isolated camps
in Thompson Sound, Knight's Inlet and Toba
Inlet. They returned after two weeks, for 10
days at SWRU, and were then flown out
again for another two weeks. They also took
advantage of weekend work, serving as fire
guards in camp during short periods when the
camps were closed down. The men were thus
able to earn good wages and show evidence
of good work habits and the ability to live up
to responsibilities. In addition, they gained
valuable work experience for release, since
many of the men come from the Campbell
River area.
Five men attended basic educational
upgrading courses at North Island College in
Campbell River. They wrote and passed the
General Educational Development (GED)
exams. In January 1980, two men began
correspondence courses in drafting and auto
mechanics.
For recreation, the men played pool, ping
pong, volleyball, basketball, badminton,
tennis and baseball, at the centre. They also
organized games with teams from Lakeview
34
Camp. A number of men took up wood
carving, painting and other crafts, although 1
there is no workshop at the unit.
New Directions Program
The New Directions Program is an attendance
program designed for a maximum of 12 girls
and boys between the ages of 13 and 17.
They may have been placed on probation, or
may have been having social and academic
problems in the regular school system.
Youths may be court-ordered to attend or
may have been referred through the probation
officer by a teacher, social worker or parentB
New Directions is operated from the
Coldharbour Road Centre in Victoria.
Facilities
The Coldharbour Road Centre is an old
private home that has been declared a
heritage building. There is a kitchen
equipped for meal preparation as part of
nutrition classes for life-skills training. Them
rest of the building accommodates classrooms
and offices.
Although the space is adequate for program*
needs, the building is in disrepair and, as it is
made of wood, is a fire hazard. It needs   j
painting and better lighting, especially in the
classrooms. Upgrading to meet fire safety
standards is also required. A dishwasher for
the kitchen would assist in maintaining
adequate health standards.
Programs
The 12-week program focusses on academic
upgrading to grade 10 and life-skills training,
including nutrition, job searching and
budgeting. Students are required to attend the
program Monday through Thursday from I
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The aim of the
program is to present the students with "new
directions" vocationally, educationally and
socially, by assisting them not only to acquire
necessary skills, but also to learn appropriate
behaviours and attitudes. Emphasis is on fl
assessing and meeting individual needs; the
 Activity Reports
rogram is operated during the regular school
ear from September to June.
luring 1979, special teachers were
ontracted to run courses for girls and boys
'hose negative behaviour appeared to stem
om a learning disability. This has been very
jecessful in upgrading probationers with a
rade two to three level of academic
i :l5evement to a grade seven to nine level
: 'ithin one year. In addition, the youths
lowed a marked improvement in
Dmmitment.
,s well as the life-skills and academic
rogram, an art instructor was contracted to
:ach photography, arts and crafts. Students
ere also accompanied on recreational
utings to various community recreational
liouities such as the Crystal Pool, tennis
nurts and gymnasiums.
letchosin Camp
ocated near Metchosin, this camp operates a
rogram designed for up to 28 boys and girls,
res 14 to 17. Participants are on probation
id have been ordered by the court to attend
ie program.
jifflities
he camp consists of old wooden cabins,
> ithout heat, insulation, or adequate facilities
ir food preparation. They are difficult to
:ep clean as well as being a fire hazard. For
)th health and safety reasons, it is hoped
at the buildings will be replaced.
rograms
he 16-weekend program is designed to
move youths from the community during
e weekend, which is the peak period for
i yenile crime. The program consists of
ilderness outings combined with in-camp
i lining, including first-aid training, map and
impass reading, rock climbing and
ppelling, canoeing and water safety, and
arch-and-rescue training. The daily
hedule is rigorous, beginning at 6:30 a.m.
ith a three-mile run to the sea, followed by
a brief swim in both winter and summer. The
emphasis is on physical and mental challenge
with the aim of improving physical health
and developing teamwork, self-confidence,
and self-respect. In response to the dramatic
increase of very young (11 to 13 years old)
delinquents appearing in court for serious
offences, a special group of these children
was admitted to the program. Parents of the
children, probation officers, and the children
themselves reported dramatic positive
behavioural changes.
As an adjunct to the Metchosin Camp
program, a boat program, involving marine
safety training, navigation and seamanship
skills is also operated. An old motor vessel
named Freedom Found, formerly belonging
to the Ministry of Forests, is used, and a
qualified captain is responsible for all
training and ship maintenance. The program
places youths in an unfamiliar setting where
teamwork and consistent, positive behaviour
toward others and toward property is
necessary to both their safety and survival.
Freedom Found was twice used by the
Developing Attitudes, Skills, and Habits
Program (DASH), once by Centre Creek and
once by Porteau Cove Camp. Both staff and
youths benefited greatly; similar outings are
planned for 1980.
Contracted Services
A wide range of contracted services operated
in the Vancouver Island Region, including
community-based residences for youths and
adults, attendance programs for youths, and a
variety of other services for offenders.
Community-based residences operating in the
region provided accommodation for from one
to eight offenders. Several others operated as
private agencies, such as the Dallas House
Society in Victoria, the Comox Valley
Recovery Centre Society and North Island's
Women's Recovery Centre (both in
Courtenay), all for adults, and the Life-
centred Learning Hospice for youths in
Victoria. Most, however, were operated for
one or two people by private citizens out of
35
 Activity Reports
their homes in communities all over the
Island region, including Ganges, Port
McNeil, Campbell River, Duncan and
Victoria. Operators worked closely with
Corrections Branch in accurately assessing
and fulfilling offenders' needs.
Attendance programs for youths were
contracted for with the Port Albemi Family
Committee, the Downtown Blanshard
Advisory Committee, the Unitarian Church
of Victoria, the Saanich Peninsula Guidance
Association, Saanich Peninsula Community
Association, and the Upper Island Low
Income Society in Courtenay.
Other contracted services included the
Community Diversion Centre in Victoria
which focussed on "diversion" or
counselling and activity programs in order to
avoid recourse to the formal justice system
for those convicted of minor offences. The
Victoria Native Friendship Centre provided
assistance for native Indian offenders, and a
variety of services were offered by the John
Howard Society. These included pre-trial
services, counselling, supervision and
assistance for those on bail or remanded in
custody to await trial, and job placement for
ex-offenders in Nanaimo, Parksville and
Victoria. The John Howard Society and
Cowichan Valley Volunteer Society provided
supervision for offenders court-ordered to
carry out community service orders. An
impaired drivers' course was contracted for at
Upper Island Driving School.
Vancouver Region
Porteau Cove Camp
Porteau Cove Camp offers four different
attendance programs for boys aged 13 to 17
on probation. It is located 56 kilometres (35
miles) north of Vancouver on Howe Sound
off the Squamish Highway.
Facilities
The camp consists of wooden cabins in a
semi-isolated wilderness setting. It was
originally constructed by the boys attending
camp, as part of the training and physical
36
fitness program. Additional construction, ■
repairs and maintenance of the camp
buildings and grounds is performed by the
boys. The aim is not only to incur minimum
building and maintenance costs, but to instil
in the boys a sense of pride in their work and
a respect for property. So far this approach I
has been very effective.
Programs
The weekend program operates for nine
weekends, removing boys from the
community during weekends, the peak period
for juvenile crime. The program runs from
September to May with a maximum of 28
boys at a time.
The program consists of three stages
focussing on physical fitness, wilderness I
survival training, and hiking expeditions. The
boys start off with hard work and
maintenance activities in camp, such as I
chopping wood and cleaning, going on to
camp construction work such as roofing and
painting. During the year, a major camp I
project was putting in a waterline to ensure a
camp water supply. The boys learned rock
climbing, rappelling, stretcher rescue, first
aid, hiking, canoeing, camping skills, and
fire fighting.
Last year the boys went on 13-day climbing
and hiking trips on mountains in the
Squamish area, and on a four-day canoe trip
to Desolation Sound. They also acted as an
emergency search and rescue team for the*
area, as well as a stand-by fire fighting crew
for the district office of the Ministry of 1
Forests. Their efforts successfully brought
under control a fire north of Squamish in the
summer of 1979. Graduation ceremonies M
were held for those successfully completing
the course, during which the boys conducted
demonstrations of the skills and teamwork
they had learned, for parents, friends and
probation officers. In 1979 a total of 16 boys
successfully graduated and 59 graduated in
the first quarter of 1980.
During the week another program was j
operated at Porteau Cove Camp. Called Leam
 ' [ow to Work, it was a six-week course, run
om September through June, for youths on
robation who were unable to obtain suitable
i mployment or adjust to the demands of the
i sgular school system. The boys were taught
fe-skills, including how to answer interview
:uestions, how to fill out an application
irm, and the importance of punctuality and
:sponsible behaviour. They also performed
irgrk projects in the camp area, such as
j Sleeting and cutting firewood from the
each, finding buyers for the firewood, and
elivering it. Proceeds from the work
j [Sects went toward renting delivery trucks
nd buying power saws.
1 addition to such projects, the boys in this
: rogram also performed volunteer work
: rojects in the community, such as
mdscaping parks in Lions Bay, clearing
iiesks in the area for the Salmonid
nhancement Program and cutting hiking
I alls in the area for the Ministry of Lands,
irks and Housing. They also worked on the
(Mays at the British Columbia Mining
luseum. Close liaison was maintained with
1 the communities in the area from West
1 ancouver to Squamish and an excellent
lationship has been established. Police and
rrqminent community members continued to
tend the graduation ceremonies. The
rogram has had a positive effect on the
)ys' attitudes toward school and many of
em have returned to the school system on
"aduation.
ji July, a 28-day program called Search and
sadership Training (SALT) was operated at
e camp for up to 30 boys. The program
ressed physical training, with a daily two-
ile run to the ocean followed by a swim,
king and canoeing, and more projects
volving hard physical labour. The boys
i arned physical co-ordination and developed
lf-confidence, teamwork and self-respect.
he success of the Porteau Cove Camp
ograms stimulated an 11 -week pilot camp
ogram for boys from September to
ecember 1979 at Powell River. Staff,
rvices and equipment from Porteau Cove
Camp were used to set up the pilot program
for a maximum of 15 boys on probation from
the Sechelt Peninsula, Powell River, and the
Comox-Courtenay area. Eleven boys attended
and underwent a similar work and training
program, including clearing the campsite and
constructing cabins and latrines, and taking
instruction in skills required for climbing and
canoeing expeditions. The camp program
showed significant success with the boys and
was well received by the community; it is
planned to run the camp again later in 1980.
Burnaby Community Correctional Centre
Located in Burnaby, this community
correctional centre accommodates up to 20
men.
Facilities
The centre consists of a converted private
home plus a 10-man trailer. From 1979
through 1980 the building was completely
upgraded to meet fire protection standards,
with fire doors, alarm systems and fire
escapes installed.
Programs
Offenders successfully found employment
through Canada Manpower. Many were
placed with the Ministry of Forests, working
at regular wages in reforestation projects in
such isolated areas as Knight Inlet,
Thompson Sound, Port Hardy, and the Queen
Charlotte Islands. Others found employment
as salesmen and casual labour.
Those seeking training and education took
basic educational upgrading courses and
trades training at King Edward High School,
Vancouver Vocational Institute and Pacific
Vocational Institute. One man took
criminology courses at Simon Fraser
University.
The men made use of the local YMCA for
sports and recreation and the local Alcoholics
Anonymous group continued to provide
constructive counselling and assistance to
offenders with alcohol problems.
37
 Activity Reports
Lynda Williams Community Correctional
Centre (LWCCC)
This centre, located in central Vancouver, is
designed to accommodate 10 women.
Facilities
LWCCC consists of two buildings joined
together; formerly a nursing home, it was
converted to serve the needs of the program.
The building is rundown, unsafe, and sadly
in need of repair. Renovations are planned to
bring the building up to health and safety
standards.
Programs
Women at the centre were successfully placed
in a variety of jobs from waitressing and
clerical positions to computer programming
and management, according to their job
skills.
Other women took educational upgrading and
vocational training at King Edward School
and Pacific Vocational Institute. The women
were also informally taught various skills
such as cooking, sewing, and household
budgeting, by staff at the centre. They were
also escorted on trips to Queen Elizabeth
Park, Mount Pleasant, and the MacMillan
Planetarium. Many women volunteered their
time to assist in a variety of community
service centres. They worked with patients at
Pearson Hospital, a chronic care institution,
helped out with Meals on Wheels for those
confined to their homes, and assisted at the
Central Vancouver Community Centre and
the nearby Manpower offices.
The positive, constructive record of Lynda
Williams Centre finally resulted in complete
acceptance of the centre by the community.
When Lynda Williams opened in April 1977,
there was considerable fear and resistance to
the centre. However, in 1979, when the
operating license for the centre came up for
renewal, there was no opposition. The
establishment of a Citizens' Advisory Board
is planned for the fall of 1980. to involve the
community in program planning for the
centre.
38
Marpole Community Correctional Centre
(MCCC)
This centre, located in the Marpole District in
South Vancouver, provides accommodation
for up to 18 men.
Facilities
MCCC is housed in a 60-year-old building.
Heavy use of this old structure has required
upgrading measures. In 1979 the dining room
carpet was replaced with new vinyl tile, and
the building has been painted and
redecorated. It is planned to buy new drapes,
light fixtures, office carpeting and hardware
later in 1980, to upgrade kitchen facilities to
meet health standards, and install sprinklers
and fire doors to ensure fire safety.
Programs
Canada Manpower, Office Overload, and a
Corrections Branch job co-ordinator helped
to find employment for offenders throughout
the Greater Vancouver area, according to ■
their skills and capabilities. Various private
sector industries and former residents of the
centre also helped to place the men. Most
jobs consisted of casual labour in
construction, landscaping or at gas stations,
but a few men were hired as salesmen, ■
bookkeepers and truck drivers.
For recreation, the men utilized community
facilities, such as sports clubs, the Marpole
Community Centre, and the local bowling
alley and golf course. TV, chess, pool and
other games were provided within the centre.
