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Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources Annual Report 1979 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1983

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 Minister of Energy,
Klines and
Petroleum Resources
Annual Report
1979
ISSN 0.165-9356
  lb the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving. D.S.O.. O.B.E.. E.D.
Lieutenant Governor of the Province tf British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of ihc Ministry of Energy. Mines and Petroleum Resources is
herewith respectfully submitted.
r. h. McClelland
Minister af Energy. Mines and Petroleum Resources
Office of the Minister of Energy. Mines and Petroleum Resources
August 1980
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword
Chapter I—The Mining and Petroleum Industries in 1979
Chapter 2—Activity of the. Ministry
Chapter 3—Mineral Resource Statistics
Chapter 4—Petroleum and Natural Gas Statistics
7
9
37
83
135
Appendix—Directory 185
PLATES
Pinning for gold, an old method still extremely useful in prospecting-lraining al
the Ministry's field course on mineral exploration Cover and 2
Blast bole drilling. H.inner Ridge coal mine. Sparwood 8
Alton open-pit porphyry copper mine, concentrator and smeller in background 16
Canadian Superior Exploration Limited's water injection plant No. I. Inga oil field    30
I Hughes 500 helicopter dropping geologist on a ridge in Peace River Coalfields 36
Northair Mines Limited's team at the end of a mine-rescue competition 42
I Fire assaying for gold and silver. Analytical Laboratory Victoria 48
[Office calculations. Drilling and Production Engineering office. Charles Lake 60
I Hoi water bubbles up from small test bole at Meager Creek gcothcrmal prospect
near Pembcrton. its heat discolouring rocks in sircam (testing of prospect a joint
project of British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, federal Ministry of
Energy, Mines and Resources, and British Columbia Ministry of Energy,
Mines and Petroleum Resources) ... 76
Marion walking dragline at Grecnhills pit. Fording Coal Limited 82
Control panel. Imperial Oil Limited's gas plant. Boundary Lake 134
All photographs by R. E. Player. Engineering Assistant. Geological Division,
except plate on page 76. courtesy of British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
  FOREWORD
The Annual Report ol the Ministry for 1979 follows the format of the 1976 Report
Annual Reports have been published since 1874. from that date to 1959 as the Annuai
Report of the Minister of Mines, and subsequently as the Annual Report of the Minister of
Mines and Petroleum Resources. In December 1978 the Ministry was enlarged and a
reorganization started so that the report is now that of the Minister of Energy, Mines and
Petroleum Resources.
In 1969 geological and technical reports previously published as part of the Annual
Report were published separately as Geology. Exploration and Mining in British Columbia.
Starting in 1975, this technical volume has been divided into separate reports (hat are issued
as they are prepared, and eventually bound together. Detailed information on mine safety,
fatal accidents, dangerous occurrences, etc., was included in the Annual Report until 1973
for 1974 was issued separately, and subsequently forms pan of the separate volume Mining
in British Columbia.
The Annual Report for 1979 contains four chapters—a general review of the mineral
and petroleum industries, a chapter on the activities of the Ministry, one on the statistics of
the mineral industry, and one on the performance of the petroleum industry.
  The Mining and Petroleum Industries in 1979
CHAPTER 1
CONTENTS
Chapter 1—The Mining and Petroleum Industries in 1979.
Introduction	
Revenue to the Crown
Pm.i
9
II
15
The Mining Industry in 1979.. 17
Metals 17
Coal  19
Industrial Minerals 19
Structural Materials 19
Provincial Revenue from Mining Companies 19
Expenditures by Mining Companies 20
Mining and Treat ment 21
Metals Mines 21
Concentrating 21
Smelting, Refining, and Destination of Concentrates 21
Non-metallic Mines 22
Coal Mines 23
Exploration 24
Metallic Minerals 24
Major Exploration Activity 25
Non-metallic Minerals _ 27
Coal 27
Coal Resources 27
Coal Exploration 27
The Petroleum Industry in 1979 31
Drilling  31
Production 31
Operation Problems in the Field 32
Exploration and Development 33
Land Disposition 35
 10 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
FIGURES
Page
1-1 Major mineral commodities produced in 1979 by value  13
1-2 Growth of the mineral industry in total value in actual dollars and deflated dollars 14
1-3 Percentage value of mineral industry sectors  14
1-4 Direct revenue to the provincial government from the mineral and petroleum
industries, 1979  15
1-5 Quantities of major metals produced, 1885-1979  18
1-6 Major mines, 1979 (greater than 1 000 tonnes of ore)  facing 21
TABLES
1-1 Mineral Production of British Columbia, 1978 and 1979  12
1-2 Direct Revenue to the Provincial Government from the Mineral and Petroleum
Industries, 1979                                                 15
1-3 Revenue from Mineral Resources, 1979 _  19
1-4 Expenditures by Mining Companies  20
1-5 Indices of Metal Exploration  24
1-6 Value of Production of Petroleum Industry, 1979  31
1-7 Provincial Revenue from Petroleum Industry, 1979  31
1-8 Oil Discoveries, 1979                                    34
1-9 Gas Discoveries, 1979  34
J
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 11
INTRODUCTION
By Staff of Mineral Resources Branch
The value of mineral production in British Columbia reached a new record exceedins
S2.9 billion, showing 50-per-cent growth over 1978. However, much of the growth was the
result of better commodity prices and exchange rates rather than increased production.
The top 10 commodities in 1979 in order of value were natural gas. copper, coal
molybdenum, crude oil, lode gold, silver, lead, cement, and sand and gravel. The value of
natural gas has now surpassed the value of copper, this being the only change of position of
the top five from 1978, both zinc and asbestos remained outside of the group and lode gold
and silver moved up in the ranking reflecting the dramatic and speculative improvement in
prices for these precious metals over the year. Natural gas assumed the top place for the
second time, previously held in 1977. Structural material commodities—sand and gravel
and cement—each moved up British Columbia is Canada's leading producer of copper,
molybdenum, lead.and coal, anda major contributor to Canada's production of natural gas.
zinc, asbestos, cement, gold, and silvec The mineral production of 1979 is shown in detail
in Table 1-1 compared to 1978. and the production in 1979 is diagrammed on Figure I -1.
All major sectors of the mining and petroleum industries experienced substantial
growth. The metals sector accounted for the most substantial increase due to significant
metal price increases and some production increases during the period. Of the top 10 value-
ranked commodities, only copper, molybdenum, and silver showed decreases in production
while all 10 showed increases in value. The total value and percentage change for the various
sectors are as follows:
Metals
Petroleum and natural gas
Coal	
Structural materials
Industrial minerals
The growth of the mineral industry and the changing proportion contributed by the
various sectors is illustrated by two diagrams. Figure I -2 shows the growth in total value in
actual dollars and in deflated dollars. Figure 1-3 snows the relative proportion contributed
by the various vectors. In both diagrams these trends are shown in five-year increments to
1970 and yearly thereafter Comparisons of the figures reveal major shifts in trends and
demonstrate growth of specific commodity sectors. The important changes illustrated arc as
follows:
(1) A dominance of mclaK throughout the whole period, but a fairly constant
decrease in importance since 1935.
(2) The collapse of the coal industry between 1945 and 1970, related significantly to the conversion of railways to oil.
(3) Rapid growth of petroleum and natural gas between 1955 and 1965.
(4) Regeneration of significant coal production related to growth of export
markets from metallurgical coals in the early 1970s.
(5) Surge i n value of metals related to copper and mo Is We nu m product ion in
1972 and 1973 when the major porphyry deposit open-pit mines came on
stream.
(6) The increase in value of natural gas in 1975 and 1976.
(7) The relative decrease in importance of metals, dropping below 50 per
cent of the total for the first rime in 1975, and the significant rise in
importance in 1979.
1179 V.loc
s
Ctunflc
1*1 Ccnl
1 350 776 761
+ 64.8
896 377 125
+ 57.6
439 280 152
+ 15.0
178 539 129
+ 25.7
84 474 280
+ 42.0
 12 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 1-1— Mineral Production of British Columbia, 1978 and 1979
1978
1979
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Metals
Units
kg
 kg
 kg
 kg
459 521
28 172
253 803
273 692 676
36 515
6 542 332
615 569
81 064 539
13 055 203
S
2 083 895
166 452
1 186 320
431 694 395
295 001
47 951 880
11 597 462
51 640 564
167 714 272
177 046
33 809
239 096
272 163 001
214 106
8 062 810
668 026
84 451 905
10 766 497
280
214 117 518
240 984
88 418 642
S
916 081
173 667
1 417 506
656 359 923
 g
101 481 156
Lead	
 kg
 kg
88 100 363
 g
227 271 890
261 863
95 618 111
45 071 509
3 675 508
52 048 701
4 652 559
94 700 656
Tin	
Others	
 kg
 k*
3 818 948
61 890 891
5 027 280
819 778 518
47 066 170
59 346
56 894
1 186 160
3 110 695
1 422 018
5 647 993
922 085
1 350 776 761
Industrial Minerals
Asbestos t
68 266
2 184
22 475
26 849
733 080
488 759
322 181
94 286
1 452
27 741
30 074
722 933
258 505
383 724
65 520 069
33 025
Fluxes , t
129 035
1 458 987
Gypsum and gypsite ...Vr>
Jade	
Sulphur	
Others	
 t
 kg
 t
5 155 924
1 325 777
9 616 390
1 235 073
59 471 361
56 140 564
6 282 560
6 929 484
8 410 065
64 227 295
18 030
84 474 280
Structural Materials
1 020 065
1 336 080
Lime and limestone t
2 445 053
2 841 920
38 315 952
405
2 880 138
2 488 389
46 241 983
2 194
8 037 476
 t
 l
71 918 633
19 700
142 007 998
381 895 241
178 539 129
Coal
 t
9 463 920
10 570 370
439 280 152
1 403 153 118
145 005 524
1 836 217
10 269 861
157 111 602
40! 373 236
5 932 766
4 513 447
2 053 119 931
Petroleum and Natural Gas
Crude oil	
2 004 699
25 386
155 503
2 139 963
32 549
184 398
Plant condensate	
m3
2 569 418
13 396 500
Natural gas to pipeline	
Butane	
Propane	
10>m]
m3
1 gas
8 003 029
106 580
85 732
11 392 641
112 683
84 864
699 508 127
7 122 711
4 851 698
Subtotals ,	
411 819 449
711 482 536
Total petroleum and natura
568 931 051
896 377 125
1 972 084 169
 THE MINING AND PI
. 1 KOI.I.I'M INDUSTRIES IN 1979                       13
METAtS^^
5*                     \
/7/>\
JSsTROLEUM ««.
/iCs^-^^v*** *** \
g^£
S
1
;;»;                 h'	
°A
p 'i m'^-Xii* \
*»*
Figure 1 -1 —Major mineral i
-ommoditics produced in 1979 by value.
The value of the production of the <
various sectors is shown throughout their history of
1 production on a log graph. Figure 3-1.
 14
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Figure 1-2—Growth of the mineral industry in total value in actual dollars
and deflated dollars.
y.'.i'.'.i'.'.t'.'.i'.'.i'.'.t'.'A'.'.t'.-
P .TROLEUM
AND
I  NATURAL  GAS
1900   05    10
20     26     30     35     40
50  55 60 65 70 71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79 1980
Figure 1-3—Percentage value of mineral industry sectors.
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 .5
REVENUE TO THE CROWN
Direct revenue to the provincial government in 1979 from the mining and petroleum
industries is as shown on Figure 1 -4.
LANDS SERVICE HEKTA
il?M
Figure I -4—Dircci revenue lo the provincial government from the mineral
and petroleum industries. 1979.
Table 1-2—Direct Revenue lo the Provincial Government from the
Mineral and Petroleum Industries. 1979
Petroleum Industry—
Crown reserves—disposition
Rentals and fees
Crown royalties
British Columbia Petroleum Corporation—
Net revenue from sales
Mining Industry—
Claims, fees, and rentals
Royalties
Mineral taxes
Lands Service—
Rentals and royalties on structural materials
Total
191 041 60S
21 474 379
45 935 056
257 875 000
4 728 366
4 401 036
52 306 415
I 198 090
578 960 147
  If
THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 17
THE MINING INDUSTRY IN 1979
By A. Sutherland Brown and F. C. Baskam
The total value of solid minerals set another new record, $2.1 billion, up 46.3 per cent
from 1978. This was achieved in the face of slight declines in output of some major metals
Increased commodity prices, favourable currency exchange rates, and increases in coal
production more than made up the difference.
Table l-l and Figure 1 -1 show the quantity and value of solid minerals produced in 1979
and the table compares these with production in 1978. The ratios of the various sectors of the
mining industry are as follows: metals, 65.8 per cent; coal. 21.4 per cent; structural
materials, 8.7 per cent: and industrial minerals. 4.1 per cent. The only significant change
from 1978 was a dramatic increase in the share of metal value.
Metals
The growth and long-term trends of the quantities of major base metals produced are
shown on Figure I -5 on a I i near graph. These, plus gold and silver, are shown on a log graph
on Figure 3-2.
Lead and zinc production advanced sharply in the period 1920 to 1943. thereafter
starting a slow decline, a feature dependent principally on the production history of the
Sullivan mine. In contrast, copper production remained at a modest level until the onset of
major porphyry copper production in the late sixties. Molybdenum production also started
its growth in this period, related principally to mining of porphyry deposits. Precious metals
arc not shown on Figure I -5 but are on Figure 3-2. Their history since the decline in the
forties increasingly has been related to by-product origin related to production of base
metals at massive sulphide and porphyry deposits. However the sharp rise in precious metals
prices will quickly return gold and silver niining to prominence.
In 1979 conditions for copper producers continued an improvement started in 1978.
Copper price, having been low since the sharp peak of 1974. advanced significantly during
the year. Favourable currency exchange rates and a lowering of world copper stocks also
added to the improved market and the increased value of production. Copper, al $656.4
million, contributed 48.6 per cent of the value of the mcials produced and 32.0 per cent of
the value of solid minerals. The quantity of production was down because of the closure of
the (iranduc mine in mid-1978 and a prolonged strike at the Gibraltar mine that started May
26. 1978. and continued into 1979.
Molybdenum markets continued to be very strong, and the value of production in
British Columbia rose 91.5 per cent to $321.2 million, despite the protracted strike at
Endako. The quantity produced, however, was down 2.3 million kilograms or 17.5 per cent
due again to the strike at Endako
Zinc production was also down 7.5 per cent, however, the value at $62 million was up
18.9 per cent due to increased price from an average of 54 cents per kilogram to 70cents per
kilogram.
Lead fell to eighth position, with a value of $88.1 million, well ahead of zinc. Unlike
some of the other major metals, production quantity was up 4.2 per cent and. with markets
continuing fairly strong from the preceding year and with the price rising, the value was up
70.6 per cent.
Gold (lode) surpassed silver in value for the second time since I960, to become the third
most valuable metal. Production was up 23.2 percent to 8 062 810 grams with a value of
$101.5 million This resulted largcl\ from the sizeable new production from Alton mine. In
addition, the average price of gold advanced from $7.33 per gram to $12.58 per gram with
the result thai the value of production was up 111.6 per cent to $101.5 million.
 18
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
750
325-
-700
300
-650
275-
i
-600
250-
V
-550
225-
500
<0
LU 200
Z
z
1
Ii.
O    175-
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_J^J            t.JJ                                                                          J
B0
18
90             18190        '    1900 19.6 "1920 'l930 1940          * 1950 I960 1970 »
Figure 1-5—Quantities of major metals produced, 1885-1979.
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 19
Silver value was up 110.1 percent to $94.7 million although production was down 5.8
per cent. This resulted from the significant price increases during the year from $6 25
(U.S.) per ounce in January to $21.79 (U.S.) in December.
Iron concentrate production was up 8.5 per cent over 1978. This was a significant
portion of the production of former years, although now almost entirely the product of one
mine, Tasu (Wcsfrob). The value of production was $13.0 million.
Of the minor metals, tin production fell 8 per cent below 1978 to 240 984 kilograms
with an increased value of $3.8 million; bismuth production was up but both antimony and
cadmium were down.
Coal
Coal was ranked third in value after natural gas and copper. Production was up 11.7 per
cent to 10.6 million tonnes and value was up 15.0 per cent to $439.3 million.
INDUSTRIAI Mim rai.s
Production value of industrial minerals increased by 42.0 per cent to $84.5 million.
Asbestos production was 94 286 tonnes compared lo 68 266 tonnes in 1978.
Sulphur production quantities were up with a value of $9.6 million in 1979.
Structural Materials
Value of most structural materials was up significantly for the eleventh year in a row.
with the total value of SI 78.5 million being up 25 7 per cent over 1978. Production of all
commodities were up except rubble, riprap, and crushed rock. Sand and gravel al $71.9
million and cement ai $80.0 million, the two most important stniciur.il materials, were both
up significantly. They advanced to become respectively ninth and tenth most valuable
commodities in the province, following lead and ahead of zinc for the second time.
PROVINCIAL REVENUE FROM MINING COMPANIES
Direct revenue lo the provincial gov eminent in 1979, derived from the mining sector of
the mineral industry, is shown in Table 1-3. The amount for mineral royalties shown is the
amount collected after adjustments for 1978. For coal licences and rentals, the amount
shown includes cash paid in lieu of work, some of which may be refundable. The rentals and
royalties on industrial minerals and structural materials were collected by the Lands Service
of the Ministry of Environment. The total revenue is about S62.6 million compared to $39.7
million in 1978.
Table 1-3—-Revenue from Mineral Resources. 1979
%
Claims I 985 509
Coal licence fees and rentals collected 2 742 857
Coal royalties 4 235 987
Iron ore royalties 161 312
Mineral land taxes 9 887 110
Mineral resource taxes 23 779 286
Mineral royalties 3 734
Minim; taxes 18 640 019
Rental and royalties on industrial minerals and structural
materials (Lands Service). . I 198 090
Total 62 633 904
 20 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
EXPENDITURES BY MINING COMPANIES
Major expenditures in 1979 by companies involved in exploration, development, and
mining of metals, minerals, and coal are shown in Table 1-4.
Table 1-4—Expenditures (Mining Companies), 1979
$ S
Capital expenditures      192 152 327
Exploration and development  167 768 513
  359 920 840
Mining operations (metals, minerals, coal)  515 930 264
Mining operations (structural materials)  76 462 348
Repair expenditures               173 136 225
Total  1 125 449 677
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MAJOR   MINES  1979
Metal Mines
Geological Class
r/V   &
PORPHYRY Cu, Mo
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SKARN  Cu, Fe
X
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117°
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ns-
Name of Mine
Mines in British Columbia Which Produced More Than 1 000 Tonnes of Ore in 1979
Products
Metal Mines
Horn Silver	
Highland Bell	
Gold Belt	
Scranton	
Arlington	
Silmonac	
Sullivan	
Lynx, Myra	
Sim i 1 kameen	
Brenda....
Craigmont
Lornex ....
Bethlehem
Afton	
Warman	
Island Copper..
Boss Mountain
Gibraltar	
Endako	
Granisle	
Bell (Newman)
Tasu	
Erickson	
industrial Mineral Open Pits
and Quarry
Torrent	
Western Gypsum....
Mineral King	
Brisco	
Parsons	
Cassiar	
Coal Mines
Bryon Creek (Corbin)	
Kaiser (Harmer Ridge; Balmer
North and Hydraulic)
Fording   (Clode   Creek   and
Greenhill)
Coleman (Tent Mountain) 	
Ag, Pb, Zn,
Cu
Ag, Zn, Pb,
Au, Cd
Au, Ag, Cu,
Pb, Zn
Au, Ag, Pb,
Zn
Au, Ag, Cu,
Pb
Zn, Pb. Ag.
Cd
Zn, Pb. Ag.
Cd
Zn, Cu, Ag,
Pb, Au, Cd
Cu, Ag, Au
Cu, Mo, Ag
Cu
Cu, Mo, Ag,
Au
Cu, Ag, Au
Cu
Au, Ag
Cu, Mo, Ag,
Au
Mo
Cu, Mo. Ag
" Mo i||
Cu, Ag, Au
Cu, Au
Fe, Cu
Au, Ag
Barite
Gypsum
Barite
Barite
Barite
Asbestos
Coal
Coal
Coal
Coal
NTS
Location
O--Open pit. U—Underground.
82E/4E
82E/6E
S2F/3E
82F/14E
82F/14W
82F/14
82G/12W
92F/12E
92H/7E
92H/16E
92I/2W
92I/6E
92I/7W
921/10E
92J/3E
92L/11W
93A/2W
93B/9W
93K/3E
93L/16E
93M/1E
103C/16E
104P/4E
82G/13W
82J/5W
82K/8W
82K/16W
82N/2E
104P/5W
82G/10E
82G/10, 15
82J/2W
82G/10W
Rated Capacity
of Mill/Cleaning
Plant
(Tonnes/Day)
140
110
140
9 500
900
13 600
22 000
4 860
40 900
16 800
6 350
426
34 500
1 590
36 330
24 500
12 260
11 800
7 300
136
2 450
Small
3 630
1 700
28 000
17 000
Mine1
Type
U
u
u
u
u
u
u
o
o
o
u
o
o
o
u
o
u
o
o
o
o
o
u
u
o
o
u
u
o
o
o, u
o
o
Name of Company
Dankoe Mines Ltd.
Teck Corp. Ltd	
Goldbelt Mines Inc.
David Minerals Ltd.
Edward Shukin .
Kam-Kotia Mines Ltd. and Sil
monac Mines Ltd.
Cominco Ltd. (Sullivan mine)
Western Mines Ltd	
Similkameen Mining Co. Ltd.
Brenda Mines Ltd	
Craigmont Mines Ltd.....
Lornex Mining Corp. Ltd.
Bethlehem Copper Corp..
Afton Mines Ltd	
Northair Mines Ltd.
Utah Mines Ltd	
Noranda Mines Ltd. (Boss Mt
Div.)
Gibraltar Mines Ltd	
Placer Development Ltd. (Endako Div.)
Granisle Copper Ltd	
Noranda Mines Ltd. (Bell Copper Div.)
Wesfrob Mines Ltd. (TasjiK	
Erickson Gold Mining Corp	
Mountain Minerals Ltd	
Westroc Industries Ltd	
Mountain Minerals Ltd	
Mountain Minerals Ltd	
Mountain Minerals Ltd	
Cassiar Asbestos Corp. Ltd.
Byron Creek Collieries Ltd.
Kaiser Resources Ltd	
Fording Coal Ltd	
Coleman Collieries Ltd	
Company Address
2002, 1177 W. Hastings St., Vancouver V6E 2L6
1199 W. Hastings St., Vancouver
V6E 2K5
507, 318 Homer St., Vancouver
V6B 2V3
1020, 475 Howe St., Vancouver
V6C 2B3
Box 247, Slocan V0G 2C0	
420, 475 Howe St., Vancouver
V6C 2B3
200 Granville Square, Vancouver
V6C 2R2
1103, Box 49066, 595 Burrard St.,
Vancouver V7X 1C4
14th Floor, 750 W. Pender St., Vancouver V6C 1K3
Box 420. Peachland V0H 1X0	
700, 1030 W. Georgia St., Vancouver
V6E 3A8
510, 580 Granville St., Vancouver
V6C 1W8
2100, 1055 W. Hastings St., Vancouver V6E 2H8
1199 W. Hastings St., Vancouver
V6E 2K5
333, 885 Dunsmuir St., Vancouver
V6C 1N5
1600, 1050 W. Pender St., Vancouver
V6E 3S7
1050 Davie St., Vancouver
V6B 3W7
700, 1030 W. Georgia St., Vancouver
V6E 3A8
800, 1030 W. Georgia St., Vancouver
V6E 3A8
17th Floor, 1050 W. Pender St., Vancouver V6E 2H7
1050 Davie St., Vancouver
V6B 3W7
500, 1112 W. Pender St.. Vancouver
V6E 2S3
203, 1209 E. Fourth St., North Vancouver V7J 1G8
Box 700, Lethbridge, Alta	
Box 5638, Postal Station A, Calgary,
Alta. T2H 1Y1
Box 700, Lethbridge, Alta	
Box 700, Lethbridge, Alta	
Box 700, Lethbridge, Alta	
2000, 1055 E. Hastings St., Vancouver V6E 3V3
Box 270, Blairmore, Alta	
1500 W. Georgia St., Vancouver
V6G 2Z8
200, 205 Ninth Ave. SE., Calgary,
Alta. T2G 0R4
Box 640, Coleman, Alta	
Mine Address
Box 190, Keremeos.
Beaverdell VOH 1A0.
Box 549, Salmo
V0G 1Z0.
Box 634, Kaslo.
Slocan.
Box 189, New Denver.
Box 2000, Kimberley
VIA 2G3.
Box 8000, Campbell
River.
Box 520, Princeton
VOX 1W0.
Box 420, Peachland
VOH 1X0.
Box 3000, Merritt.
Box 1500, Logan Lake
V0K 1W0.
Box 520, Ashcroft.
Box 937, Kamloops.
Squamish.
Box 370, Port Hardy
VON 2P0.
Hendrix Lake.
Box 130, McLeese Lake
VOL 1P0.
Endako.
Box 1000, Granisle.
Box 2000, Granisle.
Tasu.
Cassiar.
Box 603, Invermere.
Box 217, Invermere
V0A 1K0.
Box 603, Invermere.
Box 603. Invermere.
Box 603, Invermere.
Cassiar VOC 1E0.
Box 270, Blairmore,
Alta.
Box 2000, Sparwood.
Box 100, Elkfbrd     \
V0B 1H0.
Tent Mountain
T0K 0M0.
 tn* uT"
MAJOR
Metal Mine
Geological Class
1 PORPHYRY Cu,
| SKARN Cu, fe
| MASSIVE SULP
STRATIFORM PI
h
OTHER
Industrial IV
Coal Mines
ton
C^nl4hem
^ Lorn4x
BrendaY      .
Highland Nil *
.     ■„© \
Im-sen.    I   .   ;
Hornsii>fe*v
Silmonac^
Ar|ingt°n*L
Gold B<
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 21
MINING AND TREATMENT
Metal Mines
Metal mining prospered more in 1979 than for a considerable period previously
because world stockpiles were reduced, over capacity was largely eliminated so that prices
rose as a result. In addition, Canada's relative position was enhanced by favourable currency
exchange with our metal trading partners. Almost all metals participated in the strengthening of markets. However, a number of factors held production of many metals to about what
they were in 1978. Nevertheless, the dollar value of metals produced rose 64.8 per cent
during the year to a new record of $1.35 billion.
In 1979, 62 mines produced an aggregate of 85 410 000 tonnes of ore which was
concentrated or stripped directly to a smelter (see Tables 3-12 and 3-13). This contrasts with
42 mines in 1978 which produced 87 724 973 tonnes of ore. Thus aggregate tonnage was
reduced by 2.4 per cent in 1979. Of the 62 mines. 23 produced more than I OOOtonnesand
these are shown on Figure I -6 classified as to product, geological type, and whether open pit
or underground.
In 1979,13 mines produced more than 1 million tonnes. These large mines produced
an aggregate of 84 441 335 tonnes or 98.9 per cent of the ore mined. Ten of the large mines
are open-pit operations, including in order of output. Lomex, Island Copper. Gibraltar.
Brenda, Sbnilkameen, Bethlehem, Bell, Endako, Granisle. and Alton. The three others.
Sullivan. Tasu. and Craigmont. are underground mines. In aggregate these underground
mines produced almost 5 million tonnes or 5.8 per cent of the total tonnage. In regard to
geological type, all 10 large open-pit mines are porphyry deposits of copper and/or
molybdenum. Of the large underground mines, the Sullivan is a silver-lead-zinc mine of
stratiform type whereas Craigmont and Tasu are copper-iron and iron-copper skam deposits
respectively.
Two intermediate mines operated in 1979. each of which produced between 100 000
and I 000 000 tonnes. These are the Lynx and Myra and Boss Mountain mines, both chiefly
underground operations. Lynx and Myra is a massive sulphide deposit, and Boss Mountain
a porphyry molybdenum deposit with some open-pit production. The aggregate tonnage to
medium mines was 762 985 tonnes or 0.89 per cent of the total.
There were eight small mines with production between 1 000 and 100 000 tonnes a
year. These are all underground mines producing from vein deposits whose principal values
arc in silver or gold and silver with by-product base metals. The mines in order of production
tonnage are the Warnian (Northair). Highland Bell, Erickson. Horn Silver. Silmonae.
Scranlon. Arlington, and Gold Belt, producing a total of 201 197 tonnes.
Changes during 1979 included the staff of shipping from Erickson gold mine near
Cassiar.
Concentrating
In 1979, 31 concentrators operated (see Table 3-12). Four treated copper ore, five
copper-molybdenum. 15 lead-zinc (silver-gold), two molybdenum, two copper-iron, one
copper-lcad-zinc. and two gold-silver ores. Many of the lead-zinc-silver concentrators are
old ones in the Slocan area with a small throughput.
Smelting. Refining, and Destination of Concentrates
Most of the lead-zinc concentrates produced in the province are smelted and refined
here as well as some from outside the province, but, for th* first tin» since the closure of the
| Anyox smelter in 1933. copper was smelted within British Columbia. In March 1978 the
Afton rotary top-blown converter started continuous operations and produced 19 827
tonnes ol blister topper in 1979. This unique smeller near Kamloops is operated by Tcck
Corporation in conjunction with the Afton poiphyry copper mine which produces low
sulphurconccntraics. The Trail lead-zinc smeller and refinery of Cbminco Ltd continued its
 22 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
modernization to improve environmental aspects and productivity. Molybdenum concentrates are processed at Endako where both molybdic trioxide and ferromolybdenum are also
produced.
The smelter at Trail received concentrates and scrap from a number of sources—
principally company mines within the province (Sullivan), and the Pine Point in the
Northwest Territories, and custom sources both inside and outside the province. The smelter
received 142 223 tonnes of lead concentrates and 130 152 tonnes of zinc concentrates from
the Sullivan mine and 10 953 tonnes of lead concentrates and 16 230 tonnes of zinc
concentrates from other British Columbia mines. The total value of concentrates, including
by-product metal from British Columbia treated at Trail, was$209 150 106or 15.5 per cent
of metal production of the province in 1979.
Endako shipped products containing 3 738 530 kilograms of molybdenum from 12
tonnes of molybdenite concentrates, 6 205 tonnes of molybdic trioxide, and 104 tonnes of
ferromolybdenum.
The proportions of the total value of metal production going to the various destinations
are not known accurately but are approximately as follows: smelted or treated in British
Columbia, $281.9 million (20.9 per cent); shipped to other parts of Canada, $87.9 million
(6.5 per cent); exported to Japan, $574.4 million (42.6 per cent); exported to the United
States, $128.4 million (9.5 per cent); exported to Europe, $253.6 million (18.8 per cent);
other or unattributed, $24.4 million (1.8 per cent).
The destination of concentrates of the major metals is as discussed following and
shown in Tables 3-13A and 3-13B.
Copper concentrates produced in British Columbia were shipped to the following
destinations: Canada, 77 960 tonnes; the U.S.S.R., 74 541 tonnes; Japan, 651 199 tonnes;
Spain, 43 478 tonnes; elsewhere, 80 228 tonnes.
Details of the disposition of molybdenum (10 766 497 kilograms valued at
$321 228 104) are not precisely ascertainable but from known sales, 42 per cent of the total
was shipped to Europe, and about 27 per cent to the United States and about 24 per cent to
Japan. The balance was disposed of to many other countries and eastern Canada.
Zinc concentrates, produced but not smelted in British Columbia, totalled 21 519
tonnes, all of which were shipped to the United States.
Iron concentrates produced in British Columbia were sold to the following markets:
Japan, 362 224 tonnes; the United States, 202 525 tonnes; Australia, 24 893 tonnes;
Canada, 78 384 tonnes.
All lead concentrates produced in British Columbia in 1979 were smelted in the
province.
Non-metallic Mines
Industrial minerals in British Columbia with production value greater than $1 million
include asbestos, sulphur, gypsum, jade, barite, and granules (see Table 1 -1). Asbestos is by
far the most important, its production value of $65.5 million represents 78 per cent of the
total for all industrial mineral production. Asbestos production is entirely from the Cassiar
mine. Sulphur is produced entirely as a by-product, chiefly from Cominco Ltd.'s roasting
operations, but also from sour gas production in the Peace River. Gypsum is produced
chiefly at the Windermere quarry at Westroc Industries Limited (722 933 tonnes). Granules
are produced in many small quantities but production was dominated by the International
Marble & Stone Company Ltd. with a plant at Sirdar near Creston. In 1979 production of
jade again exceeded $ 1 million. Production came from many sources but the main mines are
working in situ nephrite at Provencher Lake (Primex Exploration Ltd.) and east of Dease
Lake (Cry Lake Minerals Ltd.).
Barite, an important industrial mineral, not specifically listed in Table 1-1, was \
produced by Mountain Minerals Limited from three small underground mines near Brisco,
 THE MBTING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979
23
Parson, and Torrent and tailings from the Mineral King mine at Toby Creek, all in the East
Kootenays.
The dominant structural materials produced are sand and gravel, cement, limestone
clay products, and riprap, crushed rock, and bullding-stone. Individual mines and quarries
are not shown on Figure I -6. Many of these products are produced at a large number of small
quarries, some of which have very intermittent production. Limestone production is
dominated by four mines (Ideal, Imperial, Vananda, and Domtar) on Texada Island. The
Cobble Hill quarry (British Columbia Cement Company Limited) on Vancouver Island is
being phased out. Significant operations are also located at Harper Ranch near Kamloops
(Canada Cement 1 .alarge Ltd.), Ptarmigan Creek near Quesnel (Quesnel Redi-Mix Cement
Co. Ltd.). and Pavilion Lake (Steel Brothers Canada Limited).
Clay and shale production in British Columbia is dominated by Claybum Industries
Ltd.'s pit and plant near Abbotsford, with lesser production by Haney Brick and Tile
Limited, east of Haney.
Cow. Mines
Coal is the third most valuable mineral commodity in British Columbia, following
natural gas and copper, and unproved its position vis-a-vis these products in 1979. Although
coal is widely distributed in the province, the major producing mines are at present
concentrated in the Qrowsnest Coalfield of southeast British Columbia. They are represented by five symbols on Figure 1-6 for (I) Fording Coal Limited's two open pits, (2)
Kaiser Resources Ltd.s open-pit complex i Manner Ridge). (3) Kaiser's two underground
mines (Balmer North and Hydraulic), (4) Coleman Collieries Limited's Tent Mountain
open-pit mine, and (5) Byron Creek Collieries Limited's open pit. The only other producing
coal mine is Bulkley Valley Collieries Limited's mine at Telkwa which was a very minor
producer of thermal coal. The Sukunka colliery of BP Minerals Limited near Chetwynd
operated to test mining methods during part of the year. Production for Kaiser's and
Folding's mines are consolidated in Table 3-SB so that only five operations are shown.
Kaiser Resources Ltd. and Fording Coal Limited produced 89 per cent of the coal mined in
the province in 1979.
Some salient facts about coal production in 1979 are as follows:
(1) Coal production was up significantly to 10 570 370 tonnes, a new record, 11
per cent above 1978.
(2) Clean coal output was up 16 per cent to 10 583 650 tonnes.
(3) The value of coal sold and used was S439 280 152. up 15 per cent to a new
record.
(4) About 94 per cent of raw coal produced in 1979 comes from surface mining
operations, virtually unchanged since 1978.
(5) About 92 per cent of raw coal produced was metallurgical coal.
(6) The percentage of clean to raw coal was 72 per cent.
The diversification of markets started in 1977 and has continued. Although coal sales
to Japan increased to over 7.9 million tonnes, up 12.7 percent, they now represent only 71
per cent of total production. Major shipments were as follows: Tunm
Korea 798 097
Brazil 254 684
Spain 153 569
Denmark 133 413
Italy H5 42I
Mexico 59 999
t . c.-i 227
laiwan ■" "'
Greece 49665
Chile 49 315
Sweden 49 218
 24
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Shipments in Canada were up 66.6 per cent, with 667 807 tonnes to Ontario and
46 102 tonnes to Manitoba. Use in British Columbia was down with 159 737 tonnes used
for coke, a decrease of 45.3 per cent while other uses dropped about 5 per cent to 59 337
tonnes.
EXPLORATION
Total exploration during 1979 showed nearly 50-per-cent increase over 1978 because
metal exploration was up significantly. In contrast exploration for coal was down slightly
and for non-metallic minerals down significantly.
