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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-SECOND REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING SEVENTEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1929]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-SECOND REPORT
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
SEVENTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1928.
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Baxfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.
  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1928.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May' it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the year ended June 30th, 1928.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1928.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1928.
Following my recommendation as to the division of our Annual Report, permitting of a more
extended and enlarged Vital Statistics Report, we have followed out this suggestion and our
reports will be issued now in two volumes; one being the Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health, and second, the Report of the Vital Statistics Branch of the Provincial Board of
Health.
The Vital Statistics Report issued this year is for the year ended December, 1927. In our
arrangement with the Census Department at Ottawa we are perforce obliged to delay the issuing
of the report until the full data are extended for us by the Federal Census Department. The
report which is just off the press is very full, and for the future this order of procedure will
be continued.
The Report of the Provincial Board of Health, which includes the report of the Medical
School Inspectors' examination of the school-children, will continue to report for the school-year;
that is, from July 1st to June 30th of the following year.
During the past year the Chief Health Officer of Ontario has compiled a review of the health-
work of the Dominion of Canada, and the contribution from the Province of British Columbia
was an outline of the work as carried on at present. I cannot do better than publish the excerpt
from the above-mentioned report as relating to British Columbia:—
" In health activities we are following out very much the same outline as the other Provinces.
" We are ahead, we think, in the establishment of full-time Public Health Nurses; on a par
with Quebec in the establishment of full-time Medical Health Officers: and our statistics, which
have been carefully compiled from the records of the various institutions, convince us of the
splendid results which we hope to obtain from our venereal work, and which these statistics
show we are realizing.
" Our tuberculosis-work is going on apace. We are adding a 100-bed unit to our present
Sanatorium. We have a full-time T.B. Officer who works in conjunction with our Public Health
Nurses and the medical profession. We have provided him with a nurse to accompany him in
his visits throughout the Province. We are also providing him with a portable X-ray machine.
The medical profession have co-operated in a splendid manner in this work. His efforts have
been devoted to encouragement of early diagnosis, and our present corps of Public Health Nurses
are instructed to be on the outlook and report immediately any suspicious cases.
" In regard to our contemplated developments, we are concentrating for the present year on
the full-time Medical Health Officers. We have four in the Province, outside of our two large
cities, which are used as demonstrators of the idea, and our correspondence would indicate that
other municipalities have been watching this closely. AVe feel confident that, within the next
six months, we will be able to add two more to our list.
" We are establishing them on the basis of a full-time Medical Health Officer, a Sanitary
Officer, and a staff of from two to four nurses. In addition to the usual Medical Health Officer
work, he is also appointed as Medical Inspector of the school-children; he undertakes and
manages well-baby clinics and pre-school clinics. He cultivates the local voluntary organizations
and is always at their service for meetings. In fact, he lays out a programme which enables
him to speak regularly once a month and is open for engagements at any other time.
" We have, in addition to our part-time Medical Health Officers, a staff of Medical School
Inspectors who inspect each pupil in the Province once a year, reporting to the parents any
defects discovered. The follow-up work is carried on by our Public Health Nurses, and particularly by our School Nurses. In our larger centres we have a branch of our Nursing Service,
who devote themselves entirely to the school-work. These all do follow-up work and co-operate
with voluntary organizations in carrying on well-baby clinics.
 W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" We have provided in our Normal Schools a health department as part of the curriculum,
and a teacher of health, graduate of the University (one in each Normal School), carries out
the programme. In addition, in the Summer School Course, extensive health-teaching is given
to the teachers and they are avidly availing themselves of the opportunities, our classes having
increased to such an extent that we have divided the course, and next year will give the course
in two years, a junior and senior.
" Our water and sewage problems are the least we have to deal with, as the majority of our
population are living on tidal waters and the disposal of sewage is amply taken care of.
Practically all of our towns procure their water from the mountains, and there is not a chlorinating plant in the Province, nor has there, as yet, been shown any necessity for such.
" The Women's Institutes, of which there are 119 in the Province, are all actively engaged
in health-work. In fact, that is their major work and they take great interest in the schools.
They have been a great help to us in the educational work amongst the people. This branch of
our work we consider the most important and we do not allow any opportunity to pass of holding
meetings and distributing literature. We average a distribution of 30,000 pamphlets a month
and this is growing each month.    Our printing bill is one of our highest items of expenditure.
" As regards contemplated developments, we have added an Epidemiologist to our staff, and
also a supervisory committee in regard to hospitals, which will be attached to this Department,
the Provincial Health Officer being the chairman of the committee.
" Parliament, at the last session, authorized the establishment of a psychiatric clinic and
the erection of an institution to which will be committed all cases for observation.
" In regard to the resources available for meeting disasters, under our Government we have
Government Agents in every district. These men have been instructed as to what to do in the
event of any disaster occurring and have on hand in the majority of cases supplies for immediate
use. Nurses are available to be forwarded at once to any point in the Province. Arrangements
have been made with the transportation companies to give us right of way.
" We are receiving assistance for our full-time health units from the Rockefeller Foundation,
but I have laid before my Government a suggestion for the adoption of such arrangement as you
have outlined, that the Dominion Government, Provincial Government, and local municipality
should bear the cost."
The greatest advance which we have made is to be noted in the establishment of full-time
health units. We have now, in British Columbia, four, and for one of these we are indebted
to the Rockefeller Foundation for financial assistance. I would refer you to the report of the
Medical Health Officer published in the school division in this Report, as it is evidence of what
has been accomplished at Saanich. The school report from Kelowna gives an itemized account
of the public-health work as carried on by the Public Health Nurse under the Medical Health
Officer, and is most comprehensive.
The work preceding the establishment of these units was wearisome, to say the least of it, but
by concentrating on some points of the districts, where we were endeavouring to establish the
unit, produced its results, and during the past year what has been accomplished has verified
all our predictions and has satisfied the local authorities that they have made a really worthwhile investment.
The Municipal Councils appreciate the great falling-off in the costs of the health-work as
carried on previously, and the satisfaction of the parents in regard to the examination and
management of the school-children, while they cannot be evaluated in dollars and cents, is a
sure indication that these units are upon a permanent basis.
I would suggest that any one reading our Report would turn to the pages where we deal
with the school-work, and the account of the results obtained, and particularly the outline of
the work as being carried on, will be illuminating.
The establishment of a full-time Medical Health Officer results in his being surrounded by a
useful organization, and the influence of a competent man on the job, just as in any other
business, is rapidly reflected in better water-supplies, increased sewerage facilities, better
protection of milk and food, with resulting lower mortality rates.
There is also a great co-operation from the medical profession. Where part-time men are
employed as Medical Health Officers the disadvantages are very apparent. As a rule, the part-
time Medical Health Officer has no training in public health, except what he gains by experience;
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 7
often, he loses practice in cases of communicable disease; people find that they are " shut in "
by the Medical Health Officer, but may escape if the case is seen by another doctor. Physicians
are singularly reluctant to report cases of communicable diseases to one who is in competition
with them in practice. All these factors—the poor pay, want of co-operation, lack of educated
public opinion, and, above all, lack of funds—contribute to render a part-time health service of
little value to the community.
We have made a good beginning in British Columbia in the establishment of these and are
carrying on the educational work.
The establishment of the full-time units is the outgrowth of the educational work, following
the establishment of the Public Health Nurses. We have now twenty-live Public Health Nurses
in the Province, in addition to the twenty-five School Nurses in the cities. The work that these
nurses are doing is shown in the school report in this volume, particularly as furnished by the
nurse at Kelowna.
In regard to infectious diseases, we have had a falling-off in the number reported, with the
exception of chicken-pox and diphtheria; but in regard to the diphtheria the immunization-work
which we are doing is producing results, and as this continues we look for a much better rate
in regard to the diphtheria.
In the fall of 1927 there developed a number of cases of poliomyelitis, confined to the middle
Interior of the Province principally, with a few sporadic cases spread over the remainder of
the Province. There were reported in all 198 cases, but a number of these were reported in
carrying out the regulations to treat suspected cases as true cases. There was a very small
percentage of paralytic cases.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this Report, and
the regional report of diseases is as follows:—
Chicken-pox.—Enderby District and Kamioops.
Rubella (German Measles).—Cumberland and District, Port Alberni, and Port Simpson.
Whooping-cough.—Kamioops, Prince George, Smithers and District, Telkwa, and Terrace and
District.
The laboratories are demonstrating their usefulness, particularly in respect to the co-operation of the medical profession. In the Interior of the Province, at Kelowna, we have a
laboratory. The municipalities in the district have contributed towards the upkeep of this
laboratory, and they all express themselves as being eminently satisfied with the work. They
are satisfied that the control of infectious disease is much more effective with the help of the
laboratory service, and realize that a yearly contribution is a real economy.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on request,
and for the year ended June 30th, 1928, the following have been furnished : 5,283 points smallpox
vaccine, 3,857,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 271 packages diphtheria toxoid, 9 packages Schick
test for diphtheria, 137 packages 2 cc. (prophylactic) scarlet fever antitoxin, 212 packages 15 cc.
(curative) scarlet fever antitoxin, 8 packages Dick test for scarlet fever, 390 doses typhoid
vaccine, 57,000 units tetanus antitoxin, and 70 packages pertussis (whooping-cough) serum.
Cemetery-sites approved.—Sayward, Resthaven Cemetery (D.L. 172, New Westminster
District), Topley, Balfour, Vancouver (extension to Burnaby Municipality), Lang Bay, and
Endako.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—South Vancouver (extension), North Vancouver City
(extensions), Prince Rupert (Hay's Creek trunk sewer), Vancouver (repairing and extensions),
West Burnaby (extension), and Trail (extensions).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Point Grey (extensions), Burnaby (extensions), South
Vancouver (extensions), Vancouver (extensions), Richmond Municipality (extensions), and
Kelowna  (extensions).
Water-supplies approved for Mineral-trading Purposes.—Harrison Hot Springs and well in
North Vancouver District (Leo-Lite Metal Polish, Limited).
Last year we were asking for increased accommodation for our Department, since which
time there has been a reorganization of the office space of the buildings and we have been
assigned new quarters. They are satisfactory in so far as the present work is concerned, but
we are face to face with the fact that the wonderful growth of our work, which is increasing by
leaps and bounds, will shortly require a further extension.
 W S BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We are appending a full report of the Medical Inspection of Schools, and I think any one
reading it will find it very interesting in the demonstration that we are able to give of the
improvements.
I would like sir, to express, for myself and staff, appreciation of the co-operation which we
receive from yourself, and I would like to take this opportunity of expressing to you my
appreciation of the splendid co-operation that I receive from the staff. The increase of our
work necessitates them working, on occasion, overtime, and a request for this is always cheerfully complied with The fact that we have been able to make such satisfactory progress is due
to the cheerful help that I am receiving. I may say that the staff and myself appreciate the
active interest of yourself in our work—an interest that is based upon the idea of understanding
the policies and the details of the Department and lending to our success your help and
encouragement.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, M.D.,
Provincial Health Officer.
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-2S.
W 9
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1927, TO JUNE, 1928.
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Oliver and District 	
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Carried forward	
1,296
396
228
341
 W 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1927, TO JUNE, 1928—Continued.    '
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6
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Totals	
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"   •.'•,.;-•;'■•    ';' ■'    • -.v---- :    3 .•.••;*■ ■ ■ •/ '-r::-j--  ... , .^ ■   .    .
■     *-.
HOUSES AND RECREATION-GROUNDS FOE MARRIED EMPLOYEES AT A B.C. LOGGING CAMP.
WATER-SUPPLY  FOR   PROSPEROUS   B.C.   UNORGANIZED
" COMPANY  TOWNS."
  BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 11
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITAKY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 192S.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Eighteenth Annual Report for the Sanitary Division
of your Department. •
Our increasing population, both permanent and transient, entails a corresponding increase
in work for this Department.
Industrial activity is spreading rapidly throughout the Province. This applies especially
to mining.
Industrial life in British Columbia was never in such a flourishing state and prospects
never so bright. The fact that there exists no industrial strife or labour trouble is explained
in a great measure by the persistent propaganda by this Department for improved living
conditions in all camps. It is gratifying to acknowledge the co-operation given by employers and
labour organizations.
The average logging or mining camp of fifteen or twenty years ago consisted of a few shacks
where men and horses were herded, with little consideration for comfort and convenience. The
horses were well fed and the men existed principally on flapjacks and pork and beans. To-day
all camps are equipped with weather-proof bunk-houses, sanitary bedding, shower-baths, laundry
facilities, and well-kept toilets. Many of the larger camps are provided with recreation halls
and grounds, reading-rooms, and scarcely a camp in British Columbia is without the blessing
of radio.
This evolution in living conditions for the worker in the great outdoors of British Columbia
has brought with it a very marked change in the type of men seeking employment. It is a
common event to meet in these camps men of travel and education; men tired of the stress of
city life and its congestion, who take to the hills for physical, mental, and financial improvement.
Many of our best university students spend their entire vacations employed in logging and
mining camps. These potential leaders or statesmen get in this way a real close-up knowledge
of nature in all its phases.
There has been no infectious outbreak in any of our camp communities during the past year.
The salmon-canneries of British Columbia have enjoyed an average season. Every cannery
has been periodically inspected, and eannerymen welcome your Inspector because all British
Columbia canners take a pride in having modern and sanitary equipment, with the result that
British Columbia canned salmon commands highest prices in the world's markets to-day.
Solderless sanitary cans, mechanical slicers, gutters, fillers, and weighing-machines are used;
in fact, the fish is scarcely touched by human hands from the time they are taken from the sea
until canned and tested. Visitors or tourists are welcomed at our canneries, and always express
pleasure with the sight of seeing such tempting food canned under such sanitary conditions.
The fruit-canners have enjoyed a bumper season, which was anticipated and met with
increased and modern facilities for quick handling, with the result that the growers and canners
have a ready market for their products.
At none of our food canning or preserving establishments have we had a single fault to
find with general sanitary arrangements this year.
There has been an increase in complaints re industrial nuisances, such as smoke, odours,
and water-pollution. These have all been rectified as far as humanly possible, without recourse
to the Courts.
 W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SUMMER CAMPS.
Fully 80,000 of our population adjourned to the many seaside and lake resorts during the
past summer. Of all these camps, only one case of infectious disease was reported. These
camps are all subject to frequent inspection.
During the year just passed, 280 inspection visits have been made to canneries; industrial
camps visited, 191; nuisances investigated and abated, 32; and departmental miscellaneous
matters attended to and reports filed, 19.
I have, etc., ,
Frank DeGrey',
Chief Sanitary Inspector
 BATTERY  OF  BUNK-HOUSES  FOR  SINGLE  MEN  AT   ONE  OF  B.C.'S  LOGGING  CAMPS.
BUNK-HOUSE AND DINING-HALL, MODERN EQUIPMENT, AT B.C.  MINE CAMP.
  COMBINED REPORT OP TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER
AND INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1928.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Fifth Annual Report as Travelling Medical
Health'Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
The gradual increase in the number of cases examined, year by year, as is evidenced by the
statistical report hereunder, compared with reports of previous years, denotes a continued and
intensified interest in the subject of tuberculosis, both by the medical profession and the lay
public.
In getting a correct appreciation of the extent of the work, it must be borne in mind that
my service, while it covers a large portion of the Province, does not appreciably touch Greater
Vancouver, with about half the entire population of the Province. In the latter also, being a
city of considerable proportions, there would naturally be a greater number of cases in proportion to population. This latter (Vancouver) is taken care of in a similar way by The Rotary
Clinic for Diseases of the Chest.
It may also be stated that, while there has been this increase in the number of cases
examined and also those diagnosed as tubercular, the death-rate from tuberculosis has shown a
gradual diminution both in actual number of deaths, the percentage of total deaths, and also
the number per thousand of population. This decrease in actual deaths does not apply, however,
to the year 1927, as there has been a slight increase in the total amongst the white population.
It is not a sufficient increase to have any material significance and is partly accounted for by the
increase in total population.
The striking thing about this, however, is that there has been an increase throughout the
Dominion, or at least there was such during 1926, in some Provinces very marked, while British
Columbia and Ontario were the only two that showed a decrease that year. I am not endeavouring to explain this, although it is easy to theorize about it, but will wait to see whether it is a
temporary condition or not.
In my report of last year I mentioned the beginning of a clinic in Victoria. This has been
continued this year with greatly increased interest, as indicated by the number of cases
examined (the totals are given in detail later on), being about one-fourth of the entire examinations for the Province. A regular clinic was held for one week every alternate month, but I
was frequently called in consultation on cases when visiting Victoria during the intervals of
such clinics. This goes to show, what I stated in previous reports, that the greatest interest
in the work is shown in those sections most frequently visited. The building at the Jubilee
Hospital, made possible by the David Spencer bequest and known as the Spencer Clinic, has
been completed and has been occupied for clinic purposes since the first of the calendar year.
It is quite possible that, with more time at my disposal and by enlisting the co-operation of the
Public Health Nurses, both city and district, the usefulness of this clinic may be much increased.
The arrangement with the Jubilee Hospital and the local Red Cross Society regarding X-ray
has been continued and is proving eminently satisfactory.
X-ray and other facilities at St. Joseph's Hospital have been generously placed at my
disposal.
The clinics at Nanaimo, the next largest centre to Victoria, have been continued throughout
the year, although not on as satisfactory a basis as previously, due to lack of hospital facilities,
but we hope to resume with increased vigour at an early date.
The balance of the Province has been visited from one to three times, those visited most
frequently being the larger towns in the Okanagan, Boundary, and West Kootenay Districts.
The number of cases examined here gradually increases in numbers, and many cases are
sent to Tranquille for examination in intervals.    This fact has convinced me that this district
 would be better served by more frequent clinics. Due to the amount of territory it is necessary
to cover, along with the time necessarily used in hospital-work—one that is gradually increasing
also—I find it impossible to increase services already rendered. At such time as extension at
Tranquille is completed, which will necessitate an increased medical staff, I would like some
consideration to be given to granting some assistance in clinical work from said staff.
DETAILS OF CLINICAL WORK.
Getting down to actual cases, we have the following: Total examinations made during the
year, 610, on^ total of 555 patients. Of the 555 patients examined, 377 were new cases and 178
were re-examinations. Out of the total patients examined. 231 have been classified as positively
suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis, 22 of tuberculosis of other organs, 85 as suspects, 22 as
contacts showing no infection, and 195 non-tubercular.
The cases re-examined represent many conditions. Some of the re-examinations were for
the purpose of diagnosis, or confirming or otherwise previous findings. Others again were
re-examined as part of the treatment to estimate progress being made and what changes in
treatment are necessary. Thus, while diagnosis is the most essential of my duties, the consultations as to best line of treatment to follow are rapidly increasing, especially in those communities most often visited. Perhaps there is no question more difficult to decide in these cases than
the amount of rest or exercise, as the case may be, to be recommended. The best way to decide
it, however, is, in a general way when in doubt, keep at rest.
Further classifying the 377 new cases, we have 131 as positively pulmonary tuberculosis,
13 non-pulmonary tuberculosis, 19 as contacts only, 42 as suspects, and 172 as non-tubercular.
Classifying the new positive cases according to sex, both pulmonary and non-pulmonary,
as well as the most likely ones of the suspects, making 153 in all, we find there are 80 males
and 73 females.
This same group, classified as to birthplace, gives us the following: Born in British
Columbia, 61; other Canadian Provinces and Newfoundland, 25; United States of America, 4;
British Isles, 51;   other nationalities, including Europeans and Asiatics, 12.
There is still a fair proportion of cases that have been in the Province only a short time,
some having come here either on account of the mildness of the climate or to the dry belt for its
expected benefit in chest conditions. This tendency, however, is very much on the decline, since
all parts of the country are being equipped with sanatorium facilities, and doctors and laymen
alike are coming to appreciate the necessity of rest rather than climate.
This year the number of cases classified as suspects seems a bit large compared with the
total. This is partly due to the inclusion in this class of practically all cases of pleurisy with
effusion that have either not cleared sufficiently to be sure of condition of lung involved, and
also those cases that have cleared up in which no lesion in parenchyma of lung is made out.
I am not, however, disregarding the generally accepted dictum that these cases are 100 per cent,
tubercular. In addition to these, there is the usual classification of undernourished children,
especially when these have been known to be exposed to infection but still show nothing definite
on physical examination. Many of these suspects will return for further and repeated examinations in the future clinics.
As mentioned elsewhere, the clinic at Victoria has, I think, justified itself.
The total cases examined at Victoria during the year were as follows: New cases 134,
57 of which were positively tubercular, 19 suspects, and 58 negative findings; re-examinations,
21 positive tuberculosis and 2 negatives. This, of course, includes cases from all the lower part
of Vancouver Island
As regards the non-tubercular cases, as usual there is a great variety of diseases, bronchial
and mediastinal mixed infection being most common. These are often clue to focal infection
and can only be cleared up satisfactorily by removal of focus. Others again are remnants of
flu, and many of these cases have to go through a period of rest and fresh-air treatment similar
to the tubercular. There were represented also malignancy, abscess, heart conditions, etc.
There were two very interesting cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, brothers, both young men
in the prime of life, and apparently in the best of health. One, that has fully recovered, showed
no demonstrable lesion in lung; the other is still under treatment. Equally interesting is the
fact that the father of these young men is reported to have had a similar condition in youth.
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 15
INDIAN SURVEY.
The survey amongst the Indians reported in detail in last year's report was completed by
a visit to reserves in the Fort St. James and Stewart Lake country, where some 175 were
examined by Drs. Vrooman and Hill. I regretted being unable to accompany them. A full
report of this two-year survey and recommendations should soon be available.
THE EDUCATIONAL PART OF THE WORK.
As in previous years, this work has not been neglected, but concentrated largely for this
year on nurses in training and nursing staffs. Practically all the training-schools in the
Province, outside of the Vancouver General Hospital and the Kamioops Hospital, have been
addressed once, and several of them a second time. We had a very good meeting in Vancouver
under the auspices of the Women's Benefit Association. This is to be followed next year by
further addresses to branches of this organization. I also gave a talk to high-school pupils at
Vernon, and one to the Public Health Nursing class at the University of British Columbia.
While the work has been progressing and interest is increasing, especially the co-operation
of the profession, it is still a fact that a very large number of our cases are far advanced when
first examined. Unfortunately, this is not confined to any one class of the community, but is
found where least expected. As in other places, if we are to get our cases early, we have got
to go out looking for them, for these advanced cases have mostly been late in consulting their
physician rather than being due to errors in diagnosis. In fulfilment of that belief, the Tran-
quillian Publishing Society, through funds made available by Christmas-seal sale, is offering
to supply the services of a Public Health Nurse, travelling and working in conjunction and
co-operation with me. They are further offering to supply a portable X-ray outfit to be used
in connection with the work.
The purpose of the nurse will be to get in touch with contacts and suspects from any other
source and induce them to come to the clinic for examination. It is hoped that she will also
be able to follow up cases in their homes and instruct the families in care of the case and
prevention of the spread of the infection.
The portable X-ray should be of great assistance in clearing up the diagnosis in suspected
cases, especially in children in whom diagnosis is very difficult.
This service we also hope to carry on in conjunction and co-operation with the medical
profession, as in the past.
Last year, while fluoroscoping the nurses in training in one of the Interior hospitals, I was
able to make a fairly early diagnosis in one case which at the time was not even suspected of
being tubercular, with the result that patient was enabled to undergo early treatment that
might otherwise have gone on to more or less advanced disease before beirtg diagnosed. This
result was an incentive to repeat the same thing in the case of two hospitals this year, but
fortunately without any disease being found. This is very significant, however, and is suggestive
of what should be done in all training-schools throughout the Province.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
As Hospital Inspector, I have inspected fifty-seven public hospitals and forty-five inspections of private ones, some requiring more than one visit. I attended three staff meetings of
the Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, also one at St. Joseph's in the same city. I attended eleven
meetings of full hospital boards and twenty-one meetings of committees from hospital boards,
at which a great variety of subjects were discussed. I also met with committees from City
Councils of Trail, Kelowna, and Fernie, at which the question of isolation hospitals was
discussed.
Many additions to hospitals have been undertaken during the year, as well as completion
of additions previously begun. Nanaimo Hospital is now nearing completion, and a new
modern sixty-bed hospital is to be constructed in North Vancouver. Salmon Arm is also
occupying a new hospital. Extensive additions are either completed, as at Kimberley, and
Lourdes Hospital, Campbell River, or are in course of construction, as at St. Joseph's, Victoria,
and Kelowna and Vancouver General Hospitals.
Since the recognition by the Department of nurses' homes as an integral part of hospitals
and thus entitled to Government aid, great improvement has been made in accommodation for
 W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
nurses in training. In the last year new and commodious homes have been opened at Trail,
Nelson, Cranbrook, Prince George, and Kamioops, the latter releasing one wing of hospital
formerly occupied by nurses for hospital purposes and thus providing hospital extension.
Amongst private hospital extensions of importance, one at Bridge River by the British
Columbia Electric Company is already being operated. One at Port Alice and another at
Premier are in course of construction, both of the latter being very much needed.
My work also included many interviews with chairman or other members of the Workmen's
Compensation Board; meeting with the Red Cross Society of Victoria re payment of films for
T.B. clinic; meetings of the Vancouver Medical Association and the annual meeting of the
B.C. Medical Association, at which health insurance and hospital matters were being discussed.
Also, I was privileged to sit in on the discussion re the 70-cent hospital-tax by the Union of
British Columbia Municipalities at Nanaimo last fall. By request of the president I took part
in the discussion. There was a good, full, and free discussion which I think should go far to
the removal of any opposition to that form of taxation that existed.
Only one meeting of the Board of Arbitration between municipalities and hospitals was
held during the year; this being held in Victoria on November 16th, 1927, when specific questions
of residence or abode of patients were considered.