A two-day impaired drivers' course was held
in April for those at the centre who had ■
committed driving offences. Instructors were
drawn from this centre, Burnaby Community
Correctional Centre and Lynda Williams
Correctional Centre. The course was runs
thereafter according to apparent need. It was
well attended, with nine to 10 men at a time;
a total of about 70 completed the course in
1979.
The centre continues to maintain a low ■
profile for the protection of offenders and
community acceptance of the centre is good.
 etention and Recreation Extension
rogram (DARE)
he Detention and Recreation Extension
rogram is operated out of an office in
ancouver. It is designed for selected boys
id girls aged 13 to 17 on probation.
jcilities
ARE policy is to make use of community
cilities already existing in the Vancouver
gion. Thus, during the reporting period, the
free was utilized for administration, record
jeping, as a communication centre, and for
liatne-iob staff training. Vancouver
immunity centres, job opportunities, parks,
laches and other community facilities were
it to good use by the program participants.
■ograms
t om its inception as a LIP program in 1973,
J ARE program was funded by various
ivernment agencies, including Corrections
ranch. On March 1, 1979, the program
came an integral part of Corrections
anch programs. Training of DARE
ogram staff was intensified to ensure that
ey met the standards required by the Public
irvice Commission. Two staff members
j impleted the major portion of the probation
ficer training at the Justice Institute and
,':ceiyed commendations for their high level
achievement and for their exemplary
itude. DARE program staff have also taken
vantage of Corrections Branch
ychological Services. From time to time,
obationers exhibit bizarre behaviour. By
ing able to consult quickly with a
ychologist, DARE program staff have been
le to prevent tragedies and heartbreaks in
; lives of probationers and their families.
ie DARE program provides close adult
pervision for young probationers to assist
5m in participating successfully in
:reational, social, and vocational activities,
so doing, it is hoped that the youths will
velop a more positive self-image and
5,5ater self-confidence, and thus commit
wefidelinquencies.
Boys in the program are supervised by men,
while girls are supervised by women. Each'
youth is supervised individually, not in a
group. The supervisor determines the
capability of each youngster and provides the
opportunities for each youth to participate in
a wide variety of socially acceptable activities
according to the youth's abilities.
During the reporting year, the DARE
program provided intensive community
supervision for 120 boys and girls, each of
whom was considered in need of special
attention in order to remain safely in the
community. The average monthly count of
probationers in the program was 72. All of
the probationers in the program live in the
urban area of the Vancouver Region.
The probationers were supervised in sports
and games such as hockey, football, baseball,
volleyball, tennis, cycling, fishing, billiards,
as well as a variety of outings such as to the
Vancouver Aquarium, Simon Fraser
University, the MacMillan Planetarium, the
Vancouver Stock Exchange, and the shops,
open-air market, and other activities on
Granville Island in the heart of Vancouver.
They were also supervised in carrying out
various duties and errands such as shopping,
working on a farm, and in the home and the
office, as well as preparing resumes and
hunting for suitable jobs.
Toward the end of 1979, volunteers began to
be incorporated into the program on a trial
basis. It is hoped that a modest but effective
volunteer service shall be operating by the
end of 1980.
Statistical studies of court records during the
first four years of the DARE program showed
that the average monthly delinquency rate for
juvenile probationers placed in the DARE
program, regardless of their age, sex, or
number of previous delinquencies, dropped
from .57 delinquencies to .11 delinquencies.
Work was begun during the reporting period
on an evaluation procedure for attendance
programs. A trial run of four months
39
 Activity Reports
indicated that some revisions in the procedure
are necessary.
Two staff members made a presentation on
the DARE program at the Learning
Disability-Delinquency Conference held in
Edmonton.
Contracted Services
Community-based residential accommodation
in the Vancouver Region was provided for
adult offenders by such agencies as the
Elizabeth Fry Society, the Salvation Army,
St. Leonard's Society, the Narconon Society
of British Columbia, the Allied Indian and
Metis Society, and others. There was no call
for residences for juvenile delinquents.
Attendance programs for youths from this
region were contracted at Keith Lynne
Alternate Secondary School Association in
North Vancouver, and at Camp Colonial, in
Hedley, operated by the One-Way Adventure
Foundation.
Other contracted services included a pilot
Alcohol and Drug Information Program, a
Shop-lifting Program, the Step-Up Program
and job placement. The pilot Alcohol and
Drug Information Program was sponsored by
the Queen Mary Community School
Association and proved extremely successful.
It will be expanded next year.
The on-going Shop-lifting Program is
designed primarily for youths convicted of
shop-lifting. Last year 40 youths
participated. Evaluation of this program in
previous years indicated that the participants
have not been involved in shop-lifting again
during the evaluation period.
The Step-Up Program, sponsored by the
Vancouver School Board, provides schooling
for youths on probation who have dropped
out of school. The program has a continuing
enrolment of 40 youths. It is gaining an
international reputation for its outstanding
accomplishments in working successfully
with these difficult youths.
40
The job placement services provided by   j
British Columbia Corrections Association
continue to be successful in helping ex- J
offenders and offenders in community-based
programs to find worthwhile employment. I
Impaired drivers' courses were offered by the
Powell River Community Association, the
Wilson Creek Community Association in
Sechelt, and Vancouver Community College
and Queen Mary School Association in North
Vancouver. Three courses were held in Bella
Coola for the first time, sponsored by the I
Bella Coola Band Council, and included  ]
high-school students.
Community Service Orders for offenders ■
were supervised by citizens in Sechelt, Ocean
Falls, Bella Coola, Bella Bella and Powell
River.
North Fraser Region
Southview Place Community Correctional
Centre
Located on the grounds of New Haven
Correctional Centre in Burnaby, Southview
Place can accommodate up to eight men.
although occupancy is usually kept down to
four if possible.
Facilities
Southview Place is a three-bedroom, two-
storey house with basement and was formerly
the warden's house of New Haven
Correctional Centre.
The house, lawns and garden have been well
cared-for by the residents. During the two4
years since Southview Place has been
operating, there has not been one incident of
vandalism to the house.
Programs
At Southview Place, an unusual program is
operated. It is unstaffed, although residents
are checked every day. Having been carefully
selected for their motivation to work, the
residents are assisted in finding employment
 ctivity Reports
i the community and, with their earnings,
:,; expected to provide their own food,
lotriing, and supplies, to pay bills, and to
rilace furniture and utensils as required. As
:ch, the program incurs no direct costs apart
:>m major building maintenance, which is
i: responsibility of BCBC. Families of the
nidents are free to visit in order to maintain
truly relationships and residents are
tpected to support their families from their
irnings.
re program at Southview Place was
sjcessfully maintained throughout the
Ddfting year without incurring any direct
<sts and without any adverse consequences
jonences committed, in spite of the
fedom and responsibility granted to the
nn. Nevertheless, a low profile was
liintained for their protection.
lose chosen for placement at Southview
Ice were, as always, carefully selected.
Ine of the men selected had ever committed
cences that would jeopardize the safety of
i residents in the surrounding community.
£ the men were successful at finding jobs,
rging from fishing and real estate sales to
v ting on tables. One man attended classes
a he theological college at UBC working
tt'ard a degree in theology. He maintained
h share of expenses with a part-time job.
It men exhibited a high morale in
ptiqipating in this group-home concept and
tlse who successfully completed their terms
aiouthview have maintained an interest in
tl centre after their release.
Catracted Services
Cnmunity-based residences for adults were
pvided in this region by the Seventh Step
S iety, St. Leonard's Society, Belavista
Irtel, Maple Ridge Treatment Centre, and
mBritish Columbia Borstal Association. A
P'ate citizen in Pitt Meadows operated a
Rdence for youths.
''lumber of attendance programs also were
c traded for youths. These included
PRPOSE, SHARE, Gateway Correctional
Svices, and Project Adventure, an
attendance program involving one-to-one
supervision of girls in activities and programs
within the community.
Impaired drivers' courses were also held,
sponsored by Coquitlam School District. A
total of 13 courses were held.
The Elizabeth Fry Society provided volunteer
services and BCIT educational services.
South Fraser Region
Chilliwack Community Correctional
Centre
The centre is located in the town of
Chilliwack and can accommodate a total of
15 men.
Facilities
The centre is housed in a large old house
originally built late in the last century. It is in
a very dilapidated condition and, in fact, two
years ago, it was condemned. Plans were
considered to move out of the community but
support from the mayor, council, employers,
police and media was such that other
alternatives are being explored within the
community.
Programs
Residents were assisted in their job searches
and employment counselling by Canada
Manpower, Fraser Valley College and local
volunteers. During the reporting year, the
men were able to gain entry to a wide range
of jobs in the local area, ranging from skilled
trades such as carpentry and logging to
casual labour, haying, and picking berries for
local farmers.
For those who were not immediately
successful in their job searches, volunteer
work projects in the community were
arranged. The district council requested
volunteer help for community clean-ups and
demolitions. The materials from demolitions
were then donated to local church and service
clubs. With lumber and additional help from
41
 Activity Reports
Mount Thurston Camp, log structures were
built in Chilliwack Children's playgrounds. In
1977, the local SPCA went bankrupt and the
volunteer staff provided by the centre helped
keep the SPCA open. Since that time, the
centre has provided assistance on an ongoing
basis.
During the reporting year, volunteer labour
from the centre and materials from the
Chilliwack Forest Camps were provided for
rebuilding and renovations of SPCA
facilities.
In conjunction with Participaction, two
Participarks were completed.
Fraser Valley College provided basic
educational upgrading from grades one to 12
and the General Educational Development
exam for those men planning to enter trades
training. Although trades training and higher
education are not available in the Chilliwack
community, these men may, on completion of
basic educational levels, be transferred to
another community correctional centre to
take up the training or education they require.
Residents accompanied by staff were also
able to take advantage of the wide variety of
recreational activities and clubs available in
the Chilliwack community. These included
the bowling alley, hockey rinks, baseball,
waterskiing, boating, tennis, golf, basketball
and many others.
The centre also has a group membership in
the local YM-YWCA and the men were able
to use their facilities through special
arrangements between the centre and the Y.
The centre also has an on-going alcohol
awareness program for residents. The local
Alcoholics Anonymous group and the Drug
and Alcohol Commission assist with family
problems resulting from alcohol abuse and
arrange for total family counselling.
The centre maintains an open-house policy.
In a community which supports several
correctional institutions, including the
Chilliwack Security Unit and the Chilliwack
Forest Camps, the centre has managed to
42
establish and continue an excellent
relationship with the community throughout
the reporting period.
Developing Attitudes, Skills and Habits
Program (DASH)
The DASH program is an attendance
program for boys and girls aged 13 to 17 on
probation. It is operated at Pierce Creek I
Camp.
Facilities
The youths are accommodated in a
wilderness camp setting in the Chilliwack ■
area. There has been an enormous increase in
recreational and tourist traffic in the
Chilliwack River valley during all seasons of
the past year. This has made it increasingly
difficult to maintain the wilderness conditions
on which the DASH program is based. The
only foreseeable solution to this problem is to
relocate the DASH program to a more
isolated area.
Programs
The DASH program consists of short courses
(45 to 60 days) on wilderness survival
training. This includes first aid, the care and
use of hand tools, physical training,
canoeing, hiking, camping and other skills
necessary to living and travelling in the
wilderness. During their courses probationers
also carry out a worthwhile project in the
community. During the reporting year, this
included cabin repairs at Radium Creek.
clearing campsites in the Chilliwack River
valley, cleaning and repairing the grounds
and equipment of the United Church Camp at
Cultus Lake, constructing spawning beds for
the Salmonid Enhancement Program and 9
assisting in cone picking and fire suppression
for the British Columbia Ministry of Forests.
During 1979, 13 courses were held for a total
of 143 boys and three courses were held for a
total of 22 girls, making a total of 165  I
probationers. This compares with 117
probationers for 1978. In the first quarter of
 ictivity Reports
; '80, two courses were held for a total of 29
ys.
le demand for the DASH program is
;reasing at a steady rate. Nevertheless, no
;rease in the number of participants per
aurfe is planned. There are elements of risk
jany wilderness survival training program
yd all participants must be closely and
lirefully supervised. At present, the average
amber of participants per course is 1.0 and
ipbationers' needs for challenge,
xponsibility, and personal development
snear to be satisfied. An increase in the
imber of participants would not only
jpardize the safety of the youths but would
cnpromise the effectiveness of the program.
Infracted Services
/ange of different community-based
ridences were provided for adults and
jieniles during the reporting year in the
Sith Fraser Region.
hghaven Alcoholic Treatment Centre,
Vstern Pentecostal Bible College, and the
'hse Rufus Society were among those
c ties providing appropriate accommodation
toffenders seeking employment, education
o treatment within the community.
^ important community-based residence in
d region is the Surrey Community Re-entry
Cute, which accommodates up to 15
o::nders. This centre received a total of 125
in and women down from 127 during
1'8, and 132 in 1977. These offenders
Qi;inated from facilities throughout the
Nth and South Fraser Regions and also
frn Vancouver Island Community
£rectional Centre and Kamloops
Cimunity Correctional Centre. In addition,
fliit probationers were accommodated there
itnl more suitable arrangements could be
m.e.
10979, two new community-based
,relences were developed by probation
°f:ers. The Proctor Model Project
|Pisored by Chilliwack Community
;S«'ices and jointly funded by the Ministry
of Human Resources and Corrections,
provided one-to-one residential supervision
for five teenage girls. At North Bend, the
Forman Home provided long-term
supervision and care for up to five youths
discharged from containment or delinquent
boys requiring a group home.
In North Surrey, the Starting Point
Community Remand Home, sponsored by
the Surrey Community Resources Society,
provided supervised accommodation for a
total of 95 boys and girls, drawn from all
areas of the Lower Mainland from Vancouver
to Hope.