Table 1-5—Indices of Metal Exploration
Exploration expenditure1	
Claims recorded	
Certificates of work	
Free miners' certificates—
Individual	
Companies	
Number of properties	
Total drilling (metres)2	
Total geophysical surveys (kilometres)1
39 403
8 484
562
409
92 802
4 835
$
27 183 927
28 970*
36 729
7 826
555
433
97 277
4267
$
26177
37
39
389
151*
711
566
520
564
303.6
623.5
S
) 475 341
37 242*
65 705
9 444
531
647
154 177
9 135.5
S
I 810 829
55 252*
76 233
14 591
643
781
216 962
27 520
* Unit modified grid system.
1 Compiled by Economics and Planning Division.
2 Compiled by Geological Division.
Metallic Minerals
The indices of metal exploration indicated in Table 1 -5 all show accelerated exploration
effort. Total expenditure was up 80 per cent, claims recorded were up 48 per cent,
certificates of work up 16 per cent, free miners' certificates up 54 per cent, number of
properties receiving work up 21 percent, total drilling up 41 per cent, and total geophysical
surveys up 200 per cent. That exploration programs were more mature than previous years is 1
shown by the ratio of money spent per property.
Metal exploration in 1979 was more broadly based and widely distributed than in recent
years. Major increases in exploration occurred in the southern Kootenay region, the j
southern Interior, southwestern Cariboo, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the eastern fringe j
of the northern Coast Mountains. A great variety of metal received major exploration effort j
but emphasis was on pure molybdenum deposits and precious metals. Nevertheless for the
first time in years there was a major exploration for lead-zinc-silver that was rewarded with
considerable success. The pattern of recent years in regard to copper continued —marginal
levels of effort in porphyry deposits but a considerable effort in regard to massive sulphides,
principally in the Omineca Belt.
The strong market outlook for molybdenum sparked an intense exploration effort for
pure molybdenum, molybdenum-tungsten, and copper and molybdenum porphyries. In the
Coast Tectonic Belt major molybdenum projects include Omni, Redbird (Craigmont Mines
Ltd.), and Salal Creek (BP Minerals Limited). In the Intermontane Belt, the principal]
molybdenum exploration property is Glacier Gulch (Climax Molybdenum Corporation of
British Columbia, Limited) at which a further underground drilling program was con-1
ducted. In the Omineca Belt, Boya (Texasgulf Inc.), Trout Lake (Newmont Exploration of j
Canada Limited and Esso Resources Canada Limited), Butters Creek (Noranda Exploration I
Company, Limited and Amax of Canada Limited), and Carmi (Union Oil Company of I
Canada Ltd.) are the principal sites with Trout Lake starting an underground exploration and J
drill program. Butters Creek is a new discovery made as a result of the Uranium Reconnaissance Program's regional geochemical survey.
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 25
Gold and silver deposits were the targets of major effort shown by programs widely
distributed in all but the Eastern Marginal Belt. Major exploration included the Babe
(Consolidated Cinola Mines Ltd.) and Court and Buckhom (Chevron Canada Limited) in
I the Queen Charlotte Islands: Morris Summit (Scottie Gold Mines Ltd.) and Big Missouri
(Western Mines Limited) in the Stewart area; Spectrum (Consolidated Silver Ridge Mines
I Ltd.) and Chappelle (Du Pont of Canada Exploration Limited) in the north-central Inter-
■ montane Belt; Capoose (Granges Exploration Aktiebolag) and Black Dome Mountain
(Barrier Reef Resources Ltd.) in the southern Intermontane Belt; Hanna Gold (United
llearnc Resources Ltd.) and Vollaug (Silver Standard Mines Limited) in the northern
[ Omineca Belt near Cassiar.
Most of these are vein deposits of modest size but a few. such as the Babe, propose bulk
I mining. Many of these properties were assisted by the Ministry's program of mineral
exploration incentive in 1978 or 1979.
One of the most important developments has been the discovery of significant zinc-lead-
■ sflver-barite shale-hosted deposits in the Liard Trough extension of the Selwyn basin, that is,
[ the Northwestern Rockies. Here many showings have been discovered in the favourable
■ Devonian Gunsteel Formation. The principal discovery so far is the Cirque deposit of
i Cyprus Anvil Mining Corporation and Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Company Limited with
reserves defined to date of IS million tonnes of 2.3 per cent lead. 6.9 per cent zinc, and 49
grams per tonne silver: The potential exists for considerably more at this deposit and the
nearby Elf, Fluke. Pie (Rio Tinto Canadian Exploration Limited), and Driftpile (North
Gataga Joint Venture). These appear to be the most important lead/zinc discoveries in
British Columbia since that of the Sullivan mine in 1892. In addition, a major deposit of
bariie-Iead-zinc-silver in the same stratigraphic interval has been identified at Mount
Alcock within Kwadacha Wilderness Provincial Park.
Copper has continued to be sought in polymetallic massive sulphide deposits but only in
i a minor way in porphyries. The largest new program is Craigmont's Qui Chua near the
I North Thompson River where the deposit occurs in the upper felsic portion of the Mississip-
pian Fcnnell greenstone. It has reserves of about 2 million tonnes of 2-per-eent copper plus
[ some zinc-gold-silvcr. The Kulcho deposit in the northern Omineca is continuing to be
! explored by Sumitomo Metal Mining Canada Ltd. and Esso Resources. The only new
i porphyry copper deposit extensively explored is 20th Century Energy Corporation's deposit
on Gambler Island in Howe Sound near Vancouver
Uranium exploration was greatly reduced in 1979 with only six or seven moderate drill
programs and only a major one by PNC Exploration Ltd. at Puki. Doncn. and other nearby
I claims.
Major Exploration Activity
The major increase in mature exploration programs is shown best by the fact that 16
properties were reported as completing programs exceeding 3 000 metres of drilling or 300
metres of underground development. This contrasts with nine properties in 1978. These
nonproducing propenies. defined as conducting major exploration by the previously mentioned criteria, are listed following.
Trout Lake (Newmont Exploration of Canada Limited and Esso Resources),
82K/I2E—molybdenum in stockwork within a small granodiorite plug intruding
argillite. phyllitc. siliceous schists, and carbonates; IS diamond-drill holes.
6 987 metres, and 197 metres of adit development.
Aley, Bear (Cominco Lid.). 82L/4W—molybdenum in quartz veinlels in a quartz
porphyry stock and copper in pyroxenite: 37 percussion holes. 2 683 metres, and
3 diamond-drill holes. 80S metres.
Maple Leaf (Banbury Gold Mines Ltd.), 92H/8E—gold in quartz stringers indiorite:
8 diamond-drill holes. 3 084 metres.
 26 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Keystone, Julie, What, Mag (Western Mines Limited), 92H/1 IE—molybdenum in
stockwork in a quartz diorite stock (Tertiary); 3 NQ-BQ diamond-drill holes,
3 611 metres.
OK, Alwin (DeKalb Mining Corporation), 92I/6E—copper, gold, and silver along
shear zones in Bethsaida granodiorite; 1 464 metres of decline and level development and 1 581 metres of underground drilling.
Jersey Pit Area (Bethlehem Copper Corporation). 92I/7W—27 diamond-drill
holes, 7 320 metres.
Rainbow (Seadrift Resources Ltd.), 92I/9W—copper in fault zone and tectonic
breccia at the contact between two phases of intrusive rocks; 10 diamond-drill
holes, 3 070 metres.
Poison Mountain (Long Lac Mineral Exploration Ltd.), 920/2E—copper, molybdenum, gold, and silver in fractures associated with feldspar porphyry intrusive
rocks (Tertiary ?) and sedimentary rocks (Jurassic/Cretaceous); 6 diamond-drill
holes, 1 235 metres, and 22 percussion holes, 2 023 metres.
Chu Chua (Craigmont Mines Ltd.), 92P/8E, 9W; 82M/5W, 12W—numerous small
massive sulphide deposits in mafic and felsic volcanic rocks; 22 diamond-drill
holes, 3 475 metres.
Redbird (Craigmont Mines Ltd.), 93E/6E—molybdenum and copper in stockwork at
the periphery of a quartz monzonite stock (Tertiary); 35 diamond-drill holes,
9 060 metres.
Ned, D (Granges Exploration Aktiebolag), 93F/6—zinc, lead, silver, and gold in
rhyolite; 12 diamond-drill holes, 1 787 metres, and 36 percussion holes, 1 615
metres.
Chappelle (Du Pont of Canada Exploration Limited), 94E/6E—gold and silver in
quartz vein system; 39 diamond-drill holes, 3 500 metres, and 240 metres of
underground development.
Babe (Consolidated Cinola Mines Ltd.), 103F/9E—gold in volcanic and sedimentary
rocks cut by the Sandspit fault system; 48 diamond-drill holes, 8 840 metres.
Morris Summit (Scottie Gold Mines Ltd.), 104B/1E—gold in fractured sedimentary
and volcanic rocks; underground development, 325 metres, and 14 diamond-drill
holes, 855 metres.
Jeff (Esso Resources Canada Limited), 104I/1W, 2E—massive sulphide deposits in
volcanic rocks; 29 diamond-drill holes, 6 852 metres.
Adanac (Placer Development Limited), 104N/11W—molybdenum in fractures and
quartz veins in members of the Surprise Lake batholith; 49 diamond-drill holes,
5 775 metres.
The following properties recorded continued (Stage I and/or II) development with the
Metal Mines Steering Committee:
Aurum, Idaho, Pipestem (Carolin Mines Ltd.)—development of haulage adits,
tailings, and environmental studies.
Kutcho Creek (Esso Minerals Canada Limited)—access road and environmental
studies.
Dolly Varden (Dolly Varden Resources Limited)—tailings disposal study.
Adanac (Placer Development Limited)—tailings and townsite studies.
Valley Copper (Cominco Ltd.)—this deposit is being reconsidered in light of a
possible smelter operation.
Goldstream (Noranda Exploration Company, Limited)—feasibility studies and
production decision.
1
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979
27
Kitsault (Climax Molybdenum Corporation of British Columbia, Limited)—plant
and townsite reconstruction studies.
I Non-metallic Minerals
Exploration for non-metallic minerals in 1979 decreased significantly to $284 193
j from the very high levels of 1978 and 1977. It was however double what it was in 1976 and
I previously.
Major projects involving barite, both as a main mineral or by-product of lead-zinc
j mineralization, took place in the Northwestern Rocky Mountains. Exploration drilling for
jade took place on several locations in the area east of Dease Lake. Activity continued on the
I mica property near Valcmount and the talc claims on Nahatlatch River. Smaller projects
involved asbestos, building-stone, chromite, fluorspar, and silica.
I Coal
I Coal Resources
The coal of British Columbia falls into four main age groups:
(1) Early Lower Cretaceous coals of the Rocky Mountains and Foothills and
Groundhog.
(2) Late Cretaceous coals of Vancouver and Queen Charlotte Islands and Peace
River plains.
(3) Early Tertiary coals of numerous small basins in the Intermontane Belt.
(4) Late Tertiary coals and lignites of the Skonun basin of northeastern Queen
Charlotte Islands.
The Lower Cretaceous coals of the Elk River. Crowsncst. and Flathead Coalfields, as
well as the Peace River Coalfield, are essentially medium volatile bituminous metallurgical
coal (an estimated IS per cent of which is oxidized and best suited for thermal purposes).
The rest of the coal scattered throughout the province vary from a sub-bituminous lignite at
Hat Creek and Princeton through high volatile bituminous B and C to a semianthracite at
Groundhog.
j Coal Exploration
Coal exploration continued at a high level, augmented to some degree by the need to
fulfill work commitments related to the issuance of new licences following the lifting of the
moratorium in February 1978. However the total cost of coal exploration at SI7 839 029
was down 10 percent from 1978. In 1979,925 coal licences were grained covering an area
of 253 708 hectares, bringing the total area under active exploration to about I 000 000
hectares, treble the area held during the moratorium. These figures provide the most
[ significant indicator of the intensity of coal exploration in the province.
The major new development in 1979 was the extension of the search from the
traditional stratigraphic interval of Lower Cretaceous Gething and Gates coals of northeast
Brit ish Columbia. Exploration extended out into the plains region with an important rotary
[drilling program by Gulf Canada Resources Inc. of the uppermost Cretaceous Wapiti Group
Exploration was carried out over 20 properties in the Peace River Coalfield. The most
active of these were the Monkman (Petro-Canada Exploration Inc.) for which (be Stage I
i report was submitted and has been accepted: Bcjcourt (Denison Coal Limited): Sukunka
HBP Exploration Canada Limited) for which the Stage 11 report was submitted and accepted;
[ Bullmoote fleck Corporation) for which the Stage 1 report was submitted and has been
accepted: Bri Dowling Creek (Utah Mines Ltd.); and the Adams property (Crows Nest
[ Industries Limited).
In the southeastern part of British Columbia there were IS properties in which active
exploration look place, prominent amongst these were the Horseshoe Ridge and Line Creek
 28 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Ridge properties (Crows Nest Industries) for which the Stage II report was accepted. The
Stage II report for Elk River (Elco Mining Ltd.) was accepted during the year as well. The
Prospectus report for the Greenhills property (Kaiser Resources Ltd.) was submitted and
accepted, and the Stage II report for the Sage Creek property (Rio Algom Limited) was
submitted at the end of the year.
Elsewhere in the province exploration work took place on nine groups of licences in the
Telkwa, Tuya, and Bowron coal basins as well as the Comox and Groundhog Coalfields.
The principal programs were as follows: Quinsam (Weldwood of Canada Limited) in
the Comox Coalfield, for which the Stage I report was submitted and accepted; the Petro-
Canada licences in the TrUya River area; the Crows Nest Industries' licences in the Telkwa
basin; and Cyprus Anvil Mining Corporation's property in the Telkwa basin.
   THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 3!
THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY IN 1979
By the Staff of the Petroleum Resources Branch
Record levels of drilling activity set in 1978 were maintained in 1979 with both number
of wells and metres drilled slightly higher. Geophysical work was increased by 20 per cent.
The production of both oil and gas was up by 7 and 14 per cent respectively due to greater
producing capability and improved markets. Proceeds from the disposition of rights during
1979 amounted to $191.0 million compared to 5.177.5 million in 1978.
The following are tabulations of petroleum industry fiscal data for 1979:
Table 1-6— Value of Production of Petroleum Industry. 1979
S
Crude oil 168 928 671
Field condensate 2 S69 418
Marketable natural gas 699 sgg 127
Gas plant liquids 2S 370 909
Total 896 377 125
Table 1-7—Provincial Revenue from Petroleum Industry. 1979
$
Rentals and fees 21 474 S79
Crown reserve dispositions 191 041 60S
Royalties (oil. gas. and products) .   45 935 056
Gas revenue from B.C. Petroleum Corporation 257 875 000
Total 516 326 240
DRILLING
For the third successive year drilling operations increased over the previous year
although the gain in 1979 was small. Two more wells were drilled during 1979 than in 1978
while the number of metres drilled rose 6 per cent from 643 428.1 U>685 169.6. The results
of drilling showed a greater number of oil completions, less gas completions, and about the
same number of abandonments. There were 395 wells drilled of which 80 were oil wells,
180 were gas wells, and 128 were abandoned. These compare to 71, 187, and 129
respectively for 1978.
Greater emphasis was placed on wildcat and development drilling while outpost drilling
decreased significantly which indicates operators were exploring in remote areas and
drilling within known pools rather than in step-out locations.
PRODUCTION
Both oil and gas production significantly increased in 1979. This marks a reversal in
trend after several years of continually declining production. Extensions of gas pipeline
systems and improved markets and producing capability were responsible for this important
change.
Oil production for 1979 was 2 139 962.9 m'( 13 459 961.3 barrels), up 7 per cent over
1978. The largest producing oil fields during the year were: Boundary Lake, 865 716.7 m';
Eagle, 296 465.2 m"; Inga. 200 693.4 111': and Peejay, 164 200.3 m\ The Eagle field
moved from the fourth largest producer in 1978 to second largest producer in 1979
indicating the concentration of drilling and completions that took place in the area.
 32 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Gas production for 1979 also increased compared to 1978. The nonassociated raw gas
production was 10 924 979.0 10'm3 (387 768 257 MCF), an increase of 14 per cent.
Improved market conditions and expanded field gathering facilities were responsible for the
increase.
Yoyo was again the largest gas-producing field reporting 1 878 445.5 10'm3, which
was followed by Clarke Lake, 1 376 511.7 103m3, Sierra, 912 831.8 103m3, and Laprise
Creek, 631 553.5 103m3.
During the year many applications concerning drilling and production schemes were
processed by the Branch. Each application was reviewed by the appropriate engineering
staff resulting in rejection, approval, or modification.
Four applications by industry to convert wells to salt-water disposal service were
approved in the Inga, Silver, and Siphon fields and the Sukunka area.
Applications for Good Engineering Practice were approved for the Boundary Lake—
Halfway A pool, Bullmoose—Baldonnel A pool, Grizzly North—Halfway pools, Julienne
Creek North—Debolt A pool, Oak—Halfway A pool, and the Sukunka—Baldonnel pools.
Applications for concurrent production were approved for the Airport—Halfway B pool,
Bulrush—Halfway B pool, Cecil Lake—NorthPineA, Unit No. 1, Eagle—BelloyDpool,
Fireweed—Doig B pool, Stoddart—Cecil C pool, and the Wildmint—Halfway B pool. All
the foregoing approvals were granted contingent on the conservation of gas production.
Three applications for downhole commingling of gas production and one for surface
commingling were approved in Buick Creek, Dahl, Rigel, and Stoddart fields. An application to revert from 320 to 160-acre spacing in the Eagle—Belloy B pool was also approved.
These schemes are detailed in Table 4-4.
Negotiations for the unitization of the Eagle—Belloy F pool are still proceeding and it is
anticipated that the plan for pressure maintenance of the pool by water injection will be
implemented by the middle of 1980.
Operators of Belloy oil wells in the Stoddart/West Stoddart area (Township 85, Range
20, and Township 86, Range 20) of the province are implementing schemes for the
conservation of solution gas.
OPERATION PROBLEMS IN THE FIELD
During 1979, no major spills occurred at field production facilities, however, several
fires at production facilities and one pipeline incident are worthy of mention.
The major pipeline spill which this section monitored occurred when the Norcen tank
terminal at Boundary Lake experienced a power failure, and both the alarm system and the
automatic shut-down equipment became inoperative. It was estimated that approximately
67 m3 of oil escaped over the firewall from the storage tanks toward the Peace River. Oil spill
containment booms were installed along the route in Moose Creek, Alces River, and at the
confluence of the Alces and Peace Rivers. The majority of oil was contained, although
perhaps 10 m3 reached the Peace River. Cleanup operations satisfactorily removed all
evidence of oil from the shorelines.
Toward the end of 1979 fire damage occurred at the Union Bulrush battery where
extensive damage was incurred to a compressor unit, and at the Norcen Eagle battery where
fire damaged the group separator, test separator, and inlet header beyond repair. Downtime
at the Norcen Eagle battery was excessive due to the required delivery time of replacement
equipment.
During 1979 no uncontrolled well blowouts occurred although several controlled
blowouts are worth mentioning. The first occurred at CZAR et al Monias 6-25-82-21 while
drilling at a depth of 1 636 metres. The crew were tripping in the hole with a new bit when a
flow of mud was noticed coming from the drill pipe. The stabbing valve was installed
immediately and the gas flow directed away from the rig. When the hydril was closed, gas
was observed coming out of the ground under thepipe racks, and in the vicinity of the light
J
 THE MINING AND PL=TROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979 33
plant—a distance of approximately 25 metres from the wcllborc. During the ensuing hours
equipment and materials were marshalled, and the gas blow was successfully controlled by
pumping a large volume of water, followed by a weighted drilling fluid, into the well.
Drilling operations were continued and the well was completed as a commercial gas well'
The second incident occurred at Wainoco Monias 7-30-82-20 while drilline at 2 083
metres. A drilling break occurred and a substantial increase in 1 he level of the mud pit was
observed. After checking for flow, and when none was observed, a decision was made to
drill ahead. At 2 086 metres the mud became substantially gasified. The hydril was closed
and gas flow increased rapidly to about 700 lO'm' per day (25 MMCF per day).
The well was successful)- killed by pumping 90 m* of fresh water and ISO m' of
weighted drilling fluid to the formation. The well was subsequently deepened to final total
depth and successfully completed.
EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Exploratory and development drilling activity for the 1979 calendar year again set a new
record with a total of 395 wells drilled and re-entered in comparison with 393 wells drilled
and re-entered in the previous year. Approximately 75 per cent of this total activity took
place within the general Fort St. John area.
The exploratory wildcat and outpost drilling carried out in the northeastern sector of the
province resulted in 4 oil and 89 gas completions respectively for an over-all success ratio of
56 per cent. This exploratory drilling effort resulted in 4 New Pool oil discoveries, 64 New
Pool gas discoveries, 25 extensions to established reserves, and 82 dry holes.
None of the successful exploratory wells completed in 1979 can be given major gas
discovery status at this tune. However] substantial gas discoveries were made in the Fort
Nelson, Fori Si. John, and Sukunka-Grizzly areas, fa general, the concentration of drilling
was still centred around Fort St. John, although there was a decided increase in activity to
the south. The highly active deep basin Elmworth play of Alberta was extended into British
Columbia, although on a much lesser scale. Nevertheless, the significant amount of
exploratory drilling that carried over into the province did result in a number of successes.
The full significance of these discoveries will depend to a large degree on successful
development drilling.
Development drilling activity provided a success ratio of 73 per cent with 154 completions out of 210 wdls drilled. As m p.iNi years, the Fort St. John area saw the major effort in
the development drilling program. vv ith emphasis on the oil prospects in the immediate area.
The balance of the northeastern area saw a steady rate of development drilling, controlled in
pan by proximity to pipelines and other facilities. The 154 completions comprised 88 gas
completions and 66 oil completions.
The most significant Held change as a result of development drilling took place in the
Monias—Halfway gas pool, which was extended to the north and almost doubled in areal
extent. Drilling at Yoyo resulted in the rcinlcrprelation of the reservoir as reef atoll with a
raised porous rim. Extensive development in the Tommy Lakes—Halfway gas play area,
and in the Helmet region Jean Marie gas play also ensued, but conclusive flow testing has
yet to be done in many wells to confirm success. Only infill and edge drilling occurred at the
Eagle and West Sioddart—Belloy oil pools and some minor extension resulted. Other
successful venture* included the Triassic at Sukunka. the Charlie Lake at the Commotion—
Pine area (93-P-I2). the Dunlevy in the Grizzly and Ojay areas, and isolated, areally small
Devonian reefs adjacent 10 the main reef fronts.
Geophysical activity again set a new high, with 454 crew weeks of activity during the
1 year The activity was spread over all of the northeastern area, with a growing amount of
activity to be found in the Foothills, and also in the areas to the north of Fort St. John, where
interest in the deeper prospects seems to be increasing. Continued technical development of
■both acquisition and processing methods have contributed to the increase in seismic
 34
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
programs shot, although no one technique has been developed as a breakthrough. The high
level of geophysical work would indicate a continued strong interest in the petroleum
prospects of the area and the probability of further strong drilling activity for the next year.
Late in the year, a large area in the Nechako basin was opened for exploration with the
posting of permits requiring work bonus bids. All of the successful bids were received from
one operator, and a vigorous exploration program will be undertaken in the immediate
future. While the area is decidedly wildcat in nature, only two wells having been drilled
previously, it is thought by the successful bidder to be a worthwhile exploratory venture.
Table 1-8—Oil Discoveries, 1979
Well
Authorization
No.
Well Name
Location
Tolal
Depth
(Metres)
Productive
Horizon
4768
4788
PCP CEGO et al W Beatton ......
CZAR Fina el al Venus	
d-68-K/94-H-2	
b-28-C/94-P-9	
1 176.0
1 096.0
1 245.0
1 731.0
Bluesky.
Confidential.
Inga.
Table 1-9—Gas Discoveries, 1979
Well
Authorization
No.
Total
Depth
(Meires)
Productive
Horizon
4156
4398
4411
4431
4449
4498
4517
4569
4644
4645
4646
4657
4660
4661
4662
4677
4679
4684
4686
4688
4692
4693
4722
4732
4738
4741
4750
4756
4760
4764
4774
4782
4798
4790
4805
4810
4813
4815
4825
4827
4828
4830
4834
CZAR et al Butler	
Canhunter Moose .-. ....
Skelly Getty CS Commotion ...
BP AEG W Sukunka	
Gulf Dome Norcen Thunder	
Esso Union Uno-lex Windsor..
Canhunter el al Squaw	
Canhunter Blair	
Exalla Conuco et a] Ring	
Exalta Conuco Ring	
Exatta Conuco Ring	
Remington et a] Evie	
Mobil E Yoyo	
Canhunter Tumbler	
Canhunter Bearhole	
Shell et al Lucy	
Tri Link el al Wildmint	
GEOGetal Martin	
Focus Zephyr et al Flatbed	
Chevron Amoco Ekwan	
Husky et al W Kiskatinaw	
Canhunter Jedney	
Chevron Ootla	
CZAR et al N Helmet	
Dome et al Lime _.,
Dome PCP Saskatoon	
Harbour et al Willow	
Cdn Res et al Bougie	
FinaHB PCP July	
Pacific Prespatou	
Ashland Numac Montney	
GulfTrutch	
CZAR BCR1C Dobin	
OIL Signalta N Nig	
North Mar Zephyr Prespatou	
Wainoco Cdn-Sup Septimus ....
Zephyr et al Black	
Esso Canhunter Hiding	
Amoco et al Buckinghorse	
Pacific Antler	
Dekalb et al Bivouac	
Westcoast et al Temple	
OILet al Lapp	
65-C/94-B-8.
24-B/93-P-6....
29-C/93-P-12 ..',
45-J/93-P-4	
38-I/93-I-I5	
3-B/93-P-16	
74-E/93-I-16...
65-E/94-B-16..
89-A/94-H-16.
99-I/94-H-9....
62-I/94-H-9....
b-49-F/94-J-l5...
97-F/94-I-14...
40-F/93-P-2....
53-C/93-P-2....
29-G794-P-4....
61-A/94-H-2...
23-H/94-H-5...
54-H/93-P-2....
48-F/94-I-10...
48-H/93-P-2 ...
26-HV94-G-1...
1-1/94-0-9	
20-H/94-P-10..
96-C/94-H-1...
2-80-I4-W-6...
17-H/94-H-2...
96-F/94-G-15..
27-J/94-P-10...
73-A/94-H-3...
-16-88-19	
26-G/94-G-10.
10-G/94-P-9 ...
41-J/94-H-4....
17-A/94-H-3...
31-81-18 	
98-B/94-H-6...
I-G/93-I-16....
25-I/94-G-7....
6-J/94-G-9	
67-B/94-I-8....
21-J/94-G-9....
28-C/94-H-10.
1 924.0
3 200.0
4 721.0
3 087.2
4 115.0
3 760.0
3 322.0
2 630.0
1 165.0
935.0
1 060.0
2 504.0
2 257.0
4 289.0
3 350.0
2 477.1
1 107.9
1 352.0
2 650.0
1 887.0
3 565.0
1 726.0
2 445.0
2 034.0
I 113.1
3 485.0
1 133.0
2 757.0
2 091.0
1 186.0
1 546.0
2 360.0
1 220.0
1 430.0
1 295.0
I 768.0
1 258.0
3 675.5
1 410.0
I 159.0
575.0
1 100.0
1 053.0
Confidential.
Dunlevy.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Pine Point.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Halfway.
Baldonnel.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Baldonnel.
Confidential.
Pine Point.
Gething.
Confidential.
Halfway.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Bluesky.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Bluesky.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
Confidential.
 THE MINING AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES IN 1979
Table 1-9—Gas Discoveries, 1979—Continued
35
Well
Authorization
No
Well Name
Location
Ibnl
Depth
(Mara)
Productive
Horizon
4135
REffie Notch Hon „_.....
a-li3-H94.G-9	
1 302.0
4837
Euo Union Nod	
b-86-Cr93-P.8	
3 251.0
(-'tuiltJcnn.il
DcMi
4844
h.;r..\.i:.|l-|i,
2 386.0
1960.0
3 209.0
Confidential.
48)4
Gullet ;.I Tupncr	
a.2S.A.93-P-9	
485S
tVlromaii. cl ai Amlct ....
d-tl-hV94-G-9	
1 138.3
4861
bv. cl al \s irnlNi.r
h-:s-l '»■! It.
3 680.0
4867
Canhunter Thunder
J-9J.|n)J.|.|5
4 2S5.0
4883
Dome cl al Doc ....
I1-22-8I-M	
2S86.8
4920
IVili. Norcen Lapntc
C-I2-L/94-H-5....
1 313.0
Baldonnel
4922
Canhunlct cl al Tountcnil
d-57-H 94-B-9
: w5o
4923
Canhunter Beuornaii: c "'"TT	
C-74-I094.B-9
2 095 0
4937
oil  ATAPCO Sunset
7-S-79-IS
3 3000
4963
Canhunter N TownscnJ
c5S.lr94.B-9
24000
Confidcnlbl
4970
Kancr Numac Duiei
7.19-88.19
1 522 0
Confidential.
1651.5
3 1300
«'"IlllJ.TlIl.!l
Confidential
5007
Rxtin et al Suniitc .. 	
II-IS-79-16	
5017
SamcJan cl al I mhatti
a-25-F 9.-11-3
1 408 0
("ii.-)Ir,!;!i||.i!
1   S043
Wainoen cl al lea
11.26-84.20	
1 645.0
Confidential.
5075
PEX ttT Doc ....
A7I6SO. 14
742 0
I". ■:.! i_.mii.il
LAND DISPOSITION
There were eight dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and natural gas rights held
[during 1979. Seven of these resulted in lender bonus bids amounting to a record total of
SI9I 041 605. an increase of $13 581 957 from the previous year. A total of 741 parcels
was offered in the seven dispositions, a decrease of 165 over 1978, with bids accepted on
■ 589 parcels, a decrease of 150 over 1978. The accented bids covered 500 796 hectares, a
decrease of 198 359 hectares. It is interesting to note that while both the number of
■purchased parcels and amount of hectares purchased decreased considerably, the total
amount of bonus paid increased substantially.
The eighth disposition of Crown reverse was held in December when 51 permit parcels
in the Nechako basin area west of Williams Lake and Quesnel were offered on the basis of
I work bonus bidding. A five-year work bid totalling S27 500 000 was accepted on 43 parcels
[covering I 952 490 hectares.
—[
  Activity of the Ministry
CHAPTER 2
CO^lTENTS
Bra
Chapter 2—Activity of the Ministry yi
History and Development 30
Legislation 41
Branch Activity 43
Mineral Resources Branch 43
Inspection and Engineering Division 43
Staff 43
Staff Changes 44
Mine Inspection and Safety 44
Mine Rescue and First Aid  45
Safety of Mechanical/Electrical Equipment 46
Mining and Petroleum Roads 47
Reclamation 47
Geological Division 47
Objectives and Organization 47
Staff 49
Staff Changes 50
The Work of the Division 50
Project Cicology 51
Applied Geology 52
Resource Data and Analysis Section 52
Analytical Laboratory 52
Hearings S3
Professional Activities 54
Publications 54
Titles Division 55
Staff 55
Central Records Office (Victoria and Vancouver) 56
Mineral and Placer Title Maps 58
Coal 58
Economics and Planning Division . .   59
Objectives and Organization 59
Staff 59
Review of Activities 59
Petroleum Resources Branch 61
Organization 61
Engineering Division 61
Geological Division 62
Titles Division 62
Staff 6-
Staff Changes 63
Highlights of Petroleum Resources Branch Activities 63
Legislation 63
Mediation and Arbitration Board 64
Engineering Division "4
37
 38 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Development Engineering  65
Drilling and Production Engineering  65
Reservoir Engineering  66
Geological Division  68
Economic Geology  68
Reservoir Geology  68
Titles Division  69
Mineral Revenue Division  71
Coal Royalty Regulations under the Coal Act  71
Iron Ore Royalty Agreements under the Mineral Act  71
Mineral Land Tax Act         ;  71
Mineral Royalties Act  74
Mineral Resource Tax Act  74
Petroleum and Natural Gas Royalties Regulations  74
Finance and Administration Division  75
Accounts Section „.  75
Mail/Supplies Service  75
Library  75
Publications  77
Personnel  77
Energy Resources Branch  77
Energy Policy Division  78
Forecasting and Strategic Studies Division  78
Conservation and Technology Division  78
Energy Conservation Programs   79
Consumer Conservation Information Activities  80
Activities  80
Publications „  80
Advertising  80
FIGURES
2-1 Organization chart, Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, 1979  40
9-9
Geological and geochemical project areas, district geologist offices, 1979  50
TABLES
2-1 Gold Commissioners and Claim Inspectors  56
2-2 Gold Commissioners'and Mining Recorders'Office Statistics, 1979  57
2-3 Statistics for Coal Licences, 1979  58
2-4 Mineral Land Tax Assessment Roll  72
2-5 Mineral Revenue Collections, 1979  73
2-6 Petroleum Production by Royalty Classification  74
2-7 Petroleum and Natural Gas Revenue Collection, 1979  74
2-8 Oil Credits Transactions, 1979  75
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 39
HISTORY AND DETOIA1PMENT
The Department of Mines was created in 1874. Before that time, mining laws were
administered by the Provincial Secretary's Department, to a great extent through Gold
Commissioners, the first ofw hom was appointed in 1858. As the province grew and mining
increased in importance and diversity, the Bureau of Mines was formed as a technical
division within the Department. Composed of professional men under the direction of a
Provincial Mineralogist, the Bureau lasted from 1886 to 1934, when it was succeeded by the
M mera logical Branch, now the Geological Division of the Mineral Resources Branch. The
Department took over administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas A ct and the Coal Act
from the Department of Lands in 1953 and became the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources in I960, fa a general name change in 1976 it became the Ministry of Mines and
Petroleum Resources. On December 4,1978, the mandate of the Ministry was enlarged to
include responsibility for energy matters and it became the Ministry of Energy, Mines and
Petroleum Resources.
The mandate of the Ministry as defined laic in 1978 is to develop and manage the
energy policy of the province, to manage piovincial policies for mineral and petroleum
resource development. and to implement sound conservation and environmental measures
for these industries. The Ministry is responsible for all energy-related functions, and the
Minister has direct responsibility for (he British Columbia Petroleum Corporation, the
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, and the British Columbia Energy Commission. Administration of all statutes respecting mining, petroleum and natural gas. energy,
and gcothermal resources are the responsibility of the Ministry.
fa the energy field, the Ministry develops policy and makes analyses and recommendations to Cabinet, carries out forecasting on a regular basis, reviews new energy projects,
and administers the energy conservation and technology program.For mineral resources,
the Ministry maintains the tenure records of mineral claims, placer leases, and coal licences;
provides the inspection and engineering services for worker and public safety in and around
mines: ensures optimum extraction of mineral resources and reclamation of lands disturbed
by mining; carries out gcoscicntific surveys, studies, and compilations to assist with
exploration: and makes analyses for the government respecting the economic conditions,
land use, and taxation factors as they relate to the mineral industry. The Petroleum
Resources Branch administers the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act. the Underground
StorageAct. 1964. and the Gcothermal Resources Act. The objective is to assure the orderly
development and conservation of the oil and gas resources, and to make recommendations
to the government regarding the resource and the requirements for sound development.
 40
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
a     n. o     ut a     a u
o 5 £ o
a £ m t
il   Is>   «l   If
2     a. O     < O __| | 15      < _i
o
I
5 -I J? I I I„ I si
•I -S If S2 .8 il 1 Is Si
£ ■     St J5 • -5 ■! !! a =5 US
5 S    o£ Ih 3S 0 5 ui 0 a Zc w 5
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 4I
LEGISLATION
fa 1979, minor amendments were made to the Energy. Coal, Mineral, Mineral Land
Tax, Mineral Resource Tax, and Petroleum and Natural Gas Acts.
Amendments to the Energy Act provided for the designation of surplus energy producers by the Lieutenant Governor in Council so that certain producers may not be subject to
the provisions respecting energy producers contained in the Act. A second amendment
provided the Energy Commission with the power to declare a carrier, purchaser, or
processor of oil. natural gas. or liquid natural gas to be a common carrier, a common
purchaser, or a common processor, thus enabling a producer or a processor of petroleum or
natural gas to obtain a market for their product on a prorated basis. The amendment to the
Coal A ct gives authority to the Minister to require drill cores from the testing of coal deposits
to be submitted to a central locality and allows the setting of regulations for the transportation and use of those samples. Section 10 of the Mineral Ad was amended to clarify the
rights for the use of the surface and the timber on mineral claims. The amendment to the
Mineral LandTaxAct validated assessments made and taxes collected under the Act since its
proclamation on June 15, 1973. Under the Mineral Resource Tax Act the definition of
mineral was amended to include minerals as defined under the Placer Mining Act. The
amendment to the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act requires the bolder of a location to pay a
penalty where be does not pay the royalties due or fails to file a complete report as required
by the Regulations.
