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BC Sessional Papers

Ministry of Education One Hundred and Ninth Annual Report July 1, 1979, to June 30, 1980 Hon. Brian R.… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1983]

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 >ne Hundred and Ninth Annual Report
m 1,1979, to June 30,1980
an. Brian R. D. Smith
inister of Education
  'the Honourable Henry Bell-Irving
Jutenant-Governor for
I Province of British Columbia
I jy it please Your Honour:
beg respectfully to present the One Hundred and Ninth Annual
ijjiort of the Ministry of Education, covering the period from July 1,
19, to June 30,1980.
Brian R. D. Smith
Minister of Education
 COVER PHOTO:
Grade 2 pupil Dean Scott solves a problem in mathematics for teacheis
Barstow at Maple Lane Elementary School in Richmond School District t
38.
PEMC photo by Doug McPhail
Also included in this report are a number of graphs, tables and
photographs, highlighting educational developments in British
Columbia, and two special sections:
Advancing with Technology in Education
Children's Art of British Columbia
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRODUCTION 9
Bkanization CHART 13
ISONNEL 15
J ifOOLS DEPARTMENT 19
I DIVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 19
[Basic School Programs 19
B Curriculum Development 21
■ Learning Assessment 23
■Examinations 26
■ Career Programs 26
■trench Language Services 28
* Program Implementation Services 30
I Special Education Programs 31
Special Programs 31
Indian Education 34
HiVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 34
Correspondence Education 34
Publication Services 35
IVISION OF LEGISLATIVE SERVICES 36
Provincial Educational Media Centre 36
Print Services 37
v IVISION OF EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL 38
Field Services 38
Accreditation/School Evaluation 39
Teacher Services 39
BEPENDENT SCHOOLS 41
r>T-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT I 44
I tOCRAM SERVICES DIVISION 44
College and Institute Programs 44
Program Research and Development 46
IIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 48
MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION 50
Planning and Analysis 51
Training Projects 51
Manpower Training 51
Student Services 51
Br- SECONDARY COUNCIL5j|| 53
:ademic council 53
ccupational training council 54
HSlNAGEMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL 55
OARTMENT OF MINISTRY SERVICES 56
■JANCIAL SERVICES DIVISION 56
Schools Finance 56
Post-Secondary Finance 57
■■Ministerial Finance 58
CILITIES SERVICES DIVISION 59
Schools Facilities 60
Post-Secondary Facilities 60
VISION OF DATA SERVICES AND INFORMATION      61
Data Services 61
Project Planning Centre 63
Information Services 64
Ministry Library 64
/ISION OF POLICY DEVELOPMENT 65
EflAL REPORTS 66
Advancing with Technology in Education 66
Children's Art of British Columbia 70
KIEGE REGIONS AND SCHOOLS DISTRICTS 77
•T STICAL TABLES
  Upon appointment as Minister of Education in November, 1979, it
vas realized that a priority need in the months ahead was to become
foroughly familiar with education in British Columbia and the many
ffificult issues to be resolved in the new decade of the 1980s. Much
ime had to be devoted to cabinet and ministerial responsibilities,
iut a determination was made to get out of Victoria whenever
lossibie in order to see B.C. education in action.
It was a pleasure, not just a duty, to make informal, often
mannounced visits to schools and post-secondary institutions in
Irious parts of the province through the winter and spring.
Hucation does not enjoy the automatic reverence of former times,
Id so it was a happy revelation to find so many good things
lappening in our classrooms. Excellent programs and enthusiastic
md dedicated teachers were to be found everywhere in the
Evince, and informal discussions offered insight into the concerns
if teachers and administrators alike.
iDuring this time, plans progressed for a series of professional and
Iblic forums, along with further school visits, to be conducted in
Hire than thirty centres throughout the province during the fall of
I960. These forums were designed to allow anyone interested to
nake written or oral presentations directly to the Minister of
Hucation on any issue concerning them.
In the meantime, pending completion of the tour report and the
ffi/iewing of the issues by senior ministry officials, no major changes
vould be made to the School Act, nor would revision of the
Bninfttrative Handbook for Elementary and Secondary Schools be
inalized. It was realized that these pivotal documents, however out
if date they might be without major revisions in up to twenty years,
jBuld not be overhauled until the minister and senior officials were
puRiliar with the wishes of both trustees and teachers, the needs of
>arents and students, and the aspirations of the public as a whole.
hRhe financing of education remained a major concern of
pvernments at both the provincial and local levels. The provincial
overnment contributed two-thirds of the total cost of education
nder my minjstry in 1980. This represented a slight increase over
975. Growth in homeowner grants, removal of community college
perating expenses from local taxpayers and major increases in
;acher pension contributions have all helped to maintain this high
ivel of government support.
The government has also recognized the increased burden which
pfugees and disabled students have placed upon certain school
istricts. Procedures have been established which provide 100 per
ent funding by the provincial government for English - language
raining for refugees and for educational programs for the severely
 disabled in certain provincially designated programs operated by t
school boards.
In the post-secondary area, operating grants to British Columbia'.
20 colleges and provincial institutes was increased by 15.7 per cent i
($29 million) from the previous year, to a total of more than $212«
million. The colleges and institutes also received $26.8 million for
capital programs, an increase of $7 million. It was gratifying that tml
government, to a very substantial degree, was able to support the :
funding recommendations of the three post-secondary councils.
Under the College and Institute Act the government in early 197 (
assumed 100 per cent funding of colleges as well as provincial
institutes, removing from local taxpayers their share of this
responsibility. The level of funding now established will ensure tha
our colleges and institutes are able to provide quality educational
and training opportunities. The government considers these to be
high priorities.
In 1979/80, forty-three of British Columbia's seventy-five school
districts participated in a pilot enrichment program for the gifted.
The programme-cadre de francaise — a core curriculum in whichj
French is the language of instruction — became available in
September in the eleven school districts where parents of ten or
more elementary students had requested it. In September also, mo:
than 350 British Columbians became the first students of the
innovative Open Learning Institute.
In May an invitation to speak to the annual conference of the B.(
School Trustees Association presented an opportunity to express tra
belief that every school district should have the right to a
locally employed superintendent, and to announce that this would
be accomplished as soon as possible. It was also announced that a
procedure would be established to raise the stipend paid to school
trustees, since an annual maximum of $2,000 is not adequate
compensation for the contribution trustees make to our education
system.
We have now entered a new decade, with new challenges and nt
opportunities. Public and professional forums, along with continum
visits to schools and colleges, will help ensure that the Ministry of
Education is in tune with the issues of the eighties and in a positim
to provide the leadership that will extend the progress we can see
being made every day in the classrooms of British Columbia.
10
  Basic Programs   1
Special
Education
Programs
Program
Implementation  fl
1   Services
Print Services     1
Correspondence
Education
Educational
Personnel
At
Sc
■
Curriculum
Development
■
Special Education
Provincial
Educational
Media. Centre    1
Publication
Services
■
1 Teacher Services ■
Learning
Indian Education
Assessment
Career
Jericho Hill
Programs
School
French Language H
Services
Hearing Impaired
Examinations
Visually Impaired
Resource Centre
for Visually
Impaired
12
 ORGANIZATION CHART
Ministry of Education
As of June,1980
m Management Advisory       m Occupational Training
Council Council
Post-Secondary
Department
f
Management
Services
Division
H   Planning ;
Planning and
Analysis
Training Projects
Manpower
Training
Student
Services
1
rograr
ervice
'ivisioi
I
Program
Services
Division
College and
Institute
Programs
Program
Research &
Development
Department of
Ministry Services
Division of
Policy
Development
Personnel
Services
f
■ Division of
iData&lnformation I
I Services
I
Data Services
Project Planning
Centre
Information
Services
Ministry
Library
Financial
Services
Division
Schools Finance
Post-Secondary
Finance
Ministerial
Finance
Facilities
Services
Division
I        I
' Schools Facilities
Post-Secondary
Facilities
13
  MINISTER'S OFFICE
Minister of Education
he Honourable Brian R.D. Smith, B.A.,
M LL.B.
)BjTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
leputy Minister of Education
tG. Hardwick, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
ssistant Deputy Minister — Schools
lepartment
J Carter, B.A., M.Ed.
ssistant Deputy Minister — Post-
jcondary Department
E. Soles, B.A., M.Ed.
ssistant Deputy Minister — Department of
linistry Services
R. Fleming, B.A.
CHOOLS DEPARTMENT
livision of Public Instruction
inior Superintendent of Public Instruction
L Daneliuk, B.A., M.Ed.
ogram Superintendent, Basic Programs
!. Hartwig, B.A.
irector, Curriculum Development
. OTssio, B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D.
isistant Director, Curriculum
evelopment
■Deliver, B.A.
isistant Director, Curriculum
wlopment
C. Toutant, B.Ed., M.A.
rector, Learning Assessment
N. Greer, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
' i-ordinator, Learning Assessment
jl-Wilson, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
isistant Director, Examinations
jlZoellner, B.A., B.Ed.
Program Superintendent, Program
Implementation
B. Buchanan, B.Ed., M.Ed. (Secondment)
Director, French Programs
N. Ardanaz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-ordinator, French Language Programs
C. Fournier, B.A.
Co-ordinator, Career Education
J. Jupp
Program Superintendent, Special Programs
W.J. Desharnais, B.A., M.Ed.
Director, Special Education Programs
J.A.G. Gittins, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Indian Education
S.E. Arbess, B.A., M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Special Program Administration
M.E. Epstein, B.A., M.A.
Co-ordinator, Hearing Impaired
J.L. Anderson, B.Ed., B.A., M.A.
Co-ordinator, Visually Impaired
E.Y.P. Lau, B.A., M.Ed.
Principal, Jericho Hill School for the Deaf
H. Minto, B.Ed., M.Ed.
Division of Administrative
Services
Senior Superintendent, Administrative
Services
W.L.B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed.
Director, Publication Services
D.W.C. Huggins, C.G.A.
Director, Correspondence Education
W.B. Naylor, B.A., M.Ed.
Division of Legislative Services
Senior Superintendent, Legislative Services
J.L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
15
 Director, Provincial Educational Media
Centre
B.A. Black, B.Ed.
Director, Print Services
T.F. Wrinkle, B.A., M.A.
Division of Educational
Personnel
Acting Senior Superintendent, Educational
Personnel
A.J.H. Newberry, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Program Superintendent — Accreditation/
School Evaluation
j.G. Leaman, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.
Director, Teacher Services
B.A. Andrews, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Teacher Services
E.D. Cherrington, B.A., Dip. Ed., Dip. Public
Admin.
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Inspector of Independent Schools
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
POST - SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
Post-Secondary Department
Acting Executive Director, Program Services
L.J. Thompson, B.A., B.Sc, F.C.I.S.,
(Secondment)
Director, Industrial and Trades Programs
D.R. MacRae, B.Sc.
Director, Career, Technical and Academic
Programs
T.H. Clement, B.Sc, M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Program Research and
Development
W.G. Davenport, B.Sc, Ph.D.
Division of Management
Services
Executive Director, Management Services
J.F. Newberry, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
16
Director, Trades Training & Journeynn
Upgrading
J.D. Meredith
Director, Operations and Planning]
D.S. Goard, B.Ed., M.A.
Director, Institutional Support Servki
R.C. McCandless, B.A., M.P.A.
Co-ordinator, Student Services
D.L. Clarke, B.A., M.Sc.
Division of Continuing j
Education
Executive Director, Continuing Educio
R.L. Faris, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D;- »
Director, Continuing Education i
N. Rubidge, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ed.D.
Co-ordinator, Adult Basic Education
S.R. Harvey, B.A., B.Ed.
DEPARTMENT OF MINISB
SERVICES
Division of Financial Servies
Superintendent, Financial Services   I
G.E. Wilcox, C.G.A.
Director, Schools Finance
G. Gamble, R.I.A.
Director, Post-Secondary Finance
D.S. Adams, C.G.A.
Acting Manager, Ministerial Finance
D.F. Hughes, Dip. Public AdminH
Division of Facilities Servies
Senior Superintendent, Facilities Seice
J.L. Doyle, B.A., M.Ed.
Senior Architect — Schools
N.O. Jackson, Dip. Arch.
Project Control Manager
E.L. Bullen, B.A., M.A., M.Ed.
Executive Director, Special Capital laiS
H. Mclntyre, B.Arch., F.R.I.B.A. ■
Senior Architect — Post-Secondary
D.S. McLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
 division of Policy
)evelopment
uperintendent, Educational Policy
levelopment
Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed.
division of Data and
nformation Services
ding Executive Director, Data and
lformation Services
y», B.Sc, M.Ed.
ding Director, Statistical Services
. Plant, B.Comm., M.B.A.
irector, Central Information Services
C. Ewing, B.Journ.
brarian
. Armstrong, B.A.
ersonnel Services
irector, Personnel Services
\. Holmes, Dip. Public Admin.
ISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS
IF SCHOOLS
S.Armstrong, B.Ed., Vancouver Island
West
.W. Baldry, B.A., M.Ed., Grand Forks/
^Kettle Valley
!. Beduz, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Creston/
Kaslo
. Coffin, B.Sc, Ed. Dip., M.A.T.,
keremeos/Princeton
i. Denley, B.Ed., M.Ed., Sunshine Coast
|j. pwood, B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay
L. Fiddick, B.Ed., M.Ed., Merritt
4 Glass, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Central Coasl
i. Granger, B.Ed., M.Ed., Windermere/
3olden
Golden, B.A., M.Ed., Castlegar
Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Hope/Agassiz-
Harrison
V. Huestis, B.Comm., B.Ed., Gulf Islands/
ake Cowichan
•lohnstone, B.A., M.Ed., Kimberley
W.B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Sooke
N. Keis, B.S.A., M.Ed., Nisgha
D.A. Lynn, B.Ed., M.A., Revelstoke
A.V. MacMillen, B.A., M.Ed., Smithers
E.A. Maglio, B.Comm., B.Ed., Howe Sound
W. Maslechko, B.P.E., M.Ed., Nelson
M. Roscoe, B.A., M.A., Vancouver Island
North
D.R. Smyth, B.P.E., Saanich
V.J. Storey, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., Fernie
P.F. Strettan, B.A., M.Ed., Burns Lake
D.R. Sutherland, B.Ed., Dip. Ed. Admin.,
M.Ed., Armstrong/Spallumcheen/
Summerland
O.W. Taylor, B.A., M.A., M.Ed., Southern
Okanagan
R.B. Taylor, B.Ed., M.Ed., Cranbrook
PROMOTIONS AND
APPOINTMENTS
Headquarters
C.L. Daneliuk, Senior Superintendent of
Public Instruction
W.J. Desharnais, Program Superintendent,
Special Programs
A.C. Toutant, Assistant Director,
Curriculum Development
E.Y.P. Lau, Co-ordinator, Visually Impaired
T.H. Clement, Director, Career, Technical
and Academic Programs
M.E. Epstein, Director, Special Education
Administration
W.G. Davenport, Director, Program
Research and Development
R.C. McCandless, Director, Institutional
Support Services
D.S. Adams, Director, Post-Secondary
Finance
S.R. Harvey, Co-ordinator, Adult Basic
Education
E.L. Bullen, Project Control Manager
Field
N.J. Thiessen, District Superintendent
T. Good, District Superintendent
P. McMuldroch, District Superintendent
G.B. Roth, District Superintendent
17
 AWARDS AND
ACHIEVEMENTS
25-Year Continuous Service
Certificate
G.H. Bayer
A.E. Darwood
A. Georgiou
Executive Development
Training Plan Graduate
J.A. Hill
Public Administration Course
Graduate
F.G. Miller
Retirements
A.D. Campbell, District Superintendent of
Schools, 35 years
H.M. Stevens, Clerk, Financial Services,
34 years
E.E. Sowerby, Child Care Counsellor,
Jericho Hill School, 25 years
D.M. Corrigan, Co-ordinator, Visually
Impaired, 24 years
C. Cuthbert, Assistant Inspector of
Independent Schools, 21 years
D.E. McFee, District Superintendent of
Schools, 18 years
D.H. MacKirdy, Acting Director, Field
Services, 17 years
V. Bastian, Secretary to Asst. Deputy
Minister, Post-Secondary, 16 years
B.G. Webber, Program Superintendent,
Special Programs, 6 years
DECEASED
M.J. Rhodes, Secretary
18
 SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
The Schools Department of the Ministry of Education is responsible
irthe overall direction and administration of the public school
!Ri under the terms of the School Act. The department works
o*ly with the province's seventy-five locally-elected boards of
hool trustees, to which the act and its regulations assign many
lecific functions and responsibilities.
The Schools Department in 1979/80 comprised four divisions —
Mm Instruction, Administrative Services, Legislative Services and
iMational Personnel — and was directed by a policy and planning
ilffiiittee under the chairmanship of the assistant deputy minister
^mools.
TO major activities of the department during the year included
rfflgr development in learning assessment and accreditation, and
dfflsion of further guidance and resource materials to teachers in
e evaluation of learning outcomes, all keyed to the B.C.
irMrulum.
A significant change in administrative practice during the year was
apid acceleration toward local appointment of superintendents of
hools. School boards were informed that, by the beginning of the
.xtocademic year, every school district would have the option of
rMnting its own superintendent.
nrese and other highlights of the year are detailed in the reports
the divisions.
HVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Some 511,671 pupils were enrolled in B.C. public schools in
I '9/80. Public Instruction is the division of the Ministry of Education
ectly responsible for development, implementation and assess-
MK>f curricula, from kindergarten to grade 12. Curriculum
velopment, Learning Assessment, Program Implementation, Spe-
I Education, Career Programs, French Programs and the Examina-
I ns Branch continued during the year as the major operations of
i division.
Jsic School Programs
Juring the 1979/80 academic year efforts were made to consoli-
•eSwith a limited amount of expansion, programming initiated
M'in'g the previous year. The development of system-wide plans
'ibled the ministry to project activities that will be undertaken over
S?xt ten vears- One such major activity, the development of a
!ial studies curriculum to cover grades 1 through 11, will occupy
Curriculum Development Branch for several years, and will have
19
 a significant impact on activities in both Learning Assessment anci
Program Implementation.