The Moffat Remand Home, sponsored by the
Richmond Friendship Home Society,
operated in Richmond. The home was
underutilized, however, and plans are
underway to transfer the program to the
eastern part of the region in order to provide
a remand home in both ends of the region
and an improved alternative to Willingdon.
The House of Concord provided a residential
program for up to 45 boys on probation, aged
14 to 19. The program provides schooling,
life-skills and employment experiences for
probationers. A total of 167 youths was
received at the centre.
A day-time attendance program was
implemented in Mission to provide work and
job search skills, in an effort to motivate
youths positively toward work.
The One-Way Adventure Foundation in
Surrey provided a daily five-home attendance
program and a 10-weekend attendance
program for up to 10 boys on probation.
Programs included alternative education, a
wilderness program, life-skills training, and
work experience.
Richmond was the only location where an
impaired drivers' course operated during
1979. Eighty people successfully completed
the six courses that were offered. An
additional 15 persons completed the course in
January and February 1980.
43
 Activity Reports
Interior Region
Kamloops Community Correctional
Centre
Located on the 401 Highway not far from
Kamloops, this centre accommodates up to
20 men.
Facilities
The centre is housed in a two-storey building
which was formerly a motel. It provides
excellent accommodation for the program
with two men per bedroom, and plenty of
space for a kitchen, dining room, offices and
laundry. Both staff and offenders find the
building totally satisfactory for their needs.
Programs
Job placement for offenders at the centre has
been very good and men have been placed in
a variety of jobs from full-time professional
to casual labour.
For those seeking training and education,
Cariboo College showed great co-operation in
reserving places for men from the centre.
They attended courses in educational
upgrading to grade 12. Life-skills training
and Basic Training and Skills Development,
were prerequisites to vocational and trades
training. Vocational and trades training
courses included food services, short-order
cooking, welding, electrical, carpentry, and
automotive.
For offenders with alcohol problems, the
Crossroads Treatment Program in Kelowna
and the Round Lake Treatment Centre for
native people near Vernon, funded by the
Alcohol and Drug Commission, were
utilized. Many volunteer work projects were
also carried out in the community by men
from the centre. These included shovelling
snow from sidewalks for senior citizens,
landscaping Kamloops Wildlife Park,
renovating and upgrading Kamloops
Chamber of Commerce tourist information
booths, general upgrading for the Kamloops
Community Y, decorating arenas, stuffing
44
envelopes and general labour for the Ice I
Hockey Tournament held in Kamloops last
winter.
A very successful project was filling
sandbags for the Kamloops Boys and Girls
Club and the Boy Scouts to sell as weights*
for cars on slippery roads. More than five
thousand sandbags were filled, and the centre
sold two thousand directly. The others wenjjj
distributed by the club and scout members to
gas stations in Kamloops. A total of $3,500
was collected for the various clubs.
A staff project during the reporting period
was making presentations with a video   ]
cassette on corrections programs to schools,
colleges and service clubs in the Kamloops
area. Such public education projects,
combined with community work projects, are
essential to maintaining the excellent
relationship the centre has established with
the community.
Contracted Services
Community-based residences for adults in
this region were provided by the John 1
Howard Society in Vernon and Cottonwood,
and the community Y in Kamloops. Special
treatment and accommodation for those with
alcohol problems were provided by the!
Crossroads Treatment Centre in Kelowna and
the Round Lake Treatment Centre for native
peoples near Vernon, both funded by the
Alcohol and Drug Commission.
A wide variety of attendance programs was
contracted for youths in communities 1
throughout the region. For 10 years the
Loewen Ranch near Femie has been   i
operating a four-month program for up to
four boys on probation. By raising crops and
animals and maintaining and operating the
farm equipment and generally participating in
typical ranch life in the Kootenays, the boys
learn appropriate behaviour and sound work
habits. A similar program was developed S>
1979 for 100 Mile House.
The Trail and District Child Care Society
operates a weekend attendance program at
 Mtivity Reports
anta Rosa Ranch for up to eight boys on
i robation from the surrounding communities
ffRossland, Trail, Fruitvale, Salmo, Nelson,
astlegar and others. The new Lost Creek
i ahch, developed in 1979 by the Child Care
ociety for the East Kootenays, provides a
: milar attendance program.
i Revelstoke, a weekend wilderness
I ogram was operated for boys, co-ordinated
; / a big-game guide and trapper. Camp
. olonial at Hedley, operated by the One Way
nindation, provided accommodation for
mths remanded in custody to await trial as
i effective alternative to sending them to the
'iUingdon Youth Detention Centre. Special
tendance programs were held in the Lytton
id Lillooet areas for native Indian children,
any other life-skills, recreation, and
ucation programs were operated during the
porting year in such communities as
iiilliams Lake, Kamloops, Vernon,
:lowna, Penticton, and Salmon Arm.
pervision for community services orders
is contracted in some 24 communities of
region, from Fernie to 100 Mile House
.id Williams Lake.
iipaired drivers' courses were held in 13
ritmmunities in the region, sponsored by
(riboo College, Okanagan College, and
ivate agencies. Referrals to these courses
i: down throughout the region.
if irthern Region
airrace Community Correctional Centre
Seated in Terrace, this centre accommodates
j£ttpi21 men.
hilities
1; centre consists of one building. In 1979
aiajor renovation of the building by BCBC
Si completed. Double-glazed windows and
^i^-exit doors were installed, the building
|i painted, and additional space was added
f' food storage and for an all-purpose work
s n
The offenders have kept the building in good
condition, and there has not been a single
incident of vandalism.
Programs
To effectively provide work opportunities for
offenders living at the centre, an experiment
involving the undertaking of contracts was
begun. Some of these contracts included
clearing debris from storm drains for the
Municipality of Terrace, cleaning the
millyard of Can Cel Sawmills, construction
of 10 portable outhouses for the British
Columbia Ministry of Forests, and clearing
helicopter landing sites for the federal
Department of Transport.
Earnings were used to pay the men, and to
buy and repair equipment in order to
maintain capacity to undertake such contract
work. Equipment now includes six power
saws, a one-ton truck, a hydraulic wood-
splitter, a trailer and a power unit. It is hoped
a bulldozer will be bought later in 1980.
This approach to providing work
opportunities for the men has proved highly
successful. Every deadline has been kept and
every contract has been successfully
completed. The contract work has kept the
men employed throughout the low
employment period of fall and winter. In
addition, this kind of contract work has
proven invaluable as training for the men, in
terms of a realistic, productive, goal-setting
work experience, in addition to teaching them
business management in the kind of work that
is available in this area.
In order to ensure that these contracts are
relevant to the men and that they are not
competing unfairly with private contractors,
the centre is currently developing a proposal
to organize the men into an in-house society.
Thus the men would select contracts to bid
on, disburse funds through a contracted
accountant, and purchase services and
equipment acquired to complete contracts.
In addition to contract work, a total of 60
offenders was permitted to return to their
45
 Activity Reports
homes for approved periods, in order to
enable them to capitalize on work
opportunities such as the herring fishing
season. There were no incidents of any kind
and all the men returned to the centre when
their leave periods were up.
A number of volunteer work projects were
also carried out in the community, including
clearing snow, gardening and moving house
for elderly residents in Terrace, and general
clean up and labouring at Osborne Guest
House, a home for the retarded, and Skeena
View, a senior citizens' home. Many of these
projects are carried out through direct
contact, and a good relationship with the
community has been maintained
A total of 40 men attended classes in basic
educational upgrading and trades training at
the College of New Caledonia which
continues to be satisfied with offenders'
general performance in classes.
The men also took advantage of recreation
facilities in Terrace such as the local skating
rink, swimming pool, and community
recreation centre.
Contracted Services
The Prince George Activators Centre was the
only contracted community-based residence
for adults in the Northern Region during the
reporting period. The Prince George
Recreation Home Society provided
accommodation for youths.
A number of attendance programs for youths
were run throughout the region. One of these
is Project Rediscovery, a three-year pilot
project which began in the summer of 1978.
The program is designed for Haida youths
from Masset and Skidegate, in order to give
them a more positive identity and teach them
something of their heritage and the old
traditions and way of life of their people.
They travelled to the west coast of Graham
Island where they learned traditional methods
of food gathering and survival. Older people
of the villages provided support and are being
encouraged to become more active in the
program.
46
Another contracted attendance program is m
Project Sea Adventure in Prince Rupert, a
program for up to 10 youths between the ages
of 13 and 16 who have had some conflict
with the law and whose family backgrounds
are characterized by alcoholism, instability,]
and poverty. The program provides
counselling and constructive activities 1
designed to motivate the youths to remain
school or re-enter school and spend their a
in non-criminal pursuits. Also, a forestry
patrol vessel, the White Pine, was acquired
this year from the British Columbia Ministry
of Forests. The vessel is used to teach marine
safety and seamanship, skills which could
lead to employment for youths in the Prince
Rupert area.
The Skeena Youth Work Incentive Program 1
was developed by the Terrace Probation .1
Office, counsellors of the local school board
and local Ministry of Human Resources staff.
It is designed for youths between the ages of
14 to 17 who have lengthy and serious m
delinquency records. Currently funded by the
LEAP program, it provides a three-stage
development of work habits, job readiness
skills, and job or educational placement. Iti
intended to add a counsellor to the progi
next year, and to provide follow-up
counselling for youths after they leave the
program.
Other attendance programs were operated I
the Lifeline Society in Fort St. John, the
Community Resources Society in ChetwJ
the South Peace Youth Resources Society!
Dawson Creek, and the Phoenix Transitionl
Agency in Prince George. These agenciesj
and many others, also supervised communitj
service orders throughout the region, in \
communities such as Terrace, Smithers.
K iti mat. Prince Rupert and Hazelton.  J
Courses for impaired drivers' were spon
by Fort Nelson CounterAttack, Nechako i
Justice Council, Fort St. James Justice j
Council, the Lifeline Society in Fort St.
John, and school districts of Quesnel ancj
Prince George.
  Activity Reports
Probation and Family Services: Activity Description
Probation services in British Columbia
provide a wide variety of services aimed at
youths and adults accused or convicted of
criminal and other serious offences. In
addition, some probation officers are engaged
in giving various services to families
undergoing marital breakdown.
Services for offenders and juvenile
delinquents are:
• Pre-court Services—These include the
preparation of pre-court enquiry
reports on offenders which are designed
to help Crown Counsel decide whether
or not to prosecute them. Based on the
pre-court enquiry, some offenders may
be diverted from the formal court
process and required instead to follow
agreed courses of action which
constitute reasonable consequences for
their unlawful behaviour, such as
voluntary community service.
• Pre-trial Services—Probation officers
supervise persons released from custody
by the courts during a remand period
when judges order this service. The
aims of this service are to ensure that
people on bail appear in court on
schedule and that they obey the law
during remand. Judges may order a
report by probation officers about the
behaviour of persons under bail
supervision.
• Pre-sentence Services—Probation
officers assist the court to arrive at an
effective and fair disposition by
preparing pre-sentence reports when
judges wish considerable information on
offenders' backgrounds and on
sentencing options.
• Post-disposition Services—Probation
officers serve the courts by supervising
offenders who are put on probation.
Supervision typically entails individual
counselling and/or referral of the
probationer to relevant community-
48
based agencies and resources. The aini
is to ensure that the offender lives up to
the conditions of the probation order.
One of the approaches taken by the courts is
community service. A court order to perform
some form of community service requires the
offender to perform work for the benefit of*
the victim or the general community.
The courts usually specify the numbers of
hours of service to be done. This seldom fl
exceeds 200 hours for adults and 100 hours
for juvenile delinquents. The role of
probation staff is to locate suitable projects,
to supervise or arrange supervision of the
probationer's work, and to report on the I
probationer's performance. The community
service order provides a sentencing
alternative to the courts for cases in which 5
fine is unrealistic because of the offender's
meagre finances, when a stronger response
seems to be required, or when such service
work would improve the offender's sense of
responsibility to his victim and to the
community as a whole.
Juvenile delinquents sometimes present 1
difficult placement problems and probation
officers are participating in intermmisterial
children's committees in order to find
effective solutions.
By way of working with offenders and in
trying to prevent crime, probation officers
often utilize alternate school programs, I
alcohol awareness programs, shop-lifting
prevention programs and other community
efforts in an attempt to take a pro-active™
stance in the development of preventative
measures.
Probation officers also supervise adult j
offenders who are released from prison to
serve the latter part of their sentence on m
parole. Parolees must comply strictly with the
conditions of their release. Probation officers
usually play a part in the process of screening i
applicants for parole release.
u
 m following services are provided to
milies experiencing marital discord or
eakdown:
• short-term marriage and family
counselling;
• referring family members to agencies
for long-term counselling and other
I special services;
• • assisting couples to arrive at agreements
■ in matters of financial maintenance,
■ custody of children, access to children
■ and other related concerns;
• counselling individuals on problems
pertaining to separation; and
• providing information on family court
■ procedures.
H obation officers employed as family court
n unsellors not only provide a range of
■jwices to help families cope with personal
Bncerns and the requirements of the court
. ocess when a marriage is in difficulty, but
Key also assist the courts in deciding
■ifetions about custody of, and access to,
p ildren of the marriage.
lere are over 80 probation offices
kroughout British Columbia. During
! 179-80, these offices provided services to
'.,000 offenders and 6,000 families.
iincouver Island Region
the Vancouver Island Region, there are
obation offices in Sidney, Duncan, Port
jardy, Campbell River, Courtenay, Nanaimo,
;ike Cowichan, Parksville, Port Alberni,
vnlwood, and Port McNeill. In Victoria,
Jfere is a family court services office, a court
i obation and bail supervision office and an
ult probation office. There is also a case
ianagement unit, which is a unique unit in
I e Branch. Caseloads remained high in
mrtenay, Campbell River, and Victoria,
ith over 70 cases per officer. During the
" ;ar an analysis was undertaken with the aim
Hfflualizing the work load in 1980. The
iitforia court office has been providing pre-
3 ntence reports for Victoria courts and
fectively reducing work load on Victoria
lult probation staff.