During the year, the Ministry of the Attorney General continued to work on the Revised
Statutes of British Columbia. 1979, in which some statutes administered by the Ministry
were amended along predetermined lines. The names of some statutes are amended, the
numbering of sections in some statutes has been changed, and the wording has been
modernized and clarified.
 *w
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 43
BRANCH ACTIVITY
MINERAL RESOURCES BRANCH
The Mineral Resources Branch, under the direction of Assistant Deputy Minister,
Edwin R. Macgregor, consists of four divisions: Inspection and Engineering, Geological!
Titles, and Economics and Planning.
Inspection and Engineering Division
Coal mines, metal mines, and quarries were inspected during the year by inspectors
stationed at the following listed locations. The inspectors also examined prospects, mining
properties, roads and trails, and carried out special investigations under the Mineral Act.
Dust, ventilation, and noise surveys were carried out by Environmental Control Inspectors
under the supervision of S. Elias and. where necessary, recommendations were made
regarding improvement to the environmental conditions. The roads and trails program was
supervised by P. E. Olson. J. D. McDonald administered the reclamation sections of the
Coal Mines Regulation Act and the Mines Regulation Act. Mine-rescue training was
completed under the direction of the Coordinators, Mine-rescue Training, for the areas in
which their stations were located.
Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
W. C. Robinson. Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
V. E. Dawson. Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines. Coal and Special Services       Victoria
A. J. Richardson. Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines. Metals Victoria
H. Dennis, Senior inspector of Coal Mines Victoria
T. G. Cartel; Senior Inspector of Mines. Mechanical/Electrical. Victoria
J. Cartu right, inspector of Mines, Electrical Victoria
P. E. Olson, Senior Inspector of Mines, Mining Roads Victoria
J. D. McDonald. Senior Inspector of Mines. Reclamation Victoria
D. M. Galbraitb, Inspector of Mines. Reclamation Victoria
J. C. Errington, Inspector of Mines. Reclamation (Agrologist) Victoria
S. Elias, Senior Inspector of Mines, Environmental Control Vancouver
D. J. Murray. Inspector of Mines. Environmental Control Vancouver
S J I.. Miller, faspccior of Mines, Environmental Control Vancouver
V. Pyplacz. Audiologtst. Environmental Control Vancouver
J. C. Ferguson, faspccior of Mines, Technician. Environmental Control Vancouver
B. M. Dudas. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Vancouver
W. H. Childress, Inspector of Mines. Technician Vancouver
J. W. Robinson, Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Nanaimo
HA. Armour. Inspector of Mines.Technician Nanaimo
S. J. Hunter. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
B. Varkonyi. Inspector of Mines. Technician Prince Rupert
J. F. I lutter. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Smithers
S. J. North. Inspector of Mines, Technician Smithers
A D. Tidsbury. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Prince George
T. Vaughan-1 nomas. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Prince George
J. J. Sutherland, Inspector of Mines. Technician Prince George
B. E. Warner. Inspector of Mines, Technician. Reclamation Prince George
K G Hughes. Inspector of Mines. Technician. Mechanical Prince George
I)   I   K   Henderson. Inspector ol Mines and Resident Engineer Fcrriie
D. Smith. Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Kamloops
 44 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Inspectors and Resident Engineers—Continued
E. S. Sadar, Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Kamloops
J. P. MacCulloch, Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Kamloops
J. A. Thomson, Inspector of Mines, Technician Kamloops
R. H. Heistad, Inspector of Mines, Technician, Mechanical Kamloops
J. B. C. Lang, Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer Nelson
A. L. O'Bryan, Inspector of Mines, Technician, Reclamation Nelson
E. J. Hall, Inspector of Mines, Technician, Reclamation  Fort St. John
Coordinators, Mine-rescue Training
G. J. Lee, Senior Coordinator Victoria
R. F. Brow Nanaimo
J. E. A. Lovestrom Smithers
R. J. Stevenson Prince George
B. A. McConachie Kamloops
E. C. Ingham Nelson
P. J. Switzer         Fernie
Staff Changes
V. Pyplacz joined the Ministry as Audiologist, Environmental Control, on January 2,
1979.
In August, B. E. Warner resigned from the staff of the Reclamaton section.
In November, A. D. Tidsbury retired after 10 years of service.
J. F. Hutter, Inspector of Mines and Resident Engineer, Smithers, died suddenly on
September 10,1979. He had been with the Ministry for six years and he will be sadly missed
by his colleagues.
Mine Inspection and Safety
The Mines Regulation Act and the Coal Mines Regulation Act were enacted for the
purpose of minimizing personal injury and property damage resulting from mining operations and to ensure maximum possible recovery of resources, having due regard to good
engineering practices. The Inspection and Engineering Division has the responsibility of
enforcing these Acts and ensuring that good practice is carried out by persons engaged in
mining in the province. The Division maintains a province-wide system of districts, staffed
by experienced personnel, together with additional specialized personnel based in Victoria.
A good standard of cooperation continued to exist at mines and safety programs were in
effect at mines throughout the year.
Various certificates of competency, depending on a person's supervisory function, are
required by certain supervisors and officials at mines. These are issued following examinations conducted by or on behalf of Boards of Examiners, appointed from the Inspection and
Engineering Division, under the two Acts. The examinations are designed to ensure that the
candidate has adequate knowledge of the Act and safe operating methods. In addition,
miners' certificates, coal miners' certificates, and blasting certificates are issued by the
District Inspectors.
Monitoring of dust, ventilation, and noise conditions continued at most mining
operations and in addition radiation surveys were made for radon daughters and gamma
radiation at 20 mining operations. Suitable improvements were requested and action taken
by owners and management where the environmental conditions were found to be unsatisfactory. Audiometric testing of mine employees was continued at most mine operations.
In addition to action requested by inspectors, efforts were also made by industry, on a
voluntary basis, to reduce dust and noise produced at mines and in preparation plants.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 45
Affile Rescue and First Aid
The expanding mining industry continued to place a heavy demand on mine-rescue and
first-aid training services in 1979. A new course, concerning back problems, was added to
the training syllabus.
Mine-rescue training stations were maintained at six districts under the supervision of
coordinators who were fully qualified in first aid and mine rescue. These districts were
Hemic. Nelson. Kamloops, Nanaimo. Prince George, and Smithers. Each station was
equipped as a mobile unit, in order that equipment could be transported to any place within
the area for rescue or training purposes. Sufficient self-contained, oxygen-supplying,
breathing equipment to maintain at least two rescue teams of six men each was held at each
station, in readiness for any emergency that might have arisen at mines served by the station.
In addition to that equipment, some was loaned by the Ministry to supplement that owned by
various mining companies.
The mine-rescue equipment owned by this Ministry during 1979, included 59 Aeror-
lox three-hour liquid oxygen breathing machines. 43 Dracgcr BG-174 and 46 McCaa two-
hour high-pressure gaseous oxygen breathing machines, 51 Chemox one-hour chemical
oxygen-producing machines, and 24 Demand 30-minute units. Industry owned 30 Aero-
rlox. 24 Draeger BG-174,29 McCaa. and 83 Chernov machines. Each station, as well as
most mines, had additional auxiliary equipment such as Type N gas masks, self-rescuers,
gas detectors, oxygen therapy units, and first-aid equipment.
The district coordinators of rescue training made periodic visits to the mines for the
purpose of giving rescue training to open-pit and underground employees and checking the
rescue equipment to ensure its serviceability.
Full and refresher courses in underground, survival, gravel-pit, and surface mine-
rescue training, as well as first aid. were presented by the district coordinators at various
mines and centres throughout the province. The coordinators trained or assisted in training
226 persons who obtained St. John Ambulance first-aid certificates and 135 who obtained
safety-oriented first-aid certificates. Forty persons were trained in industrial first aid, 82 in
underground mine-rescue work. 275 in surface mine-rescue work. 34 in gravel-pit rescue
work, and 212 in mine-rescue survival courses. Surface Mine Rescue Instructors' certificates were obtained by 9 persons. 1 person obtained a Survival Mine Rescue Instructors'
certificate. 6 persons received Advance Mine Rescue Certificates, and I 070 persons
attended talks on back problems.
Four mine safety associations have been established in different areas in the province.
These were supported by the Ministry of Energy. Mines and Petroleum Resources and were
aided by mining company officials, safety supervisors, inspectors of mines, mine-rescue
coordinators, and, in some areas, local industry. These organizations promoted mine-rescue
and first-aid training, as well as safety education in their various districts.
On May 26.1979 the Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association held its 65th Annual
Mine-Rescue and First-Aid Competition at Nanaimo. The Western Mines Limited's team,
captained by II I ling. won the trophy in the underground mine-rescue event. The Noranda
Mines Limited's Boss Mountain team, captained by B. Buys, was placed second and
represented the Central B.C. Mine Safety Association area at the provincial meet.
On June 2, the West Kootcnay Mine Safety Association held its 33rd Annual Competition at Nelson. The Kaiser Resources Ltd.'s team from Sparwood. captained by H. Eberts.
won the underground mine-rescue event.
On June 9, the East Kootenay Mine Safety Association held its 58th Mine-Rescue and
First-Aid Competition in Ferine. The trophy for the underground mine-rescue event was
v.on In the Cominco Ltd 's Sullivan mine team Irom Kimbcrlcy. captained In ('. N. Camel.
The Byron Creek Collieries' team, captained by L. Robin, was placed first in the surface
mine-rescue event.
 46 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
On May 26 and June 1, the Central B.C. Mine Safety Association held its 31st Annual
Mine-Rescue and First-Aid Competition in Kelowna and Smithers respectively. The
Gibraltar Mines Limited's team, captained by P. Beaudoin, won the surface mine-rescue
trophy at Kelowna. The Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Limited's team, captained by G.
Smith, was placed first at Smithers.
On June 16, the provincial underground mine-rescue, surface mine-rescue, three-
person miners' first-aid, and underground bench competitions were held at Cranbrook. In
the surface mine-rescue event, the Gibraltar Mines' team from McLeese Lake, captained by
P. Beaudoin, was placed first. In the underground mine-rescue event, the Western Mines'
team from Campbell River, captained by H. Uhrig, won the trophy. This team went on to
compete in the Canadian meet held at Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, on June 23, 1979,
where teams from British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories, Alberta,
Saskatchewan, and Nova Scotia competed. The Devco team from Nova Scotia was placed
first in the competition. The Noranda Mines' Boss Mountain team from Hendrix Lake,
captained by B. Buys, was placed first in the underground bench event and the Lornex
Mining Corporation's team, captained by G. Collison, won the trophy in the three-person
miners' first-aid event.
Safety of Mechanical/Electrical Equipment
An increase in mining activity in the province was reflected in the numbers of pieces of
mechanical/electrical equipment in use at the mines. Construction type equipment, such as
dozers, scrapers, and graders showed an increase of over 70 per cent over the previous year,
while the number of permits issued to allow the operation of diesel-powered equipment
underground doubled that for 1978.
A total of 925 large mining trucks were in use at the various mines and quarries during
1979 and well over 300 of these had capacities exceeding 75 tonnes. Several new models of
trucks having gross vehicle weights in excess of 50 tonnes were qualified during the year for
use in the province after exhaustive engineering evaluations of their braking, steering, and
other safety-related systems had been carried out, together with a series of high-speed
downhill brake tests. These preoperational tests and evaluations together with subsequent
annual brake tests conducted at the mines are important factors in ensuring the continuing
safety of such equipment.
The use of fire-resistant fluids in equipment operating underground increased substantially and this positive contribution to fire prevention was achieved without undue decrease
in efficiency of the various systems in which it is used.
A close scrutiny was made of plant layout for new installations in order to ensure that
safe operating and maintenance of equipment was considered at the design stage. This
practice may necessitate alteration of design drawings but that is usually an easier task than
rearranging items of plant once installed.
Electrical installation designs were reviewed and accepted as suitable for construction
at several new properties, major expansions at existing mines, and the rehabilitation of two
previously closed mines. In addition, engineering reviews were conducted on various
electrically powered mining machines and directions were issued to equipment manufacturers on the manner of compliance with the electrical code requirements.
The annual meeting of the Canadian Committee for Electrical and Mechanical Mine
Safety was attended in St. John's, Newfoundland, as well as meetings of the British
Columbia Mobile Equipment Committee. Representation on the committee responsible for
updating the Canadian Electrical Code, pertaining to the Use of Electricity in Mines, was
continued during the year, and a member of the staff accompanied a team of engineers on a
tour of coal operations and equipment manufacturers' plant in the United States, in order to
advise on British Columbia safety requirements.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 47
\   Mining and Petroleum Roads
The Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources' road program continued
during 1979 under authority oi the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources Act.
The purpose of the program was to encourage and assist in the development of mineral and
fossil fuel resources in the province.
During 1979, an expenditure of around $475 000.00 was made to extend an all-
weather road to the main gas-producing area east of Fort Nelson. This work included the
construction of a bridge across the Snake River and the construction of a 2-kilometre by-pass
road around an Indian reservation.
t Approximately S215 000.00 was spent during the year to upgrade the Omineca road
and construct a new bridge across Lay Creek. This work included the maintenance of the
Takla Lake spur road.
fame order of SI 16 000.00 was granted to about 15 smaller access projects throughout
the province by way of improving roads to mineral-rich areas.
Reclamation
Reclamation was administered by the Inspection and Engineering Division, under the
authority of section 11 of (he Mines Regulation Act, and section 8 of the Coal Mines
Regulation Act. The objective is to restore lands used in mining, waste disposal, and
exploration to useful purpose, compatible with the surrounding countryside. Reclamation
does not apply to land disturbed by mining prior to legislation enacted in April 1969.
Surface work permits are issued on a permanent basis and annual reports are submitted
and reviewed. Bonding requirements are assessed on a yearly basis from the annual reports.
A total of 117 new surface work permits (4 metal, 6 coal. 48 mineral exploration. 36 placer.
23 sand and gravel) was issued during 1979.
Reclamation progressed satisfactorily during 1979 and, in particular, the coal mining
industry showed good progress. The 38 active metal mines reported a total disturbance of
9 952 hectares, of which 210 hectares were revegetated during 1979. The four active coal
operations reported > total disturbance of 4 965 hectares, of which 246 hectares were
revegetated during 1979. The total amount revegetated since 1969 now stands at 1 262
hectares for metal mines and I 021 hectares for coal mines.
Vegetation studies continued at the operating mines and the vegetation results were
computerized. A program to summarize the results has been commenced and results will be
published for the benefit of (he mining industry. Vegetation projects on abandoned tailings
ponds continued and these have shown excellent to poor results.
The 3rd Annual Mine Reclamation Symposium was held in March 1979, sponsored by
the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources and the Mining Association of
British Columbia. One hundred and ninety participants attended the three-day session and
heard talks on dump design for revegelation. reclamation planning.site preparation, and
other resource and environmental problems and solutions.
During the symposium, the reclamation award for 1978 was presented to Kaiser
Resources Ltd. for its excellent reclamation and research program. Citations were given to
Craigmont Mines Ltd. at Merrill and Fording Coal Limited at Elkford.
Geological Division
Objectives and Organization
Metals, non-metallic minerals, and coal are nonrenewable judged by the scale of man's
I  lifetime. The province's needs for these commodities for our own use and for export are
I  fulfilled only by continuous exploration and discovery. The fundamental role of the
Geological Division is to facilitate the renewal process. To do this the detailed objectives of
I  the Geological Division are to provide accurate and current faformation on the quantity and
  ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 49
distribution of mineral and coal deposits of the province for government and industry to
provide geological, geochetnical, and geophysical maps and other data, ideas, interpretations, and training useful in the search for these deposits, and to assist in the orderly
exploration, development, and use of these resources. To cany out these objectives, the
Division is organized into four sections: Project Geology, Applied Geology, Resource Data
and Analysis, and Analytical Laboratory, the work of which is described subsequently.
Staff
The staff on December 31, 1979, included 49 permanent positions, 1 vacancy, and 5
auxiliary positions. The permanent positions consisted of 27 geoscientists. 6 chemists, 9
technicians and technical assistants, and 8 secretaries, clerks, and office assistants. The
auxiliary positions included two geoscientists, one laboratory technician, and two office
assistants.
A. Sutherland Brown. Ph.D., P.Eng.  Chief Geologist
Project Geology
N. C. Carter, Ph.D.. P.Eng. Senior Geologist
P. A. Christopher, Ph.D.. P.Eng Geologist
B  N. Church. Ph.D., P.Eng. Geologist
G. E. P. Eastwood. Ph.D., P.Eng. Geologist
R. D. Gilchrist. B.Sc. Geologist
T. Hoy. Ph.D., P.Eng. Geologist
D. G. Maclntyrc. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Geologist
W. J. McMillan. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Geologist
A. Pantclcycv. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Geologist
D. E. Pearson. Ph.D., P.Eng. Geologist
V. A. Prcto. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Geologist
J. L. Armilage Chief Draughtsman
R. E. Player                                                          Lapidary and Photographer
Applied Geology
E. W. Grove. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Senior Geologist
A. F. Shepherd, B.A.Sc. P.Eng.  Geologist
G. G. Addic. M.Sc, P.Eng. District Geologist
G  II  Klein, B.A.Sc. P.Eng. District Geologist
T. G. Schrocicr, M.Sc. P.Eng.  District Geologist
G. P. E. White. B.Sc. P.Eng. ... District Geologist
R. H. Karst. B.Sc. District Geologist
D. A. Grieve, M.Sc. District Geologist
G. V. White Engineering Assistant
Resource Data and Analysis
I vacant]  Senior Geologist
K. E. Northcote. Ph.D.. P.Eng. Geologist
Z. D. Hora. M.Sc. Geologist
T. E. Kalnins. B.A.Sc, P.Eng. Geologist
J. E. Forester, M.A. Research Officer
A. Matheson. B.Sc. Research Officer
 50 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Analytical Laboratory
W. M. Johnson, Ph.D Chief Analyst
R. F. Ralph. L.R.I.C Deputy Chief Analyst
B. Bhagwanani, B.Sc Laboratory Scientist
R. J. Hibberson, B.Sc Laboratory Scientist
Y. T. J. Kwong, M.Sc Laboratory Scientist
V. V. B. Vilkos, Ph.D Laboratory Scientist
M. A. Chaudhry Laboratory Technician
F. F. Karpick Assayer
L. E. Sheppard Laboratory Technician
Staff Changes
During 1979, J. A. Garnett, Senior Geologist, Resource Data and Analysis Section,
resigned in July to take the position of Director of Mineral Resources of the Nova Scotia
Department of Mines and Energy. V. E. Jackson resigned in June to return to New
Brunswick to work for the Department of Mines. G. V. White replaced W. Proudlock as
Engineering Assistant at Charlie Lake.
The Work of the Division
The distribution of major projects in 1979 and of district offices, regional geochemical
surveys, and areas are shown on Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-2—Geological and Geochemical Project Areas, District Geologist Offices, 1979.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
51
Project Geology
The work of this section is devoted to geological mapping of areas important for
mineral resources and regional geochemical reconnaissance surveys useful for both exploration and environmental baseline studies. The section mounted 11 main field projects at a
total field cost of about S250 000 and a geochemical reconnaissance survey at a cost of
S225 000. Salaries and other costs of the section totalled about S500 000.
The geochemical survey in 1979 of Taseko Lakes (920) and Bonaparte River (92P)
areas was done by a series of separate contracts with only planning, supervision, and control
provided by the Division. Considerable help in data handling was received from the
Geological Survey of Canada.
The previously mentioned studies by project geologists were augmented by work of
district geologists and laboratory scientists both in cooperative studies such as that carried
out a! the Alton mine lor a I'h I) In J Kwong of the Analytical Laboratory with the help of
G. P. E. White, district geologist. Kamloops. and also by independent studies such as R. H.
Karst and G. V White's coal rank distribution in the Peace River district. In addition
valuable field and office studies were conducted by professors and graduate students at The
University of British Columbia with the aid of grants from the Ministry. Most of the"*
studies were directly relevant to Division projects and some were cooperative. The following were conducted in 1979.
Project and C.anrnodii, Interest
Map
Publication
Scale
Principal
Intotifator
CeiltugHat N.,... . i  iRtdt,  . J |
fa) Ntitth OLanacan Tertian Sttancraishv fU. Au. All
SIE and pan.
1:50 000
B N. Chinch
fbl SculhcaM Bmith Columbia 1 cad Zinc OcpowH
Bam of
1 JO 000
T Hon
S20.L.M
1:10000
(cl Bamrrc Lake Adam* Plateau (Cu. Zn)	
SIM J. 4.5
9IP/I.S
1:23 000
V. A  Piclo
Idl Nicola Volcanic Sludt (Cu. Zn. Mai and Chu Chua Dcpout	
021/1.2. T
1:23 000
W. I. McMillan
92P
1:23 000
(cl SkLci Snath (Zn. Cu. Au. Alll	
"IB 13
130(100
G. E. P. Eauwood
(0 \i-rthciNicm BnLuh Columbia Lead Zinc
•wn i. 3:6. ii.
II. IJ.nULI.S
1 JO 000
1) G  Malum
(c 1 CatMar MoKbdcrtumTunc**rn Oepraur.
lOtP -.5
1:23 000
A  PantclescN'
(hi Adanac Mohbdcnum Dcpmtt	
RUN 11
1:10000
P A Chnvlopher
(il Ell. R.Nct Coalficldi
SIG 1-1. IS
1:10000
D. E  PealNOn
(il Peace Run Coalfield
panoTvlLP
1:13 000
R. D. Gilchritt
ill CorreLsliofi Studio
pamof93l.P
P. Mel. D. DttlT
Gevcitmkwl Swwjn
Taseko LaLcv Bonaparte Ri»o	
•II o. p
1230000
T Kaln.nv
N C Carter
In addition. ihc Division sponsored field projects by The University of British Columbia staff. Many of these had Division staff as coinvestigaiors or the project was part of a
larger Division study.
Evaluation Procedure for Geochemical Data. Uranium Reconnaissance
Program, by A. J. Sinclair and W. K. Fletcher
Surface Litbogcochcrnislry. Northair Mine, by A. J. Sinclair. J. II   I
Miller, and N. C. Carter.
Cariboo Mountains Project, by H. J. Greenwood. J. V. Ross, D. Klepacki,
and J. Getsinger.
K/Ar Age Determinations. Wrede Creek Zoned Ultrarnafic Complex, by
R. H. Wong and C. I. Godwin.
Progress Report on the Geology of the Specogna (Babe) Gold Deposit, by
N. Champigny and A. J. Sinclair.
 52 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Preliminary Interpretation of Lead Isotopes in Galena-Lead from British
Columbia Mineral Deposits, by C. 1. Godwin, A. J. Sinclair, and B. D. Ryan.
The fieldwork of the section and these university projects are described yearly in
January of the year following in Geological Fieldwork and also in a series of preliminary
maps, papers, and authoritative bulletins.
Applied Geology
The work of the Applied Geology Section includes aid in the field to exploration
personnel and prospectors, monitoring of exploration and geological developments at
producing mines, coal core storage and studies, prospector training, and control of incentive
grants to exploration. District geologists continued their property visits and field mapping
as well as other duties related to prospectors, public information, and integrated resource
management. The geological studies are described in Geological Fieldwork, 1979.
A considerable part of the effort of the section is devoted to prospectors and small
developers. Over 1 000 students were enrolled in basic prospecting courses in 1979 and 32
prospectors graduated from the two-week-long Third Annual Mineral Exploration course
held at Selkirk College, Castlegar. One hundred and sixty-one prospectors received grants
under the Prospectors Assistance Act. The Mineral Exploration Incentive Program, with a
budget of $500 000, which was first started in 1978 continued. It was designed to act as a
fiscal bridge between prospecting and preliminary development. The Mineral Exploration
Incentive Program provided grants up to one-third of the receipted cost of approved
programs to a maximum of $50 000. Forty-six contracts were let in 1979 under the
supervision of J. Bristow.
The operating costs of these programs were approximately as follows: core repository
and recovery, $19 000; prospector training, $32 000; Prospectors' Assistance grants,
$185 000; field programs of district geologists, $84 500; salaries and overhead, $234 000.
Resource Data and Analysis Section
This section is responsible for the collection, compilation, interpretation, and distribution of exploration and development data gathering from various sources. Most of the
information is readily available after requisite confidential periods, normally one to three
years. The major files are: MINF1LE, a shallow computer file of over 8 000 mineral
occurrences; assessment report file, over 7 000 microfilmed reports available at reader/
printers in Vancouver or Victoria; property files of historic maps and data from producers
and prospects recovered from many sources and filed by NTS system; and industrial
minerals reference files. In addition, a computerized coal data file is being constructed
under contract jointly with the Geological Survey of Canada, and a computer file of statistics
on producing mines and major prospects is underway. The annual volume, Exploration in
British Columbia, is produced by the section coincident with its update of M1NF1LE.
In addition, the section administers the Portable Assessment Credit account, produces
map compilations and mineral potential evaluation studies related to land-use conflicts, and
advises on regulations. Field-oriented studies related to industrial minerals and structural
materials are also handled by this section.
The major field study was of aggregate materials of the lower mainland and Vancouver
Island under the direction of Z. D. Hora with the cooperation of the Economics and Planning Division. K. E. Northcote also conducted field checks and liaison with other government agencies in regard to land-use intepretation.
The costs of this section were approximately as follows: field studies, $26 500;
MINF1LE and analyses, $65 000; coal file construction, $68 000; salaries and overhead,
$230 000.
Analytical Laboratory—The laboratory, under W. M. Johnson, is responsible for a
complete range of analytical services for the Division geologists and prospector grantees as
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
53
well as some services to other government agencies.The laboratory also runs control
samples and handles the chemical data for the British Columbia regional geochemical
i surveys. The Chief Analyst is also responsible for assayer examinations for the province.
The facilities include X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption and emission spectrogra-
phy. X-ray diffraction, gamma ray spectrometry, and mineral separation. Capability in
traditional wet analytical chemistry still exists. Instrument output is fully computerized.
Method Development and Research—Method development and research in the laboratory concentrated in 1979 on the following subjects: research on the mineral matter and
oxidation of coal, measurement of low levels of uranium in silts, monitoring of uranium in
natural waters, trace elements in molybdenum concentrates, geochemical standards, and
new methods of determination of gold. Many of these studies cooperated with Project
Geology or with other agencies. These studies were as follows:
X-ray diffraction determination of mineral matters in ash of coals by J.
Kwong in cooperation with D. E. Pearson.
Investigation of the oxidation of coals by W. M. Johnson with D. E.
Pearson and Dr. Paul West of the University of Victoria.
Development of a combined ion-exchange concentration X-rav fluorescence measurement technique for the determination of low levels of uranium in
silts and other geological materials.
Development and coordination by W. M. Johnson of a domestic water
monitoring program with the Ministry of Health.
Development of a new method of determining gold by M. A. Chaudhry.
Development of trace element analysis by X-ray fluorescence by P. F.
Ralph.
Participation in intetiaboratory standards program and particularly M. A.
Chaudhry and B. Bhagwanani in determination of cobalt, nickel, and copper
results of standard reference      terial SU-2.
Collection and establishment of reference geochemical silt materials containing cobalt, nickel, silver, uranium, tungsten, and tin in cooperation with A.
Panteleyev.
Cooperative program with Dr. Ian Jonasson of the Geological Survey of
Canada in regard to rhenium, lanthanum, and gold in molybdenum concentrates from Canadian mines.
Certification—Two Certification of Efficiency in Assaying examinations were held
[ with a total of eight examinees writing. Three certificates of efficiency were awarded.
Output—Wet Chemical and X-ray Fluorescence Laboratory: There were 373 determinations on 158 samples submitted by prospectors. 2 795 determinations on 804 samples
from prospector grantees, and 13 380 determinations on 2 106 samples submitted by
Ministry personnel.
Emission Spectrographic Laboratory: There were 48 870 semi-quantitative determinations on I 629 samples. In addition, there were I 123 quantitative samples.
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: There were 619 mineral identifications made, determination of mineral matter in ash of coals on 93 samples, and 43 determinations on quartz.
Sample Comminution: There was a total of 2 751 samples received and prepared for
analytical work, I 842 from geologists and 909 from prospector grantees.
Mineral Separation: There were 47 mineral separations made.
[ Hearings
The Geological Division was involved in a number of ways in regard to the Bates Royal
Commission of Inquiry, Health and Environmental Protection—Uranium Mining. The
Commission was conducted and aided in its field visits by district and project geologists at
[ localities throughout the province. The Division also provided much documentation early in
 54 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
the inquiry before the hearing process began and then also prepared and presented a 109-
page brief at the Phase 1—Overview hearings. This brief was later published by the Ministry
as Paper 1979-6.
Professional Activities
The staff of the Division was very active in professional activities related to their work
during 1979.
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy—D. E. Pearson was elected
councillor of the Institute, A. Panteleyev was Victoria Branch Chairman.
Geological Association of Canada—The Council of the Association met
in Victoria in October as A. Sutherland Brown was President of the Association. T. Hoy was a councillor of the Cordilleran Section and W. J. McMillan was
a councillor of the Mineral Deposits Division. D. E. Pearson was appointed by
the Association as a member of the North American Commission on Strat-
agraphic Nomenclature.
W. M. Johnson was President of the Spectroscopy Society of Canada and
Vice Chairman of Analytical Chemistry Division of the Chemical Institute of
Canada.
J. A. Garnett and then N. C. Carter were councillors of the British
Columbia Association of Professional Engineers.
A. Sutherland Brown was Vice President of the Canadian Geoscience
Council and a member of the Advisory Committee to the Geological Survey of
Canada.
Publications
The work of the Division is presented to the interested public by a series of formal
publications and maps as well as by informal discussions, consultations, and technical talks.
Formal publications prepared by the Division in 1979 include the following:
Prepared yearly:
Geological Fieldwork—a preliminary account of work of the Division
published as soon as possible after completion. Now published as part of the
paper series of the Ministry.
Exploration in British Columbia—a report that summarizes and collates all
known exploration in the province based on reports filled out jointly by the
Division and industry personnel.
At irregular intervals:
Bulletins—these are generally the result of three or four years' work and
commonly of areas of significant mineral potential. In 1979 three were published:
Bulletin 60—Geology of the Akolkolex River Area, by R. I. Thompson.
Bulletin 69—Geology of the Nicola Group between Merritt and Princeton,
by V A. Preto.
Bulletin 71—Geology of the Goldstream Area, byT. Hoy.
Preliminary Maps, usually white prints issued as soon as compilations are
complete with brief accompanying notes. In 1979, the following five were issued:
Map 31 —Geological Map of Crowsnest Coalfield, Northeast Part, by F. B.
Gigliotti and D. E. Pearson (NTS 82G/7 and 10; scale—1:10 000).
Map 32—Geochemical Orientation Survey, Hazelton Area, by T. E. ■
Kalnins (NTS 93M/3W, 4E).
Map 33—Coal Resources, Peace River Coalfield, Northeastern British
Columbia, by R. D. Gilchrist and B. P. Flynn (scale—1:50 000).
Map 34—Geology of the Mount Fisher-Sand Creek Area, by Margaret E.
McMechan (NTS 82G/6. 11, 12; scale—1:25 000).
 .ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 55
Map 35—Geology of the Penticton Tertiary Outlier, by B. N Church
(NTS 82E/4 and 5; scale—1:50 000).
Papers include a miscellaneous group of technical reports by the Ministry on
many topics, some geological. In 1979 two geological papers were produced
Paper 1979-1—Geological Fieldwork. 1978.
Paper 1979-6—A Brief Submitted to the Royal Commission of Inquiry,
Health and Environmental Protection—Uranium Mining, by A. Sutherland
Brown, N. C. Carter, W. M. Johnson. V. A. Preto. and P. A. Christopher.
Other map scries issued included:
Regional Geochemical Reconnaissance maps—
104 O and P—Jennings River and Cassiar areas, scale 1:250 000, 12
elements (Uranium Reconnaissance Program, federal/provincial—Geological
Survey of Canada Open Files 561 and 562).
1031 and part of J and 103 P and part of O—Terrace and Stikine areas, scale
1:250 000. 14 elements.
Aeromagnetic maps—
Federal provincial series. 1:50 000 and 1:250 000compilations, 104 A. B,
G, H, I, J and 103P/9 to 16—the final maps of joint agreement.
Mineral DepositlLand Use maps—So new nor revised maps of the
1:250 000-scale series were issued in 1979 but two related compilation maps
were.
Metallic Mineral Potential of British Columbia (scale—1:2 000 000), a
compilation of the 1:250 000 series.
Producer—Near Producer Properties of British Columbia (scale—
1:2 000 000). an index of major metallic properties in British Columbia.
In addition, regularly updated maps in the following scries are available:
Mineral Inventory maps, issued as ozalid prints, show location and commodities of all known mineral deposits.
Assessment Report Index maps show the location and number of reports
accepted for assessment credit by the Ministry. A new Assessment Report Index
to accompany the map series was issued in a ring binder for regular update.
Titles Division
The Titles Division of the Mineral Resources Branch is under the direction of the Chief
Gold Commissioner and is responsible for the administration ol the provincial laws relating
to the acquisition of minerals and coal.
Staff
E. J. Bowles duel Gold Commissioner
R. Rutherford Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner
D. Doyle Gold Commissioner. Vancouver
Gold Commissioners and Sub-recorders are appointed for the 24 Mining Divisions
throughout the province and their duties are specified in writing by the Chief Gold
Commissioner.
 56 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 2-1—Gold Commissioners and Claim Inspectors
Mining Division
Phone
Location of Office
Name
723-3501
651-7577
992-5591
459-2268/69
489-2311
344-5221/22
442-8642
372-5233
387-6246/55
256-7548
754-2111
352-2211
525-0375
378-9944
847-4411
493-1719
837-3222
295-6957
624-2121
353-2338
362-7324
688-2208
545-2387
387-6246755
4515 Elizabeth Street, Port Alberni V9Y 6L5
Box 100, AtlinVOW 1A0
102. 350 Barlow Avenue, Quesnel V2J 2C1
Box 70, Clinton V0K 1K0
102— 1 Ith Avenue South. Cranbrook VIC 2P2
Box 39, Golden V0A 1H0
Box 850, Grand Forks VOH 1H0
Court House, Kamloops V2C IE5
411 Douglas Building, Parliament Buildings, Victoria V8V 1X4
Box 70, Lillooet V0K IV0
Courthouse, Nanaimo V9R 5J1
Box 730, Nelson V1L5R4
100, 403 Sixth Street, New Westminster V3L 3B1
Box 339. Merritt V0K 2B0
Box 340. Smithers V0J 2N0
Courthouse, Penticton V2A 5A5
Box 380, Revelstoke V0E 2S0
Box 9. Princeton VOX 1W0
Courthouse. Prince Rupert V8J 1B7
Box 850, Kaslo V0G 1M0
Box 910, Rossland V0G 1Y0
800 Hornby Street, Vancouver V6Z 2C5
Courthouse, Vemon V IT 4W5
411 Douglas Building, Parliament Buildings, Victoria V8V 1X4
W. G. Mundell
R. Campbell
W. L. Draper
New Westminster....
T. P. McKinnon
I. Williams
D.Doyle
Claim Inspectors
D. Lieutard, 401, 350 Barlow Avenue, Quesnel V2J 2C1.
R. T. Morgan, Box 877, Smithers V0J 2N0.
I A. Reyes, 800 Hornby Street, Vancouver V6Z 2C5.
H. S. Turner, 212, 2985 Airport Drive, Kamloops V2B 7W8.
The recording of locations and of work on mineral claims as required pursuant to the
provisions of the Mineral Act, and the recording of work on placer leases as required under
the Placer Mining Act, must be made at the office of the Gold Commissioner for the Mining
Division in which the claim or lease is located. The statistics for the Gold Commissioner's
office are shown on Table 2-2.
Central Records Office (Victoria and Vancouver)
Copies of records of mineral claims and two-post claims recorded in the offices of Gold
Commissioners are forwarded to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner daily, while
transcripts of all other recording in the offices of the Gold Commissioners are sent twice
monthly.
Information concerning claims and leases and the ownership and standing of claims
and leases in any Mining Division may be obtained from the Gold Commissioner for the
Mining Division in which the property is situated or from the Ministry's offices, Room 411,
Douglas Building, Victoria, and 800 Hornby Street, Vancouver, the office of the Gold
Commissioner.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
57
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 58 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
The records and maps, showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer leases, may be viewed by the public during regular office hours in
Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner in Vancouver. The position of mineral
claims held by record and of placer leases is plotted from details supplied by the locators.
Prints of mineral and placer titles reference maps at a scale of 1:50 000 may be obtained
from the Victoria and Vancouver offices.
Appointed officials in the office of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold
Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-recorders for all Mining Divisions.
