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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1929]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
SEVENTH ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
FISCAL TEAE ENDED MAECII 31ST, 1028
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.
    To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1928.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.
 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary. P. Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant Medical Superintendent.
Miss B. Bibby, Matron.       A. Whitecross, Bursar.
M. McQuitty, M.B., Assistant Physician. II. A. Jones, M.D., Assistant Physician.
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S., Dentist.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
Miss L. Wright, Dietitian.
Miss Gordon Forbes, Clerk. Mrs. O. Burton, Stenographer.
J. R. Mathieson, Clerk of Works.
A. N. Low, Steward. J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
J. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Presbyterian. Rev. E. R. Bartlett, Church of England.
Rev. Fr. A. Madden, Roman Catholic.
SANATORIUM FARM  STAFF.
D. W. Strachan, Farm Superintendent.
T. G. Kingscote, Book-keeper.
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Seventh Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928.
The average daily population was 216, the largest number in residence at any time being
230. There were 245 beds available. There were 160 admissions and 164 discharges, and a
total of 383 patients received treatment.
These figures are considerably higher than those of last year. This is largely due to the
opening of the new tuberculosis ward at the Vancouver General Hospital, facilitating a freer
exchange of patients, to our mutual benefit.
The Sanatorium has now been in operation for twenty years, and during that time has
changed so much that only one building then in existence still remains. This is also the smallest
of the original buildings. In 1907 it was the Medical Superintendent's office and the laboratory.
It is a small wooden structure about 14 by 16 feet; it is being kept in good repair and will be
preserved. It is now being used to house two male patients who are able to be on exercise, and
they are quite attached to their little " home."    A photo of the building appears in this report.
Between 1910 and 1914 the Women's Building, the Pavilions, and the Administration
Building were erected, also the Farm Superintendent's residence and what is now the Assistant
Medical Superintendent's residence. During the war the Dominion Government built what is
now the Men's Infirmary and Service Building, also the power-house and the laundry. These
buildings, together with the old barns, composed the Sanatorium as taken over by the Provincial
Government in 1921. Since then the buildings and grounds have been extended to such an
extent as to completely change the appearance of the institution.
The medical services have been steadily improved and kept up to date. Besides the regular
routine medical attendance, the services of the surgeon are used freely, and a specialist in the
diseases of the eye, ear, nose, and throat sees that none of our patients lack any care that is
likely to affect the general health. A full-time dentist ensures healthy mouths. Two full-time
technicians are employed in the laboratory, doing research-work, in addition to the many procedures which have become routine during the last few years.
The working and living conditions of the employees have been greatly improved by the
building of new quarters and the establishment of the eight-hour day and six-day week.
SURGICAL.
Surgery is finding a wider application each year as our experience increases. At the first
of the year we had twenty-nine cases receiving artificial pneumothorax treatment. This treatment was attempted in twenty-seven new cases during the year and was successfully instituted
in twenty cases. During the year four cases were admitted with artificial pneumothorax already
established. At the end of the year forty-four cases were receiving the treatment. There were
887 refills given during the year.
Extra-pleural thoracoplasty was done in ten cases. Results were: Marked improvement in
six cases, improvement in one, no improvement in one, one death a few months after operation,
and one death immediately after operation. This makes a total of thirty-one cases here who
have had this operation performed. Over 50 per cent, have results which we expect will lead
to arrest of the disease. As this operation has been performed as a last resort in nearly all our
cases, we consider these results as excellent.
Surgical treatment for various other conditions has been necessary.
 Y 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
X-RAY.
Twelve years ago the X-ray was not in common use, even in our best sanatoria. To-day it
is indispensable. During the year just ended we took 634 pairs of stereoscopic chest films and
eighty-seven miscellaneous films. There were dental films of the full mouth taken in 139 cases
and seventeen single dental films. X-ray treatment was given for various conditions in twenty-
eight cases. The fluoroscope is used very freely. Our sun-lamps have been kept busy throughout
the year and about 7,500 treatments were given.
BUILDING OPERATIONS.
During the year plans were completed and work is now well under way on the building
of a fine new 100-bed infirmary, together with other additions which are necessary to operate it.
These include an addition to the Nurses' Home, an addition to the laundry, a building to house
the male employees, a new residence for the Medical Superintendent, and five houses for the
assistant physicians, the dentist, the radiologist, and the laboratory technician.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
To make the Sanatorium complete, when the buildings mentioned above are finished, some
further additions will be necessary.
The laboratory space is very much too small to carry on the work we are doing at the
present time, satisfactorily. It will be impossible to extend the work until more room is available. If we are to take our place in the front rank of sanatoria our laboratory-work must be
pushed ahead. There is a wealth of material here for research-work and every facility should be
provided.
The tunnel from the new infirmary cuts right through our present X-ray room and new
quarters should be found.
Our Administration Building is very much congested and a new filing-room is badly needed.
I would recommend that a new Administration Building be built facing the present one, which
should then be taken down. This would greatly lessen the fire hazard, as there is very little
space between the present Administration Building, the East Pavilion, and the Men's Infirmary.
None of the buildings are fire-proof, but are of frame construction. This new building could
be connected with the tunnel, and as the site has a sharp grade at the back the basement-level
could be used to provide space for the laboratory, X-ray department, and the dental clinic,
thereby centralizing all these services. The Administration Building in this situation would be
facing all the other buildings.
Another building which is urgently required is an auditorium, with some gymnasium
facilities in the basement for the employees. The present room in use as an auditorium is
hopelessly inadequate, particularly with the increased size of the institution. On account of
our isolated position it is imperative that we have a building for recreational purposes.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
I wish to express my appreciation of the visits and donations to our patients by the Red
Cross Society.
The various organizations in Kamioops and elsewhere who give of their time so generously
in providing entertainments are doing a good work which is greatly appreciated.
I thank those who made donations to the patients at Christmas.
The kindly ministrations and good work of the chaplains and visiting clergymen is ac-
knowleged with thanks.
I wish to thank the medical men on the consulting staff for their assistance.
I wish the staff of the Sanatorium to feel that their efforts are appreciated, and thank them
for their co-operation.