The probation offices in Port McNeill and
Colwood were opened in 1979. Until this
year, Port McNeill, Alert Bay, Holberg and
surrounding areas depended on the Port
Hardy office. However, the caseloads for
these areas grew too heavy and the new office
in Port McNeill now provides family
counselling and probation services to these
developing communities. The new office,
which opened in the fast-growing area of
Colwood, is part of a decentralized
neighbourhood approach in probation
services being undertaken in Greater
Victoria. Further developments are being
undertaken to increase services in the
community.
It is planned to open a court in Sidney. This
would resolve the problem of distance and
time in providing service to a centralized
court. During 1979, Sidney Probation Office
participated in two notable crime prevention
efforts. One was a day-long workshop,
entitled "Sex Offender—The Client We Like
to Avoid", designed to teach professionals
how to handle the sex offender. About 30
professionals participated in the workshop
undertaken jointly with an ex-offender and
the Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association.
The other was a two-day workshop on
alcoholism at Gillain Manor, a private
treatment centre for alcoholics not far from
the town of Sidney. The workshop was
arranged by School District No. 63, in
response to the alarming increase in the
district of teenage drinking. The district is
planning school alcohol awareness programs
for its students.
In Victoria, there was a 27 per cent increase
in applications for assistance and counselling
under the Family Relations Act. Family court
counsellors continued to be successful in
obtaining consent agreements, thus
drastically cutting down the number of
contested cases to be handled by the court.
The family court office jointly undertook
with the Ministry of Human Resources, the
Downtown Businessmen's Association, the
49
 Activity Reports
Victoria City Police and the community Y to
resolve the much-publicized problem of
youths living on the streets of downtown
Victoria. It was found that an average of 12
youths actually slept on the street and a
police check revealed that out of 12 youths
only one was from Victoria. The Victoria
community Y provided a Youth Outreach
worker, the Victoria City Police stepped up
their patrols and the problem is now virtually
non-existent.
A number of law and social work students
from the University of Victoria and Camosun
College were placed with the Victoria Family
Office. This has benefited the staff in
keeping them up-to-date with current theory,
while students benefit from leaniing the
practical aspects of this kind of work.
All offices continued to work with private
agencies to develop contracted community-
based programs throughout the region to
provide for local needs.
The case management unit, located at
VIRCC, not only handles the classification
and transfer of offenders to facilities
throughout the region, but also screens
offenders' applications for temporary absence
passes, and co-ordinates contracted services
involving community-based residential
centres for adults and youths. The staff of the
unit maintain a close liaison with institutional
staff, Provincial Classification staff,
probation officers and the police, in order to
successfully carry out their tasks. In 1979,
this unit began preparations to gear up to
provide the preparation, co-ordination and
supervision necessary for offenders on
parole.
Vancouver Region
Probation and family services are provided to
the Vancouver Region through offices in 15
locations throughout the City of Vancouver
and the communities of Powell River,
Squamish and Sechelt.
The North Shore District Office continued to
provide probation services to Bella Bella,
50
Bella Coola and Ocean Falls. Service to these
communites during the reporting year has
resulted in a caseload of from 55 to 60. It is
hoped to open a new probation office for 1
service to these communities.
The Sechelt Probation Office was relocated
from its cramped quarters to larger
accommodation by the end of February 1980.
The move was much welcomed, as demand
for services had outstripped the capacity of
the former offices.
The West Vancouver Probation Office was
also relocated from a cramped office to larger
quarters during the year. Staff held an open
house to welcome those with whom they I
work to the new offices. The West Vancouver
office now provides bail supervision in that
area.
In the North Vancouver Probation office, bail
supervision was offered as a pilot test in I
March 1979. Up to December 31, 1979. 36
offenders were supervised on bail and this
will be a definite service offered in North
Vancouver through 1980.
Community service orders continued to I
expand, providing effective ways for
offenders throughout the North Shore to fulfil
their debt to the victim and the community as
an alternative to incarceration. In West 1
Vancouver, for example, the old Inglewood
School is being renovated as a municipal
recreation centre. Some 10 offenders are
working on this project. In North Vancouver,
252 offenders completed a total of 17,151
hours of work.
North Shore officers also participated in a
number of community efforts to prevent ■
crime. One of these is the North Shore 1
Neighbourhood House Youth Project, a ■
multi-agency project aimed at children on
probation or on the verge of delinquent fl
activities. Parents, schools and child care
counsellors are also involved, providing
activities and programs to prevent
delinquency. Another effort is a proposed
school for children with learning disabilities.
Staff were also involved in Emily Murphy
 Itivity Reports
rmse, a transition home and emergency
later for battered women and families.
conation services to the Pemberton-Whistler
a from the North Shore District increased
50 per cent. Plans are underway to
itablish a more suitable location for the
nbation officer in both communities.
ffiramily services were extended to the
uamish Probation Office in September
• 79. The Squamish office provides these
iirvices to both the Squamish and
Imberton-Whistler areas.
d conjunction with numerous other
itofincial and municipal agencies and
]rsonnel, the Squamish Probation Office has
I en developing an alcohol awareness
qngram suitable for the needs of the
'. uamish Valley. It is planned to implement
H program later in 1980.
' ere has been increased community
i'olvement by the Squamish Probation
tfice in the development of a community
lison team, including officers from the
liuamish Probation Office, the local
Lnistry of Human Resources office, the
|:15kchool board, the RCMP, and health
jrsonnel.
jtfie District of West Vancouver, the two
alt probation offices carried out 494 pre-
iitence reports for the courts during the
■ jMf while the three juvenile probation
(Ices carried out 1,550 pre-court enquiries,
flrnily services in this district reported a total
(4,980 cases during the year, with a marked
iop after October.
'e East District has also been developing
pgram evaluation models for youth
pbation and diversion. During the year,
f|ums in the district ordered to perform a
(nmunity service order worked a total of
-'52 hours, while adults in the same
ifciation worked a total of 10,648 hours.
e volunteers' program in the West District
^s co-ordinated by two volunteer colli linators, one specializing in volunteer
'rk for adults, the other in volunteer work
for youths. A total of 80 volunteers have been
assigned for adults and 160 for youths.
In the West District, the Burrard Family and
Juvenile Probation Office reported a total of
273 family cases for 1979, with a significant
drop in caseloads after October. There was a
total of 289 youth cases during the year, an
average of 48 cases per probation officer. A
total of 59 offenders was referred for
community service orders, and they worked a
total of 2,130 hours.
The West District Community Pretrial
Services Unit is located in downtown
Vancouver and services the provincial courts
in Vancouver, North and West Vancouver, as
well as the County Courts of Vancouver and
New Westminster, the Supreme Court Assize,
the British Columbia Court of Appeal and
occasionally the Vancouver Family Court.
Bail supervisors attached to this unit provide
services mostly to the provincial court.
Unit staff assisted accused persons through
referrals to government and private agencies
for legal employment, housing and financial
assistance, and for social, psychiatric and
health services. Cases for 1979 totalled
1,967.
During 1979, the unit expanded its services
to include diversion. A total of 232 offenders
were diverted, with 836 hours of community
service orders completed and $763 in
restitution jjaid.
The unit also undertook the development of
standards and training requirements for bail
supervisors. These were subsequently
accepted by Branch management and in 1980
an operations manual will be developed as a
guide to these requirements.
In the summer of 1979 it was decided to split
the West District Vancouver court team into a
federal court service and a provincial court
service.
The federal courts West End Office reported
a total of 113 pre-sentence reports and an
average caseload of 67. A total of 87
offenders were ordered to perform
51
 Activity Reports
community service orders and they
completed 4,927 hours of work.
In the West Family and Juvenile Probation
Office, there was a total of 405 youth cases,
and 245 family cases. Forty per cent (188) of
youths were diverted, with 65 youths
completing 2,500 hours of community
service orders.
Family cases dropped after October, while
youth cases showed a continuing downward
trend, due to the drop of approximately
10,000 school-age children from 1970 to
1977, as well as the proliferation of
alternative schools and attendance programs.
In addition, there have been demographic
changes in the Vancouver area such that more
youths are concentrated in the suburban area
of south Vancouver.
In the South West Vancouver Adult Probation
Office, the average caseload is between 60
and 65. A total of 123 adults was referred for
community service orders, completing a total
of 9,800 hours. On average, 260 adult
offenders are on probation at any one time.
North Fraser Region
Probation and family services offices in this
region are located in Burnaby, Coquitlam,
Maple Ridge and New Westminster.
A total of 42,055 hours was worked by adults
and youths on community service orders.
Many of these community service orders
were spent in social services such as working
with retarded children, the physically
disabled, and the elderly. The Minister of
Human Resources, the Honourable Grace
McCarthy, presented a special award to the
New Westminster Community Service
Program for their contribution to the city
during the Year of the Child. In the Maple
Ridge District, a number of those who
completed their community service orders
have been hired full-time and part-time by
the agencies for which they performed the
service.
52
All offices continued to develop volunteers
programs, utilizing their expertise in
preparing newsletters, developing special
programs and acting as coordinators fori
other volunteers.
During 1979, 91 people were placed on bail
supervision in the Coquitlam-Maple Ridge
area. There were only three people on bail
supervision in the New Westminster area.
Caseloads under family services continued to
be high in all districts. In the Coquitlam
office, there was an average monthly
caseload of 102 per family court counsellor.
All offices showed initiative in developing
ways to prevent crime and delinquency. M
Many are intensively involved with local
junior and senior high schools, providing
education and consultation as preventives
measures. Others are building good liaisons
with private agencies and professional  j
associations such as the Fraser Regional I
Correctional Society, British Columbia I
Corrections Association, Association for the
Prevention of Crime, Association of
Conciliation Courts, and the Civil Liberties
Association.
Efforts continue to divert adults and youths
from the justice system and to resolve their
cases by other means than court sentence and
incarceration.
South Fraser Region
The probation and family services offices in
the South Fraser Region are located in 1
Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Delta, Hope, I
Langley, Mission, Richmond, Surrey, I
Cloverdale and White Rock.
Caseloads throughout the area remained at an
average level, apart from a pressing demand
for family court services in the communities
of Mission, Chilliwack, Hope and
Abbotsford. This demand fell off
significantly towards the end of the year.
Letters of support have been received from
the public by family services in the Surrey
area. All offices worked to establish  1
 TW
ctivity Reports
ecialized contracted community-based
ograms throughout the region as outlined in
; previous chapter, Community-based
ograms (page 43).
iiring 1979, a total of 15,790 hours of
immunity service orders were completed by
uths in the communities of Richmond,
llta, Langley and Surrey, while adults
impleted over 10,000 hours of community
:vice orders.
<j November 1978, an initiative was taken by
Ji Surrey offices to gain public support and
(•operation by issuing weekly reports on
pceedings in the Surrey youth courts. The
norts, written by volunteers, gave a
•Saightforward summary of the offences and
Mw they were dealt with, and the limitations
ii tthepstice system and the community in
aiiling with them. This initiative has been
citinued, with reports being issued to six
-. \ekly newspapers and radio station CKNW.
jle Richmond office has begun a small
\ unteer sponsors program with volunteers
,vrking on a one-to-one basis with
ipbationers.
(als for next year include development of
: f lily court services, careful implementation
c3ritish Columbia parole legislation, and
. brovement of services to witnesses and
;vtims in the adult courts.
^tlcron-in-crisis committees are active in
ifnmunities throughout the region, and
pbation officers have maintained an
%cttve participation.
nil 1%
I he New Westminster Office, 32 per cent
ouvenile delinquents were diverted; in the
.^ple Ridge area, 65 per cent of juvenile
dinquents were diverted. Tours of LMRCC
y|l ESkeside continue to be used to divert
Use youths from further delinquent
baviour. A shop-lifting diversion program
.* operated from the Maple Ridge
Fbation Office and the Coquitlam Juvenile
a Family Services Office in conjunction
"Jh local merchants.
Interior Region
Probation offices are located throughout the
Interior Region in Ashcroft, Castlegar,
Clearwater, Cranbrook, Creston, Fernie,
Golden, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley,
Lillooet, Merritt, Nelson, Oliver, 100 Mile
House, Penticton, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm,
Trail, Vernon and Williams Lake.
A high percentage of juvenile delinquents
was diverted from the formal court process
through pre-court enquiries. In some areas it
was as high as 85 per cent. Many of the
youths are performing community service
orders as part of the diversion agreement.
Community service orders throughout most
of the area were done under contract. These
contracts are outlined in the preceding
chapter, Community-based Programs (pages
44—45). Only in Kamloops and in the
Cranbrook-Kimberley area are community
service orders supervised by community
service officers employed full-time by
Corrections Branch. Community service
orders are available in all communities in the
region, and the concept has been well
received by the justice system and the public.
Family and children's services are provided
through the probation offices in all
communities of the region. Heaviest demand
for these sservices is in Kamloops, the largest
population centre of the region, where 477
new cases were opened in 1979. Caseloads
began to drop toward the end of the year as a
result of the October ruling of the Supreme
Court on the jurisdiction of the Provincial
Court in the Family Relations Act.
Probation officers in all commmunities
participated in Interministerial Children's
committees, bringing about efficient and
effective co-operation among agencies,
attempting to reduce the duplication of
services and filling in gaps in jurisdictions.
Several committees have been very
successful in dealing jointly with problems in
their communities.
53
 Activity Reports
Few family court committees continue to
function, but there is still one active in
Williams Lake. Probation officers are very
involved in its promotion. Consisting of nine
citizens, the committee has been involved in
local youth justice and has made studies and
recommendations on local resource needs.
Northern Region
Probation offices in the Northern Region are
located in Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Fort
Nelson, Mackenzie, Prince George,
Vanderhoof, Quesnel, the Queen Charlotte
Islands, Prince Rupert, Terrace, Kitimat and
Smithers.