Mineral and Placer Title Maps
The initial program of redrawing mineral titles reference maps which are produced for
the public on a scale of 1:50 000 was completed in 1977 and the entire province is now
available at this scale. A new mapping program on the same scale using superior Ottawa
base maps has been commenced. These maps will show contours and should be of great
assistance to the prospector.
One thousand two hundred and eighty-two applications were received for placer leases
under a new system, established in 1975 with the proclamation ofa new Placer Mining Act,
of only accepting applications for leases in designated placer areas.
There were 11 requests for the designation of additional areas under the Placer MrajiS
Act.
Mineral Claims Inspectors are based at Kamloops, Smithers, Vancouver, and Quesnel.
Their duties include checking the locations of mineral claims to correlate them with the
plotted position of the claims, determining the validity of the staking under the Mineral Act
and the Placer Mining Act and Regulations, investigation of possible misuse of mineral
claims, and investigations of disputes. In order to fulfill the objectives of providing claim-
holders with firm title and maintaining accurate and up-to-date records, the activities of the
inspectors have increased with the use of the modified grid system and also as a result of the
increase in applications for placer leases.
During 1979 as a result of 12 complaints under section 50 (formerly section 80) of the .
Mineral Act, nine mineral claims were cancelled.
The Gold Commissioner's office in Vancouver is now equipped with a microfilm^
reader which will allow the general public to view technical reports. The Xerox machine
will print these reports at a nominal cost. The Vancouver office should now become a greater
source of information for the mining community.
Coal
The Coal Administrator is responsible to the Chief Gold Commissioner for the daily
administration of the Coal Act, This involves reviewing applications for coal licences and
leases and maintenance of records of title.
The statistics related to coal licences for 1979 are shown in Table 2-3.
Table 2-3—Statistics for Coal Licences, 1979
Number of coal licence applications  1 807
Approximate area of coal licence applications      501 181 hectares
Number of coal licences issued  925
Approximate area of coal licences issued        253 708 hectares
Annual rental  $2 648 500.00
Application fees  $     18 070.00
Cash in lieu of work  $     74 285.00
Miscellaneous fees  $      9 703.00
 activity of the ministry 59
Economics and Planning Division
Objectives and Organization
The Division provides economic, financial, and statistical analyses pertaining to
provincial mineral sector policy, legislation, and planning and also collects, maintains, and
disseminates comprehensive statistical data in support of Ministry resource management
responsibilities. These major objectives are further delineated as follows:
(1) the provision of expertise on the economic aspects of mineral sector policy
and planning including assistance on the formulation of incentive programs,
infrastructure support programs, taxation and tenure systems, appropriate
evaluation frameworks, and provincial and intergovernmental mineral
policies;
(2) the conduct of selected mineral industry economic analyses including marketing, supply, financial, economic and fiscal evaluations of mineral projects
and government programs, and environmental-economic and socio-economic assessments; and
(3) the collection, maintenance, and dissemination of comprehensive British
Columbia mineral industry statistics for use by the Division, the Ministry,
and other users, covering producing metal, coal, industrial minerals, structural materials, and placer operations, and associated production, sales, and
values of commodities produced from these operations.
The Division is organized under a Director into four groups—an administrative
support group, an economic and financial analysis group, a mineral policy group, and a
mineral statistics group
Staff
The professional staff of the Division as at December 31, 1979 was as follows:
F. C. Basham Director
J. F. Clancy Senior Economic Analyst
P. Monier Senior Financial Analyst
W. Wilson Senior Mining Statistician
During the year. J. S. Poyen. Director of the Division since its inception in 1974,
resigned. F. C. Basham was appointed Director in late 1979. P. Monier joined the Division
in September 1979, following the establishment of a permanent financial analyst position. J.
Harris and S. Thorieifson also joined the Division during the year as secretary to the
Director and office assistant respectively.
1 Review of Activities
Major activity areas for the Division during the year included the evaluation of
emerging coal and metal projects under the Guidelines for Coal Development and Procedures for Approval cf Metal Mine Development pursuant to infrastructure assistance and
benefit cost analysis of prospective coal and metal projects in several regions. Concurrent
I with these evaluations, efforts were also directed toward refining and updating
C0ALM0D and MIN SIM. the Ministry's computerized financial and economic evaluation
systems for coal and metal mining projects respectively.
Following the November 1978 federal-provincial mineral taxation review, staff in the
j Division in consort with Mineral Revenue Division staff undertook reviews of tax legislation proposals from the industry and the federal government which were expected to
[ culminate in modifications to British Columbia's mineral taxation system in I980; The
I Division also provided a number of briefings, two seminars, and a publication on taxation of
' the mineral industry.
Staff of the Division continue to provide information on mineral policy and project
planning to foreign and domestic groups of investors, buyers, and other parties. In 1979,
  AcnvrrY of the ministry 6i
these groups included Alberta Energy Company, the Government of Hungary's Minerals
Department, AMOK of France, the Coal Industry Rationalization Corporation and Mitsubishi Metal Corporation from Japan, the Department of Mineral Resources from Fiji, the
LKAB coal mission from Sweden, and United Technologies/General Dynamics and Anaconda CopperCorporation from the United States. Discussions took place with these groups
on subjects ranging from general policy matters, to coal market potential, and mineral
processing and fabricating opportunities in British Columbia.
At year-end, it had become apparent that significant opportunities were emerging for
increased coal trade, and selected mineral processing activity in the energy intensive
minerals such as aluminum, zinc, and ferro alloys as well as copper. Staff were specifically
engaged in preplanning and research for copper, aluminum, and ferro-alloy smelting. A
major study of British Columbia's molybdenum mining industry in a world context was also
completed during the year.
Research and analysis for a major resource management study of the sand and gravel
industry in the lower mainland continued with staff of the Geological Division. Activity
included assembly and analysis of survey returns and preliminary report preparation. The
study is expected to be completed in 1981. Other shorter analyses were completed on
mining projects expected in two regional districts and on markets for silica and perlite.
The mineral statistics groups activity during the year included assembly and dissemination, on a monthly and annual basis, the survey, collection, editing, and compilation
of all mineral production activity and data for the province. Staff in the group participate
regularly in joint consultative efforts with other governments to streamline the data collection process and improve the accuracy and validity of mineral statistical reports. The
Division also continued with planning and programming for computerization of die monthly
metal nunc surxexs. through the MINSTATS protect This work is expected lo be completed
in 1981 and will result in a much improved and more timely statistical reporting system.
PETROLEUM RESOURCES BRANCH
Organization
The Petroleum Resources Branch, under the general direction of Assistant Deputy
Minister J. D. Lineham. Chief of the Branch, administers the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act and the regulations made thereunder, including the Drilling and Production Regulations,
the Geophysical Regulations, the Drilling Reservation Regulations, and the Development
Road Regulations. It also administers the Underground Storage Act, 1964. Therefore, the
Branch is responsible for all matters related to the disposition of Crown-owned petroleum
and natural gas rights as well as the regulation of the exploration, development, and
production phases of the oil and gas industry.
The Branch is divided into three Divisions, namely, the Engineering Division, the
Geological Division, and the Titles Division.
Engineering Division
The Engineering Division, under the direction of Chief Engineer A. G. T. Weaver, is
responsible for all engineering activities of the Petroleum Resources Branch.
There are three main functions:
(1) Enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act, together with provision of advice to the Minister with
respect to applications made by industry under the Act;
(2) Collection, filing for Branch and public use. and publication of drilling and
production statistics, production and disposition data, and reservoir and pool
performance data:
(3) Reservoir analysis of all oil and gas pools in the province, including maintenance of production rate forecasts together with data concerning reserves
discovered to date and estimates of potential reserves growth.
 62 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
The Development Engineering section, under the supervision of Senior Development
Engineer W. L. Ingram, licenses drilling and service rigs, issues well authorizations, and
maintains detailed records pertaining to all drilling and production operations.
The Reservoir Engineering section, under the Senior Reservoir Engineer B. T. B arber,
is concerned with all reservoir engineering aspects of the Division's activities. The section is
responsible for determination of reservoir and production characteristics of oil and gas pools
in the province. This involves interpretation of reservoir pressure, rock and fluid properties,
and production data. These parameters are used to forecast ultimate recoveries obtainable
from oil and gas accumulations in the province, and the rates at which these volumes will be
produced. Oil and gas allowable rates are set by the section, and recommendations
concerning proposed improved recovery and produced fluid disposition schemes are made.
The Drilling and Production Engineering section, under the supervision of District
Engineer D. L. Johnson, is located at the field office at Charlie Lake and is primarily
responsible for enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations in the field. It also
collects reservoir and other data as required, acts in a liaison capacity with industry at the
field level, and maintains core and drill sample storage and examination facilities.
Geological Division
The Geological Division consists of two sections, under the direction of Chief Geologist W. M. Young, and is responsible for all geological activities of the Petroleum Resources
Branch. The Division is accountable for the collection, compilation, and assessment of
geological and related information concerned with the exploration for and development of
petroleum resources within producing and nonproducing areas of the province; assisting in
the framing of development procedures to ensure conservation and the best returns from
these resources; estimating the remaining undiscovered petroleum resources used for the
prediction in forecasts of oil and gas production; and providing data and opinions to attract,
assist, and encourage industry in the development of the province's petroleum resources.
The Economic Geology section, under the supervision of Senior Economic Geologist
J. A. Hudson, is responsible for the coordination and direction of projects concerned with
regional mapping and the assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources.
The Reservoir Geology section, under the supervision of Senior Reservoir Geologist
R. Stewart, is responsible for the coordination and direction of projects concerned with the
detailed mapping and assessment of discovered petroleum resources.
Titles Division
The Titles Division consists of three sections, under the direction of Commissioner W.
J. Quinn, and is responsible for administering those parts of the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act relating to and affecting title to Crown petroleum and natural gas rights. The Division
administers the disposition of Crown petroleum and natural gas rights.
The Lease Administration section is responsible for all transactions involving petroleum and natural gas permits, all forms of leases, natural gas licences, and drilling
reservations. They are also responsible for geophysical licences, notices of commencement
of exploratory work, affidavits of work, unit agreements, and miscellaneous recordings.
The Revenue section is responsible for the collection and accounting of all petroleum
and natural gas revenue payable to the Crown under the provisions of the Act with the
exception of royalty.
The Draughting section is responsible for preparing and updating on a continuing basis
title maps, seismic road and trail maps, and petroleum development road maps. They are
also responsible for the preparation and affixing of plats to all title documents issued.
Staff
On December 31, 1979, the professional and senior staff included the following:
Assistant Deputy Minister, J. D. Lineham, P.Eng Chief of Branch
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
63
Engineering Division
A. G. T. Weaver, P.Eng.
W. L. Ingram, P.Eng	
M. B. Hamersley, C.E.T.
W. Duncan
B. T. Barber. P.Eng.
P. S. Attariwala, P.Eng.
L. Pepperdine, P.Eng.
P. K. Hans	
J. H. Burt	
D. L. Johnson. P.Eng.
D. E. Krezanoski, P.Eng.
D. A. Sclby....
G. T. Mohfcr	
J. L. Withers	
B. Baraniski
G L. Holland
R. W. Nyffelcr	
G. German
L. London
Geological Division
W. M. Young. P.Eng.
K  Stewart, P.Eng.
T. B. Ramsay, P.Eng.
J. Coulson, P.Eng.
J. J. English
J. A. Hudson, P.Eng.
K. A. Mc Adam
Titles Division
W.J. Quinn
Staff Changes
In the Engineering Division. L. London joined the District staff at Charlie Lake as
Geophysical Technician.
In the Geological Division, J. Coulson, a long-time consulting geologist in Edmonton,
joined the staff.
Highlights of the Petroleum Resources Branch
This section describes the highlights of both the technical and administrative work
carried out by the Branch in 1979.
Legislation
The only significant new legislation of interest to the Petroleum Resources Branch was
an amendment to the Energy Act to allow the British Columbia Knergy Cornmission, after a
hearing, to declare the purchaser of oil or gas from a pool to be a common purchaser. Related
to this was provision also for the declaration of a common carrier and a common processor.
The purpose of this legislation is to provide the means to remedy an inequitable reservoir
drainage situation when a preiduccr in a pool cannot obtain a purchase contract or access to a
pipeline or processing plant.
Several amendments were made to the Drilling and Production Regulations during
1979. Most were of a minor nature but the following are significant:
Chief Engineer
..Senior Development Engineer
Development Technician
Administrative Supervisor
Senior Reservoir Engineer
Reservoir Engineer
Reservoir Engineer
Reservoir Technician
Reservoir Technician
... District Engineer
Field Engineer
Field Technician
 Field Technician
Field Technician
Field Technician
Field Technician
Field Technician
Geophysical Technician
Geophysical Technician
Chief Geologist
Senior Reservior Geologist
Reservoir Geologist
Reservoir Geologist
Reservoir Geologist
Senior Economic Geologist
Economic Geologist
. ommissioncr
 64 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
(a) It was clarified that a production allowable always applies to an area, which
could be a single spacing area, a Unit area, a Good Engineering Practice
(GEP) area, or a project area.
(b) Gas wells may be produced at the rate of 125 per cent of their daily
production allowable at any time provided that their average daily production
rate does not exceed the allowable, over a specified year.
(c) A gas-oil ratio penalty formula replaced the series of tables in Schedule 3.
In addition to the above, the Drilling Reservation Regulations were amended to convert
all numerical data into SI.
Mediation and Arbitration Board
The composition of the Mediation and Arbitration Board for the past year ended
December 31, 1979, was the same as for 1978, that is, G. B. Pomeroy, Chairman; Cecil
Ruddell, Vice Chairman; John Martin, Member.
The Mediation and Arbitration Board is established under Part 3 of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act. Its authority and powers are covered by sections 6 to 32 inclusive. In these
the Board is authorized to:
(a) grant right of entry to oil and gas companies over alienated lands where such
right of entry has been refused by the landowner;
(b) determine conditions for right of entry and compensation to be paid
therefore;
(c) to appoint a Member of the Board to act as a mediator between a petroleum
company and a landowner where an impasse develops respecting right of
entry;
(d) if mediation proves unsuccessful, to (as a Board) hear and determine
compensation for right of entry respecting wellsite, campsite, roadways, and
pipeline installations;
(e) to review and set a compensation on leases and previous Board orders of
more than five years' duration;
(f) to terminate rights of entry when an operator has ceased to use the occupied
land, after a Certificate of Restoration has been issued by the Ministry of
Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources; to amend or rescind orders from
time to time, as circumstances and conditions dictate.
Each Board Member has, for the Board's proper business purposes, the power and
authority of a Commissioner under the Enquiry Act, and the power and authority that may be
conferred on a Commissioner under sections 12, 15, and 16 of the Act.
In 1979,74 field surveys were carried out by the Board. The Board issued 34 right-of-
entry orders, most of which were preceded by a mediation hearing and an on-the-site
inspection of the proposed leased area. Seven arbitration hearings were held to set compensation. The Board met regularly, once each week, to deal with general Board matters and
specific concerns of the public. In addition, many special meetings were held as circumstances warranted.
Engineering Division
The continued high level of activity by the petroleum industry during 1979 gave rise to
a proportionately high regulatory work load by Division staff. In addition, the Division
acted as advisor on petroleum engineering matters to governmental and private agencies and
carried out studies and projects used, in the final analysis, for improving the public interest
in provincial petroleum resources.
Projects included forecasts of future oil and gas producibility in the province, studies of
various reservoir production mechanisms, development of regulations for geothermal
operations, trial of the microfiche method of data retrieval, development of guidelines or
'-"-i
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 65
regulations on road construction, drill site preparation, blowout prevention and electrical
installations, and the construction of the first 11 kilometres (7 miles) of an ail-weather road
into the Sierra area.
These items are described more fully in the following summaries of work carried out in
the three sections of the Engineering Division.
I   Development Engineering
The Development Engineering section is responsible for the administration of all
matters related to the location, drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells in the
I  province. This involves the assurance that operators of all wells located, drilled, and
produced conform with the Drilling and Production Regulations and submit the required
applications, reports, and information to the Branch.
Approxal of well authorizations to drill proposed well locations is granted by the
section after review and reference to the Titles and Geological Divisions. In 1979 there were
464 well authorizations issued, two less than during 1978. Throughout the life of a well the
■ status, well name, or classification may be changed as circumstances require. During the
year statuses were changed on 187 occasions, well names on 329, and well classifications on
34.
In addition to comprehensive well data records. all geological and geophysical reports
submitted for work credits as well as the Branch correspondence files of the three Divisions
are maintained by the section. The program to microfilm all significant full-sized documents in the well files for security purposes and to establish a library in microfiche format
I   was continued. At the end of 1979 the first 4 200 well data files were in this library. Trials
were run during the year lo use this formal for data retrieval. Although it proved to be
considerably slower, the method will have to be adopted as filing space becomes limited.
Other equipment and filing methods were examined to determine an improved method.
Effective at the beginning of 1979. all production and disposition records were
converted to SI. The changeover caused difficulties initially but by year-end the submitting
|   ope: and the Branch had resolved most problems.
Each drilling and service rig operating in the province must have a valid Rig Licence.
I During 1979, 105 licences were renewed while 67 new ones were issued.
B- Drilling and Production Engineering
This section is located in the district office at Charlie Lake in the Peace River district of
I northeastern British Columbia During 1979 oxer 260 000 kilometres (166 344 miles) were
I driven by the field staff of this section to enforce at the field level requirements of the
I Drilling and Production and the Geophysical Regulations, both made pursuant to the
■ Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
The high level of drilling activity and subsequent production operations carried on
undiminished throughout 1979. The work load was dealt with by seven drilling and
production technicians and one geophysical technician. To ensure compliance with gas
I   conservation orders and to attempt to reduce needless flaring of gas, inspections were
I  carried out on 688 different occasions at oil and gas battery facilities.
To ensure the accuracy and reliability of gas measurement equipment .gas production
■ was monitored throughout the year with fast meter checks being made on 660 different
I  occasions, and complete meter checks being made on 466 occasions.
To augment data received by the Reservoir Engineering section, 131 static pressure
[ gradients were run, 10 oil and 20 gas well tests were w nncssed. and I 492 pressure bomb
I elements were calibrated. In keeping with the requirements for metriftcation all pressure
I  bomb calibrations were done in SI.
Geophysical field activity continued at a very high level throughout 1979, with 198
3 seismic field inspections being made compared to 176 during 1978. The activity prompted a
 66 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
request, which was subsequently approved, for the acquisition of a second geophysical
technician. Recruitment for this position took place in late 1979.
Drilling activity continued at the unprecedented high level which had begun in 1977.
Throughout 1979 the active well count never fell below 50 except for a short period
following spring breakup when it dipped to 40 active wells. During 1979, 758 inspections
were performed at drilling sites and 4 232 inspections were made at producing or abandoned
locations.
Inspection of salt-water disposal systems and the witnessing of segregation tests was
again emphasized during 1979.
This section continued its involvement with the Northeastern British Columbia Oil
Spill Cooperative, taking an active role at all meetings and training exercises. It also had
direct participation as an associate member of the PROSCARAC (Prairie Regional Oil Spill
Containment and Recovery Advisory Committee), an organization having expertise and
equipment for western Canada operations.
The section was also involved throughout 1979 as a member of the Blowout Prevention
Certification Committee which was established under the auspices of the Canadian Petroleum Association, the Independent Petroleum Association, and the Association of Oil
Well Drilling Contractors. The role of the comrnittee was to establish training and course
material and the subsequent examination for certification of Drilling Supervisors. By the
end of 1979 this certification procedure was in place and working well.
Throughout 1979, industry was reminded of the proposed changes to the blowout
prevention section of the Drilling and Production Regulations. Although they were in draft
form and implementation of them was considered to be imminent, industry's acceptance of
the changes was excellent as was their general attitude toward blowout prevention.
This section has been directly involved with the Sierra—Yoyo road project and spent
many man-hours on both route selection and onsite supervision of the project. The road,
which will ultimately give all-weather access from Fort Nelson to the general Sierra—Yoyo
area, is of vital significance to the Ministry and to the Peace River area. It will not only allow
for summer drilling activity and the resulting benefit for the Fort Nelson area, but it will also
give access to the prolific gas fields of Sierra and Yoyo in the event of an uncontrolled
blowout.
In May 1979, a meeting was held with the Fort Nelson Indian Band, when permission
was obtained for the Ministry and its agents to use roads on the Indian Reserve and gain
access to the starting point for road construction to the Snake River. By year-end road'
construction had reached the Snake River and site preparation for placement of a bridge on
the Snake River was underway. Budgetary commitments are being requested to complete
this project during 1980.
Reservoir Engineering
An important responsibility of the Reservoir Engineering section is to estimate on a
continuing basis the oil and gas reserves in British Columbia. Estimates as of December 31,
1979 are shown in Table 4-3 and are summarized below.
Oil, established     28 484 lOW (179 249 MSTB)
Natural gas, established—
Raw  259 511 10W (9 211 BSCF)
Marketable  212 515 106m3 (7 543 BSCF)
Natural gas liquids—
Propane      1 533 103m3 (9 658 MSTB)
Butane      2 227 10W (14 023 MSTB)
Pentanesplus      4 199 10'm3 (26 424 MSTB)
Sulphur      8 146 103t (8 017 MLT)
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY ™
It may be observed from Table 4-3 that the oil reserves have decreased by 1.1 10*m'
(6.7 MMSTB) from last year. Additions due to drilling and revisions were 0.4 10' m' (2 7
MMSTBi and 0.6 10*m\ (4.0 MMSTB). Production reduced the reserve by 2 1 10*rn'
(13.4 MMSTB).
Raw gas reserves at the end of 1979 were 13.9 10"m' (493 BCF) higher than last year.
Additions due to drilling were 26.1 10'm' (928 MCF). Revisions and production reduced
the reserves by 0.8 I0*m' (31 BCF) and 11.4 10'm' (404 BCF) respectively.
Revisions to the natural gas producibility forecast were made to reflect the impact of
more discoveries in the first four years of the forecast (1979 to 1982) due to the continued
surge in drilling activity and of expected higher off-take rates from pools in the vicinity of
the south west Sierra pipeline which is expected to be completedinthespringof 1980. Under
these assumptions the provincial marketable gas producibility remains fairly constant at
about 11 700 I O'm' (41S billion cubic feet) per year until 1997.
A revised forecast of oil available from pools within the province was also made in
support of a study by the British Columbia Energy Commission on the future oil supply,
demand, marketing. and refinery patterns in the province. As a result of recent oil discovery
experience it appears that decline from the 6 200-m' (38 000 to 40 OOO-barretj-per-day
range will be delayed for several years; however, it still appears unlikely that the province
will ever produce more than 25 per cent of its own oil requirements
In the Yoyo—Pine Point gas pool, allowables in early wells were based on deliv-
crability whereas recent wells received allowables based on recoverable reserves, this led to
inequity among operators and. following a request from them, the Branch moved to place all
allowables on a rccoxcrable reserves basis. With information from recent wells the pool has
been remapped and the volumetric reserves are now similar to reserves estimated by
material balance. The reserves based allowables are sufficient to enable operators to fulfill
their gas contracts without additional drilling.
Three reservoir simulation studies were conducted during the year, one on the Weasel
Unit No. 2 oil pool. one on the Cabin—Slave Point C gas pool, and the third on a model
water-driven gas pool in which the param lets of thickness, horizontal and vertical permeability, amount of penetration into the reservoir, production rate, and strength of water-
drive could be varied individually to examine their influence on recovery.
The study on Weasel Unit No. 2 indicated that the waierflotkl was performing better
than in most pools due to the favourable nature of the reservoir. The recovery is predicted to
be about SO per cent of the oil in place compared to the average of 35 percent for all oil pools
in the province. However, it was further predicted that with certain changes to the flood
pattern, the recovery could be increased to about 64 percent.
The study of the Cabin—Slave Point C gas pool was initialed because of the poor
performance of the pool compared lo the Clarke Lake pool studied in 1977. The study
established that the early breakthrough of water was due to the influx of water from a large
aquifer together w ith a marked w atcr coning effect. The latter effect is greater than in Clarke
Lake due to thinner pax and lower permeability. Recovery is predicted to be about 49 per
cent of the gas in place due to a sweep efficiency of only 69 per cent, the sweep efficiency
estimated in the Clarke Lake study was 94 per cent. It appears that infill drilling would be
effective in increasing recovery in the pool.
In the third study, the parameter variations svere selected to cover the range of values so
far encountered in pools in the province and. from the various combinations of values tested
mine model, it appears that sweep efficiency x-arics from 61 per cent up to 94 per cent and
that recovery of initial gas in place varies from 36 per cent to 75 per cent. From variations in
the values of an individual parameter with the values of all other parameters held constant it
was established mat sweep efficiencies increased as reservoir thickness increases, as
horizontal permeability increases, as the ratio of horizontal to vertical permeability increases, and as the strength of the water drive decreases. The sweep efficiency is hardly
—
 68 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
affected by reduced rates of production. It also appears that for maximum sweep efficiency
the optimum depth of penetration into the reservoir is in the order of 15 to 20 per cent of
reservoir thickness.
Geological Division
Economic Geology—The regional subsurface mapping coverage of the northeastern
sedimentary basin area was increased by the addition of maps of the Triassic Halfway
Formation in National Topographic Series 94 A, B, G, H and 931,0 and P inclusive. All of
the published subsurface mapping series of the western Canadian sedimentary basin were
updated and revised to include released information as of April 30, 1979. This subsurface
coverage of the major producing horizons is available on a 1:100 000 and 1:250 000
mapping scale. The latter scale, comprising eight map sheets, provides a broad regional
perspective of the mapped horizon.
In addition to the previously mentioned mapping the drillstem test and penetration
compilation map series were updated as of April 30, 1979. These maps, on a scale of
1:100 000, show, for all wells outside designated field boundaries, the deepest geological
formation penetrated, all formation drillstem tests, and the zone(s) in which gas and oil
wells are completed. In addition to the latter information and within the designated field
limit, the penetration map will show drillstem tests in horizons other than that productive in
the field as well as the formation at total depth for wells which have penetrated below the
lowest productive horizon within the field.
Other project work carried out by the section during the year included the completion
of seven regional Triassic stratigraphic cross-sections within the general Fort St. John area.
The purpose of this publication is to aid in defining the limits of the Pre-Coplin Unconformity productive oil and gas-bearing zones within the Triassic Charlie Lake Formation.
The section was very active in assisting other Divisions, ministries, Crown agencies,
and the public in matters concerning geology, estimates of the remaining undiscovered
petroleum resources, evaluation of land sales, and assessment reports submitted in accordance with work requirements. Frequent meetings were held with industry representatives to
discuss aspects of geology, geophysics, and the petroleum resource potential of the producing and nonproducing areas of the province.
Reservoir Geology—As a result of another year of high drilling activity, the Reservoir
Geology section carried out an extensive program of assessment and mapping in detail of all
oil and gas accumulations encountered by the drill. Structural, stratigraphic, and reservoir
geologic data made available through drilling were used as a basis for new and revision-type
map work, reservoir studies, evaluation of reserves, and the control of remedial work,
cycling, repressuring, and secondary recovery projects.
In 1979 changes resulted from new drilling and studies in the following fields and
hydrocarbon-bearing rock unit(s); Airport—Dunievy, Beatton River West—Bluesky,
Beaverdam—Halfway, Beavertail—Gething, Birch—Baldonnel and Halfway, Bivouac—
Debolt, Buick Creek—Bluesky and Dunievy, Buick Creek North—Dunievy, Buick Creek
West—Halfway, Cecil Lake—North Pine, Dahl—Bluesky, Eagle—Belloy, Fireweed—
Dunievy, Flatrock—Boundary Lake, Fort St. John—North Pine, Helmet—Jean Marie and
Slave Point, Laprise Creek—Baldonnel, Mica—Mica, Monias—Halfway, Nig Creek—
Baldonnel, Oak—Halfway, Paradise.—Halfway, Rigel—Bluesky and Dunievy, Rigel
East—Gething, Stoddart West—Belloy, Two Rivers—Halfway, Wargen—Gething, Wil-1
der—Halfway, Willow—Gething, and Yoyo—Pine Point.
Several new fields encompassing single or multiple well pools were designated. These j
included the Graham field with Gething, Dunievy, and Debolt pools, the Ladyfern field
with a Gething pool, the Martin field with Bluesky, Baldonnel. Siphon, and Halfway pools,
the Ring field with Gething pools, and the Tommy Lakes field with a Halfway pool. All field I
and pool outlines were revised where necessary on a quarterly basis. The field and pool I
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 69
designations often have significant impact on well confidentiality, royalty rates, wellhead
prices paid for production, and lease tenure.
Much time was employed in assessing the volumetric oil and gas reserves of wells as a
basis for determining production allowables. Controversy this year with industry was
moderate in comparison to the previous year because in many cases more definitive data
such as satisfactory penetration, adequate electric logs, and cores were available.
Preliminary studies were done on the distribution of the Cretaceous sands between
Rigel East and Fireweed. the development of porosity in the Jean Marie limestone the
occurrence of isolated Devonian reefs, and porosity development in the Belloy down dip
from the subcrop edge. Belloy lithology in the Eagle area was studied in detail in relation to
a proposed \x at cr flood scheme.
Routine assistance was provided in advising other Divisions with geological evaluations and assessments of Crown lands posted for disposal of petroleum and natural gas
rights, petroleum and natural gas lease extension renewals, the reclassification of wells for
the purpose of confidentiality of information and new pool discovery status, geological
appraisal concerning industry production schemes such as concurrent production and good
engineering practices iGEP'Si. and the disposal of water production.
Titles Division
During 1979 there was a marked increase in the activities of the Division. Even though
the number of parcels acquired by industry al the various dispositions was less than in 1978
the total number of title documents issued during the year increased by over 10 per cent.
This was due to a substantial number of permits reaching the end of their term and being
converted to leases, plus the effects of the amendments to the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act that became effective on July 1. 1978.
The two clerical positions that were approved in 1978 have been filled and this has
enabled the Division to be redesigned into three functional groups, namely. Lease Records,
Draughting, and Accounting. It is anticipated that two additional positions will be approved
and filled during 1980 which will enable the Division to provide better service.
Geophysical exploration continued at a very active pace with 188 programs being
approved in 1979. Ii is important to note that all projects xvcre not confined to the northeast
comer of the province, with the Queen Charlotte Islands, the Cariboo, as well as the Fcmic
area now being actixciv explored.
The Draughting section is nearing completion in converting the present base maps to a
1:50 000 scale and the Permit. Lease, and Well Location maps to a 1:200 000 scale. Both
types shou Id be available to industry sometime in April 1980. Topography will be shown on
these maps and should prove very useful lo companies undertaking geophysical work.
The British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation was very active in obtaining
farmouts resulting in an additional 28 permits being issued over their licensed lands. The
British Columbia Resources Investment Corporal ion has now completed agreements on
approximately 70 per cent of lands held under the terms of the British Columbia Resources
Investment Corporation Act.
In December 51 permit parcels in the Nechako basin area west ot Quesnel ami Williams
Lake were advertised in a disposition of Crown petroleum and natural gas rights. This
disposition was unique in that bonus bidding was not required. Instead, the determination of
the successful bidder was done on the best work program over the maximum area during the
normal five-year lenn of the permits. Of the parcels offered. 43 permils covering 1 952 490
hectares were awarded to Canadian Hunter Explorat ion Ltd. based on a work program bid of
S27 500 000.00. The issue of these permits is effective January 15, 1980, therefore, the
statistics that these permits represent are not included in the 1979 totals. As of December 31.
1979, 9 170 756 hectares of Crown petroleum and natural gas rights issued under the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Act were held in good standing by approximately 460 companies and individuals. The form of title held and the number of hectares involved are as
follows:
 70 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Rrrm of Title Number Hectares
Permits  389 4 727 388
Natural gas licences  2 7 559
Drilling reservations  100 422 888
Leases (all types)  6 048 4 012 921
Total  6 539 9 170 756
During 1979 the following transactions were completed:
1. PERMITS—
Issued  52*
Renewed  285
Converted to lease  83
Cancelled .-.  1
Transferred (assigned)  131
2. DRILLING RESERVATIONS—
Issued  39
Renewed  53
Converted to lease ;..  42
Cancelled  4
Transferred (assigned)  26
3. LEASES—
Issued  1 076
Annual rental paid  4 114
Continued under penalty  199
Continued NOT under penalty  627
Cancelled  85
Transferred (assigned) _„_  936
4. NATURAL GAS LICENCES—
Issued    5
Renewed  Nil
Converted to lease  5
Cancelled „,  JVif
Transferred (assigned)....  Nil
Number       Number
5. CROWN SALES-                                                       ***** S°'d
Permits     28 23
Drilling reservations     45 39
Leases  668 527
Total  741 589
6. GEOPHYSICAL LICENCES—Issued    31
7. AFFIDAVITS OF WORK—Approved
Permits  114
Leases    22
8. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDINGS (mergers, grouping
notices, etc.)—Approved  3 OOOt
9. UNIT AGREEMENTS—Approved      1
' Includes 28 BCRIC permits.
' Estimated.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
MINERAL REVENUE DIVISION
The Mineral Revenue Division is responsible for the administration of mineral and
petroleum resource taxes and royalties assessable under the Mineral Resource Tax Act
Mineral Land Tax Act, Coal Royalty Regulations, Petroleum and Natural Gas Royalty
Regulations. and the Iron Ore Royalty Agreements. The operations of the Division are under
the direction of W. W. Ross, assisted by B. A. Garrison with a permanent establishment of
21 which was augmented by two auxiliary employees and one summer student during 1979.
A shifting work load necessitated the transfer of one established position to headquarters from the district office in Nelson, and the elimination of one position in the New
Westminster office. This change will eliminate the necessity of employing one full-time
auxiliary employee in the headquarters office.
Although there were not significant changes in the primary responsibilities of the
Mineral Revenue Division, there was a substantial increase in revenue collections which
rose bv 26.7 per cent over the 1978 calendar \ car. Details of these collections are set out in
Table 2-5.
A brief review of activity by statutory or regulator)- authority follows.
Coal Royalty Regulations Under the Coal Act
Under the provisions of section 29 of the Coal Act and its related Coal Royalty
Regulations, all coal produced under a licence, lease, or permit from Crown lands is subject
tome payment of a 3.5-per-cent roy ally based upon the minchcad value of the coal produced
and sold during each calendar month. Producers under this Act reported 2 869 503 tonnes
of coal sold during the 1979 reporting period with a minehcad xalue of $121 028 207.00,
yielding Crown royalty collections of S4 235 987.00. The volume of coal shipped and sold
during the period was 2.3 per cent greater than the volume during the same period in 1978;
however, rcx'cnuc collections were down by 15.8 per cent over the same period due to the
inclusion in 1978 of $808 682.61 which relates to the 1974-1977 period audits.
Iron Ore Royalty Agreements Under the Mineral Act
Two mining operations producing iron ore during 1979 were subject to the payment of
an iron ore royalty of $1.00 per long dry ton of contained iron in concentrates produced and
sold during the year. Under the terms of these agreements, concentrates are deemed to have a
50-pcr-ccnt iron content, and the royalty payable may be reduced by 50 per cent where
satisfactory exploration work for iron ore has been performed and approved. For the
reporting period ending December 31. 1979. 645,248.67 long dry tons of iron concentrate
with a deemed iron content of 322,624.34 long dry tons was reported as shipped and sold
yielding royally payments of $161 312.20.
Mineral Land Tax Act
Mineral rights in lands other than those vested in the Crown in the Right of the Province
of British Columbia are subject to taxation under the Mineral Land Tax Act. For purposes of
taxation, such freehold mineral rights are classified as undesignated mineral lands, a
production tract, or a production area. Undesignated mineral lands pay a basic annual
acreage tax ranging from 62 cents per hectare to $2.47 per hectare with a minimum tax of
$10.00 depending on the total area held by an ow net Production areas are subject to an
annual tax of $4.94 per hectare in place of the basic tax. Production tracts must pay a mill
rate assessment, not exceeding 25 mills of the assessed value, in addition to the $4.94 per
hectare assessed for production areas. Under current policy, only mineral lands producing
coal, petroleum, or natural gas arc designated as production tracts which are subject to an
assessment of 12.5 mills of the assessed value as determined for the year under the
assessment regulations.
 72
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
The mineral land tax assessment roll on May 1, 1979 was composed of 7 639 folios
covering a total of 534 819.97 hectares. The number of folios increased by 1 514 or 25 per
cent over 1978, while the hectares on the roll increased by 13 168.15 hectares or 2.5 per
cent.
Details of the 1979 mineral land tax assessment roll issued on May 1,1979 are set out
in the following table.