In addition, major curriculum developments were undertaken |
the French language subject area and new elective courses were !
developed for pupils from kindergarten to grade 11. In the area iv
career preparation, a program was developed for students in gra<$;
11 and 12 to provide experience activities and courses that articus
very closely with colleges and vocational schools.
Computer technology was introduced into the school system   i
through seminars and the announcement of a ministry-sponsorei
pilot project to provide computers to twelve districts in 1980/81.
the same time, teachers and other interested persons were
encouraged to develop computer software programs for specific
areas of the curriculum. The results of the computer pilot project
influence future provision of computers in schools, and the use
computers in instruction.
Trends in Public School Grade Enrolments
1957-1979
Enrolments
50,000
1957  1958 1959   1960 1961   1962 1963 1964   1965 1966   1967  1968   1969 1970  1971   1972  1973  1974   1975 1976 1977 llfll
Source: B.C. Ministry of Education
20
 Major changes and advances in the work of the division have
suited in the following:
Increased interest by students in writing scholarship examinations,
\/Mh the value of the scholarships raised from $500 to $1,000.
Affrncreased number of French-language programs, which will
make instruction in French possible for all students.
Continuation of support for British Columbia book publishers
through a program providing library books to schools.
Amincrease 'n l^e nurr|ber °f B.C.-normed achievement tests in
response to a continuing high level of demand
Continuation of major assessment programs to identify strengths
and weaknesses in school programming and to directly influence
cfBiailum development activities.
Successful completion of the second phase in the development of
a new administrative handbook. In 1980/81 a revised handbook
IwMbe issued to the schools.
Commencement of formal discussions with other ministries to
examine areas of common concern. These areas included health
education, physical fitness and delivery of health services in the
school system.
urriculum Development
During the 1979/80 academic year, the staff of the Curriculum
ivelopment Branch devoted considerable time to the development
policies and procedures for branch operation,
.ong-range curriculum plans were completed and events in the
rriculum development process were identified. Both have been
tlined in a document entitled Curriculum Planning, 1979.
\ comprehensive system to evaluate all textbooks and other
rning resources was introduced. All resources which support
JVJJKial courses will be reviewed using this procedure. The branch
Wished a series of "product information" booklets which provide
>{ffiation about prescribed and authorized learning resources.
;se will assist school districts and teachers in selecting and using
:h materials.
\ procedure for evaluating materials submitted by other ministries
•i outside agencies was also introduced. This development was
'de possible by the co-operation of other B.C. government
'listries developing educational materials,
he branch used a variety of means to encourage wider
Iticipation in the curriculum process. Reaction panels, consisting of
'icators, trustees and members of the public, became an integral
It of the curriculum development process. Advisory committees
leestablished in certain subject areas and a committee of
s|pitendents was appointed to react to proposals and to provide
ilaance. A number of activities were initiated or continued in order
|lfhprove communication between the branch and other parts of
o ministry, the school system and publishers (the first of what may
'ome annual meetings with publishers was convened). Staff
'fibers participated in a large number of professional days and
21
 22
Availability of Curriculum Materials - Elementary Schools
Sept. 79 I Sept. 80 | Sept. 81
English Language Arts |l-7)
|Sept!81
Sept. 82
L.A. 1-7 Guide; Reading Series(1-7), Spelling Res. Bk. (2-7)
a Languages Series (4-7) (Pres.); Res. Books
(Auth)        "f>
Lang. 3
Spell 2, 3, 4
Novels 4, 5
Diet. 1 - 5
French (K-7)
Early Immersion Guides & Texts (K-7)
Programme-Cadre (K-7)
Guides and Texts
| Science (1-7)
| (Auth)
| Lang. 3, 4-7
Spell 5, 6, 7
Novels 6, 7
Diet. 6, 7
I Late Immersion (6, j
I Guides & Texts
French-as-a-
Second Language (I
E.F.S.L. Gde.
Update Sc. 1
Guide
7
Availability of (8 -12) Curriculum Materials - Secondary Schools
English
En 8-12 Guide
•iais - secondary scno
U I
En 9 Wr Texts]
En 8-10
Additional Texts
Fine Arts
I Music 8-12 Guide and Student Materials
| Drama 9, 10 Guide and Materials
Prej^Jl. 1 French a
■  Program
Physical Education       n P.E. 8-11
Business Education
1 Business Ed. 9-12 Guide, Texts & Res. Books
■ Career Preparation
I Home Economics
9  Home Ec 8-12 Guide, Textbooks & Res. Books
En 12 Texts
Wr 11 Texts  *j
Art 8-12 Gd & Mtli
; Acting 11,12 ;
French
I Physical Education
| French 8-12 Guide and Texts
Programme-Cadre Guides 8-12
P.E. 8-11 Guide and Teacher Handbooks
Business Education
t          ^n
CP. 11,12 Gds
Science
Science 9 Text
CP. 11,12 GDI
Physics Guide
Ph 11 Texts
Curriculum for Exceptional Children (K-12) - All Schools
E.S.L.
Sc 8-10 Gds &
Txls Update
Ph 12 Texts
ii
.(K-12)
Res. Book/Texts
Resource Bo
Gifted, Hear'g Ii .
Native Indian Srtoll
E.M.H.,T.M.H.Prop
oofcs I i<
r'glmifl
53HB
I New curriculum materials available for the first time In September 1981.
 [inferences. In addition to the documents already mentioned, the
•anch produced Curriculum Update, 7979, which summarized the
atus of all revision and review activities, and Curriculum Summaries,
\\80, a publication which gave specific information about curriculum
lianges planned for implementation in September, 1980.
A number of revised programs and new materials were introduced
IrShe 1979/80 academic year. Prescribed resources in reading and
elling were introduced to support part of the revised elementary
nguage arts program. Additional materials will be added over the
«t few years. A new curriculum guide, Secondary English, 8-12
\97S), outlines a province-wide scope and sequence for instruction
English at the secondary school level. New materials introduced
|r English 11 include texts which focus on mastering skills and the
lejbf language. Learning resources for use with the revised drama 9
d 10 courses were also made available. September, 1979, also saw
e introduction of revised secondary school programs in business
: ucation and home economics, together with new textbooks.
[in addition to these changes for the 1979/80 academic year, work
, ntinued or was begun in many other areas. There were continuing
|ojects in business education, secondary English and elementary
liguage arts. Other curriculum areas in which committees were
I live were: secondary physical education, elementary and junior
rondary science, secondary physics, agriculture, secondary music,
iting 11, French as a second language at the secondary level,
rondary art and theatre.
The area of social studies revision was a major continuing project.
iring the year a study of the scope and sequence of instruction was
I'rripleted for ministry review. Work continued toward completion
ha-curriculum guide for social studies K-11, identification of
llrning resources, and planning for pilot testing of learning
lources.
wo areas of particular interest were English as a second language
|rj special education. The branch prepared an English-as-a-second-
.Iguage kit for Vietnamese students and continued work on the
w/elopment of a resource book for teachers of all students learning
l;lish as a second language.
'fans were laid for developing an overall curriculum strategy for
(sicial education. Some pilot testing of materials for use with gifted
sdents was also carried out in 1979/80.
laming Assessment
he 1979/80 academic year was a key one for learning assessment
phat it marked the end of the first cycle of province-wide
wsssments of major curriculum areas and the beginning of the
sand cycle. The first cycle ended with publication of the physical
location assessment reports. The second cycle began simultaneity with the second assessment of reading, which examined
inges in provincial performance since the first assessment of
jlJing was conducted in 1976/77. The 1980 reading assessment was
ri unique in being the first provincial assessment which included
23
 students from both public and funded independent schools, a
pattern to be followed in future assessments. Both provincial and   j
individual district reports of the 1980 reading assessment were
scheduled to be issued in the fall of 1980. The second assessment o j
mathematics was launched and is scheduled for completion in 1981|
The 1979 report of the physical education assessment revealed j
many instances of excellent performance among some B.C. studenii
particularly when compared to other Canadian, American and Briti i
students. However, the overall motor ability and fitness results of tl
majority of elementary students and of secondary-level females wa >
judged to be weak. The report pointed to a disturbingly high
incidence of overweight students of both sexes and revealed that ti
performance of elementary children and of secondary females in
cardiovascular endurance tests was weak. Secondary-level boys' I
performance was judged satisfactory on the majority of measures   j
taken.
The report recommended that current physical education pro-H
grams be broadened to provide an increased emphasis on physical
fitness, motor ability and knowledge and understanding of physical
education. It also urged that particular emphasis be placed on bod i
fat reduction, cardiovascular endurance, development of motor skiI
and knowledge basic to active health.
The results and recommendations of this assessment were used t
the curriculum committee in revising the secondary physical educa
tion curriculum guide which is to be implemented in B.C. schools
1980/81. A further constructive step was taken by the branch thrtffl|
preparation of packages of physical education assessment material
for classroom use. The materials, distributed to all schools, enable
teachers to assess performance of their own students and to plan
remedial action where required
24
 'he past year was also noteworthy for the establishment of closed
cages between the processes of learning assessment, curriculum
i'elopment and curriculum implementation. The linkage with
[riculum development was evident in the launching of the
tdergarten needs assessment. It was designed specifically to
rvide curriculum developers with information on which to base
:ir decision when the scheduled review of this program area
Ijms in 1981. The kindergarten needs assessment is surveying
:icators and parents of young children across the province. The
IwL will document the current program status, and expressed
rnions concerning directions which should be taken by kinder-
glen programs and the policies governing them in the 1980s.
Ifflrts of this assessment will be distributed early in 1981. Similarly,
i reading assessment surveyed teachers and administrators to
per information which can assist the Program Implementation
lach in planning to meet identified needs of districts and schools
the implementation of recently introduced reading programs.
Ifprk begun by the Learning Assessment Branch in 1978 to provide
reoom teachers with a bank of curriculum-based achievement
Is was extended in 1979/80. A total of twenty-one tests in
[hematics, science and English have been made available; more
• presently under development. An achievement test credit
■cation plan was put into place to ensure free access to these tests
■all teachers and districts.
lie past year also saw completion of a two-year assessment policy
ielopment program designed to ensure that all districts have in
■reassessment policies consistent with provincial guidelines. A
■as of workshops and seminars, together with printed materials,
|e provided by learning assessment staff to assist districts in
(sloping these local policies. Work is now underway to continue
M"e efforts by providing leadership and resource materials which
* facilitate locally initiated program evaluation.
25
 Examinations
The Examinations Branch is responsible for administering the I
Grade 12 Scholarship Program and General Educational Developmri
Testing Program (GED), and also issues transcripts for those who
obtained secondary school graduation in British Columbia betweeifs
1890 and 1973. The fourth responsibility of this branch is to provill
service evaluating student records from outside the province in tetp
of British Columbia equivalents.
Early in 1980 it was announced that grade 12 graduates who j
successfully write the B.C. government scholarship examinations nil
henceforth enrol within two years at a recognized post-secondary f
institution before becoming eligible for the $1,000 award that goes?
top candidates. Students in career and vocational fields, to be eligie
for a $1,000 district award, must also enrol in a bona fide
post-secondary institution, or in a training school approved by the n
Ministry of Labour.
Grade 12 scholarship examinations are scheduled in January andrl
June annually (German 12, geology 12, Latin 12 and Spanish 12 are
administered in June only). In 1979/80 a total of 5,295 candidates
applied to write the examinations. Of these, 846 earned
scholarship vouchers valued at $1,000 each. A further 370 earned
district scholarship award vouchers, also valued at $1,000 each. The
winner of the Governor-General's Silver Medal for achieving the
highest average on these exams, 97.67 per cent, was Thomas Robei
Stevenson, a graduating pupil from Carson Graham Senior Second*
School in North Vancouver. The winner of the Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for achieving second place was Jessica Treisman, a   i
graduate of University Hill Secondary School, Vancouver, who hadi
average of 97.33 per cent.
British Columbia leads the rest of Canada in successful GED
candidates. During 1979/80, 6,304 candidates applied to write the
tests and 4,221 received a secondary school equivalency standing.  ;
During the school year, the branch issued 3,325 transcripts and   1
evaluated 260 transcripts from outside the province.
Career Programs
The Career Programs Branch was established in the spring of 19it
and the first full year of operation has now been completed. The 3
branch is structured to service career programs in industrial
education, business education, home economics, graphic commuri
cations, programs for particular occupations, agriculture, work ■
study-work experience and metric conversion.
Career preparation pilot programs expanded from twenty-fiv«l
programs with 200 students participating to forty-two with 300 ■
students. During the 1979/80 academic year, all school districts we
invited to participate in this project. Seven regional workshops we
held to explain the objectives and procedures to senior adminisfflji
26
 It-
•s from every district. Thirty-two districts responded, and 102 pilot
jgrams involving 3,000 students were slated to be in operation by
ptember, 1980. Staff has been seconded to the Schools Department
d to the Post-Secondary Department to develop joint curricula
Iffih will enable many of these pilot programs to become
ISgnized as regular school programs in September, 1981. As a
ult of "laddered" studies, secondary graduates may earn advanced
ucement in a college vocational course or in apprenticeship
iiparation, thereby reducing the total time spent in such training.
The revised business education curriculum is now in effect for all
rondary schools. A specialist consultant was seconded to the
llnch to review supporting equipment lists and to write specifica-
[Sfor essential items. The number of students enrolled in business
Ireation courses in 1979/80 was 106,421, an increase of seven per
ifflfrom 1978/79. The number of business education teachers
[ffoyed in 1979/80 was 983.
he number of students enrolled in industrial education courses in
19/80 was 159,988, a decrease of less than .1 per cent from 1978/79.
total of 1,245 teachers were employed in industrial education
pisrooms in 1979/80. The Career Programs Branch recruited
"four tradesmen and twenty-five third-year students of the
linear university program to provide schools with well-trained
llarial education teachers. Training is conducted through the
[ratry-sponsored Industrial Education Teacher Training Program at
I University of British Columbia.
he number of students enrolled in home economics courses in
B9/80 was 106,036, an increase of less than .1 per cent from
18/79. The number of home economics teachers employed in
89/80 was 905.
IRiould be noted in this report that 6,454 students were enrolled
'ipecial education and locally developed courses which use
■Imes constructed to accommodate regular courses within career
bgrams. Work study-work experience programs continued to
Bmd and 16,889 students from seventy-two school districts
iluding one class at Jericho Hill School) were enrolled in 1979/80.
I represents a student increase of .8 per cent from 1978/79. A
at provincial guide for work study-work experience has been
met) and distributed to all interested parties for reaction and
hrovement.
ie Career Programs Branch continued to assume repsonsibility for
[Brie conversion within the ministry, and a handbook for teaching
reric, Metrics in the Schools: A Handbook for Educators, was
Rfeloped for distribution to all schools in the 1980/81 school year.
[{979/80, most schools offered instruction in metric measurement.
BOndary school graduates entering the work force are able to
wrtion in both metric and imperial measure.
ie ministry's fixed capital asset replacement program enabled
IJity-three metal-working lathes and five milling machines in
K'ndary schools to be replaced with new machines calibrated in
W'ic
n
27
 28
French Language Services
The past year saw the introduction of the core curriculum in
French (programme-cadre de francais) in the elementary grades. '
Classes were established in eleven school districts — wherever tern
more students were enrolled — to a total of 232 students in the 1
province.
The programme-cadre de francais is the most comprehensive of
the French programs; it is offered where parents request a prograr
in which French is the language of instruction for all subjects (excel
English as a second language). This program parallels the contents
the English-language core curriculum.
A substantial increase in enrolment is anticipated for the next *
school year in all of the French programs offered in the provincell
Guides for early French immersion were fully written and
developed for kindergarten to grade 7 in all subject areas. In 197911
3,088 students enrolled in early immersion programs in fourteenB
school districts. Early French immersion programs are designed to q
produce students with "functional bilingual ism". Up to grade 3,
French is usually the only language of instruction. English-language;
subjects are then gradually introduced until, by grade 5 or 6, a  1
balance has been achieved between English-language and Frenchal
language instruction.
A committee was established this past year to identify and devejjj
curriculum guides for late immersion in all subjects. Guides in f
interim form will be ready for June, 1981, and distributed to all <
schools offering late immersion. Feedback and data will then be
gathered to produce final versions of the guides for the 1982 schoc
year. The committee is also developing a curriculum for secondary
immersion which is intended to reinforce and expand the French-
speaking ability students have gained in elementary school. These «
guides should also be ready in interim form by June, 1981.
This past year, 103 students in four school districts were enrolledB
late immersion. This program usually begins in grade 6, at which rt||
all subjects are taught in French. During grade 7, 80 per cent of tjjjl
instruction takes place in French, with English language arts makffll
up the other 20 per cent.
The late immersion program is designed to provide students wijlfr
"instrumental bilingualism." This means that a student who has
completed late immersion in grades 6 and 7 with a secondary scho
follow-up should be able to communicate adequately in French bi
would probably not be as fluent as one who had the benefit of eail
immersion.
The most widely taught French courses are still the basic ones at
both the elementary and secondary levels. In 1979/80, the enrolments in French as a second language were 83,444 for elementary
classes and 94,702 for secondary. These programs are intended to
develop basic French-language communication skills and offer an
understanding of, and appreciation for, French culture.
A new secondary French curriculum guide was launched in May
the product of a revision committee established two years ago.
 ool districts have three years in which to implement the guide
Hits accompanying instructional programs dealing with language,
llmjral and attitudinal content.
A provincial survey regarding French literature and reading
[Serials in the secondary schools was conducted in 1979/80. The
ISlis are being interpreted and used as a source of guidance for
; e secondary French revision committee.
Mb raft version of a guide for secondary French literature and
, ading will be presented to the field for reaction in January, 1981.
ISrJifications based on reactions to the draft will be incorporated
: fore the guide is implemented in September, 1982. This will
rlude the curriculum, together with support material,
iThe Fourth Annual Summer Institute, held in July at Pearson
illege, was attended by sixty-five elementary teachers representing
Iffity-seven districts. Teachers were offered courses in teaching
jjnniques. They also participated in various conversational activities
IBving numerous cultural topics.
\ Resource and In-Service Training Centre for French was
■Bgurated in February and was well attended by over 500 teachers,
IBrripals, co-ordinators, parents and school district administrators.
■Scentre offers workshops and houses materials relating to all
Inch programs taught in British Columbia.