Once again I would like to express to you my hearty appreciation of your cordial co-operation and helpful assistance at all times in this particular line of health-work. I would also like
to express my sincere thanks to the doctors and nurses through the Province, and lay organizations, with special reference to the Red Cross Society of Victoria, without whose co-operation
my work would be of little avail.
I feel I cannot close without special reference to the Late David Spencer bequest, by means
of which a special building has been constructed on the grounds of the Jubilee Hospital, Victoria,
for the holding of clinics and furthering of the tuberculosis cause.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Hospital Inspector.
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 17
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 192S.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Seventeenth Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
In a previous report for last year I mentioned that the work of our Department as a whole
is making very satisfactory progress, and we have been pleased to call your attention to the
advances in respect to the different departments, but I feel that, in reporting as to the work of
the medical inspection of the schools, we can show more real advance and more accomplishment,
with the result of greater interest being taken by the parents and the public in general than
in any other branch of our Department.
As mentioned in report of even date, the establishment of the full-time health units in
British Columbia is showing that a trained personnel in charge of the health-work of a district
is the most satisfactory means of attaining our object. The work is more systematized; the
different branches are brought under the management of a trained Medical Health Officer: and
the results during the past year are such as, when the short time is considered, to fully justify
all our representations of all that would accrue from the establishment of such units.
I will not review in detail the work, as the reports that I have received from three of the
full-time health units in regard to school-work are a striking commentary by way of proof of
the arguments used in an endeavour to have these units established, and I cannot do better
than publish these.
There is a general review of the school-work in the City of Vancouver by the full-time
School Health Officer, supplemented by a report from the Nurse in Charge under the School
Health Officer.
In addition, we have a report from the Saanich Medical Health Officer which is concise,
but the report that he gives as to the result of the year's .work is such as should carry weight,
especially to School Boards and Municipal Councils who are dealing chiefly with the financial
aspect of the question. The monetary saving that has been made in Saanich is remarkable,
and what is more remarkable is the work that has been done with the children. You cannot
evaluate this in dollars and cents, but the fact that immunization has been carried out will
go far to relieving the Saanich Municipality of not only a great financial burden, but will
relieve the municipality of the recurrence of epidemics which have been so marked in the past.
We have, also, the report of the nursing-work as carried on in the Okanagan District, where
a full-time health unit has been established.
A careful perusal of these reports will, we think, convince any one of the benefits that are
derived from a well-organized health service in charge of a trained personnel.
These reports follow:—
" Vancouver School Medical Department—Medical Inspection.
" I beg to submit the report of the Medical Department for the year 1928.
" During JJie first five months of this year I was at the School of Hygiene, University of
Toronto, completing my post-graduate course in public health. This was made possible by the
leave of absence granted to me by the School Board, and by the award of a fellowship by the
Rockefeller Foundation on the recommendation of the Provincial Board of Health.
" I found the course very comprehensive and of great value to me in my work here, and
was granted the diploma of public health by the University.
" During my absence the work of the Department was well carried out by the two part-time
Medical Inspectors and the nursing staff.
" The general health of the pupils continues to be very good, and, I think I may say,
compares very favourably with that of pupils entering our schools from outside points.
" This year has not been marked by any serious epidemics. The little flare-up of smallpox
at Templeton Junior High School and of diphtheria at Simon Fraser School caused us some
anxiety, and we concentrated our attention there.    The threatened epidemics have now subsided.
 W 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The opening of the Sight-saving Class at General Gordon School was the greatest forward
step of the year. This class is doing good work under Miss Morrison, who took special training
in California during the summer, as well as instruction under Mrs. Cleverley, who organized
the class.
" The results obtained by this class suggest that much more may be done to conserve the
sight of the pupils in general, by proper lighting, unglazed blackboards, good type, and proper
colouring and cleanliness of walls. The lighting of our schools, with a few exceptions, is very
poor and needs immediate attention. The effect of a mixture of artificial light and natural
light is so bad that adequate diffused artificial light should be available for exclusive use when
daylight is insufficient. The light from unprotected, low-hanging globes is often worse than
useless.
" Another important innovation this year was the physical examination, in June, of children
who were expected to enter school for the first time in the following September. A team
consisting of the Medical Officer, as School Dentist, and three School Nurses attended at one cchool
in each district of the city. The parents had been invited to bring the children here at a
certain time. They were received by the nurse of the district, who entered the personal history
of the child on a new medical card and passed him on to the nurse assisting the dentist. The
dental condition having been recorded, the child was passed on to the nurse assisting the
Medical Officer. Any defects found by the Medical Officer were recorded, and the parent
advised by the Medical Officer regarding the defects, general hygiene, and prophylaxis. The
District Nurse then discussed with the parent the ways and means of obtaining medical or
surgical treatment.
" The advantage of this early examination was in giving parents an opportunity to have
defects corrected before the child should enter school, and in bringing out nearly 100. per cent,
of the parents who had to come to bring the new children.
" In this way 600 of the beginners were examined and a large percentage of defects
corrected before the opening of school.
" Perhaps I may be permitted, in anticipation of the early amalgamation of the school
system of Greater Vancouver, to give a brief outline of the work of our Department, which has
gradually evolved during the past twenty-one years.
" Vancouver schools were among the first in Canada to adopt medical inspection of schoolchildren, the first Medical Officer, Dr. Georgina L. Urquhart, having been appointed in the year
1907. In 1910 the first nurse was appointed to assist the Medical Officer and to see that
recommendations made were carried out.
" The condition of cleanliness among school-children at this time was very low as compared
with that of to-day. Much of the improvement may be attributed to the diligent work of our
nurses. The regulations for the control of communicable diseases were crude and rather
oppressive. The aim of the Department has been to make these efficient with the least inconvenience to pupils and parents as is possible.
" It was early recognized that the curbing of epidemics, the prevention of preventable
diseases, and the remedy of remediable defects is good business.
" The per capita cost of educating a child is obtained by dividing the amount of the school
budget by the total number of pupils registered. Provision must be made for 100 per cent, of
the children on the register, not for the 75 or 80 per cent, in attendance on a given day. If a
child has to repeat a term, so much more accommodation must be provided. A reduction in the
percentage of retarded children means fewer school buildings and reduced overhead charges.
" If in a school population of 20,000 it costs $.80 per year to educate each child, making a
total of $1,600,000, and the average attendance is 75 per cent., then $400,000 is wasted yearly.
If three-fifths of the 25 per cent, are absent directly from illness, then $240,000 is the amount
annually lost in this way. Add to this the time lost by those present in body, yet not receiving
full benefit of school by reason of defective sight, defective hearing, and poor attention, due to
defective breathing and faulty habits of sleep, nutrition, and personal hygiene, and we see what
a field there is for true economy in money as well as in the time of the children.
" The total registration of pupils in Vancouver schools in 1927 was 21,735. The cost of the
Medical and Nursing Services for the year was 99 cents per pupil.
" To resume our history: As the value of the work became realized and as the number of
pupils increased, the Medical and Nursing Services have been augmented.   At present all have
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 19
a full-time Medical Officer, one head nurse, eleven field nurses, one remedial exercise instructor,
and one office assistant.
" The Medical Officer has general supervision of the Medical and Nursing Services, attends
to the medical work at the office after school-hours, when pupils and parents may apply or be
referred by the nurses for advice, and does complete physical examination of as many pupils
during school-hours as time will allow.
" The general plan aims at giving each child a complete physical examination twice during
public-school life and once during the high-school period. As a routine, the beginners and all
pupils newly arrived in the city are given a complete physical examination by the Medical
Officer and as many as possible of the pupils of Grade VIIL are examined and given lectures
in health. This last-mentioned service has had to be curtailed lately on account of our having
such a large number of pupils and only one Medical Officer.
" In the high schools all pupils taking part in school sport and all new pupils are examined
physically. Short talks upon the preserving or regaining of good physical condition are given
to groups. The Medical Officer also gives talks on sex hygiene to high-school boys in small
groups, and a senior nurse talks to the high-school girls on this subject.
" About 6,000 complete physical examinations are made by the Medical Officer yearly.
" The physical examinations comprise the taking of height and weight, testing sight and
hearing, examination of nose, throat, mouth, teeth, scalp, heart, lungs, glands, skin, posture, and
feet, and in boys for hernia.
" The examinations are conducted in the medical room, where strict privacy is maintained,
and a really satisfactory examination of the heart and lungs may be made.
" A time-table of school visits by the Medical Officer is arranged for the term's work. Each
principal is notified of the time allotted to his school. The majority of the schools receive one
half-day a month ;   some of the larger schools receive two half-days.
" Several days before the examination of beginners, written invitations to be present are
sent to the parents by the School Nurse. An opportunity is thus provided for the parents to
attend should they so desire. AVe find the plan of inviting the parents to be present with the
little ones much appreciated; the Medical Officer is able to give first-hand advice upon the care
of each individual child.
" It has been found that the great majority of all treatments recommended are procured
either privately or publicly. Besides these, many thousands of minor defects are found and
the parents warned.
" In addition to conducting the complete physical examinations, the Medical Officer examines
all cases referred to him by the School Nurses for special examinations. Thus all pupils receive
attention without the necessity of the Medical Officer personally examining so many normal
pupils.
" Frequent examinations are also made of special cases, which for any reason, such as the
presence of abnormal heart conditions, are being kept under observation.
" Each child is provided with a card on which is recorded the results of the examinations.
This card shows the record of the child's physical condition throughout his school and high-
school life, and follows him from school to school in case of transfer. This record is very
valuable in studying the individual case.
" In cases of serious accident the Medical Officer is called by the principal to give first aid,
minor cases being attended to by the nurses if available. It is not the policy of the Department
to give regular treatment, this being left to the private physician or, in case of poverty, to the
public clinics. The treatment of certain conditions, such as skin-diseases in children of the most
helpless people, must be supervised by the nurses in the interest of the schools.
" In some of the schools first aid is taught to groups of boys by specially trained male
teachers and to girls by the nurses. The Medical Officer conducts the examination of the
boys leading to the certificate of St. John Ambulance Association.
" Special matters of sanitation are investigated by the Medical Officer, the routine sanitary
inspections being entrusted to the School Nurses, who make monthly reports.
" The special classes in which this Department is particularly interested are the Sight-
saving Class, mentioned above, and the Open-air School. Here there is accommodation for
pupils who are persistently underweight, or have extreme nervous tendencies, or have been
exposed to  infection  of  the lungs  at  home,  though  not  yet  showing  symptoms.    No  child
 I
AV 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
dangerous to the others is allowed to attend.    The improvement in the general condition of
these classes of children is very striking.
" The Medical Officer, along with other members of this and associated departments, gives
a series of lectures on school hygiene to the nurses taking the Public Health Nursing Course
at the University of British Columbia; and also occasional talks on health matters to Parent-
Teacher Associations.
" Close co-operation is maintained with the Dental Department.
" The detailed account of the work of the nurses of this Department has been left to the
Head Nurse, whose report follows.
"(Sgd.)    Harold AVhite, M.D., D.P.H.,
School Medical Officer."
" Atancouver School Medical Department—Department of School Nursing.
" I beg to submit the report of the School Nursing Division for the year 1928.
" In view of the approaching amalgamation, possibly this is an opportune time to outline
the work of the Nursing Division as it is carried on at present.
" The Nursing Staff consists of one Head Nurse and eleven Field Nurses. Each Field Nurse
is assigned to a district for which she is responsible to the Head Nurse. The size of the district
and the number of schools allotted to each nurse are determined by the school population and
by the type of people living in the district. In general, however, each nurse has approximately
2,000 children under her care, though this may vary somewhat according to the type of districts
and schools. The Head Nurse has general supervision of the Staff Nurses, the office-work, and
the detail of the control of communicable diseases.
" Both elementary and high schools are included in the Nursing Service and receive regular
visits from the nurses. Six of our schools receive daily visits—namely, Strathcona, Seymour.
Hastings, Roberts, Templeton Junior High, and Kitsilano High—Junior and Senior. Other
schools receive from two to four visits per week, depending on the size of the school and its
needs. One school only, Block 70, is visited only once a week. Frequent visits to the schools
are highly desirable, as they contribute to the control of infectious disease through closer
supervision and thus decrease the loss of school-time. A time-table of school visits is arranged
for each nurse at the beginning of the term and each school notified.
" With one exception, the Alexandra, there is in each school building a medical room
furnished with all necessary equipment for carrying on our work and where all inspections and
examinations are conducted. In so far as possible, we endeavour to delegate to the nurses all
work that can be satisfactorily done by them in order to leave the School Medical Officer free
for more important duties which he alone can perform.
" In pursuance of this policy, the following general plan for the yearly physical examination
has been adopted:—
" Pupils in selected grades and groups are examined physically by the School Medical Officer
as outlined in his report, with the assistance of the nurses, who make all preliminary arrangements with the parents and teachers, assist at the time of the examination, and do the follow-up
work. All pupils in grades not receiving a physical examination from the School Medical Officer,
and who have been examined previously, receive a physical inspection from the School Nurse.
This inspection includes an examination of the eyes, ears, nose, throat, teeth, skin, glands, feet,
and posture. Any children showing symptoms of abnormal conditions are referred to the School
Medical Officer for further examination and diagnosis. It can be readily seen that this system
results in the saving of a great deal of time for the School Medical Officer, at the same time
complying with the Provincial regulation, which requires a yearly physical inspection for each
school-child.
" In addition to the yearly physical examination or inspection, the nurses make a classroom inspection each month of all children under their care. The purpose of this inspection is
to detect uncleanliness, skin-diseases, infectious diseases, any incipient conditions, and to
encourage and stimulate the formation of health habits.
" AVhile the teaching of health as required by the curriculum is done by class-room teachers,
the School Nurse teaches health also by giving class-room health talks and individual instruction.
In the junior high schools a programme of health education is being developed, to which a
number of departments are contributing.
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. W 21
" While it is not our policy to treat any children who are in a position to consult their
family physician, nor to remove responsibility from the parents, still we find, particularly in the
poorer districts, that there are always minor cases which must be looked after by nurses or a
serious and unnecessary loss of school-time would result; if available, the nurses render first
aid in cases of minor accidents.
" As a means of overcoming malnutrition and underweight found among our school-children,
a milk service has been established in many schools. In this work the School Nurses have the
assistance of the teachers, who supervise the daily distribution; without this help it would be
impossible to provide this service.
" Although the City Health Department has control of the infectious diseases for the city,
the detail of this work as it affects school-children is largely delegated to the School Medical
and Nursing Departments. Close co-operation is arranged between the city and the school
departments.
" Routine sanitary inspection of schools is entrusted to the nurses, and a report of the
sanitary condition of each school is submitted monthly to the Head Nurse and to the Principal.
" Home-visiting is a most important feature of the nurses' work. Home visits are made on
all cases of physical defects requiring treatment, on all excluded cases, on as many cases of
reported illness as possible, and on cases of suspected infectious disease. The nurses are thus
kept closely in touch with the health conditions in their district, learn when it is necessary to
arrange for free treatment for various defects, see that proper care is given, and medical
attention provided when necessary. This all tends to prevent loss of school-time and to raise
the standard of health.    During the past year the nurses made 7,484 home visits.
"The dental clinics in the schools are of great value, providing as they do a means of
treatment for those unable to pay usual dental rates. The nurses make all the necessary
arrangements with parents for children to attend the clinic, and also arrange appointments
with the clinic.
" In many ways our nurses are the social workers for the schools. They co-operate with
all social agencies in the city by referring cases found in need of help to the agency best suited
to meet the special need.
" First-aid and Home Nursing Classes have been formed in the Kitsilano High School and
are most enthusiastically attended by a very large group. AVhile these classes are part of the
school activities, they are organized under the St. John Ambulance Society, and at their conclusion the successful pupils will receive the certificates from this society.
." An interesting exhibit featuring nutrition was displayed as part of the school exhibit at
the Vancouver Exhibition in August and attracted a great deal of interest.
" At the request of the Department of Nursing and Health of the University of British
Columbia, a course of lectures in school hygiene and also field experience and instruction was
given to students taking the Public Health Nursing Course. Eight students were enrolled in
this course, each of whom spent ten days in our Department. Visits to special features of
school-work, such as the Sight-saving Class, the Open-air School, the Remedial Classes, and the
Little Mothers' League Classes, were also arranged for them.
" Through the kindness of the Alexandra Fresh-air Camp and the Rotary Clinic Camp, we
were able to arrange summer outings for a large number of our children whose physical condition was below par, and whose parents were unable to provide an outing for them. We find
great benefit derived from these camps and hope that the time is not far distant when there
will be more summer camps available for such children.
"(Sgd.)    Elizabeth G. Breeze, R.N.,
Head Nurse."
" Saanich Health Centre,
" To the Board of School Trustees, RoYAL °AK' B'°" 3nl* llth' 1928'
Corporation of the District of Saanich:
" I have the honour of submitting to you the first annual school report for the Saanich
Municipality under the reorganized and unified Health Service.
" To those who fully understood the changes, the improved service, and added attention to
the school population incident upon the reorganized system, the following report will occasion
no great surprise.
 AV 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" But, when first seen and compared with previous reports, one is struck by the great
number of defects and conditions hitherto not found or suspected, as compared with the paucity
of the figures of the previous report.
" From what was formerly, on paper, a select and fortunate and remarkably defect-free
school population, our children have been reduced to the average obtaining almost universally.
" One may ask, and rightly so, how this has been arrived at.
" The answer is that where formerly a school, such as Cloverdale, with a registration of
270, has been examined in a morning, or at the most in a day, it has now taken a full-time
Medical Officer two or three weeks to do justice.
" Instead of a mere glance, each child was bared to the waist and given as thorough an
examination as conditions permit.
" Instead of sending a parent, as a result of the perfunctory examination, a clean bill of
health, giving a false sense of security, each parent was appraised of defects now found. Our
responsibility did not end with a note sent home, but personal interviews and the dogged
determination of the School and District Nurses that the child be given fair play has resulted
in a wonderful attention and correction of defects which will be shown in the next annual
report.
" The figures of the present report agree within fairly close limits with results obtained in
other Canadian and American municipalities where school medical inspection is actually carried
out.
" It is unfortunate that no reliable figures for comparison as to the reduction of communicable diseases can be drawn from former records. For instance, in 1924 the School Medical
Officer reports four cases of scarlet fever, whereas the Municipal Health Officer reports none,
thus giving the municipality a clean bill of health. In 1926 it is significant that only the names
and not the number of the communicable diseases are given in the schools report, whereas in the
Medical Health Officer's report the number of scarlet fever cases is 44 and whooping-cough 90.
" Now, under a unified administration of public health, not only are accurate records
possible, but a more efficient control of the communicable diseases.
" The costs to the community of infectious diseases has been reduced to an absurdly
negligible figure, under $200, compared with bills of $5,000 to $6,000.
" We have instituted last year what was almost unique in the Province, and that is a
campaign for the immunization against diphtheria. The results, though adversely influenced
by an unfortunate incident abroad and by faddists at home, were gratifying. Nearly 300
children received the complete treatment. AAre hope that in the course of time, through
education and realization of the protection against an insidious and dangerous disease,
immunization of the young population will become as much routine as vaccination.
" In our work the family physician has been a great ally in furthering appreciation of
health and preventive medicine whenever a child has been referred to him by the School Nurse
or Medical Officer.
" In conclusion, I wish to thank the members of the Board for their hearty and intelligent
co-operation in overcoming prejudice, ignorance, and faddism and making the past a successful
school-year.
" Respectfully submitted.
"(Sgd.)    D. Berman, M.D., D.P.H.,
School Medical Officer, Saanich Municipality."
" A Summary* of Public-health AA^ork and Organization in Kelowna Rural Districts
from March to December, 1928.
" The work is divided into three sections as follows :—
"(1.)  Child-welfare, including home-visiting and clinics.
"(2.) Educational and public-health organization, including: (a) Meetings addressed and
attended; (b) public-health propaganda—health exhibit at fair; (c) distribution of literature
and letters written ;   (d) prenatal hygiene.
"(3.) School-work, including: (a;) Actual work with children in schools ; (b) home-visiting
to school-children;   (c) time spent on records, etc.
"(1.) Childrwelfare.—There are 51 babies and pre-school children on the register, visited at
home.
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28. AV 23
" Thirteen well-baby and pre-school clinics were organized in conjunction with the AVomen's
Institutes and Women's Club at AVinfield, Rutland, and Benvoulin. There are 33 babies and 37
pre-school children on the clinic roll, making in all 78 attendances. Three more clinics are
planned at East Kelowna, Okanagan Mission, and Westbank, respectively, as soon as the spring
weather comes. It is our object to carry on monthly clinics at all these places during suitable
weather.
" Three chest clinics were held with Dr. Lamb, Government Chest Specialist, 18 attendances. Eleven were X-rayed; 1 positive case of T.B. lungs and 6 children to be watched and
return for re-examination in the spring; rest were negative.
" Five active immunization clinics against diphtheria;  88 attendances.
" Six Schick test clinics to test for susceptibility to diphtheria;   172 children attended.
" Total number of clinics, 27 ;  number of attendances, 376.
"(2.) Public Health Organization and Educational.—Meetings were addressed as follows:—
"(1.)  AVinfield AVomen's Institute:   On child-welfare and especially well-baby clinic.
"(2.) Kelowna District Schools Health Association: On public-health organization and
local situation.
"(3.) Benvoulin AVomen's Club: On public-health organization and well-baby and pre-school
clinic.
"(4.)  Rutland Ratepayers' Association:   On Kelowna District Schools Health Association.
"(5.) Rutland AA'omen's Institute: On diphtheria epidemic, with reasons for methods of
control, explaining Act, immunization, etc.
"(6.) Ellison Ratepayers' Association: On school nursing and local public-health organization (explanatory).
" (7.) East Kelowna AA'omen's Institute : On child-welfare, international, national, and local;
well-baby clinics.
,   "(8.) Rutland Board  of  School  Trustees:    On  methods  of   school  medical  examination
(explanatory).
"(9.)  Board of School Trustees, Kelowna:   On Cowichan scheme for school dental clinics.
"Instruction consultations:   Parents (over phone), 156.
" Health literature : Distributed in schools, homes, clinics, and at fair, 1,636 pieces, of which
600 pieces distributed at fair.
" Letters written—i.e., different phases of work—72.
"Public Health Exhibit at Kelowna Fall Fair.—A health exhibit was planned by Miss
Frances Lyne, R.N., Kelowna School Nurse, and Mrs. A. F. Grindon, R.N., Public Health Nurse,
Kelowna Rural Districts, for the Kelowna Fall Fair. The need for a school dental clinic for
Kelowna and surrounding rural districts and active immunization of children against diphtheria
were the points especially emphasized.
" The nurses were in attendance during the fair, answered innumerable questions, and
distributed 1,200 pieces of literature dealing with these questions and all phases of hygiene.
" We are grateful to Kelowna Board of School Trustees, Rutland Women's Institute, and
Kelowna AVomen's Institute, who contributed towards the necessary expenses; also the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (Calgary AVestern Division), who supplied (free) splendid
literature for distribution.
" The Provincial Health Officer was much pleased with this effort and expressed his approval
in very appreciative terms.
" The school dental clinic has not yet materialized and is a pressing need for both Kelowna
and the surrounding rural districts.
" Prenatal hygiene: Cases opened, 4; eases dismissed, 3 ; cases carried, 1; visits at home, 5.
"(3.) School-work.—Number of schools, 13; visits to schools, 160; children seen by doctor,
1,105; inspections of children by nurse, 2,507; children weighed and measured, 567 ; weighings
and measurings, 655; children underweight, 173; children over 10 per cent, underweight, 57;
children gaining, 561.
" Two complete physical examinations of nearly every child have been made by Dr. Ootmar,
School Medical Officer.
" New defects found, 876; old defects not improved, 282; skin-diseases, scabies, impetigo,
pediculosis, 50; interviews, teachers and others, 363; home school visits, 286; children and
others transported, 73; health talks in schools, 50;  old defects improved, 211;  children excluded,
 AV 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
105 (including carriers of diphtheria germs); referred to own doctor, 257; investigations
(including disinfecting 9 homes), 15; throat-swabs taken, 336 (in diphtheria epidemic) ; notices
to parents re defects, 604.
'.' The following is a complete and special report on diphtheria epidemic in Rutland and
Mission Creek Districts, May 13th to September 12th, 1928:—
"Active cases: Rutland, 3 school-children, 5 pre-school children, 1 older child of school age,
1 adult;  Mission Creek, 2 school-children ;   total, 12 cases.    One death.
" Carriers found: Rutland, 45 school-children, 3 pre-school children, 3 adults; total, 51
carriers.
" Throat-swabs taken, 336.
" Schick test:   Rutland, 136 school-children,  30 pre-school children,  36 positive reactors.
" Active immunization :  88 injections of diphtheria toxoid to school and pre-school children.
" Disinfected, 9 homes ;   clinics held, 11;   attendances, 260.
" Anne F. Grindon, R.N.,
Nurse in Charge, Kelowna Rural Districts."
The dental work in connection with the schools is making satisfactory progress. This work
is one that has an immediate appeal to the parents. AVe are following out our plan of first
having a survey made of the school or schools in the district, the charge for which is borne
by the Department. Each child receives an examination, defects are noted, and the probable
cost is stated on the card. The parents are furnished with these cards and a request made that
the child be taken to their own dentist or else referred to the dentist who is selected for the
work. The cost, under this plan, has been reduced very much, and when the cards are signed
by the parents and returned the work is carried out by the dentist, assisted by the School Nurse.
Indigents are taken care of, either by local committees or by the assistance of the Government.
The reports of the school medical examination show that there were 4,955 more pupils
examined than last year.
Details of the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E.
Young, M.D.,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:  164.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:   163.
High Schools.
High schools.    1926-27, 73:   Reported, 50;   not reported, 23.    1927-28, 79:   Reported, 53;
not reported, 26.
Pupils inspected, 1926-27, 9,368;   1927-28, 11.783, an increase of 2,415.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.    1926-27, 33 :  Reported, 33 ;  all reported.    1927-28, 33:  Reported, 33;   all reported.
Pupils inspected, 1926-27, 39,882;  1927-28, 39,387, a decrease of 495.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1926-27,26:   Reported, 25;   not reported, 1.    1927-28,26:   Reported, 26;
all reported.
Pupils inspected:   1926-27, 28,130;   1927-28, 29.696, an increase of 1,566.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:   1926-27, 657, at a cost of $15,245;   1927-28, 661, at a cost of $15,396.90.
Schools not inspected:   1926-27, 56;   1927-28, 84.
Pupils inspected:  1926-27, 17,661;  1927-28, 18,140, an increase of 479.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1926-27, 86 cents;   1927-28, 85 cents.
Percentage of defects:  1926-27, 101.97;  1927-28, 105.47, an increase of 3.50.
 t
>
■
STATISTICAL TABLES.
 AV 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
1
Oh    .
. o
° fl.
br- fl
n
a
fl   .
<h c
p -g
o" S
d
fl
s
13
| I
o
-2 a
o ■«
OK
■33
C3
3
"8
S
■d
■4
|1
fl 0
<L>   ai
rt  fl
w3
0
0
2121   21R
1
	