Table 2-4—Mineral Land Tax Assessment Roll
Classification of
Mineral Land
Number
of Fol ios
Hectares
Current
Delinquent
and Interest
Agricultural
Forgiveness
Net
Assessments
Nondesignated	
7 564
46
29
516 265.50
12 590.70
5 963.77
S
410 995.75
62 198.06
9 439 256.90
J
22 080.68
5 482.02
1 366.59
$
(90 304.62)
S
342 771.81
Production Tracts	
9 440 623.49
Totals	
7 639
534 819.97
9 912 450.71
28 929.29
(90 304.62)
9 851 075.38
The External Audit section completed four audits under the Act which resulted in
revised assessments of $65 870.00 at December 31,1979. Also, administrative adjustments
totalling $2 719.10 for interest, agricultural forgiveness, and surrenders were made to yield
total tax assessments for the calendar year of $9 913 806.06.
Revenue collections for the year by classification of mineral land are as follows:
Classification of Mir
I Land
Revenue
Collected
$
Nondesignated      323 733.89
Production Areas       71 310.16
Production Tracts  9 492 065.85
9 887 109.90
In 1979, the Titles Search section completed a total of 21 266 searches of which 2 366
were for the Water Rights Branch of the Ministry of Environment. Title searching activity
resulted in 1 798 parcels covering 70 016.62 hectares being added to the roll. Nonpayment
of assessed taxes resulted in 115 parcels of mineral land covering 34 276.06 hectares being
forfeited. Also seven surrenders covering 290.89 hectares were processed. Due to the
complicated nature of the titles composing the "lieu lands" of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Belt located north of title 7434A, additional work has been required to produce the
surrender document in registerable form. It is now anticipated that registration will not be
completed until mid-1980.
On June 7, 1979, John Eric Merrett of 4128 Long View Drive, Victoria, B.C., was
appointed Chairman of the Mineral Land Tax Review Board replacing John Bedford Evans
who resigned in 1978. There were no appeals heard by the Board during 1979 although there
were three appeals against 1979 assessments filed with the Board. Hearing dates for two of
these appeals have been scheduled for the first quarter in 1980. Other appeals relating to
1978 and prior years and to matters dealt with in the Supreme Court judgment of the
Honourable Mr. Justice Berger remain adjourned sine die.
An amendment which validated assessments made for the 1974-1977 taxation years
under the Mineral Land Tax Act came into force and effect on September 10, 1979.
 -ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
73
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 74
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Mineral Royalties Act
Although this Act was repealed as of January 1, 1977, there remained delinquent
royalty on account of two companies. Through the initiation of remedial measures, the
Division collected $3 734.41 from one of the operators and has entered into an agreement
with the other operator for recovery from future production incomes.
Mineral Resource Tax Act
Any mine which produces minerals as defined under the Mineral Act or Placer Mining
Act is subject to an annual tax of 17.5 per cent on the mining income derived from the
operation of that mine in the province. In 1979,49 returns were filed with the Commissioner
for corporate fiscal years commencing in 1978. These returns reflected net aggregate
incomes of $721 559 486.00 which translate to agross tax payable of $16 453 820.00
which after allowing deduction of royalty credits in the amount of $1 760 317.00 yields a
net tax payable of $14 693 502.00. Actual revenue collections during the year under this
Act were $23 799 285.77. This represents a 166.5-per-cent increase over the corresponding
period in 1978.
The External Audit section completed 51 audits under this Act, and issued 26
assessments for net adjustments of $409 469.00 during 1979.
A minor amendment was made to the Act during the year to ensure that the definition of
mineral under the Act applied to placer mining operation thus placing it under the Act for
purposes of taxation.
Petroleum and Natural Gas Royalty Regulations
Petroleum and natural gas produced from Crown land, with the exception of that sold
under contract to the British Columbia Petroleum Corporation, is subject to the payment of
royalty as prescribed under the regulations. During the 12-month period ending December
31, 1979, 6 545 returns were received and processed. An analysis of these returns reflects
the following with respect to petroleum production during the period.
Table 2-6—Petroleum Production by Royalty Classification
Classification
Production
Value of
Marketed
Production
Crown
Royalty
Share
Average
Royalty
Rale
Old oil	
1 804 206.2
216 454.3
46 887.5
109 990.5
10 591.1
S
141 917 089.44
17 027 032.24
3 687 360.93
8 652 435.30
851 589.70
522 137.8
53 178.4
PerCent
28.94
24.57
Exempt discovery wells	
Total	
2 188 129.6
172 135 507.61
575 316.2
26.39
A detailed analysis for natural gas is not presented because virtually all commercial
production is sold under contract to the British Columbia Petroleum Corporation and only
minor amounts of natural gas used for field production purposes are subject to the payment
of royalty.
Actual revenue collections received for the year under these regulations are as follows:
Table 2-7—Petroleum and Natural Gas Revenue Collection, 1979
Natural gas royalties  67 200.07
Crude petroleum royalties  44 819 109.42
Conservation plant and products royalties     1 048 746.08
Total  45 935 055.57
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY 75
The petroleum exploration incentive program was discontinued in 1978, and is in a
phase-out stage. Details of transactions under the program for the 1979 year are as follows:
Table 2-8—Oil Credits Transactions, 1979
Credits Value
Balance brought forward from 1978 ..  1 590 266 1 192 699.50
Credits approved for prior periods                      354 26S.S0
Credits redeemed ..  1 520 268 I 140 201.00
Balance December 31, 1979                70 352 52 764.00
An amendment to the Act was approved which will allow the Lieutenant Governor in
Council to impose a penalty for failure to file the required returns or make payment of the
royalty due within the prescribed nine.
FINANCE AND A I) \ 11 ni s i r \ 11 < > \ DIVISION
The Director of this Division is Robert R. Davy. Reporting to the Director are the
Accounts Section and the Mail/Supplies Service. Publications and the Library reported to
the Director, however now are the responsibility of the Communications Division. The
Director also has the responsibility for space accommodation and telephone services. The
Director reports directly to the Deputy Minister.
Accounts Section
This section is under the control of the Director. This section consists of the Accounts-
Payable under Mary-Ellen Ibngc and the Payroll under Sue Smith. The several functions in
this section arc the preparation of budget estimates, administering payment of suppliers'
accounts and travel claims, payroll administration, costing and facilitating of purchases
through the Purchasing Commission, licensing and insuring of vehicles, and other administrative accounting responsibilities.
Mail/Supplies Service
This section is located in Room 414, Douglas Building. The supervisor is Ian Clark.
Services provided are the mail and runner service, and the acquisition and disbursement of
general office supplies.
Library
The Ministry Library, located at Room 430, Douglas Building, Victoria, is administered by the Director of Finance and Administration and is supervised by S. Ferris. The
Library provides geological and technical information for the staff, other ministries,
industry, and the public.
The Library is the depository for all publications of the Ministry. Other holdings
include reports of the geological surveys' and mines' branches of Canada, the United States,
and other foreign nations. Government reports and maps total approximately 16 500 in
number There are about 2 000 texts and reference books. Audiovisual equipment is also
stored in the Library for staff use. Special collections comprised of proceedings and
guidebooks from international geological congresses, and annual reports of mining and
petroleum companies are also held by the Library.
An estimated 2 000 requests for information were dealt with in 1979 and 80 interii-
brary loan requests were made for staff members by the Library. Indexing of government
serial publications was continued.
 m
M
i
*$WiV
 activrty of the minister 77
Publications
The Publications section is administered by the Director and supervised by Mrs.
Rosalyn J. Moir. Responsibilities include publication preparation for the Ministry, maintaining indexes and publication lists, disseminating press releases, and dispatch of the ever-
increasing requests for information from other government agencies, universities, industry
and the public. Approximately 9 000 communiques were handled during the year.
The Publication Committee, composed of a representative from each Division, is
chaired by A. Sutherland Brown.
Publications that are in print may be obtained from the Ministry, 552 Michigan Street.
Victoria, and from the Geological Survey of Canada. 100 West Pender Street. Vancouver.
Current publications may also be obtained from the Gold Commissioner^ office, 800
Hornby Street, Vancouver
Publications are available for reference use in the Ministry Library, in the Reading
Room of the Geological Survey of Canada, in the offices of the Inspector of Mines in Nelson
and Prince Rupert, as well as in certain libraries.
Separate lists of publications are available for the Mineral Resources Branch and the
Petroleum Resources Branch on request to the Publications Section, Ministry of Energy.
Mines and Petroleum Resources, 552 Michigan Street, Victoria V8V IX4. Mailing lists are
maintained for all those interested in receiving notification of the release of new
publications.
PERSONNEL
The Personnel Office staff remained at three with no change in 1979.
Projects underv, ay include negotiations for transfer of British Columbia Energy Commission staff to the newly formed Energy Resources Branch, initial staffing of the Energy
Resources Branch, and continuation of the Licensed Science Officer Classification Plan.
Personnel Statistics, 1979
Number of permanent employees 339
Number of appointments 31
Number of resignations 13
Number of rciircments/prcrciircmcnis 2
Number of in-service transfers 11
Number of promotions and reclassifications 12
Number of temporary employees 31
Number of temporary employees under WIG 1979 . 35
Number of Labour summer students 16
Death in service I
ENERGY RESOURCES BRANCH
In December 1978. the mandate of the Ministry was expanded to include responsibility
for energy matters
Early in 1979, the Energy Resources Branch of the Ministry was formed. All non-
regulatory functions of the British Columbia Energy Commission were then transferred into
this new Branch.
The Energy Resources Branch is the principal agency for government energy policy
initiatives and energy programs. It is responsible for policy recommendations on all energy
and related issues, for energy data and analysis, and for conservation programs and the
development of programs that pertain to new energy technology.
Hits was a formative year lor the Energy Resources Branch. B> the end ol 1979. the
Branch comprised three Divisions: the newly created Energy Policy Division, the Forecast-
 78 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
ing and Strategic Studies Division, and the Conservation and Technology Division, the
latter two transferred from the British Columbia Energy Commission. Rirther organizational changes are anticipated.
It was also a year of transition. Although the Branch had formal control of all its
Divisions early in 1979, many sections continued to function under the joint aegis of the
Ministry and the British Columbia Energy Commission for some or all of the year. The
activities of these sections are properly included in this report.
For much of 1979, the Energy Resources Branch came under the direction of the
Deputy Minister.
Energy Policy Division
The Energy Policy Division was created late in 1979 and staffed, initially with
personnel seconded from other ministries.
Douglas H. Horswill was appointed Director of the Division shortly before year-end.
A primary objective of the Division is to design energy strategies which meet, on a
continuing basis, the energy needs of British Columbia, while taking into account and
developing policy to deal with environmental, social, and economic factors related to
energy. The Division is also designed to provide the capability for quick and accurate
responses to emergent, short-term energy issues.
The major thrust of the year's work was the development of an energy policy for British
Columbia. That policy is geared to the achievement of energy security for British Columbia
for the 1980's and beyond. The Energy Policy Statement, slated for release in February
1980, will provide a framework for detailed policy initiatives, to be developed over time as
specific programs are introduced.
Forecasting and Strategic Studies Division
The Forecasting and Strategic Studies Division was created in July 1979, when staff of
the Energy Resources Management Division of British Columbia Energy Commission were
transferred to the Ministry.
Staff of the Division were involved almost exclusively with the preparation of a long-
term energy supply and requirements forecast for British Columbia, extending to 1996.
Both a summary and a technical report are due to be published early in 1980.
The Division is also preparing a study of opportunities for conversion to coal in the
British Columbia cement industry. This study is also to be released early in 1980.
Conservation and Technology Division
In December of 1978, the Conservation and Technology Division of the British
Columbia Energy Commission was seconded to the Ministry in anticipation of transfer at a
later date. The Division, under the direction of R. L. Evans, continued its work, assessing
energy conservation and renewable energy options and encouraging and promoting conservation and renewable energy developments.
A major initiative began on May 8, 1979 with the signing of the "Canada-British
Columbia Agreement on the Development and Demonstration of Renewable Energy and
Energy Conservation Technologies." This agreement provides $27 million over a five-year
period for major energy conservation and renewable energy demonstration projects. During
the year a number of important demonstration projects were initiated. These are described in
more detail below.
During the year, the Division continued to provide advice and staff support on new
energy technology and in particular on coal research and development. This work was in
support of the government's intention to increase energy research and development activities in the province.
 activity of the ministry 79
Energy Conservation Programs
A number of studies and projects were carried out in order to encourage and promote
the efficient use of energy in buildings including industrial, commercial, and residential
establishments.
Energy Management for Commercial Buildings—The Conservation and
Technology Division commenced work on a manual on energy conservation for
commercial buildings. The manual will outline the potential forexisting buildings
to save energy and money and it explains how to set up an energy management
program.
Energy Conservation for Schools—In cooperation with the Ministry of
Education, Science and Technology, a manual was published on steps to energy
conservation in schools. The manual outlines how in-school conservation programs could be established and suggests several energy conservation techniques.
IECM Conservation Information Tour—In cooperation with the federal
Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, a team of people were hired to provide
energy conservation information to the public in about 14 different British
Columbia communities. The Ministry's residential energy conservation computer
program BCHEAP was used by over 800 people in the different communities.
Building Owners and Managers Conference—In cooperation with Building
Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and University of British Columbia's Centre for Continuing Education, a workshop on building cnergv conservation management was provided. Over 120 participants attended the workshop and listened to guest speakers outline the potential savings and methods of
conservation available to building operators.
Further projects were undertaken lo encourage the efficient use of energy by industry
and to continue to promote the increased substitution of wood waste as a fuel in place of
other prime fuels such as oil or natural gas.
Energy Bus Program—Under the jointly funded federal/provincial agreement, the Conservation and Technology Division operates a computer-equipped
mobile energy audit vehicle or "Energy Bus." This vehicle, with a highly trained
technical staff, visits industrial and commercial establishments around the
province to conduct free energy audits. In 1979, a total of 95 visits were made to
establishments throughout British Columbia. Over $2.5 million in potential
energy savings were identified by these visits.
The Use of Wood Waste and Municipal Solid Waste as Energy Resources—
The Ministry has an ongoing interest in the ate of wood waste and municipal solid
waste as energy resources. In this context, the Management Committee of the
Joint Canada-British Columbia Agreement on the Development and Demonstration of Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation Technologies approved the
following external projects which are to be completed during 1980:
• Firing a lime kiln with a lamb wet-cell burner (wood waste)
• A technical and economic csalualion of a fluidized bed combustion unit in
Vancouver (wood waste/municipal solid waste)
• A feasibility study of the concept of cogcncration for the metropolitan
Victoria area based on the use of refuse derived fuel (municipal solid
waste).
The following studies were undertaken during the year:
Cogeneration Survey—A joint study with British Columbia Hydro and
Power Authority undertaken to assess the potential for increased cogcncration of
electricity and process beat at industrial operations in the province was
undertaken.
 80 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Electrical Generation Station Using Wood Waste as a Fuel—The feasibility
study of a 60-megawatt wood waste-fired generating station at Quesnel commissioned by British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority was commenced. This
was a follow-up study funded by the Wood-Waste Energy Coordinating Committee, chaired by the British Columbia Energy Commission. The Ministry was
represented on the steering committee which directed the work.
Consumer Conservation Information AcnvrriES
Many consumer conservation information projects were undertaken during 1979 in
order to improve public understanding of the need for, and benefits of, energy conservation.
Activities
Lovings/Hawthorne lectures—Luncheons were organized in order to
provide an opportunity for many of Vancouver's business executives to meet and
speak with Amory Lovings and Sir William Hawthorne (two prominent energy
spokesmen).
These seminars were designed to provide information on conservation with
such prominent speakers as the Honourable Mr. Justice Tom Berger, Dr. David
Brooks, and Dr. John Helliwell.
Enersave Test—Enersave, a federal government home insulation audit, is
available to all Canadians. Since it is not actively promoted by the federal
government, the Ministry cooperated with them in distributing the audit
throughout British Columbia.
Publications
A number of consumer information and materials were developed during
1979 including:
Energy: the Canadian Picture—a teacher's guide, and was prepared jointly
with the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology to coincide with, and
complement a teacher's kit of audiovisual materials assembled by the Provincial
Education Media Centre.
Energy a Quest for New Technology—a pamphlet providing information on
the federal/provincial renewable energy and conservation demonstration
program.
U.B.C. Teacher's Kit—an assemblage of energy conservation information
for home economics teachers.
Advertising
Two advertisements were placed in daily and weekly newspapers encouraging the public to reduce energy consumption.
• International Energy Conservation Month provided the forum to focus on
energy conservation. During the month (October) one advertisement was
placed four times in all daily newspapers.
Work continued on a number of renewable energy studies and demonstration programs
in 1979. Some new projects were introduced, and as a result of the Canada-British
Columbia Agreement some demonstration projects have been initiated. The following is a
summary of projects, either completed or in progress in 1979.
Solar Resource Assessment Study—Acres Consulting Services Limited have
prepared a draft final report of this study. It is expected that a summary report and
three subreports will be issued for public distribution.
Geothermal Energy Resource Assessment Study—This project will result in
a preliminary assessment of the availability of geothermal energy in British
Columbia.
 ACTIVITY OF THE MINISTRY
Wind Energy Resource Assessment Study—Work on this project to assess
the availability of wind energy in British Columbia began in December 1979.
Results to date are very encouraging and an original approach to the assessment of
wind energy has been taken.
Windmill Demonstration Project—A demonstration project was undertaken
in conjunction with British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority and the National Research Council. The unit will be situated at Christopher Point, the
southern end of Victoria Island. Installation is expected to commence in April
1980 and the project will continue for one or two years. The design is a vertical
axis unit with 55-kilowatt output and it stands some eight metres high. The power
will feed British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority's grid and the operation
will be monitored over a one-year period.
Windmill Education Project—A small grant was made to The University of
British Columbia, Mechanical Engineering Department, to purchase and install a
small horizontal axis windmill and use this in undergraduate course projects to
enhance the energy sections of the syllabus. Useful information will also be
obtained from the monitoring of a small system typical of a remote application,
and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority is also interested in using the
machine to study the problems of a remote independent user, interfacing with the
grid to feed in surplus power.
Geothermal Energy Project at Meager Mountain—Funding was provided to
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority to continue the geothermal exploration work at Meager Mountain in 1979. This work will carry over into 1980. This
work concerns the drilling of shallow, slim holes to establish temperature profiles
over the probable reservoir area. Environmental studies also took place to establish the conditions prior to any geothermal exploitation.
Geothermal District Heating Feasibility Study—A study was completed to
investigate the preliminary feasibility of district heating from gcothermal hot
water in the northeastern sedimentary basin of British Columbia. A draft final
report has been submitted recommending further work in the Fort Nelson/
Dawson Creek areas.
  Mineral Resource Statistics
CHAPTER 3
COiNTENTS
Chapter 3—Mineral Resources Statistics
Introduction
Methods of Computing Production
Metals
1'v.l
83
84
84
84
Average Prices 34
Gross and Net Content 85
Value of Production g5
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials 86
Coal— 86
Petroleum and Natural Gas 86
Notes on Products Listed in the Tables 87
Figure 3-1—Value of Mineral Production. 1887-1979 07
Figure 3-2—Production Quantities of Gold, Silver. Copper. Lead. Zinc, and Molybdenum, 1893-1979 98
Prices Used in Valuing Production of Gold. Silver. Copper. Lead. Zinc, and Coal 99
Table 3-1—Mineral Production: Total to Date. Past Year and Latest Year 101
Table 3-2—Total Value of Mineral Production. 1836-1979  102
Table 3-3—Mineral Production for the 10 Years. 1970-1979 104
Table 3-4—Comparison of Total Quantity and Value of Production and Quantity and
Value of Production Paid for to Mines                                                         . 106
Table 3-5—Exploration and Development Expenditures. 1974—1979 106
Table 3-6—Production of Gold, Silver. Copper. Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum, and Iron
Concentrates. 1858-1979 108
Table 3-7A—Mineral Production by Mining Divisions. 1978 and 1979, and Total to
Date HO
Table 3-7B—Production of Lode Gold, Silver. Copper, Lead, and Zinc, by Mining
Divisions, 1978 and 1979. and Total to Date 112
Table 3-7C—Production of Miscellaneous Metals by Mining Divisions, 1978 and
1979, and Total to Date                                                                             . 114
Table 3-7D—Production of Industrial Minerals by Mining Divisions, 1978 and 1979,
and Total to Date 118
Table 3-7E—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions, 1978 and
1979. and Total to Date 120
Table 3-8A—Production of Coal. 1836-1979 121
Table 3-8B—Coal Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Mining Divisions, I979._ 122
Table 3-8C—Metallurgical and Thermal Coal Sold and Used. 1973-1979 122
Table 3-8D—Destination of British Columbia Coal. 1979 123
Table 3-9—Principal Items of Expenditure. Reported lor Operations ol All Classes 124
Table 3-10—Emplo\men! 111 the Mineral Industry 1901 1979 125
Table 3-11— Employment al Major Metal and Coal Mines. 1979 126
Table 3-12—Metal Production, 1979 127
Table 3-I3A—Destination of British Columbia Concentrate*, 1979 131
Table 3-I3B—Destination of Ores and Concentrates Shipped from British Columbia
Mines Showing Metals Paid for and Values. 1979                                       ■ 132
Table 3-14—Petroleum and Natural Gas, 1954-1979  133
83
 84 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
INTRODUCTION
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated for this
Report by the Economics and Planning Division of the Mineral Resources Branch.
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with the
statistics for 1925, Statistics Canada and the provincial ministries have cooperated in
collecting and processing mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and petroleum and
natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms prepared for use by the
province and by Statistics Canada.
As far as possible, both organizations follow the same practice in processing the data.
The final compilation by Statistics Canada is usually published considerably later than the
Annual Report of the Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources for British
Columbia. Differences between the values of production published by the two organizations arise mainly because Statistics Canada uses average prices considered applicable to
the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining statistician uses prices
considered applicable to British Columbia production.
Peat, classified as a fuel by Statistics Canada, is not included in the British Columbia
statistics of mineral production, being regarded as neither a fuel nor a mineral.
The statistics of the petroleum industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated for this
Report by the Petroleum Resources Branch.
METHODS OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the production
records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year. From time to time, revisions
have been made to figures published in earlier reports as additional data became available or
errors became known.
Data are obtained from the certified returns made by the producers of metals,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal, and are augmented by data obtained
from custom smelters. For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products, production
figures supplied by the Petroleum Resources Branch of the Ministry of Energy, Mines and
Petroleum Resources are compiled from the monthly disposition reports and the Crown
royalty statement filed with the Ministry by the producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Metric weights are used throughout.
METALS
Average Prices
The prices used in the valuation of current and past production of gold, silver, copper,
lead, and zinc are shown in the table on page 99.
Prior to 1974 the price of gold used was the average Canadian Mint buying-price for
fine gold.
The price used for placer gold originally was established arbitrarily at $17 per ounce,
when the price of fine gold was $20.67 per ounce. Between 1931 and 1962 the price was
proportionately increased with the continuously changing price of fine gold. Since 1962,
Canadian Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have been available for all but a very
small part of the placer gold produced, and until 1973 the average price listed is derived by
dividing ounces of placer gold into total amount received. Starting in 1974 the price used
for the valuation of gold, lode and placer, is the amount received by the producer.
Prior to 1949 the prices used for silver, copper, lead, and zinc were the average prices at
the markets indicated in the table on page 102, converted into Canadian funds. The
abbreviations in the table are Mont. = Montreal; N.Y. =New York; Lon. =London; E. St.
L. =East St. Louis; and U.S. = United States.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
83
Starting in 1949 the price of silver, copper, lead, and zinc were average United States
prices converted into Canadian funds. Average monthly prices were supplied by Statistics
Canada from figures published in the Metal Markets section of Metals Week. Specifically
for silver it was the New York price; for lead it was the New York price; for zinc it was the
price al East St. Louis of Prime Wesiem. lor copper it »as the I Inited States export refinery
price. Commencing in 1970 the copper price is the average of prices received by the various
British Columbia shippers and since 1974 this applies also to gold, silver, lead, zinc, and
cadmium.
For antimony and bismuth the average producers' price to consumers is used. For nickel
the price used is the Canadian price set by Inco Limited. The value per tonne of the iron ore
used in making pig iron at Kimberley was an arbitrary figure, being the average of several
ores of comparable grade at their points of export from British Columbia.
Gross and Net Content
The gross content of a metal in ore. concentrate, or bullion is the amount of the metal
calculated from an assay of the material, and the gross metal contents are the sum of
individual metal assay contents. The net contents are the gross contents less smelter and
refinery losses.
In past years there have been different methods used in calculating net contents,
particularly in the case of one metal contained in the concentrate of another. The method
established in 19fi3 is outlined m the following table for example, the net content ol silver
in copper concentrates is 98 percent of the gross content, of cadmium in zinc concentrates is
70 per cent of the gross content, etc. Commencing in 1974 the quantities represent the
actual net quantities or metals paid foe
Lead
Zinc
Cower
Coppct-Niclcl
Copper
Concentrates
Concentrates
Concentrate,
Concentrates
Malic
PcrCcnt
Pa Cent
fcrCera
Per Cent
rVrCcnt
Sll«T    .
98
91
98
98
Copper
/.cl 26 lb ..ton
tctj 10 lb ton
tela 10 lb ton
Lead
98
SO
SO
Zinc
Cadmium
JO
90
70
Nickel	
SS
Value of Production
For indium, iron concentrate, mercury, molybdenum, rhenium, and tin the value of
production is the amount received by the shippers.
For gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, some iron concentrate . and nickel the value of production was calculated from the assay content of the ore,
concentrate, or bullion less appropriate smelter losses, and an average price per unit of
weight. Since 1974 the values represent the settlement values received by the producers for
the respective metals.
Prior to 1925 the value of gold and copper produced was calculated by using their true
average prices and. in addition, for copper the smelter loss was taken into account.
The value of other metals was calculated from the gross metal content of ores or
concentrates by using a metal price which was an arbitrary percentage of the average price,
as follows: silver. 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent.
It is these percentages of the average price that are listed in the table on page 99.
For 1925 to 1973 the values had been calculated by using the true average price (see
page 99) and the net metal contents in accordance with the procedures adopted by Statistics
Canada and the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Since 1974 the total quantity and value of metal production include the quantities paid
lor to Ihe mines, and the smelter and refinery production that can be attributed to the mines
but is not paid for. The quantity and value paid for to the mines, excluding outward
 86 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
transportation costs, smelting and refining costs, penalties and deductions, are shown
separately for comparative purposes.
INDUSTRIAL MINERALS AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS
The values of production of industrial minerals and structural materials are approximately the amounts received at the point of origin.
COAL
The value of production of coal is calculated using a price per tonne which is the
weighted average of the fob. prices at the mine for the coal sold.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
The values of production of natural gas, natural gas liquid by-products, and petroleum
including condensate/pentanes plus are the amounts received for the products at the well
head.
 IVflhlERALRKOURCE STATISTICS g7
MINKR AI. AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Antimony—Antimony metal was produced at the Trail smelter from 1939 to 1944;
since 1944 it has been marketed alloyed with lead. The antimony is a by-product of silver-
lead ores. In 1907 the first recorded antimonial ore mined in British Columbia was shipped
from the Slocan area to England. Since then other out-of-province shipments have originated in the Bridge River, North Laideau. Slocan, Spillimacheen, and Stuart Lake areas. In
Table 3-7C the antimony assigned to individual mining divisions is the reported content of
ore exported to foreign smelters; the antimony "not assigned" is that recovered at the Trail
smelter from various ores received there. See Tables 3-1. 3-3, and 3-7C.
Arsenious oxide—Arsenious oxide was recovered at foreign smelters from arsenical
gold ores from Hedlcy between 1917 and 1931, and in 1942, and from the Victoria property
on Rocher Deboule Mountain in 1928. No production has been recorded since 1942. See
Tables 3-1 and 3-71).
Asbestos—British Columbia has produced asbestos since 1952 when the Cassiar mine
was opened. All British Columbia production consists of chrysotile from the Cassiar mine
near the Yukon boundary. This deposit is noted for its high percentage of valuable long
fibre and for the low iron content of the fibre. The original claims were located at Cassiar in
1950, and the first fibre was shipped two years later The fibre is milled from the ore at
Cassiar and now most is shipped by truck to Stewart. From 1953 to 1961 the fibre was
valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver, but beginning in 1962 it has been valued at
the mine. and values for the preceding years have been recalculated on that basis. See Tables
3-1.3-3, and 3-7D.
Barite—Barite production began in 1940 and has been continuous since then, coming
from several operations in the upper Columbia River valley. Some barite has been mined
from lode deposits and the rest recovered from the mill-tailings ponds of the former Silver
Giant and Mineral King silvcr-lcad-zinc mines. See Table 3-71)
Benlonite—Small amounts of bentonite were produced between 1926 and 1944 from
deposits in the coal measures near Princeton. There has been no production since 1944. See
Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
Bismuth—Since 1929 the Trail smelter has produced bismuth. It is a by-product of
lead refining and thus the production cannot be assigned lo specific properties or mining
divisions. See Tables 3-1. 3-3. and 3-7C.
Brick—See Clay and shale products.
Building-stone —Dimensional stone for building purposes is quarried when required
from a granite deposit on Nelson Island and an andesite deposit on Haddington Island.
Other stone close to local markets is quarried periodically or as needed for special building
projects. See Tables 3-1,3-3 and 3-7E.
Butane—Butane is recovered as a by-product at the gas-processing plant at Taylor and
at oil refineries. See Tables 3-1.3-3, 3-7A. and 4-16.
Cadmium—Cadmium has been recovered as a by-product at the Trail zinc refinery
since 1928. it occurs in variable amounts in the sphalerite of most British Columbia silver-
lead-zinc ores. In Table 3-7C the cadmium assigned to individual mining divisions is the
reported content of custom shipments lo the Trail and foreign smelters; that "not assigned
is the remainder of the reported estimated recovery at the Trail smelter from British
Columbia concentrates. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7C.
 88 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Cement—Cement is manufactured from carefully proportioned mixtures of limestone, gypsum, and other mineral materials. It has been produced in British Columbia since
1905. Present producers are Inland Cement Industries Ltd., with a 907 180-tonnes-per-year
plant on Tilbury Island, and a 490 000-tonnes-per-year plant at Bamberton, and Canada
Cement Lafarge Ltd., with a 476 000-tonnes-per-year plant on Lulu Island and a 191 000-
tonnes-per-year plant at Kamloops. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7E.
Chromite—Two shipments of chromite are on record, 608 tonnes from Cascade in I
1918 and 114 tonnes from Scottie Creek in 1929. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Clay and shale products—These include brick, blocks, tile, pipe, pottery, lightweight
aggregate, and pozzolan manufactured from British Columbia clays and shales. Common
red-burning clays and shales are widespread in the province, but better grade clays are rare.
The first recorded production was of bricks at Craigflower in 1853 and since then plants
have operated in most towns and cities for short periods. Local surface clay is used at Haney
to make common red brick, tile, and flower pots. Shale and fireclay from Abbotsford
Mountain are used to make firebrick, facebrick, sewer pipe, flue lining, and special fireclay
shapes in plants at Kilgard, Abbotsford, and South Vancouver. A plant at Quesnel makes
pozzolan from burnt shale quarried south of Quesnel. Several hobby and art potteries and a
sanitary-ware plant are in operation, but these use mainly imported raw materials and their
production is not included in the tables. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7E.
Coal—Coal is almost as closely associated with British Columbia's earliest history as
is placer gold. Coal was discovered at Suquash on Vancouver Island in 1835 and at
Nanaimo in 1850. The yearly value of coal production passed that of placer gold in 1883
and contributed a major part of the total mineral wealth for the next 30 years.
First production, by mining divisions: Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898; Kamloops,
1893; Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907; Omineca, 1918; Osoyoos, 1926;
Similkameen. 1909; and Skeena, 1912.
The Nanaimo and Comox fields produced virtually all of the coal until production
started from the Crowsnest field in 1898. The Crowsnest field contains coking coal and
prospered in the early years of smelting and railroad building. Mining started in the Nicola-
Princeton Coalfield in 1907, at Telkwa in 1918, and on the Peace River in 1923. The
Nanaimo field was exhausted in 1953 when the last large mines closed, and only small
operations on remnants were left. The colliery at Merritt closed in 1945 and at Coalmont in
1940. The closing of the large mine at Tsable River in 1966, and the last small one, near
Wellington in 1968, marked the end of continuous production from the important Vancou-i
ver Island deposits. Recent exploration indicates the possibility of renewed coal mining on
the island.
Undeveloped fields include basins in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains south of the j
Peace River, the Groundhog basin in north-central British Columbia, the Hat Creek basin
west of Ashcroft, and Sage Creek basin southeast of Fernie.
The enormous requirements for coking coal in Japan created intense exploration in j
various areas of British Columbia since 1968. The signing of large contracts with the
Japanese resulted in preparations for production at several deposits in the East Kootenays.
First shipments to Japan via special port facilities at North Vancouver and Roberts Bank
began in 1970.
All the coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary mine j
production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in
picking and washing. From 1910 the quantity is the amount sold and used, which includes j
sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees; coal used j
under company boilers, including steam locomotives; and coal used in making coke. See j
Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-7A, 3-8A, and 3-8B.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 89
Cobalt—In 1928 a recovery of 1,730 pounds of cobalt was made from a shipment of
arsenical gold ore from the Victoria mine on Rocher Deboule Mountain. From 1971 to
1973, cobalt was shipped from the Pride of Emory mine at Hope. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C
Coke—Coke is made from special types of coal. It has been produced in British
Columbia since 1895. Being a manufactured product, its value does not contribute to the
total mineral production as shown in Table 3-1. Up to 1966, coke statistics had been
included in the Annual Report at Table 3-9, but this table has been discontinued. The coal
used in making coke is still recorded in Table 3-8B.
Condensate—(a) Field—Field condensate is the liquid hydrocarbons separated and
recovered from natural gas in the field before gas processing. i/>i Plant—Plant condensate
is the hydrocarbon liquid extracted from natural gas at gas-processing plants. See Tables
3-1,3-3. 3-7A. and 4-16.
Copper—From 1935 to 1978 no copper smelter operated in British Columbia and
most of the copper concentrates were shipped to Japanese, eastern Canadian, and American
smelters. In 1978. Afton Mines Ltd. started producing blister copper from its own
concentrates. Most of the smelting in British Columbia in early years was done on ore
shipped directly from the mines without concentration, but modem practice is to concentrate the ore first. Small amounts of gold and silver arc commonly present and add value to
the ore.
Ore was smelted in British Columbia first in 1896 at Nelson (from Silver King mine)
and at Trail (from Rossland mines), and four and five years later at Grand Forks (from
Phoenix mine I and Greenwood (from Mother Lode mine). Later, small smelters were built
in the Boundary district and on Vancouver and Texada Islands, and in 1914 the Anyox
smeller was blown in. Copper smelting ceased in the Boundary district in 1919, at Trail in
1929, and at Anyox in 1935. British Columbia copper concentrates were then smelted
mainly at Tacoma. and since 1961 have gone chiefly to Japan.
Most of the production has come from southern British Columbia—from Britannia,
Copper Mountain, Greenwood. Highland Valley, Merntt. Nelson. Rossland. Texada Island, and Vancouver Island. although a sizable amount came from Anyox and some from
Tulscquah. During the 1960s, exploration for copper became intense, interest being
especially directed toward finding very large, low-grade deposits suitable for open-pit
mining. The activity has resulted in the establishment of operating mines at Merntt
(Craigmont) in 1961, in Highland Valley (Bethlehem) in 1962, on Babinc Lake (Granisle)
in 1966. near Peachland t Hrendai in 1970, Stewart (Granduc)—closed mid-1978. near Port
Hardy (Island Copper) in 1971, near Babine Lake (Bell). McLccsc Lake (Gibraltar).
Highland Valley (Lornex), Princeton (Ingcrbelle) in 1972, and near Kamloops (Afton) in
1977. See Table 3-12 for a complete list of copper producers.
Some of these mines produce molybdenum as a by-product, for example, Bethlehem,
Brenda. Lornex, Gibraltar, and Island Copper. Copper is also produced as a by-product of
iron mining at Tasu Sound. Queen Charlotte Islands t Wcsfrob), and with ores containing
zinc. gold, silver, and lead at Buttle Lake (Lynx and Myra. Western Mines).
Copper has been the most valuable single commodity of the industry since 1966 except
in 1977 when it was surpassed marginally by natural gas. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-6. and
3-7B.
Crude oil—Production of crude oil in British Columbia began in 1953 from the Fori
St. John field, but was not significant until laic in 1961. when the oil pipeline was built to
connect the oil-gathering terminal at Taylor to the Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company
pipeline near Kamloops. In 1978. oil was produced from 36 separate fields, of which the
Boundary Lake, Inga. Pcejay. and Eagle were the most productive.
In fables 3-1. 3-3. and 3-7 A. quantities gi sen prior to 1962 under "petroleum, crude''
are total sales, but since 1962 the field and plant condensates arc listed separately. Table
4-16 incorporates all revisions since the commencement of production.