In the North Central District of the region,
the bail supervision caseload averaged 93 in
any one month. In the rest of the region there
were no referrals for bail supervision.
Use of community service orders was
expanded to principal communities
throughout the region. Use of these orders
has increased greatly in Prince George,
where an average of 12 adult offenders i
month served 635 hours in 1979. Supervisj
of community service orders for youths #
almost entirely a contracted service in the|_
region. Jobs weremany and varied. Women!
served as clothing sorters at the Salvation!
Army Thrift Shop, assisted at the CrisisF
Centre, and did cleaning for the Homemj
Society. The men transported the I
handicapped, cut and delivered firewood fij
old-age pensioners, and did repairs and
shovelled snow for the Homemakers Sociii
These community service orders have been -J
well received by the public and the courtsj|
Such work projects are, however, more
difficult to organize in smaller communities
so that the community service orders in thq
locations have expanded at a slower rate.
Family and children's services are nowj
provided through all probation offices of tl
district. Caseloads were average.
There have been few referrals for bail
supervision.
54
  Activity Reports
Management Support Services: Activity Description
This activity consists of a number of sections
providing the specialized services necessary
to operate correctional facilities and programs
as outlined in this report. These include the
Commissioner's Office, Information
Services, Resource Analysis, Operations and
Management Systems, and Program Analysis
and Evaluation, all located at the Victoria
offices, as well as Staff Development,
Psychological Services, Medical Services,
Provincial Classification, and Religious
Programs, all located in the Vancouver area.
Also included are all regional and district
offices throughout the regions.
As varied as these services are, they share the
same over all objective: to maximize the
efficiency and effectiveness of Corrections
Branch staff .and programs.
Operations and Management Systems
The title of the section is a new one,
reflecting its new function. This section
began the year as Program Evaluation and
Data Systems and its role then included the
development of long-term evaluation for
Branch programs. With the increasing need
for both automated information systems and
program evaluation, it became necessary to
create two separate sections: Operations and
Management Systems, and Program Analysis
and Evaluation.
The new responsibilities of this section
include the maintenance, updating and
improvement of the Offender-based
Information System (OBIS), a computerized
historical record of all adult offenders of the
Branch from 1972, and the development of
different ways to provide this information to
directors at all levels in order to assist them
in dealing with clients. The section rents the
computer hardware and software services of
British Columbia Systems Corporation for
these purposes.
During 1979, the section began installation of
terminals in regional offices, permitting 1
ready access to records of Branch clients.
Moreover, the information in the master files
was redesigned to make it more accessible to
field personnel and also more economical to
maintain. Special facsimile equipment
enables regional offices to transmit, via
computer, exact copies of legal
documentation on clients from one institution
to another and to the master files in Victoria
for updating, thus eliminating dependence on
time-consuming and unreliable mail services.
Along with the development of the means to
provide ready access to records on Branch 5
offenders, the section was heavily involved in
developing policies and procedures on the
access to distribution of this information,!
with the aim of protecting both the Branch
and offenders as far as possible within the
limits of the law.
In addition, the section carried out
development and testing of a monthly report
package on each region for regional
directors, based on information in the master
files. This report package consisted of a 1
series of statistical profiles of Branch
offenders, providing such information as age
of sentenced offenders admitted, most serious
offence for sentenced offenders admitted,
court location of the most serious disposition
for sentenced offenders admitted, duration of
offenders' stay at a location before moving,
days in custody for offenders discharged, and
reasons for discharging offenders. Final ■
decisions on the type of information required
by directors for management purposes shall
be taken later in 1980.
In addition to these duties, Operations and
Management Systems is required to respond
to requests from regional staff for specific
information from the master files, and to
compile trends and projections as required.
(See Table 2 and Figures 3 to 7).
56
 Activity Reports
11979 the section also acquired and tested
systems. Held in Victoria, some 80
ord-processing equipment for these
participants registered, including the
i lanagement support services located in
Canadian National Work Group on Justice
ictoria. Ten operators were trained in the
Information and Statistics, the Canadian Task
> >e of the word processors. Installation of
Force on the Administration of Justice,
the
lis new equipment was successful and the
U.S. National Criminal Justice Information
J jafity, quantity and speed of written work
and Statistics Service, and corrections
oduced have been significantly improved.
personnel from all provinces
and territories of
is planned to install further such
Canada. Demonstrations of computer
mipment.
hardware and software were
held, and
participants had the opportunity to present
si September 1979, the section hosted a
and discuss new ideas, strategies and
inference on correctional information
information needs.
TABLE 2 ACTUAL AND PROJECTED MAXIMUM, MINIMUM, AND AVERAGE UTILIZATION
OF CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES BY SETTING, 1976TO 1981
Year
Setting                                                1975
1976         1977         1978         1979
1980
1981
cure     max         819
703          675          620          640
568
518
ntenced      min          599
553         598         556         521
496
473
avg           655
630         612         578         544
522
494
cure      max          540
546         475         535         495
488
478
tnand      min          294
273         252         277         271
261
257
avg           399
385.0'357         396         385
379
378
en ;.     max          603
603         604         634         598
610
614
min          382
519         495         454         499
506
511
avg           531
571         548         524         532
528
523
129          158          187          185
208
232
min            52
81            82           80           88
98
101
avg           103
111          123          128         144
152
161
TALl:     max        2086
1981        1912        1976        1918
1874
1842
min         1327
1426        1428        1368        1379
1361
1342
avg         1688
1697        1639        1626        1605
1581
1556
Source: Operations and Management Systems.
57
 Count
3000
2950
2900
2850
2800
2750
2700
2650
2600
2550
2500
2450
2400
2350
2300
2250
2200
2150
2100
2050
2000
1950
1900
1850
1800
1750
1700
1650
1600
1550
1500
1450
1400
1350
1300
1250
1200
1150
1100
1050
1000
950
Note:
58
FIGURE 3 PROVINCIAL SUMMARY OF MAXIMUM, MINIMUM. AND AVERAGE
UTILIZATION OF CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES, 1976TO 1981
~--..
^•»*
1976                 19
ACTUAL
77                    1978                 1979                 1980                 1981
PROJECTED
iximura
inimum
average
CDQ5.
: Operations and
Management Sysi
 tount
FIGURE 4 CCC POPULATIONS BY MAXIMUM, MINIMUM'.
AND AVERAGE UTILIZATION, 1976 TO 1981
400
390
380
370
360
350
340
330
320
310
300
290
280
270
260
250
240
230
220
210
200
190
180
170
160
150
140
130
120
110
100
090
080
070
060
050
040
030
020
010
000
	
	
	
«.••**"*
,.••*
■
	
; m"
---"
,---''
Dte:
1976                1
ACTUAL
977                 1978                   1979                   1980                  1981
PROJECTED
dmum
nimum
verage
'-
wrce: Operations and Management Systems.
 FIGURE 5 OPEN INSTrrUTIONAL POPULATIONS BY MAXIMUM, MINIMUM,
AND AVERAGE UTILIZATION, 1976TO 1981
Count
1000
975
950
925
900
■
875
850
825
1
800
775
750
725
700
675
650
625
i
i—"""■"■— r^*-^-^
600
575
550
525
500
475
450
s
""■•--
--*''
425
s
400
375
'
350
325
n
300
275
250
225
j
	
200
175
150
125
100
075
050
025
000
1976                   1977                  1978                     1979                  1980
1981
ACTUAL                                                                PROJECTED
Note:
Source:
Operations and Management Systems.
■J
 t
FIGURE 6 SECURE REMAND INSTITUTIONAL POPULATIONS BY MAXIMUM,
MINIMUM, AND AVERAGE UTILIZATION, 197 6 TO 1981
)
1
1
1
1
''.
1
1
I
j
1
—
1
e:
1976
ACTUAL
977                 19
78                   19
79                  19
PROJEC
80                 19
fED
1
minimum
average
wrce: Operations and Management Systems.
 FIGURE 7 SECURE SENTENCED INSTITUTIONAL POPULATIONS BY MAXIMUM,
MINIMUM, AND AVERAGE UTILIZATION, 1976TO 1981
Count
1000
975
950
925
900
875
850
825
800
775
750
725
700
675
650
625
600
575
550
525
500
475
450
425
400
375
350
325
300
275
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
075
050
025
000
Note:
1976
1978
ACTUAL
1979 1980
PROJECTED
1981
maximum
minimum
average
Source: Operations and Management Systems.
I
 .ctivity Reports
aff Development
lis division is responsible for the training of
w staff and the development and upgrading
easting staff. All staff go through four
lases of on-the-job and off-the-job training.
I aff training is continued throughout their
\ irMs, to ensure understanding and
I iplementation of Branch policies,
ocedures and standards. New theories,
pHGiments, research and pilot projects in
rrections work are discussed, with the aim
stimulating new ideas and programs for
itish Columbia Corrections.
lis division is now an integral part of the
stice Institute of British Columbia. A joint
dertaking of the Ministry of Attorney
sneral and the Ministry of Education,
ience and Technology, the institute houses
;; Police Academy, the Fire Services
i :ademy, the Courts Training Division and
i ining sections of other major components
the Provincial justice system. This sharing
the facilities resulted in a fruitful exchange
information and discussions and some
rining courses were integrated.
ie new location of the Staff Development
vision at the institute brought other
•fnefits, such as a range of modern
nssrooms and seminar rooms, on-site
ifeteria and sports complex, and a complete
:dia and library service. Books,
Ltiodicals, slide-tapes, films and media
uipment were also acquired, all of which
lis available for use by corrections, justice
d public safety personnel throughout the
ie hundred and five separate courses,
bging in length from one day to 11 weeks,
iriecarried out during the year, including:
• 15 basic security officer courses (Block
H and Block HI);
J • 6 basic probation officer courses
(Blocks I, H, and III);
• 25 advanced institutional courses;
• 14 advanced community courses;
• 4 basic management courses;
• 4 advanced management courses;
• 21 special workshops and courses; and
• 6 advanced integrated courses
Total student training days completed during
the 1979 calendar year amounted to 10,043.
In addition to the courses offered by the Staff
Development Division, 245 Branch
employees took advantage of programs
offered by colleges, universities, school
boards, and private agencies, for which they
received a tuition subsidy from either the
Public Service Commission or the Staff
Development Division.
For the first time, the Staff Development
Division produced a calendar of training
events to be offered during the year, allowing
employees and supervisors to select courses
which most effectively met individual
training needs. The calendar was based on a
needs analysis process, carried out at the
beginning of the year, and which was refined
and again carried out near the end of the year.
Staff at all levels were encouraged to identify
desirable content areas which were then
developed into courses for inclusion in next
year's course schedule.
As a result of consultation with directors at
all levels, a modified Block II and Block IV
basic training course for staff employed in
youth containment facilities was developed
during the year. Also a greater variety of
advanced modules was offered to institutional
staff, with most modules being well attended
and well received.
As part of probation officer training,
particular emphasis in community programs
continued to be on family counselling skills,
and a number of workshops and courses were
offered for both practitioners and supervisors.
A major conference focussing on the new
Family Relations Act was held in March. A
special course for trainees was held in
December in preparation for a series of
courses to be offered in mediation-
conciliation counselling in the new year.
A variety of training events was organized
and co-ordinated within regions by regional
63
 Activity Reports
staff development officers, including regional
and district conferences, team building
workshops, and training sessions for
administrative support staff.
Provincial Classification
The major responsibility of Provincial
Classification is the placement, within
Corrections Branch facilities, of offenders
sentenced under Provincial jurisdictions to
periods of up to two years. Provincial
Classification is also responsible for the
placement of offenders sentenced under
federal jurisdiction to periods of two years or
more who are transferred to Provincial
jurisdiction under the Federal-Provincial
Exchange of Services Agreement. This
agreement allows for selected adult
offenders, on application, to serve their
sentences in Provincial institutions for
specific training purposes, or to enable them
to serve their sentences closer to their
communities, families, and friends.
The objectives of Provincial Classification
are to ensure that the offender is classified to
the facility which provides the level of
security appropriate to the offender's needs
and the opportunity to develop a sense of
responsibility toward other people and the
community.
In the three Lower Mainland regions of M
Vancouver, North and South Fraser, there are
three classification officers, plus the director
and deputy directors. Two classification
officers are assigned to the Northern Region,
one classification officer each assigned to the
Interior Region, and to the Vancouver Island
Region, the latter being part of the unique
Vancouver Island Case Management Unit.
The pilot alternate entry project instituted in
March 1979 in the three Lower Mainland-
Fraser Valley regions, required the services of
Provincial Classification officers at each of
the reception points of LMRCC, North Fraser
Reception Centre (daily), and the Chilliwack
Security Unit (three times weekly), as well as
at each of the four South Fraser courts. ■
Table 3 shows statistics of classifications and
re-classification for 1979 with comparative
figures for 1978.
Table 4 shows statistics relating to the  I
Federal-Provincial Exchange of Service^B
Agreement. At the close of the year there
were 14 offenders (one man, and 13 women),
serving their sentences in Provincial
institutions.
64
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OO
1
1
so
Ol
CO
1
o
CO
o
I
Ol
Ol
!2 |
I  »n  t^
I  co  ol
I   co   ol
—       ■—< I oo
3
£
u sJ rj
m
III
o
L_J-
u
()
02
t)
S
s
.1 o ■
3   W !
lels
M   U   O     U
03 -± on .^
yBoo. w
s
z
u
u
m
u
02
§
65
 Activity Reports
TABLE 4' FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS,2 CALENDAR YEAR 1979   j
Fed. to Pros. 1979 1978 Pros, to Fed. 1979 ]978
Males        Females        Total Total Males        Females        Total "r^
Approved  6 13 19 28 5 1            69
Not Approved  9 3 12 12 6 2             8
Total Processed  15 16 31 40 11 3           14         u
Rehired to Federal System ..Jt^—  3 9 12 3
Returned to Provincial System  — 3 3 _
1 Included in above statistical information, four federally-sentenced females were approved for temporary stay in a Provincial facility pending cleanup
up of court appearances and other matters.