In conclusion, I would like to express my gratitude to all members of your Department for
the support and assistance which has been given me.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent.
 14
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main building, 1907.
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WOMEN s   BUILDING,   1907.
■
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 7
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1927-28.
Civil.       Military.     Female.        Total
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1927.
Number of patients admitted, 1927-28	
Number of patients discharged, 1927-28 :	
Number of patients treated, 1927-28	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1928
123
77
76
200
124
24
30
35
54
19
76
53
53
129
76
223
160
164
383
219
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 160 CASES ADMITTED TO SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1927-28.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
2
13
53
9
6
5
18
1
7
9
35
2
15
27
106
12
9.4
16.8
66.3
Miscellaneous	
7.5
77
30
53
160
100.0
TABLE No. 2a.—CLASSIFICATION OF 12 CASES ADMITTED AS MISCELLANEOUS.
Spinal caries	
Gastric ulcer 	
Miners' phthisis	
Vincent's angina 	
Chronic bronchitis 	
Neurasthenia  	
Bronchitis and asthma
Bronchiectasis 	
Male.
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
Female.
1
Totals
10
TABLE No. 3.—SHOWING CIVIL STATE OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
. 45
60
2
29
24
74
84
Divorced	
Widowed           ....  	
2
Totals	
107
53
160
TABLE No. 4.—SHOWING RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OF PATIENTS ADMITTED
FROM APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Roman Catholic            	
20
1
4
1
84
3
....
47
23
Seventh Day Adventist            	
1
Non-sectarian	
4
Sikh	
1
Protestant	
131
Totals	
110
50
160
 Y 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING THE NATIONALITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Canada	
35
1
34
10
2
1
2
6
2
1
5
3
2
1
1
1
25
1
14
4
1
3
1
3
1
60
2
48
14
2
England           .         ....
Scotland	
Italy	
Ireland              	
United States of America          ...
East Indies	
1
Sweden	
China           	
Australia	
1
Denmark	
1
Czechoslovakia	
1
Totals	
107
53
16'0
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Agassiz	
Albert Canyon	
Ashcroft	
Britannia Mines	
Burns Lake	
Beaver Point	
Courtenay	
Chilliwack	
Coleman, Alta	
Cloverdale	
Darcy	
Duncan	
Dewdney	
England	
Field	
Gibson's Landing	
Huntingdon	
Hope	
Holberg	
Kamioops	
Kelowna	
Ladner	
Langley Prairie	
Longworth	
/Lake Cowichan	
Maillardville	
Michel	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
New Aberdeen	
Nanaimo	
Newton	
North Galiano Island	
Ocean Falls	
Prince Rupert	
Premier	
Carried forward
7
1
1
1
2
1
14
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
2
1
18
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
5
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
53
20
73
 OCCUPATIONAL  THERAPY   SHOPS.
. "■":■■' :  '"i;      '••,;-     i   i     "■■■.'./.'.:....'/■■ 33, .;';'•-;.     V'"..   • '. \ -'...:
PORTION   OF  GROUNDS   AT   REAR  OP   BUILDINGS.
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 9
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
53
1
1
' 1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
35
1
4
1
20
1
1
1
1
1
2
21
3
1
1
73
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
Trail                    	
5
1
56
1
7
1
1
1
Totals            	
107
53
160
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
6
1
1
9
2
1
7
1
26
1
14
1
1
1
o
1
Baker                        .                     ...         ...                ..
1
Bridgeman	
Cannery employee .	
Clerk                                             	
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
26
1
1
6
1
1
9
2
1
65
36
101
 Y 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No.  7.—SHOWING  THE  OCCUPATIONS  OF  THOSE  ADMITTED—Continued.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Brought forward
Metal-miner	
Military motor-driver	
Millwright	
Mo tor man...	
Machine operator	
Nurse-graduate	
Nurse in training	
Orderly	
Purser	
Painter	
Radiologist	
Rubber-worker	
Stenographer	
Sawmill employee	
Smelterman	
Sales clerk	
Seaman ;	
Steward	
Salesman	
Stone-mason	
Skate-sharpener	
School principal	
School	
Storekeeper	
Trucking	
Tailor	
Railway  conductor	
Telegraph operator	
Track-walker	
Underwriters' inspector	
Washerman	
Totals	
65
4
1
1
1
1
36
101
4
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
1
2
6
2
3
1
1
1
(1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
160
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st,
1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Age. Male.
Under 15 years        1
15 to
20
21 „
25
26 „
30
31 „
35
36 „
40
41 „
45
46 „
50
51 „
55
56 „
60
61 „
65
66 „
70
Over
70
12
16
14
18
14
13
10
3
2
2
2
Female.
5
11
9
16
2
5
4
1
Totals   107
53
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 11
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1927, TO MARCH 31st, 1928.
Admissions.
Discharges.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1927.
April	
9
8
17
11
8
19
3
3
6
May	
9
13
4
3
13
16
12
15
12
8
6
23
3
3
2
3
June	
5
July     	
S
6
14
1
3
4
4
1
5
August	
7
8
15
4
4
2
2
21
2
23
4
4
8
2
1
3
8
7
7
5
6
1
13
13
8
3
4
15
3
1
3
7
16
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
3
1928.
January	
5
5
10
2
3
5
2
1
3
6
2
8
5
1
6
2
2
March	
7
3
10
6
3
9
4
1
5
Totals	
107
53
160
82
40
122
31
11
42
TABLE No. 10.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 164 DISCHARGES DURING 1927-28.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
4
4
2
3
'   20
17
1
8
11
15
3
o
5
26
1
40
2
17
40
100
7
Totals	
10
41
37
34
42
164
TABLE No. 11.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 8 CASES  (MISCELLANEOUS)
DISCHARGED.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Miners' phthisis	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Lung-abscess	
1
Spinal caries           	
1
1
1
Asthma	
1
Carcinoma	
1
Neurasthenia	
1
Totals	
7
1
8
 Y 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 12.—SHOWING CAUSES OF 42 DEATHS.
Male.
Female.
Total.
General exhaustion	
24
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
35
2
1
1
Pyogenic infection	
1
1
1
Totals :	
31
11
42
TABLE No. 13.