11
11
4
1
47
4
47
9
5
A- E. McMicking	
161
160
19
HIGH
46
100
155
307
260
7
70
143
42
80
72
90
130
79
•   28
40
145
15
15
75
87
22
59
53
231
255
339
27
303
74
677
217
48
135
114
77
90
26
75
161
44
75
146
296
248
7
61
143
41
'78
65
90
130
78
28
39
141
14
15
72
63
20
57
53
231
235
339
26
319
69
773
225
47
132
110
77
82
26
65
159
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1
3
0
22
5
13
4
10
41
4
18
56
97
30
1
3
6
Miss P. Charlton...
9
6
13
6
1
Burnaby:
1
4
	
Chilliwack	
R. McCaffrey	
E. Sheffield	
1
5
13
1
13
6
7
7
7
17
8
1
1
4
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton.
2
1
10
1
Delta:
5
7
1
H. N. Watson	
Miss M. Claxton....
Miss E. Morrison...
Miss W. Seymour..
9
J. S. McCallum	
4
4
6
11
0
4
4
3
2
3
2
5
74
8
4
6
4
2
14
3
1
1
8
0
2
10
4
38
12
G
2
6
5
W. Truax	
Mrs. E. Yard	
Miss 0. M. Garrood
M. G. Archibald
14
1
0
1
Miss K. Snowden..
2
1
4
1
2
4
1
H. B. Maxwell	
B. B. Marr	
Miss H. Anderson.
8
6
1
O
Matsqui:
R. H. Port	
3
G. H. Tutill	
1
5
34
31
16
3
41
1
82
23
7
9
1
9
13
1
2
9
1
1
6
9
5
12
34
35
23
11
2
25
9
3
3
2
3
3
8
10
9
91
37
12
1
5
	
