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FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1929]

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 FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
HOME FOR GIRLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1927, TO MARCH 318T, 1928
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Tour Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Fourteenth Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial Home for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1928.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1928.
 Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1928.
The Honourable A. M. Manson,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls; covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928.
MARGARET W. BAYNE,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls.
   PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME
FOR GIRLS.
SUPEKINTENDENT'S ANNUAL KEPOKT.
The Honourable A. M. Manson,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
ISir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the Honourable members of the Legislature
the Fourteenth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls from April 1st,
1927, to March 31st, 1928.
This report will be chiefly a review of the ten years' work of the present Superintendent.
THE BUILDING.
Many changes have been made in the building, adding to its comfort, safety, and usefulness.
Fireplaces have been built in the living-room, the school-room, and the Superintendent's suite, in
which for several years the fuel used was salvaged from the land-clearing of the premises.
THE LAUNDRY.
In the laundry live steam is now used in the boilers; drying-cupboards have been built
to dry the clothes and electric irons have replaced the old-fashioned sad-irons.
While the drying equipment was being installed in the laundry the linen was sent out and
laundered in a city plant. The prices paid enabled us to place a monetary value of $40 per
week, or $2,000 per annum, on the work done by the girls in our own laundry. This is carried
out under the teaching and supervision of one member of the staff.
PREMISES.
The site, comprising 14 acres, has been cleared for six years. Hundreds of cords of wood
were obtained and used as fuel for the furnace and fireplaces. As each portion of land was
cleared large quantities of chips and bark and other debris from the clearing were gathered
by the girls and burned in bonfires, in which potatoes and onions were baked as a relish with
their lunches. The stones were gathered in heaps to be afterwards broken up and used as
foundation for the service roads.
GROVE.
A grove of about half an acre was preserved from the clearing. This was cleaned out and
made park-like by the girls, who use it as a shady retreat in which to eat the mid-meal lunches
that are served to all the girls working outdoors.
CROPS.
The land is all either under crop or used as pasture for the dairy cattle. The returns in
crop value are always greater than the outlay, besides furnishing needed work for the girls.
FENCE.
A 6-foot close-board fence surrounds the property. Though adding to our privacy, it is
not sufficient defence against the visits of prowlers, or obtaining contraband goods or surreptitious letters and messages.'
ORCHARD.
The orchard set out in 1923 bore a small crop of fruit last year. While the greater number
are apple-trees, there are also pear, cherry, prune, crab-apple, quince, and mulberry trees.
POULTRY-HOUSE.
As soon as the land was cleared a poultry-house was built for 150 birds. Good stock was
obtained and by trap-nesting and leg-banding only the best were kept. A brooder-house and
breeding unit have since been added, with good results.    When the price of eggs is low many
 R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
dozens are preserved in water-glass for use in the kitchen during the period of high-prices, when
• the fresh eggs are sold.    This enables the poultry plant to pay its way.
A number of girls are trained in poultry-work, so that they are competent to take positions
on  poultry-farms.
For a while we carried on the rearing of rabbits, ducks, and geese, but the premises are
not large enough to continue this work properly, so it has been given up.
DAIRY-BARN.
A dairy-barn large enough to care for six cows is a valuable part of out plant. Grade
cows of ordinary quality were tried first and gradually replaced with a pedigreed Holstein and
two pedigreed Jerseys. From these foundation cows was obtained a herd of four Jerseys and
two Holsteins. These are all on the R.O.P. test. A number of enviable records have been won.
These, together with the cows' pictures, are framed and hung in the barn.
While much of the butter used is made in the dairy, there is also an abundant supply of
milk and cream for the house and separated milk for the chickens and pigs.
The care and exactness required for this work, with its resultant successes, is a constant
incentive to good work, and of unfailing interest to the girls themselves, who are impressed
with the value of unceasing care.
The early rising is willingly done, the animals are tenderly cared for, while their success
in the R.O.P. test is an occasion for rejoicing.
PIGGERY.
Very early in the work some pigs were procured and used to kill out the fern-roots in the
newly cleared land, as well as to utilize the necessary waste from the kitchen. A commodious
piggery has been built. The school has since been well supplied with excellent pork, home-
cured bacon, and hams.