• 'ending the final renegotiation of the Federal-Provincial Agree-
int for Bilingualism in Education, programs under the purview of
llffrench programs co-ordinator were administered according to
■Provisions of an interim agreement for the 1979/80 academic
>ir. In June, $1,250,000 was divided among the seventy-five school
crricts as French Language Support Grants. Funds made available
trier the French Teachers' Bursary Program totalled $276,115,
awing 866 B.C. French teachers to receive bursaries to follow
[Dividual programs or to attend district-sponsored in-service
Wjrons. Under the terms of the Second-Language Monitor Program,
Hw-three B.C. post-secondary students were employed as monitors
HI© studying on a full-time basis in other provinces, and ninety-two
Sicophone students worked in British Columbia, divided among
ne school districts and two colleges. The Full-Time Monitor
Pgram continued as a pilot project for a second year, allowing
pe/en francophones to be assigned to work in school districts away
Kn the province's major centres. The 1979 Summer Language
Bsary Program provided bursary assistance for 493 students to
Snd six-week total immersion French programs in various parts of
KB country. A total of 444 students from this and other provinces
Iflied here at one of the four post-secondary institutions involved
Whe program. One hundered and five B.C. post-secondary students
Befitted from the Second-Language Study Fellowship Program, as
)l),000 was made available for full-time study at francophone or
*>igual institutions within Canada. Also, $1.5 million was divided
ng forty-seven special projects where programs of French
ruction were initiated or expanded.
i"
29
Ui_
 Program Implementation Services
In 1979/80, its second year of operation, the office of Prograrrn
Implementation Services expanded its role of providing informatii
and support to school districts for the implementation of proving!
developed programs. The Program Implementation Services sectiil
of the education ministry is responsible for co-ordinating and   j
facilitating:
• implementation of provincially developed curricula
• action arising out of recommendations from provincial learninjl
assessment reports
• in-service education related to curriculum, assessment, and
planned educational change
• linkage of program resources within the ministry and among
school districts.
Regular communication with senior school district personnel is i
maintained during the year at provincial and regional meetings, al
through a superintendents' advisory committee. Feedback fromH
school districts is reported to the ministry as a result of this liaisoij
Operating with only two professional staff members. Program
Implementation Services has been limited in its ability to provioa
direct support to individual school districts. However, services haj
been provided indirectly through numerous provincial and regio I
meetings planned and co-ordinated by the section. During the
school year, thirty-five eductional leaders were trained to offer
orientation workshops related to curriculum changes in seconda'fl
English, music and physical education; elementary language arts, i
junior secondary drama. Held in over forty centres throughout ffll
province, these meetings involved 1,200 educators who subsequel
acted as resource persons in their own school districts. An evalu'ai
of this orientation process was undertaken and, although this sera
is already valuable to districts, improvement will be made in futu
years.
A discussion paper on guidelines for successful program implementation has been prepared. Factors which help or hinder thai
actual use of intended changes in school programs was also the tfi
of intensive study at two week-long summer institutes planned ir
co-operation with the University of British Columbia and the   I
University of Victoria. Senior administrators from sixty-one schoo
districts were represented at these professional development pro
grams which focussed on planning and evaluating program imple
mentation. A resource file has been established which containSJ
recent research, articles and books on planned educational chan.
Program Implementation Services analyzes recommendationjfl
ing out of provincial learning assessment programs and co-ordifflfli
ministry action on those which are given priority. Three individu
school districts which requested support, consultation and in-ser rt
programs to improve student achievement were assisted directly
during the year.
While in-service education and professional development pro-it
30
 is are a major responsibility of universities, school districts and
essional associations in the province, Program Implementation
rces assists in co-ordination and liaison regarding these important
Hies. Policy has been prepared to guide ministry-sponsored
rvice programs and funding of proposals from groups of
ators in the province. A registry of resource personnel available
list districts with in-service programs is available through
jam Implementation Services.
:e major focus of activities for the year was to create an
Bjess of the complexities involved in bringing about desired
Ees in the educational program and to provide practical services
support for planning successful implementation.
ecial Education Programs
rJucational support services are provided by the Ministry of
Igation to assist in the establishment and maintenance of services
Igh supplement regular services. These include a variety of special
grams for exceptional children.
ecial Programs
he Special Programs Branch is responsible for developing,
llementing and communicating policies and procedures on
Iters relating to the education of exceptional children. Under the
tiority of section 181 of the School Act, the branch issues special
rrovals. This funding device — valued at $23,760 in 1979 — allows
[ministry to contribute to the shareable cost of school districts'
rial programs for the education of mentally and physically
laicapped children, severely learning-disabled children, autistic
Irfren, visually and hearing-impaired children, and for
liing assistance and other educational services in related
rsof need. In addition, special approvals are granted
nrrhool districts to support programs and service for
pe Indian children and children learning English
f second language.
ider the approval system, the Special-Programs
rich allocated over 2,800 special      ^»£j|§
hrams approvals in the
[lol districts during 1979/80
Bjfnmary, financial assista
Rgranted for the
Bation of programs
P e following areas:
Special
Approvals
1955-1980
2838
1955  1960 1965  1970  1971   1972  1973 1974  1975   1976
Source: B.C. Ministry of Education
1977  1978   1979 1980
31
 Special Approvals in the 1979/80 Academic Year
Elementary Learning Assistance (K-7)
Secondary Learning Assistance (8-11)
Moderately and Severely Retarded
Hospital — Homebound
Physically Handicapped
Residential Programs
Visually Impaired
Hearing Impaired
Autistic
Rehabilitation 21
Climate and Distance — Specialized 2i
Job Training for Moderately and Severely Handicapped
English as a Second Language
Indian Education
Others — Specialized
Total
Increasing numbers of severely handicapped children attendU
public school programs, and resources were provided to support
them. In many instances this was achieved through inter-ministem
co-operation, the efforts of the branch and its participation in the
provincial Inter-Ministry Children's Committee. In other cases,
teachers provided education in the hospital or home.
The Special Programs Branch has continued to be involved in a
variety of councils and committees of an advisory nature, such as tl
Minister's Advisory Council for the Hearing Impaired. Also, in
conjunction with the Curriculum Development Branch, a number j
committees have been at work developing curriculum guides and I
teacher resource guides. Among them are:
• Mathematics Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Speech Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Life Skills Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Survival Skills Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Visually Impaired Resource Guide
• Moderately/Severely Retarded Curriculum Guide
• Language Arts Handbook — Native Indian Children
The branch undertook and sponsored extensive in-service atrffl
as well as conferences for parents of hearing-impaired and mental
handicapped children. With the assistance of the Division of Speei'
and Hearing of the Ministry of Health, the branch continued to
underwrite costs to school districts of auditory training equipr^ffl
and speech therapy programs.
Among programs for the communicatively impaired in 1979/80: t
• The Provincial Program for the Hearing Impaired enabled 700 I
students to be assisted by local itinerant programs and district cjasit
Support was given to parents of hearing impaired children and to j
117 teachers offering services to them in forty school districts.1 Se'ni
 school districts have been in the areas of student placement,
Irality programming, professional development and the provision of
Iffissary resources, including auditory training equipment.
lericho Hill School enrolled a total of 156 students ranging in age
|fii five to nineteen years. Programs were provided in both
: -campus and off-campus settings, including three elementary and
e secondary classes in Vancouver School Board schools and one
Imientary class in Maple Ridge. The on-campus programs offered
hdemic and pre-vocational courses.
Iffudents atttended Jericho Hill School from all areas of British
Ifflimbia. Day students travelled from all school districts in the
peater Vancouver area, while forty-nine students from other areas
hB.C. lived in the school residence, with frequent home visits. In
IBary, 1980, the ministry contracted with the Western Institute for
Ii Deaf to operate a group home for six students as a pilot project
Investigate the viability of group homes as an alternative to
Iffiiitory accommodation.
■Raffing at the school included thirty-one teachers and fourteen
lid-care counsellors. A team of health professionals, contracted
fm Vancouver Metropolitan Health, provided continuing medical
IMrvision, psychological and psychiatric services, speech therapy,
thtal hygiene, nutrition consultation and occupational and physical
irapy. Audiological services were provided by the Ministry of
Iffih.
V committee to recommend future directions for the school was
e up in the fall of 1979 by the assistant deputy minister. Its report
j> scheduled for completion by the end of August, 1980, for
Rmission to the minister.
• he Provincial Program for Visually Impaired enabled over 350
■rally impaired students to receive instruction in regular classes
vh the support of itinerant and resource teachers of visually
paired children.
_i Language Arts Curriculum Development Committee for visually
Iffired students was formed in December, 1979. The committee
Icnpleted work on a proposed currriculum guide on language arts
Hffisually impaired students in kindergarten to grade 3. Future
lariculum development activities will be administered by the
HiJculum Development Branch.     The ministry continued to
ffivide support services to deaf-blind children requiring specialized
Pgrams both within and outside the province. These include
[Sport of five deaf-blind children attending W. Ross MacDonald
Sool in Brantford, Ontario, and approximately ten deaf-blind
hdren being maintained in local programs. The ministry also
ISded an educational assessment of eight deaf-blind children by a
t<n from the W. Ross MacDonald School.
•lie Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired assisted
wfJol districts in the instruction of visually impaired students by
larJing specialized instructional resources. These included special-
Mnat editions of curriculum materials, such as "talking-books" or
33
 a
braille editions, and visibility enhancement devices for the partial)]
sighted. A catalogue of all materials available for loan was distribtf
to all school districts in January, 1980.
The centre lent materials to 237 students during the year, 60 of
whom use braille. The total items lent included 5,763 braille volurfl
3,596 cassette tapes, 122 large print maps and books, 262 other tatfl
ids and fifty-six braille writers.
The production/acquisition section of the resource centre, by
purchase or direct staff production, acquires new special-format 1
materials to keep pace with curriculum revision. Some 2,706
acquisitions were made during the year, including 892 braille
volumes, 1,246 cassette tapes and 164 braille and large print maps!
Indian Education
To meet the special needs of native Indian children, programs h
been designed not only to develop basic skills but also to reflect 1
cultural, linguistic and social background of the children. The bra]
supported programs in over fifty school districts during the 1979/8
academic year.
Programs were implemented in co-operation with Indian comra
ities to provide native paraprofessional workers, such as home-scl
co-ordinators and teacher aides, and to provide native Indian
language, cultural, counselling, tutoring and alternative education
programs.
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
The Division of Administrative Services has been responsible fort
wide range of administrative, regulatory and logistical functions I
within the provincial educational system. During the 1979/80 yeaflj|
these activities were reorganized into two principal areas: Adminfll
trative Operations and Legislative Services.
Administrative Services — Operations was established in 1979 to>
develop general administrative procedures, systems and routines,!!
to provide support systems and guidance to school district official]
also co-ordinates inter-departmental activities in certain program ;l
project areas.
Responsibility for the Correspondence Education Branch and th>l
Publication Services Branch was transferred to Operations upon it;il
inception.
Correspondence Education
The primary function of the Correspondence Education Branch -J
to provide education services to school-age students who are unalij
to attend school due to distance or illness and secondary school
34
 IBents who are unable to take particular courses in their schools.
Ms latter service is especially valuable for students attending small
londary schools where course offerings are limited. In addition,
Iftnranch enrols adults who wish to take secondary school courses
Ithe purpose of upgrading their school standing or for vocational
lmterest purposes. During the 1979/80 academic year, just under
^00 course registrations were processed.
he branch continued to supply course materials for the satellite
mentary correspondence school operating out of Dawson Creek.
Rational services were also supplied to a school in Czechoslovakia
iblished for children of Canadian workers.
Bensure that the correspondence courses offered are generally
iivalent to those taught in the public school system, the branch
■tains a continuing program of course development. During
9/80, a revised language arts program for grade 1 was developed,
lg with new courses in reading (years 2 and 3), science (years 4
B) and art (year 6). New secondary school courses prepared for
Jementation in September, 1980, included personal and business
nrds 9, typing 9, shorthand 11, algebra 11 and 12, and German 11.
Bring the year, the branch was subjected to a thorough analysis
:s internal operations. As a result, new procedures were
eloped to improve the student registration and record-keeping
resses and to reduce the delay between the submission of
Ent papers and the return of marked assignments,
lembers of the branch have continued to work closely with
rials of the Open Learning Institute in the area of program
Bopment. In addition, the branch director met with officials of
gspondence education schools in other provinces to establish
nanisms for co-operation.
blication Services
fie Publication Services Branch acts as the principal purchasing
Hdistribution agency for learning resource materials used by 1,800
Hie and private schools in the province. Over four million pounds
rfiaterial were shipped during the year, and invoices for learning
nerials in excess of $10 million were processed.
diblication Services operates out of a 40,000-square-foot ware-
ase in Victoria, with contracted warehousing space in Vancouver.
Iforanch maintains a sufficiently large inventory to meet most
Hs on demand.
Bool district orders are funded through the Credit Allocation
fj. The per-pupil credit is calculated by dividing the branch's
tiling materials budget by the province's total student enrolment.
Ktments are made to compensate for the lack of volume
oomies in small districts, the wide geographical dispersion in
II districts and increased enrolments. The Credit Allocation Plan
Ms districts more responsibility in the selection and development
leal priorities. Each district appoints a co-ordinator who provides
«r>n between the branch and the district. Approximately 175
spendent schools in the province are also served by this system.
Ii
35
 36
Savings are realized by having used or damaged books repaired|
binderies in Vancouver and central B.C. In 1979/80 over 200,000
repairs were made at a significant saving over the cost of purchasiffl
new replacement textbooks.
The branch also administers the School Library Book Purchase PlS
which places one copy of each selection in every school library. Ofl
B.C.-authored and B.C.-published books are reviewed, so this
program directly supports the provincial publishing industry. The
plan continues to receive an enthusiastic response from schools.
DIVISION OF LEGISLATIVE SERVICES
The Division of Legislative Services was established in 1979/80
through a restructuring of responsibility involving the Division of
Administrative Services. The Legislative Services office carries out
various administrative, para-legal and logistic functions in supportB
the Schools Department and school districts. It is responsible for th
preparation of School Act legislation and regulations in co-operatffl
with the Ministry of the Attorney General.
The office serves as a focal point for the two-way flow of
information between the Ministry of Education and school districgl
All administrative and information circulars are distributed by theBI
division. In addition, it provides consultative services to superinteffll
ents and secretary-treasurers in a wide range of administrative anal
operational matters.
A section of the office is responsible for pupil transportation and
for the transportation assistance and adult school crossing guard 1
programs. It also authorizes the inclusion of new or replacement I
school buses in annual capital programs.
During the 1979/80 academic year. Legislative Services held
responsibility for the Provincial Educational Media Centre and the]
Print Services Branch.
Amendments to the School Act (formerly the Public Schools Acffl
approved during the spring sitting of the legislature included
improvements in the grievance and appeal procedures for teachers
designed to provide increased informality while at the same tima"
protecting teachers' rights. School districts were given permissions
assist in the cost of educating a student outside the province — am
provision of special value to northern communities which often d|
not have the numbers to support their own secondary schools. Ala
the date on which new trustees assume office each year was movei
forward to December 1 from January 1 in order to parallel the
Municipal Act. A further amendment enabled the cabinet to
determine the remuneration received by school trustees, rather tffl
having the level fixed in legislation.
Provincial Educational Media Centre
The responsibility of the Provincial Educational Media Centre il
||
 Ride media services in support of ministry objectives. The primary
races are videotape dubbing and distribution; audiotape dubbing
d distribution; film loan, and radio and television school broadcast,
gjrams are acquired from a variety of sources, and original
nductions are undertaken when appropriate materials are
Mailable.
E1979/80 emphasis was given to purchase of materials to support
•riculum changes in elementary language arts, elementary science
^secondary art. An annotated Language Arts Media Resources
ide, designed to assist teachers in relating the media programs to
Kurriculum, was prepared and distributed. Work on similar media
ources guides in various subject areas was initiated. Another
Bty of the media centre was the selection and acquisition of
terials to support post-secondary programs. Although services
re been available to colleges for several years, it is the first time
i a concerted effort has been made to acquire programs
Bfically for college use.
nco-operation with the Correspondence Education Branch, a
Iffect was initiated to assist primary grade correspondence students
language development. The award-winning radio series Sound-
\pe was adapted for use on audio cassettes and distributed along
\h printed lesson plans. The program was enthusiastically received
iboth parents and students, and the development of additional
iKspondence materials using cassettes and filmstrips has now
Iffinenced. Other production activities included radio, televison
nl film presentations in the areas of British Columbia history and
lEraphy, language arts, music, art and secondary English.
Ine centre co-ordinated quantity purchases of videotape and
Iffotape from distributors and films from the National Film Board.
Ise bulk purchases resulted in significant savings to colleges,
||ol districts and the Ministry of Education.
rnt Services
irint Services continues to provide the Ministry of Education with a
uplete range of specialized educational publishing functions,
biary emphasis is on the dynamic integration of educational
jelopment, graphic design and printing of new learning materials
eie used in B.C. schools. To keep pace with the ever-increasing
biand for high-quality educational materials by the ministry, Print
■'ices has assembled a professional manuscript development group
■©rising manuscript editors, copy editors, graphic designers,
Itrators, proofreaders and indexers.
Bjecial projects produced this year include the elementary
ft;uage arts program for the Correspondence Branch; Metrics in
■School's: a Handbook for Educators; the secondary French, music
« physical education curriculum guides for the Curriculum
[jelopment Branch; a Heavy- Duty Mechanics Manual for the
H;ram Research and Development Branch; and a catalogue for the
Hich Language Services Resource Centre.
37
 Demand for publishing and production services increased signif
cantly over the past year, with a current total of 341 publications
involving 15 million impressions.
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL
PERSONNEL
38
The Division of Educational Personnel is responsible for monitoi
field activities throughout the province, through both the provin-T
daily appointed district superintendents of schools and the locally
appointed superintendents of schools. It assumes responsiblity fori
the accreditation of secondary schools, provides resources which]
assist with self-assessment by elementary schools, issues teacher j
certificates and co-ordinates international teacher exchanges. Thesfl
functions are carried out by three branches: Field Services,
Accreditation/School Evaluation and Teacher Services.
Field Services
The Field Services Branch provides for the recruitment and
assignment of provincially appointed district superintendents,
assesses the performance of provincially employed superintendents]
and maintains liaison with superintendents throughout the provinra|
An important function of the branch is to monitor the quality of
school district administrative performance.