4
0
43
W. F. Drysdale
Miss M. E. Kerr...
3
8
1
3
26
69
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught...
D. A. Clark	
A. E. H. Bennett	
Miss A. Stark	
7
3
6
44
Point Grey:
Mrs. Hyde and
G. Jeeves
Miss M. Ewart	
Miss M. Ewart
Miss M. Ewart
24
11
91
28
41
13
103
31
7
4
1
10
6
4
5
1
2
2
1
1
W. Dykes	
0. Ewert	
2
1
1
1
1
Revelstoke	
Richmond:
W. K. Hall	
20
7
_
E. E. Topliffe	
2
1
1
1
4
1
0
13
1
4
Trail	
2
21
16
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-2.S.
AV 27
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
c"
1
S
r*
1)
03
V
W
6
a
ft
|
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Tear.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
T.B.    history,    1;    scarlet    fever,    2;
hernia,   1;  kidney,  2;  serious fractures, 6; pneumonia, 12; rheumatic
hearts,   2; nervous break-down,   2;
eczema, 3
Heating, ventilation,
and accommodation good
Excellent	
atrophied   left   arm,    1,    following
infantile paralysis
SCHOOLS.
Good	
Brick building; window ventilation
rather difficult to
manage
Good	
Good	
Good	
Fair	
No  overcrowding;
well heated
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Good.
Mumps,  1; chicken-pox,   1	
of   spine,   1;  tuberculosis,   1;  toxic
goitre,   2;   cystic   goitre,   1;   cleft
palate, 1
Yes.
1
Chicken-pox, 20; measles, 10....
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Wax in ears, 1; blepharitis, 2	
Measles;   chicken-pox   	
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory.
Clean;  sanitary.
Sanitary;   adequate.
Good	
Brick,     good;    well
heated   and   ventilated
Good	
Satisfactory	
Brick    building    in
good  repair;  adequately  heated
and ventilated
Excellent	
1
1
Chicken-pox,   1  	
Infantile   paralysis,    3;   typhoid
fever,  1
flat feet, 3; spinal curvature, 1
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory 	
4
Measles,   4   	
Rubella,  37; pneumonia,  1
Measles,   8   	
Measles,   2   	
Clean; adequate.
Clean;   adequate.
No   overcrowding;
heating good; ventilation quite
good
New  part   of   building  is  poorly
heated
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
V.D.H.,  2  	
1
3
0 K
pulmonary,  2; anaemic,  2
Clean;  adequate.
2
cardiac,      14;      orthopaedic,      23;
ansemia,   1
Visible thyroid, 170; nervous, 1; cardiac, 22 ; orthopaedic, 36 ; anaemia, 1
1
1
2
Mumps,   1;  whooping-cough,   1;
scarlet fever,   1
Good.
orthopaedic,   13; anaemia,   2
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Good
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Good
Good	
1
O.K	
0 K
 AV 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ll
<i to
So
a. &
ptt
£;
ll
s
I
fl
flP5
-4
NH
PEH
so
Vancouver:
Britannia..
King Edward..
King George...
FairvieAv Junior ,
Kitsilano	
Kitsilano Junior	
School of Commerce.
Templeton Junior	
Technical	
Vancouver, North..
Vancouver, South:
John Oliver	
Vancouver, West..
Vernon	
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. White-
H. White..
H. White.;
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. Dyer—.
G. A. Lamont..
A. C. Nash ,
G. Williams  Mrs. S. Martin..
Miss I. Smith	
Miss M. Campbell-
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Campbell-
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. McLellan.
Miss M. D. Scbultz
Miss E. Edwards...
|
851|   962|.
670
785
399
469
196
484
792
623
185
494
654
502
16
I
19[
889
995
105
10
446
411
13
368
296
3
34
899
892
37
96
85
134
6
5
135
3 	
14 	
8 1
10|        1
1
9
274
17
150
6
112
2
66
1(i
102
5
182
12
102
153|..
I
5
2
202
o
17
1
0
20
11
7
1
15
1
9
2       11
I
I
51
GRADED CITY
Alberni	
Armstrong..
A. D. Morgan..
Chilliwack..
Courtenay...
Cranbrook:
Central...
Kootenay Orchards.-
South  Ward	
Cumberland	
Duncan....
Enderby...
Fernie:
Annex..
Central	
Fernie, West-
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamioops:
Lloyd George..
Stuart Wood	
L. A. Patten. .
J. McKee	
G. E. L. MacKinnon.
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. N. Watson..
H. W. Keith...
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan..
W. Truax—
A. Franeis.-
M. G. Archibald..
M. G. Archibald-
Miss P. Charlton...
Miss M. Claxton...
Miss W. Sej-mour..
Miss W. Seymour..
Miss W. Seymour-
Miss O. M. Garrood
Miss O. M. Garrood
123
528
115
500
33
150
33
4
33
23
17
80
340
340
4
4
8
26
26
20
283
257
1
2
2
25
91
91
594
15
44
430
594
12
44
428
36
3
1
45
88
6
23
127
84
5
4
42
13
426
416
37
5
14
21
20
43
149
126
6
1
38
4
16
41
7S
78
23
2
1
8
7
37
570
570
192
25
3
21
18
166
55
55
12
1
2
1
3
15
280
275
2
1
20
1
26
8
32
78
310
78
304
3
25
1
8
2
25
7
78
102
6
493
481
176
5
30
3
15
12
123
41
196
3
3
282
506
47
70
1
30
150
12  10
28
6
20
6
110
11
76]  55
29
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
AV 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
fl
1
33
W
d
5
|
S
o
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Vaccinated,  576; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,  446; cardiac,  3; pulmonary, 1
*
Rubella,  1; mumps,  1; chicken-
pox, 1
Scarlet fever,   1;  diphtheria,   1;
smallpox,  1
nary,   2
Diphtheria,   3;   diphtheria   carriers, 1; mumps, 20; chicken-
pox,  1
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox,  1; scarlet fever,  2; smallpox,  1
nary,   1
nary,  2
2
Good____ 	
Both.
orthopaedic,   1
Conjunctivitis,    1;   vaccinations,    10;
home visits,  40
Diphtheria, 1; carriers, 4 ; smallpox, 13; mumps, 5; chicken-
pox, 3; throat-swabs, 22; poliomyelitis,   1
Measles,   7   	
1
1
SCHOOLS.
1
Good
Abscess   on   lung,   1;   pneumonia,   2;
heart-lesion,   2;   congenital   dislocation of hip,   1
8
1
1
8
1
3
Scarlet   fever,    5;   chicken-pox,
4 5 ;   mumps,   4 8 ;  chorea,   4 ;
rheumatic fever,  2
Measles;   scarlet   fever;   whooping-cough
Measles,   20;   scarlet   fever,   1;
chicken-pox,   IS;   diphtheria,
1; mumps,   3
Brick building; good
condition;      good
heating   and   ventilation
Clean;  adequate.
Poorly   ventilated;
well  heated
Good	
Good -	
Good	
O.K	
1
nary,   1
2
1
1
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
ears,   108; anfemia,   18; blepharitis,
14;   cleft   palate,   2;   nervous,    1;
stammering,   1
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Not   crowded;    well
heated   and   ven*
tilated
Not   crowded;   heating   and   ventilation good
Good;  not  crowded;
well   heated   and
ventilated
Good	
2
6
2
5
1
	
Chicken-pox,   22;  scarlet   fever,
23
Infantile  paralysis,   1;   chicken-
pox,  14; scarlet fever,  23
Chicken-pox, 21; scarlet fever, 2
Measles; chicken-pox 	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Fairly   clean   and
adequate.
	
Valve heart-trouble,   1	
1
1
3         2
1
 |	
acne, 1
Infantile paralysis, 1; whooping-
cough
Chicken-pox, 2; whooping-cough
This   building   is   of
brick; a comparatively new school,
but  poorly   ventilated and heated
This school is housed
in brick building,
fairly   well   ventilated and heated.
basement of high
these  rooms   are
ventilated;   also
Court-house  is   n
room.
Adequate;     clean;
sanitary.
Adequate;     clean;
sanitary.
1
1
1
1
Two rooms in, the
school being used;
badly   heated   and
one   room   at   old
ot   fit   for   school-
 AV 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
6 g
£   01
CM
QB
S=r
Kaslo	
Kelowna..
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward..
North Harewood..
North Ward	
Quennell..
South Ward..
Nelson:
Central..
New Westminster:
Central	
Lister-Kelvin.	
Richard McBride..
Queensboro	
Herbert Spencer..
Technical	
Port Alberni	
Port  Coquitlam:
Central	
James Park	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial..
Borden Street....
Seal Cove	
Westview	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Rossland:
Maclean	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan City	
Traii-Tadanac;
Central	
East Trail..
Vancouver:
Aberdeen..
D. J. Barclay..
W. J. Knox....
II. B. Maxwell..
G. H. Tutill	
W. F. Drysdale-.
W. F. Drysdale  Miss M. E. Kerr
W. F. Drysdale..
W. F. Drysdale..
W. F. Drysdale..
E. C. Arthur..
E. C. Arthur..
D. A. Clark..
D. A. Clark..
D. A. Clark..
D. A. Clark..
D. A. Clark..
D. A. Clark...
C. T. Hilton..
W. Sager	
W. Sager	
C. R. Symmes..
C. Ewert..
H. E. Tremayne..
H. E. Tremayne..
H. E. Tremayne..
H. E. Tremayne. .
J. H. Hamilton..
.1. H. Hamilton..
E. E. Topliffe....
Alan Beech	
Wm. E. Gomm..
F. S. Eaton..
H. White..
H. White-
Miss H. Anderson
Miss M. E. Kerr.
Miss M. E. Kerr..
Miss M. E. Kerr..
MPss M   I   Kerr
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss H. Jukes  ■ 490
Miss V. B. Stevens
105
76
300
323
148
636
101
703
280
300
103
26
148
720
259
892]
697
580
118
478
100
332
165
96
23 G
094
231
S90
697
570
118
475
100
332
163
95
23G
450
320
63
33
305
300
440
202
09
450
320
03
33
300
295
440
202
08
860
200
400
528
6
35
156
121
100
70
19
1A
89
4
350[ 332j
15
HI
21
4   9
10  3
I
I
35[ 102
33
127
52
178
126
116
30
93
8
04
55
47
24
135
102
82
26
80
0
10
8
15
22
117
99
118
28  27
48  13
19
92  24
j
3391  56
4]   5
I
18
385
132
325
312
26
14
6
4
32
25
52
49
67
128
4
1
245
198
166
46
139
3
17|
74
07
1
68
12
137
3
3
20
6
13
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
AV 31
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
01
>
01
o
CQ
6
■ta
AA
O
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Chorea,   10;  cardiac,   9;  curvature  of
spine,   6;   bronchitis,   7;   flat   feet,
0; pulmonary tuberculosis, 4; squamous eczema,  9
7
17
3
Chicken-pox, 5 ; infantile paralysis,    53    cases   in   city   and
district
Excellent;    but    in
spite   of  the  new
school    there    is
overcrowding     in
some rooms
Adequate; modern;
sanitary;    flush
septic-tank   system ; most desirable to be connected with city
sewerage system
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
Chicken-pox,  25  	
German measles, 48; measles, 1;
whooping-cough, 5; rheumatic
fever,     1;     chicken-pox,     4;
pneumonia,   2;   influenza,   2;
erysipelas, 1
German   measles,   4;   whooping-
cough, 1; chicken-pox, 1
German measles,  30; whooping-
cough,   11;   chicken-pox,   1;
influenza, 1
German   measles,   91;   measles,
4;    mumps,     11;    rheumatic
fever,   5 ;  whooping-cough,   3 ;
chicken-pox, 4; influenza, 12;
pneumonia,  4
Rubella, 9 ; pneumonia, 2 ; influenza,  1; chicken-pox,  1
No  acute fevers  were epidemic
during year
Satisfactory	
Filled   to   capacity;
heating   and   ventilation   good
Yes.
Nephritis, 1; pinkeye, 3 ; bronchitis, 2 ;
blepharitis,  2
Adequate;  clean.
Appendicitis,   1; pinkeye,   14;  herpes,
1; blepharitis,  3
Jaundice,  2; asthma,  2; fractures,  7;
eczema,  7; appendicitis,  2; nervous
break-down,  2; pinkeye,  4; blepharitis, 9; bronchitis,* 4
2
2
1
5
1
3
1
9
9
10
4
10
5
6
6
3
10
3
6
	