ROOT-HOUSE.
With the increased cultivation of the land a root-house was needed to store our winter
supply of vegetables and provide a cool room for the canned fruit and pickles.
Sufficient fruit is canned each year to supply the breakfast-table each morning with a
small portion of jam, and the supper table six nights of the week with canned fruit when fresh
fruit is out of season.
GARDEN.
All the girls do some form of garden-work. Small plots are allotted to them, in which
they prepare the soil, sow the seed, plan the design, and care for the plot throughout the
season. Prizes are awarded to the best plots. Many girls at first do not so much as know
the names of the tools, and nothing of their use.
Much pleasure is derived from this work, for gardening satisfies the creative instinct more
than any other form of work.
Besides caring for the garden-plots, many hours are spent hoeing and weeding in the
kitchen-garden.
For a happy diversion there is the picking of raspberries, loganberries, and blackberries,
from which much fruit is canned. No day seems too hot for this work. The daily sense of
fullness at quitting-time is much envied by those not participating in the fruit-picking.
PLAYFIELD.
The levelling, stone-picking, raking, and rolling the playfleld has been the work of the
girls.    On the playfleld is a straight and a wave slide, productive of much enjoyment.
GYMNASIUM.
The last building to be erected is the gymnasium, finished a few months ago but as yet
unfurnished.    It is equipped with shower-baths, which we expect to enjoy during the summer.
When Dr. Augusta Stowe Gullen, of Toronto, visited the school she remarked in the
visitors' book: " This is truly a home where maternal love is expressed and all efforts are
towards upbuilding honour, integrity, and courage of a high order among the pupils, while the
mental and spiritual side of life is the guiding principle."
 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1927-28.
R 7
Flower-garden plots bloom at the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls in soil that was
until a few years ago covered with mighty fir and cedar stumps. The fence at the background is parallel with the old historic Douglas Trail, that was built in 1862 to enable
the officers of the ships loading at Moodyville to take a short-cut to New Westminster,
where they were able to clear the Customs.
j*« «*
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YOUNG GOSLINGS OF THE TOULOUSE
STRAIN.
These   extremely   fine   birds   are   only   8
weeks old and the gander immediately in
front weighs 9 lb.
" JOHANNA POSCH KOBA MCKINLEY."
" Johanna," who is only 6 months old, is
expected to keep up the reputation of her
grandmother, "Pauline Fayne Peitje," who
is the foundation cow of the herd.
DOMESTIC TRAINING.
In homelike surroundings of scrupulous cleanliness the girls are given a training in home
efficiency, in the preparation and value of plain wholesome food, in household cleanliness, the
use of soap as a cleanser being a high mark of civilization, the cultivation of the pleasures of
simple tastes, and the value of moral and spiritual behaviour.
Since marriage is the greatest trade open to women, household training is her greatest
necessity. The successful married life of many of our girls is due largely to this training in
domestic efficiency.
In addition to the household training given to all the girls, some are instructed in dairy and
poultry work as previously outlined. Several of these so trained have gone to positions in the
country, where they are now happily married to successful farmers.
HAIRDRESSING COURSE.
Some years ago a hairdressing course was. established to train the girls of higher mentality
whose education did not permit their taking the commercial course.
An experienced hairdresser was secured, who taught marcelling, hair-cutting, and manicuring.    Plenty of practice was obtained on the other girls.
Although begun so auspiciously and carried on so successfully, this training was discontinued after one year. The system of exploitation carried on in the beauty-parlour business
prevents our girls from obtaining positions. Until the privileges regarding paid apprenticeship
in beauty-parlours is under a more just regulation it is useless to resume the teaching of this
work.
 R 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
While sewing and the making of simple dresses is* taught, neither the trade of dressmaking
nor of millinery has been carried on. The minimum wage law has brought about the elimination of the work-room, whose productions are now made in factories.
VARIOUS TRADES.
Clerks' positions are difficult to obtain. The minimum wage law again operates against
the girl of deficient mentality or limited education.