This was a major year of transition from provincial employments
school superintendents to local employment by boards of schoolH1
trustees. Twenty-six school districts chose the local employment I
option as a result of changes to the School Act Regulations whicW
permitted smaller districts to appoint their own chief educationalH
officer.
Liaison with superintendents and school boards continued to be •
important branch function. Orientation sessions were held for all
newly appointed school superintendents and eleven field visits wer
conducted in the school districts where new superintendents were i
recruited. In addition, the program superintendent of the branch!
acted as a consultant to superintendents and school boards.
A major project of the year was an analysis of evaluation reports
written on teachers and administrators by school superintendents!
during the period from 1977 to 1980. This analysis led to a report oi
issues raised in evaluation reports, an examination of formats in 1
reports and a summary of teacher and administrator evaluation I
ratings.
The branch continues to administer professional development™
programs of a leadership and management nature for district and
ministry employees. Professional development programs with
regional or provincial impact that are consistent with goals
J
 Bplished by the Schools Department of the ministry, and those
Bh have branch personnel involvement in planning, are funded as
rt of a comprehensive management leadership training program.
§ year, a model was developed for evaluating the division's
Sessional development activities.
fcreditation/School Evaluation
01 secondary schools in the province must periodically undergo an
i reditation process. This involves a self-assessment by school staff,
ai then a thorough evaluation by an external team. During the
19/80 academic year, revisions were made to the accreditation
Ircedures. A secondary school may now be accredited for a period
|jne to six years, depending on the quality level of education
png offered to students. Some 20 provincial secondary schools
|'e so accredited during the 1979/80 academic year.
i order to assist elementary schools with an evaluation process, a
B-assessment booklet was developed by the branch* Although its
IEs not compulsory, it has proven valuable to school districts in
Y2ting a ministry directive which calls for an elementary school
i-assessment policy by December, 1981.
richer Services
the Teacher Services Branch is responsible for activities involving
icertification and decertification of teachers, dismissal and transfer
seals and teacher exchange programs. It also represents the
t istry on the Teachers' Pension Board.
uring the year, a Certification Advisory Committee was estab-
is:d for the first time. The committee is comprised of respresenta-
lirfrom the teaching profession, teacher education institutions and
■ field of school administration. With the director of teacher
Bices as its chairman, the committee advises the ministry on
bters related to the certification and decertification of teachers.
Hiring the past year, the number of certificate issues was again
Hti. Over the last three years, issues have declined in number in
||jing with the decline in student enrolments and reduced
Bffinyment opportunities for teachers.
ie branch processed over 200 applications for exchange in
B/80, of which 38 were successfully placed in overseas assign-
rats. Negotiations to establish an exchange program with France
p: completed during the past year, and discussions were begun to
Bite programs with Italy and Sweden. In addition to existing
hi-provincial programs (Quebec and Ontario), discussions were
em with the province of Manitoba to implement an exchange
keram.
Iqlsponsibility for administering dismissal and transfer appeal
Messes was transferred to the branch in July of 1979. The branch
Hilishes boards of references and review commissions, as required
|o:r the provision of the School Act, and processes transfer review
Rests.
39
 Provincial Enrolments in Faculties of Educa]
Enrolments per 1000 Population, Ages 18-24
NFLD.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
QUE.
CANAtB
ONT.
MAN.
SASK.
ALTA.
B.C.
,38.7
35.?
.36.1
32.3
31.9,
28.8
.29.7
,27.2
30.5
32.4
26.8
28.2
27.4 !
Source: Statistics Canada
 r
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
he 1979/80 academic year was the third year of education ministry
gities under the authority of the Independent Schools Support
.In all, 109 schools with 18,251 pupils and 1,350 teachers qualified
Support under the terms of the act — an increase of two schools
m 1978/79.
We 1977 act established two grant levels. In the past year, 107
gnendent schools qualified for maximum grants of 30 per cent of
gverage per-pupil operating cost of the public school districts in
ich they are located. This averaged approximately $600 per pupil.
iee other schools qualified for the lower grant level, which in
9/80 continued at nine per cent and averaged approximately $180
raupil.
Srants for the year totalled $10,663,400, payable in 1980/81.
E obtain the lower grant level, a non-public school must satisfy
Inspector of Independent Schools that it does not foster doctrines
Rial or ethnic superiority, religious intolerance, or social change
)ugh violent action. Facilities must be adequate and the
ependent school must have been in operation for at least five
ool years.
er the higher grants, an independent school must also provide
Bnum instructional time on core curriculum subjects, have a
■.factory pupil-testing program, meet standards of school opera-
li and administration approved by an external evaluation team,
iricipate in the provincial learning assessment program, and act to
lure certification of all teachers within five years,
ne Inspector of Independent Schools (appointed by, and
eionsible to, the Minister of Education) must be satisfied that all
h above criteria are met before funding is recommended. To assist
Ii in his task, a Teacher Certification Committee and external
\uation committees have been established. These committees,
Bi meet from time to time each year, are composed of highly
tlified and experienced professional educators and are chaired by
Imtly retired public school superintendents,
^ffllitating the work of these committees are two professional
|-time co-ordinators: a co-ordinator of teacher certification and a
irdinator of external evaluation. Professional consultants are also
fflfrom time to time to advise in specialist areas such as
lergarten, industrial education and foreign languages,
^grnal evaluations of all schools receiving the higher grant are
e on a four-year cycle. The external evaluation committees,
gwered by the act "to examine and assess programs, operations
administration in the school," make written reports of their
rations to the inspector. Discussion of the reports with each
Bl's "authority" and principal normally follows. In the three
Bs between each formal evaluation, the inspector monitors the
Ic of each school by detailed analysis of annual data forms and by
41
 42
personal visits to each school at least once a year.
While this evaluation and monitoring process is necessary to
ensure that schools applying for or receiving grants meet the critefl
laid down by the act, it is in no way used to diminish the legitimaffl
independence of the schools. The freedom of independent school!
to operate within the very broad limits set by the act is respected M
all times, for it is this very freedom which enables independent
schools to contribute in significant and varied ways to the welfare c
their pupils and to the educational health of society.
The number of independent school teachers certified under thS
B.C. School Act continues to rise, from 672 in 1978/79 to 719 in
1979/80. The following table shows the numbers and percentages o
teachers authorized to teach under all categories:
Certified under B.C. School Act
Certified by Inspector of Independent Schools
(A number of these teachers (12-15%) will qualify
to receive B.C. Schools Certificates after two years
of teaching in the province.)
Certified by Ten-Year Clause
(Some teachers in this group have the qualifications to receive a B.C. Schools Certificate, but have,
not applied for one.)
Certified by Inspector, with Restriction 68 (5.0'
(Most of the teachers in this group have an
academic degree or degrees, but no teacher
training.)
719
(53J|
335
(24.|l
144
(10.7'
Granted a One-Year Permit to Teach 22(1.6'
(These are teachers who teach in specialist areas,
usually for a few periods a week. They are on an
upgrading program and are expected to obtain
certificates within five years.)
Volunteer Apostles 52 (3.9'
(Almost all of the teachers in this group would
qualify for a B.C. Schools Certificate, but are on a
visa and cannot apply.)
Teachers of Religion Only 3 (0.2'
(The members of this category are ministers who
teach religion only.)
During the year, further development and refinement of the
program by the Inspector of Independent Schools and staff took
place. It can now be said, three years after the 1977 act was passed
that a process is in place which successfully addresses its intent. In
fact, the process is working well, thanks primarily to the high level
co-operation by all concerned.
J||
 rolment in Independent and
lublic Schools 1969-1979*
irades 1-12, excluding Kindergarten
Total
in 78/79
23,215
Total
in 78/79
477,373
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
||70    70/71   71/72    72/73   73/74    74/75    75/76   76/77   77/78   78/79
Impendent school enrolment figures include pupils from schools receiving aid
uler the Independent Schools Support Act as well as from schools not receiving such aid.
i"ce: Statistics Canada
B.C. Ministry of Education
43
 POST-SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
The Post-Secondary Department is responsible for carrying oul
role of the Ministry of Education in a comprehensive range of I
academic, technical, vocational and continuing education progra
offered at fourteen community colleges and seven specialized |
institutes in the province. It also performs the major task of fundi
student aid programs. As well, the department assists the three I
provincial post-secondary co-ordinating and advisory councils: th
Academic Council, the Occupational Training Council and the I
Management Advisory Council.
New program classification and budget allocation systems were
successfully implemented during the year. There was also a marj
improvement in the operational data that was provided to the
provincial councils. A major new program of industry-based traini
in co-operation with the federal government was started, and a
process of assessing the impact of facilities' costs on operating I
budgets was begun along with the development of five-year plan:
colleges and institutes.
The department consists of three divisions: Program ServiceJB
Management Services and Continuing Education.
PROGRAM SERVICES DIVISION
44
The Program Services Division of the Post-Secondary Depart^™
engages in two major activities: program approval and program
development and research. Program approval is divided between t
branches: Academic/Technical and Vocational.
College and Institute Programs
Three main functions constitute the daily activities of the
Academic/Technical and Vocational sections of College and Instill
Programs. These are the examination of provincial program neeffl
the co-ordination of new and existing programs and the recorrH
dation of newly approved programs to the Academic Council^H
Occupational Training Council.
The 1979/80 academic year was one of change, as more fiscal
responsibility was delegated to these branches. Their new duties
include the management of their own budgets and the monetaM
management of curriculum contracts that fall within their progratj
areas. In this respect, the following projects are a sample of wH
been undertaken:
• hotel management program
 development of a career path in the dental assisting and dental
Iffiygiene field
development of counselling guidelines and diagnostic and place-
Went tests for the long-term care and homemaker fields.
"hese curriculum projects are some of the direct results of the
llordinating activities in which branch staff are engaged. It is
ough this mechanism that the various college and institute
|Bties make their needs known and communicate with each other
1 the ministry. Each year, groups who have not previously met are
|ffiified and encouraged to meet, initially through the sponsorship
pne of the post-secondary co-ordinating councils.
Ill and Part-time College Enrolments 1979/80
lares indicate percentage of provincial total in each program area.
ERN LIGHTS
1.0
OOTENAY
1.4
»EST
2.2
:
2.3
EDONIA
3.4
/ALLEY
4.6
0
S.8
PINA
6.1
IAN
7.1
Island
7.6
to
8.0
re"*
8.1
*DEMIC CAREER/TECHNICAL
>ce: B.C. Ministry of Education
VOCATIONAL
45
Li
 B.C.I.T.
O.L.I.
Program Research and Development
One of the roles of the Program Research and Development 1
Branch is to complete or make arrangements for a college or
institute to provide the curriculum development and research
projects that have been identified through the other two branchg
The programs mentioned above are examples of this activity. Asa
this branch has a major responsibility for helping to plan and
monitor the five-year plan and institutional review of each of thej
twenty colleges and institutes. During the year, Douglas College aj
Capilano College completed their self-studies.
Professional development is another area of responsibility of I
Program Research and Development. This past year has seen the
completion of Teaching Techniques and a series of video tapes an]
booklets that have been placed in each institution to enable
instructors to improve their skills. The instructional skills prograrhj
short practical training in instructional design and classroom skills
has been widely implemented during the past year, with approxa
mately 400 instructors participating around the province.
In the area of research, a study to examine what happened to]
university transfer students who, in fact, did not transfer was
commissioned and received this year. Additionally, an extensive*
needs analysis of employers, students and residents of various cm
regions was completed.
 r
BOURSE REGISTRATIONS*
3Y PROGRAMS AREAS
N B.C. PROVINCIAL INSTITUTES, 1979-80
pM^IPLIN
IE CLUSTER
Agriculture Related
Renewable Resources
NOfrRenewable Resources
Marine Related
Land and Air Tra
Engineering Relali
Electrical/Electro;
Mechanics Relati
Metal Trades Relat
Construction Rela'
Business Administration
Olfice Administration
Communication Arl
Personal Services
Legal and Social!
Health Related
Fine Arts Related
Humanities Related
Social Sciences Related
i Mathematics Relat*
| Sciences Related
I English Related
J Basic Education I
TOTAL
B.C.I.T.
CT    CP
1,490
765
mm
HH
15,812
17
37
974
SUSHI
i
37,593   30
B.C.M.S.
mil
E.C.C.A.
1,951
J.I.B.C.
VOC
O.L.I.
P.M.T.I.
P.V.I.
Hi
UK
;    VOC
u:
108
'Ml
M\
tag*
108 334
1,298
1 1     1 111111
Tie figures for University Transfer, Career Technical and College Prep, reflect course registrations at October 31,191
Tie figures for Vocational reflect course enrolments for the total year.
.C.I.T. - British Columbia Institute of Technology
.C.M.S. - British Columbia Mining School
■CCA. - Emily Carr College of Art
'•B.C. - Justice Institute ol British Columbia
'•LI. - Open Learning Institute
•M.T.I. - Pacific Marine Training Institute
•V.I. - Pacific Vocational Institute
UT = University Transfer
CT = Career Technical
CP = College Preparatory
VOC = Vocational
3.C. Ministry of Edueatioi
47
 —
DIVISION OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
The 1979/80 academic year was similar to those of the 1970s; iv
another year of steady growth in adult education. As a transitioi
year, however, 1979/80 was very important because of several!
significant events: the first major conference on continuing edu,
tion for school trustees, college board members and professicMci
the production of a continuing education policy paper and
subsequent specific program policies for the province; the intral
tion of a formal budgeting system for school board adult educate
programs; the completion of a special projects directory; the
implementation of rural and urban institutes, and the initiation!
adult basic education and English-as-a-second-language newsleil
The foundation for continuing growth in the 1980s was thus
established.
The ministry continued to stimulate activity in the field of sped
education. Several colleges and school districts initiated prograrf
handicapped adults, using the curriculum developed at Vancou'r.
Community College. Valuable experience was also gained thromi
program developed by Camosun College which makes college
resources accessible to handicapped people.
The shortage of curricula and resource materials in the area ce
adult basic education resulted in the development of the Adult u
Literacy Curriculum and Resource Guide, which is designed to it
teachers and administrators in the creation of high-quality adulla
literacy programs. In addition, work on a similar guide for Englij
language training programs was commenced. Basic literacy pro;ir
received further assistance through the development of a biblic ■
graphy of reading materials for basic literacy students. Experien =
with the volunteer tutor training program developed in 1978/7St
Northern Lights College assisted Sechelt and Powell River programmers with their basic literacy and tutor training programs.
The ministry continued to stimulate professional and commuiy
development activities, especially in rural centres. English-langujt
training workshops were held in Dawson Creek, Quesnel, Nanm
Cranbrook and Trail. Community needs identification studies we
conducted in Delta School District, McKenzie, Cassiar and the r
Queen Charlottes.
48
 Registration Trends
in School Districts and College
Continuing Education
No. of School Districts I
No. of Registrants 137,416
27
23
158,7
7 155,390
I14
I 155,1361
14
10
74,816
|9
I 58,781
1 9
I   46,431
9  No. of Colleges
34,977  No. of Registrants
14
109,355
i.OOO
W>   71/72   72/73   73/74    74/75   75/76   76/77    77/78    78/79   79/80
Source: B.C. Ministry of Education
49
 MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION
mil
A major role of the Management Services Division, through its
Administrative Operations function, is the provision of adminfs'tr.l
services for the Post-Secondary Department. Other important rol
1979/80 were the allocation of capital and operating budgets to
colleges and institutes; planning and negotiation of federal trainif
purchases, including inter-ministerial relations with the MinisjHI
Labour, and provision of operational and budgetary statistics to S|
Academic Council and to the Occupational Training Council.
Administrative Operations successfully assisted the first cycle oh
new budget system for colleges and institutes. As well, it complea
review of the capital equipment inventory and funding system in
colleges and institutes. The development and implementation ofi<
Post-Secondary Management Information System is a major ongai
activity of the Management Services Division.
During 1979/80, a number of major developments occurred
B.C. post-secondary education system. The last seven of British
Columbia's seventy-five school districts became full participants rl
their local college regions — with representatives on college boil:
and full access to college services. School District 17 (Princeton) I
joined Okanagan College; School District 46 (Sunshine Coast) jo:
Capilano College; School Districts 62 (Sooke). 63 (Saanich), and i
(Gulf Islands) joined Camosun College; School District 13 (Kettle!
Valley) joined Selkirk College, and School District 86 (Creston-K;b
was linked with both Selkirk College and East Kootenay Commurrj
College.
About the same time, School Districts 38 (Richmond) and 41
(Burnaby), already linked to Douglas College, accepted a recomi::
dation from the Minister of Education and agreed to participate
Vancouver Community College as well. This reflected the fact th
VCC has historically served students from beyond Vancouver cit;
boundaries, and gave Burnaby and Richmond students a wider ra
of options.
Douglas College for ten years served eight school districts witl
nearly a third of the B.C. population. In 1979/80 it had 5,900 stum
with another 8,000 in continuing education. In April it was M
announced that the college would, from April 1,1981, be dividei
into two regions. Douglas College itself, with its core campus ine
Westminster, is to continue serving the north side of the Fraser l|
— School Districts 40 (New Westminster), 41 (Burnaby), 42 (Mapl
Ridge) and 43 (Coquitlam). The new institution — to be called
Kwantlen College — will serve School Districts 35 (Langley), 36
(Surrey), 37 (Delta) and 38 (Richmond). Kwantlen will be British
Columbia's fifteenth regional college.
Amendments to the College and Institute Act (formerly the
Co//eges and Provincial Institutes Act) during the spring sitting oI
legislature increased the number of government appointees on
college boards to one greater than the total number of school I
50
 ppointees. Changes and clarifications were also made in respect to
ie terms served by members of college and institute boards and
,raR)cial post-secondary councils. Board members appointed by
:hool districts will now serve for one year, reflecting annual changes
lat may occur on school boards, and those appointed by the
linister will serve for terms of up to two years. Council members are
ow to serve for terms of up to three years.
lanning and Analysis
During the year, the role of the Planning and Analysis section was
i prepare operational and performance measures for community
nlleges and provincial institutes and to assist in short- and
iedium-term planning and program approvals. As well, it provided
formation and other analytical services to all three provincial
juncils, and assisted with annual budget approvals.