No  overcrowding;
ventilation    quite
good; heating good
Not  overcroAvded;
well   heated   and
ventilated
Not   crowded;   well
heated   and   ventilated
Overcrowded	
All class-rooms seriously overcroAvded
Good	
Clean,   adequate.
Clean,   adequate.
Yes.
3
0
3
4
1
Good.
Orthopaedic,   24;   heart,   18;   nervous,
4; pulmonary,  3; anaemia,  2
Orthopaedic,  18; heart, 8; nervous, 4;
pulmonary, 3; anaemia, 4
Orthopaedic,  11; heart,  6; nervous,  1;
anaemia,   3
Orthopaedic,   4;  heart,   2;  pulmonary,
1,   anaemic,   3
Orthopaedic,   14;   heart,   10;   nervous,
1; pulmonary, 2; anaemic, 2
22
13
22
9
6
3
Measles,    2;    pertussis,    8;
-scarlatina,  1; diphtheria, 1;.
chicken-pox,   79
O K
Good	
Good	
Crowded	
Good	
Crowded	
O.K.
O.K.
O K
16
13
O.K.
O.K.
Anaemia, 2; slight nervous affection, 2
Measles	
Measles	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Measles,   4;   chicken-pox,   4;   infantile
paralysis,  2; cardiac,  3
3
2
4
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean;   adequate.
10
6
3
3
1
2
Scarlet fever 	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Infantile paralysis; scarlet fever
Clean;   adequate.
18
15
16
10
17
18
3
2
2
Chicken-pox,    23;    measles,    4;
whooping-cough,   1; poliomyelitis, 3
Chicken-pox,    10;    measles,    2;
whooping-cough,  2; poliomyelitis   G
O.K.
O K
O.K. -	
Not croAvded; ventilation   and   heating  could  be  improved
O K.
Clean;  adequate.
Diphtheria,  1; chicken-pox,  28;
mumps, 7
Diphtheria,   3;  mumps,   8;   carriers,   3 ;   Avhooping-cough,   4 ;
smallpox,   1;  chicken-pox,  43
ary, 2   -
ary, 2
!
 AV 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
° ft
d 8
an
Vancouver—Continued.
Bayview	
Block 70..
Central	
Dawson	
Charles Dickens..
Franklin	
Simon Fraser	
General Gordon..
Grandview	
Grenf ell-
Hastings..
Henry Hudson..
Kitsilano	
Livingstone	
Model	
Mount Pleasant-
Lord Nelson-
Florence Nightingale.
Open Air	
Cecil Rhodes	
Lord Roberts-
Laura Secord..
Seymour..
Strathcona	
Lord Tennyson..
H. White. .
H. White..
H. White. .
H. White..
II. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. White. .
H. White. .
H. White. .
H. White. .
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
H. White. .
H. White..
H. White..
H. White.-.
II. White-
H. White..
H. White. .
H. White..
II. White..
H. White..
H. White-
Miss D. Shields-
Miss I. Smith....
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss H. Jukes..
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Shields-
Miss I. Smith	
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss D. Shields..
Miss D. Shields	
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Bellamy...
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss I. Smith	
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss D. Bellamy...
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss I. Smith.	
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss M. McLellan
Miss D. Bellamy...
361
570
127
543
891
712
372
607
734
504
91
861
318
537
141
540
920
743
362
548
81
105
13
72
152
88
56
81
705[ 120
4891  97
I
91
860
347
43
89
476
539] 541
730 7491  52
601 555 124
13
127
781| 794
66
600
922
651
73
540
864
060
131
178
151
90
120
87
14|   3
16
I    I
2|  26
I
41  63
I
I
3(  48
3  27
4|  22
I
2|   4
I
[
I
38
140
207
135
43|
I
92]   3|
73
79
23
3
00
4
12
66
12
10
9
21
15
1
17
35
13
44 157
I
150
11
142
153
8|  47|  84
15
7
'!'[  17
7
18|   9
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Vaccinated, 204; cardiac, 2 	
Vaccinated, 220; pulmonary, 5..
Vaccinated, 49; cardiac, 1 	
Vaccinated, 309; cardiac, 2; pulmonary,   1
Vaccinated, 468; cardiac, 6; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 365; cardiac, 4
Vaccinated, 173; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 280; cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated, 397; cardiac, 5; pulmonary,  1
Vaccinated, 228; cardiac, 1
Vaccinated,   90   	
Vaccinated,   346;   cardiac,    10;   pulmonary, 7
Vaccinated,  360; cardiac,   1  	
Vaccinated
ary, 1
Vaccinated,
ary, 1
Vaccinated,
ary, 1
Vaccinated,
ary, 2
Vaccinated,
ary, 5
Vaccinated,
ary, 1
Vaccinated,
ary, 2
Vaccinated,
ary, 1
Vaccinated,
ary, 3
Vaccinated,
ary, 3
1G1   	
227; cardiac, 2; pulmon-1
314; cardiac, 1; pulmon-
335; cardiac, 4; pulmon-
305; cardiac,   C; pulmon-
357; cardiac,  5; pulmon-
289; cardiac, 2; pulmon-
35; cardiac, 3; pulmon-
316; cardiac,  2; pulmon-
516; cardiac, 4; pulmon-
240; cardiac,  2; pulmon-
Vaccinated, 484; cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   1,090;   cardiac,   3;   pulmonary,  3
Vaccinated,  389; cardiac,  4; pulmonary, 2
Diphtheria, 4; mumps, 44; carriers,   2;  chicken-pox,   36
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1;
mumps, 2; chicken-pox, 62;
smallpox,  1
Diphtheria, 5; whooping-cough,
1; carriers, 2; chicken-pox, 29
Diphtheria carriers, 2; rubella,
5; mumps, 19; whooping-
cough, 1; chicken-pox, 22
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 3;
carriers, 1; mumps, 4; whoop-
cough,  3; chicken-pox,  45
Diphtheria, 5; measles, 1; carriers, 2; rubella, 2G; mumps,
8; smallpox, 1; chicken-pox, 8
Diphtheria, 2; mumps, 2; carriers,  2; chicken-pox, 46
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria carriers, 13; mumps, 4; whooping-cough,  2; chicken-pox, 14
Diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox, 25;
measles, 1; mumps, 86; smallpox, 2; poliomyelitis, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2;
carriers, 4; mumps, 9; smallpox,  1; chicken-pox,  6
Diphtheria, 12; mumps, 21; carriers, 5; chicken-pox, 47 ;
whooping-cough,  8
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2;
measles, 1; mumps, 84; rubella, 1; whooping-cough, 6;
chicken-pox,  18
Diphtheria, 1; whooping-cough,
1; mumps, 5 2; chicken-pox,
18
Scarlet fever, 1; whooping-cough,
11; mumps, 3; chicken-pox,
51
Diphtheria, 4; mumps, 3; rubella, 1; whooping-cough, 2 ;
chicken-pox,   4;   smallpox,   2
Diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox, 69;
carriers, 2; mumps, 54; smallpox, 4
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1;
mumps, 4; whooping-cough,
7 ; chicken-pox, 2; poliomyelitis, 1
Diphtheria, 2; measles, 1; rubella, 2; mumps, 83; whooping-cough, 1; smallpox, 1;
chicken-pox,   12
Rubella, 1; mumps, 5; whooping-cough, 1; smallpox, 1;
chicken-pox,  75
Rubella,  1  	
Diphtheria, 1; whooping-cough,
2; rubella, 1; mumps, 17;
chicken-pox,  6
Measles, 1; mumps, 5; whooping-cough, 7; chicken-pox, 52
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 9;
carriers, 2; measles, 1; rubella, 1; mumps, 5; chicken-
pox, 37; smallpox, 5; poliomyelitis,  1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 4;
carriers, 3 ; rubella, 2 ; whooping-cough, 3; mumps, 2;
chicken-pox,   16
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-pox,
27; rubella, 1; measles, 1;
mumps, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 4;
carriers, 2 ; rubella, 1; mumps,
32; whooping-cough, 1; poliomyelitis,   1; chicken-pox, 8
 AV 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
'fl
rU      .
. o
II
ft
«A     fl
°i
|
3
03  >,
P
£ fi
01  01
eg
Ol
tr
||
iv .2
Or>
-3 fl
Cl -H
03   03
QM
%
%
Zl
« S
h .9
'£22
£**
<D   t-i
.■i
'0
H
■3333
<
■d
01 .3
£?3fi
Ji °
>
33,333
Ol +j
Ob
to —
Ha
HO
'3
O
Vancouver, North:
H. Dyer	
453
558
540
825
154
147
404
221
475
374
476
320
150
451
550
250
140
328
152
307
465
507
507
812
154
147
404
221
475
374
476
320
150
451
550
250
140
328
152
307
13
6
4
3
3
27
25
38
25
2
1
1
10
7
7
4
4
2
61
48
52
30
1
1
2
5
11
4
17
10
5
9
5
7
3
15
2
8
6
7
4
62
4
6
8
2
10
7
H. Dyer	
H. Dyer	
Vernon:
Mrs. S. Martin
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adjims..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss I. E. Adams..
10
10
1
1
2
47
Victoria:
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
1
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
o
4
4
11
6
3
1
2
5
1
4
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
16
D. Donald	
1
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
13
19
8
2
9
2
3
1
1
1
1
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
1
D. Donald	
3
2
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnahy:
Armstrong Avenue—
58
30
247
191
074
724
35
205
614
306
411
82
28
94
29
69
43
226
110
25
62
63
68
38
24
130
145
190
58
28
230
185
660
712
35
201
608
301
405
82
27
92
29
66
43
226
110
25
62
63
65
38
24
130
142
190
1
1
2
4
1
22
18
73
93
26
16
119
87
309
303
15
88
278
150
196
39
14
37
13
38
22
113
21
2
5
7
7
5
3
22
22
40
6
5
39
28
68
57
2
27
70
38
41
10
4
7
2
1
4
5
27
31
0
4
14
9
12
1
1
1
2
2
7
5
15
17
7
6
28
26
5
2
Douglas Road .....
2
5
1
20
1
1
1
1
1
13
8
11
2
5
21
12
19
1
1
4
19
72
36
52
7
3
11
2
6
3
24
12
5
12
11
7
6
4
16
34
24
7
18
4
Kingsway, West	
4
Riverway, East	
Riverway, West	
1
3
1
1
2
1
7
4
1
1
11
10
8
5
30
7
Sperling Avenue	
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
10
10
6
Chilliwack:
1
3
2
2
1
1
10
11
5
6
4
12
34
18
6
12
4
3
5
3
Promontory Flats
R. McCaffrey	
2
1
3
5
2
3
4
6
12
10
18
R McCaffrey	
6
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
o
bn
U
s3
te
rd
M
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Cardiac, 5; asthma, 2; orthopaedic, 3
Cardiac, 4; nervous, 9; respiratory, 2;
orthopaedic,  3
Cardiac, 7 ; nervous, 7 ; respiratory, 2;
orthopaedic, 2
Stammering,  2;  cleft palate,   1; cardiac, 1
Nervous,  1; no thumbs,  1  	
Pulmonary, 1
Cardiac, 2 ....
Nervous,  1; cardiac,  2; pulmonary,  1
Pulmonary, 1 	
Cardiac,  1; orthopaedic,  2  	
Nervous, 2; partial paralysis,  1
Nervous, 1
Nervous, 1
Nervous, 2; flat chest,  1..
Cardiac, 1; paralysis, 1 ..
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic,  1
Nervous, 1 	
Cardiac,  1 	
Scarlet   fever,    3;    chicken-pox,
67; measles,  1
Chicken-pox, 3 ; scarlet fever, 3 ;
whooping-cough, 2
Whooping-cough, 2 ; scarlet fever,
4; chicken-pox,  17
Chicken-pox, 1; scarlet fever, 1;
whooping-cough, 5 ; measles, 3
Chicken-pox, 2; scarlet fever, 1;
whooping-cough, 2
Chicken-pox,  1; scarlet fever,  2
Chicken-pox, 7; whooping-cough,
3
Scarlet fever, 5; chicken-pox,  5
Chicken-pox, 7 ; scarlet fever, 2 ;
mumps, 1; Avhooping-cough, 2
Chicken-pox, 24 	
Chicken-pox, 3; scarlet fever, 1
Chicken-pox,    4 9;
scarlet   fever,
cough,   1
Scarlet  fever,   1   .
Chicken-pox,  45  .
Chicken-pox, 5 ...
measles,    1:
;;   whooping-
Chicken-pox, 8; scarlet fever, 2
whooping-cough,   2
Chicken-pox, 5; scarlet fever, 3
whooping -cough,  3
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Old   building;   good
lighting
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Old building; fair
condition
Old building; fair
heating and ventilation
Good	
Good	
Good	
Old school; fair ventilation and heating
Old building; fair
heating and ventilation
Good; good ventilation  and  heating
Both.
Both.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
adequate,
adequate.
adequate.
adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
adequate,
adequate.
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
SCHOOLS.
i
res.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean;
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Clean;
Good.
Clean ;
Good	
1
i
Good
i
i
Good
corrected vision,   19
8
2
1
corrected vision,  24
1
3
2
1
1
Good
Good
asthma, 1
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Crowded	
■
5
Measles; chicken-pox 	
i
adequate.
3
1
adequate.
i
I
 W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
5
Ph   .
0 r—
. o
O  Pfl
ft
fl   .
£•8
°l
ll
rU   01
fl
3
fl
3
0 .33
01 Sri
■3 oi
o!S
OK
333
Y,
?$
'22 fl
0 r.
01 «3
I33 in
Oi u
PM
'3
fi
01
■c
<
ig
■fi fi
fl 0
01
p fl
01   03
OH
T3J
Oj     .
ce fl
flrS
Qj
"5
O
Chilliwack—Continued.
43
38
17
24
68
44
39
63
22
112
7
172
25
15
19
21
25
14
3 5
11
49
255
8
51
33
23
533
165
28
54
26
68
23
40
23
94
153
83
104
136
68
20
34
33
28
20
157
382
25
72
185
40
• 94
107
51
69
71
56
19
142
48
29
59
63
9
74
59
38
38
13
24
62
42
35
60
19
107
6
153
18
11
15
21
22
13
34
10
43
247
8
50
21
23
533
158
28
43
25
63
23
34
22
83
139
72
97
116
64
19
27
33
26
20
138
315
22
50
144
35
86
101
48
57
61
47
19
135
40
29
58
38
9
70
59
4
2
9
4
2
0
2
2
9
6
5
4
3
5
10
2
8
1
12
6
7
5
5
5
8
1
18
1
49
9
3
1
3
7
6
5
2
13
■    27
3
6
5
10
120
5
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
12
4
9
1
1
1
1
 2
3
1
Coldstream:
S. G. Baldwin	
0
S. G. Baldwin      	
Coquitlam:
9
0
6
12
Glen	
0
2
1
1
Cowichan, North:
H. B. Rogers	
Miss N. Armstrong
Miss N. Armstrong
Miss N. Armstrong
16
4
3
1
1
11
1
11
2
9
1
66
5
4
2
5
9
5
5
2
14
36
4
16
8
12
60
73
14
1
3
1
16         2
1
3
3
Delta:
3
4
2
5
2
6
22
3
7
9
10
23
73
14
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
3
2
6
17
1
5
10
22
73
14
5
1
1
6
3
1
11
1
3
A. A. King
1
4
4
A. A. King
2
4
7
1
Westham Island	
1
9
9
1
3
3
3
1
13
10
5
6
2
4
3
13
2
Esquimalt:
Miss E. Morrison..
3
33
Kent:
Harrison River	
Langley:
2
7
County Line	
2
1
4
14
2
11
14
8
3
6
3
2
3
56
54
8
9
27
12
31
32
5
8
9
6
5
8
6
1
2
2
2
12
12
5
Langley, East	
2
17
3
11
12
2
1
3
0
Langley, Fort	
B. B. Marr
o
2
6
5
5
7
8
2
3
7
5
12
54
116
10
14
65
14
32
37
4
4
6
5
2
8
4
3
6
3
5
15
19
1
Langley Prairie	
2
2
1
1
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
F-
Otter	
Otter, South	
Patricia	
B. B. Marr
1
1
1
Sperling -	
Springbrook	
B. B. Marr
Maple Ridge:
1
7
10
1
2
5
3
2
2
2
4
1
1
Hammond	
4
0
1
5
Whonnock ....
Matsqui:
R  H  Port
0
1
R. H. Port	
1
1
1
3
3
1
->
R. H. Port     .
R. H. Port	
2
R. H. Port	
1
7
R. H. Port	
1
0
Peardonville	
R. H. Port	
1
3
R. H. Port
o
1
0
R. H. Port	
1
2
10
12
--
Mission:
4
1
1
1
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
d
■rS
n
£
p
Si
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good.
1
Good.
Good	
Good	
Dilapidated	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Whooping-cough,   7; measles,  4
1
clean,  1; granular lids,  1
tooth,  1
s
2
4
3
G
Varicella, 4; rotheln, 4; mumps,
47
1; acne, 4; conjunctivitis, 4
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Good	
Good	
3
Good	
Good	
Good.	
Good '.
Poor	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Crowded	
Measles,   2   	
2
G
o
Heart,   1   	
3
2
1
3
8
G
6
2
Yes.
2
Heating   poor;   furnace  broken
3
Well   out  of   order..
1
6
Good
O.K.
Good
O.K.
12
Good	
Good	
Good
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Crowded 	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
O.K.
O.K.
0 K
0 K
Chicken-pox, 15 	
,
2
Yes.
_
Yes.
Chicken-pox,  20  	
1
1           1
Yes
Clean;  adequate.
5
10
40
Whooping-cough,   3;  measles,  2
Dirty; poor condition.
 W 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
t>g
01.2
a>
OK
CC
Mission—Continued.
Mission	
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls .....
Stave River Gardens
Steelhead	
Oak Bay:
Monterey Avenue	
Willows	
Peachland:
Peachland.....	
Trepanier	
Penticton:
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows:
Pitt Meadows	
Point Grey:
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener	
Langara	
Lloyd George .....
Magee	
Oak Street	
Prince of Wales	
Queen Mary	
Quilchena	
Richmond:
Bridgeport	
Lord  Byng	
English	
Mitchell.	
Richmond, East * ...
Sea Island	
Trites	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill ,
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Gordon Head	
Keating	
Lake Hill	
A. J. Stuart..
A. J. Stuart..
A. J. Stuart..
A. J. Stuart..
A. J. Stuart-
A. J. Stuart..
J. N. Taylor..
J. N. Taylor..
Wm. Buchanan..
Wm. Buchanan.-
H. McGregor..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall..
D. Berman..
D. Berman..
Miss Bradshaw..
Miss Bradshaw..
Miss M. Ewart..
Mrs. Hyde and
G. Jeeves
Mrs. Hyde and
G. Jeeves
Mrs. Hyde and
G. Jeeves
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss M. Ewart..
Mrs. Hyde and
G. Jeeves
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss E. Naden..
381
19
13
35
10
15
273
001
112
18
13
33
10
15
307
601
107
3451  348
780
572
416
644
086
179
427
596
398|   350
462    450
721
565
389
631
683
173
407
21
108
165
277
58
20
108
157
273
42
70
10
18
49
20
30
44
38
36
55
55
4
29
45
17
7
10
6
152
29
20
10
3
126
61
70
23
25
3
48
103
34
29
24
13|.
J.
20[.
9
9
30
11
37
80
29 f
I
12
25
12
34
Not examined.
 SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
>
o
OQ
6
'+2
01
I
a
M
o
1
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
26
Chicken-pox,   20;   measles,   10;
whooping-cough,  20
Good...	
*
Good	
Good	
Measles;   scarlet   fever;   whooping-cough; mumps
Measles; mumps; whooping-cough
Excellent;   no   overcrowding; ventilation and heating
satisfactory
Excellent;   no   overcrowding; ventilation  and  heating
satisfactory
pulmonary,  1; orthopedic, 3
Anaemia,   10;   cardiac,   5;  pulmonary,
2; cleft palate, 1; diabetes, 1
Clean;  adequate.
Nervous,  9;  cardiac,   17;  asthma,   8;
skin,  23; bronchitis,   6; anaemia,  8
4
18
25
2
16
7
8
14
12
2
1
13
3
12
15
4
1
9
2
o
4
8
1
1
4
5
3
Excellent	
Mumps, 5; infantile paralysis, 1
Mumps,   4;   whooping-cough,   5;
scarlet fever,   1; chicken-pox,
45;   meningitis,   1;   infantile
paralysis, 1
Mumps, 10; diphtheria, 3; scarlet fever,  1; chicken-pox,  G3;
rubella, 2
Mumps,   7;   measles,   1;   whooping-cough, 2; scarlet fever, 1;
chicken-pox,  14
Mumps,   1; chicken-pox,   32  ....
Whooping-cough, 3; chicken-pox,
74; meningitis, 1
Scarlet fever,  3; diphtheria,   1;
chicken-pox,  91; rubella,  3
Mumps,   1;   whooping-cough,   G;
diphtheria,  2; chicken-pox,  3
Mumps,   2;  measles,   1;  whooping-cough, 1; scarlet fever, 1;
diphtheria, 1;   chicken-pox, 18
Mumps,    7;    scarlet   fever,    1;
diphtheria,  3; chicken-pox,   7
Mumps,   1;   whooping-cough,   2;
chicken-pox, 4 2; rubella,  3
Chicken-pox, 18; diphtheria, 2..
Measles, 15; chicken-pox, 4; tonsillitis, 5
O.K	
Yes; except drain
Visible thyroid, 57; cardiac, 19; anaemia,  6; orthopaedic, 8
Visible   thyroid,    67;   pulmonary,    1;
cardiac,   11;   orthopsedic,   7;   anaemia,  6
Visible thyroid, 33; pulmonary, 4; cardiac, 12; orthopsedic, 16; ana?mia,4
Visible thyroid, 32; cardiac, 4; anaemia,  1; orthopaedic, 4
Visible thyroid, 66; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 7; orthopaedic, 14; anaemia, 7
Visible thyroid, 69; nervous, 1; pulmonary, 4 ; cardiac,  7; anaemia, 2 ; orthopsedic,  13
Visible thyroid, 30; pulmonary, 1; cardiac,  4; orthopaedic,   1; anaemia,   1
Visible thyroid, 6 7; pulmonary, 1; cardiac,  13; orthopaedic, 8
Visible thyroid,  33; nervous,  1; pulmonary,  2; cardiac,  6; orthopaedic,
3;  anaemia.   5
Visible thyroid, 35; pulmonary, 2; cardiac,  6; orthopaedic, 9; anaemia, 1
7
2
4
4
9
7
8
1
5
2
age   at   No.    1
school.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good     	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good :	
Good .*.--	
Good.
Good.
Good.
O.K	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K	
O.K.
O.K.
Pneumococci meningitis, 3 ; pneu-
mococci peritonitis, 1; chicken-
pox, 2
O.K	
O.K.
10
O.K	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
Pulmonary,  8; cardiac, 5; ichthyosis,
1; stammering, 2
Pulmonary,   12;  cardiac,   13; chorea,
2; scoliosis, 12; asthma, 2; nervous,
1;   strabismus,   1;  rheumatism,   1;
lordosis,  1
1
2
1
3
3
4
1
3
Scarlet fever, 3; chicken-pox, 29
Scarlet fever, 2; chicken-pox,  1
Chicken-pox,    10;    ac.    catarrh
conjunctivitis,  3
Heating   and  ventilation poor
Good	
Good	
Good	
defective palate,  2; leucoderma,   1
1
4
1
1
palate, 3 ; scoliosis, 1; strabismus, 1
diac,   1;   pulmonary,   2;   umbilical
hernia, 2; scoliosis, 5
 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
P.
=1
fe   .
o|
. o
o y
ft
fl   .
Pl, ■a ■
AA   £
o 3
Zi   03
E3J
O
3
01 >>
03-g
% o
OS
01
f|
OJ  .M
Or*
ai   .
£ ti
CD   Ii
ca
d
r5
'3 2
03 4J
Oi rt
aa
"3
s
■d
1333
o   .
tz22
U  -r.
01
o 5
ppd
«1   .3
to p»
Or3
HO
01
o
O
Saanich—Continued.
Miss E. Naden ...
Miss F. Lyne	
Miss E. Naden 	
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden 	
Miss E. Naden   ....
Miss E. Naden   .. .
Miss E. Naden
151
85
40
92
38
04
107
278
293
20
42
26
26
35
38
51
64
34
22
93
312
19
74
200
26
30
26
25
82
19
51
51
48
110
40
■ 68
50
33
. 43
145
156
39
142
83
40
96
36
65
99
265
292
20
36
23
24
33
30
43
60
31
21
85
303
18
68
153
25
28
24
23
75
18
47
40
47
100
36
50
48
33
41
132
142
33
6
1
4
1
o
14
6
6
33
7
26
32
38
77
9
10
10
10
6
5
14
8
7
3
16
89
o
4
16
2
2
27
•
7
16
12
14
19
6
28
60
7
10
8
16
7
5
10
14
9
5
16
179
10
33
12
Model           	
J. P. Vye	
1
6
1
1
3
6
2
1
6
5
4
2
3
4
15
29
8
27
45
38
98
2
3
2
1
1
2
10
2
3
59
2
15
17
8
2
1
3
6
2
9
16
8
13
5
5
2
6
12
27
8
15
9
i
28
3
1
1
1
3
3
5
4
1
3
2
4
1
1
5
56
8
D. Berman	
1
4
1
11
11
2
o
41
54
D. Berman	
63
Salmon Arm:
2
2
9
2
13
9
3
7
1
3
1
4
76
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
4
52
4
Sumas:
5
2
1
5
14
2
3
Summerland:
87
Surrey:
2
6
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
2
2
1
3
1
4
1
1
2
8
1
1
6
3
6
2
5
1
2
6
5
12
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
4
Kensington, East	
Kensington Prairie....
1
5
1
1
o
3
6
1
2
7
4
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
Tynehead	
2
6
4
2
2
	