1 Applications on some of the returnees recorded above were processed prior to 1979, while others, included in these figures, were under process t
year's end.
Source: Provincial Classification.
Information Services
The objectives of Information Services are to
inform the various publics of Corrections
Branch programs and goals, to promote the
effectiveness of Branch staff, and to keep the
Branch informed of public opinion regarding
corrections programs. This is achieved
through careful planning and development of
internal and external communications at all
levels, as well as through the production of
specific materials designed for use by Branch
staff, by the rest of the justice system, by
other ministries (such as Ministry of Human
Resources, Ministry of Health and the
Ministry of Education), private agencies
(such as the John Howard Society and the
Elizabeth Fry Society), volunteers with
whom the Branch works closely, and the
general public.
During the year, such materials consisted of
the monthly Corrections Newsletter, and the
Annual Report for 1978-1979. In addition,
audio-visual and display materials, and
brochures on corrections programs, facilities,
and services, were updated to reflect changes
made in response to specific needs.
A communications project begun in 1978 to
promote communications at'the regional level
was completed in March 1979. This project
was consistent with the Branch's policy of
sharing information and was carried out in
the North Fraser Region.
It was recommended that North Fraser
regional management ensure that every job
description clearly articulate communications
principles, roles and responsibilities of that
66
position, and that communications programs
be developed around key objectives at all
levels of management. The project report was
made available to managers in all regions.
In addition, Information Services was  1
involved in developing a policy on
information-sharing for the entire Ministry of
Attorney General.
This section also participated with the 1
Schools Legal Education Project sponsored
by the Legal Services Society. A joint brief,
recommending that a wide range of legal
education studies be incorporated in the
Provincial school curriculum, was submitted
to the Ministry of Education, Science, and
Technology, which is currently considering
revision of the social studies curriculum in
the schools. The brief was accepted, and
work on goals and outcomes was begun,
continuing through 1980. The goal of thi^
project, if successful, is to provide ever]M
school child with a basic legal education.
Psychological Services
The Branch has one, full-time senior J
psychologist, responsible for advising on all
psychological services to adult offenders and
juvenile delinquents. This includes direct
service to offenders in the Lower Mainland
area as well as co-ordinating services by local
community or government psychologists to
offenders in facilities in other regions. The
objective of Psychological Services is to
ensure that offenders with psychological
problems receive proper care and treatment.
 :tivity Reports	
Cnical research continues to be a major
avity of Psychological Services. The
Emch Clinical Research Committee is
cired by the senior psychologist and
iiludes the senior medical officer and a
limber of Operations and Management
Stems. This committee is responsible for
niewing clinical and other research
pposals initiated within or outside the
Ench. The aim of the committee is to
eourage psychologists in the community in
tne-related research.
II979, Psychological Services extended
s port to family court counsellors. This new
biatiyeiwill continue to be a high priority in
111980s, requiring close consultation with
siting psychological services available
whin the community.
Pcholbgical Services takes an active part in
tl professional training of psychologists at
LC and Simon Fraser, and this aids in
rcuitment for the section. In addition, the
51 ion sponsors a continuing education
pgram entitled "Psychology and the Law",
inform professionals of the current issues
i concerns involved in working with
binders.
Rigious Programs
psistent with the Branch's policy of
pi/idihg the most normal environment
jSiible for adult offenders and juvenile
jimquents, Religious Programs continues to
jxn integral part of Corrections Branch
.sices.
"ordinated by the director from an office in
louver, both full-time and part-time
.Mains provide services to offenders and
.unile delinquents in Corrections Branch
mm throughout British Columbia on a
^denominational basis. Chaplains ensure
Offender has access to a minister of his
j) denomination and provide opportunities
jpffenders to worship, according to their
•ai, at the corrections centre and in the
si'Tf'ty churches, as well as performing
^menders religious services such as
jpsms, funerals, and marriages. Chaplains
also provide counselling for both offenders
and staff, help offenders to develop and carry
out personal development programs and
assist in other programs run by the Branch.
They also encourage community faith groups
to develop volunteer sponsor programs such
as Man-to-Man (M2) and Woman-to-Woman
(W2).
During 1979, Religious Programs,
Psychological Services and Medical Services
designed a course in consultation with the
Professor of Theology at the Vancouver
School of Theology. The course, "Ministry
with Persons in Conflict with the Law",
focussed on five areas:
• youths in containment centres;
• adults in correctional centres;
• probation and parole services;
• family court; and
• institutional administration.
The course was offered by the school in the
fall of 1979 and students were given the
opportunity to gain practical experience by
working with offenders under the supervision
of experienced Corrections Branch staff.
At LMRCC, a workshop was planned and
organized in March 1979 by Religious
Programs for the Alternatives Committee on
Justice and Corrections of the Canadian
Ecumenical Action Organization. The
workshop centred around the theme of
discipline—of ourselves, of children, of
offenders, in the home and in institutions.
The majority of the 80 participants were
senior high school students.
A three-day workshop on stress was
organized in October 1979 for all Provincial
and federal correctional service chaplains.
At the VIRCC, the chaplain began a weekly
group session, and a new program for
offenders and their wives to discuss their
problems with loneliness, finances, and
attitudes of other people. The chaplain also
supervised the training of a Catholic Jesuit
priest, and located a Spanish-speaking
Catholic priest to say mass for the 20
Colombians at VIRCC remanded in custody
67
 Activity Reports
to await trial. The priest also brought other
Latin Americans with him to converse with
the Colombians after mass. English classes
were made available for those who could
only speak Spanish.
At LMRCC, the chaplain held several
marriage-counselling courses with offenders
and their wives, and held a baptism at which
the wife and other members of the offender's
family were present. The chaplain also
participated in or accompanied offenders to
18 funerals, ministered to 85 bereaved staff,
offenders and relatives, and made 24
emergency visits to ailing families and
friends of offenders. During the year, the
chaplain spoke to a variety of groups, such as
churches, schools, colleges and service
clubs, concerning Corrections Branch
programs and offenders' needs.
At nearby Lakeside CC for Women, the
Protestant chaplain collected books for the
new library. Both Protestant and Catholic
chaplains spent most of their time in personal
counselling with offenders, especially new
arrivals. The counselling assisted the new
offenders in resolving their fears, and in
composing themselves in their new
environment.
The United Church sponsored a conference
in October in Toronto on the criminal justice
system in Canada at which the Protestant
chaplain from Lakeside CC participated,
reporting on the "achievements and problems
of the Branch". The next general council
meeting of the United Church will follow-up
on the conference, and formulate the church's
policy on treatment of offenders within the
criminal justice system.
At Willingdon YDC, a number of efforts to
assist youths to develop positive attitudes and
habits were undertaken. These included
weekly meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous,
attended by half of the residents, the Five-day
Plan for Smoking, and the Seeking
Achievement Series, which focussed three
films and talks on various skills such as log-
house building, carving, raising racehorses
68
and, in general, encouraged youths to
undertake positive recreation activities. The
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings resulted in
a drinking driving course being initiated and
youths transferred to Lakeview Youth Camp
requested an extension of this program.
The chaplain at Kamloops RCC established
an M2 program, with support from the   j
United Church, and supervised offenders in
planning and carrying out a Chritsmas   j
program of puppet shows, cartoon films, and
refreshments for residents of Tranquille 1
School, a home for the mentally retarded.
The chaplain at Prince George RCC
developed a corps of four excellent regular
volunteers, who attended the centre four!
times a week and went once a week to Hutda
Lake Camp. The chaplain also led three I
successful alcohol awareness seminars at the
centre, and developed a photography course
as a way of establishing sound relationships
with offenders and assisting them in their
relationships with other people.
Chaplains in other centres throughout the
Province continued to expand their services
and participation in the operation of
correctional facilities and treatment and ■
counselling programs. Their wide-ranging
services are playing an increasingly
important role in corrections services to
offenders and in the involvement of the 1
community in the corrections process,  j
TABLE 5 RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS SECTION.
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE OF TIME, 1979
Categories
Direct Ministry
Services	
Programs	
Counselling, Offenders	
Counselling, Staff	
Co-ordination of Volunteer Ministries...
Community Involvement	
9
PcrcenlaecofTiroe
8
9
37
7
Branch Goals
Administration..
Travel	
10
 p dical Services
Iidical Services to offenders are coil inated by one full-time senior medical
c cer. The objective of Medical Services is
ti insure a good standard of health for all
cmders residing in Corrections Branch
f ilities and for those under security for the
ptection of the public.
E h Corrections Branch facility has local
dtors and dentists available to visit the
fi lities regularly, so that 90 per cent of all
niical problems are handled locally. When
anffender requires hospital services and
sijrity is not an issue, medical facilities in
tl nearest community are used. However,
omders requiring medical attention who are
li ly escape-risks or require protective
c tody are treated in the limited medical
ft lities within secure custodial facilities.
|i hospital at LMRCC is the facility used
ft such offenders. It can accommodate up to
4patients. Until the early part of 1979,
L RCC Hospital also had access to a secure
ud at the Vancouver General Hospital for
sirery and treatment that could not be
conducted at LMRCC Hospital. The closure
of the ward has resulted in more cost to
provide individual security. This has been of
great concern to LMRCC Hospital staff and
negotiations were undertaken with Vancouver
General Hospital to resolve this problem.
Dental standards at LMRCC Hospital have
been upgraded from a very basic service of
fillings and extractions to meet the standards
of dental care of the British Columbia
College of Dental Surgeons. Routine root
canals, silver amalgam fillings, plastic
fillings, peridontal cleaning, oral hygiene
instruction, and good quality dentures are
now provided at LMRCC Hospital.
A top priority for the coming year at
LMRCC Hospital is the renovation of the
facilities to a more modern, functional unit
for services delivered.
The standards of medical services in
Corrections Branch facilities have been
revised according to those of the American
Medical Association. Steps were taken
during the year to ensure that all facilities
meet these standards and this effort shall
continue through 1980.
69
 Activity Reports
TABLE 6 DIAGNOSIS OF PATIENTS ADMITTED TO LMRCC HOSPITAL
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31. 1979
Diseases of the Respiratory System „....„:...... 1
Tuberculosis - —
Eye  —
Ear      —
Nose (including Surgery) — 2
Disease of the Throat (including Tonsilitis)  1
Cardiovascular System  —
Urogenital System  3
Surgeries „ 3
Infections (boils, abscesses, etc.)     2
Trauma  4
Diseases of the Rectum  —
Hepatitis  —
Bums  —
Digestive System (gall bladder and liver)  1
Musculo-Skeletal (including fractures)  5
Dermatitis  —
Influenza  2
Diabetes  2
Feb.
1
Mar.
1
1
Apr.  May
—   i
—     3
1
1 —
— 3
1 1
2 8
1 —
June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec T«j|
— 1      1    -     1 1     3 H
— 3      1     4     4 3     1 a)
— —   —   —   — —   — 0
 2 3
2      1      4      1      4 1   - 19
  118
— 3 2 2 I n
2   -
  3-M
1     5      1 4    3 30
7     4     5 5    5 53
— — — 1 - 6
1      1   - 4
_   _   _  o
— — — 1 - 3
7 7 6 2 7 70
1      1   — —     1 6
—      I
3   —
—     3
2      1
_1
59
Epilepsy    6
Alcoholics    2
Drug Addicts  — — —
Mental Observation  22 23 23
Overdose     I 1 2
Neurology    2 — 1
Arthritis  — — 1
X-Ray  — 1 —
Medicine — — 1
Protective Custody  12 4 15
Allergies „..  — — —
Miscellaneous  — — 1
Workers	
Dental	
Paraplegics  „    3 — 1
Amputee     1 1 —
Overflow  — — 1
Gastro-Intestinal  —
Total  83
1 —
3 1
1 —
1 2
4 —
18 15
2 1
— I
2   in
I   -    23
9     6    37
     10
15   10   175
2—16
—     I     10
3     1
12     9
1      1
1      1
1
1      1
1      4
1    —
1      1   -
1
1
83   62   60   45   54   58   69   5
2   _4   _3 L
72   56  753
: Medical Services.
70
 TABLE 7 OUT-PATIENTS SEEN AT LMRCC HOSPITAL
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1979
Feb.
265
Mar.
298
Apr.
213
Jan.
^inflicted wounds. 1
A mpted Hangings... —
§biBgs  —
IWGH Emergency
Bailment  4
Eifflfc  1
i frfa!  5
May
230
Mar.
i
i
June
191
July
218
Aug.
225
Sept.
192
Oct.
207
Nov.
225
Dec.
187
EMERGENCIES
Apr.       May       June       July
Aug.      Sept.
12
17
H = Hangings
' = Head Injuries
j = Haemorrhage—SI wound
Source: Medical Services
R ource Analysis
T; role of Resource Analysis is to co-
ainate Branch resource management and
pvide analysis regarding these resources.
Ts includes a broad spectrum of financial,
itipower, facilities, food services, and
nrerial resources; liaison is provided by the
srion with central agencies over these
itters.
Airoximately 80 per cent of the budget of
Crections Branch is composed of staff
a:s. One of the major responsibilities of
rH ource Analysis is the documentation of
tlnumbers, classifications, and locations of
aiiinistrative, institutional and community
sfice staff of the Branch for budgeting and
o):r purposes. Another important
roonsibility is the co-ordination of the
blget.cycle each fiscal year with regional
ffiagement, and the preparation of progress
rents on Branch expenditures throughout
ttyear. The section also assumes
reionsibility for these functions for the
Qiimissioner's office. Resource Analysis
siDlies administrative services such as
B usraoning and vouchering for certain
9nch requirements and for various
exponents of the commissioner's office in
Soria.