There are few industries available for our girls except positions as waitresses, as domestics,
as laundry-workers, and the various branches of seasonal work.
THE SCHOOL-ROOM.
While the academic work of the public school is followed, much time is given to hand-work,
as basketry, bead-work, toy-making, paper flowers, and various other kinds where restricted
space is a consideration. A commodious work-room would greatly facilitate our manual teaching, would permit new industries to be taught, would remove the hand-work from the present
crowded school-room and allow the academic studies to be carried on more peacefully and
undisturbed. This would form the beginning of a trade school that should be established at no
distant date.
Since a considerable proportion of our girls are subnormal the most to be hoped for them
is to become skilled manual workers, and thereby, if possible, adequately self-supporting.
No industrial school can discharge its whole duty unless provision is made for training in
various manual arts.    Industrial inefficiency is one of the principal causes of poverty.
COMMERCIAL COURSE.
To those who have sufficient academic education a commercial course in stenography,
typing, and book-keeping is given if desired. So successful has this work been that for the past
eight years the Civil Service has never been without one or more of our graduates. Other girls
trained here are now filling responsible and well-paid positions in the commercial world.
One example will suffice. Beginning at a salary of $75 per month, one girl was given an
increase of $5 at the end of three months and a bonus of $10. At the end of the year was
given a $10 increase and a bonus. Is now getting $125 per month with bonuses. Same girl
attended night-school, where for speed in typing she won a bronze medal and bar, a silver medal
and bar, and a gold medal, as well as a prize for speed in shorthand.
SPIRIT OF SCHOOL.
On the whole, the spirit of the school has been one of content and cheerfulness. There is
enough work and in sufficient variety to keep every one occupied. This has been interspersed
with frequent and pleasing recreation.
DISCIPLINE.
The spirit of discipline is one of teaching and training rather than punishment. It is the
desire to reward for doing right rather than to punish for doing wrong, though both are sometimes necessary. The honour roll, the honour motor-rides, honour uniforms, honour jobs, birthday cakes, time earned off, and good-conduct money are all means to this end.
PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL.
It is well to keep in mind that the great purpose of this school is to provide for delinquents
such wise conditions of modern education and training as will restore the largest possible
portion of them to useful citizenship.
DECLARATION OF GENEVA.
In the Declaration of Geneva, known as the " Children's Charter," the men and women of
all nations, recognizing that mankind owes to the child the best that it has to give, declare and
accept it as their duty that, regardless of all considerations of race, nationality, and creed, the
child must be given the means requisite for its normal development, both materially and
spiritually; that, the delinquent child must be reclaimed and put in a position to earn a livelihood ; that the child must be brought up in the consciousness that its talents must be devoted
to the service of its fellow-men.
 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1927-28. R 9
CONFORM TO THE DECLARATION OF GENEVA.
The rules and regulations of this school conform to the spirit of the " Children's Charter."
Each member of the staff is expected to carry out the work in accordance with this spirit. It is
not easy to find people who are willing and capable of doing this work.
In reviewing the work of the past ten years, the percentage of successes is sufficiently high
to show that the Industrial Home is eminently worth while; that the number of good citizens
produced thereby is of much economic value to the country.
EXPERIENCE.
Our experience has shown:—
(a.)  That a lack of self-control indicates an unpreparedness for life on the outside.
(6.) That some girls are definitely feeble-minded; some are sophisticated to a degree that
makes them capable of being exceedingly harmful.
(c.) That without segregation the proper care of these is an extremly difficult and well-
nigh impossible task.
(d.) That we are expecting too much when we attempt to make socially safe in a period
of two years girls who have, as their personal histories show, unfortunate social heredity and
have never in all their lives had proper social view-point.
(e.) Their backwardness in their academic studies, due to subnormal mentality, shows
that it is a mistake to require them to attend public school until 15 years old. This produces
the habit of inefficiency and failure and tends to make them vicious.
(/.) That special training is needed for the subnormal.
(g.) That a twenty-four-hour school in the pre-delinquency stage would save many children
from the industrial school and be a saving economically, morally, and spiritually to the State.
PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORDS.