3
3
3
2
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 41
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Toxic goitre, 1; cardiac, 1; exophthalmic goitre, 1; congenital dislocation
of hips, 1; scoliosis, u ; pulmonary,
5; congenital lues
Chicken-pox,  1
Good.
Satisfactory.
Scoliosis, 4; lordosis, 1; T.B. arthritis,
1; otitis, 1; pulmonary, 1; stammering, 1
Nervous, 2; scoliosis, 3; umbilical
hernia,  2; ichthyosis,  1
Umbilical hernia,  1  	
Pulmonary, 9 ; cardiac, 1; pleurisy, 1;
scoliosis, 3; deformity of chest, 2;
umbilical hernia, 1; Xeroderma, 1;
strabismus,  1
Cardiac, 4 ; pulmonary, 1; strabismus,
1; scoliosis,   1; ichthyosis,   1
Pulmonary', 12; cardiac, 5; scoliosis,
9; nervous, 1; strabismus, 1; umbilical hernia, 4; psoriasis,  1
Pulmonary, 10; cardiac, 8; scoliosis,
15; nervous, 1; umbilical hernia, 3;
strabismus, 3 pes varus,  1
Cardiac,   1; blepharitis,   1   	
Chicken-pox,  7
Bubella,   1   	
Scarlet fever, 2
Bronchitis, 1; flat chest, 1-.
Cardiac, 1; cleft palate, 1..
Pulmonary,   2;  cardiac,   2....
Pulmonary,   1;   eczema,   1..
Keratitis,   1
Scoliosis,   1   .
Anaemia,   6;   cardiac,   3;   chorea,   1;
eczema,   6;  pulmonary,   1;   acne,   2
Underweight, 8; aortic murmur, 1;
defective  pupil,   1
Marginal blepharitis. 1; endocarditis,
1; abdominal T.B., 1
Underweight,   1   	
Underweight,   2; deviated  septum,   1..
Anaemia,    1   	
Chronic   infantile  paralysis,   1	
Underweight, 2; osteomyelitis, 1; marginal blepharitis, 1; defective palate
due to operation,  1
Underweight,      6;     endocarditis,      1;
pigeon-chest,    1;   high-arch   palate,
1;  anaemia,   1
Underweight,   4;  wax in ears,   1;  fct.
systolic,  1; rheumatism,  1
Underweight,   2;  high-arch  palate,   1;
anaemia,   1
Underweight, 7; pyorrhoea, 1; orthopaedic,  2
Systolic murmur, 1; endocarditis, 1;
pigeon-chest,   1;   underweight,   7
Underweight, 5; facial paralysis, 1;
marginal blepharitis, 2; deviated
septum, 1; eczema, 1
Underweight,   1; bronchitis,   1  	
Fct. systolic, 1; foreign body in ear,
1; underweight,  4
Infection in ear, 1; infection in nose,
1; infection in eye, 2; anaemia, 1;
foreign body in ear, 1; pigeon-
chest,   1; endocarditis,  1
Cleft palate, 1; wax in ears, 1; fct.
systolic,  1
Pigeon-chest,  1; cervical spine,  1	
Whooping-cough, 5; ac. catarrh
conjunctivitis, 6
Whooping-cough, 14; chicken-
pox, 13; ac. catarrh conjunctivitis,  1
Mumps .
Scarlet fever
Conjunctivitis; measles; chicken'
pox
Mumps; pinkeye
Pinkeye..
Mumps
Fair	
Good	
Satisfactory.
Good	
Good 	
One  room   overcrowded
Good	
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
One  room  poorly
heated
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate
Clean;  adequate
Clean;  adequate
Clean;  adequate
Clean; adequate
Clean; repair
necessary.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Modern;   8-room
frame;  concrete
basement and one
frame cottage; adequate
Yes.
Clean
Satisfactory	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good.
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good.
 W 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
> th
3  3
p
r5
0
<
A3
rSl
>
03 ~Z
^   01
01   rj
OH
6
20
10
10
16
14
2 5
45
40
13
31
19
2
2
8
23
39
104
29
77
181
8
11
6
13
24
92
21
37
119
25
60
129
18
44
140
11
23
149
11
35
39
47
71
121
18
32
78
16
52
130
15
37
108
29
61
118
1
12
36
3
26
155
2
39
142
Vancouver, North:
Capilano	
Keith Lynn	
Lynn Valley	
North Star	
Roche Point	
Vancouver, South:
General Brock..
Connaught	
Gordon	
Moberly and Fraser.
Richard McBride	
Sir A. Mackenzie..
John Norquay	
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith...
Tecumseh..
Van Home	
General Wolfe..
Vancouver, West:
Dundarave	
Hollyburn	
Pauline Johnson..
R. V. McCarley..
R. V. McCarley..
R. V. McCarley..
R. V. McCarley..
R. V. McCarley..
G. A. Lamont....
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
G   A
G. A.
G. A
G. A
G. A.
G. A.
Lamont	
Lamont	
A. O. Nash..
A. O. Nash..
A. C. Nash..
Miss E. Bell..
Miss E. Edwards..
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Bell-
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Edwards-
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Bell	
122
112
303
208
42
449
579
715
639
532
249
928
376
704
448
709
66
355
315
121
110
298
205
42
61
446
579
715
639
531
249
926
375
692
448
708
60
325
298
IC
14 ..
17|-
10
6
17
2
7
14
11
2
6
6
11
11
13
0
3
3
1
6
23
6
19
4
29
3
14
4
I
121     14
I
I
1|     10
71     23
I
5|     17
22
25
107
109
RURAL AND
228
8
19
13
20
12
58
12
8
7
11
27
12
19
54
12
12
11
200
8
19
13
20
9
58
12
8
7
11
24
8
19
53
12
12
9
12
1
6
22
26
36
22
J
3
K. W. Irving	
2
2
1
1
1
7
1
1
6
6
6
4
6
40
3
2
13
Miss H. Kelly
2
1
4
	
2
4
8
3
3
6
4
22
2
6
2
2
6
1
3
10
2
3
5
6
3
19
2
3
F. H. Stringer	
.1. T. Steele	
H. O. McKenzie	
1
1
G. E. Baker	
G. A. Charter	
2
1
2
7
7
13
3
6
W. E. Laishley	
0
2
1
3
3
3
2
4
3
4
1
2
8
1
1
12
2
2
M. G. Archibald   . ..
3
1
1
2
,T. H. Palmer  .
15
22
8
15
11
15
22
8
15
10
1
1
3
2
9
3
2
4
11
5
3
1
6
1
1
11
10
1
1
1
1
Roads washed out; unable to visit.
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 43
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
1
rS
02
o'
Si
03
n
S
a
o
ft
bo
13
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
6
5
20
6
2
4
13
3
5
4
Tes.
Satisfactory	
i"es.
orthopsedic,   2
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Diphtheria; whooping-cough 	
Smallpox,   8;   chicken-pox,   26;
mumps, 2 ;   whooping-cough, 2
Chicken-pox,    104;   mumps,   4;
whooping-cough, 2
res.
2
o
12
home visits, 135; vaccinations, 25;
poliomyelitis,   1
Carriers, 8 ; conjunctivitis, 3 ; vaccinations,  47; throat-swabs,  83; home
visits, 128
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Vaccinations 20; home visits, 58	
4
2
4
4
14
2
6
5
o
3
7
6
9
2
ii
10
3
9
5
4
1
15
3
10
5
8
7
11
8
14
1
1
4
7
2
3
3
Smallpox, 4; chicken-pox,  9	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
home visits, 26
Carriers, 7 ; conjunctivitis, 7 ; vaccinations, 15; throat-swabs, 116; home
visits,   150
Conjunctivitis,   11;   vaccinations,   18;
throat-swabs,  3; home visits,  87
Diphtheria,  8; chicken-pox, 43;
measles, 1; rubella, 1; mumps,
5; whooping-cough,   1
Whooping-cough,   10;   poliomyelitis,  1; chicken-pox,  92
Diphtheria,   1; chicken-pox,  26;
smallpox, 7; whooping-cough, 7
Smallpox,  10; chicken-pox,  1....
Diphtheria,  8; chicken-pox,  28;
whooping-cough,  1; smallpox,
18; mumps,  3
Chicken-pox,  6; mumps,   3   ..
Diphtheria,    2;   smallpox,    25;
chicken-pox,    19;    whooping-
cough,  6
Diphtheria,  1; chicken-pox,  33;
smallpox,  2; mumps,   1
Smallpox, 6; rubella, 4; chicken-
pox,   5 ;  mumps,   4 0;   whooping-cough,   1; diphtheria,   1
> Measles; rubella; chicken-pox-J
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
throat-swabs, 2; home visits, 109
Conjunctivitis,    3;    vaccinations,    5;
home visits,  46
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
tions, 46; throat-swabs, 207; home
visits,  261
throat-swabs, 1; home visits, 25
Conjunctivitis,   10;  vaccinations,   39;
throat-swabs,  43; home visits, 229
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
throat-swabs, 41; home visits, 49
Carriers,   2;  conjunctivitis,   11; vacci
nations,     17;    throat-swabs,     56;
home visits,   122
Ventilation had	
1
Both.
Good	
Both.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
Scoliosis,    1;    anaemia,    1;   ulcerated
i
1
Scarlet  fever,   5;  diphtheria,'   1;
measles,  1
mouth,  1
Good	
School needs repairing
Good	
Lighting poor; otherwise  satisfactory
3
Nasal catarrh,  2 ; anaemia,  1  	
i
	
i
	
1
1
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Not    crowded;    well
heated   and   ventilated
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory.
O.K	
Two;  in poor repair.
Good	
Good	
Badly kept.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
 W 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School N^rse.
Q
333
Z     .
t3J
■SrS
. o
O   rl
a
3   .
<r-, 3
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03   £
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10
92
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94
19
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.18
13
21
38
20
7
29
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27
12
19
13
10
15
22
47
23
26
9
8
45
20
10
7
10
20
7
20
13
10
28
65
14
8
18
28
7
29
9
24
18
12
13
19
14
14
22
22
138
14
8
20
105
14
50|
1
10
]     90
25
78
19
12
5
18
11
20
38
20
7
29
12
23
12
19
4
13
10
15
20
47
22
24
9
8
42
19
10
7
8
20
6
20
12
9
25
65
13
8
18
28
6
28
9
23
17
12
13
19
14
14
21
22
136
12
8
18
88
12
49|
l
,1
2
1
2
4
10
2
9
4
4
9
2
3
28
5
4
11
2
4
32
5
7
11
7
2
3
6
9
6
7
1
16
1
4
6
1
2
4
3
1
7
9
8
8
2
2
30
2
4
2
8
4
30
8
2
4
17
2
2
1
2
6
6
1
7
H. W. Keith	
F. E. Coy	
1
2
R. J. Wride
3
1
M. G. Archibald	
1
A. D. Morgan	
Miss M. Grierson..
1
1
2
6
3
3
4
2
4
4
3
2
8
1
9
1
2
4
o
4
F. T. Stanier	
Miss M. Claxton...
3
1
o
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
3
4
1
1
3
1
1
E. M. Sutherland	
3
1
2
5
4
1
1
2
3
16
6
2
2
3
14
3
6
2
3
3
5
6
4
2
1
3
1
15
7
2
15
7
1
3
1
F. T. Stanier	
Miss N. Armstrong
Bend     	
M. G. Archibald
G. K. MacNaughton.
J. T. Steele	
Miss 0. Garrood....
1
5
2
1
11
2
1
2
1
1
21
4
1
1
	
3
3
3
2
9
2
6
4
3
12
33
9
5
3
19
1
2
10
5
8
4
1
1
1
C. J. M. Willoughby.
N. J. Paul	
6
10
12
1
1
5
4
13
2
6
4
44
2
3
1
20
M. G. Archibald	
3
5
1
10
1
E. Sheffield	
3
1
1
4
1
2
6
Bloedel	
4
1
4
16
1
Blubber Bay	
K. Terry	
4
3
4
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
4
3
3
7
3
3
8
3
1
15
3
3
7
10
21
2
4
44
4
23
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
o
2
1
3
12
11
3
1
6
1
1
Miss J. Dunbar
2
3
1
o
1
4
2
19
14
4
6
2
12
5
2
12
1
10
6
25
6
5
1
17
1
16
5
2
2
2
9
9
1
2
1
5
1
4
J. H. Palmer and
J. B. Thorn
o
o
4
2
25
Britannia  Beach	
J. W. Laing	
•
i.
5,'
5
18
5
1
1
 BOARD OP. HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  ete.).
s
1
>
QJ
1
Tfl
6
i3
01
p.
a
a
c
o
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good.
Cough   of   nature   of   whooping-
cough
Good	
Yes.
Poorly   heated   in
winter
Bilateral   lighting....
Ventilation fairly adequate ;      heating
adequate
pair.
Good.
Good.
Yes.
3
Both.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good'.	
Good	
Yes.
Yes
Good	
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Fair   	
1
1
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Ventilation and light
good; heating adequate
O.K	
Satisfactory	
Poor  repair;   and
light; fairly heated
Adequate; well ventilated and heated
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
One;  poor  repair.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory.
One; unsanitary.
Two;    clean   and
adequate.
One   earth   closet;
clean; a second
one   should   be
built.
i
mia,    2;   blepharitis,    5;   defective
speech, 1
Colds :...
 ! 1	
 J ! 1	
	
Satisfactory 	
Good	
Good	
Poor   light;   heating
fair;      ventilation
O.K.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good..	
Good	
Good	
Two; clean.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Two; clean.
Clean; adequate.
1
Yes
Satisfactory.
Fair.
Chorea,  1; rapid cardiac,  3  	
2
Influenza; bronchitis 	
One; clean.
Fair condition.
Sanitary.
i
2
1
i
Adequate;  well ventilated and heated
1
1
Clean.
 I	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Overcrowded;  poorly
ventilated
Yes.
Clean; but should
be replaced.
Very clean.
Good.
Clean.
O.K.
 |	
1
Good	
Good	
Cardiac,  2  :	
2
Good   repair  	
Satisfactory	
Good
Insanitary.
Clean;  adequate.
	
	
	
Good	
Good   condition   in
every way
Dirty and in disrepair.
Clean; adequate.
i    i    i
....  ..... i ■.... i
Measles, 1; chicken-pox, 7	
1
 W 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
:  Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
'a
s
ft  .
UA    "S
0 r-j
.   O
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Britannia Mine	
Brookmere..!	
77
17
12
8
49
19
09
39
10
0
8
44
26
12
77
13
21
17
37
34
13
68
7
62
12
38
11
63
28
10
20
19
33
89
20
76
7
14
14
20
7
13
9
18
14
14
53
70
24
24
9
16
77
17
12
8
37
18
66
36
10
6
8
44
25
12
70
12
20
17
36
25
13
68
7
46
12
38
11
61
28
-10
20
8
25
85
18
76
6
14
14
20
7
13
9
18
12
14
48
70
24
21
7
16
9
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
4
3
1
19
3
3
32
4
3
9
2
8
1
1
J. J. Gillis	
Buckley Bay....	
J. C. S. Dunn	
Bull River	
H. A. Christie	
1
8
1
15
5
2
8
1
15
8
2
2
18
4
20
10
2
3
24
10
15
19
1
1
21
10
1
3
2
24
7
1
Burgoyne Bay	
E. M. Sutherland....
Burns  Lake	
J. T. Steele	
4
Burtondale	
2
Cache  Creek ...
1
Cahilty	
1
Campbell Creek	
Campbell River	
Camp No. 3	
R. W. Irving	
2
3
3
*
1
•j
1
1
1
7
1
3
4
5
3
1
6
3
10
5
6
3
1
1
3
1
3
10
13
2
2
5
4
1
2
12
1
7
2
15
2
6
4
12
5
4
16
4
3
9
11
1
1
T. A. Briggs	
J. J. Gillis	
2
1
1
4
4
7
C. Ewert	
E. Buckell	
10
1
7
Cartier	
W. Truax	
4
5
2
4
4
20
1
25
1
1
2
11
11
4
1
4
9
58
7
24
4
8
2
7
2
1
13
T. J. McPhee	
3
9
9
P. Ewert	
1
7
5
G. R. Baker	
Miss K. Snowden..
29
2
10
7
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
. 1
2
8
3
1
6
4
1
15
3
T. J. McPhee	
V. E. R. Ardagh	
2
2
2
1
5
23
3
16
3
2
2
13
2
2
M. E. Tiffin	
3
7
2
2
23
3
13
1
2
1
14
1
Chase Creek, Lower	
5
3
1
5
3
13
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
8
1
1
8
1
2
8
2
7
2
3
1
1
	
8
5
2
1
3
4
3
2
3
4
10
2
2
1
12
11
IG
3
2
8
9
25
5
2
6
6
10
28
5
9
3
4
8
13
11
11
2
12
3
17
4
2
8
10
15
21
10
1
1
6
2
2
4
2
2
3
3
6
7
3
	