Daily average population  ;	
Per cent, of discharges on admission (not including deaths)
Per cent, of fair recoveries on admission 	
Per cent, of deaths on whole number under treatment 	
  216
  74.3
  53.6
  10.9
Total number of patient-days   77,770
TABLE No. 14.—SHOWING WORK COMPLETED BY PATIENTS IN OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY CLASSES DURING YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1928.
Woodwork—
Picture-frames     106
Clock-cases   .:  6
Cribbage-boards    7
Book-ends, hand-carved, sets of   3
Bookshelves, hanging s  4
Tables,  card   _'  2
Bird-houses  14
Watch-stands      8
Reed-work—
Trays—
Size 14 by 20 inches (oval)    54
Size 18 by 10 inches (oval)    36
Size 12 by 18 inches  (oval)    34
Size 9 by 12 inches (oval)  26
Size 12 by 12 inches  (round)    24
Size 10 by 10 inches (round)    22
Fruit-dishes, size 10 by 10 inches  i  14
Pin-trays (small), 3 by 6 inches  38
Cradles   (doll)     16
Cradles  (full size)    1
Table-lamps     26
.Dresser-lamps   (small)     18
Flower-vases   58
Flower-baskets  19
Sewing-baskets    6
Bed-trays    2
Pine-needle work—
Baskets   38
Fruit-dishes    ,  14
Trays   6
Flower-vases  16
Pine-cone storks  160
Pine-cone cockatoos   26
 -*; 'SB
™ ^v5» g
MEDICAL   SUPERINTENDENT'S   OFFICE   AND   DISPENSARY,   1907.
TRANQUILLE SCHOOL-HOUSE.
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 13
Bead-work—
Bead-bags   98
Bead-necklaces  16
Watch-fobs   15
Butterflies   43
Needlework, embroidery—
Cushions    4
Table-centres    6
Runners     5
Passe-partout work—Frames, picture  i  206
Note.—During the year 110 patients took advantage of the occupational therapy classes
and instruction. Two sales of work were held, one netting $160, the other $96. A large showcase has been built and placed in the recreation-room to hold samples of the work done at the
classes and by the patients.
DENTAL REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report of work done in the Dental Clinic
of this institution during the year ended March 31st, 1928:—
The principal aims of the Clinic have remained the same as in preceding years, the removal
of foci of infection being the primary one. This in itself involves considerable time and work,
as the complete mouth X-ray on admission reveals all foci.
In the cases of patients who have considerable dental work to be done, including one or
more infected areas, which usually means extractions, the dental treatment is started as soon as
possible on the advice of the physician in charge, and a systematic spacing of the work is
arranged, so that too much energy is not expended by the patient at one time, in cases oi!
multiple extractions to lessen post-operative shock. It has been the experience of the Clinic
that when extractions are spaced in this way, where, the number of extractions at one time are
confined to two, and on rare occasions to three teeth, and when the patient refrains from
unnecessary exertion after the operation, that post-operative pain is practically negligible. All
extractions are done under local anaesthetic and complete extractions of upper and lower jaws
are rare.
In previous years it has been the object of the Clinic to restore all mouths to a healthy
condition and maintain them in that way while the patient was in the institution. This was
carried out successfully, and the greater part of the work of the Clinic was in the restoration
to health of the mouths of newly admitted patients, the maintenance of other patients being a
smaller part. This last year the Clinic went a step farther. Working on the principle that the
nature of all dental work must from necessity be governed by the health of the patient at all
times, the objective was fixed of placing the mouth of the patient in such a condition that, while
being free from infection, would ensure his freedom from any dental work of any great extent
for some time after his discharge from the institution. This has been worked out chiefly by
the installation of dentures of different designs.
From my three years' experience in the Dental Clinic I can find no trace of direct relationship between caries—or decay of tooth-structure—gingivitis, pyrrhcea alveolaris, or irregularities
in arrangement and construction of teeth, and pulmonary tuberculosis itself; and' I find that
pathologic conditions of the mouth are slightly over the average, due in a great part to the
inability of the patient to receive proper dental treatment while being confined to his home, on
account of his lung condition before admission to the Sanatorium.
 Y 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Following is a statement of the work completed in the Clinic for year ended March 31st,
1928 :—
Fillings     709
Extractions     363
Dentures  149
Rebases        7
Repairs       41
Inlays   (gold)        11
Bridges        14
Devitalizations         3
Treatments   280
Pyorrhoea        29
Prophylaxis  186
I have, etc.,
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual Laboratory Report for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1928.
A perusal of the appended technical report reveals a most favourable increase in work on
the examination of the blood. The addition of a full-time technician to the present staff has
made it possible to secure, as a routine procedure, a complete blood-count of every patient
admitted and, for comparison, on discharge. These tests are time-consuming if accuracy is to
be assured, and the number represented for the year entails no small amount of concentrated
effort. The Kahn and Wassermann tests also show a 100-per-cent. increase, and these, together
with glucose tolerance tests, designate the blood department as one of the most important of
the Laboratory. In this connection much greater efficiency would result if all blood analyses
could be correlated in one room.
The research into carbohydrate metabolism in the tuberculous during the past year represented monthly glucose tolerance tests on selected cases over a given period. The tests were
done by the micro method, and the data obtained are now being assembled for publication.
Dr. R. E. Coleman, who is directing this research, has introduced a revised programme by which
future work will be done with the macro method. It is hoped to cover 200 cases within the next
few months; results from these should be of especial interest.
Of seventeen gastric analyses, seven revealed achlorhydria, a condition claimed by Todd to
be frequently encountered in pulmonary tuberculosis. A series is being compiled and when
complete will contribute an interesting paper on this subject.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for your interest and encouragement.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
George Darling,
Laboratory Technician.
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 15
GENERAL WORK DONE IN THE LABORATORY.
Material examined.
Ol
a
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Sputum	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative	
Urinalysis	
T.B. urine	
Positive	
Negative	
Renal functional test.
Albuminuria	
Blood-counts—
Erythrocytes	
Hemoglobin	
Leukocytes	
Differential	
Coagulation time	
Kahn precipitation	
Wassermann	
Glucose tolerance test.
Non-protein nitrogen...