-
1
l-H
2
4
l-H
5
Total
2,738
Total
6
2
0
45
4
57
In early 1979, the staff of Resource Analysis
restructured Branch activities in consultation
with regional managers. The new structure
improved financial reporting by reducing 20
activities to six; this annual report has been
prepared on the basis of those activities.
During 1979, Resource Analysis was
represented on the steering committee of a
Branch project to set up documentation of
staffing levels for the activity of probation
and family services. Begun in the summer of
1979, the project is expected to be completed
by the fall of 1980.
Staff also helped to manage the Branch-wide
Corrections Personnel Classification Project
(CPCP), initiated in early 1979. This project
involves reviewing all job descriptions and
developing a classification system that is
intended to provide career mobility for all
Branch employees. Implementation of the
new classification system is expected in June
1981.
Resource Analysis staff also lent their special
expertise to the development of food services
standards, in consultation with regional food
services personnel.
In early 1980, the Branch began a detailed
study of staffing structures in all institutions,
71
 Activity Reports
with a view to ensuring appropriate and
consistent levels in each. It is expected that
this project will be completed in the fall of
1980.
Plans for the future include expanding the
analysis and documentation of resources.
Although the current emphasis is on finances
and manpower, systems relative to material
management and facilities development, fl
maintenance and renovation will take
increasing priority.
It is also anticipated that the Resource   |
Analysis Section and the Operations and I
Management Systems Section will
amalgamate by the fall of 1980.
TABLE 8 CORRECTIONS BRANCH ESTABLISHMENT BY ACTIVITY
Activity 1979-80
Secure Custodial Facilities  776
Open Facilities  388
Community-based Programs  151
Probation and Family Services  505
Management Support  236
Inspection and Standards        6
Total    2,062
198041
769
387
154
514
231
 6
2,061
Source: Resource Analysis.
72
 TABLE 9 CORRECTIONS ESTABLISHMENT BY REGION
Support Island Vancouver    S. Fraser
I     Classification Services Region Region Region
;puty Minister (Comm.)  '
isociate Deputy Minister  1 — —
sanagement  24 11 21 8
i laplain  '°
i lministrative Officer 3  3 — — —
i Iministrative Officer 1  — — 2
isearch Officer 4  1 — — —
:search Officer 3  1 — — —
; obation Officer 5  3 — — —
; obation Officer 4  — 7 21 7
obation Officer 3  3 6 3 4
obation Officer land 2  11 49 83 53
ierviewer 2...  —— ^ 18 3
brarian 2  1
nior Corrections Officer  4 6 24 6
incipal Officer  5 22 45 26
irrections Security Officer  16 124 390 107
od Services Officer 3  — — 1 —
od Services Officer 2  — 1 1 1
od Services Officer 1  — 8 16
itructor  — 1 2 1
edical Officer 4  1 — — —
edical Officer 3  — — 1 —
ychologist 4  1 — — —
ychologist 3  — 1 — —
intist 2 %,.  — — 1 —
irse5  — — 1 —
use 3  — — — —
irsSjRV  _ 1 11 —
nior Hospital Officer 1  — — — —
edical Technician 3 (X-ray)  — — 1 —
armacist2  — — 1 —
i b Technician 3  — — 1 —
:erk5 #'.  — — 1
erk4 L  2 1 2 —
erk3  5 1 9 2
erkSteno5  — — 1 —
erkSteno4 .,  2 1 3 1
erkSteno3  5 9 19 10
fice Assistant 2  15 31 32 20
lice Assistant 1  — — 2 1
: j irpenter Foreman  — — 1 —
ipenterrjl  — 1 1 —
; idesman'■':*.....                                 — 1 —
: Jctrician Foreman  — — 1 —
: metrician,,,,                                    1 —
Jmber Foreman  — — 1 —
imber. i'l                    1             	
inter.     *                                        1              	
11 'charu'erft                                       1             	
:chanic5:                         	
■ i :chanirfM.f              1
:chanicffi                  1              	
reman of Works 2  — — 1 —
i  pervisor of Stores 1  — — — —
i ickmantSt                       1
Total permanent positions  122 289 724 259
Total man-years of permanent
Positions  113 284.50 723.75 255
, FISCAL YEAR
1979-80
N. Fraser
Interior       Northern
Region
Regio
i         Region
Total
1
13
7
5
I
89
—
Sfifrf,
—
18
—
ifc'%*
—
3
2
1
7
4
3
1
3
49
—
5
6
27
40
48
26
310
4
2
1
36
8
4
4
56
31
16
14
159
134
93
78
942
1
10
1
5
3
49
7
3
5
19
306
305.50
217.25
169
166
2
—
—
3
2
—
1
8
1
2
1
21
1
—
—
2
8
65
11
7
4
17
I
24
17
156
3
2
1
—
—
2
1
2
2,091
,065
73
 TABLE 10   INSTITUTION POPULATIONS, REGIONAL TOTALS AND AVERAGES
FOURTH QUARTER, 1979-80
Totals
February
G Institution Staff
1 CBRC *.  —
I Camp Point  —
I Graham House  —
1 Home Supervision  —
I JDH Female  —
I JDH Male  25
1 Jordan River  19
1 Lakeview Camp Female  —
I Lakeview Camp Male  25
1 Snowdon WRU  14
1 VIRCC  67
1 Victoria CCC   10]
Regional totals.........  160
2 Burnaby CCC  12
2 CBRC  —
2 Doukhobor Unit  —
2 Home Supervision  —
2 LMRCC  367
2 Lakeside  69
2 Lynda Williams CCC  9
2 Marpole CCC  13
2 Willingdon Female  —
2 Willingdon Male       66
Regional totals     536
3 CBRC       —
3 CJRC  20
3 CJRC Female	
3 Centre Creek Female ..
3 Centre Creek Mate	
3 Chilliwack CCC	
3 Ford Mountain	
3 Home Supervision	
3 Mount Thurston	
3 Security Unit	
3 Surrey CCC	
Regional totals	
4 CBRC	
4 ARCC	
4 Boulder Bay Camp	
4 Cedar Lake Camp	
4 Haney Forest Camps...
4 Home Supervision	
4 New Haven	
4 Pine Ridge	
4 Reception Centre	
4 Southview CCC	
4 Stave Lake Camp	
4 Twin Maples Female...
Regional totals	
5 Bear Creek Camp	
5 CBRC	
5 Home Supervision	
5 KRCC	
5 Kamloops CCC	
5 Rayleigh Camp	
Regional totals	
6 CBRC Female	
6 CBRC Male	
6 Home Supervision F...
6 Home Supervision M..
6 Hutda Lake Camp	
6 PGRCC	
6 PGRCC Female	
6 Terrace CCC	
Regional totals	
Branch totals ...   1248
20
25
40
40
10
10
20
20
30
35
24
24
19
29
37
37
6
6
5
20
20
20
28
30
33
139
138
134
20
20
21
155
32
278      260      283
512
677
61
65
10
10
18
20
10
10
41
48
9
8
7
434
474
499
47
51
47
6
10
10
18
16
19
6
10
3
56
71
38
606
671
658
16
20
20
16
10
9
8
8
6
6
5
6
9
7
8
9
514
507
505
497
48
48
46
55
9
8
9
10
153
24
20
144
30      31
306     289
8
9
9
8
8
7
490
509
tw
53
51
56
10
10
9
12
17 j
IS
7
10
10
54
52
65
666
690
691
29
30
30
30
29
30
29
29
29
29
29
29
30
29
3
29
8
15
18
5
5
5
7
9
11
12
II
20
9
It
12
10
21
50
50
40
40
46
44
45
45
49
48
48
50
50
50
41
	
6
3
5
6
3
4
7
8
5
3
5
2
J
21
50
50
42
43
46
46
46
43
50
47
48
50
51
51
SO
20
25
25
20
14
6
—
—
5
9
14
14
15
14
8
7
6
6
6
7
II
125
195
198
•159
154
155
168
171
166
176
171
177
162
176
145 i
161
5
6
9
9
8
13
16
14
13
_
9
12
12
71
119
119
110
105
114
113
118
121
120
124
117
114
119
114
121
24
51
51
34
36
36
36
32
32
35
43
48
42
40
37
37
1
,
2
2
1
1
3
4
4
3
1
1
1
22
40
40
30
30
31
30
30
30
34
31
29
30
30
26
XI
26
52
52
53
52
47
48
48
55
51
50
53
52
SI
54
41
34
34
10
8
17
20
18
19
16
15
16
31
26
II
8
8
5
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
2
22
55
55
53
52
54
52
47
47
52
48
49
52
53
S3
27
43
56
23
25
22
23
22
27
28
31
29
27
26
23
192
402
415
324
320
336
336
327
348
358
363
362
355
359
334
352
19
30
60
28
29
29
24
29
28
30
32
29
32
31
32
12
	
	
	
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
1
2
j
2
2
3
4
3
2
5
3
2
76
86
86
90
91
107
117
93
98
95
105
91
99
97
83
II
43
10
20
20
18
16
17
16
12
12
9
10
12
14
16
21
30
65
28
34
31
30
34
33
33
33
44
40
183
126
166
231
167
173
189
191
174
177
172
184
183
189
182
in
2
_
_
13
13
15
18
12
13
1
17
1
15
1
15
1
IS
1
7
13
14
IS
2
5
8
9
9
10
10
8
4
i
37
132
17
50
50
42
36
32
40
38
35
38
37
40
38
41
86
140
140
no
108
115
139
113
118
117
121
131
	
	
	
—
—
—
—
—
14
4
21
32
16
16
17
15
23
17
12
13
10
12
13
109
211
222
196
181
179
187
213
191
193
192
197
199
206
204
»!
1815     1818     1836     1814     1838     1884
1902     1979     1893     1862
74
	
 TABLE 10 INSTITUTION POPULATIONS, REGIONAL TOTALS AND AVERAGES
FOURTH QUARTER, 1979-80—Continued
Weekly Averages
Quarter
Institinlon Twal
:BRal.  V-
ramp Point  74
Jraham House	
lotne Supervision  —
DH Female  77
DHMale  Z23
ordan River  483
jkeview Camp Female  34
.akeview Camp Male  281
InowdonWRU  320
llltm  1874
teoriaCCC  290
Regional totals  3678
lumabyCCC  217
3RC  "3
louthobor Unit  74
lome Supervision  99
JMRCCV.  6374
.akeside  646
.ymla Williams CCC  110
iarpoleCCC  205
Villingdon Female  93
Wllingdon Male  702
Regional totals  8633
SRWE  Ill
lIRfi  120
JRC Female  —
'entreCreek Female  —
henlre Creek Male  354
MliwackCCC  127
ord Mountain  603
lome Supervision  60
lount Thurston  613
(ecunlyUnit  34
lurreyCCC  122
Regional totals  2144
BRfJje  126
J1CC  1510
oulder Bay Camp  488
.'edar Lake Camp  —
laney Forest Camps  —
lome Supervision  26
ilewHaven  391
tineRidge  662
. eception Centre  236
3 oulhvierfCCC  45
btave Lake Camp  659
i win Maples Female  331
< Regional totals  4474
earCreekCamp  385
. BRC  29
ome Supervision  29
*SSHb X  1257
-jamloonsCCC  190
ayleighCamp-.JJ;.  462
Regional totals  2352
BRCFemale  23
BRC Male "■Z'.'.'.'.ZZZ'.'.Z'.. 182
: ome Supervision F  1
i °mc Supervision M ....  76
l uidaLakeCamp  495
! OREefemale       15"
;mMCcc ::::::::::::::: t96
Regional totals  2541
Branch totals  23822
Quarter
Average
1.69
5.69
5.92
17.15
37.15
2.62
21.62
24.62
144.15
22.31
First
Quarter
0.15
21.54
0.31
2.54
11.46
32.23
4.54
9.23
25.23
108.23
25.62
Second
Quarter
1.46
19.38
0.77
1.54
5.15
36.54
8.15
17.15
28.15
114.31
24.46
Third
Quarter
1.36
14.93
0.07
1.50
12.14
36.00
8.36
18.79
28.50
122.64
19.21
Fourth
Quarter
1.69
5.69
5.92
17.15
37.15
2.62
21.62
24.62
144.15
22.31
1978779     1977/78    1976/77   1975/76   1974/75
13.38
2.77
0.17
3.83
12.12
24.92
12.38
0.04
5.77
13.00
36.94
37.04 36.58 25.65
16.10    —    _ _ Z
24.44  26.88  27.17 37.13 48.62
102.37  92.04  86.21 67.19 97.88
22.67  20.38  22.12 20.46 17.12
282.92  241.(
257.08  263.50
282.92  222.77 206.63 183.83 161.37 189.27
16.69
8.69
5.69
7.62
490.31
49.69
8.46
15.77
7.15
54.00
15.54
9.85
10.54
528.46
63.54
8.00
15.38
4.69
51.69
17.08
10.00
17.23
481.85
56.54
7.31
14.46
9.38
58.31
17.14
11.86
3.86
10.00
444.00
54.86
7.57
16.79
7.71
58.93
16.69
8.69
5.69
7.62
490.31
49.69
8.46
15.77
9.46
9.90
12.56
43.19
4.15
32.10
11.46     29.83     24.27      11.38 —
563.29   573.42    625.60   624.85    584.50
70.81      67.10     86.58     79.94     91.37
6.29
12.48
7.63
44.50
4.87
16.58
664.C
8.54
9.23
27.23
9.77
46.38
4.62
47.15
2.62
9.38
707.69
4.77
29.15
16.69
37.77
10.08
52.46
15.00
11.00
672.15
6.15
28.77
14.69
36.23
14.23
39.62
14.62
18.77
632.71
29.00
9.00
42.07
10.21
43.07
13.07
10.71
8.54
9.23
27.23
9.77
46.38
4.62
47.15
2.62
9.38
735.83   794.77   810.52   769.69   695.71
3.85       1.81 — — —
15.38
12.71
28.46
8.81
43.38
15.63
12.92
11.00
13.37
41.52
4.04
41.38
17.73
5.33
10.92
45.04
46.10
9.06
9.27
38.65
164.92       176.92
9.69
116.15
37.54
2.00
30.08
50.92
18.15
3.46
50.69
25.46
12.00
103.62
34.46
4.00
37.77
49.54
14.31
4.62
51.00
31.46
173.08
11.92
98.46
38.85
3.23
35.31
44.69
12.31
3.62
51.38
32.69
165.14      164.92      141.15    136.17   111.79   111.12     85.92
10.57
112.86
34.64
2.43
0.50
32.71
41.00
12.00
3.71
51.64
27.43
9.69
116.15
37.54
2.00
30.08
50.92
18.15
3.46
50.69
25.46
8.33
107.79
32.08
20.31
10.08
35.44
37.50
0.21
4.87
41.44
30.21
4.15 — — —
18.69    126.69    130.52    105.31
38.12
33.75
1.19
32.67
40.06
7.15
42.15
25.54
41.54
27.58
4.79
47.27
23.85
42.52
3.27
22.75
32.35
50.00
44.06
28.29
34.60
37.35
32.37
29.44
344.15       343.69       332.46       329.50       344.15       328.25    345.48    351.60   353.75   443.56
29.62
2.23
2.23
96.69
14.62
35.54
45.92
3.38
3.31
91.85
15.69
19.92
35.23
5.08
6.38
94.31
12.85
29.77
19.57
4.57
2.86
98.43
16.29
42.50
29.62
2.23
2.23
96.69
14.62
35.54
31.13     25.25     28.54     28.90     37.96
91.33
11.73
37.13
86.02
17.08
29.33
88.44 78.88 74.87
18.56 17.90 13.83
28.83     40.90     35.06
180.92
1.77
14.00
0.08
5.85
38.15
120.54
15.08
1.54
17.31
0.08
3.00
53.08
142.38
183.62
1.15
14.31
39.77
148.23
19.00
184.21
0.29
11.93
2.07
37.21
126.57
16.36
180.92
1.77
14.00
0.08
5.85
38.15
120.54
15.08
176.83   157.67    164.37   166.60   161.71
0.02
10.96
0.10
41.04     47.00
0.19
9.35
1.60
44.71
118.90    116.88
13.85      10.23
4.63 —
8.62
0.96
39.33
133.06
14.88
41.25
129.15
11.12
195.46      240.85       227.15       194.43       195.46       199.98    197.71    182.96    197.02    181.52
1832.46     1800.31     1845.54     1769.50     1832.46     1804.81
75
 This section was created in 1977 to
undertake, on behalf of management, a
variety of analytical, evaluative, data
gathering and consultative functions. The
analysts act as a resource to operational
managers on specific issues, and to
management as a whole, with regard to
general directions, issues, programs and
manuals of operation which require policy
decision. As well, the analysts provide facts
and recommendations for informed decisionmaking at all levels of the Branch and within
the Ministry.