A major project, analysis of the five-year operating budget forecast,
aajpmpleted during the year.
raining Projects
The recruitment and training of new industrial education teachers
intinued in 1979/80, as did the upgrading of instructors' training to
e standards of the instructor's diploma. Continuous workshops and
rrunars to upgrade instructors were undertaken in an effort to
iprove professional development and to maintain currency in
ecialty subject areas.
The branch also provided for the management and administrative
rection of the Canadian International Development Agency logging
nool project in Indonesia.
lanpower Training
jPrS'incial industrial training consultants were housed during the
Jar in selected colleges throughout British Columbia. B.C. employ-
I; entering into cost-sharing agreements with the federal govern-
hntfor the training or upgrading of their employees can now
I tain assistance in the development of their training plans. The
Ipvifioial consultants will be participating in the Canada Manpower
|iiiffirial Training Program which, through financial incentives,
ycourages employers to establish new employee training programs,
lis year the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission
iJects to enter into some 8,000 contracts with British Columbia
Hiployers for the sharing of instructional and wage costs.
udent Services
j )uring the 1979/80 academic year, B.C. post-secondary students
i! |uiring financial aid were serviced under three programs.
proximately 35 per cent of the full-time student body applied for
fl'Ogal assistance under the B.C. Student Assistance Program during
■ year. In all, 15,074 loans and 11,885 grants were authorized. The
fage loan and grant were $1,400 and $846 respectively.
51
 Thirteen institutions participated in the work-study program
designed to reduce indebtedness and provide career-related job
experience. Approximately 1,000 individuals were involved with
on-campus employment.
The Special Assistance Program serviced approximately 225 stu-.
dents studying on a part-time basis or enrolled in a full-time proja
of a short duration.
The ministry funded ten persons for world scholarship study at i
Lester B. Pearson of the Pacific on Vancouver Island and at Uniteil
World College of the Atlantic in St. Donat's, Wales.
Two advisory commitees, the B.C. Student Loan Committee anil
the Student Services Advisory Committee, dealt with matters relaJ
to the administration of student aid programs and the developmerl
of student services.
52
 Under terms of the College and Institute Act, three provincial
ijmcils co-ordinate the programs and activities of British Columbia's
urteen regional colleges and six provincial institutes offering
t#iical, vocational and specialized education. The Academic
~~Ril, Occupational Training Council and Management Advisory
rSicil also advise and work with the Ministry of Education on
Bniversity post-secondary education matters pertaining to their
amis.
POST-SECONDARY COUNCILS
CADEMIC COUNCIL
ffe Academic Council in 1979/80 completed its first full cycle of
et reviews and allocations for the fourteen colleges and five
avincial institutions which offer programs that come under the
ademic Council's area of responsibility. This includes all academic
nsfer programs, most career-technical programs, and some
rMional programs. At budget review time, and again at allocation
^Krouncil members met with representatives of the institutions'
ards and administrations so that a direct exchange of information
uld take place.
The council held ten regular meetings during the year, with six of
im at one or another of the colleges and institutes. These included
letings with students, faculty, administrators and board members.
^Btitutions visited were the College of New Caledonia (Prince
orge), Fraser Valley College (Abbotsford), Malaspina College
l^nmo), Cariboo College (Kamloops), Emily Carr College of Art
incouver), and the Pacific Vocational Institute (Burnaby). These
its, plus the budget and allocation meetings, helped the council to
derstand the unique objectives, characteristics and needs of each
Iffiition and the communities they serve,
"hree advisory committees were established — in health, data
Iffissing and recreation — to provide the council with province-
<le and industry-wide perspectives on training needs and the
I^Biriate programs to meet them. The members are employers,
lOTtioners and educators. Additional advisory committees will be
Hffiished in other major career areas.
he Academic Council has encouraged meetings of the thirty-two
<>ting articulation committees and has assisted in organizational
Jetings of two new committees — diploma nursing and home-
TOrs. Most academic and career-technical program areas now
E articulation committees. Members are from all post-secondary
1 itutions offering the program; their primary concern is with
'isferability of courses among institutions.
Bassist in carrying out its statutory responsibilities, the council has
UK
53
 developed close and co-operative working relationships with the
Ministry of Education and the other councils; effective communic?
tions with the colleges and institutes, and an active committee
system.
OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIlH
The purpose of the Occupational Training Council is to review
existing and proposed occupational programs as presented by the
colleges and institutes. After review, recommendations on fundin;
are made to the Minister of Education. When the minister has
established the amount of funds to be made available, the councl
makes allocations to the colleges and institutes for programs unde
its auspices.
The council is also responsible for organizing procedures leadin
to obtaining information from which recommendations regarding
funding of programs can be made. In addition, it is responsible fa
establishing career counselling services to augment those of
secondary and post-secondary institutions.
The Occupational Training Council established four major objea
tives. The first of these for the 1979/80 academic year was to estab
nine industry consultative committees covering the following
industries: forestry; construction; marine; mining and smelting;
agriculture; metal fabrication; transportation; communications aifl
public utilities, and hospitality. The effectiveness of these commira|
has been a positive means of ensuring an industry perspective is
applied to the tasks undertaken by the council.
The second objective was to complete the evaluation of a careel
advisory resource known as CHOICES. The pilot project for CHOM
has been completed, together with an assessment of the effectives
of CHOICES terminals in ten secondary and two post-secondary
institutions in the B.C. Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island.
The third objective was to establish a rational means of reviewin i
financial requests received from institutions to allow council
members to deal knowledgeably with the data produced through e
Post-Secondary Activities Classification Structure (PACS) system. Tnl
council, in co-operation with Ministry of Education personnel, j
established a means of addressing budget requests received from t
institutions utilizing the PACS system.
The fourth objective, resulting from past experience in reviewill
programs submitted for funding, was to establish appropriate criteij
These related to the employment record of graduates and the   ]
proliferation of similar courses throughout the province requiring!
expensive capital equipment.
To address the four objectives, four committees of the counciHI
were established: the budget committee, the industry advisory
committee, the managment committee and the counselling comm
tee. These committees established criteria and policy utilizing advi
from all relevant sources.
54
 i he Management Advisory Council, also established under the
Igisions of the College and Institute Act, consists of representatives
in all B.C. colleges and institutes. It was chaired in 1979/80 by
Ifessistant deputy minister — post-secondary,
ihe council's responsibilities are residual, covering programs not
• gned to other councils, and functions common to all institutions,
mas administration, capital building approvals, support services
Bries, student aid, etc.), the development of a budgeting process
grve the various institutions, long-range planning and personnel
lions.
lembership of the council comprises the board chairman of each
lege and institute (or a person designated by the board chairman),
Beputy minister of education and others appointed by the
Bty minister. Committees of the council were formed to act on
Rtive matters, budget, capital projects, personnel and library
lagement.
■n
LL_
55
 DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
The Department of Ministry Services is responsible for many of tj
activities of the ministry which, though not strictly educational, for..
the infrastructure that makes the delivery of educational programs \t\
possible. These include finance, facilities services (through which II
buildings and equipment are provided) and various ancillary serviaH
including the Division of Educational Policy Development. In
addition, the Division of Data and Information Services provides I
systems development, implementation and management support ta|
sections of the ministry.
During the past year the department continued to concentrates
the improvement of ministry management systems. Development o
long-range planning systems for the ministry and its field agencieS
was continued, and five-year forecasts were analyzed in a numbem
sectors. A number of major reporting systems were made
operational.
The Department of Ministry Services is the focal point for the   I
central agencies of government and the conduit through which tra
are involved in the ministry's long-range fiscal and physical plansH
These agencies include the Treasury Board, the Government
Employee Relations Bureau, the Public Service Commission, the B.(.f
Systems Corporation, and the B.C. Buildings Corporation.
FINANCIAL SERVICES DIVISION
The Financial Services Division is organized into three branchesBl
Schools Finance, Post-Secondary Finance and Ministerial Finance.!
Schools Finance
The main function of the Schools Finance Branch is to monitor tr
expenditures of capital and operating funds in all school districtsffl
branch analyzes the budgetary requirements of the districts,
calculates the value of the instructional unit (the basis on which*
operating grants to districts are determined), advises the governrrS
on the effects of various levels of funding, recommends the mill rffl
which should be established on property taxes for school purposesjj
(the basic levy) and calculates the educational grants payable to eac
district.
For the 1979 calendar year, school district expenditures exceeded
$1 billion (see tables 3.1 and 3.2 for details). Prior to finalization of |
the 1979 budgets, budget reviews were conducted in selected sdw
districts by senior staff of the division.
Between July 1, 1979, and June 30, 1980, seventy-five capital
56
 xpense proposals, amounting to $128.8 million in borrowing
jfhority, were processed. This amount was an increase of 19.25 per
Bt from 1978. Capital expense proposals provide borrowing
Biority to the school districts for the acquisition of capital assets in
3orm of land, buildings, equipment and buses. The actual cost is
jet by the sale of debentures through the British Columbia School
mtricts Capital Financing Authority.
In 1979/80, the branch continued its involvement in processing the
rMool districts' five-year budget projections as well as establishing a
ystem of key management indicators. These indicators provide both
ffiistry and school district officials with measures of management
^Bency not previously available.
A number of special projects were undertaken during this period,
lost important of which was a pilot project involving a number
f school districts with a view to establishing a formal operational
Kt system.
'ost-Secondary Finance
The Post-Secondary Finance Branch, while a functional part of the
epartment of Ministry Services, performs a staff role for the
ost-Secondary Department in areas of accounting, budgeting
|ralysis and forecasting in relation to colleges and institutes in British
olumbia.
In the past academic year, the branch continued to play an
Iffictive role in the implementation of the Post-Secondary Activity
l^sification Structure (PACS), which is the budgetary system
■tablished following implementation of the Colleges and Provincial
IS/tutes Act of 1977 (now the College and Institute Act). In
Imicular, assistance was given to the Management Advisory Council
I id the Ministry Standing Committee which, together
||tti the Academic and Occupational Training
louncils, are responsible for making
icommendations on college and institute
■Sewing and budgets.
; Administration of the capital financing of
ist-secondary facilities continued, as did the
ranch's involvement in the cost-sharing
rangements between the provincial and
deral governments related to post-secondary
^cation. jjjgggS
P ATING EXPENDITURES  by Type of Expenditure OPERATING EXPENDITURES by Major Source of Funding
CAPITAL SUPPORT   EXPENDITURES
lull Basic
Education &
English Language
irce: B.C. Ministry ot Education
57
 Ministerial Finance
The Ministerial Finance Branch is the service section of the
division, responsible for internal finance, compilation of the annl
estimates and development and maintenance of effective interna
financial control systems and products.
The branch maintains liaison with various branches of the MinS
of Finance, including the Comptroller-General's Office and Treasl
Board Staff, regarding financial matters. In addition, the branch i¥
responsible for liaison with the Auditor-General's Branch regardin
expenditure audits on behalf of the ministry. The branch is
responsible for ministerial accounts and, additionally, for monitoffl
and maintaining records of all expenditures, transference of fundi
and other financial adjustments. It provides a monthly update of
expenditures as compared to estimates for all responsibility centrl
managers who are responsible for budgets.
The Ministry of Education budget for 1979/80 was $1,120,957,311
more than 24 per cent of the entire provincial budget.
Public School
Capital Expenditure Approvals
 ACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION
The Facilities Services Division of the Ministry Services Department
jvelops and controls the capital projects required to provide
Jequate facilities in which to offer educational programs to British
olumbians. The division separates naturally into two sections:
Bols and post-secondary institutions.
The schools section has six regional teams, each consisting of a
>-ordinator and a technician who offer full capital projects service
tjie school districts in their regions. The six teams are co-ordinated
i a project control manager to ensure that selection of building
ograms is equitable and monitoring and control of capital projects
consistent across the province. The colleges and universities
ction has two project managers and an executive director to
ovide direct and consistent contact with each institution; overall
i-ordination is provided by the executive director.
l*> Lin*. A".:. -V«afejl&&^ts££St ,*&,'.-*. Jt. rt
ROBRON Junior Secondary School, Campbell River
Gymnasium
Library
Classroom and Equivalent
p 74/75 75/76 76/77
Wise: B.C. Ministry of Education
77/78
78/79
79/80
59
 60
Schools Facilities
The Division of Facilities Services — Schools continued the taskS
assisting school districts in the preparation and processing of capita
budgets. Members of the division visited every school district in tffl
province to provide consultation on site acquisition, school buildiffl
standards, code requirements for safety and fire protection and otfl
facilities matters. The division approved 882 building projects dur^
the 1979/80 fiscal year.
Expenditures for the 1979/80 Fiscal Year
Sites $ 8,840,;
Buildings 72,928,{
Equipment 7,82^
Other 9,45-M
TOTAL $99,043,41
While demands for new school facilities lessened due to declinin i
pupil enrolments, there was a considerable need for building
renovations to bring older facilities up to current standards for
educational program needs, safety and fire protection.
A draft of the revised School Building Manual was prepared and |
was scheduled to be circulated throughout the province during then
latter months of 1980 for comment from the field. The proposed rail
school building standards incorporated in the manual allow for ]
greater flexibility in the design of instructional spaces.
Post-Secondary Facilities
During the past year, the thrust of Post-Secondary Facilities has!
been to build other space evaluation and monitoring mechanismS
the base provided by the computerized space inventory.
A "qualitative" survey was completed on all the buildings whicml
had been identified in the space inventory during the previous yea
Eighty-five per cent of the spaces surveyed were reported to be 1
generally adequate or better. Improvements to the remainder, mSI
of it in buildings between 15 and 20 years old, will be progressiveffll
carried out as part of the capital facilities program.
Work continued to develop criteria and procedures for encourags
ing better utilization of facilities. Guidelines were completed for ■
student station areas in classrooms and a variety of workshops and ;
laboratories. Sample data was collected to initiate the development
of a computer-based system for monitoring and managing room ans
seat utilization.
Using a major construction project as a model, and working in
collaboration with the institution and its construction management n
consultants, innovative procedures were developed for isolating an'i;
monitoring controllable cost factors separately from escalating cost I
increases due to continued inflation. These procedures will now bej
used on other projects.
Progress with several major projects in the 1979/80 academic yeal
emphasized the Ministry of Education's commitment to improved a |
—lU
 Kpanded facilities at British Columbia's post-secondary institutions;
fibroval was given to twenty-seven projects totalling $77.8 million,
Esther with $5.0 million for renovations and public works on
Bees and building systems.
mst Kootenay Community College received approval for develop-
ffit of a $7.5-million core campus to be located on a 31-acre site in
ranbrook. Northern Lights College was authorized to call tenders
B$1.25-million regional campus in Fort Nelson.
The British Columbia Institute of Technology was given approval
ff47,000 square feet of assignable new space at its Burnaby campus,
us renovations to existing facilities, at a total cost of $7.75 million,
mcouver Community College is to have a new 7.8-acre campus at
llffina Creek in Vancouver's east end, acquired for $5.15 million, and
iiproval was given for design of a $17-million facility of 190,000
, uare feet there to replace the leased King Edward campus. New
IBtruction and major renovations over a three-year period at
IBcouver Vocational Institute was authorized at $13.5 million.
[Approval of a new $7.5-million, multi-purpose facility for Capilano
pllege was announced, and construction was launched for both a
7.5-million core campus for Douglas College in New Westminster
d $6-million North Vancouver facility for the Pacific Marine
raining Institute.
Iffiie Facilities Services Division also serves the Ministry of
Imrersities, Science and Communications. Approval was given in the
79/80 fiscal year for expenditure of $14 million on construction,
Iraly in the renovation and public works categories.
HVISION OF DATA SERVICES
u\ID INFORMATION
The Division of Data and Information Services includes the
Imities of data operations, data project development, systems
litfrance, statistical services, information services, project planning
d control and the ministry library.
lata Services
rThe year was one of consolidation and laying the foundation for
Iminuing improvements to the data services provided to the
Irystry and the education community at large.
The responsibilities of this part of the division involved three areas.
stly, the division provided data and services essential to the
smistry for the cost-effective planning, administration, research and
sunagement of the B.C. education enterprise. Secondly, the division
lavided an interface with the B.C. Systems Corporation, outside
Tntractors such as the B.C. Research Council, other government and
Hn-government data agencies, other provincial government educa-
ir)nal data services and the federal government on data matters
61
111
 concerning education. The division also co-operated with Statistic:
Canada, both directly and indirectly through the B.C. Statistics
Bureau, and the statistics committees of the Council of Ministers ot
Education, Canada. Also, as part of this responsibility, the division™
was involved in procuring and managing outside data services andl
making these services available to the ministry program areas.
Thirdly, the division was responsible for the custody and release
ministry data. During the year the division published the ministry™
updated Data Release Policy document which explains how other
jurisdictions, organizations and agencies may apply to the ministrM
for access to current and past educational data. Confidentiality
undertakings are required, however, and these, together with the«
types of use permitted, are explained in the leaflet.
The installation of word processing machines and terminals
connected to large computer systems allowed a significant increases
in secretarial and clerical productivity. In addition, the use of
computer terminals enabled the division staff to design and develop
a number of new and innovative data services for ministry manager
• The Data Operations Section collected extensive data from 1,600
schools, seventy-five school districts and more than 20 post-
secondary institutions, verified the data, and stored it. Over 50,000 (
essential documents are collected each year, many of them comple
Many are stored on microfilm and computer tape. A computerize™
indexing system provides rapid access to records fromas far back ass
1946. Schedules for the return, processing and reporting of the
information have been shortened. This faster turn- around of currSI
data, together with the availability of extensive, detailed historical|j
increased the value of the information to ministry and field
personnel.
• The Project Development Section of the division had the
responsibility for determining and co-ordinating the data requirel
ments of ministry program areas and other educational agencies an
governmental levels, and improving data and information response
capabilities and data bases.
Working closely with the B.C. Research Council and the B.C. I
Systems Corporation, the section established a number of innovativj
and valuable new data programs to improve accessibility. This
enhanced research facility was important because the level of
management information requests continued to increase, not onfuj
frequency but also in complexity. The section ensured that request:
were met in the most expeditious way possible, proposing and 1
developing new systems or revisions to existing ones.