Ten years ago a happy arrangement was made with the psychological clinician of the
Vancouver schools to have all the girls here given the psychological test very soon after
admission.    This has been a most valuable working basis for the training of the girl.
This work has been carried on throughout the entire ten years. We have now the most
complete and extensive psychological record of any industrial school in Canada.
If a properly qualified officer could be engaged to follow up these cases its would form a
valuable record for the study of delinquency. I would earnestly request that this work be
carried out.
A NEW LOCATION NEEDED.
During the first years of our decade here many excursions were made in summer into the
surrounding woods to pick wild berries. Long walks were taken on Sundays, as the houses
were few and only occasional cars and people were met.
Within a few years this rural seclusion has been changed to a busy community. Houses
are built thickly on all sides. Roads and streets have been made that carry an unending stream
of motor-vehicles bearing all manner of people, some shouting and horn-honking; other conversing with the girls, and many shouting coarse and vulgar remarks; others prowling around
the premises, especially at night, leaving contraband articles and letters till the school is no
longer a place of safe-keeping for the girls.
The projected Harbour Railway is expected to pass close to the premises. All these and
other changes make a new location an immediate necessity.
In the present building it has been impossible to segregate from the better-behaved girls
those who are persistently incorrigible and vicious. This herding is detrimental to good
discipline and interferes with the training and well-being of most of the girls.
In a new location buildings could be erected to meet modern requirements which this
building does hot.
The work now carried on and the money expended would be productive of greater and
better results if a more secluded and rural situation could be selected. No delay should occur
in making preparations to meet an increasingly difficult and crucial condition.
 R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, CASSIAR STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
OUR IDEALS.
Our ideal is to elevate the ideals of the girls; to increase their efficiency; to create a
desire for better living, and to give the training necessary to make possible that desire; to
inculcate a respect for law and order, for '■' as a man thinketh in his heart so is he." No home
can be wholesome, no school efficient, and no country or nation safe until this lesson has been
mastered.
The present yearly report is in much of the statistics typical of all the years.
The matron's report shows a well-filled larder and a busy household.
The outdoor report shows many lines of activity.
The doctor's report indicates the average health of the school in the past ten years.
COMMITMENTS.
The age of commitments is as follows:—
13 years of age  2
14 years of age   4
15 years of age   5
16 years of age   5
17 years of age   5
18 years of age   1
19 years of age   1
NATIONALITY.
Their nationality is as follows:—
Canadian     3
English     9
Italian  1
French-Canadian     1
Czeckslovakia    1
Canadian children having British parents   8
Scotch  3
Irish     3
Russian     1
Ukrainian     1
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible    18 Breaking parole
Sexual immorality      1 No charge 	
Theft      2
NUMBER OF INMATES.
During the year twenty-three were admitted, making 292 since the opening of the school,
and 262 in training during the incumbency of the present Superintendent.
 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1927-28. R 11
RELEASED ON PROBATION OR DISCHARGED.
Number released on probation or discharged during the year is twenty-seven. Of these,
thirteen were released through the Vancouver Juvenile Court and fourteen were returned to
relatives or were placed in suitable positions.
ESCAPES.
During the year there were nineteen escapes. Two made their escape for the fourth time.
Most of the girls escaping received outside assistance and indications are not wanting of
treachery on the staff.
COST OF MEALS, ETC.
The average cost per meal throughout the year including meat, fish, groceries, cereals,
yeast, ice, and fruit, is 9 cents per meal.
The number of meals served during the year is 53,432.
The cost per girl per month, including salaries, office supplies, travelling expenses, furniture
and fixtures, clothing, boots, etc., janitors' supplies, etc., fuel, light, and water, provisions,
medical and hospital supplies, good-conduct fund, and incidentals and contingencies, is $54.65.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent  Miss Margaret W. Bayne.
Matron   Mrs. Rhoda Butter.
First Assistant  Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Second Assistant  Mrs. Nancy Lyall.
Third Assistant  .Miss Jessie Macdonald.
Needle-woman  Mrs. Helen M. Atcheson.
Linen-keeper  Miss K. M. Smith.
Cook    Mrs. Jean F. MacDonald.