Cerebrospinal fluid	
Autopsies	
Animal inoculation	
Animal autopsies	
Cultures	
Autogenous vaccine	
Bacteriological smears
Faeces	
Water bacteriology	
Milk—
Bacteriology	
Butter-fat	
Gastric analysis	
Tissue sections	
133
161
100
125
49
72
44
37
84
89
56
88
25
211
35
23
3
4
O
1
1
2
4
1
2
4
16
2
4
2
3
9
17
2
4
9
17
1
4
10
17
1
6
10
17
2
17
25
32
17
17
12
26
14
8
4
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
16
5
3
5
1
o
1
4
4
. 5
4
8
8
10
8
1
1
2
74
34
40
206
3
1
15
17
17
17
17
27
25
1
2
1
11
5
10
142
47
95
33
2
20
20
20
20
28
86
80
85
1
92
43
39
43
46
43
41
42
46
19
226
18
16
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
3
16
6
6
12
26
13
20
12
26
13
20
12
26
13
19
12
26
13
19
14
36
14
15
10
34
14
11
4
4
4
6
3
1
1
1
6
2
2
3
3
2
45
45
6
9
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
3
5
4
8
8
10
8
2
1
2
1
24
20
6
75
39
36
225
16
19
16
1
4
82
1
4
1
1
4
8
1
113
52
61
56
1
7
22
22
20
23
12
12
9
36
1
16
5
20
1,266
545
721
1,093
22
5
103
168
169
166
171
2
254
219
45
4
6
10
22
20
301
3
60
2
31
49
110
17
53
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
SUMMARY  OF  METEOROLOGICAL  OBSERVATIONS   FOR  YEAR  ENDED
MARCH 31st, 1928.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Average
Temp.
Average
Humidity.
Snow.
Rain.
Sunshine,
Bright.
1927.
April	
Deg. F.
80.0
79.0
91.0
96.0
91.0
75.0
73.0
45.0
46.0
48.0
47.0
65.0
Deg. F.
21.0
36.0
42.0
47.0
50.0
41.0
28.0
4.0
—26.0
—14.0
4.0
15.0
Deg. F.
48.08
55.6,1
64.86
54.25
68.66
57.70
47.03
11.50
18.82
26.01
31.65
40.59
78.09
64.71
69.78
77.00
80.80 '
Inches.
15.05
22.05
12.05
*
*
Inches.
0.79
1.32
0.95
1.59
1.32
0.95
0.30
1.02
0.32
*
0.28
Hours.
190.0
216.4
218.8
July	
289.0
August	
269.1
170.8
113.3
42.6
60.2
1928.
January	
48.9
156.5
173.5
* Trace.
 —
Y 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet and the Profit and Loss
Accounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1928.
On looking over the attached Balance-sheet, Profit and Loss Accounts, with tables, you will
note that our operating costs are much the same as the previous year, only showing slight
increases and decreases under the different departments. The number of hospital days shows
a considerable decrease, due mainly to the increasing difficulty in securing patients suitable for
occupation of our pavilions. As has been pointed out previously, the lack of incipient cases
seeking admission tends to keep our general costs at a high level.
As you will see, our total revenue shows a slight decrease from last year. This decrease is
shared by all sources of revenue except the municipalities, the greatest drop being in collections
from sundry patients. This is due to the fact that so many of our patients are here for long
periods and their funds are exhausted before they are fit for discharge.
Our gross and net daily per capita this year are respectively $3.72 and $2.94. Our net
expenditure for the year is $232,413.29, and this, with a daily patient average of 216, makes the
net cost to the Government of the Province $1,075.99 per patient.
I again take this opportunity of thanking you for the valuable support and assistance you
have given me during the year; also to my assistants and all departmental heads I wish to
tender my sincere appreciation of their co-operation in carrying on the work of the institution.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1928.
Land     $5,793.14
Buildings  420,697.01
Plant and equipment  -  101,080.23
Furniture and fixtures   13,937.26
Inventories   11,514.92
Treasury advance   1,000.00
Accounts receivable   6,440.77
$560,463.33
Deficit (cost of operations, 1927-28)   260,608.77
y
$821,072.10
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia
821,072.10
 P      3.    .
\3:'.
.    ■;.■•..,;
.^•.••-•••^-^pi
"'
TRANQUILLE  TO   KAMLOOPS—ROAD,  RAIL,   OR  RIVER.
SPILLWAY  OF  WATER-SUPPLY DAM  ON  TRANQUILLE CREEK.
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 17
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Depreciation—
Buildings          $22,141.94
Plant and equipment   5,320.01
Furniture and fixtures   733.53
Salaries         119,876.18
Office supplies  2,228.64
Travelling and transportation   2,569.15
Fuel, light, and water         36,608.02
Maintenance, etc        13,865.61
Furniture and fixtures   7,544.09
Provisions           96,977.65
Medical and surgical          11,624.60
Incidentals and unforeseen   3,380.88
By Donations         $2,005.00
Receipts from maintenance of patients         60,256.53
Balance       260,608.77
$322,870.30    $322,870.30
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1928.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher (less amounts credited to vote for supplies sold) —
Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff       $16,307.27
Sundry   employees          103,568.91
$119,876.18
Office supplies—
Books and journals   $76.59
Stationery, etc  1,704.62
Telephone and telegraph   455.33
  2 236 54
Travelling and transportation—
Travelling expenses          $1,126.95
Transportation expenses   2,328.16
•  3,455.11
Fuel, water, light, and power—
Fuel        $35,435.67
Plant supplies   661.69
        36,097.36
Maintenance of buildings, grounds, etc.—
Janitors' supplies        $6,891.15
Equipment renewals   8,989.98
Garden and grounds   576.75
Sundries  1,166.57
         17 024 45
Furniture and fixtures—
Linen         $6,876.88
Beds and bedding  :  2,029.19
„      . .   8,906.07
Provisions—
Groceries         $35,976.80
Meats           29,331.18
Fish   2,843.51
Milk and eggs         30,030.81
 98,182.30
Carried forward      $286,378.01
2
 Y 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Expenditure and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward      $286,378.01
Expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Medical and surgical supplies—
Medicines and drugs         $3,198.01
Consultants' fees, etc  4,823.36
X-ray and dental   3,686.80
        11,708.17
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry          $5,757.14
Freight and cartage   670.05
Clothing, etc  746.44
Occupational    303.93
Sundries  62.50
  7,540.06
Total operating expense by voucher      $305,626.24
Inventories as at March 31st, 1927—
Office supplies   $448.48
Travelling and transportation   25.92
Fuel, water, light, and power   510.66
Maintenance, etc  3,217.48
Furniture and fixtures  1,117.61
Provisions  3,198.86
Medical and surgical supplies   320.83
Incidentals and unforeseen   603.75
  9,443,59
$315,069.83
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1928—
Office supplies   $456.38
Travelling and transportation  35.88
Maintenance, etc  6,043.49
Furniture and fixtures  2,479.59
Provisions     2,299.28
Medical and surgical   138.40
Incidentals and unforeseen   61.90
         11,514.92
$303,554.91
Less equipment transferred to Asset Account   5,645.33
$297,909.58
Less sundry collections—
Provisions     $999.18
Board  1,105.05
Post-office   300.00
Junk     :  31.50
Thermometers   103.00
X-ray plates, medical examinations, etc  163.00
Laundry '...  272.89
Miscellaneous  260.14
 3,234.76
Gross cost of operating for year     $294,674.82
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 19
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Brought forward     $294,674.82
Revenue.