 90 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Diatomite—Relatively large deposits of diatomite are found near the Fraser River in
the Quesnel area, and small deposits are widespread throughout the province. Small
amounts of diatomite have been shipped from Quesnel periodically since 1928. A plant to
process the material is located in Quesnel. See Table 3-7D.
Fluorite (fluorspar)—Between 1918 and 1929, fluorite was mined at the Rock Candy
mine north of Grand Forks for use in the Trail lead refinery. From 1958 to 1968, small
quantities were produced as a by-product at the Oliver silica quarry. See Table 3-7D.
Flux—Silica and limestone are added to smelter furnaces as flux to combine with
impurities in the ore and from a slag which separates from the valuable metal. In the past,
silica was shipped from Grand Forks, Oliver, and the Sheep Creek area. Today, silica from
near Kamloops and limestone, chiefly from Texada Island, are produced for flux. Quantities have been recorded since 1911. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7D.
Gold, lode—Gold has played an important part in mining in the province. The first
discovery of lode gold was on Morseby Island in 1852, when some gold was recovered from
a small quartz vein. The first stamp mill was built in the Cariboo in 1876, and it seems
certain that some arrastras (primitive grinding mills) were built even earlier. These and
other early attempts were short-lived, and the successful milling of gold ores began about
1890 in the southern part of the province. By 1900 the value of gold production was second
only to that of coal. At the start of World War U, gold mining attained a peak yearly value of
more than $22 million, but since the war it has dwindled until developments in the 1970s.
In the early years, lode gold came mostly from the camps of Rossland, Nelson,
McKinney, Ejirview, Hedley, and also from the copper and other ores of the Boundary
district. A somewhat later major producer was the Premier mine at Stewart. In the 1930's the
price of gold increased and the value of production soared, new discoveries were made and
old mines were revived. The principal gold camps, in order of output of gold, have been
Bridge River, Rossland, Portland Canal, Hedley, Wells, and Sheep Creek. In 1971 the
Bralome mine at Bridge River closed.
With the closing of the Bralorne mine, most of the lode gold is produced as a byproduct of copper, copper-zinc-silver, and other base metal mining. Because of the volume
of this production the amount of gold produced is still at a fairly high level, and with the
significant rise in the price of gold in the 1970's the value of production has exceeded the
peaks reached during the era of gold mines in the 1930's. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-6, and
3-7B. See Table 3-12 for a complete list of current producers.
Gold, placer—The early explorations and settlement of the province followed rapidly
on the discovery of gold-bearing placer creeks throughout the country. The first placer-
miners came in 1858 to mine the lower Fraser River bars upstream from Yale.
The year of greatest placer-gold production was 1863, shortly after the discovery of the
placer in the Cariboo. Another peak year in 1875 marked the discovery of placer on creeks
in the Cassiar. A minor peak year was occasioned by the discovery of placer gold in the
Granite Creek in theTulameen in 1885. A high level of production ensued after 1899, when
the Atlin placers reached their peak output. Other important placer-gold camps were
established at Goldstream, Fort Steele, Rock Creek, Omineca River, and Quesnel River.
The last important strike was made on Cedar Creek in 1921, and coarse gold was found on
Squaw Creek in 1927 and on Wheaton Creek in 1932.
Mining in the old placer camps revived during the 1930s under the stimulus of an
increase in the price of fine gold from $20.67 per ounce to $35 per ounce in United States
funds. Since World War II, placer mining declined under conditions of steadily rising costs
and a fixed price for gold but is showing signs of revival in response to a freely floating gold
price since 1972. Since 1858, more than 161 181 000 grams valued at $98.5 million has
been recovered.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
91
A substantial part of the production, including much of the gold recovered from the
Fraser R i\ er upstream from Yale (in the present New Westminster, Kamloops, and Lillooet
Mining Divisions) and much-of the early Cariboo production, was mined before the original
organization of the Department of Mines in 1874. Consequently, the amounts recorded are
based on early estimates and cannot be accurately assigned to individual mining divisions.
The first year of production for major placer-producing mining divisions was: Atlin
1898; Cariboo. 1859; Liard. 1873: Lillooet. 1858: Omineca, 1869.
In 1965, changes were made in the allocation of placer gold in New Westminster and
Similkameen Mining Divisions and "not assigned," to reconcile those figures with data
incorporated in Bulletin 28, Placer Gold Production of British Columbia. See Tables 3-1
3-3, 3-6. and 3-7A.
Granules—Rock chips used for bird grits, exposed aggregate, roofing, stucco, dash,
terrazzo. etc., have been produced in constantly increasing quantities since 1930. Plants
operate in Burnaby and near Grand Forks. Sirdar. Vananda. and Armstrong. See Tables 3-1
3-3, and 3-7D.
Gypsum and gypsite—Production of gypsum and gypsite has been recorded since
1911. Between 1925 and 1956, more than 907 000 tonnes were shipped from Falkland and
some was quarried near Cranbrook and Windermere. Since 1956. nearly all production has
come from Windermere. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-71)
Hydromagnesite—Small shipments of hydromagncsite were made from Atlin between 1904 and 1916 and from Clinton in 1921. See Tables 3-1 and 3-71)
Indium—Production of indium as a by-product of zinc refining at the Trail smelter
began in 1942. Production figures have not been disclosed since 1958.
iron—Iron ore was produced in small quantities as early as 1885, commonly under
special circumstances or as test shipment. Steady production started in 1951 with shipments of magnetite concentrates lo Japan from Vancouver and Texada Islands.
Most of the known iron-ore deposits are magnetite, and occur in the coastal area. On
the average they arc low in grade and need lo be concentrated. Producing mines have
operated on Texada Island, at Benson Lake and Zchallos on Vancouver Island, and at Tasu
and Jcdway on Morscby Island. At Texada Island copper was a by-product of iron mining,
and in the Coast Copper mine at Benson Lake iron was a by-product of copper mining. The
latest operation, and to dale ihc largest, is that of Wesfrob Mines Limited at Tasu, begun at
the end of 1967; copper is produced as a by-product.
From January 1961 to August 1972, calcined iron sulphide from the tailings of the
Sullivan mine was used for making pig iron at Kimbcrlcy. This was the first manufacture of
pig iron in British Columbia. The iron occurs as py rrhotite and pyrite in the lead-zinc ore of
the Sullivan mine. In the process of milling, the lead and zinc minerals are separated for
shipment to the Trail smelter, and the iron sulphides arc separated from the waste rock. Over
the years a stockpile has been buili containing a reserve of about 18 million tonnes of iron
ore.
The sulphur was removed in making pig iron and was converted to sulphuric acid,
which was used in making fertilizer. A plant buili at Kimbcrlcy converted the pig iron to
steel, and a fabricating plant was acquired in Vancouver. The iron smelter at Kirnberley
closed in August 1972. The entire production, credited to (be Fort Steele Mining Division
in Table 3-7C, is of calcine. See Tables 3-1. 3-3. 3-6. and 3-7C.
Iron oxide—Iron oxide, ochre, and bog iron were mined as carl) as 1918 from several
occurrences, but mainly from tinonite deposits north of Squamish. None has been
produced since 1950. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
 92 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Jade (nephrite)—Production of jade (nephrite) has been recorded only since 1959
despite there being several years of significant production prior to that date. The jade is
recovered from bedrock occurrences on Mount Ogden and near Dease Lake and as alluvial
boulders from the Fraser River; the Bridge River and its tributaries, Marshall, Hell, and
Cadwallader Creeks; O'Ne-ell, Ogden, Kwanika, and Wheaton Creeks. See Tables 3-1,
3-3, and 3-7D.
Lead—Lead was the most valuable single commodity for many years, but it was
surpassed in value of annual production by zinc in 1950, by copper in 1966, by molybdenum in 1969, and in total production by zinc in 1966. Lead and zinc usually occur
together in nature although not necessarily in equal amounts in a single deposit. Zinc is the
more abundant metal, but lead ore usually is more valuable than zinc ore because it contains
more silver as a by-product. For a long time British Columbia produced almost all of
Canada's lead, but now produces about 28 per cent of the total. All of the concentrated ore
was smelted and the metal refined at Trail in 1979.
Almost all of British Columbia's lead comes from the southeastern part of the
province. The Sullivan mine at Kimberley is now producing about 99.4 per cent of the
province's lead and has produced about 85.9 per cent of the grand total. This is one of the
largest mines in the world and supports the great metallurgical works at Trail. Other mines
are at Pend-d'Oreille River, North Kootenay Lake, Slocan, southwestern British Columbia,
and Vancouver Island. In northwestern British Columbia less important parts of the total
output have come from Tulsequah, the Premier mine, and several small mines in the general
region of Hazelton. See Table 3-12 for the current lead producers.
A small amount of high-grade lead ore is shipped directly to the smelter, but most of
the ore is concentrated by flotation and the zinc content is separated from the lead. All
output from the Sullivan goes to the Trail smelter. Lead was first produced in 1887, and the
total production amounts to approximately 7.8 million tonnes.
In 1958, revisions were made in some yearly totals for lead to adjust them for recovery
of lead from slag treated at the Trail smelter. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-6, and 3-7B.
Limestone—Besides being used for flux and granules (where it is recorded separately), limestone is used in agriculture, cement manufacture, the pulp and paper industry,
and for making lime. It has been produced since 1886. Quarries now operate at Cobble Hill,
near Prince George, at Kamloops, and on the north end of Texada Island. See Tables 3-1,
3-3,and3-7E.
Magnesium—In 1941 and 1942, Cominco Ltd. produced magnesium from magnesite
mined from a large deposit at Marysville. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Magnesium sulphate—Magnesium sulphate was recovered in minor amounts at
various times between 1915 and 1942 from small alkali lakes near Basque, Clinton, and
Osoyoos. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
Manganese—From 1918 to 1920, manganese ore was shipped from abogdeposit near
Kaslo and from Hill 60 near Cowichan Lake, and in 1956 a test shipment was made from
Olalla. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Mercury—Mercury was first produced near Savona in 1895. Since then small
amounts have been recovered from the same area and from the Bridge River district. The
main production to date was between 1940 and 1944 from the Pinchi Lake and Takla mines
near Fort St. James. In 1968 the Pinchi Lake mine reopened and continued in operation
until 1975 when it closed because of market situations. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Mica—No sheet mica has been produced commercially in British Columbia. Between
1932 and 1961, small amounts of mica schist for grinding were mined near Albreda,
Armstrong, Oliver, Prince Rupert, and Sicamous. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 93
Molybdenum—Molybdenum ore in small amounts was produced from high-grade
deposits between 1914 and 1918. Recently, mining of large low-grade molybdenum and
copper-mol) bdcnum deposits has increased production to the point that molybdenum now
ranks second in importance in annual value of metals produced in British Columbia. The
upswing began when the Bethlehem mine recovered by-product molybdenum from 1964 to
1966, commencing again in 1978. In 1965 the Endako and Boss Mountain mines, followed
by the Coxey in 1966, and British Columbia Molybdenum mine in 1967, all began
operations as straight mohbdcnum producers. The Boss Mountain mine closed in 1971 and
reopened late in 1973. The Coxey and British Columbia Molybdenum mines closed in 1971
and 1972 respectively. In 1970 the Brenda mine, a combined copper-molybdenum producer, started operating, and Island Copper in 1971, and Lornex in 1972, while Gibraltar
ceased molybdenum production in 1975 but recommenced in 1977. See Tables 3-1, 3-3,
3-6. and 3-7C.
Natro-alunile—In 1912 and 1913.363 tonnes of natro-alunitc was mined from a small
low-grade deposit at K) uquot Sound. There has been no subsequent production. See Tables
3-1 and 3-7D.
Natural gas—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954 to supply the
community of Fort Si. John. In 1957 the gas plant at Taylor and the pipeline to serve British
Columbia and the northwestern United Slates was completed. The daily average volume of
production in 1975 was 1.14 billion cubic feet. In 1978 there were 83 gas fields producing
both associated and nonassociated gas. of which the Yoyo, Clarke Lake, Sierra, and La
Prise Creek, were the most productive.
The production shown in Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-7A. and 4-16, is the total amount sold of
residential gas from processing plants plus dry and associated gas from the gas-gathering
system: that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The quantity is net after
deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used or lost in the cleaning plant.
The quantity is reported as millions of cubic metres at standard conditions (99.2 kPa
(kilopascals) pressure, 15 C temperature, up to and including the year I960, and thereafter
101.3 kPa pressure, 15°C temperature].
Full details of gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales arc given in the
tables in chapter 4.
Nickel—One mine, the Pndc of Emory near Hope, shipped nickel ore in 1936 and
1937 and began continuous production in 1958. From 1960 to 1974. bulk copper and nickel
concentrates have been shipped to Japan and Alberta respectively for smelting. The mine
closed in August 1974. See Tables 3-1. 3-3. and 3-7C.
Niobium—Niobium was produced from placer deposits on Vim c 11 and Malloy Creeks
in the Bugaboo area in 1956. A test shipment of 8 187 tonnes of gravel was shipped by St.
Eugene Mining Corporation Limited to Quebec Metallurgical Industries The placer
contained a variety of minerals, including pyrochlore and maritime Recovery from the test
shipment was as follows: 104.39 kilograms of niobium and 146.29 kilograms of uranium
and thorium.
Palladium—Palladium was recovered in 1928,1929. and 1930 as a by-product of the
Trail refinery and is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the
smelter from the Copper Mountain mine. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Perllte—In 1953 a test shipment of I 009 tonnes was made from a quarry on Francois
Lake. There has been no further production. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
Petroleum, crude—Sec Crude oil.
 94 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Phosphate Rock—Between 1927 and 1933, Cominco Ltd. produced 3 485 tonnes of
phosphate rock for test purposes, but the grade proved to be too low for commercial use.
More test shipments were made in 1964, but there has been no commercial production. See
Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
Platinum—Platinum has been produced intermittently from placer streams in small
amounts since 1887, mostly from the Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers. Placer platinum
also has been recovered from Pine, Thibert, McConnell, Rainbow, Tranquille, Rock, and
Government Creeks; from Quesnel, Fraser, Cottonwood, Peace, and Coquihalla Rivers;
and from beach placers on Graham Island. Some platinum recovered between 1928 and
1930 as a by-product at the Trail refinery is presumed to have originated in copper
concentrates shipped to the smelter from the Copper Mountain mine. See Tables 3-1, 3-3,
and 3-7C. Small amounts were contained in the placer gold in 1979.
Propane—Propane is recovered from gas-processing plants at Taylor and Boundary
Lake, and at oil refineries. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-7A, and 4-16.
Rhenium—Rhenium occurs in significant quantities only with molybdenite associated with porphyry copper deposits. It was first produced in 1972 by the Island Copper
mine and is extracted as rhenium oxide from fumes produced during roasting of the
molybdenite concentrate.
Rock—Production of rubble, riprap, and crushed rock has been recorded since 1909.
See Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7E.
Sand and gravel—Sand and gravel is used as aggregate in concrete work. The output
varies from year to year according to the level of activity in the construction industry. See
Tables 3-1, 3-3, and 3-7E.
Selenium—The only recorded production of selenium, 332 kilograms, was in 1931
from the refining of blister copper from the Anyox smelter. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7C.
Silver—Silver is recovered from silver ores or as a by-product of other ores. Most of it
is refined in Trail, and some is exported in concentrated ores of copper, lead, and zinc to
American and Japanese smelters. Silver bullion was produced by the Torbrit mine from
1949 to 1959.
Some silver is associated with galena, while other is recovered from gold and copper
ores, and although the silver in such ores is usually no more than a fraction of an ounce per
ton, even that amount is important in a large tonnage operation.
Production of silver began in 1887 from silver-copper and silver-lead ores in the
Kootenays and has continued in this area to the present. Now, most of the silver is a byproduct of lead-zinc ores and nearly all is refined at Trail, although some is exported with
concentrates to American and Japanese smelters. Today the greatest single source of silver
is the Sullivan mine, which has been in production since 1900. By 1979 the Sullivan mine
has accounted for 46 per cent of the total silver production of the province. A significant
total amount is contributed by the Lynx, Lomex, Island Copper, Afton, Silmonac, and
Granisle mines. Table 3-12 details the current silver production. The only steady producer
that is strictly a silver mine is the Highland Bell mine at Beaverdell, in operation since 1922.
A former important mine, the Premier near Stewart, produced more than 1.3 million
kilograms of silver between 1918 and 1968. See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-6, and 3-7B.
Sodium carbonate—Sodium carbonate was recovered between 1921 and 1949 from
alkali lakes in the Clinton area and around Kamloops. There has been no further production. See Tables 3-1 and 3-7D.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 95
Stone (see Building-stone)—Cut stone for building purposes is prepared from rock
produced at quarries in various parts of the province when required. Two of the most
productive quarries have operated on Haddington and Nelson Islands. See Tables 3-1 3-3
and 3-7E.
Structural materials—In Table 3-7E the value of 55 972 171 for unclassified materials is the total for structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot be allotted to
particular classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions, and includes
$726 323 shown against 1896 in Table 3-2 that includes unclassified structural materials in
that and previous years not assignable to particular years. The figure S3 180 828 in Table
3-7E under "Other Clay Products" is the value in the period 1886-1910 that cannot be
allotted to particular clay products or assigned to mining divisions. See Tables 3-1 3-2
3-3, 3-7A, and 3-7E.
Sulphur—The production of sulphur has been recorded since 1916. From 1916 to
1927 the amounts include the sulphur content of pyrite shipped. From 1928 the amounts
include the estimated sulphur content of pyrite shipped, plus the sulphur contained in
sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. The sulphur content of pyrrhotitc roasted at
the Kimberley fertilizer plant is included since 1953. Elemental sulphur has been recovered
from the Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd. plant at Taylor since 1958 and the Fort Nelson
plant of Petrosul International Ltd. since 1978. See Tables 3-1, 3-3. and 3-71).
Talc—Beween 1916 and 1936. talc was quarried at Leech River and at Anderson Lake
to make dust for asphalt roofing. There has been no production since 1936. See Tables 3-1
and 3-71)
Thorium—See Niobium.
77/i—Tin. as cassiterite. is a by-product of the Sullivan mine, where it has been
produced since 1941. Tin is also produced in a lead-tin alios at the Trail smelter See Tables
3-1.3-3. and 3-7C.
Tungsten—Tungsten. very largely as scheelite concentrates, was produced from 1937
to 1958, first from the Columbia Tungstens 11 lardsc rabble) mine in the Cariboo in 1937 and
during World War II from the Red Rose mine near Hazelton and the Emerald mine near
Salmo. The Red Rose closed in 1954 and the Emerald in 1958. Small amounts of sehcelite
have been produced from the Bridge River. Revelstoke. and other areas where demand was
high. In 1970, production began from the Invincible mine near Salmo, which closed in
1973.
A very small amount of wolframite came from Boulder Creek near Atlin. See Tables
3-1.3-3. and 3-7C.
Uranium—See Niobium.
Volcanic ash—The only recorded production of volcanic ash is 27 tonnes from the
Cariboo Mining Division in 1954. See Table 3-71)
Zinc—Zinc was first produced in 1905. For many years lead was the most valuable
single metal, but in 1950 the annual value of production of zinc surpassed that of lead and in
1966 the total value of copper production exceeded that of zinc. In 1977 the production of
zinc was exceeded by that of copper, molybdenum, asbestos, coal, crude oil. and natural
gas. Zinc is invariably associated v. nh lead, and most ores are mined for their combined
values in zinc. lead, and silver, and rarely for their zinc content alone. Some zinc ores
contain a valuable amount of gold, and zinc is associated with copper at Lynx mine.
Modern practice is to concentrate and separate the zinc mineral (sphalerite) from the lead
mineral (galena). Most of the zinc concentrates go to the zinc-recovery plant at Trail, are
roasted, and are converted electronically to refined metal. Usually some concentrates arc
shipped to American or Japanese smelters.
 96 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
About 85 percent of the zinc that has been mined in British Columbia has originated in
southeastern British Columbia, at the Sullivan mine, and at mines near Ainsworth,
Invermere, Moyie Lake, Riondel, Salmo, Slocan, and Spillimacheen. Other production
has come from mines at Portland Canal and Tulsequah and is coming from Buttle Lake and
Callaghan Creek. The greatest zinc mine is the Sullivan, which contributed about 73 per
cent of the total zinc production of the province. See Table 3-12 for details of current zinc
producers.
Records for the period 1905 to 1908 show shipments totalling 17 096 tonnes of zinc
ore and zinc concentrates of unstated zinc content. In 1918, revisions were made to some
yearly totals forzinctoadjust them for recovery of zinc from slag treated at the Trail smelter.
See Tables 3-1, 3-3, 3-6, and 3-7B.
  98
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
400
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 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
99
Prices' Used in Valuing Production of Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold.
Silrer.
Fine
Fine
Copper
Lead
Zinc
Coal
**
*I
Sir.
S*g
Ml
S/l
1901
0.66457
0.01801 NY.
0.355 N.Y.
0.057 N.Y.
.081   ..
084   ..
.01593   „
258   „
2.92
1903
.01633   ..
.292   '.'.
2.90
2.94
1904
.01716   ..
.283   ..
.086   ..
2.89
2.98
1905
.01650   ..
.344   ..
.094   ..
1906	
.02040   ..
.425   ..
.106   ..
2.88
1907
.01995   ..
.441   ..
.106   ..
3.38
1908
01615   ..
.291   ..
.083   ..
3.43
1909	
.01573   ..
.286   ..
.085   ..
3.52
1910
.01634   ..
281   ..
ins ..
o ioi i. st i
3.69
1911
.01628   „
.273   ..
088   ..
.108
3.51
1912
01858   ..
.360   ..
089   ..
.130
3.70
1913
0IS26   ..
.337   ..
.087   ..
.106
3.74
1914	
01675   ..
.300   ..
.077   ..
.097
3.69
1915
1.151s   ..
.381   ..
092   „
.248     ..
3.78
1916
.02006   ..
.600   ..
.136   ..
.240     ..
3.80
1917
02487   „
.599   ..
.174   „
.167     ..
3.84
1918
.02956   ..
.543   ..
.147   „
.153     ..
5.50
1919	
.03394   ..
.412   ..
.114   ..
.138     ..
5.42
1920
030SO   ,.
.385   ..
.158   ..
144
5.20
1921
01914   „
.276   ..
.090   ..
.087
5.30
1922.	
02062   ..
.295   ..
.114   ..
.107     ..
5.20
1923	
01981   ..
.318   ..
.144   ..
.124     ..
5.30
1924
.02040   ..
.287   ..
161    ..
.119
5.39
1925	
.02221   „
.310   ..
.173 Land.
-l74Lond.
5.28
1926
01997   ..
.304   ..
.149   ..
.163 ..
5.34
1927	
.01812   ..
.285   ..
.116   ..
.137    ..
5.30
1928
0IS7O   „
.321   ..
.101    ..
.121    ..
5.19
1929
01704   ..
.399   ..
.Ill    ..
.119   ..
5.22
1990
4)1227   ..
.286   ..
.087   ..
.079   ..
5.21
09923   ..
.179   ..
.060   ..
.056   ..
4.80
75-59
01011   ..
141 Load.
.047    ..
053    ..
4.45
1933
.91953
.01216   ..
.164    ..
.053   ..
.071    ..
4.30
1934
1.10922
.01526   ..
.164   ..
.054    ..
.067   ..
441
1935
1 131*0
02083   ..
.172   ..
.069   ..
.068   ..
4.35
1936.	
1.12626
.01451   ..
.209   ..
.086   ..
.073   ..
4.66
1937	
1 12497
.01443   ..
.288    ..
.113    ..
I0S   ..
4.68
1938
1.13108
.01398   ..
.220   ..
.074    ..
.068   ..
4 42
1939
1.16195
.01302   „
.223    ..
070   ..
.068   ..
4.43
1940
1.23712
01230   ..
.222    ..
074    ..
.075    ..
4.70
1 2J7S2
.01230   „
.222    ..
.074    ..
.075   ..
4.57
1942
1.23782
.01324   ..
.222   ..
074    ..
.075    ..
4.55
1.237X2
.01455   ..
.259   ..
.083   ..
.088   ,.
4.60
1.23782
01383   ..
.265    ..
.099   ..
.095   ..
4.68
I.237S2
.01511   ..
.277   ..
.110   ..
.142    ..
4.67
1946
I.ISIS6
.02689   ..
.2*2   ..
.149   ..
.172    ..
5.16
I9-.7
1.12529
.02315   ..
.450   ..
.301    „
.248   ..
5.64
1948
1 12529
024)1 Mom
493 I' S
.398   ..
.307    ..
6.71
1949
1.15744
.02387 US.
440   ..
.348 U.S.
.292 U.S.
7.18
1950
1 22335
02593   ..
.517   ..
.319   ..
.332   ..
7.09
I IM77
473040   ..
.611   ..
.406   ..
.439   ..
7.12
I.I0IS2
.02674   ..
685   ..
.3)5   ..
.350   ..
7.65
1.10665
.02693   ..
.669   ..
.292   ..
.235   ..
7.5S
1.09539
02668   ..
.642   ..
.302   ..
.230   ..
7.72
1 10986
.02825   ..
844    ..
.329   ..
267   ..
7.43
1.10729
02873   ..
xn ..
347   ..
.293   ..
7.26
1 07867
02799   ..
.574   ..
310  ..
.246   ..
7.45
1958
1.09250
02779   ..
.516   ..
.259   ..
.221   ..
821
1959
1 07932
.02812   ..
611   ..
.257   ..
242   ..
8.74
1960
1.09153
.02850   ..
.639   ..
.256   ..
.277   ..
7.32
1961
1.14008
.03012   ..
.620   ..
.243   ..
.258   ..
8.16
1962
1 20278
.03730   ..
.672   ..
.227   ..
.274   ..
8 19
1963
1 21371
.04436   ..
.676   ..
.265   ..
290   ..
8 08
1964
1 21371
04484   ..
.737   ..
.323   ..
.323   ..
7.65
1.21307
04481    ..
846   ..
.380   ..
.345   ..
7.75
1 21242
04479   ..
1 176   ..
.359   ..
.344   „
8.02
1.21403
.05373   ..
1 125   ..
.333   ..
329   ..
8.54
1968
1 21242
.07429   ..
1.193   ..
.321   ..
.312   ..
8.72
1969
1 21178
.06196   ..
I 470   .,
.354   ..
.347   „
8.82
r page H4 lot JcUlIcd cipUnaIn*i
 100
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Prices' Used in Valuing Production of Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, Zinc, and Coal—Continued
Year
Cold.
Fine
Silver.                   _
Fine                    C°PI>er
Lead
Zinc
Coal
1970	
m
1.17545
1.13622
1.84934
3.13185
5.34868=
5.20466=
4.03514=
5.29972=
7.32948=
12.58090*
S'g
.05946
.05014
.05348
.08251
.15653
.15560
.13571
.15707
.19832
.44228
J/kg
1.294=
1.030=
.989=
1.835=
1.884=
1.283=
1.438=
1.398=
1.577=
2.4/2=
S/kg
.360   ..
.308   ,.
.328   ..
.359   ..
.422=
.346=
.384=
.541=
.637=
1.043'
$*g
.353   ..
.359   ..
.388   ..
.455   „
.767=
.808=
.615=
.591=
.544=
.700=
$7t
8.16
11.06
12.08
12.71
19.93
35.53
39.63
39.04
40.35
41.56
1971	
1972
1973	
1974	
1975	
1976	
1977	
1978	
1979	
1 Se
2Se
page 84 for de
page 85 for ex
ailed explanati
lanation.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 10I
Table 3-1—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year, and Latest Year
1 W iwcei uo mdi. urJual products titled Alphabetic-ill) «o p**o 17 to 96
; Sit page 12 for com croon laMe to aid t>urm
Producu1
Total Quart-
tity to Datc=
Total Value
to Date
Quanlilv
1978
VjllK.
1978
Quanlilv
1979
Value.
1979
Mrw/j
J*
27316760
3295060
29721611
722
114 484
4219611424
163 394 809
577 555 557
33 771 759
7920 384 794
92SI9
1564
6 094 3S7
170 945 559
23 337 783
23 296
44042
332
17 084 804 047
9 659 586
9 090 002
7 510 616 387
$
28 240 398
16 173 332
SI 407 731
32295
376661
4 760 467 291
101 114 796
7S6 288 095
356 214 931
1 704 663 313
88 184
32668
49 218 263
1 193 570 798
SI 698 754
30462
138 801
I3S9
665 440161
29 162 551
48 068 016
1930 263 511
2*597 156
45*521
21 172
251801
'273692676
36 SIS
6542 332
615 569
SI 064 539
13 055 313
227 271 890
261 863
95 611 III
S
20*3 895
166452
1 1(6)29
"~m"iniy»
295001
47951 880
11597 462
516*0 564
4507150*
3 675 508
5204* 701
4652 559
177 0(6
33 809
239096
5
*I6 081
173 667
1417 506
Burnuib   .. 	
OJmiuni
Gahib
Copper
Gold—
272 163 001
214 106
(062(10
668 026
84 4SI905
" io'76S497
280
214 117 311
240 984
88 418 642
636 359923
2 649 918
101 481 156
13 008 475
88 100 363
lode.fine	
t
t
i«
it
IrtW COttCeTfU*c\
Lead
Merctjn
if
itj
tf
VW>Mfnum
321228 104
Platinum
1
Silwr	
Tta
(
kf
94 700 656
Zinc
Oihcn	
61(90(91
5 027 280
Total*	
11 83* 290 117
819 778 518
1 350 776 761
Industrial Mmrralt
»*
9 9*7 7*9
1603 400
7IS
3 945 661
627634
8 242 501
2 044
16427
2I3S 75S
12 604
5115 954
474
1009
3 485
9 518
9075 917
984
271291
527 496 967
8 535 473
153050
6 811 112
254 352
185 818
9 391
II 129
16894
IIS 983
1364142*9
34 871
I20O5OI8
68 266
22475
26 849
733 009
488 759
 322 Ml
47 066 170
 56(94
1 186 160
31106*5
1 422 018
 564799)
9114)1
94 286
 27 741
10074
722 933
258 505
 3(1724
65 520069
129 035
1458 987
5 155 924
Up
lr
1325 777
M: ;--i->*-~i ' -*r'L-;'r                        1
Ifiea
la
Itete                            .i
Sulphur
9616390
Tt.lT
Often	
1 268 098
T.-'-H
743 564 915
59471 361
(4 474 2*3
Smmural Marriott
20162624
1060 371
522 770070
137 668 194
99 111 313
103 905 348
661764 275
9370750
5*72171
1029 065
2 443 053
2141929
38 315 952
405
56140564
6282 560
6 929 484
8410065
642272*5
18 0)0
13)60(9
2 880 138
2 488 3(9
46 241 983
2 194
(0052461
II 744 194
S037476
Rafafafc, npnp. ousted
6766665
71 9116))
19700
Total,      .
1 570 5S2 121
142007 9*8
17(5)9 129
Coo/
200 8)3 429
50 476 7I»
2312)1
3 288 311
117 070 713
1 658 342
1 308 232
2 756 503 138
1 309 478 737
9 929 615
54 574 374
2 449 125 841
271X30}
21 292 629
946)929
2 004 699
25 3*6
155 503
8 00) 02*
106 5*0
•5 732
3*1(9)241
145005 524
1 1)6 217
10 269 861
401 373 236
5932 766
4513447
10570370
2 139 963
32 549
184 398
II 392 641
112 68)
(4(64
4)9 280 152
Fettaitvm and Valuta] (it
Crude oil
i
m'
168 928 671
1)3*6 500
.'."■•.r,l.-i-." i  ;-.■-,;-         10
'at'
m*
7122711
Propane
Total*
3 872 141 UH
56(9)1051
(96 377 125
(kkodlouh
20 781081 850
1972 0*4 169
2 949 447 447
 102 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1979
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Petroleum
and
Natural Gas
1836-86..
1887	
1888
1890..
1891
1892
1893 ..
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901 ..
1902..
1903..
1904.
1905..
1906..
1907,.
1908..
1909..
1910..
1911
1912..
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921 ..
1922.
1923
1924.
1925
1926
1927
1928.
1929
1930.
1931 .
1932..
1933 .
1934..
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938..
1939.
1940..
1941 .
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947 !
1948..
1949.
1950.
52 880 750
729 381
745 794
685 512
572 884
447 136
511 075
659 969
1 191 728
2 834 629
4 973 769
7 575 262
7 176 870
8 107 509
11 360 546
14 258 455
12 163 561
12 640 083
13 424 755
16 289 165
18 449 602
17 101 305
15 227 991
14 668 141
13 768 731
11 880 062
18 218 266
17 701 432
15 790 727
20 765 212
32 092 648
27 299 934
27 957 302
20 058 217
19 687 532
13 160417
19 605 401
25 769 215
35 959 566
46 480 742
51 867 792
45 134 289
48 640 158
52 805 345
41 785 380
23 530 469
20 129 869
25 777 723
35 177 224
42 006 618
45 889 944
65 224 245
55 959 713
56 216 049
64 332 166
65 807 630
63 626 140
55 005 394
42 095 013
50 673 592
58 834 747
95 729 867
124 091 753
110 219 917
117 166 836
46 345
17 500
46 446
51 810
133 114
150 718
174 107
281 131
289 426
508 601
330 503
251 922
140 409
116 932
101 319
223 748
437 729
544 192
807 502
457 225
480 319
447 495
460 683
486 554
543 583
724 362
976 171
916 841
1 381 720
1 073 023
1 253 561
1 434 382
1 378 337
I 419 248
1 497 720
1 783 010
2 275 972
2 358 877
2 500 799
2 462 340
S
43 650
22 168
46 432
77 517
75 201
79 475
129 234
726 323
150 000
150 000
200 000
250 000
400 000
450 000
525 000
575 000
660 800
982 900
1 149 400
1 200 000
1 270 559
1 500 000
3 500 917
3 436 222
3 249 605
2 794 107
1 509 235
I 247 912
I 097 900
783 280
980 790
1 962 824
1 808 392
2 469 967
2 742 388
2 764 013
2 766 838
3 335 885
2 879 160
3 409 142
3 820 732
4 085 105
3 538 519
1 705 708
1 025 586
1 018 719
1 238 718
1 796 677
2 098 339
1 974 976
1 832 464
2 534 840
2 845 262
3 173 635
3 025 255
3 010 088
3 401 229
5 199 563
5 896 803
8 968 222
9 955 790
10 246 939
10 758 565
I 240 080
1 467 903
1 739 490
2 034 420
3 087 291
2 479 005
2 934 882
3 038 859
2 824 687
2 693 961
2 734 522
3 582 595
4 126 830
4 744 530
5 016 398
4 832 257
4 332 297
4 953 024
5 511 861
5 548 044
7 637 713
7 356 866
8 574 884
11 108 335
8 071 747
10 786 812
9 197 460
7 745 847
7 114 178
8 900 675
8 484 343
12 833 994
11 975 671
13 450 169
12 836 013
12 880 060
12 678 548
9 911 935
12 168 905
11 650 180
12 269 135
12 633 510
11 256 260
9 435 650
7 684 155
6 523 644
5 375 171
5 725 133
5 048 864
5 722 502
6 139 920
5 565 069
6 280 956
7 088 265
7 660 000
8 237 172
7 742 030
8 217 966
6 454 360
6 732 470
8 680 440
9 765 395
10 549 924
10 119 303
63 610 965
1 991 629
2 260 129
2 502 519
2 682 505
3 613 902
3 119 314
3 594 851
4 230 587
5 659 316
8 394 053
10 459 784
10 909 465
12 434 312
16 355 076
19 674 853
17 445 818
17 497 380
18 955 179
22 461 826
24 980 546
25 888 418
23 784 857
24 513 584
26 377 066
23 499 071
32 458 800
30 194 943
26 382 491
29 521 739
42 391 953
37 056 284
41 855 707
33 304 104
35 609 126
28 135 325
35 207 350
41 330 560
48 752 446
61 517 804
67 077 605
60 720 313
65 227 002
68 689 839
55 763 360
35 233 462
28 806 716
32 639 163
42 407 630
48 837 783
54 133 485
74 438 675
64 416 599
65 711 189
75 028 294
77 566 453
76 471 329
67 151 016
54 742 315
62 026 901
72 549 790
112 583 082
145 184 247
133 226 430
139 995 418
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 103
Table 3-2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1979—Continued
Industrial
Structural
IVtroleum
Year
Metals
Mineral,
Material,
Coal
and
Natural (ias
Total
s
$
1
$
s
S
1951
153 598 411
2493 MO
10 606 048
10 169 617
176(67 916
1952	
147 857 523
2 1(1 464
11 596961
9729 739
171 365 6(7
1953
126 755 705
3002 673
13 555 0.18
9S2S279
152 841 695
1954
121 834 286
3 504 114
14 395 174
9 154544
6 545
152(94 663
1955
142 609 505
6939490
15 299 25*
8 986 SOI
18 610
173(53 360
1956
149441 246
9 172 792
20 88.16)1
9 346 SIS
319 465
1(9 163 652
1957
125 353 920
It 474050
25 626939
7.340 339
1 197 581
170 992(29
1958
104 251 112
9 958 768
19999 576
5 937 860
4 806 23)
144 933 549
1959
105 076 330
12 110 286
19025 209
5 472 064
3 967 128
147 651 217
I960
130 304 373
13 762 102
18 829 989
5242 223
9226 646
in 365 333
1961
I2S 565 774
12 948 308
19 (7( 921
6(02 134
II 612 184
179(07 321
1962
159 627 293
14 304 214
21 366 265
6I33 9S6
27939 726
229 371 484
1963
172 S52 S66
16 510 898
23 882 190
6237 997
36 379 636
255(63 5(7
1964
180 926 329
16 989 409
26 428 939
6327 678
36 466753
267 139 168
1965
177 101 733
20409649
32 325 714
6713 590
44 101 662
280 652 348
1966
208 664 003
22S6S324
43 7*0 272
6 196 219
54 2741(7
335 7(0003
1967	
235 865 318
29 364 065
44 011 488
7 045 341
67 096 286
383 382 498
1968	
250912026
26056 7S2
45 189 476
7 588 989
75 281 215
405 028 488
1969
294 SSI 114
20492943
55 441 528
6 817 155
(6 756009
464 188 749
1970
309 9(1 470
22020 359
46104 071
19 559669
90974 467
488 640 036
1971
301 059951
21909 767
59 940)))
43 801 936
99 251 I5S
527 963 145
1972
372 032 770
25 764 120
66 745 698
66 030 210
105 644 97S
636 217 776
795 617 596
27 969 664
73 720 8)1
(7 976 105
124 104 445
1 109 388 641
1974
764 599451
33676 214
7SOSS39)
154 593 643
233 275 505
1 264 233 206
1975
5*6 650 344
48 667 602
90 92(011
317 III 744
320719474
1 364 077 175
1976
646 750403
S3 917 142
100 9M 648
29(6*3 679
420973 564
1 520 263 436
1977
714 036 707
79 1(5 0*9
115 650992
32SS46SS3
550439(56
1 788 159 537
1978
819 771 518
59 471 361
142007 99*
3SI 895 241
56(931 051
1972 0(4 169
1979
1350 776 761
(4 474 2(9
178 3)9 129
439 2*0 152
(96)77 125
2 949 447 447
lotah
II 838 290 l«7
743 564 915
1 570 582 121
2756 50) 13*
3 (72 141 489
20 781 0(1 150
 104               ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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105
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 106
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-4—Comparison of Total Quantity and Value of Production,
and Quantity and Value of Production Paid for to Mines
Metals
Units
1979
Total Production
1979
Production Paid for to Mines
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
         kg
 kg
177 046
33 809
239 096
272 163 001
214 016
8 062 810
668 026
84 451 905
10 766 497
280
214 117518
240 984
88 418 642
$
916 081
173 667
1 417 506
656 359 923
2 649 918
101 481 156
13 008 475
88 100 363
321 228 104
3 793
94 700 656
3 818 948
61 890 891
5 027 280
S
 kg
26 630
271 833 805
214 106
8 062 810
668 026
84 451 905
10 766 479
280
212 646 941
198 955
74 760 690
90 991
541 956 306
2 649 918
88 669 459
13 008 475
 kg
 kg
 g
         kg
kg
 kg
80 834 765
319 549 815
3 793
81 651 137
3 144 877
37 580 298
3 844 956
1 350 776 761
1  172 984 790
Not.-:—For metals, the total quantity and value of production include the quantities paid for to the mines, and the smelter and
refining production that can be attributed to the mines but is not paid for. The quantity and value paid for to the mines, excluding
outward transportation costs, smelting and refining costs, penalties and deductions, are shown separately for comparative
purposes.