Teacher and Agricultural Instructor  .Miss Mollie Mornington.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher  Miss M. AV. Sibbald.
Engineer and Janitor   Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener    Thos. Hoskins.
Gardener    Frank Holland.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
MARGARET W. BAYNE,
Superintendent.
OUTDOOE BEPOET.
Maintenance Account.
Labour     $  329.75
Seeds, plants, etc        164.10
Tools and sundries        276.40
Feed and stock      2,027.37
Repairs to outbuildings 	
$2,797.62
Credit       .1,713.79
$4,511.41
 R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Income from Outdoors.
Milk, total value for year   $1,034.75
Buttermilk, total value for year  41.05
Butter, total value for year   773.96
Eggs, total value for year   628.02
Poultry (used)    364.66
Pork supplied to house and sold  397.81
Vegetables used   662.40
Fruit    152.56
Field roots and fodder corn  88.70
Fertilizer from barn  192.50
Live stock sold—
One calf   25.00
One cow   150.00
:,511.41
MATEON'S EEPOET.
Miss Margaret W. Bayne,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C. '   .
Dear Madam,—I beg leave to make the following report on the house-training and work for
the past year:—
The ususal bread-making was carried on twice a week. Twenty-five girls were taught to
make good bread. From April 1st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928, were baked 6,973 loaves of bread.
Cakes, buns, cookies, and pies numbered 3,997. The number of hours worked in the bakery
amounted to 785.
Fruit-canning was carried on during the season. Several groups of girls assisted and were
taught the work.
The following fruits were cared for :— Lt|
Apples   302
Black currants      22
Cherries     456
Crab-apples     46
Damson plums  150
Gooseberries  218
Marmalade   (orange)     356
Marmalade  (green tomato)    994
Peaches     256
Pears   140
Prunes   530
Raspberries    412
Rhubarb and raspberry      46
Strawberry        92
Total 4,020
The total outlay was $323.91, or an average of 8% cents per pound.
Canned fruit was served over the whole house six times a week for supper when fresh
fruit was not available, and a small portion of jam each morning for breakfast.
One hundred and fifty quarts of pickles were also made.
In the sewing-room from April 1st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928, the number of articles mended
is 5,443; number of new articles made, 973 ; number of yards of material used, 1,623; number
of hours worked in the sewing-room, 1,914.
 In the laundry for the same period the number of articles washed and ironed is 44,590;
number of hours worked, 6,385.
During the year the hours spent in housework is 34,238, and outdoors is 16,495.
Treatment for venereal infection has been given daily to eighteen girls. Some of these had
three treatments each day; a few had two treatments daily. At proper intervals Dr. Campbell
gave special treatment.
Each member of the house staff when on duty works a twel\ e- or thirteen-hour day. Taking
into consideration her afternoons, evenings, and Sundays off, her working-time averages ten
hours per day for seven days in the week.
The outdoor staff works longer hours owing to the milking of the cows involving early
rising and later turning-in.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Rhoda Rutter,
Matron.
MEDICAL OPFIOEE'S EEPOET.
Miss Margaret W. Bayne,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—I  beg leave  to  submit  the  following  report  on  the  work  of  the  Girls'
Industrial Home for the past year:—
One girl who was pregnant on admittance was transferred to the Salvation Army Hospital,
where she gave birth to a child last July.
Two girls were sent to the General Hospital for tonsillectomy.    One girl was transferred
to General Hospital for appendectomy.    Two girls were given X-ray treatment for fractures.
One case of measles developed, but immediate and effective quarantine prevented further
contagion.
Seven cases of goitre were given proper iodine treatment here for this condition, while one
girl was given several basal metabolism tests for goitre.
Twenty-nine girls were given the Wassermann test for luetic infection.    One was found
positive.    She was given special treatment in the General Hospital for several months.
Thirty-one cases of Neisser infection were given treatment here.    One case was transferred to General Hospital for special treatment.
Two girls were given special treatment for ear-trouble.    Forty-eight girls were given dental
treatment by dentist.
The general health of the school has been good throughout the year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Mary B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.
S2 5-929-3135
 

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