By Donation, Greaves Estate, etc        $2,005.00
Receipts, Department of S.C.R        27,119.54
Receipts, municipalities         22,642.50
Receipts, sundry patients         10,494.49
        62,261.53
Net cost of operating for year    $232,413.29
Depreciation written off—
Buildings         $22,141.94
Plant and equipment   5,320.01
Furniture and fixtures  733.53
        28,195.48
$260,608.77.
Summary of Profit and Loss Account.
Yearly
Per Capita.
Salaries     $119,876.18 $554.98
Office supplies   2,228.64 10.32
Travelling and transportation   2,569.15 11.89
Fuel, water, light, and power  '.  36,608.02 169.48
Maintenance, etc  13,865.61 64.20
Furniture and fixtures   7,544.09 34.93
Provisions     96,977.65 448.97
Medical and surgical supplies   11,624.60 53.82
Incidentals and unforeseen   3,380.88 15.65
$294,674.82        $1,364.24
Less donations      $2,005.00
Less revenue  (maintenance)       60,256.53
        62,261.53 288.25
Net cost of operating for year      $232,413.29       $1,075.99
Depreciation, buildings, etc        28,195,48 130.53
$260,608.77        $1,206.52
Remarks.
Number of days' treatment given during year 1927-28  77,770
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1928         219
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1927       216
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  .-  $1,364.24
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  3.72
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year     1,075.99
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   2.94
 Y 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
•                                           Year.
Average Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921-22	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
216.00
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
308,194.82
294,674.82
$1,429.85
1922-23	
1,460.55
1923-24	
1924-25	
1,506.46
1,357.75
1925-26	
1,312.44
1926-27	
1,382.04
1927-28	
1,364.24
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
'So
6-0+j
c
<V
rP    O.
u
09
P
ri
•Cq,
Tfl
OK
EHH
^■Z-r
€.>
3 t3
fefa
11=
3rf0
p*«3t»
§2
flp
th
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
]924-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
$16.96
12.49
119.81
116.77
103.53
105.21
$439.59
$9.01
482.22
8.09
479.85
7.46
467.52
6.01
479.75
8.97
501.57
9.51
554.98
10.32
$20.56
11.32
9.42
11.93
8.09
14.81
11.89
_L
_L
$225.14
232.81
243.48
211.11
189.92
173.22
169.48
I
$138.43
133.03
85.77
70.55
68.62
65.85
64.20
$57.79
66.80
13.70
25.78
6.62
33.96
34.93
$421.96
472.17
441.26
288.86
392.98
426.23
448.96
$28.37
13.07
39.95
26.17
34.68
39.32
53.82
J_
J72.06
28.46
65.76
33.05
19.31
12.36
15.65
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1,506.46
1,357.75
1,312.44
1,382.04
1,364.24
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28.
Y 21
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 Y 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table E.—Showing Number of Day
s' Treatment given each Mon
PH.
Year.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
for Year.
1921-22	
6,102
5,566
6,548
6,701
6,982
6,787
6,595
6,059
5,343
6,329
6,575
6,982
6,'936
6,601
5,439
4,961
5,740
5,965
6.638
6,582
5,987
5,359
4,523
5,567
5,815
6,543
6,549
5,850
5,680
5,022
5,981
6,312
6,182
6,587
5,928
5.160    5.547
5,641
6,513
6,527
7,133
6,714
6,896
6,852
6,078
6,662
6,543
7,243
7,002
6,947
6,827
6,405
7,061
6,600
7,382
7,269
7,027
6,695
5,809
6,554
6,703
6,686
6,592
6,458
6,343
6,086
7,093
7,304
7,383
7,319
7,003
6,893
69,365
1922-23	
5,334
5,786
6,457
6,581
6,619
6,374
6,346
6,191
7,101
6,951
7,033
6,825
70,978
1923-24	
75,819
1924-25	
80,753
1925-26	
81,775
1926-27	
81,422
1927-28
77,770
Table F.—Showing Laundry-work Done.
Number of Pieces done from April 1st, 1921.
Number of Pieces done during Year ended March 31st, 1928.
Year.
Flat-work.
Personal.
Total.
1921-22	
159,393
181,399
196,011
212,508
230,653
256,067
291,859
123,875
140,447
147,060
146,694
145,438
133,862
141,522
283,268
1922-23            	
321,846
1923-24	
1924-25	
343,071
359.202
1925-26	
376,091
1926-27	
389,929
1927-28              	
433,381
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
January, 1928..
February	
March	
Totals	
Average number of pieces per month..
23,499
23,098
23,989
21,558
23,860
23,441
23,999
25,578
25,707
24,918
24,792
27,420
11,000
12,991
11,897
10,104
11,977
10,633
12,637
12,027
10,805
13,519
11,884
12,048
291,859
24,322
141,522
11,793
34,499
36,089
35,886
31,662
35,837
34,074
36,636
37,605
36,512
38,437
36,676
39,468
433,381
36,115
FARM  SUPERINTENDENT'S  REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the operations of the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1928.