Table 3-5—Exploration and Development Expenditurei
, 1974-1979
Physical
Work
and Surveys
/Administration,
Overhead,
Land Costs,
Etc.
Construction,
Machinery and
Equipment,
Other Capital
Costs
Totals
A. Exploration on Undeclared Mines
Metal mines—
J
18 773 326
16 366 152
20 437 180
19 097 099
22 724 774
42 789 552
3 450 746
9 955 507
9 234 269
14 741 425
15 289 351
11 765 168
42 706
90 025
73 453
327 113
342 100
135 062
22 266 778
26 411 684
29 744 902
34 165 637
38 356 225
54 689 782
2 652 243
2 792 378
8 359 413
2 988 366
6 562 912
6 946 143
s
6 525 878
5 298 367
6 365 331
6 974 231
5 715 214
10 438 163
884 849
3 057 843
3 678 893
4 797 788
4 511 572
6 073 861
11  134
35 679
47 760
9 860
117 180
149 131
7 421 861
8 391 889
10 091 984
11 781 879
10 343 966
16 661 155
762 224
3 090 135
83 304
2 020 259
1 729 402
1 585 176
$
128 144
442 327
381 416
106 059
1 035 353
583 114
18 9S8
S
25 427 348
22 106 846
27 183 927
26 177 389
29 475 341
53 810 829
4 354 553
1975	
Coal mines—
1974	
1975	
1976	
1977	
1978	
1979	
Others—
1974	
1975	
1976	
1977	
1978	
222 092
559 065
1979	
Totals—
1974	
1975
1976
1977  	
1978
1979
B. Exploration on Declared or Operating Mines
Metal mines—
1974	
147 102
442 327
381 416
328 151
1 035 353
583 114
278 500
29 835 741
35 245 9O0
40 218 302
46 275 667
49 735 544
71 934 051
3 692 967
1975	
1976	
1977	
1978	
1979	
263 586
8 794 905
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
107
Table 3-5—Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1974
-/ 979—Continued
Administra
Contraction.
ItlS.Kjl
tion.
Majdiinery and
Work
and Sajnraya
Oscrhcad.
Land Costa.
Be.
luiuipmciit.
Other Capital
Coats
Totals
B. Exploration on lift Itirrd ,<r Operating Mine,
—Continued
S
S
S
5
Coal mines—
1974
488 308
104 259
592 567
I97S	
1 0170000
1 oooooo
1976
665 000
28 000
693 000
1977
5 97*01)
25 113 000
31 093 043
1978
4 052 774
510612
4 563 386
1979
3 376 551
.198 984
3775 535
Others—
1974
4 236
4 236
1975	
36 242
 2 70*
38 942
1976
214 081
30 000
244 081
1977
106*96
40) 300
310 196
1978
12 025
36 604
48 629
1979
35 200
1 300
3*500
Totals—
1974
3 144 787
(66 483
27* 500
4 2*9 770
1975
3 828 620
3 092 835
6921 455
1976
923*494
141 304
9379 798
1977
9 073 305
27 538 559
36611 864
197* 	
10 627 711
2 240 014
36 604
12 904)29
1979
10)57 894
1 9*4 160
264 886
12 606 940
C    fTrsWifMH-ar ml Oet lured iiattt
Metal, mine,—
1974
1 2*0 51)
I 028 199
1 9(5 000
4 29)712
1975
57 166
840 344
897 310
1976	
512 197
974 985
12 447 569
1) 934 751
1977	
380419
1 132 316
5)672 15)
35 184 sn
1978
133 33J
(95(92
1029 227
1979
) 482 962
1 331 567
54 559204
59)9)7)3
Coal mines—
1974	
1975.....
1976
320 098
256 055
III 500
6*7 653
1 425 312
5*3 304
2 00*616
1*77	
1 725 484
247)1)
1972 797
1978	
30 957
38 910
69 867
1979
9(1517
550157
1 331 674
[     Others—
1974	
2)242
37 988
2 88)584
2 944 814
1975
1976
 3 15)
18 001 500
18 004 655
1977.	
64 689
708
40 000
105)97
1978	
7 045
2 159
10000
19 204
1979	
Totals—
1974
162) (5)
1)22 242
49*00(4
7926 179
KM	
57 166
840 344
(97 510
1976	
1 937 S"
1 561 444
30 449 069
33 948 022
1977	
2 170 592
1 380 337
33 712 153
37 263 0(2
1978
171 337
9)6961
10000
1 III 29)
1979
446*479
1701 724
54 559 20*
60 725 407
O. Pes*!.« mem am Oprtaurtt Mine,
Metal* mine,—
1974...
20 9)) SOI
1 722 680
46 7)2 326
69)88 507
1975	
9 01) 373
5*04 924
24 548 602
39)66 901
1976	
6 9)7 229
404 226
41 SSI 126
49 222 581
1977	
14 491 378
1 722 479
45 859 006
62 072*63
1978
10 424 872
575 164
17 90S 816
2*90*852
1979
27 393 0*6
2 672 011
67(31 381
97 898 418
Coal mines—
1974	
9 027 811
16 607 506
25 635 324
1975	
3 300 000
59 000000
62)00000
1976
16 04) 383
 55)77
20767)97
36 866 157
1977	
30466 894
25 94) 377
56 410 271
1978
31 222 328
15621757
46 844 2(5
1979
Others—
4647)67*
62*021
40 698 097
(7 799 796
1974
6 198 552
1461(2
16 606 229
22 950 963
1975
17)50 175
124*60
1(077 3(4
35 552 419
1976
5S9SO
79 300
1 3*9 956
1 52(236
1977
4)2 7)1
10*500
9)1 521
1472 752
1978	
102 24*
9579
1 220 265
1 332 092
1979
1*7 044
30 700
1 05)645
1251 3(9
E      Totals—
1974
26159(71
1 868 862
79946061
117 974 794
1975	
2966)559
5 929 784
101 625 9(6
137 219 320
1976
23 039 592
538 903
64 03(479
(7 616 974
1977.	
45  I'M 003
1 830 979
72 7)) 904
119 955(86
1978
41 749641
584 743
34 750*38
78 085 229
74 055 76*
3 3)0 732
109 56) 12)
IS6949 623
—	
 108
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-6-
-Production of Gold
Silver, Copper, Lead,
Zinc, Molybdenum, and
Iron Concentrates, 1858-1979
Year
Gold (Placer)
Gold (Fine)
Silver
Copper
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
g
S
t
$
g
$
kg
$
1858-90..
1891-1900
100 978 533
11 703 748
55 192 163
6 397 183
6 876 531
700 977 829
214 152
13 561 194
16 064 375
19 682 165
12 858 353
4 365 210
1901-1910
15 787 261
8 628 660
72 224 836
47 998 179
971 114 910
16 973 507
172 344 737
56 384 783 1
1911 	
779 441
426 000
7 110 675
4 725 512
58 858 198
958 293
16 750 016
4 571 644 I
1912	
1 016 446
555 500
8 008 898
5 322 442
97 417 955
1 810 045
23 340 171
8 408 513
1913	
933 090
510 000
8 467 916
5 627 595
107 798 519
1 968 606
21 073 930
7 094 489  !
1914	
1 033 864
565 000
7 687 729
5 109 008
112 038 605
1 876 736
20 415 949
6 121 319
1915	
1 408 655
770 000
7 776 403
5 167 934
104 708 436
1 588 991
25 817 619
9 835 500 1
1916	
1 062 167
580 500
6 902 751
4 587 333
102 699 711
2 059 739
29 655 426
17 784 494 1
1917	
907 585
496 000
3 562 009
2 367 191
91 107 405
2 265 749
26 765 241
16 038 256 1
1918	
585 358
320 000
5 121 855
3 403 811
108 803 644
3 215 870
27 888 416
15 143 449 1
1919	
524 086
286 500
4 740 906
3 150 644
105 847 210
3 592 673
19 259 132
7 939 896 1
1920	
405 583
221 600
3 733 853
2 481 392
105 061 237
3 235 980
20 360 601
7 832 899 ■
1921 	
426 733
233 200
4 222 699
2 804 197
83 150 418
1 591 201
17 706 790
4 879 624 1
1922	
674 624
368 800
6 153 915
4 089 684
220 872 076
4 554 781
14 678 125
4 329 754 ■
1923	
768 555
420 000
5 575 057
3 704 994
187 643 964
3 718 129
26 181 346
8 323 266 I
1924	
769 799
420 750
7 704 711
5 120 535
259 454 010
5 292 184
29 413 222
8 442 870
1925	
512 453
280 092
6 522 890
4 335 069
238 088 613
5 286 818
32 797 475
10 153 269 I
1926	
650 426
355 503
6 264 984
4 163 859
334 312 337
6 675 606
40 523 625
12 324 421 1
1927	
285 868
156 247
5 536 365
3 679 601
325 654 164
5 902 043
40 461 530
11525 011 1
1928	
262 012
143 208
5 619 130
3 734 609
330 536 775
6 182 461
44 410 233
14 265 242 1
1929	
217 192
118 711
4 516 871
3 002 020
309 791 230
5 278 194
46 626 180
18 612 850 ■
1930	
278 527
152 235
5 002 482
3 324 975
352 342 964
4 322 185
41 894 588
11 990 466 ■
1931 	
534 225
291 992
4 545 175
3 020 837
234 837 945
2 254 979
29 090 879
5 365 690 1
1932	
634 501
395 542
5 649 891
4 263 389
222 406 822
2 264 729
22 955 299
3 228 892 1
1933	
744 233
562 787
6 954 289
6 394 645
218 397 615
2 656 526
19 572 164
3 216 701
1934	
783 205
714 431
9 244 309
10 253 952
267 920 527
4 088 280
22 521 530
3 683 662 I
1935	
961 985
895 058
11 363 263
12 856 419
288 323 068
6 005 996
17 884 241
3 073 428 I
1936	
1 349 528
1 249 940
12 583 590
14 172 367
296 944 198
4 308 330
9 830 071
2 053 828 ■
1937	
1 684 321
1 558 245
14 331 671
16 122 767
351 630 830
5 073 962
20 891 260
6 023 411 ■
1938	
1 796 478
1 671 015
17 340 607
19 613 624
337 827 661
4 722 288
29 832 572
6 558 575 ■
1939	
1 547 250
1 478 492
18 267 912
21 226 957
336 577 786
4 381 365
33 227 590
7 392 862 1
1940	
1 215 101
1 236 928
18 149 347
22 461 516
383 436 042
4 715 315
35 371 049
7 865 085 ■
1941 	
1 361 534
1 385 962
17 760 622
21 984 501
378 700 797
4 658 545
30 134 516
6 700 693 1
1942	
1 023 413
1 041 772
13 825 843
17 113 943
301 011 133
4 080 775
22 723 823
5 052 856 ]
1943	
454 104
462 270
6 979 607
8 639 516
265 193 820
3 858 496
19 190 263
4 971 132 ■
1944	
355 601
361 977
5 804 815
7 185 332
177 453 003
2 453 293
16 465 584
4 356 070
1945	
391 556
398 591
5 454 626
6 751 860
191 510 720
2 893 934
11 726 375
3 244 472 ■
1946	
489 219
475 361
3 658 086
4 322 241
197 994 264
5 324 959
7 938 069
2 240 070
1947	
216 757
200 585
7 566 800
8 514 870
177 550 262
4 110 092
18 952 769
8 519 741 ■
1948	
632 386
585 200
8 902 612
10 018 050
209 016 328
5 040 101
19 515 886
9 616 174
1949	
556 308
529 524
8 969 981
10 382 256
237 559 178
5 671 082
24 882 500
10 956 550 ■
1950	
595 125
598 717
8 832 723
10 805 553
295 772 610
7 667 950
19 147 001
9 889 458 ■
1951 	
736 861
717 911
8 126 405
9 627 947
255 632 882
7 770 983
19617612
11980 155 S
1952	
545 982
494 756
7 955 805
8 765 889
274 042 530
7 326 803
19 053 280
13 054 893 ■
1953	
443 062
403 230
7 886 228
8 727 294
260 606 407
7 019 272
22 235 441
14 869 544 ■
1954	
270 098
238 967
8 036 642
8 803 279
305 630 613
8 154 145
22 747 578
14 599 693
1955	
238 436
217 614
7 541 762
8 370 306
245 811 643
6 942 995
20 065 928
16 932 549 ■
1956	
120 213
109 450
5 963 782
6 603 628
261 423 017
7 511 866
19 667 923
17 251 872
1957	
91 318
80 990
6 948 504
7 495 170
252 847 111
7 077 166
14 237 029
8 170 465
1958	
175 732
157 871
6 044 992
6 604 149
218 998 027
6 086 854
5 741 837
2 964 529 ■
1959	
235 450
208 973
5 385 360
5 812 511
192 779 535
5 421 417
7 363 374
4 497 991 1
1960	
119 653
107 418
6 394 155
6 979 441
231 612 937
6 600 183
14 997 694
9 583 724 ■
1961 	
106 248
99 884
4 970 913
5 667 253
229 353 429
6 909 140
14 375 361
8 965 149 ■
1962	
103 106
96 697
4 940 712
5 942 101
192 521 474
7 181 907
49 431 850
33 209 215 ■
1963	
143 696
135 411
4 820 312
5 850 458
199 764 616
8 861 050
53 635 704
36 238 007 ■
1964	
57 292
55 191
4 307 361
5 227 884
163 901 675
7 348 938
52 414 456
38 609 136
1965	
26 935
25 053
3 642 908
4 419 089
154 646 729
6 929 793
38 644 540
32 696 081 ■
1966	
47 743
44 632
3 717 057
4 506 646
172 594 622
7 729 939
47 990 080
56 438 255 ■
1967	
27 713
25 632
3 923 861
4 763 688
192 239 525
10 328 695
78 352 932
88 135 172 ■
1968	
20 839
19 571
3 853 537
4 672 242
221 791 325
16 475 795
73 024 968
87 284 148 ■
1969	
12 410
11 720
3 654 012
4 427 506
179 169 889
11 100 491
75 937 956
111 592 416
1970	
15 272
14 185
3 135 462
3 685 476
202 521 462
12 041 181
96 329 694
124 657 958
1971 	
5 505
4 647
2 668 046
3 031 844
238 670 301
11 968 046
127 286 040
131 037 918
1972	
21 492
26 905
3 782 871
6 995 448
215 420 498
11 519 660
211 832 288
209 403 822
1973	
119 156
311 524
5 784 723
18 117 268
236 987 318
19 552 997
317 603 055
582 803 251 1:
1974	
45 162
232 512
5 001 082
26 749 083
181 695 950
28 440 365
287 547 048
541 644 913
1975	
43 744
232 204
4 819 241
25 082 494
196 305 885
30 545 947
258 497 599
331 693 850 |
1976	
26 064
115613
5 393 477
21 761 502
239 720 882
32 532 836
263 618 197
378 984 941
1977	
46 170
289 075
5 906 336
31 301 931
241 503 007
37 934 098
275 224 115
384 736 661
1978	
36 515
295 001
6 542 332
47 951 880
227 271 890
45 071 509
273 692 676
431 694 395
1979
Totals...
214 106
2 649 918
8 062 810
101 481 156
214 117 518
94 700 656
272 163 001
656 35U 923
163 394 809
101 114 796
577 535 557
786 288 095
17 084 804 047
665 440 861
4 219 611 424
4 760 467 201
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
109
Table 3-6-
—Production of Gold, Silver, Coppe
r. Lead, Z
AC. JltillW
'num. and
Iron
Concentrates, 1858-1979—Continued
Year
Lcad
Zbjc
M.'Krsienum
Iron Conecnlrale.
Quanl.ts
■^————
Value
Quanlits
Value
Quality
Value
Quantity
Value
4
s
k*
t
k*
s
t
S
■ 1858-90
■ IS9I-I900
473 729
93 002 804
45 527
7 SSI 619
27 097
II 820
70879
45602
1   19011910
1(49(90(9
170)3102
 slsY-iS
 (94169
17 738
■   1911
12 189051
1069 521
1195003
129092
'
I    1912
20 353 243
1805 627
2430462
3161)9
I    191.1
25112(6*
2 175 832
3 065 710
324421
j    1914
■ 1915
■ 1916
22963016
21 093 563
22 102314
1 771 877
1939200
3007462
3S6SISI
5888 705
16 859478
3*6 125
1460324
40439(5
901
1641
559*
 '662
2000
20560
|   1917
16922293
2951020
1(9(2067
3166 259
3)71
11636
1   1918
19912447
292(107
1(947777
2 899 040
433
1(40
907
5000
■ 1919	
13 370004
1526(55
25 735 631
3540 429
1 116
6150
I '«»
17 840 247
2(16 IIS
21413 19S
3077979
1335
7360
■ 1921
18 779664
1693 354
22416133
1952 065
916
5050
■ 1922
30 593 731
.1480 306
25 921103
2 777 322
I0S9
3600
ji   1923
43*45439
6321770
26464 465
3 278 903
220
1337
jjf  1924	
77 284 697
12415917
35(9)017
4 266 741
■ 1925
107 90)698
IS 670 329
44 56*438
775*490
I   1926.
119305027
17 757 535
64 807 554
105(6610
H-   1927	
128 364 347
I4S74 292
65 872809
8996135
■  1928
138 408 812
13961 412
(2445946
99*4613
18
j|   1929...
139705336
15 5551(9
7)061406
926*792
S  1930	
145966952
12638198
11)614 910
9017005
§  1931
118 7962)2
7097112
91 657 703
5 160 911
1  1932.
114 308 115
5326 4)2
(7143752
4621641
Ii   1933	
123235 512
6497 719
SSSS7I9S
6291 416
£   19)4..
1375621(3
(461(59
113 013 ins
75*4 199
1   1935	
156156723
107(5930
116 227 650
79*0*60
1  1936...
171444 146
14 790028
115475 574
(439373
■ 1937	
190107 902
21417049
1320(1905
14 274 245
B. 1938..
187 323 227
13(10024
13) 395 3H
9172 S22
■ 1939
171 794 33)
12002390
1262(35(5
SS44 37S
I   1940
211 75)089
IS 695 467
141 529456
10643026
h   1941   ...
207 21(262
15 358976
166(61962
1254(031
fit  1942..
230060714
17 052 054
ITS 646 590
1320(636
;     1943
199 196604
16485902
152474 485
I34460IS
i   1944. .
132*66*93
131(1530
126126 765
11956 725
■   1945
152(49156
16*4)82)
133714 538
1(9(4 5(1
1   19-6.
156 879 853
23)45 7)1
124406109
21 4204*4
1   1947
142 306 192
4207 31)
114 761 068
2(412593
if   1948
145165(21
57 734 770
122 610 001
37654211
616
3735
1    1949
120)7)215
41929*66
1)0736145
381(1 214
4964
27579
K 1950...
128830683
41 052 905
131 697 2JS
4)769392
■ 1951
124037 Id
50)16015
15)091 761
67 164 754
102997
790000
■ 1952
129250197
45936692
1691)0 8)2
591(9636
(16 (M
5474924
■  1953
13500*129
39 481 244
173407 S4S
40)10618
899 240
6763105
if   1954   .
iso (07 on
45 482 505
151555)59
34(05755
4)6018
3 7)3 (91
■ l955
137241656
45 161 245
1946(0177
3204(909
55*223
322(756
■ l956
128691681
44702619
2013272(4
5*9)4 801
335616
2190(47
■ 1957
127732463
39 56) 0(6
2027(7462
50 206681
32*17*
2 200637
§19511
133 615 439
34 627075
195 952 146
4)234(39
571769
4 193442
H 1959	
H I960
130 372 360
151 321 570
33542)06
38 661912
18249)69)
182977*97
44 169 198
50656 726
2456
770421
1052651
6363)4)
10292(47
9500
■   1961
174 307617
4231)569
1759707(0
43370(91
1211 147
120(2540
■ 1962
152080806
34 537 454
1(732(0(4
SI3S6376
1627)42
1) 326911
§' 1963	
142*69 197
37(34 714
1)2 734 69*
5306916)
1(69009
20746424
p 1964	
121*96644
39402293
1*1797313
58648561
12(12
47063
1(16614
204194(7
1 1965.
1134)0 794
43 149171
141 179)47
4866693)
3306274
124053*4
1964 410
2149*581
1966
95929798
34436934
13)401 MS
47666540
7 754 0*8
27606061
1952074
2077(934
1967
94 406 546
31432079
119 217 472
3924(539
7 945 782
31 18)064
1 954 468
20(20765
W  1968.
10506)971
32782 257
135*03 151
43 5501(1
89(0 988
32552722
1900 311
21437569
■ 1969
95 284)15
3)69)5)9
134 565 199
46639024
12064350
47999442
1(82 266
19 787 84)
|   1970	
97 44)607
35096021
125005208
4*111053
14 186 706
52561796
1704 650
17 391 883
jffi 1971	
112865 575
34 711408
13(549629
49 745 789
9926694
36954 846
1 750 738
IB 153612
■ 1972
((10(66)
2* (96 566
121 719 Wi
47 172(94
12 719)91
4)260349
1 139 698
11642379
■ 1973
(4(9092*
30 477 936
137 3M176S
62 564 731
137(5264
51(51509
1420160
12906063
1  1974
55 252692
23333016
77733732
59582753
1)789 825
60791552
1306930
12742227
■ 1975 .
70 60.1483
24 450 158
99668 230
SO 572 S72
13026627
71 201 391
1305(40
15 273878
it' 1976	
85 407)82
32 796 533
10649(9(7
63499I0S
14 OS* 686
94 109 138
1255277
14760526
|   1977
78 172646
42 31629)
103 780 228
61 301001
15 521 970
142057947
445 317
7 362 345
■ I97S
81 064 5)9
51640 564
95611 111
5204(701
13055203
167714272
613569
11 597 462
■ 1979
I    Totals
84 451 90S
88 100 36)
SS4IS642
61(90(91
10766497
321 228 104
668026
13008475
79203(4 794
170*663)1)
7510 616 3(7
19)0 26)511
170945 559
1 193 570798
33771759
356214931
 110 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-7A—Mineral Production by Mining
Division
Period
Placer
3old
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Quantity
Value
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
g
%
$
24 988 615
44 641 124
327 436 991
S
$
9 398
50 294
3 328
58 342
23 042 312
9 611
23 004
81 287 415
33 253
26 880
763 144
18 702 010
78 621
277 976
54 779 218
8 764 665
38 171 207
41 934 799
121 356 715
613 355 361
20 325
59 346
33 025
1 031 009
407 189
4 665 794
10 241 475
61 619 925
975
317 324
11 791
254 860
848 377
102 876 534
166 856 343
2 954 491 413
36 541
17 538
66 302 170
3 621 966
4 930 911
250 212 139
179 822 859
358 878 012
1 405 468 769
162 427
1 531 236
2 283 198
29 709 312
3 110 695
5 157 040
33 644 234
23 339
87 800
2 439 936
10 429 495
639 241
472 087
15 711 868
14 587
Greenwood	
11 268
5 264 778
1346
159 163
16 274
131 936
166 963
771 748
4 750
180 016
1 438 169
532 207
4 297 909
ps
13 812
872 099
591
14 891
1 580 194
6 540 538
50 028 356
70 432 192
556 921 025
103 971 408
Lillooet	
8 422 918
27 579 416
106 590
5 083 171
30 488 907
418
2 893 766
5 057
1 942 910
148 273 846
102 917 596
172 355 903
973 229 844
4 195 459
127 479
409 314 614
473 095
56 734
119 594
2 958 418
1 139 304
1 350 105
9 417 026
4 846 200
3800
30 735
111 535
31
45 939
65 239
11 039 696
122 880 542
89 026
250
16 029 684
17168
63 768 973
41 065 672
39 779 612
459 250 006
139 006 311
197 711 930
1 151 599 018
74 146 136
100 373 878
565 407 503
3000
15 503 414
40 878 260
72 480 723
412 547 209
37 248 519
24 779 427
704 586 677
2 604 889
6 653 541
293 566 345
82 734
73 928
91 061 303
8 815 561
13 401366
332 123 856
9 360
975 418
597 152
1 611 625
322 865 028
7 278
342
1 918
1 757 925
264
7 729
4 764
2 750
23 189
1 532 339
10 050
48 689
1 755
1 562 575
22 100
19 327
6 801 441
18 558
3 410 654
2 924 269
21 914 125
3 186
8 652
10 061
174 538
24 734
902 938
542 425
7 895 442
491
236 314
508 491
5 132 082
2 065
1 417 469
280
143 447
212 744
6 229 423
3 382
108 951
1 240 215
32 811 851
11 384
9 397
26 469
365
6 026
24 260
4 417
9 723
Vancouver
7 066 964
288 249 620
23 286
108 344
281495
354 844
8 325
233 666
160
371 414
2 943
21 813 376
19 533
22 612
68 849
47 678 808
15 680
181 750
832 294
18 679 834
24 812 286
15 122 173
15 265 327
407 893 240
190 811
3 451 402
4 981 919
81 502 267
386 461 141
3 906 398
78 939 107
1978
1979
lb Date
36 515
214 106
163 394 809
295 001
2 649 918
101 114 796
819 483 517
1348 126 843
11 737 175 391
59 471 361
84 474 280
743 564 915
178 539 129
1 570 582 121
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
Divisions, 1978 and 1979, and Total to Date
Ul
Petroleum and Natural Gas
Coal
Ciuclc Oil and
Condensates
Natural Gs* Delivered
to Pipeline
Buune and
Propane
Division
Quantity
Value
Quant it >
\Uoa
Quantity
Value
Qjiantily
Value
t
S
2 185 588
2 356 910
54 016 260
s
157 111 603
184 894 589
1 373 9S2 726
lOW
8 003 029
11 392 641
137 070 713
s
401 373 236
699 508 127
3449 135 141
m'
192 313
197 547
3966 574
S
10 446 213
11 974 409
49 033 933
$
36 004 684
45 558 175
336 344 307
44 433
784 830
57 300 731
46 738 560
131 909 19|
730786613
1 775433
3559 788
II 695 159
487 151 300
609 753 957
3 430074 939
33 466 980
5 657 733
105 333 450
3 895 107
5 567 192
357 081 920
193 133 596
376 962 917
1 $16 813 338
623 505954
980 459 422
4 490 084 $13
417 393
444 947
155 536 051
113 332 599
183 561 133
1 400 278 787
7 038 791
3 573 937
434 850 350
32 012 647
29 877 220
388 842 778
41 228 773
40 087 486
473 756 310
140 091 674
200 667 368
1 180 060 135
74 670 106
100 938 816
$80 1 IK 046
369 539
521 552
20 810 034
41 225 774
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439 351 853
38 973 791
28 668 206
738 747 810
2 698 709
6 863 922
397 076 365
1 818053
767 694
97 732 743
17 IKI 6.13
62 017 152
627 450163
1 798 080
2 838 514
22 773 300
32 123 338
31 677 157
411 479 918
31 817 143
24 985 938
$87 014 448
263
9463 648
10 570 145
125957 129
1  100
381 889*169
439 273 927
2 419 690 259
59 765
1 515 $07
301  144 744
II 080 836
6 772
6 225
3 452 078
5008
 i9553-725
116
13687
131 923
67 425 673
2 657 660
272
225
457 192
1 01)
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 33
9 463 920
1 10 570 370
200 S3) 429
Ml 993 Ml
439 280 152
2 756 503 138
2 18) 588
2 356 910
534 016360
157 III 602
184 894 589
I 373 982 726
8 001 029
II 392 641
137 070 713
401 373 336
699 508 127
3 449 135 841
193 313
197 547
3966 574
10446 313
II 974 409
49033 933
2 949 447 447
20 781 081 850
 112
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
p
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24 857 599
44 499 456
274 018 767
37 609 085
29 952 377
81 162 920
501 686 569
TsO-
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MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
113
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 114
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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 116 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
T3
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131 016
141668
53 418 224
562 122
11 982 422
40 193 795
111668 792
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3 583 907
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137 153 306
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 MINERAL RESOURCE ST>OTSTICS
117
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 118
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-7D-
-Production of Industrial Minerals by j
Division
Period
Asbestos
Barite1
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,   j
Limestone, and     j
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Valuc
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value     |
Albemi     ,
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
>
$
t
s
I
$
t
$
t
S
2 184
1452
26 218
59 346
33 025
887 529
Atlin	
Cariboo	
44
Clinton	
Fort Steele ..
7
80
Golden	
73
3 029
1 116
13 728
398 388
4 489 227
711
2 168
3 101
1 624 308
1540 319
Kamloops...
567
Liard
68 266
94 286
1603 400
47 066 170
65 520 069
527 496 967
Lillooet
22 451
27 657
1 049 891
56 734
119 594
2 181 269
31 506
25 327
27 162
254 987
6 895
8 174
99 490
Nicola
20
25
148
791
719
194 932
Osoyoos ...
728 113
3 699 031
Similkameen
545 232
I 050 722
26 936
II
2 914
24
8 325
38 725
160
7 210
286
3 505
8 713
68 266
94 286
1 603 400
47 066 170
65 520 069
527 496 967
2 184
1 452
26 218
59 346
33 025
887 529
22 475
27 741
3 960 668
56 894
129 035
8 535 473
26 849
30 074
627 634
398 395
4 489 307
15 417 983
1 From 1972, excludes production which is confidential.
Other See notes on individual materials listed alphabetically on pages 87 to 96.
1 Natro-alunite. 4 Volcanic ash,
3 Hydromagnesite. s Magnesium sulphate.
6 Sodium carbonate.
1 Phosphate rock.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
Mining Divisions, 1978 and 1979, and Total to Date
119
Gsttsumand
Gypute
Jade
Mka
Sulphur
Other.
Salut
Division
Total
Quantity
Vajrat
Quantity
Saloc
Quantify
Value
Quantity
Value
t
~"tm
1    102 400
I    733 0*0
■22 13.1
H 7005 719
I   1 111 179
$
6236
291124
3110 to
5155*14
29 140 001
"".."jam
W 050
•*
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1
VsjV'iiso
$
"woii
207)
1
S
s
9398-'
 '20325"
 'JOO"
 156 i9l>t»
S
 9398
20 32)
59 346
33 025
IO3IO09
 162427
1531 236
2 2*3 198
29 709 312
3 110 695
5 157 040
1.1 Ml 214
23 339
17 800
2439 936
6 540 53*
50 02*356
7*432 112
556921025
 trwi
19 467
1583 295
1531 236
2 2*3 IN
29 393 314
16 894'
 V»S»9
7*3 57*»
 1 5*74*0
3 5*1)4*
24 620794
4)190*
25*505
1337 42*
" '253391
36*51
557 939
1 374 746
132)777
4*0)261
467 966
"""47272
15)91X2
192640
2030))"
•94*0
147 437
1 117 207
5 129"
 Mlb'll
 17**7*
6550*69
2 52*317
3 744 Ml
73 670 333
4730*5
56 734
11*5*4
2 958 418
1 139 304
1 35*1*3
9417026
10 M5
"im
 37761
"earn
lit  SMS.
■4* n*
3 643 9)1
1611 625
p'i'iii
10050
4*6*9
1755
1 562 575
22 100
1*327
6 801441
 iiss*
""'i"2h0 2I5
7 066 964
• 325
2)3 666
160
■ 70*
720*64
11460"':
J06SS3""'
'"'Sfipi
227
"'-jjij'jjii
 72 VII
97 Us*
30 226"
922 0*5
1233*7)
3*31*32
190*11
3451402
IKI 919
■ 1 502 267
F 733 0*0
722 131
Bi 242 301
3 nous
5 155 124
3*779*91
:-- — i
25*5*5
2 111 751
142201*
1)25 777
6 511  112
5115*34
ii) ii*
322 1*1
JU724
907)9*7
56479*3
9 616 390
136 414 290
922 0*5
1 2.IJI73
7546445
59 471 361
84 474 210
74) 564 91)
1     ' IronutMVr and .. l.:c                                       w Fluorspar                                                          ■ lYIIrtc
■   * Talc.                                                            " Arsenious oudc                                             Bentonirc
 120              ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-7E—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions, 1978 and 1979,
and Total to Date
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Materials
Division -"£
Tolal
Albemi	
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
To Date
1978
1979
lb Date
1978
1979
To Dale
1978
1979
To Date
S
S
$
|
S
1 016 069
917 051
8 418 006
17 542
21 686
303 628
2 191 561
6 998 811
42 892 967
452 423
2 509 697
7 192 065
834 961
1330 489
12 595 825
99 744
483 155
4 828 856
241 541
515 287
3 669 391
2 698 939
2 372 213
25 889 048
4 082 797
5 083 171
27 866 099
7 653
43 209
2 397 621
3 493 113
4 380 217
28 920 140
762 920
1 059 022
9 964 745
14 798 377
17 549 446
172 300 469
163 101
307 874
3 214 660
1 016 349
2 328 524
18 323 818
501 870
542 425
7 463 301
251 014
484 891
4 266 384
347 514
212 744
5 457 656
1 199 224
3 085 146
24 677 756
93 820
210 381
3 227 057
1 735 319
693 766
6 147 766
6 418 333
7 129 255
89 722 937
1 788 720
2 538 694
20 755 690
6 952 573
7 215 081
65 182 642
13 061 818
3 906 398
S
$
sl
917 051
8 764 665
346 659
Cariboo	
21 686 i
407 189 U
4 665 794 11
10 241 475 1
61 619 925 1
1 775 423 1
2 547 997 1
1  108
469 780
476 521
4 151 612
102 453
2 004 453
2 766 143
14 242 889
1 323 000
38 300
3 237 430
20 000
9000
2 984 311
332 457
854 9ft t
1 339 489 1
15 711 868'
99 744 1
483 155
Golden	
Greenwood	
43 873
71941
15 918
1 000
8 261
16 900
67 721
50 840
255 923
128 159
20
161 040
278 474
1 544 504
1 394 030
18 614 430
459 000
121 283
9 067 294
14 151 699
59 350 684
Liard	
Lillooet	
25 067
19 800
72 379
2 622 808
303 150
386 926
1 314 006
5 085 859
5 951 297
81 041 288
929 653
1 035 960
5 013 430
86 172
120 896
3 801 778
9 755
II 755
1 122 818
1 679 297
708 182
8 289 387
1 455
1 371
592 397
845 288
445 516
26 262 463
Nelson	
New Westminster..