The development of a modern data base for use in research, 1
planning, management and administration will reduce the number
forms used throughout the system, simplify the maintenance and
reorganization of data and enable quick retrieval.
A study of the feasibility of machine-media data collection frorffl
the field was well underway. Under such a system, schools and 1
colleges having data processing systems in place would meet the
62
J]
 iSistry's data collection needs by direct transfer of computer
jrffirds.
A new Systems Assurance function was implemented to provide
Bty control on ministry systems by making a number of
nprovements to existing systems, many of which provided essential
ata to operating divisions of the ministry. It also ensured that
■stems were developed in a way that minimized operational
IBalems for user managers and achieved maximum systems
srformance.
The Statistical Services Section was designed to   provide analysis of
Jucational and related data. Requests required the integration of
fferent sets of data from various services. For example, work started
1 an analysis of public school dropouts which required analysis of
ita on attendance, school organization, teachers, enrolment and
fficial information. Special studies included teacher demand and
pply forecasts and public school enrolment forecasting.
Satistical Services maintained liaison with committees of the
nuncil of Ministers of Education, Canada on the development of
I^Eprovincial information on school operating costs and pupil-
..acher ratios. There was a close liaison with the Central Statistics
jireau of the Ministry of Economic Development which resulted in
je production of a joint report on school district enrolment and
iipil migration.
'oject Planning Centre
3The prime function of the Project Planning Centre is to offer
IfflEct management expertise, tools and techniques for planning
IKontrolling computerized and non-computerized projects to
sure that a project is developed on time, according to a clear plan,
I d to meet specific objectives.
'Originally operated by JEM Research at the University of Victoria,
a planning centre was internalized and became a regular staff
' iction of the ministry in late 1979.
M any time, between twenty and thirty major projects are being
imaged by the centre. Projects monitored during the past year
nrluded: CHOICES — Student Guidance in B.C., Career Preparation,
tructional Use of Microcomputers, Schools Facilities Inventory,
'■lieges and Institutes Budget Data Support System, Ministry
iliancial Management System, Delegation of Authority, BCUC
l^ation Study, OTC Requirement Analysis, Colleges and Insti-
les Financial Systems Study, Northern Colleges Computer Needs
iessment, Okanagan College Computing Needs Assessment and
Baling Enrolments Management Manual.
■he direction of each project is determined by a project review
•Timittee; over 20 such committees operate concurrently. Repression on these committees has been very wide, including people
<lm school districts, colleges and institutes, officials of the Ministry
'Education and other provincial and federal government depart-
1 nts, post-secondary councils and the B.C. Systems Corporation.
UjL
63
 64
The project planning office also prepared discussion papers and
project reports, facilitated the preparation of contracts for consuls
tants and served as an information centre on project progress.   I
Information Services
The Information Services Branch in 1979/80 became part of the
new Division of Data and Information Services. Three information
officers were each given responsibility for a department of the  |
ministry.
Emphasis during the year was placed on spending more time innl
field and using the monthly newspaper Education Today not only t'
promulgate information about ministry programs and concerns bwl
also to serve as a medium for the exchange of educational ideas.fljl
newspaper, as well as the ministry's expanded annual report for
1978/79 and the staff newsletter, Bonus, won awards of distinctioffl|
educational publications in a U.S. competition.
Other Information Services activities included development of a
series of glossy brochures outlining major ministry program areas*
the 1979 Pacific National Exhibition and other events, an exhibit w
developed to convey the concept of learning as a life-long pursira
As a result of this experience, it was recommended that the brand
further expand its PNE activity for 1980 and encourage a broad I
representation from B.C. post-secondary institutions.
The branch also continued in 1979/80 to extend its editorial, I
graphic and advisory services to other sections of the ministry.
Several special brochures and new report formats resulted, incluffll
a standard letterhead design for ministry circulars and bulletins. Al.K
thirteen discussion papers were published and seventy-three news*
releases produced during the year, including eight releases for thei
new Ministry of Universities, Science and Communications.
Ministry Library
In the past year the library used the University of Toronto Librajjl
Automation Service catalogue support system to produce a compui
output microfiche (COM) catalogue. Conversion of all records to
machine-readable form was scheduled for completion by Septembin
1980, with copies of the microfiche catalogues available at varioi™!
locations soon after.
Microfilming of the archive collection of ministry circulars and
curriculum guides also proceeded in co-operation with the Centra;
Microfilm Service.
With such tools, and membership in the B.C . Union Catalogue,
the library contributed to the resource-sharing network of the ■
province. Additionally, research and support services to ministryW
managers increased during 1979/80.
	
 HVISION OF POLICY DEVELOPMENT
The Division of Policy Development evaluates existing policies for
Rtiveness, assesses the needs which must be met, carries out
search into the feasibility of proposed policies, and undertakes
lot projects to test the validity of particular policies.
Several initiatives taken this past year were closely linked. Studies
jgudents who leave school without graduating are continuous and
e effects of local and provincial policies on the numbers involved
e closely observed. Four other areas are allied to this study. A task
roe report on counselling at the secondary levels was made to the
IBstry and has been distributed widely. A pilot study in the use of
computerized career search tool, CHOICES, was undertaken in
i-operation with the Occupational Training Council. Terminals were
aced in ten school districts and two colleges. As a result of the pilot,
ie decision was made to make CHOICES available to all secondary
Ihools and post-secondary institutions in the province.
^tudy was begun into the kinds of information specific to B.C.
pi should be included in the CHOICES program. The following
ids of information have been identified and are being collected:
mand for people in each major industry in B.C., pay ranges,
ticipated technical advances, kinds of training needed and places
lere this training may be obtained.
The decision was made at the end of a pilot project in career
eparation programs to extend the option to all school districts and
provide supplementary resources to those districts which set up
i Dgrams of this kind.
: These initiatives were directed toward providing better, earlier and
user career counselling which is specific to the B.C. situation, and
BRivide opportunities during the last two years of schooling to
jpare students for the years following grade 12.
: The Traffic Safety Program, begun in the United Nations Interna-
llrial Year of the Child, was continued in co-operation with the
^rnstry of Health, and work has begun on a new policy for the
tljwon of a basic schools health service.
?me division co-operated with the Special Services Branch in the
.i/elopment of a policy for the placement and funding of severely
hdicapped children. Liaison was maintained with the Ministry of
lalth in the development of materials to be used from grades 4 to
;'to show the danger of using drugs. Liaison also continued with the
ijfjStry of Highways, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia
ii the Ministry of the Attorney General in the Counter Attack
iiools Program which is aimed at drinking and driving among
Onagers.
he year's activities also included numerous research projects in
iJh areas as provincial sports and fitness programs, cross-grade
(minations, the provision of medication in schools, family life
['grams, student exchange programs and outdoor education.
65
IM.
 SPECIAL REPORTS
66
ADVANCING WITH TECHNOLOGY
IN EDUCATION
With the advent of the 1980s, British Columbia's education system
led by the Ministry of Education, took firm hold of the challenge an
opportunity presented by increasingly sophisticated computer and
communications technology.
Management information systems such as PACS (Post-Secondary
Activity Classification Structure) have received developmental
emphasis over the past several years, with PACS becoming fully   1
operational in 1979/80. A Project Planning Centre was establishedB
within ministry headquarers in late 1979, and development pro- 1
gressed on a computer acquisition policy for B.C. school districts^!
In March the Ministry of Education sponsored a well-attended■
conference on the instructional use of microcomputers. There it vS
announced that an experiment on this teacher-support technology
would begin in the fall of 1980 though a pilot project in which 100
units would be placed in B.C. schools at a purchase cost of
approximately $330,000.
Deputy Minister Dr. Walter Hardwick told the conference,
crowded with interested teachers, that "microcomputers are a new
technology which may have major implications for the learning 1
process at (B.C.) schools, colleges and universities . . ." He stressed
the importance of developing the necessary educational programs*
suitable to British Columbia, for use with classroom microcomputer:
It was announced that the 100 microcomputers would be
purchased through the B.C. Systems Corporation for placement I
under ministry direction in schools of various sizes in both urban ar
rural areas. They would be used for computer literacy, computers
science and remedial instruction, and to augment regular classroom
teaching.
Another technological development was CHOICES, a computer-
based career counselling system which matches the aptitudes and
ambitions of individual students with one or more of 1,114 primary
occupations and 3,000 related jobs which are listed in a central 1
computer. (These represent ninety-five per cent of those employed |
in Canada.) Examination of CHOICES began in 1977 and by the end
of the 1979/80 academic year, following a successful pilot project*!
managed by the Occupational Training Council, the Ministry of
Education neared final approval of a program which will offer   j
CHOICES terminals to all B.C. secondary schools and colleges. As in
the Lower Mainland pilot project, these terminals would be linked I
a B.C. Systems computer in Victoria.
 for a number of years the B.C. Ministry of Education has been
wincing the concept of employing interactive television broadcast-
ig by satellite to overcome the barriers of distance and isolation to
location in this large and mountainous province. In a two-month
<periment in 1977, video and audio signals were relayed by
ffiada's Hermes satellite to receiving dishes at a logging camp and
mr colleges in widely separated parts of the province, and audio
gnals were returned to the Provincial Educational Media Centre
Buo in Burnaby.
British Columbia extended its leadership in this field in 1979/80
irough a year-long program of regular interactive instruction via the
^Rr Anik B satellite from the British Columbia Institute of
ffiinology to six colleges in northern and eastern B.C. and, as well,
e Yukon Vocational and Technical Training Centre and the
^ersity of Victoria. Students were thus able to receive lectures and
Barticipate in class discussion almost as though they were in a
LTT seminar room in Burnaby.
ffien in June, 1980, building further on this pioneering work of the
ffistry of Education, the B.C. government announced establishment
: the Knowledge Network of the West Communications Authority
Kl)W) to co-ordinate distance education programs of universities,
jieges, provincial institutes and school districts and to manage a
:w telecommunications delivery system.
KNOW would not produce its own programming, it was stated, but
fflld assist other institutions in the development and distribution of
eir education materials. The Knowledge Network would have three
^ffSjts:
a closed-circuit cable and micro-wave system connecting the three
Kiiversities, BCIT, the Open Learning Institute, the Robson Square
Law Courts and the Vancouver teaching hospitals;
a closed-circuit, low-power transmission and satellite link to
Hf-campus, interior and northern locations;
Sblic access to an educational channel on community cable
Stems wherever located around the province.
Thus, as the 1979/80 academic year came to a close, CHOICES,
*JOW and classroom microcomputers were being entered below
e B.C. Union Catalogue (a computerized file of all books in B.C.
(Bersity, college and public libraries) and other major innovations
previous years on the list of Ministry of Education advances in the
(Ration of computers and high-technology communications.
67
IA-
   CHILDREN'S ART
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Creative activity is a crucial factor of human experience, the m§
of self-revelation, the basis of empathy with others. Art teaching
forms the foundation of visual literacy. Perception of the world
around is dominated by the eye, and the eye is also the window
the inner worlds of imagination, feeling and expression.
These catalogue reflections helped introduce the British Columbi
Exhibition of Children's Art which toured thirteen centres across tl
province for ten months from September, 1979. Organized by tha
Emily Carr College of Art Outreach Program and supported by thl
Ministry of Education, the exhibition assembled 192 outstanding 1
paintings, prints and drawings created by students and children frm
age two to eighteen years in seventy-seven B.C. communities. The™
were selected from more than 5,200 submissions from students irj
public and independent schools and the Ministry of Education
correspondence program, as well as others.
"We look for those personal qualities which transcend style, whic
have something to say, something to reveal of the child's response
to life and the physical world, as well as the imaginative inner lifeffi
the child," the ECCA Dean of Instruction, Tom Hudson, said in hia
catalogue notes. The sampling on these pages (mostly from originffl
in colour) concentrates thematically on students' perception of thg
people that affect their lives.
70
 obyn Else, age 15
Ictoria
mil Lee, age 11
Rcouver
Charlene Kalln, age 5
Vancouver
71
 Wendy Turza, age 12
Daria Mantua, age 17
Vancouver
Terrace
Mana Inoue, age 18
Vancouver
72
 Bin Parker, age 13
Rcouver
ra Schneider, age 4
Rcouver
Raymond Port, age 15
Kelowna
Carole Blackburn, age 15
Courtenay
73
 Linda Wemer, age 16
Vancouver
Robin Gallacher, age 9
Chase
' If A h
74
Theresa Koster, age 17
Clinton
*-*£■
l\<"k\i
 jnjeel Bralch, age 11
Rcouver
In Grierson, age 14
ncouver
*4    »S
>^>»t   7
Bob Mattheson age 13
Vancouver
Lillian Varl, age 16
Vancouver
 Joni Collett, age 13
Vancouver
76
 COLLEGE REGIONS
AND SCHOOL DISTRICTS
77
 College and Main
School Districts           *
Campus:
included
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
in College Region:
61,62,63,64
Victoria
^B
CAPILANO COLLEGE
44, 45, 46, 48
•*d
North Vancouver
CARIBOO COLLEGE
24, 26, 27, 29, 30, 31
Kamloops
COLLEGE OF
NEW CALEDONIA
55, 56, 57, 28
Prince George
\   * m
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
35, 36, 37,38, 40,41, 42, 43            _.
\       «l
New Westminster
A
1 v<s
EAST KOOTENAY
1, 2, 3, 4, 18,                                      M
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
V2 of 86, (South of Sanka Creek)
Cranbrook
1
iV \ >
FRASER VALLEY COLLEGE
32, 33, 34, 75, 76                                     '
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MALASPINA COLLEGE
65, 66, 68, 69, 47
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70, 71, 72, 84, 85, 49
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NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE 59, 81, 87, 60
Dawson Creek
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50, 52, 54, 80, 88, 92
Terrace
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14, 15, 16, 19, 21, 17, 22, 23, 77, 89
Kelowna
SELKIRK COLLEGE
7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
Castlegar
% Of 86 (North of Sanka Creek)
VANCOUVER
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
39, 38, 41
Vancouver
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T61
  PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2.   Teachers
TABLE
2.1 Distribution of full and part-time professional staff by type of school	
2.2 Teachers' certificates	
2.3 Teachers and principals with and without university degrees	
2.4 Highest degree by faculty and level	
2.5 New inquiries and sources of full-time and part-time teaching force	
2.6 British Columbia public school full-time and part-time teacher flow, September 1978
to September 1979  	
2.7 Changes in numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers during the school year
2.8 Sources of teachers beginning in British Columbia, September 1979 (those with less
than one year of British Columbia experience)	
2.9 Numbers of trainees completing certification programs at British Columbia uni
versities in 1978/79 and teaching/not teaching in September 1979 	
2.10 Certificates issued during the 1979/80 school year (July 1, 1979 to June 30, 1980)
2.11 Number of full-time and part-time teachers by type of certificate and average years of
British Columbia experience	
2.12 Certificates and degrees of full-time and part-time teachers, principals and super
visors, September 1978 and September 1979 	
2.13 Certification of full-time and part-time British Columbia teachers according to
location of initial teacher training, September 1978 and September 1979	
2.14 Statistical summary of British Columbia exchange teachers and their geographic
distribution	
Teachers' Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Salaries by Type of School:
2.15 Supervising principals and vice-principals	
2.16 School attached teachers (including teaching principals and vice-principals)	
2.17 District-wide supervisory and instructional staff	
2.18 Total district-wide supervisory and school attached teachers  	
2.19 Full-time equivalent district-employed — administrative and instructional staff (not
assigned to specific schools)	
2.20 B.C. public school pupil/teacher ratios by school district	
2.21 Agedistributionoffullandpart-timeB.C. public school teachers by sex in September
1979 expressed as a percentage	
2.22 Source of initial teacher training of B. C. public school teachers by year initial teacher
training completed for all B.C. public school teachers	
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
2.23 School broadcasts	
2.24 (1) Distribution of audio-visual materials 	
(2) Distribution services circulation report 	
T63
 TABLE 2.1 DISTRIBUTION OFFULL AND PART-TIME
PROFESSIONAL STAFF BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Number Tota]
Type or School                                       of                      Admimslralive               Inslniclional Profes.ion.1
Schools                        SHUT1                         Staff2 Sf
Senior secondary              25                                       57                              1,297 l 354
Secondary            153                                     312                             5,970 6^82
Junior secondary           115                                 217                          3,406 3/J23
Elementary-senior secondary             19                                   34                             458 492
Elementary-junior secondary            69                                   59                             813 872
Elementary        1,225                                 883                         14,317 15,200
District-wide instructional staff             —                                      —                                614 614
District-wide administrative staff            —                                 384                                 334
TOTALS         1.606                                  1,946                           26,875 28.821
Source: September 1979 Forms I and J.
1 Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51 % or more of their time in administration.
2 Instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time.
T64
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T65
 TABLE 2.3 TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS
WITH AND WITHOUT UNIVERSITY DEGREES
SEPTEMBER 1979
Highest Degre
Type of School Bachelors
Senior secondary  969
Secondary  4,673
Junior secondary   2.848
Elementary-senior secondary  350
Elementary-junior secondary  598
Elementary  8,992
District-wide instructors 	
Total instructional staff	
District-wide supervisory staff
Total staff....!..  18,9!
Percent
Masters or      of teachers
Doctorate     in school type
Percent
of teachers
in school type
160
20.2
493
11.6
70
1.5
87
2.4
Oil
34.7
187
1.8
0.3
1.6
5,197
99
6,282
3,623
15,200
614
21.8
12.6
18,758
3,304
76.5
6.375
22,
28.437
98.7
163
198
1.3
23
0.1
384
1.3
Source: September 1979FormJ.
Note: Part-time teachers are included.
T66
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2,760          3,135
321          1,318
253            539
21              396
50            193
14              63
156              144
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5 20
45 94
19                13
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T67
 TABLE 2.5 NEW INQUIRIES AND SOURCE OF
FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME TEACHING FORCE
Source of
Initial Teacher
Training
New Inquiries
Received in
School-year
1979/80
First Certificate
Issued in
School-year
1979/80
to Persons
Initially
Teaching in
Sept. 1979 but
not Teaching
in B.C.
Public School
System in
Sept. 1978
Total
Sept. 1979
Teachers
British Columbia:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Prairie Provinces:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Ontario:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Quebec:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Atlantic Provinces:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Canada:	
Number	
Per Cent	
United Kingdom:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Europe:	
Number.	