The crops grown this year were average ones. On an irrigated farm, particularly where
there is an abundant water-supply, it would be difficult to anticipate a poor crop; this is
particularly true of this ranch, where every year a good crop is obtained, and where some years
an exceptional one is secured. In looking over past years' reports the yield does not vary greatly.
This year we were about 75 tons below the previous year's hay-crop; this was due to an exceptionally dry, hot spell during the time the second crop was maturing.
The dairy herd has had a very good year; there has been an excellent natural increase.
The milk yield has also exceeded last year's by over 33,000 lb., with a total of 649,429.3 lb. A
little difficulty was experienced with the general health of the herd during the early part of the
year, chiefly breeding-troubles, which necessitated the attendance of a specialist in this particular
line. I am pleased to report that during the latter half of the year this difficulty was fully
corrected, and the general health of the herd is excellent at the present time.   The practice of
 :2M2M2mr::2^22wmr¥m24:
view of farm buildings.
" CARNATION   ROMEO  DEKOL,"   BORN   MAY  4T1I,   1927.
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 23
testing the herd for tuberculosis every six months has been rigidly observed, and although over
100 animals are thus tested, no reactors have been found for a great many years. The milk-
supply has been sufficient for the use of the Sanatorium at all times. Among our high-producing
cows might be mentioned " Alexandra Verona May." This cow was born and bred on the ranch,
and finished her last lactation period with 24,383.4 lb. milk and 914.4 lb. butter, and during the
last five lactation periods has produced R.O.P. records which totalled 97,090.4 lb. milk and
3,751.85 lb. butter.
I am sorry to report that the housing facilities are entirely too limited at the present time,
and new buildings must be erected during the coming year for the better housing of our growing
herd. A building is in course of erection on the Sanatorium grounds which will accommodate
100 patients, and when this is completed it will mean an increase to the institution of over 40
per cent. This will also mean that the ranch will be expected to increase its production by that
extent on all lines in order to supply the needs of the institution. We have the stock on the
ranch with which I confidently expect to do this, but we are woefully short of housing accommodation for the dairy cattle. It will be necessary to build a barn to house the surplus females
and also a building for the bulls.
Referring to my report of last year, I emphasized strongly the necessity of purchasing a
suitable sire for our herd, which would have both type and production. I am pleased to report
that this has been done and an excellent young bull has been secured. This animal, " Carnation
Romeo Dekol," was sired by " Sir Romeo Mildred Colantha," and his dam was " Tillamook Lola
May Dekol " ; both of these animals having been All American (Champions) for two successive
years.
The beef cattle are improving in quality and increasing in numbers from year to year. The
use of a good type of beef bull for this herd is showing good results, and the calf-crop this year
was a decided improvement in quality over the past. An exceptionally long winter last year
greatly increased the cost of wintering these animals, as it was necessary to keep them in the
feed-lot almost twice as long as other years. The choicest animals are selected from the herd
each year and stall-fed on balanced grain rations for several months before slaughtering for the
use of the Sanatorium.
In past years the swine have always proven to be one of the most profitable lines on the
ranch ; this year, however, disease broke out in the herd among the young stock, which greatly
lessened their number. The best of veterinary skill was obtained, but with no avail. I came
to the conclusion that to remedy this condition it was necessary to dispose of the herd and purchase new stock; this I did with gratifying results, and at the time of writing I am pleased to
report that the present farm herd is in the best of health and breeding condition. The loss in
hogs, together with the cost of the long winter-feeding period, are almost wholly responsible for
the year's deficit shown on the Balance-sheet.
In past years we have always had the greatest difficulty in segregating the different -kinds of
stock, due to the shortage of corrals. During the year we have constructed several large corrals,
which have done good service and have filled a long-felt want.
The scenic effects of the approach to the Sanatorium has always been marred by the
immense amount of driftwood which had accumulated along the beach in past years. This
driftwood has all been collected into piles and burned, greatly improving the general appearance.
An experiment was carried out in the growing of tobacco and broom-corn. The tobacco-
plant made rapid and luxuriant growth, and appeared to be well adapted to the soil and climatic
conditions of this vicinity. However, like most other growers in British Columbia, we experienced the greatest difficulty in disposing of it at satisfactory prices. Broom-corn has been
grown upon the ranch for several years, and we have proven conclusively that this commodity
can be grown very successfully in the interior of British Columbia. Both warehouse and house
brooms were manufactured each year and proved to be equal in quality to those made from the
American brush.
We have been in need of two cottages for the use of two married employees of the ranch.
When it was found that there was no money available for the building of these, we decided to
supply one of them with quarters by renovating a portion of the old boarding-house. This was
done at an actual cash outlay of less than $150; although it was necessary to supply considerable
labour from the ranch in order to accomplish this end. I am pleased to state these new
quarters are very comfortable and commodious and have saved the ranch in capital expenditure
a sum of not less than $3,500.
 Each year one or more new buildings are added to the Sanatorium. This all entails a
further demand on the best farming land of the ranch for new sites and grounds. Approximately 7 acres were taken from the farm this year for that purpose.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the valuable co-operation afforded me in my work
and to the Department for all assistance given during the past year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
D. W.  Strachan,
Farm Superintendent.
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1928.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet with the Profit and  Loss
Accounts for the Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1928.
During the year the farm has encountered adverse and profit-eating conditions which were
unavoidable—namely, a long, hard winter and disease amongst our hogs. Everything possible
was done to eliminate the hog-trouble, without success, and the final result was the disposal of
the herd and a fresh start.
Owing to the long winter the range cattle had to be kept on the feed-lot about twice as long
as usual, thereby entailing the purchase of extra feed. With the exception of the above-noted
departments, the farm has shown successful operation.
Milk, beef, pork, etc., have been supplied to the Sanatorium in quantities sufficient for their
needs and the quality has been of the usual high standard.