3 450 735
1 178 992
437 138
21 974
6 282 560
11 744 194
120 479 344
20 974
Omineca	
Osoyoos	
Revelstoke	
Similkarneen	
Skeena	
Slocan	
8000
105
125
701
187 994
6 420
590 072
3 541 555
4 278
5548
42 777
5 274
43 774
33 018
17 925
9800
77 145
355 349
600
13 800
787 553
1 000
10 500
II 571
24 000
712 341
526 048
800 251
6 331 546
13 355
6 229 42.-
1 645 300
144 000
13 249
93 821:
210 38?
1 000
115 143
157 323
3 500 52:
1 735 311
32 500
85 520
693 761
381 393
6 647 171
21 947 739
41 482 114
184 702 850
40 885
4 012 560
8 681 796
1 088 592
288 249 621
1 788 721 1
Victoria	
Not Assigned	
2 538 69
351 416
42 33!
43 428
1 184 709
141 367
403 649
161 254
21 813 37i
25 125 531
24 418 648
308 706 036
32 120 43.
31 677 IS
55
532 563
10 855 136
IS 061 81
3 906 39
315 498
505 018
2 879 844
5 972 171
78 939 10
56 140 564
80 052 461
522 770 070
6 929 484
8 037 476
99 131 313
18 030
19 700
9 370 750
8 410 065
6 766 665
103 905 348
64 227 295
71 918 633
661 764 275
6 282 560
11 744 194
137 668 194
5 972 171
178 539 12
1 570 582 12
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
Table 3-8A—Production cf Coal, 1836-1979
121
Year
Quantity1
Value
Year
Quantity'
Value
36-59 	
(60
1
37 915
14 475
13 995
1*409
5
149 548
56 988
55 096
72 472
1920
1921	
1922	
1923	
t
2 587 763
2 422 455
2473 692
2 391 998
1 839 619
2305 337
2 182 760
2 316408
s
■3 450169
12 836 013
12 880060
12 678 548
9 911 935
12 168 905
65
21 687
29 091
33 us
S3 380
115 528
131 276
1924	
1925
1926
66
25 SIS
100 460
1927..
11 650 180
12 269 13)
31 740
124 956
1928
2 431 794
12 633 510
6S
44 711
176020
1929	
2154 607
II 256 260
69
36 376
143 208
1930
1 809 364
9435 650
70             -■,...	
30322
119 372
1931 .
1601600
7 684 155
50 310
164 612
1932	
1 464 759
6523 644
50)10
161 612
1933	
1 249 347
1 297 306
5 375 171
5 72) 133
SO 311
16*612
1934
[74
12*56
244 641
1935	
1 159 721
5048 864
III 912
141 425
330435
417 576
1936
1937
1 226 780
1 312 003
5722 502
6 139 920
156 525
462 156
19)1
1 259626
5565 069
7J
173 5*7
522 538
19)9
1 416 184
6280 956
79	
245 172
723 903
19*0	
1 507 758
7088 265
271 «*9
232 020
802 785
685171
1941	
1942
1673 516
1 810 731
7660 000
1 237 172
2M666
216721
400 391
846417
639 897
1 182 210
1943
1944..  .
1945	
1 682 $91
1752626
1 381 654
7742030
1217966
6 454 360
14 ...
15
371*61
331 ITS
1096 788
979908
19*6
19*7.
1 305 SI6
1 538 895
6 732 470
8680 440
419 992
1 240080
1948
1 455 552
9765 395
497 ISO
1467 903
1919
1470 782
10 549 924
go.
SS9I33
689 020
1 045 607
1 739 490
2034 420
3 087 291
1990	
1951. .
1952
1 427 907
1427 513
1272 ISO
10 119 303
90
10 169617
9729 739
859 591
247*005
1953
I25S662
9528 279
993 on
293*1*2
1954
1 186 849
9 154 544
M
1029 204
3 03S 859
1955	
1 209 157
8 986 501
95
93*727
2824 687
1956
1 285 664
9 346 518
96
909 237
2693 961
1957
984 886
7 340 339
906 610
2734 522
1958
722 490
5937 860
1 146015
3582 595
1959
625 964
5 472 064
99
1 302 OK*
4 126 803
I960
715 455
5 242 223
DO
1 615 6*1
4 744 530
1961
833 827
6102 134
1711692
S0I6 398
1962
748 731
6 133 986
1667 960
1 473 93)
4832 257
4332 297
1963
1964
771594
826 737
6237 997
6 327 678
1 712 739
4953024
1965
862 513
6 713 590
05
1 855 121
5 511 861
1966
771 84S
6 196 219
D6
1 929 540
5 54*044
1967
824 436
7 045 341
2 255 214
7637 713
1968
170 1*0
7588 989
2143 225
2439109
3 007 074
7)56*66
S 574 8*4
II 108 335
1969
1970
1971
773 226
2398 635
4 141 496
6 817 155
09
19 359 669
45 801 9)6
2305 77*
8 071 747
1972..
5466 846
66 030 210
2913 771
10 7X6 811
1973
6924 733
87 976105
2461665
9197 460
1974
7757 440
154 593 6*3
2 029 400
7 745*47
1975
1924 116
317 III 744
15
1 B3I5I
7 114 17*
1976
7 5)7 695
29*613 679
16
234)671
8900 075
1977
8 424 181
328 846 883
2 209 922
8484)43
197*
946)920
381 895 241
»
2336 231
2207 659
12 833 994
II 975 671
1979
1i>ah
10 570 170
439 280 152
200 8.13 429
2 756 SO) 138
m 1836 to 1W9 fcpnti
I thai utltl tVki u**rd
nunc ixitpul and in. ludrt. nrutci
.■ ••■-'. .i :■!.!. .   Bjt 1910 -.ml \ub-Ciiucnl
 122               ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-8B—Coal Production and Distribution   1
Raw Coal Production
Clean Coal
Coal Used
Surface
Underground
Total
Production
Plant Use
and
Misc.
Making   1
Coke
Fort Steele Mining Division
1
t
t
t
t
t
Bvron Creek Collieries Ltd.
893 074
893 074
775 639
Coleman Collieries Ltd.
Fording Coal Ltd.
621 359
621 359
387 483
Kaiser Resources Ltd.
4 824 951
4 824 951
2 921 954
7 120 799
321 497
845 826
7 966 625
321 497
6 367 471
130 878
5 784
159 737
7 442 296
845 826
8 288 122
6 498 349
5 784
159 737  1
Omineca Mining Division
Bulkley Valley Colliery Ltd.
86
139
225
225
5
Totals 1979
Metallurgical	
12 567 109
845 826
13 412 935
9 676 908
5 784
159 737
91.2
1 214 657
8.8
100.0
139
91.7
1 214 796
8.3
91.4
906 742
8.6
100.0
5
100.0   1
Per cent of 1979 totals	
Totals 1979	
13 781 766
845 965
14 627 731
10 583 650
5 789
159 737 I
Table 3-8C—Metallurgical and Thermal Coal Sold and Used, 1973-1979
Year
Metallurgical
Thermal
Total
t
$
,
$
t
S
1973	
6 853 120
87 406 677
71 613
569 428
6 924 733
87 976 105
1974	
7 279 406
149 025 665
496 034
5 567 978
7 757 440
154 593 643
1975	
8 104 102
305 484 901
820 714
11 626 843
8 924 816
317 111 744
1976	
14 929 700
7 537 695
298 683 679
1977	
1978	
20 640 387
26 887 554
9 463 920
10 570 370
381 895 241
439 280 152   ]
1979	
9 591 975
412 392 598
. 978 395
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
by Collieries and by Mining Division, 1979
123
Coal Sales
Total Coal Sold and Used
Canada
United
States
Japan
Others
Total
Quantity
Total
Value
Average
Value
British
Columbia
Other
Provinces
Total
t
t
713 909
t
722 055
t
t
71 854
392 716
3 001 731
4 444 749
120
1
t
793 909
392 716
3 051 396
5 982 342
184 261
t
793 909
392 716
3 051 396
6 147 863
184 261
$
22 175 741
16 800 135
126 218 012
269 374 451
4 705 588
$/t
27.93
42.78
41.36
43.82
25.54
49 665
1 537 350
133 413
243
243
50 728
50 728
50 971
l_       220
4 444 869
1 670 763
6 166 603
220
6 332 124
225
274 080 039
6 225
43.28
27.67
220
243
243
7 839 196
99.1
71 974
0.9
1 587 015
92.2
133 413
7.8
9 426 454
90.6
978 390
9.4
9 591 975
90.7
978 395
9.3
412 392 598
93.9
26 887 554
6.1
42.99
713 909
100.0
773 003
100.0
27.48
100.0
713 909
773 246
7 911 170
1 720 428
10 404 844
10 570 370
439 280 152
Table 3-8D—Destination of British Columbia Coal',
1979
Metallurgical
Thermal
Total
t
243
t
59 094
46 102
667 807
t
59 337
46 102
667 807
254 684
49 315
254 684
Chile                                                                              	
49 315
133 413
133 413
49 665
115 241
7 839 196
798 097
59 999
153 569
49 218
57 227
49 665
115 241
71 974
7 911 170
798 097
59 999
153 569
49 218
57 227
9 426 454
978 390
10 404 844
' Excludes coal used at plants and for making coke.
 124
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
Table 3-9—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Oper^^^m
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Fuel and
Process
Wages
Electricity
Supplies
$
S
S
146 627 673
48 510 967
165 769 397
91 962 580
79 421 521
11 013 759
18 419 796
17 426 778
Petroleum and natural gas (exploration and production)...	
22 066 856
5 587 808
12 099 468
Structural materials industry «...-...; ...'.
36 042 982
24 648 417
15 770 949
Totals, 1979	
387 135 371
97 166 988
211 066 592
1978	
335 136 110
84 785 126
189 133 090
1977	
337 382 149
71 149 313
192 025 357
1976	
277 736 828
59 220 204
170 075 616
1975	
246 953 568
49 104 838
154 476 238
1974	
272 945 078
42 381 258
140 002 685
1973 	
221 877 595
36 750 711
103 840 649
1972	
199 351 449
31 115 621
77 092 955
1971 .
179 175 692
23 166 904
68 314 944
1970	
172 958 282
19 116 672
59 846 370
1969	
123 450 327
14 554 123
43 089 559
1968 	
113 459 219
13 818 326
38 760 203
1967 2.	
94 523 495
13 590 759
34 368 856
1966	
93 409 528
12 283 477
28 120 179
1965 .
74 938 736
11 504 343
30 590 631
1964
63 624 559
10 205 861
27 629 953
1963	
57 939 294
10 546 806
12 923 325
1962	
55 522 171
9 505 559
14 024 799
1961	
50 887 275
8 907 034
17 787 127
I960
52 694 818
7 834 728
21 496 912
1959
49 961 996
7 677 321
17 371 638
1958 	
48 933 560
8 080 989
15 053 036
1957	
56 409 056
8 937 567
24 257 177
1956
57 266 026
9 762 777
22 036 839
1955	
51 890 246
9 144 034
21 131 572
1954	
48 702 746
7 128 669
19 654 724
1953	
55 543 490
8 668 099
20 979 411
1952	
62 256 631
8 557 845
27 024 500
1951 	
52 607 171
7 283 051
24 724 101
1950
42 738 035
6 775 998
17 500 663
1949.
41 023 786
7 206 637
17 884 408
1948	
38 813 506
6 139 470
11 532 121
1947	
32 160 338
5 319 470
13 068 948
1946	
26 190 200
5 427 458
8 367 705
1945	
22 620 975
7 239 726
5 756 628
1944	
23 131 874
5 788 671
6 138 084
1943	
26 051 467
7 432 585
6 572 317
1942	
26 913 160
7 066 109
6 863 398
1941 	
26 050 491
3 776 747
7 260 441
1940	
23 391 330
3 474 721
6 962 162
1939	
22 357 035
3 266 000
6 714 347
1938	
22 765 711
3 396 106
6 544 500
1937 :.	
21 349 690
3 066 311
6 845 330
1936	
17 887 619
2 724 144
4 434 501
1935	
16 753 367
2 619 639
4 552 730
Note—This table has changed somewhat through the years, so that the items are not everywhere directly comparable. Prior tol
1962, lode mining referred only to gold, silver, copper, lead, andzinc. Prior to 1964,someexpenditures for fuel and electricity were ]
included with process supplies. Process supplies (except fuel) were broadened in 1964 to include "process, operating maintenanceI
and repair supplies . . . used in the mine/mill operations; that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electricala
etc. ... not charged to Fixed Assets Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company-operated cafeteria orl
commissary." Exploration and development other than in the field of petroleum and natural gas is given, starting in 1966.
 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS
125
Table 3-10—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901
-1979
I
Year
Metals
Coal Mines
Structural
Materials
1
i 5
■= E
1-1
Its
*SrS
M
nes
1
l
"j.
'E'CH
23
.Sj
1
_
K.
3
<
r_)
VI
3
<
!§
cSs
O.
— 23
lIjQ
iS %
[2
1    1901	
2 736
1 212
3 948
3 041
7 922
7 356
7 014
7 759
8 117
8 788
7 712
9 767
9 672
11 467
10 467
10 966
10 949
9906
9 135
1 163
I  1906	
7 680
1303
3 983
3 415
1 127
1 237
1 364
1913	
7 773
1505
4 278
4 950
1 721
1435
1916	
3 357
2 036
5 393
1694
I 366
5060
I    1917	
3 290
2 198
5 488
1760
1 410
5 170
i    1918	
2 626
1 764
4 390
3 658
1 769
10 225
I  1920	
2 074
1605
3 679
4 191
2 158
6 349
■   1921	
1 155
975
2 330
4 722
2 163
6 885
1     1922	
1 510
1 239
2 749
4 712
1 932
I   1923	
2 102
1 516
3 618
4 342
1 807
1924	
7 353
1 680
4 033
3 894
1 524
5418
t    1925	
7 798
2 840
5 138
1878
1 615
5 443
1     1926	
299
2606
1 735
808
2 461
7 610
3 757
1 565
5 322
493
324
124
14 172
1927	
415
2 671
1 916
854
2 842
8 283
3646
1 579
5 225
647
138
122
14 830
1928	
355
2 707
2 469
911
2 748
8 835
3 814
1 520
5 334
412
368
120
15 424
1929	
341
2 926
2 052
966
2 948
8 892
3 675
1 353
5 028
492
544
268
15 565
(      1930	
425
2 316
1 260
832
3 197
7 605
3 189
1 256
4 645
843
344
170
14 032
1931	
688
1 463
834
581
3 157
6 035
2 957
1 125
4 082
460
526
180
12 171
1932	
874
1 355
900
542
2 036
4 833
2 628
980
3 608
536
329
344
10 524
1933	
1 134
1 786
1 335
531
2 436
6 088
2 241
853
3094
376
269
408
II 369
I    1934	
1 122
2 796
1 729
631
2 890
8 046
2 050
843
2 893
377
187
160
12 985
1935	
1291
2 740
1 497
907
2 771
7 915
2 145
826
2 971
536
270
754
13 757
1936	
1 124
7 959
1 840
720
2 678
8 197
2 015
799
2 814
931
288
825
14 179
1937	
1 371
1601
1 818
1 168
3 027
9 616
2 286
867
3 153
724
327
938
16 129
I    1938	
1 303
1849
2 266
919
3 158
10 192
2 088
874
2 962
900
295
369
16 021
1939	
2 167
809
2 976
652
311
561
15 890
■ 1940	
1004
1971
2 104
1 048
2 944
10 019
2 175
699
2 874
827
114
647
15 705
1941 ,
939
3 901
1 823
1 025
3 072
9 821
2 229
494
2 723
766
411
422
15 084
!      1942	
489
2 920
1 504
960
3 555
8 939
1 892
468
2 360
842
178
262
13 270
■ 1943	
212
2 394
1 699
891
2 835
7 819
2 240
611
2 851
673
326
567
12 448
■ 1944	
255
1 896
1825
849
2 981
7 551
2 150
689
2 839
690
151
628
12 314
209
347
360
1 933
1 918
3 024
1 750
1 817
2 238
822
672
960
2 834
2 813
3 461
7 339
7 220
9 683
1 927
1 775
1 694
503
532
731
2 430
2 305
2 425
921
827
977
515
555
585
586
679
869
11 820
11 955
1     1947	
14 899
■   1948	
348
1 141
2 429
1 126
3 884
10 582
1 594
872
2 466
1 591
656
754
16197
303
327
205
3 034
3 399
1785
2 724
2 415
3 695
1 203
1 259
1 307
3 763
3 759
4044
10 724
10 832
12 831
1 761
1 745
1462
545
516
463
2 306
2 261
1 925
2 120
1 916
1 783
542
616
628
626
660
491
16 621
16612
■'1951	
17 861
1952	
230
4 171
3 923
1 516
4 120
13 730
1 280
401
1 681
1 530
557
529
18 257
132
199
103
105
3 145
2644
2 564
2 637
2 589
2 520
2 553
2 827
1 371
1 129
1 091
1 043
3 901
3 119
3 304
3 339
11 006
9 412
9 512
9846
1 154
1 076
1 100
968
396
358
378
398
1 550
1434
1478
1 366
1 909
1 861
1 646
1 598
559
658
641
770
634
584
722
854
15 790
14 128
1955	
14 102
■ 1956	
14 559
67
75
99
86
74
35
2 393
1 919
1 937
1 782
1 785
1 677
2 447
1 809
1 761
1 959
1 582
I 976
838
625
618
648
626
949
3 328
3 081
3 008
3 034
3 118
3 356
9006
7 434
7 324
7 423
7 III
7 958
1 020
826
765
894
705
548
360
260
291
288
237
228
1 380
1 086
1056
1 182
1 705
1483
1 357
1 704
625
677
484
557
474
446
459
589
15 257
1958	
II 201
1959	
10 779
II 541
II 014
1    1962	
776
1 523
481
517
270
11 560
1963	
43
1 713
2 012
850
3 239
7 814
501
247
748
909
460
528
450
10 952
■   1964	
5
1 819
I 967
822
3 281
7909
446
267
713
1 29.)
444
509
772
■   1965	
2
2
1 752
2006
1 928
1 823
1 794
2 019
2 296
2 532
2 369
2 470
965
1014
992
1 072
1099
3 529
3 654
3 435
3 283
3 468
8 265
8 970
8 887
8 547
8 831
405
347
260
195
245
244
267
197
358
455
649
614
457
553
700
1 079
1 269
1 309
1 207
1097
422
593
172
380
549
639
582
584
582
567
786
1 894
1 264
5 990
4 270
441
478
507
400
416
12 285
■ 1966	
14 202
■ 1967	
13 380
1968	
15 659
■   1969	
7
16 437
1970	
2 160
2 073
1 833
1 704
1 509
1 100
1 268
1 208
1 009
898
3 167
3 058
3 463
4 005
4 239
3 619
3 733
3 768
3 874
3 615
1 331
1 513
1 734
2 394
2 352
1 983
2 048
2 224
2 029
2 084
3 738
3 481
3 353
3 390
2 767
3 733
3 542
3 590
3 838
4 273
10 396
10 125
10 383
11 493
10 867
10 435
10 591
10 790
10 750
10 870
242
444
214
265
267
299
327
312
377
413
1 051
1 013
1 771
1 951
2 255
2 464
2 500
2 556
2606
2 931
1 275
1 457
1 985
2 216
2 522
2 763
2 627
2 868
2 983
3344
740
846
1 116
898
895
826
951
1 380
734
931
647
794
800
802
782
725
680
626
460
601
627
666
527
667
646
705
670
766
618
726
4 964
4040
4 201
1192
2 848
2 931
1 101
3 557
3 232
3 707
437
495
458
454
509
518
495
490
496
489
■    1971	
18 423
■   1972	
19 470
■ 1973	
19 922
1974 ....
19 069
1     1975	
18 905
■ 1976	
19 095
1977	
20 457
1978	
19 275
1979	
20 668
1 Commencing
with 1967, does
not inclu
de emplo
yment in
by-product plants
Note—These
igures refer onl;
10 comp
any emp
oyeesan
1 do not include ill
e many e
mployees of con
trading
firms.
1
 126
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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 128
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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Copper concentrates, 10 2491; blister copper. 19 827 t
Copper concentrates. 51 3391; molybdenite
concentrates, 592 t containing 306 286
kg of molybdenum
Copper concentrates, 194 829 t; molybdenite concentrates, 3 818 t containing
2 059 851 kg of molybdenum
c
X
Copper concentrates, 218 490 t; molybdenite concentrates, 2 705 t containing
1111 400 kg of molybdenum; rhenium
shipments are confidential
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129
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Bulk concentrates. 872 t; jig concentrates.
132 t
c
c_
Clean-up; lead concentrates. 361: ore. 69 t
Iron concentrates. 589 642 t; copper concentrates. 18 739 t
&      5                co                ct^O^      co            cm           m                  ini-                       —Soi
t-~     *o              co                                           r-          m                               o>                             g
Noranda Mines Ltd. {Babine
Div. —Bell mine)
Placer Development Ltd.
(Endako Mines Div.)
Zapata Granby Corp. and
Noranda   Mines   Ltd.
(Babine Div.—Granisle
Mine)
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 130
ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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 MINERAL RESOURCE STATISTICS 131
Table 3-13A—Destination of British Columbia Ores and Concentrates, 1979
Destination
Ore
Gold-
Silver
Concentrates
Copper1
Concentrate,
Lead
Concentrates
Zinc
Concentrates
Concentrates
Molybdenite
Concentrates.
Molybdic
Trioxide,
Ferro-
Molybdenum
Tin
Concentrates
CANADA
Trail
Other Canadian
FOREIGN
Australia
Germany
Japan
Korea
Philippines
Spain
U.K.
U.S.A.
U.S.S.R.
Europe (country
not specified)
t
4 387
t
t
t
153 176
t
146 742
t
t
.
173
77 960
5 255
15 372
651 199
25 002
78 384=
24 893
1 121
160
362 224
3 815
24
43 478
19 827
14 772
74 541
12
243
21 519
202 525
5 080
9 603
Total
4 399
416
927 406
153 176
168 261
668 026
19 803
549
1 Includes blister copper.
2 Includes small amount of coarse iron.
 132 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
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CHAPTER 4
CONTENTS
STATISTICAL TABLES Paoe
Table 4-1—Hectares of Crown Petroleum and Natural Gas Rights Held
1970-1979 '. 137
Table 4-2—Petroleum and Natural Gas Revenue, 1947-1979  138
Table 4-3—Established Hydrocarbon and By-product Reserves, December 31
1979 '. 139
Table 4-4—Drilling and Production Schemes Approved in 1979  140
Table 4-5—Wells Drilled and Drilling, 1979  142
Table 4-6—Summary of Drilling and Production Statistics, 1979  153
Table 4-7—Monthly Crude-oil and Condensate Production by Fields and Pools,
1979  154
Table 4-8—Monthly Nonassociated and Associated Gas Production by Fields
and Pools, 1979  157
Table 4-9—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil/Pentanes Plus, 1979 164
Table 4-10—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Natural Gas, 1979  166
Table 4-11—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Propane, 1979  168
Table 4-12—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Butane, 1979  169
Table 4-13—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Sulphur, 1979  169
Table 4-14—Crude-oil Pipelines, 1979  170
Table 4-15—Crude-oil Refineries, 1979  171
Table 4-16—Natural Gas Pipelines, 1979  172
Table 4-17—Gas-processing Plants, 1979  176
Table 4-18—Sulphur Plants, 1979  176
frlGURES
4-1—Metres drilled in British Columbia, 1947-1979  177
4-2—Northeastern British Columbia oil and gas fields  178
4-3—Wells drilled in British Columbia, 1966-1979  179
4-4—Geophysical crew weeks in British Columbia, 1966-1979  180
4-5—Oil production in British Columbia, 1955-1979  181
4-6—Gas production in British Columbia, 1955-1979  182
4-7—Pipelines of British Columbia  183
4-8—Sedimentary basins of British Columbia  184
Chapter 4 is a series of tables and figures providing important information on the
■Ktroleum industry operations in 1979. It complements the review of the industry in
Ehapter 1 and the work on the Ministry reported in Chapter 2.
135
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DIRECTORY ig5
DIRECTORY
(as of February 28, 1981)
Hon. R. H. McClelland Minister)      Room 310, Parliament Buildings . . . 387-5295
Kathy Mayoh (Executive Assistant to
the Minister)     Room 310, Parliament Buildings . . .387-5295
R. 11 ling (Deputy Minister) Room 406, Douglas Building 387-5445
Dr. James T. Fyles (Senior Assistant
Deputy Minister) Room 409, Douglas Building 387-6242
T. Chatton (Executive Assistant to
Deputy Minister) Room 429, Douglas Building 387-5476
J. Lewis (Policy Advisor) Room 428, Douglas Building 387-3354
P. D. Meyers (Solicitor for Ministry) 609 Broughton Street 384-4434
PERSONNEL
N. K. Gillespie (Director) 516 Michigan Street 387-3775
A. Maclnnis (Personnel Officer) 516 Michigan Street 387-3775
Cathie Green (Personnel Clerk) 516 Michigan Street 387-3775
FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION  DIVISION
R. R. Davy (Director) 516 Michigan Street 387-5185
G. L. James (Coordinator, Data Processing) 516 Michigan Street 387-5488
MINERAL REVENUE  DIVISION
W.W.M. Ross (Director) 525 Superior Street    387-6991
B. A. Garrison (Assistant Director) 52SISuperior Street 387-6991
COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION
L. P. Hrushowy (Director)      525 Superior Street    387-5231
D. Ctimenhaga (External Communications Manager)  Room 417, Douglas Building 387-6245
Rosalyn J. Moir (Assistant Editor)  Room 417, Douglas Building 387-5631
i Sharon Ferris (Library)  Room 430, Douglas Building 387-6407
ENERGY RESOURCES BRANCH
E. R. Macgregor (Assistant Deputy Minister)  .....  525 Superior Street . . .   387-1916,387-1917
POLICY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
ID. Horswill (Director) 525 Superior Street 387-6265
D. Watson (Senior Energy Analyst)    525 Superior Street    387-5231
B. Friesen (Senior Energy Analyst)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
I Rebecca Vermeer (Senior Energy Analyst) 525 Superior Street 387-5231
j R. Hopp (Energy Analyst)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
Joan Darling (Energy Analyst) 525 Superior Street 387-5231
L
 186 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
POLICY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION  (Continued)
G. Davies (Senior Policy Analyst)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
G. Dittmer (Senior Policy Analyst)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
Marnie Dobell (Energy Analyst)  525 Superior Street 387-5231
J.Allan (Senior Policy Advisor)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
FORECASTS AND SPECIAL PROJECTS DIVISION
R. Preece (Director) 525 Superior Street    387-3048
J. Rana (Analyst, Forecasts)    525 Superior Street 387-3048
G. Macauley (Economist, Forecasts) 525 Superior Street 387-3048
PROJECT ANALYSIS DIVISION
D, O'Gorman (Director)  525 Superior Street 387-5231
Judy Wigmore (Research Officer)     525 Superior Street 387-5231
A. Ferguson (Research Officer)  525 Superior Street 387-5231
E. Henderson (Planning Officer)  525 Superior Street 387-5231
CONSERVATION AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Dr. R. L. Evans (Director) 2006,1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E 2L7 689-1831
Dr. J. M. Hill (Coordinator, Renewable Energy)  . . .  2006,1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E 2L7 689-1831
T. G. Hedley (Coordinator, Energy from Wastes)    . .  2006,1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E 2L7 689-1831
G. W. Bachmayer (Coordinator, Internal
Conservation Program)     2006,1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E2L7 689-1831
P. K. Honke (Coordinator, Industry)    2006,1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E 2 L7 689-1831
MINERAL RESOURCES BRANCH
[vacant] (Assistant Deputy Minister)  Room 409, Douglas Building 387-5489 ]
INSPECTION AND ENGINEERING  DIVISION
Victoria Office:
W. C. Robinson (Chief Inspector)     525 Superior Street 387-3781 j
V. E. Dawson (Deputy Chief Inspector-
Coal)     525 Superior Street    387-37811
A. J. Richardson (Deputy Chief Inspector-
Metal)   525 Superior Street   . . . .!§ . . . .387-37811
H. J. Dennis (Senior Coal Inspector)  525 Superior Street 387-3781 j
T. Carter (Senior Mechanical/
Electrical Inspector)     525 Superior Street    387-37811
G.J. Lee (Senior Mine-rescue Coordinator) .... 525 Superior Street 387-3781]
J. D. McDonald (Senior Reclamation
Inspector)     525 Superior Street    387-37811
 DIRECTORY 187
INSPECTION AND ENGINEERING  DIVISION  (Continued)
D. M. Galbraith (Reclamation Inspector) 525,Superior Street 387-3781
J. C. Errington (Reclamation Inspector) 525 Superior Street  387-3781
P. E. Olson (Engineer—Mining Roads) 525 Superior Street    387-3781
Vancouver Office:
B. M. Dudas (Inspector) 2747 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver V5K 1Z8 254-7171
D. J. Murray (Inspector, Environmental
Control)    2747 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver V5K 1Z8 254-7171
Verna Pyplacz (Audiologist,
Environmental Control)    2747 East HastinggStreet,
Vancouver V5K 1Z8 254-7171
R. Kumar (Inspector, Environmental
Control)    2747 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver V5K 1Z8 254-7171
Kamloops Office:
D.Smith (Inspector) 101, 2985 Airport Drive,
V2B 7W8 376-7201
E. S. Sadar (Inspector) 101, 2985 Airport Drive,
V2B 7W8 376-7201
J. MacCulloch (Inspector) 101, 2985 Airport Drive,
V2B 7W8 376-7201
Nelson Office: J.B.C. Lang (Inspector) 310 Ward Street,
V1L5S4 352-2211, ext. 213/342
Fernie Office:  D.I.R. Henderson (Inspector) Box 1290, V0B 1M0 423-6222
Nanaimo Office: J. W. Robinson (Inspector) 2226 Brotherstone Road,
V9S 3M8    758-2342
Prince Rupert Office: V. A. Pakalniskis (Inspector) .   Box 758, V8J 3S1 624-3245, ext. 202
Smithers Office: S. J. Hunter (Inspector) Box 877, V0J 2N0 . .  847-4411, ext. 237/245
Prince George Office:
T. Vaughan-Thomas (Inspector) 1652 Qu^^ptreet,
V2N 1X3 562-8131, ext. 322/323
R.W. Lewis (Inspector) 1652 Quinn Street,
V2N 1X3 562-8131, ext. 322/323
TITLES DIVISION
R. Rutherford (Chief Gold Commissioner) Room 433, Douglas Building 387-5517
i [vacant] (Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner) Douglas Building	
D. I. Doyle (Gold Commissioner, Vancouver)    ....  800 Hornby Street, V6Z 2C5 668-2672
E.A.H. Mitchell (Gold Commissioner) Room 411,
Douglas Building . . .   387-6255, 387-6246
P. Hagan (Coal Administrator) Room 411, Douglas Building 387-5687
Mineral Claims Inspectors
Vancouver:  [vacant]    800 Hornby Street, V6Z 2C5 668-2672
Kamloops:  H.Turner 212, 2985 Airport Drive,
V2B 7W8 554-1445
 188 ENERGY, MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1979
TITLES DIVISION (Continued)
Quesnel: D. Lieutard 401, 350 Barlow Avenue,
V2J 2C1 7-751-260
Smithers:  [vacant]     Box 877, VOJ 2N0 776-278
Nelson: D. Moule 403 Vernon Street,
V1L4E4    352-2211, ext. 311
GEOLOGICAL DIVISION
Dr. A. Sutherland Brown (Chief Geologist) Room 418, Douglas Building 387-5975 1
ANALYTICAL LABORATORY
Dr. W. M. Johnson (Chief Analyst) 541 Superior Street 387-6249
P. F. Ralph (Deputy Chief Analyst) 541 Superior Street 387-6249
PROJECT GEOLOGY
Dr. W. J. McMillan (Senior Geologist) Room 418, Douglas Building 387-5975
Geologists
R. D. Gilchrist  626 Superior Street 387-5068 I
Dr. T. Hoy     626 Superior Street 387-5068 I
Dr. D. G. Maclntyre  626 Superior Street 387-5068 j
Dr. A. Panteleyev  626 Superior Street 387-5068
Dr. V. A. Preto  626 Superior Street 387-5068 I
Dr. B. N. Church  630 Superior Street 387-5068 ]
Dr. G.E.P. Eastwood  630 Superior Street  387-5068 j
RESOURCE  DATA AND ANALYSIS
G. McArthur (Senior Geologist)    Room 418, Douglas Building 387-5975]
Geologists
Special Projects:  [vacant]      Room 416, Douglas Building 387-5975
Industrial Minerals: Z. D. Hora     630 Superior Street 387-50681
Mineral Inventory:
T. Kalnins  Room 427, Douglas Building 387-5975 I
J. E. Forester  Room 42^B>ouglas Building 387-5975 j
Coal Inventory: A. Matheson      625 Superior Street 387-6588
APPLIED GEOLOGY AND PROSPECTORS' ASSISTANCE
[vacant] (Senior Geologist) 525 Superior Street 387-55381
District Geologists
Fernie:  D. A. Grieve Box 1290, V0B 1M0 423-6222
Fort St. John:  R. H. Karst Box 7438, V1J 4M9 785-69061
Kamloops: G.P.E. White 101, 2985 Airport Drive,
V2B 7W8 376-7201
Nelson: G. G. Addie 310 Ward Street,
V1L5S4 352-2211, ext. 213
 DIRECTORY Igo
GEOLOGICAL DIVISION (Continued)
Prince George:  G. H. Klein 1652 Quinn Street,
V2N 1X3 562-8131, ext. 322/323
Smithers: T. G. Schroeter    Box 877, VOJ 2N0 847-4411, ext. 277
MINERAL ECONOMICS DIVISION
F. C. Basham (Director)  525 Superior Street  387-3787
W. P. Wilson (Senior Mining Statistician)  525 Superior Street  387-3787
P. Monier (Senior Financial Analyst)      525 Superior Street 387-3787
J. F. Clancy (Senior Economic Analyst)  525 Superior Street 387-3787
PETROLEUM  RESOURCES BRANCH
Dr. R. W. Durie (Assistant Deputy Minister,
Chief of Branch) Room 404/405,
Douglas Building  . . .   387-3485,387-6256
ENGINEERING  DIVISION
i A.G.T. Weaver (Chief Engineer)  Room 436A, Douglas Building .... 387-5993
B. T. Barber (Senior Reservoir Engineer)  Room 436, Douglas Building 387-5993
P. K. Huus (Reservoir Engineering Technician) .... Room 403, Douglas Building 387-5993
W. L. Ingram (Senior Development Engineer)    .... Room 443, Douglas Building 387-5993
M. B. Hamersley (Development Engineering
Technician)  Room 443, Douglas Building 387-5993
D. L. Johnson (District Manager)  Box 6880, Fort St. John,
V1J 4M9    758-6906
GEOLOGICAL DIVISION
W. M. Young (Chief Geologist)  Room 402A, Douglas Building .... 387-5993
I R. Stewart (Senior Reservoir Geologist)  Room 440, Douglas Building 387-5993
[ J. A. Hudson (Senior Economic Geologist)  Room 442, Douglas Building 387-5993
TITLES DIVISION
I W.J. Quinn (Commissioner)    Room 446A, Douglas Building .... 387-1908
 

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