*
6
2
2
2
3
E. Sheffield	
1
F. T. Stanier	
2
1
1
2
C. S. Williams	
5
11
I. B. Hudson	
Miss H. Kelly	
481      471
|
5
4
13
3
25
5
1
130
16
10
9
47
70
51
43
10
6
33
1
8
24
236
10
129
15
9
9
46
70
47
42
15
6
31
8
24
225
10
1
4
1
1
6
9
1
6
3
1
1
1
3
8
4
7
4
5
8
13
5
1
2
4
7
1
2
1
6
3
2
1
3
8
Miss N. Armstrong
Bliss M. Claxton...
Cowichan Station	
6
4
4
10
18
Crawford Creek	
Crescent Valley	
Creston	
Creston, West	
1
4
1
1
5
22
4
1
6
39
3
1
3
1
1
35
2
1
2
2
18
3
1
|
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
3
QJ
rt
a
w
d
01
Pi
S
a
f-i   ■
o
M
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Tear.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1       1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
No.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good.	
1
clean.
Good	
Good	
l
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Not very clean
Good	
Good	
Good.
Chicken-pox, 26 	
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Dirty.
Good.
O.K	
O.K.
Poor construction....
Good	
Good	
Good.
Yes.
Good	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
l
O.K	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
New frame building;
well ventilated
Ventilation poor
Pair	
Very good 	
Very good 	
Ventilation poor 	
O.K	
Yes.
5
Good.
Yes.
Inadequate.
O.K.
2
i
1
Pair :	
Dirty.
Good	
One   pupil,   with   defective   mentality,
vision,   and   hearing,   has   also   congenital dislocation of both hip-joints
School building
seated at present
to its utmost capacity,    but    not
overcrowded
Crowded  	
closet  required.
Yes.
Good	
Good; crowded
Good....	
Whooping-cough,  school closed-
Good;  clean  	
Not crowded; ventilation   and   heating satisfactory
Good; modern building
Not  overcrowded;
fair   heating   and
ventilation
Fair   	
Two; clean.
Acute pharyngeal catarrh,  3; chronic
pharyngeal   catarrh,   1
Chorea, 2; cardiac, 1; bronchitis, 1
l
I
	
Scarlet fever, 2; whooping-cough,
6; measles,  6
adequate.
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Hernia,  1; orthopaedic, 2; aneemia, 1;
overweight,   1
Otitis   med.,   2;   irregular   heart,   1;
backward,  1
Good.
Numerous cases of pertussis	
Measles,   10;  chicken-pox,   4....
i
1
Good	
Good.
Fair.
Fair  	
Yes.
Good	
Not crowded 	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Building   needs plastering
Good	
Yes.
Measles, 28; whooping-cough, 18
Chicken-pox,  6 	
3
2
Disorderly action of the heart, 1 .   ...
Good.
quate.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
|   	
Good	
Good	
 1	
Yes.
1
 W 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
«
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
3
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Robt. Elliot    	
16
13
10
10
22
10
6
16
33
13
9
58
11
72
30
13
10
17
7
8
10
13
11
10
10
8
23
15
8
17
33
14
19
15
27
5
53
23
16
18
12
8
48
16
20
23
18
90
10
28
52
7
67
20
14
6
14
13
10
10
15
10
6
15
31
12
9
55
10
71
30
13
9
17
7
8
10
13
11
8
10
8
21
12
8
16
31
14
19
10
18
4
50
23
16
16
12
8
40
15
20
23
18
85
10
26
49
7
65
20
14
6
i
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
2
4
4
2
1
2
1
W. A. Watson	
1
2
1
4
4
1
4
5
3
4
9
9
1
3
13
1
7
8
1
2
9
1
3
3
3
5
o
1
1
12
1
1
3
2
3
8
5
3
1
n
Dawson Creek, South....
W. A. Watson	
J. T. Steele	
3
1
4
H. W. Keith	
2
•    1
9
1
2
1
7
13
1
3
8
1
3
11
2
15
8
5
1
8
6
4
4
1
4
1
14
3
3
2
o
1
3
2
O
T. J. McPhee	
A. J. Stuart	
3
1
Diamond Crossing	
Miss H. Anderson
1
1
1
1
E. M. Sutherland	
G. R. Baker	
2
2
1
2
1
2
C
V. E. R. Ardagh	
F. Inglis._	
o
1
1
3
1
3
1
H. A. Christie	
o
T. A. Briggs	
2
0. H. Hankinson	
1
2
R. W. Irving	
R. H. Mason	
Dunster	
Duthie Mines	
3
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
4
1
4
1
E. Buckell	
G. A. Ootmar	
F. E. Coy	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
5
.>
J. E. H. Kelso	
2
1
3
1
3
7
2
3
9
1
10
Edith   Lake	
R. W. Irving	
2
7
3
11
2
2
9
4
4
8
11
7
5
8
F. Inglis	
1
F. J. Buckley	
1
H. A. Christie	
1
6
6
Elk Valley	
F. J. Buckley	
2
1
Ellison	
Elphinstone Bay 	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
3
1
4
3
8
5
6
3
8
2
1
14
14
3
4
4
6
2
5
3
5
e>
H. W. Keith._	
4
1
W. R. Stone
3
1
8
1
5
1
2
l
H. C. McKenzie	
Erie	
J. H. Palmer	
4
L. T. Davis	
Miss J. Dunbar
1
2
Evelyn	
Ewing's Landing	
1
2
G. A. Ootmar	
H. B. Maxwell	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
Miss H. Anderson
1
2
3
12
12
3
21
13
1
5
2
2
4
50
4
33
1
34
3
3
2
19
2
o
Falkland	
5
3
3
10
4
18
1
G. K. MacNaughton
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
1
2
2
4
4
1
3
1
1
1
Fauquier	
Field	
2
3
2
1
3
4
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
2
2
3
Fir Valley (closed)   	
G. A. Ootmar	
9
17
11
9
11
10
42
47
54
20
43
9
11
11
oo
9
17
11
9
10
10
42
46
51
20
43
9
8
11
22
1
1
2
2
2
1
4
3
1
4
3
5
3
4
1
7
1
3
16
9
8
4
4
1
2
2
5
3
5
5
11
19
23
7
4
5
6
2
4
2
,j
Flagstone	
H. A. Christie	
J. T. Steele .
3
2
2
2
3
H. C. McKenzie
P. Ewert	
W. A. Watson	
1
12
4
2
4
1
1
2
7
4
2
4
C. Ewert
3
4
2
2
5
7
Fort George, South	
Fort St. James	
W. R. Stone	
F. W. Green	
4
2
Four  Mile	
Francois Lake	
Francois, South	
Fraser Lake	
1
1
J. T. Steele	
2
2
J. T. Steele	
1
1
2
3
4
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-2$.
W 49
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
I
a
o
m
H
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
1
1
Good	
Good*.   ..
Yes.
Good
O.K. ...
O.K.
Good
Yes.
Good
O.K.
0 K.
15
Good
Frame building;
small and draughty
Two; good.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good
Good	
Small   log   building;
low ceiling; poor
light
Good
Clean; adequate.
1
Satisfactory	
Good
4
Building good 	
Good
Clean; adequate.
Fair;   needs  plastering
Satisfactory „*	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Good.
Yes.
3
8
1
Crowded;   room used
temporarily
Good
Clean; adequate.
Well ventilated
Old;   hard   to   keep
clean
Good	
Very clean.
Good.
0 K
O.K. .
Skin-disease, 2; wax in ears,  8; anae
Clean; adequate.
mia,   2;  blepharitis,   1;  headaches,
1; defective speech, 1
Rather   crowded   	
Very poorly situated
Clean; adequate.
Fair;   frame   building in rather poor
repair
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Unfinished   	
Not  good   	
quate.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Fair;   old   building-
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Clean
Satisfactory.
 W 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
fl
rU     .
O ;S
.  O
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11
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84
47
10
12
11
8
14
18
25
7
61
13
12
12
11
26
7
50
12
20
35
12
40
13
11
136
19
158
17
7
28
9
9
8
28
7
19
75
20
27
6
294
E
32
30
22
34
18
54
16
9
8
15
15
20
13
7
69
12
18
39
13
105
10
15
14
21
11
4
15
12
4
1
Miss J. Dunbar
50
80
40
10
12
11
8
13
18
25
7
61
13
12
12
10
16
7
49
12
20
35
10
36
12
11
121
19
158
16
7
28
9
9
8
24
7
19
61
20
.27
6
291
7
32
. 29
20
31
17
52
16
9
8
15
15
20
12
8
64
11
17
37
13
98
9
15
14
19
2
9
3
2
1
1
11
2
1
1
2
13
29
3
1
8
10
1
3
S. A. Widlace	
1
1
1
1
1
1
P. Ewert	
1
1
5
1
5
2
5
2
1
11
3
4
1
C  H. West     	
1
1
1
1
7
6
7
15
3
12
5
9
3
7
19
1
6
17
2
9
4
1
8
2
5
6
5
4
7
3
1
4
2
3
3
1
1
4
4
4
5
5
19
Gill..              	
A. D. Morgan	
Miss Grierson	
1
5
10
2
6
8
1
4
1
3
5
2
1
6
2
8
1
1
10
3
7
10
7
4
2
5
21
5
30
10
• 4
4
4
4
3
14
3
3
23
1
13
6
2
4
1
1
2
3
9
1
Miss M. Thatcher..
9
26
5
34
9
6
5
5
2
6
1
1
23
3
1
3
60
3
3
5
4
1
2
7
7
Mrs. E. Yard
11
6
2
.   1
1
3
2
i
1
2
2
4
2
1
2
4
1
3
8
A. D. Morgan	
Miss Grierson	
9
2
1
2
2
11
1
2
1
7
7
14
1
Miss H. Kelly
2
1
31
6
1
28
2
5
72
3
4
50
2
12
2
7
 5
~"ei
15
2
3
7
2
2
28
10
2
11
9
4
2
3
2
5
4
3
13
5
13
16
6
1
2
9
1
3
6
2
2
8
5
i
2
3
1
4
3
2
5
4
2
2
1
48
34
1
Heffley Creek, Upper....
1
3
4
8
8
1
18
3
4
14
2
33
4
3
4
8
3
1
4
1
2
7
1
Miss J. Dunbar
1
1
1
2
1
13
1
3
6
21
6
21
6
4
15
3
13
15
1
1
10
1
5
3
2
1
6
1
33
4
8
1
8
1
5
2
 2
2
1
2
8
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
W. E. Laishley	
1
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
>
rl
U2
o"
a.
ft
a
a
M
O
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Well heated 	
Good	
Good	
O.K	
Good.
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
Good	
Crowded  	
Good.
Rotheln,   1;  whooping-cough,   3
In   good   condition;
not crowded; well
ventilated; heated
with box stove.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Yes.
2
2
Good.
Building not
crowded;   ventilation   and  heating
good
good condition.
Good.
Very dirty.
■Con. dislocation of hip, 1; diabetic,  1
Crowded  	
Satisfactory	
Old; poor light and
ventilation
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Fits,  1; deformity,  1  	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Rapid heart, 1; slight valvular disease,
Satisfactory.
1
Cardiac,  1  	
1
O.K.
Yes.
	
Satisfactory.
Closets inadequate.
Good.
Disrepair;   insanitary
Good.
Yes.
Clean,  but should
be replaced.
Clean;   adequate.
tering
Good	
Poor  light;  fair repair
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Bronchial glands, 1; round shoulders, 1
Measles, 41; heart,  3; phthisis,  1	
o
5
3
0 K
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Spinal curvature,   1  	
1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
0 K
■Orthopaedic right foot,   1  	
Cardiac, 9; stutters, 1; anaemia, 1	
Good	
Good	
Well heated 	
Clean  	
Sanitary.
Yes.
Very clean.
Clean.
Good.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Two; clean.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Cardiac, 5; anaemia, 1 	
Crowded 	
Fair  	
Good	
Good	
Building hot
crowded;   ventilation   good;   heating fair
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Outside  toilets  in
good condition.
 W 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
Pi   .
<*- S
O r-H
.   O
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Ingersoll Mountain	
10
11
125
14
20
27
50
12
13
7
9
12
22
13
10
11
125
14
19
27
50
12
13
7
9
11
22
13
1
4
4
1
18
3
4
6
12
5
1
17
1
7
16
22
1
1
8
2
7
6
4
4
1
1
1
8
8
E. M. Sutherland	
2
4
2
4
3
IT. A. Christie	
H. G. Burden	
13
1
1
1
1
1
3
21
2
5
Johnson's Landing	
1
1
4
3
1
4
3
4
3
1
6
11
1
4
4
1
1
2
5
1
2
1
2
4
0
1
Kedleston (closed)	
H. G. Williams	
P. M. Wilson
9
12
61
18
70
6
10
13
12
14
5
465
11
7
8
9
10
9
23
158
12
8
15
25
15
10
12
14
10
14
15
54
15
7
9
68
15
31
27
17
18
10
18
13|
14
11
17
53
72
31
20
9
12
00
18
70
6
10
13
12
14
5
458
11
7
8
9
9
9
22
158
10
8
14
12
15
10
12
14
10
7
15
51
12
7
9
66
14
31
27
17
18
10
18
12
14
11
15
53
72
30
20
2
1
1
2
4
8
2
8
2
2
2
5
2
3
86
4
2
■>
Kelly Creek	
1
<>
G. A. Ootmar	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
Mrs. A. Grindron..
Miss K. Snowden..
1
1
1
1
3
2
7
2
110
1
5
3
4
4
6
5
65
6
1
5
4
1
2
9
4
4
19
6
0
13
1
45
37
1
1(>
Keremeos	
5
Kettle River, North	
5
2
1
Kettle Valley	
Kidd	
1
j
1
36
1
32
*>
13
2
49
4
r-
1
2
3
2
3
7
50
5
Kingfisher	
1
1
1
1
4
6
1
38
2
3
15
2
2"
2
16
4
26
n
1
Miss M. Claxton...
1
1
1
4
3
4
2
3
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
7
8
1
4
2
5
12
5
3
5
2
4
3
6
6
W. A  Watson
1
o
3
3
2
2
3
5
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
Miss H. Kelly
3
4
6
3
1
4
1
4
o
1
6
5
1
4
1
6
6
21
10
6
5
4
6
3
12
5
2
10
1
3
1
1
1
1
Miss J. Dunbar
1
2
6
2
1
5
4
2
1
5
4
8
4
8
3
7
1
3
2
7
5
5
5
1
11
31
1
2
1
o
1
2
2
4
*
1
1
3
F. W. Green	
3
2
3
7
<$
H. G'. Williams	
R. E. Ziegler	
1
5
1
5
1
1
5
P. M. Wilson	
1
1
 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
fl*
1
IS
oi
o
OS
6
sV
ft
s
r,
O
*
bo
c
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good.
5
G
Fair   	
Fair.
Spinal, 1; rheumatism, 1 	
1
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good... 	
Fair repair 	
Clean;  adequate.
Two; sanitary.
Good	
Good.
Fair.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Yes,
Anter.  poliomyelitis,  1   	
Excellent   	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Fair   *	
Good	
Good	
Fair.
Infantile   paralysis;   chicken-pox
Infantile  paralysis;  chicken-pox
Good  when
1
screened.
Good	
screened.
O.K.
Clean;    well    ventilated
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
i
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
8
 ^
Good	
Good	
Heart,  2  ...
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good        	
Yes
Good
1
3
Numerous cases of pertussis
1; onychia, 1
Asthma,    1;    infantile    paralysis,    1;
ichthyosis, 1
Clean;  adequate.
Fairly    clean    and
adequate.
Good .
Good	
Yes.
Very clean.
Two; sanitary;
adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good; adequate 	
Good
Building not
crowded;   ventilation   good;   heating fair
Building not
crowded;   ventilation   good;   heating fair
	
good  condition.
	
	
good   condition.
	