Per Cent	
United States:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Australia, New Zealand:	
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:.
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Non-Canadtan and Not Reported: .
Number	
Per Cent	
1,215
41.8
574
19.8
110
3.8
2,548
87.7
21
0.7
38
1.5
2,506
99.6
2,143
75.2
2.579
90.5
21,690
75.3
2,476
8.6
270
9.5
3,162
11.0
2,515
100
2,849
100
       2,904
28,821
Source: Teacher Services Branch records and September, 1979FormJ.
T68
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T70
 TABLE 2.8
SOURCE OF TEACHERS'
BEGINNING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 1979
(THOSE WITH LESS THAN ONE YEAR OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE)
Elementary Beginners
Secondary
Beginners
Location of Initial
Teacher Education
Number
Per Cent
of Elementary
Beginners
PerCent
of All
Beginners
Number
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners
Per Cent
of All
Beginners
Total
British Columbia —
UBC   	
280
144
34.7
17.9
22.1
0.9
22.1
11.4
14.0
0.6
197
64
68
12
42.7
13.9
14.8
2.6
15.5
5.0
5.3
0.9
477
SFU 	
NDU 	
B.C. Normal School, other and
178
7
246
19
TOTALS, PROVINCIAL	
609
75.6
48.1
341
74.0
26.9
950
Alberta	
32
20
4.0
2.5
1.7
5.7
3.2
0.5
2.5
1.6
1.1
3.6
2.1
0.3
28
9
8
32
3
9
6.1
2.0
1.7
6.9
0.7
1.7
0.7
0.6
2.5
0.2
0.6
60
29
46
26
78
29
Yukon 	
17.7
11.3
89
19.3
7.0
United Kingdom and Europe 	
13
1.6
2.7
0.4
0.5
0.9
1.0
1.7
0.2
0.3
0.6
11
11
1
2
1
2.4
2.4
0.2
0.4
0.2
0.8
0.8
0.1
24
33
Africa 	
Australia  	
3
4
4
6
8
6.1
3.9
26
5.6
2.0
75
0.6
0.4
5
1.1
0.3
10
TOTAL, BEGINNERS	
806
100.0
63.6
461
100.0
36.3
1,267
Source: September 1979 Form J.
1 Includes school-attached and district-wide full-time and part-time public school teachers.
T71
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T72
 TABLE 2.10 CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING
THE 1979 / 80 SCHOOL YEAR
(JULY 11979 TO JUNE 30, 1980)
Teaching
Licence
13
13
In addition, 157 Letters of Permission were issued for the 1979/80 school year.
Source: TeacherServicesBranchrecords.
Li
cence
standard
Diploma
Other
Total
13
83
680
775
2.077
49
-
871
2.806
TOTALS	
13
763
2,852
49
-
3,677
TABLE 2.11 NUMBER OF FULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME TEACHERS B Y TYPE OF CERTIFICATE AND AVERAGE
YEARS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE
Professional
Standard
Teaching
Licence
Instructor's
Diploma
Letter of
Permission
Total
Number of teachers	
Average years of British
Columbia experience ...
22,887
9.9
4,645
7.9
1,095
15.2
65
8.5
129
2.5
28,821
10.0
Source: September 1979 Form J.
T73
 TABLE 2.12 CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES OF
TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS
SEPTEMBER 1978 AND SEPTEMBER 1979
Sept
mber 1978
Sept
mber 1979
Changes in
of Staff
Qualifications
Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
PerCent
Certificate —
Teaching licence	
22,702
4,742
70
78.6
16.4
0.2
3.9
0.2
0.6
22,887
4,645
66
1,029
65
129
79.4
16.1
0.2
3.6
0.2
0.4
185
- 97
- 4
- 90
0
_ 39
0.8
- 2.0
- 5.7
Instructor's Diploma	
Letter of Permission	
65
168
0.0
-  23.2
TOTALS	
28.866
100.0
28,821
100.0
- 45
-    0.2
Degree
69
0.2
10.9
65.6
23.2
79
3,423
18,921
6.398
0.3
11.9
65.7
22.2
10
279
- 29
-305
14.5
Bachelor's	
None K. ■
18.950
6,703
- 0.2
- 4.6
TOTALS	
28,866
100
28,821
100
- 45
-    0.2
Source: September 1979 Form J.
1 Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C.
2 Including Elementary A.
T74
 TABLE 2.13 CERTIFICATION OFFULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME BRITISH COLUMBIA TEACHERS ACCORDING TO
LOCATION OF INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING,
SEPTEMBER 1978 AND SEPTEMBER 1979
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current Other
British Columbia British Columbia Canadian
Certificate Provinces Countries Reported
Sept. 1978 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1979
Other
Countries
Totals
Professional
N  17.085
A  79.2
B  75.3
C  59.2
Standard2
N  3,410
A  15.8
B  71.9
C  11.8
Teaching Licence
N  930
A  4.3
B  78.2
C  3.2
Instructor's Diploma
N  51
A  0.2
B  78.5
C  0.2
Letter of Permission
N  96
A  0.4
B  57.1
C  0.3
TOTALS
N  21.572
A  100.0
B  74.7
C  74.7
17.354
80.0
75.8
60.2
3.348
860
4.0
78.5
13.8
10.9
16.1
0.7
30
0.7
17.9
3,094
78.0
13.5
10.7
677
15.8
0.6
5.6
0.2
21
0.7
12.5
2,433
77.6
10.6
19.7
13.3
2.0
5.7
14
0.4
10.9
0.0
6 22,702 22,887
24.0 78.6 79.4
0.0 100.0 100.0
0.0 78.6 79.4
0.0
0.0
4,742
4,645
100.0
16.1
21.690 4,070 3.969 3,194 3,137 30 25 28,866 28.821
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
75.3 14.1 13.8 11.1 10.9 0.1 0.1 100.0 100.0
75.3 14.1 13.8 11.1 10.9 0.1 0.1 IO0.0 100.0
Source: September 1979 Form J.
N = Number of teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as a percentage
of:
A = Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B = Percentageofteachersfiomalljurisdictionsholdingthattypeof certificate.
C = Percentageofteachersfromalljurisdictionsholdingalltypesofcertificates.
1 Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic and Professional C certificates.
2 Including Elementary A certificates.
3 Including Elementary B certificates.
T75
'—
 TABLE 2.14 STATISTICAL SUMMARY
OFBRITISH COLUMBIA EXCHANGE
TEACHERS AND THEIR GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION
Interprovincial
School
Year U.K.       U.S.        Ontario       Quebec      Saskatchewan     Nova Scotia    Australia Other
1921
4
1922
5
1923
3
1924
3
1925
9
1926
7
1927
9
1928
8
1929
8
1930
13
1931
8
1932
8
1933
2
1934
5
1935
9
1936
17
1937
18
1938
21
1939
14
1947
16
1948/49
13
1949/50
17
1950/51
12
1951/52
21
1952/53
18
1953/54
19
1954/55
18
1955/56
22
1956757
22
1957/58
23
1958/59
26
1959/60
26
1960/61
26
1961/62
23
1962/63
22
1963/64
22
1964/65
23
1965/66
20
1966/67
24
1967/68
25
1968/69
16
1969/70
13
1970/71
17
1971/72
16
1972/73
15
1973/74
2!
1974/75
10
1975/76
10
1976/77
10
1977/78
12
1978/79
17
1979/80
14
4 3 — 2 1 24
8 3 1 —35
6 11 22
5 I — — 28
2 1 1                                         —                     26
T76
 TABLE 2.15 SCHOOL-ATTACHED FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT (FTE) SUPERVISING PRINCIPALS
AND VICE-PRINCIPALS
Elem.-
Junior
Elem.-
Senior
Secondary
FTE
Salaries
48,499 — 48,998..
47,999 — 48,498..
47,499 — 47,998..
46,999 — 47.498..
46,499 — 46.998..
45,999 — 46,498..
45,499 — 45,998..
44,999 — 45,498..
44,499 — 44,998..
43,999 — 44,498.
43,499 — 43,998.
42,999 — 43,498..
42,499 — 42,998.
41,999 — 42,498..
41,499 — 41,998..
40,999 — 41,498..
40,499 — 40,998..
39,999 — 40,498..
39,499 — 39,998..
38,999—39,498..
38,499 — 38,998..
37,999—38,498..
37,499—37,998..
36,999 — 37,498..
36.499 — 36,998..
35,999 — 36,498..
35,499 — 35,998..
34,999 — 35,498..
34,499 — 34,998..
33.999 — 34,498..
33,499 — 33,998..
32,999 — 33.498..
32,499 — 32.998..
31,999 — 32,498..
31.499—31.998..
30,999 — 31,498..
30,499 — 30,998..
29,999 — 30,498..
29,499 — 29,998..
28,999 — 29,498..
28.499 — 28,998..
27.999 — 28,498..
27,499 — 27.998..
26,999 — 27,498..
26,499 — 26,998..
25,999 — 26,498..
25,499 — 25.998..
24,999 — 25,498..
24,499 — 24.998..
23,999 — 24,498..
23,499 — 23,998.
22,999 — 23,498.
22,499 — 22,998.
21,999 — 22,498.
21,499 — 21,998.
20.999 — 21,498.
20,499 — 20.998.
19,999 — 20.498.
19,499 — 19,998.
18.999—19,498.
18,499—18,998.
17.999— 18,498.
17,499— 17,998.
16,999—17,498.
16,499— 16,998.
15,999— 16,498.
15.499—15,998.
14,999—15,498.
Not Reported .
8.0
2.0
8.0
26.0
12.0
46.0
41.0
18.0
57.0
25.0
50.0
44.0
45.0
33.0
53.0
41.0
45.0
35.0
33.0
31.0
23.0
23.0
21.0
21.0
20.0
11.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
14.0
II.0
4.0
6.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
21.0
16.0
14.0
10.0
11.0
10.0
10.0
15.0
10.0
10.0
9.0
12.0
7.0
11.0
8.0
1.0
1.0
—
5.0
99.5
.0
1.0
99.2
.0
2.0
99.1
.0
6.0
99.0
.0
10.0
98.6
—
10.0
98.0
.0
9.0
97.3
.0
15.0
96.7
—
4.0
95.8
.0
J 2.0
95.5
.0
7.0
94.8
.0
73.0
94.3
.0
13.0
89.6
.0
37.0
88.8
.0
37.0
86.4
.0
39.0
84.1
.0
49.0
81.6
.0
33.0
78.4
.0
63.0
76.3
—
68.0
72.3
.0
48.0
67.9
.0
85.0
64.9
.0
47.0
59.4
.0
73.0
56.4
.0
79.0
51.7
.0
74.0
46.7
—
48.0
41.9
.0
72.0
38.9
.0
63.0
34.3
—
61.0
30.2
1.0
67.0
26.3
.0
56.0
22.0
—
42.0
18.4
—
36.0
15.7
—
35.0
13.4
0.4
0.3
0.2
TOTALS	
MEDIANS	
      883.0
 S34.038
59.0
$33,312
33.0
$36,249
217.0
$35,874
313.0
$36,749
57.0
$38,124
1,562.0
$34,828
T77
Median Salary | $34,828; Mean Salary = $34,887.
 TABLE 2.16 SCHOOL-ATTACHED FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT (FTE) TEACHERS (INCLUDING TEACHING
PRINCIPALS AND VICE-PRINCIPALS)
Sec.
Senior
Sec.
Sec.
dary
Sec.
Total
Percent
FTE
Salaries
1.0
1.6
100.0
—
—
1.0
—
—
2.5
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
3.0
100.0
—
—
—
0.5
—
9.3
100.0
1.0
—
1.0
—
2.0
8.0
99.9
—
—
—
—
1.0
11.0
99.9
—
1.0
—
—
1.0
21.5
99.9
1.0
—
—
—
—
10.0
99.8
—
—
—
1.0
—
9.0
99.7
—
—
—
1.0
—
17.5
99.7
0.5
—
3.6
3.0
1.0
26.1
99.6
0.6
—
1.0
2.5
—
20.6
99.5
1.0
3.0
3.0
16.0
4.0
62.0
99.4
2.0
1.0
3.0
19.0
2.0
52.5
99.2
2.0
5.0
5.0
94.0
9.0
153.5
99.0
3.0
3.0
25.0
45.0
16.0
131.1
98.4
4.0
4.0
22.0
60.0
19.0
150.0
97.9
7.0
18.0
62.6
437.5
79.0
803.5
97.3
10.2
4.0
103.9
158.5
102.0
513.4
94.1
7.0
15.0
69.9
192.1
70.0
433.3
92.0
5.5
3.0
29.7
70.5
19.0
163.3
90.3
13.0
8.0
61.0
135.0
21.0
301.0
89.7
32.2
24.7
151.5
494.3
71.5
1.180.8
88.5
26.0
13.0
334.8
403.3
186.0
1.406.5
83.8
50.0
15.2
259.9
484.2
140.6
1,362.3
78.2
5.5
1.0
92.5
120.8
35.0
375.8
72.8
27.7
13.0
50.5
147.8
18.0
414.3
71.3
15.0
11.0
95.5
160.1
32.0
525.7
69.7
21.3
13.5
73.0
141.3
25.5
491.3
67.6
30.4
13.0
141.6
233.8
54.0
1,412.3
65.7
34.7
21.5
198.8
226.3
56.6
1.330.3
60.1
20.4
9.0
92.6
169.9
22.0
608.6
54.8
19.4
7.0
130.8
166.5
28.2
721.8
52.4
34.1
25.5
99.1
217.3
23.5
810.8
49.5
26.8
24.0
148.3
231.4
34.0
1,013.1
46.3
23.9
7.6
143.3
180.4
20.4
985.9
42.3
25.2
25.0
150.2
242.0
40.0
1,816.4
38.4
38.6
13.9
135.9
152.5
26.5
999.1
31.2
29.1
13.0
105.8
166.0
41.5
956.7
27.2
37.3
19.0
148.4
175.0
16.8
1.038.8
23.4
45.0
29.0
126.7
147.4
13.0
1,265.0
19.3
31.4
26.5
92.5
130.3
16.0
741.7
14.3
35.0
17.0
66.0
92.7
11.0
659.9
11.3
27.2
6.0
48.4
68.0
13.6
598.9
8.7
11.0
7.0
31.1
30.9
1.4
388.8
6.3
29.7
10.0
10.5
34.4
2.0
399.2
4.8
15.6
9.0
21.1
15.5
1.5
344.8
3.2
11.0
3.0
8.3
11.0
3.5
172.6
1.9
12.0
2.0
2.0
5.2
2.0
167.4
1.2
2.0
1.0
6.0
4.0
—
78.9
0.5
s
37,999—38,498   0.6
37,499—37,998   1-5
36,999—37,498   1.0
36.499 — 36,998   3.0
35.999—36,498   8.8
35,499 — 35,998   4.0
34.999 — 35,498   10.0
34,499 _ 34.998   19.5
33.999 — 34,498   9.0
33,499 — 33,998   8.0
32.999 — 33,498   16.5
32,499—32,998   18.0
31,999 — 32,498   16.5
31.499 — 31,998   35.0
30.999 — 31,498   25.5
30,499 — 30,998   38.5
29,999—30.498   39.1
29,499—29,998   41.0
28.999 — 29,498   199.4
28,499 — 28,998   134.8
27.999—28,498   79.4
27.499 — 27,998   35.6
26.999 — 27,498   63.0
26,499 — 26.998   406.6
25,999 — 26,498   443.4
25,499—25,998   412.3
24,999 — 25,498   121.1
24,499 — 24,998   157.2
23,999 — 24.498   212.1
23,499—23,998   216.7
22,999 — 23,498    939.4
22,499 — 22,998    792.4
21,999 — 22,498    294.7
21,499 — 21,998    369.9
20,999 — 21,498    411.3
20,499 — 20.998    548.6
19,999 — 20.498    610.2
19,499— 19.998    1,333.9
18,999— 19,498    631.7
18,499— 18,998    601.4
17,999—18,498    642.4
17,499— 17,998    903.7
16,999— 17,498    445.0
16,499— 16,998    438.2
15,999— 16.498    435.7
15,499—15,998    307.4
14,999— 15,498    312.6
14,499— 14,998    282.1
13.999— 14,498    135.8
13,499— 13,998    144.2
12,999— 13,498    65.9
12,499—12,998    3.5
11.999— 12,498    29.6
11,499 — 11,998    4.4
10,999— 11,498    0.5
Not Reported  —
TOTALS 	
MEDIANS	
   13,461.9
    $20,010
776.3
$20,745
448.4
$21,179
3,359.9
$22,775
5.891.3
$24,313
1,283.1
$25,864
25,220.9
$21,585
-
Median Salary = $21,585;Mean Salary
Source: September 1979 Form J.
$21,932.
T78
 TABLE 2.17 DISTRICT-WIDE FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENTfFTE) SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL
STAFF (NOT ATTACHED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
Salary
Mid-Point
Number of
FTE Persons
Cumulative
Percent
FTE
Salaries
$
48,499 — 48,998 .
47,999 — 48,498 .
47,499 — 47,998 .
46,999 — 47,498 .
46,499 — 46.998 .
45,999—46,498 .
45,499 — 45,998 .
44,999 — 45.498 .
44,499 — 44,998 .
43,999 — 44,498 .
43,499 — 43,998 .
42,999 — 43,498 .
42,499 — 42,998 .
41,999 — 42,498 .
41,499 — 41,998 .
40,999 — 41,498 .
40,499 — 40,998 .
39,999 — 40,498 .
39,499 — 39,998 .
38.999 — 39,498 .
38,499—38,998 .
37,999—38,498 .
37.499 — 37,998 .
36,999 — 37,498 .
36,499 — 36,998 .
35,999 — 36.498 .
35,499 — 35,998 .
34.999 — 35,498 .
34,499 — 34,998 .
33,999 — 34,498 .
33,499 — 33,998 .
32,999 — 33,498 .
32,499 — 32,998 .
31,999 — 32,498 .
31,499—31,998 .
30,999 — 31,498 .
30,499—30,998 .
29.999 — 30,498 .
29.499 — 29,998 .
28,999 — 29,498 .
28,499—28,998 .
27,999 — 28,498 .
27,499—27,998 .
26,999 — 27,498 .
26,499 — 26,998 .