During the year the Sanatorium has grown large quantities of vegetables, but it has been
necessary for us to augment their supply as enumerated in the tables following.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet,  March 31st,  1928.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements        $99,936.37
Equipment  3,989.08
Land Account        70,405.88
Automobile Account   425.00
Accounts receivable  4,347.68
Dam Account   421.00
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)   1,000.00
Inventories (live stock) —
Dairy herd   $18,485.00
Bulls        1,100.00
Range stock      20,735.00
Swine       2,561.00
Horses         7,480.00
Unissued stores       6,476.69
Machinery and plant        3,863.50
Tools          1,078.26
Harness   555.00
        62,334.45
Canadian Bank of Commerce (Trading Account)   699.33
Deficit     9,629.12
$253,188.63
 STELLA   KORNDYKE   BUTTER   GIRL       WITH   HER   TWINS.
4
' *■*
TOBACCO-GROWING.
  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 25
Balance-sheet—Continued.
Liabilities.
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)   $1,000.00
D. W. Strachan (Stock Trading Account)   1,500.00
Capital   250,688.63
$253,188.63
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Salary, Superintendent   $2,400.00
Salaries, employees   11,722.66
Fuel, light, and water  1,491.34
Feed Account   14,820.90
Provisions   3,781.59
Blacksmith's supplies   491.92
Seeds and fruit-boxes   184.05
Drugs and veterinary  864.67
Implements and harness   931.20
Incidentals and contingencies   2,137.51
Maintenance of buildings   1,629.75
      $40,455.59
Profit on—
Live stock   $8,951.74
Hide-sales   317.87
Farm produce  26,333.02
Milk-sales    54.34
Teaming  16.00
Beef and pork sales   404.30
Board Account :  22.00
Horse-hire   62.00
        36,161.27
Loss on Operating Account         $4,294.32
Depreciation on automobile         $75.00
Depreciation on farm buildings      5,259.80
  5,334.80
Deficit for year         $9,629.12
Dairy Herd—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Receipts.
Milk supplied to Sanatorium, 596,270 lb  $22,015.20
Milk for calves, 25,730 lb  900.55
Milk-sales, 1,359 lb  54.34
Milk supplied to boarding-house, 26,070 lb       1,042.00
Beef sold, 900 lb         144.00
Manure produced, 427 tons          640.00
Inventory, live stock, 1927-28     19,585.00
Inventory, feed, 1927-28      2,440.92
Stock  sold           170.35
      $46,992.36
Carried forward      $46,992.36
 Y 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dairy Herd—Profit and Loss Account—Continued.
Brought forward        $46,992.36
Expenditure.
Milk for calves   $900.55
Inventory, live stock, 1926-27   17,080.00
Inventory, feed, 1926-27   1,887.38
Wages  4,301.00
Board of employees   1,800.00
Equipment  71.95
Sundries     76.15
Electricity  369.45
Hay (alfalfa), 330,000 lb  3,300.00
Mangels, 70,000 lb  175.00
Beet-pulp   65.00
Flax-seed   4.25
Green feed, 674,000 lb  1,685.00
Silage, 540,000 lb  1,350.00
Oats   :  5,685.79
Barley ■.  764.25
Oilcake     945.00
Bedding   358.00
Bran    .,  382.50
Laundry     147.51
Veterinary and drugs   679.76
Potatoes  196.70
Salt     52.50
Horse-labour     511.00
 42,788.74
Profit, 1927-28  '.        $4,203.62
Dairy Herd—Production and Cost Account, March 31st, 1928.
Salaries      $4,301.00
Board of employees        1,800.00
Feed      13,255.99
Sundry expenses          295.61
Silage       1,350.00
Bedding  358.00
Veterinary and drugs          679.76
Horse-labour            511.00
Inventory, feed, 1926-27        1,887.38
 $24,438.74
Less allowance for manure   640.00
$23,798.74
Less cost of feed and care of young growing non-producing dairy
stock  .'..     4,687.74
      $19,111.00
Less inventory, feed, 1927-28   2,440.92
$16,670.08
Milk production for year, 649,429.3 lb., or 64,942.93 gallons.    Average cost of production,
I cents per gallon.
24.12 cents per gallon
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 27
Milk Production, March 31st, 1928.
1927. Milk. Lb. 1927.                                                                    Milk, Lb.
April   53,885.3          December     49,028.7
May    .•  52,960.8 1928.
June  52,958.8         January   59,076.2
July     54,890.1         February  55,191.3
August   60,655.3         March  61,228.2
September  3  53,800.3                                                                           	
October   :  53,010.1 649,429.3
November    42,744.2 .    .
List of Record of Performances produced by the Tranquille Sanatorium Farm Herd
for the Year 1927-28.
Milk Production. Butter.
Name. Lb. Lb.
Alexandra Verona May   22,014 811.25
Excellency Hengerveld Echo   21,631 807.05
Alexandra Birdie May   19,753 837.05
Mercena Molley Hengerveld   19,702 745.00
Alexandra Tranquille Korndyke   18,691 886.25
Mina Posch Pontiac   18,221 781.25
Fairy Sylvia Echo   17,505 542.05
Lady DeKol Clinker   17,212 751.25
Uneeda Peach DeKol  16,901 662.05
Stella Korndyke Butter Girl  16,803 700.00
Julianna Korndyke DeKol   16,059 735.00
Inka Darkness Hengerveld   16,050 710.00
Alexandra Queen Hengerveld   15,037 741.25
Johanna Butter Girl Pontiac  14,758 625.00
Hengerveld Pontiac Countess   14,516 606.25
Alexandra Dorothy Kelly Pontiac  14,270 653.75
Balcomo Ormsby Rose   13,100 542.05
Swine—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Receipts.
Pork sold to Sanatorium, 6,458 lb  $1,048.23
Pork supplied to boarding-house, 1,893 lb  350.00
Pigs sold   4,420.93
Boars sold    92.00
Inventory, feed, 1927-28  228.90
Inventory, live stock, 1927-28   2,561.00
        $8,701.26
Expenditure.