	
be   separate  for
the sexes.
Clean;  adequate.
Sanitary.
Dirty.
 W 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
Ph   .
<*- s
O £H
II
333     .
rsr-j
01
*. a
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3
3
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£ 9
03   H
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03   01
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a
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03  .2
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03
'3
O
H. G. Williams	
13
10
39
51
10
16
20
17
61
9
23
18
18
25
26
18
15
17
6
8
11
11
8
24
148
184
38
30
72
8
73
8
10
13
11
12
10
15
53
14
7
12
8
67
17
12
9
17
111
90
17
67
9
81
15
12
16
12
29
40
37
18
16
9
14
13
39
49
10
16
20
13
57
9
21
17
17
25
22
13
14
16
6
8
11
10
8
24
144
155
38
28
67
8
71
7
10
9
11
12
10
15
58
14
7
12
5
66
12
11
9
15
111
89
17
63
9
81
15
12
16
8
28
39
35
17
12
9
3
5
7
17
1
3
7
2
24
3
12
2
i
i
6
6
5
6
10
8
2
26
1
3
11
4
20
3
5
7
15
1
M. G. Archibald	
1
I
3
6
1
6
3
1
2
3
6
1
10
3
12
1
W. R. Stone	
1
l
2
2
5
1
3
3
1
1
1
2
H  W. Keith
W. R. Stone	
1
O
M. E. Tiffin	
J. C. Dunn	
C. H. West	
1
1
1
5
3
6
7
1
2
1
5
1
6
27
23
5
4
12
2
4
4
3
2
3
9
3
7
4
3
2
H. N. Watson	
Miss N. Armstrong
2
H. A. Christie	
5
3
5
2
M. E. Tiffin	
2
3
4
1
J. H. Palmer	
3
2
3
2
1
*>
H. G. Williams	
pr
G. A. Charter	
1
1
1
2
5
100
62
1
13
46
1
2
3
1
1
1
3
1
Menzies Bay	
R. E. Ziegler	
1
2
6
4
1
2
8
6
2
3
2
1
44
22
36
2
33
1
37
5
1
4
1
2
2
4
2
3
3
37
Mill Bay	
F. T. Stanier	
G. K. MacNaughton.
Miss Claxton	
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
19
3
3
Mission Creek	
G. A. Ootmar	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
23
1
1
1
It. E. Ziegler	
3
2
L. T. Davis	
Miss J. Dunbar	
Morrissey Mines	
1
3
5
-
Mount McPherson	
33
F. W. Green	
1
1
2
6
2
2
5
5
6
4
C. Ewert	
1
1
Myncaster	
1
3
5
17
4
2
4
4
8
12
1
1
32
9
2
1
5
16
13
4
35
McAllister	
2
3
4
1
2
5
1
10
5
1
-
McConnell Creek	
1
3
1
4
1
3
20
9
1
C. J. M. Willoughby.
1
1
1
1
2
6
2
1
2
1
1
1
10
7
3
23
8
Nanoose   Bay	
L. T. Davis	
Miss J. Dunbar ....
3
1
1
5
1
10
9
14
3
20
1
18
2
2
5
3
9
8
10
6
2
3
12
21
J". E. H. Kelso	
Newgate	
H. A. Christie	
2
2
2
2
6
8
2
1
5
18
14
14
3
1
10
2
6
1
1
5
3
1
J. J. Gillis .
1
2
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
2
9
2
9
5
6
5
1
3
1
J. J. Gillis.........
Nicomen	
r.
1
1
3
F. H. Stringer	
6
2
1
E. L. Garner	
Miss N. Armstrong
3
1
1
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
A.
>
rt
o
as
6
60
+3
01
ft
a
a
g
o
fl
u
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good.
Ventilation only fair
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Measles    	
Yes.
Good	
completed.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Excellent	
Building in good
condition; not
crowded; comfortably heated with
box stove
Poorly heated 	
Rotheln,  1;  whooping-cough,   3;
rheumatic  fever,   1;  chicken-
pox, 30
1
3
Yes.
Roomy; fair light....
Ventilation only fair
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Frame; adequate 	
Yes.
Good.
Not   crowded;   well
heated   and   ventilated
of both eyes, vision totally gone in
right   eye,   and   corneal   opacitis   of
left eye
quate.
Satisfactory	
Crowded	
Crowded 	
Arrested T.B.,   1   	
2
1
Measles; chicken-pox 	
O.K	
anaemia,  3; blepharitis,  2
Good.
Infantile paralysis;  chicken-pox;
diphtheria
Not very clean; will
be better next
year
Good	
and improved.
Good	
In good  shape	
Well heated 	
l
3
Good	
Good.
Clean; adequate.
2
O.K	
O.K.
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Old	
Good; lighting only
fair
Adequate.
O.K.
l
O.K	
Well heated 	
Frame; concrete
basement; adequate
Very clean.
Yes.
4
.
Rickets, 1; defective pulmonary valve, 1
Encephalitis,   1;  anterior  poliomyelitis,  1
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Building not crowded; ventilation
good; fair heating
Good	
good  condition.
0 K
2
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Dirty;   poor   condition.
Badly contracted nasal passage, 1 ....
10
12
Good	
1
 W 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
3
fc  .
-a
o£
. o
si
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81
59
97
8
15
21
186
28
24
30
56
14
94
12
15
15
16
9
8
8
12
29
68
7
42
12
26
10
7
11
12
12
85
24
23
20
17
8
20
53
13
16
19
9
8
25
47
18
8
10
10
30
14
9
16
429
12
210
12
37
84
17
21
7
95
12
21
11
9
23
8
32
8
81
58
84
8
14
20
185
27
24
30
56
14
92
12
15
14
16
9
6
7
12
28
61
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
4
1
3
1
4
12
1
4
11
1
5
20
12
30
5
6
7
40
2
2
6
9
10
20
4
6
8
7
3
1
2
2
4
3
2
9
37
20
19
3
13
27
1
12
15
3
1
12
1
14
T. J. McPhee	
7
7
S. A. Wallace	
7
2
23
1
1
7
16
1
24
4
3
Mrs. A. Grindron..
Mrs. A. Grindron..
14
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
3
1
5
28
1
7
1
7
9
2
7
2
11
46
3
7
Miss K. Snowden..
8
1
24
1
2
4
16
1
150-Mile House	
2
3
5
5
1
2
2
5
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
Othello	
1
1
3
6
1
1
20
1
3
2
H. G. Williams
7
38
9
24
9
7
11
11
12
85
23
19
20
16
6
20
52
13
16
18
0
8
24
47
18
8
10
10
30
14
9
16
417
12
204
12
36
78
17
20
7
93
12
21
11
9
23
S
32
8
1
2
. 2
9
2
14
1
8
3
6
3
2
6
14
3
11
2
4
1
3
-14
3
8
3
1
5
16
1
6
1
1
3
1
1
H. B. Maxwell
Miss H. Anderson
1
1
1
Miss H. Anderson
3
3
1
2
6
2
2
1
5
2
7
1
1
7
6
2
9
8
3
2
7
14
1
1
7
11
1
4
2
3
89
4
56
6
15
10
2
V. E. R. Ardagh	
1
'    5
3
J. T. Steele	
1
1
1
2
Miss N. Armstrong
3
1
4
1
1
Miss J. Dunbar	
3
P. Ewert	
1
4
6
1
2
2
1
6
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
o
3
1
7
2
1
1
2
S. A. Wallace
1
5
3
6
2
3
2
i
1
1
2
1
5
2
1
4
3. J. Gillis	
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
2
5
3
1
7
J  AV. Laing	
1
3
9
24
1
8
1
1
25
6
58
6
8
33
4
8
5
3
19
6
6
5
1
1
2
1
.
1
2
1
1
28
2
15
3
2
1
1
12
2
26
4
5
6
2
8
1
2
W. A. Watson
3
1
97
3
16
12
W. R. Stone	
1
2
2
3
3
o
7
32
2
4
8
3
L. T. Davis	
Miss J. Dunbar
1
1
3
1
3
1
2
1
6
6
G. R. Baker	
1
10
2
7
1
1
3
1
7
4
3
3
3
2
1
4
1
4
1
1
1
5
C. J. M. Willoughby.
4
1
1
L. T. Davis	
Miss J. Dunbar.
H. G. Williams
J. E. H. Kelso	
3
2
1
4
3
2
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
fl
fl
Or
IS
cd
u
W
d
en
ft
a
a
H
O
M
fl
(2
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Crowded 	
O.K	
Fair.
2
Measles,  4  	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
Required cleaning ..
Good.
Good	
Very good; well
heated   and   ventilated ;   no   overcrowding
Good :..
Heating very bad....
Orthopaedic,  2; cardiac,  2; stuttering,
1; defective speech, 2; humpback, 1
Infantile paralysis; chicken-pox;
smallpox,   1
Good.
Poor.
Good.
2; orthopaedic, 2
1
Smallpox, 2; infantile paralysis;
chicken-pox
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good       	
O.K.    .
Acute conjunctivitis, 2; asthma, 1 	
1
i
Supp.   otitis   media  with  influenza,   2;  rheumatic  fever,   1
O.K.
Good.
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Lighting poor 	
O.K.
Good.
Good.
Good	
Clean.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Need  improved  ventilation
Good	
Satisfactory
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Not overcrowded ....
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Heart,   1   	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good	
Fair   	
Fair.
Satisfactory	
Fairly satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Good; plenty of room
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate
Yes.
1
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
1
Good                     	
clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Good
G
Good
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Well heated.
Very clean.
Clean; adequate.
Good....
Clean;  adequate.
Good
Sanitary.
Very clean.
Fair; overcrowded....
Good
Sanitary.
I
 W 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
fc   .
"o^>
. o
11
Zt 13
m   03
CM   fl
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7
13
17
30
12
36
6
11
10
8
14
11
8
7
18
9
9
23
161
97
24
17
6
40
12
11
9
12
15
30
7
27
7
6
10
10
23
10
60
16
10
2
18
41
11
4
8
24
129
20
70
10
17
33
28
50
197
12
25
60
13
12
10
19
13
7
13
16
30
11
34
6
11
10
8
10
11
8
7
18
9
9
22
160
84
22
15
6
40
12
10
9
12
14
30
7
25
7
6
9
10
19
7
56
15
9
2
16
38
10
4
8
23
112
16
70
10
16
29
25
49
193
12
25
56
13
12
9
13
13
1
7
i
4
2
4
3
4
1
4
1
3
2
2
1
2
3
6
2
4
7
17
30
4
5
2
9
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
J. E. H. Kelso	
S. G. Mills..	
1
1
1
o
3
5
33
4
10
1
2
l
1
1
1
l
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
2
1
l
Rose Hill    	
1
1
1
2
5
8
4
19
4
2
31
3
5
2
o
9
11
1
12
2
3
1
10
5
23
3
3
1
2
1
.    4
3
o
2
1
1
1
3
4
1
2
3
G. K. MacNaughton.
2
1
1
3
1
1
Mrs. A. Grindron..
55
1
1
2
1
2
5
Miss N. Armstrong
7
5
o
3
1
3
2
5
1
9
8
10
2
5
1
2
9
1
7
2
2
3
5
1
5
1
1
9
2
1
o
1
1
4
6
2
1
Miss 0. Garrood...
Miss 0. Garrood....
Mrs. E. M. Walls-
Mrs. E. M. Walls..
11
1
8
3
3
1
7
M. G. Archibald
1
2
1
Sayward,   Upper	
F. H. Stringer	
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
5
1
3
2
3
2
3
2
4
1
1
3
1
1
2
4
3
3
4
3
13
4
4
1
2
2
2
1
3
3
14
4
12
10
2
i
12
2
2
8
Shuswap	
3
1
4
2
58
1
11
5
3
36
3
1
22
8
1
8
1
1
4
0
Silver Creek	
1
7
3
8
7
13
17
100
5
1
9
5
3
2
5
2
5
52
3
2
1
2
2
1
3
3
4
4
1
1
3
20
3
3
1
1
9
4
6
16
88
5
3
9
2
3
2
1
Slocan  Junction	
Slocan,  South	
3
7
3
1
1
10
6
3
17
1
3
23
1
3
2
3
Solsqua	
1
	
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
2
1
o
Sorenson	
1
1
	
2
3
4
4
4
o
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
3
1
01
1
xn
d
a
QJ
ft
|
s
hi
O
5)
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Yes
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good	
O.K	
1
Satisfactory	
Lighting poor 	
Good	
Dirty.
Yes.
O.K	
Clean; adequate.
Has to be changed
and screened.
O.K
ritis,  1
3
Infantile paralysis;  chicken-pox;
scarlet fever; diphtheria; smallpox, 6
Good	
.
	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good     	
Clean;  adequate:
Satisfactory	
Good	
1
1
Satisfactory.
Two   in   poor   re--
pair; dirty.
Clean; adequate:.
lighting good;
heating fairly adequate
Small   frame   building in only fair repair
Good -	
Yes.
Sanitary.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Building not
crowded;   ventila-
good; heating fair
Outside   toilets   in-
good   condition..
Satisfactory.
Insanitary.
Poor.
Good.
Dirty.
Good.
Fair.
None too clean.
No proper drainage
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Outside  toilets  in
good  condition.
Post, infantile paralysis, 1 	
Playground poor ....
Mumps;  varicella   	
Satisfactory	
Small   and   crowded
Building not crowded;  ventilation
good; heating fair
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Div.   2  crowded ~~
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 3 ; tachycardia, 2 ;
dull chest resonance, 3; heemic murmur,   1
Clean; adequate.
Clean; but should
be replaced.
Clean; adequate.
Overcrowded; poorly
ventilated
Scarlet fever, 5 	
ma,  1; ansemia, 2
Unsatisfactory	
Fairly   clean   and'
adequate.
Good	
Satisfactory.
 W 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
ft
3
fc    .
13
lM     QJ
CJ=I
. o
5S
A oi
a
fl   .
£■8
Pr.   C
ca
6 ^
Z, oi
ri
3
£ ■*-
SS
OS
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I*
t «
cu .12
03     .
£ a
oi rt
■Si oi
OK
01 +3
(0l  rt
'ol 2
on
.'3
'3
fl
01
13
13
oi . •
60^5
la
.=, °
01
01 22
01 £
»  S
OH
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01  „3
i- 13
^t fl
BrS
So
A.
"3
6
26
11
20
15
22
117
9
14
12
39
22
9
9
8
0
19
13
9
15
10
15
22
11
41
23
9
13
50
21
8
51
9
8
48
23
23
6
9
12
11
185
12
15
22
28
10
76
41
19
21
33
90
12
23
15
12
36
32
51
68
9
69
55
158
6
26
11
19
13
22
116
7
14
7
35
21
8
9
8
6
19
12
9
15
16
15
18
11
40
23
9
9
50
21
8
40
7
8
48
23
23
6
9
12
11
170
12
13
18
28
7
73
41
18
21
33
89
8
23
15
11
36
30
47
67
9
68
54
155
20
1
i
2
3
1
2
3
1
3
4
4
7
8
20
8
2
6
4
3
40
5
2
3
4
3
4
2
2
1
o
1
1
1
2
6
10
2
4
6
10
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
1
3
1
2
5
3
2
13
9
2
1
1
3
4
3
3
3
5
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
8
6
8
2
7
3
2
2
19
2
4
3
13
4
2
7
3
5
4
1
11
2
4
8
3
10
1
2
12
1
11
5
1
2
2
3
1
1
Suunyside Cannery	
1
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
6
14
2
1
2
1
1
2
3
3
2
3
3
8
4
2
4
4
3
3
8
8
1
7
1
3
1
4
2
1
3
6
3
14
2
J. T. Steele	
3
o
1
2
2
2
2
4
3
2
21
3
3
2
2
3
M. G. Archibald	
4
2
1
1
1
1
24
4
2
2
1
3
4
2
H. W. Keith !	
H. G. Williams	
1
2
1
7
9
41
5
2
8
7
2
2
3
4
4
15
2
1
41
11
2
8
7
3
16
8
7
4
15
22
2
3
23
4
8
4
5
2
45
34
13
3
26
37
2
14
9
4
27
8
32
22
8
15
3
27
1
E. Sheffield	
1
2
23
13
1
2
3
1
8
7
2
6
1
4
15
1
3
2
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. W. Hill	
10
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Mrs. C. A. Lucas...
1
4
1
3
1
2
12
1
20
1
3
3
4
C. J. M. Willoughby.
2
11
11
11
4
9
4
16
2
11
7
11
11
4
9
31
20
1
8
12
13
15
16
5
19
4
28
4
13
18
3
Waldo         	
1
2
2
o
o
1
4
3
6
3
4
3
2
2
2
1
2
5
3
1
7
13
3
19
7
4
17
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl"
1
>
01
V2
d
to
01
ft
a
a
fH
o
c5
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Fair 	
Good.
Clean and well ventilated
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
i
i
Good	
*
Poorly   lighted   and
ventilated
Good.                   	
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
Crowded; poorly
lighted
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Clean; tidy 	
Yes.
Sanitary.
In good condition.
1
1
i
i
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean;   but   more
is needed.
Satisfactory.
Clean;  adequate.
O.K.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Fairly  clean;  but
new  system required.
Crowded	
Improved ventilation
Satisfactory	
•
Heart,   2  	
i
Good	
Needed   improved
ventilation
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated  and
heated
Influenza;   whooping-cough
alimentary,  1
8
Building in poor repair;    ventilation
and  heating  adequate
Two   in   poor   repair; clean and
sanitary.
Two   closets;   not
clean.
Yes.
Good.
Clean;   adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Dirty.
Both.
Both.
Satisfactory.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
Sanitary.
Filth.y.
Good	
Poor   lighting  	
Very   good   	
1
r
Poor  lighting   	
Asthma,  1  	
Neither 	
Satisfactory	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Wooden; fair repair;
lighting good; ventilation   good;
heating adequate
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good   	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
O.K.
middle and inferior turbinate,   1
1
i
i
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
wax in ears, 3; cardiac, 1; anaemia,
1; blepharitis,   1
 ...
i
l
Influenza,   7;  tonsillitis,   10
Two   in   poor   repair.
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Clean.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
3
Scarlet fever,   1; chicken-pox,  5
Good	
O.K.
Yes.
_
1
l
Cardiac,  1; anaemia,  1 	
Diphtheria,  1 	
0 K
O.K.
1
 ...
O.K.
1          1
1
 W 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"S
3
fc    .
.0 £
. 0
8
1  .
fc-g
<W    fl
°a
'A s
ri
0
fl
■3
*A
01 £?
3ri "rt
» fl
"oi 01
a?.
01
| §
Pr»
03     .
£ ^o
9|
01 |
03 0
OK
r5
Gl  ttt
tS-Js
03  +3
01 rt
"^ £
QM
'3
c
03
pd
<!
rd
330^2
fl §
0
01 £2
03 +J
"333  01
03   oi
OH
■fl
01  A,
ga
rt fl
CrS
HO
03
'3
0
G. A. Ootmar	
Mrs. A. Grindron..
23
46
18
15
58
29
10
15
59
52
7
27
25
16
21
6
15
65
39
13
6
87
17
8
41
61
87
24
36
8
10
23
45
16
15
57
15
15
15
57
47
7
26
24
16
21
6
15
64
37
13
6
87
17
7
41
59
85
21
33
8
9
1
1
8
2
4
21
7
2
5
5
7
2
3
5
5
22
3
10
12
8
13
4
7
1
14
5
8
2
1
1
32
	
13
4
5
7
2
25
1
2
1
2
3
2
	
3
2
6
8
1
1
4
8
1
22
14
9
10
2
4
2
2
2
6
	
2
3
2
4
1
4
1
W. R. Stone	
F. E. Coy 	
4'
1
1
2
1
2
1
4
18
6
1
23
7
1
3
11
■     19
11
14
F. E. Coy	
1
1
2
Mrs. A. Grindron..
19
5
1
2
4
3
0
22
5
2
23
4
4
2
18
20
3
20
6
14
1
13
J. T. Steele	
V. E. R. Ardagh	
1
Woodflbre	
C. G. G. Maclean	
4
8
2
3
1
5
3
3
C. Ewert	
Wycliffe	
F. W. Green	
2
9
10
4
1
1
1
4
3
4
1
2
■ 1
2
11
6
5
8
11
6
Yahk	
Yale	
P. McCaffrey	
1
10
6
1
G. R. Baker	
Miss N. Armstrong
3
3
3
 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1927-28.
W 63
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
QJ
>
■V
IS
as
V
m
6
m
QJ
a
3
a
M
O
be
fl
u
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
Good	
Good.
Rather crowded
Good     	
Good.
Good.
Good;  crowded  	
Satisfactory	
Good           	
Yes.
Good.
1
Good	
Good.	
Fair.
Heart,   1   	
Building not
crowded;   ventilation   good;   heating fair
Good	
Cardiac murmur,   1   	
good  condition.
Yes.
Good   	
Good       	
Yes.
Good	
Smallpox,  2; chicken-pox 	
Good	
Fair.
Good condition; well
ventilated
Excellent; good ventilation, light, and
heat;    not    overcrowded
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.
92D-1028-3758
 

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