Within designated areas of expertise, each
analyst is accountable for drafting Provincial
policy, standards and procedures; contributes
to the drafting of legislation and regulations;
and co-ordinates inter-ministerial activities
relevant to the development and
implementation of the various programs and
services of the Branch.
Significant accomplishments in 1979
included a first-ever program evaluation
workshop to assist management in its top
priority of determining the efficiency of
current correctional programs. A seminar
workshop on program planning, analysis and
evaluation in corrections was also held, to
better equip analysis and policy planning
staff with the skills, techniques and concepts
of program analysis. A study was facilitated
by management consultants to develop a staff
planning technique for probation officers. As
well as analyzing and evaluating citizen I
involvement in Branch activities in the North
and South Fraser Regions, the staff
implemented Phase II of the Corrections
Personnel Classification Project which began
on June 20, 1979 and is expected to be  ]
completed in June 1981. They also assumed
responsibilities for the design and
maintenance of operational manuals for adult
institutions, probation, and youth
correctional programs.
Staff prepared a woman's position paper on
the female offender, took the chairmanship of
an ongoing workshop to examine the
"Correctional Centre Jail, Rules and
Regulations", chaired a subcommittee to set
standards for the delivery of family services
for the Provincial committee, took the
leadership to respond to the proposed federal
Young Offenders Act, organized a Provincial
conference to deal with the implementation
of the new Family Relations Act for family
court counsellors, and assisted with the M
Second Annual Community Corrections ■
Centres Conference in Vancouver.
Analysts also began to examine the relatively
new idea of victim-witness services; the legal
and program issues of juvenile containment,
and assisted the Interior Region in designing
a model to evaluate a particular contracted
service.
76
 IT
] ogram Analysis and Evaluation
TABLE 11 TEMPORARY ABSENCE STATISTICS
Type of
Absence
iSit-term...
<i tinuous.
.ilical	
Ciulative total..
Active
Beginning
of Month
January 779
5
99
0
104
Applications
Received
15-Month
Period
5,851
4,862
145
10,858
Granted
15-Month
Period
4,286
2,643
130
7,059
Revoked
15-Month
Period
23
369
2
394
Active
End of
Month
March/80
20
213
3
236
Bocation
lib Unlawfully at Large	
Convicted of Additional Criminal Offences.
Centre-Community Behaviour	
Total..
113
26
255
394
11 number employed  3,049
II number of person-days worked  39,720.77
Tl amount earned $1,405,161.35
Tl restitution and fines paid  $26,314.82
till room and board paid  $75,976.48
ill family maintenance paid  $354,199.88
Tl debts paid  $58,578
• Til income tax paid  $345,873
: j source: Program Analysis and Evaluation.
77
—
 Fi
^
-
1
;
/■
Yi
 activity Reports
inspection and Standards Division: Activity Description and Report
• ie objective of the Inspection and Standards
i'tvilion is to ensure that Corrections Branch
jaintains a co-ordinated approach to the
i commodation and treatment of offenders,
i cording to a basic humane standard.
lis objective is fulfilled in a variety of
ays. Regular inspections are made of all
Snrectional facilities and specific incidents
these facilities such as escapes, suicides
d injuries to staff and offenders are
irefully documented and investigated. The
ii/ision also investigates written,
Linfidential grievances and complaints of
ij'enile delinquents and adult offenders and
lurents of youths under Corrections Branch
nrjervision. In addition, the division serves
; ian appeal board for offenders dissatisfied
|ith the awards of the directors' disciplinary
]iels in Corrections Branch facilities. These
:jiels are composed of the director of the
liility and two officers chosen by the
Hector. One of these officers is often the
Liiplain of the centre, and in some centres,
-ty even be a member of the community.
siring 1979, the division continued an
c;oing project to develop basic standards of
Bffing and operational procedures for
Lerections. On the acceptance of these
Bidards by Branch management, it is
|nned to develop manuals as guides to
Jse standards to co-ordinate with
Ijtytional manuals now in use, coupled
ujh the gradual implementation of these
Bidards according to a phased plan.
•January 1979, the division concluded a
A1 style of inspection reporting utilizing a
slti-disciplinary team of specialists in food
*'ices, finance and administration, and
grectional programs, as well as
g'esentatives from WCB, BCBC, the
■listry of Health and the Fire Marshal's
If ice. All except four Corrections Branch
i| lities were inspected and reports were
ilized and distributed by early 1980. Of
gfour that were not inspected, two were
under construction, one was not yet
purchased by BCBC, and weather prevented
travel to the Terrace CCC. The facility was to
be inspected later in 1980.
A total of 38 investigations into escapes and
other incidents was carried out during the
year. Divisional statistics show that there was
a slight decrease in the number of escapes in
1979 over those of 1978. A total of 248
injuries to staff were reported, compared with
216 in 1978, while 484 injuries to offenders
were reported, compared with 496 in 1978.
Grievances and complaints received from or
on behalf of offenders totalled 382, which is
26 per cent higher than last year. In addition,
a total of 26 requests for review of directors'
disciplinary panel awards were received
during 1979. On the average about three
quarters of all grievances are found to be
minor and very few disciplinary panel awards
are overturned. Last year was no exception.
However, due care and attention was given to
all matters, for experience has shown that
even apparently minor issues can trigger most
disastrous consequences if not handled
carefully.
Inspection and standards continues to
participate in the Corrections Branch
Standards Committee for Wilderness
Programs and high-risk activities. The
division plans to re-inspect all youth
correctional programs and to review and
finalize a standard format for institutional
inspection reports.
It is to be noted that the Office of the
Ombudsman and the courts also receive
complaints and grievances regarding
correctional facilities from or on behalf of
offenders. They often refer these to the
Inspection and Standards Division and thus
have assisted in reinforcing the work of
Inspection and Standards in developing and
maintaining basic standards and consistent
practices throughout the Branch.
79
 Annex: Corrections Branch Regions.
Districts, Facilities and Offices
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
Resource Analysis
Program Analysis and Evaluation
Operations and Management Systems
Information Services
Provincial Classification
Religious Programs
Staff Development Division
Psychological Services
Medical Services
Inspection and Standards
VANCOUVER ISLAND REGION
Vancouver Island Regional Office
South District 1
South District 1 Office
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre
Vancouver Island Community Correctional
Centre
Vancouver Island Case Management Unit
Victoria Adult Probation Office
Colwood Probation Office
Victoria Court Office
South District 2
South District 2 Office
Jordan River Camp
Victoria Youth Detention Centre
Victoria Family Court Services
Victoria Attendance Programs:
—New Directions Program
—Metchosin Camp
Sidney Probation Office
Duncan Probation Office
Lake Cowichan Office
North District
North District Office
Snowdon Work Release Unit
Lakeview Camp
Campbell River Probation Office
Port Hardy Probation Office
Courtenay Probation Office
Port Alberni Probation Office
Parksville Probation Office
Nanaimo Probation Office
Port McNeill Probation Office
VANCOUVER REGION
Vancouver Regional Office
East District
East District Office
South East Adult Probation Office
South Juvenile and Family Office
East Juvenile and Family Office
North Juvenile and Family Office
Burnaby Community Correctional Centre I
Yale Street Family and Juvenile Court Office
DARE Office
North East Adult Probation Office
West District
West District Office
South West Adult Probation Office
West End Adult Probation Office
West End Adult Probation Office
Community Pre-Trial Services Unit
Burrard Juvenile and Family Office
Vancouver Court Team Adult Probation 1
Office
West Juvenile and Family Office
Marpole Community Correctional Centre i$
Lynda Williams Community Correctional
Centre
North Shore District
North Shore District Office
West Vancouver Probation Office
Porteau Cove Camp
Sechelt Probation Office
Squamish Probation Office
North Vancouver Juvenile and Family Office
Powell River Office
North Vancouver Adult Probation Office m
Oakalla District
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional I
Centre
Lakeside Correctional Centre for Women
Youth Containment
WUlingdon Youth Detention Centre
80
 nnex: Corrections Branch Regions,
istricts, Facilities and Offices
1 )UTH FRASER REGION
iuth Fraser Regional Office
I lit District
. st District Office
I ibotsford Probation and Family Services
untre Creek Camp
wiilliwack Probation and Family Services
;rce Creek Camp—DASH Program
hpe Probation and Family Services
ussion Probation and Family Services
]st District
\st District Office
Ilta Probation and Family Services
Ingley Probation and Family Services
Iihmond Unified Family Court Probation
lind Family Services
Iihmbnd Adult Probation Office
5rey Unified Family Court Probation and
'. ■•amily Services
Srey Adult Probation Office
Srey Bail Supervision
\iite Rock Probation and Family Service
iilliwack Forest Camps
Ltrict Office, Chilliwack Forest Camps
Cilliwack Community Correctional Centre
Cilliwack Security Unit
;N>unt Thurston Camp
lid Mountain Camp
UiRTH FRASER REGION
$th Fraser Regional Office
Oirict 1
Clrict 1 Office
Bnaby Central Probation Office
Bnaby North Probation Office
■Bnaby South Juvenile and Family Services
N/ Westminster Probation Office
■Hi Haven Correctional Centre
Q'rict 2
■Dxict 2 Office
i?n Maples Community Correctional Centre
,Jv)le Ridge Probation Office
£;uitlam Adult Probation Office
^-;uitlam Juvenile and Family Services
District 3
Haney Forest Camps Administration
Haney Forest Camps
Boulder Bay Camp
Pine Ridge Camp
Stave Lake Camp
Southview Place Community Correctional
Centre
District 4
District 4 Office
Alouette River Correctional Centre
INTERIOR REGION
Interior Regional Office
Kamloops District
District Office, Kamloops
Ashcroft Probation Office
Kamloops Probation Office
Lillooet Probation Office
Merritt Probation Office
100 Mile House Probation Office
Williams Lake Probation Office
Okanagan District
District Office, Okanagan
Oliver Probation Office
Penticton Probation Office
Kelowna Probation Office
Vernon Probation Office
Salmon Arm Probation Office
Revelstoke Probation Office
Kootenay District
Castlegar Probation Office
Cranbrook Probation Office
Creston Probation Office
Fernie Probation Office
Golden Probation Office
Kimberley Probation Office
Nelson Probation Office
Trail Probation Office
Institutions
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
Rayleigh Camp
Bear Creek Camp
Kamloops Community Correctional Centre
81
 Annex: Corrections Branch Regions,
Districts, Facilities and Offices
NORTHERN REGION
Northern Regional Office
West Coast District
West Coast District Office
Terrace Community Correctional Centre
Queen Charlotte Islands Probation Office
Prince Rupert Probation Office
Terrace Probation Office
Kitimat Probation Office
Smithers Probation Office
North Central District
North Central District Office
Dawson Creek Probation Office
Fort St. John Probation Office
Mackenzie Probation Office
Prince George Adult Probation Office
Prince George Juvenile Probation and Family
Services
Vanderhoof Probation Office
Quesnel Probation Office
Institutions
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre
Hutda Lake Camp
s Printer for British Columbia <
Victoria, 1981
82

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