Horse-labour  $105.00
Inventory, 1927  4,852.00
Board of employees  360.00
Salaries   612.33
Stock purchased   756.95
Expenses   247.19
Electricity     44.79
Feed for stock   1,114.83
Hay for bedding, 20,000 lb  70.00
8,163.09
Profit, 1927-28   $538.17
 Y 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Horses—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1927-28      $7,480.00
Teaming    3  71.90
Horses sold          951.00
Manure, 158 tons          237.00
Inventory, oats   151.83
Horse-labour—
Garden       $95.00
Beef        225.00
Swine      105.00
Potatoes          50.00
Silage         315.00
Hay     2,373.00
       3,163.00
       $12,054.73
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1926-27  $6,980.00
Wages     542.51
Electricity     44.79
Oats     630.80
Horse-shoes, etc  110.00
Hay, 326,000 lb  3,260.00
Board of employees  :  360.00
        11,928.10
Profit, 1927-28  .'.  $126.63
Range Cattle—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Receipts.
Beef sold to Sanatorium, 21,405 lb  $3,424.80
Veal sold to Sanatorium, 262 lb  40.50
Liver sold to Sanatorium  9.82
Stock sold  :  1,020.51
Hides sold   317.87
Manure allowance, 200 tons  300.00
Inventory, March, 1928   20,735.00
Inventory, feed   421.50
Beef supplied boarding-house, 9,249 lb  1,387.35
      $27,657.35
Expenditure.
Horse-labour     $225.00
Inventory, 1927   16,915.00
Bull purchased   505.00
Salt, 5,000 lb .".  55.00
Sundry expenses   52.11
Leased ranges   335.26
Silage, 288,000 lb  720.00
Wages  580.91
Hay (alfalfa), 332,000 lb '.  3,320.00
Hay (swamp), 304,000 lb  1,064.00
Mill-feeds, 95,600 lb.  1,263.62
Board of employees   350.00
        25,385.90
Profit, 1927-28         $2,271.45
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 29
Poultry Department—Profit and Loss Account,  March 31st,  1928.
Expenditure.
Inventory, March, 1927   $368.50
Wages    :  197.79
Board of employees   90.00
Feed   217.70
Receipts.
Poultry sold   $234.62
Poultry sold to Sanatorium   177.24
Eggs supplied to boarding-house  76.25
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Receipts.
Vegetables sold to Sanatorium—
Parsnips, 700 lb.; green onions, 52% doz.; radishes, 74 doz.;
turnips, 260 lb.; Swiss chard, 505 lb.; lettuce, 11 doz.; beets,
3,185 lb.; peas, 540 lb.; string beans, 300 lb.; vegetable marrow,
3,347 lb.;  carrots,  4,246  lb.:  squash,  750  lb.;   corn,  50  doz.;
pumpkin, 1,505 lb.;  cabbage, 480 lb.;  spinach, 1,045 lb        $387.09
Vegetables supplied to boarding-house   193.75
Inventory, seeds   9.04
Expenditure.
Horse-labour     $95.00
Seeds and vegetables  31.26
Tomato-plants    2.80
Wages     390.11
$873.99
488.11
Loss, 1927-28   $385.88
519.17
Profit, 1927-28   $70.71
Crop Department   (Potatoes)—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st,  1928.
Receipts.
Potatoes sold to Sanatorium, 15,000 lb  $150.00
Potatoes supplied to boarding-house, 14,000 lb  140.00
Inventory, 1927-28   30.00
 • $320.00
Expenditure.
Horse-labour    ;         $50.00
Inventory, 1926-27   100.00
Seed    15.00
Wages           136.63
 ■ 301.63
Profit, 1927-28  $18.37
 Y 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Ensilage—Profit and Loss Account,  March 31st,  1928.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1927-28   $250.00
Inventory, seed-oats  60.00
Supplied to cattle  2,070.00
Expenditure.
Horse-labour    $315.00
Inventory,  1926-27   750.00
Seed purchased   100.80
Wages  650.00
Board of employees   390.00
$2,380.00
2,206.57
Profit, 1927-28  $173.43
Hay Department—Profit and Loss Account,  March 31st,  1928.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1927-28, 274,000 lb  $2,740.00
Inventory, seed   216.57
Hay (alfalfa), beef, 332,000 lb  3,320.00
Hay (alfalfa), dairy, 330,000 lb  3,330.00
Hay (alfalfa), horses, 326,000 lb  3,260.00
Hay (swamp), beef, 304,000 lb  1,064.00
Hay (swamp), bedding, 20,000 lb  70.00
Hay (swamp), bedding, 24,000 lb :  84.00
       $14,084.57
Expenditure.
Manure    $1,177.00
Horse-labour  2,373.00
Inventory,  hay  4,500.00
Repairs, mower parts, etc  278.09
Salt for curing hay  ■.  52.50
Wages, seeding, cutting, stacking, etc     2,091.11
Board, labourers   529.34
Board,  irrigators    450.00           .
Seed      216.57
        11,667.61
Profit, 1927-28  ...        $2,416.96
Grounds—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st,  1928.
To Expenses—
Wages v  $650.16
Board of employees   360.00
Horse-labour    '. -  147.00
Plants  23.90
Mowers, hose, etc  93.88
Seeds    8.10
$1,283.04
 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1927-28. Y 31
Fuel, Light, and Water—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927  -  $456.00
Wages     54.39
Water fees   25.48
Coal   ;  535.96
$1,071.83
Less inventory, 1927-28  , .-.  232.00
Loss  $839.83
Fencing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
To Material   $201.74
Wages  214.55
Board, employees  135.00
Loss, 1927-28   $551.29
Machinery, Harness, and Tools—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1926-27—
Harness  $845.00
Machinery and plant  3,500.50
Tools  812.47
New equipment   912.13
    .   $5,870.10
Receipts.
Inventory, 1927-28—
Harness   $555.00
Machinery and plant   3,733.00
Tools  1,078.26
  5,366.76
Loss,  1927-28   $503.34
Automobile and Motor Machinery—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Gas and oil  $398.62
Repairs to motors, etc  913.95
Inventory, 1926-27   500.00
$1,812.57
Inventory, 1927-28  ,  425.00
Loss, 1927-28         $1,387.57
Blacksmithing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1928.
Expenditure.
Wages    $314.14
Supplies   491.92
Electricity  44.79
Loss, 1927-28  $850.85
 VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.
525-129-4154

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