25,999 — 26.498 .
25,499 — 25,998 .
24,999 — 25,498 .
24,499—24,998 .
23,999—24,498 .
23,499—23,998 .
22,999—23,498 .
22,499 — 22,998 .
21,999—22,498 .
21,499 — 21,998 .
20,999—21,498 .
20.499 — 20,998 .
19.999 — 20,498 .
19,499— 19,998 .
18,999— 19,498 .
18,499— 18,998 .
17.999— 18,498 .
17,499— 17,998 .
16,999— 17,498 .
16,499—16,998 .
15,999 — 16,498 .
15,499— 15,998 .
14,999— 15,498 .
14.499— 14,998 .
13,999 — 14,498 .
13,499— 13,998 .
12,999— 13,498 .
12,499— 12,998 .
11.999— 12,498 .
Not Reported	
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
$
48,749
48,249
47,749
47,249
46,749
46,249
45,749
45,249
44,749
44,249
43,749
43.249
42,749
42,249
41,749
41,249
40.749
40,249
39,749
39,249
38,749
38,249
37,749
37,249
36.749
36,249
35,749
35,249
34,749
34,249
33.749
33,249
32,749
32,249
31,749
31,249
30,749
30,249
29,749
29,249
28,749
28.249
27.749
27,249
26.749
26,249
25,749
25,249
24,749
24,249
23,749
23,249
22,749
22,249
21,749
21,249
20,749
20,249
19,749
19,249
18,749
18,249
17,749
17,249
16,749
16,249
15,749
15,249
14,749
14,249
13,749
13,249
12,749
12,249
4.0
7.0
10.0
19.5
29.6
9.0
14.0
17.0
12.0
7.0
7.0
17.0
12.0
16.0
17.0
19.0
16.0
6.0
25.0
30.7
31.0
23.0
19.0
25.2
39.9
34.0
18.5
20.4
12.5
20.1
22.2
39.8
14.6
18.6
9.8
20.0
29.5
26.2
22.0
19.3
26.7
25.1
14.0
99.4
99.0
98.2
97.8
97.6
97.2
97.0
96.3
95.5
94.9
94.3
93.5
92.6
91.4
90.8
90.1
89.2
88.2
86.2
83.1
82.1
80.7
78.9
77.7
77.0
76.2
74.5
73.2
71.6
69.8
67.8
66.2
65.6
63.0
59.8
56.6
54.2
52.2
49.6
45.5
41.9
40.0
37.9
36.6
34.5
32.2
28.1
26.6
24.6
23.6
21.5
T79
Median Salary = $26,577; Mean Salary = $27,482.
Source: September 1979 Form J.	
 TABLE 2.18 total full-time equivalent
(FTE) DISTRICT-WIDE AND SCHOOL-ATTACHED TEACHERS
Cumulaliv
Number of
Percent
FTE Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
48,499 — 48,998 .
47.999 — 48,498 .
47,499 — 47,998 .
46,999 — 47,498 .
46,499 — 46,998 .
45,999 _ 46,498 .
45.499 — 45.998 .
44,999 — 45.498 .
44,499 — 44,998 .
43,999 — 44.498 .
43,499 — 43,998 .
42,999 — 43,498 .
42,499 — 42,998 .
41,999 — 42,498 .
41,499 — 41,998 .
40,999 — 41,498 .
40,499 — 40.998 .
39.999 — 40,498 .
39,499— 39,998 ,
37,999 — 39,498 ,
38,499—38.998 .
37,999—38.498 .
37,499 — 37,998 .
36,999 — 37,498 .
36,499 — 36.998 .
35.999 — 36,498 ,
35,499 _ 35,998 .
34,999—35,498 .
34,499 — 34,998 .
33,999 — 34,498 .
33,499 — 33,998 .
32,999 — 33,498 .
32,499 — 32,998 .
31,999 — 32.498 .
31,499—31.998 .
30,999—31,498 .
30,499 — 30,998 .
29,999 — 30.498 .
29,499—29.998 .
28,999—29.498 .
28,499—28.998 .
27,999—28,498 .
27.499—27,998 .
26.999 — 27,498 ,
26,499 — 26,998 .
25,999 — 26,498 .
25,499 — 25,998 .
24,999 — 25,498 .
24,499 — 24,998 .
23,999 — 24.498 .
23,499 — 23,998 .
22,999 — 23,498 .
22,499 — 22,998 .
21,999 — 22.498 .
21,499 — 21.998 .
20,999—21.498 .
20,499 — 20,998 .
19,999—20,498 .
19.499— 19,998 .
18.999— 19,498 .
18,499— 18.998 .
17,999— 18.498 .
17,499—17,998 .
16,999—17,498 .
16,499— 16,998 .
15,999— 16,498 .
15,499— 15.998 .
14,999— 15,498 .
14,499 — 14,998 .
13,999— 14,498 .
13,499— 13,998 .
12,999— 13,498 .
12.499— 12,998 .
11,999— 12,498 .
11,499— 11,998 .
10.999— 11,498 .
Not Reported	
T80 TOTAL	
MEDIAN	
$
48,749
4.0
100.0
48,249
—
—
47,749
7.0
100.0
47,249
—
—
46,749
5.0
100.0
46.249
4.0
99.9
45,749
2.0
99.9
45,249
10.0
99.9
44,749
17.0
99.9
44,249
14.0
99.8
43,749
11.0
99.8
43,249
19.0
99,7
42,749
6.0
99.7
42.249
19.0
99.6
41.749
14.0
99.6
41,249
79.0
99.5
40,749
19.0
99.2
40.249
45.0
99.2
39,749
45.5
99.0
39,249
50.5
98.8
38,749
55.0
98.7
38,249
41.0
98.5
37,749
74.1
98.3
37,249
79.0
98.0
36,749
70.5
97.8
36,249
123.9
97.5
35,749
64.0
97.1
35,249
98.0
96.8
34,749
117.5
96.5
34,249
96.0
96.1
33,749
64.0
95.7
33,249
96.5
95.5
32,749
106.1
95.1
32,249
93.6
94.8
31.749
145.0
94.4
31.249
125.5
93.9
30.749
214.5
93.4
30,249
183.1
92.7
29,749
191.0
92.0
29,249
855.5
91.3
28,749
575.1
88.2
28,249
492.3
86.2
27,749
203.3
84.4
27,249
330.0
83.7
26,749
1,222.0
82.5
26,249
1,455.4
78.1
25,749
1,405.3
72.8
25,249
399.3
67.8
24,749
440.7
66.3
24,249
543.2
64.7
23,749
513.4
62.8
23,249
1,438.5
60.9
22,749
1,370.1
55.7
22.249
625.2
50.8
21,749
741.4
48.5
21,249
821.6
45.9
20,749
1.033.1
42.9
20,249
1,015.4
39.2
19,749
1,842.6
35.5
19,249
1,021.2
28.9
18,749
976.0
25.2
18,249
1,065.5
21.7
17,749
1.290.1
17.8
17,249
755.7
13.2
16,749
664.7
10.5
16.249
610.9
8.1
15,749
392.8
5.9
15,249
413.0
4.5
14,749
347.9
3.0
14,249
176.1
1.7
13,749
169.6
1.1
13,249
80.4
0.5
12,749
7.9
0.2
12,249
36.6
0.2
11,749
5.4
—
11,249
0.5
,,jy,
Median Salary = $22,323; Mean Salary = $22,841.
 TABLE 2.19 FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED ADMINISTRATIVE AND
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(NOT ASSIGNED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
School District Number and Name
District-Wide
Administrative Staff
District-Wide
Instructional Staff
Total
District-Wide Staff
1. Femie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Arms trong-S pal lu mchecn .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Bums Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Albemi	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West ..
85. Vancouver Island North..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL	
3.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
6.0
2.0
3.5
4.0
6.0
10.0
16.0
11.0
7.5
18.5
13.0
13.0
26.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
6.0
14.0
5.0
7.7
12.7
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
—
1.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
—
3.0
3.0
8.0
8.5
16.5
9.0
10.4
19.4
14.0
1.0
15.0
18.0
85.0
103.0
9.0
16.5
25.5
17.0
9.0
26.0
34.0
27.0
61.0
5.0
9.5
14.5
16.0
11.0
27.0
7.0
13.8
20.8
12.0
13.0
25.0
15.0
11.5
26.5
6.0
12.2
18.2
2.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
7.3
11.3
3.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
—
1.0
2.0
13.6
15.6
2.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.4
2.4
4.0
6.0
10.0
25.0
9.0
34.0
7.0
15.9
22.9
3.0
3.5
6.5
11.0
63.3
74.3
8.0
11.4
19.4
6.0
5.0
11.0
1.0
1.6
2.6
7.0
7.0
14.0
1.0
2.7
3.7
9.0
47.6
56.6
2.0
—
2.0
6.0
15.0
21.0
5.5
10.0
15.5
4.0
19.4
23.4
4.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
_
1.0
1.0
5.0
6.0
1.5
1.5
1.0
—
1.0
4.0
—
4.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
9.0
6.0
14.0
20.0
2.0
—
2.0
Source; September 1979FormJ.
T81
 TABLE 2.20      B.C. public school pupil/teacher
RATIOS BY SCHOOL DISTRICT
SEPTEMBER 30,1978 TO SEPTEMBER 30,1979
School District
FTE
Pupils
September 30, 1978
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
FTE
Pupils
Septet
iber 30, 1979
FTE
Pupil/
Teacher
1. Femie  3.468.0
2. Cranbrook  4,666.5
3. Kimberley  1,932.5
4. Windermere  1.382.0
7. Nelson  4,094.0
9. Castlegar  2,800.5
10. Arrow Lakes  1,052.5
11. Trail  4,485.5
12. Grand Forks  1,427.5
13. Kettle Valley  723.5
14. Southern Okanagan  2,361.5
15. Pcnticton  4,829.5
16. Keremeos  623.5
17. Princeton  1,002.0
18. Golden  1,483.5
19. Revelstoke  2,102.5
21. Armstiong-Spallumchccn  1,381.0
22. Vernon  8,324.5
23. Central Okanagan  15,843.0
24. Kamloops  17,501.0
26. North Thompson  1,288.5
27. Cariboo-Chilcolin  8,186.0
28. Quesnel  5,404.0
29. Lillooet  1,036.5
30. South Cariboo  1,927.0
31. Merrill  2,552.0
32. Hope  1.622.5
33. Chilliwack  8,069.0
34. Abbotsford ,\. 8.987.0
35. Langley  12,159.0
36. Surrey  28.021.5
37. Delta  17,545.5
38. Richmond  18,020.5
39. Vancouver  57,758.0
40. New Westminster : 4.437.5
41. Burnaby  21,355.5
42. Maple Ridge  7.476.0
43. Coquitlam  22,198.5
44. North Vancouver  18.165.5
45. West Vancouver  6,298.0
46. Sunshine Coast  2.492.0
47. Powell River  4,223.0
48. Howe Sound  2,826.0
49. Central Coast  784.0
50. Queen Charlotte  1,270.5
52. Prince Rupert  4,159.5
54. Smithers  2,824.0
55. Bums Lake  1,902.0
56. Nechako  3,231.0
57. Prince George  20.720.5
59. Peace River South  5,284.5
60. Peace River North  5,683.0
61. Greater Victoria  24,037.0
62. Sooke  7,592.0
63. Saanich  5,955.0
64. Gulf Islands  999.0
65. Cowichan  7,584.0
66. Lake Cowichan  1,271.0
68. Nanaimo  11,772.0
69. Qualicum  2,467.5
70. Albcmi  7,673.5
71. Courtenay  7,261.0
72. Campbell River  5,760.5
75. Mission  4,395.5
76. Agassiz-Harrison  809.0
77. Summerland  1,367.0
80. Kitimal  3,063.5
81. FonNclson  1.118.5
84. Vancouver Island West  1,046.0
85. Vancouver Island Noith  2,995.0
86. Creston-Kaslo  2,406.0
87. Slikine  511.5
88. Terrace  5,439.0
89. Shuswap  5.570.5
92. Nisgha  539.5
GRAND TOTAL  501,026.0
197.50
249.20
116.35
84.40
233.60
155.60
64.68
247.38
80.80
45.90
132.17
253.10
37.00
58.50
87.00
129.50
79.50
452.40
868.50
975.14
74.95
466.10
317.36
64.30
119.60
144.30
95.50
444.35
481.50
656.05
1,521.50
957.80
979.30
3,096.92
262.40
1,203.20
425.28
1,223.10
1,040.74
342.06
145.85
241.80
160.40
56.70
82.50
245.60
160.40
118.60
192.50
1,139.45
305.70
310.33
1,276.74
421.70
334.40
64.20
440.90
84.68
678.12
134.00
436.60
375.65
321.80
245.60
50.00
74.00
177.70
67.50
63.50
191.51
145.20
36.26
311.33
316.00
42.00
17.56
18.73
16.61
16.37
17.53
18.00
16.27
18.13
17,67
15.76
17.87
19.08
16.85
17.13
17.05
16.24
17.37
18.40
18.24
17.95
17.19
17.56
17.03
16.12
16.11
17.69
16.99
18.16
18.66
18.53
18.42
18.32
18.40
18.65
16.91
17.75
17.58
18.15
17.45
18.41
17.09
17.46
17.62
13.83
15.40
16.94
17.61
16.04
16.78
18.18
17.29
18.31
18.83
18.00
17.81
15.56
17.20
15.01
17.36
18.41
17.58
19.33
17.90
17.90
16.18
18.47
17.24
16.57
16.47
15.64
16.57
14.11
17.47
17.63
12.85
3,463.5
4,673.0
1.918.0
1,350.5
4,005.5
2.719.0
984.0
4,276.5
1,385.5
712.0
2,277.0
4.740.5
603.5
979.5
1,439.0
2,074.5
1.378.5
8,317.0
15,640.0
17,294.5
1.287.5
8.267.0
5,221.0
1,020.0
1,832.0
2,440.0
1,585.0
7.750.0
9.217.0
12,559.5
28,332.5
17,812.5
17.823.5
55,800.0
4,224.5
20.380.0
7,520.5
21,901.0
17,942.0
6,094.5
2,635.0
4.069.0
2,812.5
754.5
1,213.5
4,074.5
2,806.0
1,907.0
3,201.0
20,205.5
5.180.5
5,748.0
23.487.0
7.696.5
6.009.5
1,013.0
7,398.5
1.260.0
11,774.0
2,664.5
7,425.5
7,121.5
5,799.0
4,445.0
770.0
1,345.5
2,961.5
1,139.5
1,056.0
3,040.5
2,343.0
558.5
5,414.5
5,420.5
530.0
201.50
247.50
116.12
82.60
233.10
149.40
68.68
239.90
83.30
44.90
134.70
250.90
36.35
59.50
86.20
125.50
81.50
443.10
855.00
986.39
78.00
454.10
310.70
64.70
116.05
142.30
93.00
430.50
491.00
676.23
1,541.80
971.90
981.10
3.005.56
247.00
1,155.30
430.87
1,201.80
1.022.84
334.75
153.25
234.70
158.39
59.05
82.00
248.90
160.15
118.40
194.50
1,138.29
299.70
323.40
1,272.63
426.12
338.60
67.30
434.50
82.13
680.10
142.37
428.10
373.02
333.00
246.90
48.00
75.75
174.70
67.00
66.00
197.10
140.95
42.36
307.20
313.45
43.50
17.19
18.88
16.52
16.35
17.18
18.20
14.33
17.83
16.63
15.86
16.90
18.89
16.60
16.46
16.69
16.53
16.91
18.77
18.29
17.53
16.51
18.21
16.80
15.77
15.79
17.15
17.04
18.00
18.77
18.57
18.38
18.33
18.17
18.57
17.10
17.64
17.45
18.22
17.54
18.21
17.19
17.34
17.76
12.78
14.80
16.37
17.52
16.11
16.46
17.75
17.29
17.77
18.46
18.06
17.75
15.05
17.03
15.34
17.31
18.72
17.35
19.09
17.41
18.00
16.04
17.76
16.95
17.01
16.00
15.43
16.62
13.18
17.63
17.29
12.18
T82
Source: September 1978,1979 Form I and J.
Note: Calculation of F.T.E. pupils —each Grade I through XII pupil is counted as 1.0; each Kindergarten pupil is j
counted as 0.5.
Calculation of F.T.E. teachers — part-time as well as full-time teachers are counted. Each part-time teacher is
counted according to the appropriate decimal fraction of full-time (i. e., a half-time teacher is counted as 0.5). All   i
district-wide (i.e., directors of instruction, supervisors, teacher consultants, coordinators, district librarians,
district counsellors, relieving teachers, etc.) as well as school-attached teachers (i.e., principals, vice-principals,   j
department heads, librarians, counsellors, regular classroom teachers, etc.) are counted.
 TABLE 2.21
AGE DISTRIBUTION OF FULL AND
PART-TIME B.C.
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS BY
SEX IN SEPTEMBER 1979 EXPRESSED AS A PERCENTAGE
Age
Male
Female
Total
<20
20
—
—
—
21
—
0.3
0.2
22
0.3
1.4
0.8
23
0.5
2,4
1.5
24
1.0
3.3
2.2
25
1.6
3.8
2.8
26
2.1
4.2
3.2
27
2.6
4.9
3.8
28
3.4
5.4
4.4
29
4.2
5.5
4.9
30
4.4
5.1
4.7
31
4.8
5.0
4.9
32
5,6
4.8
5.2
33
5.0
4.1
4.6
34
4.4
3.1
3.7
35
4.8
3.3
4.0
36
4.6
3.4
3.9
37
4.2
2.9
3.5
38
4.2
2.7
3.4
39
3.7
2.6
3.1
40
3.6
2.2
2.9
41
3.0
2.1
2.5
42
2.6
1.9
2.2
43
2.5
1.7
2.1
44
2.2
1.9
2.0
45
2.1
1.6
1.9
46
1.9
1.6
1.7
47
2.1
1.8
1.9
48
2.1
1.7
1.9
49
1.9
1.6
1.7
50
1.8
1.6
1.7
51
1.6
1.5
1.5
52
1.6
1.4
1.5
53
1.6
I.I
1.3
54
1.2
1.1
1.2
55
1.3
1.1
1.2
56
1.1
1.1
1.1
57
1.0
0.9
0.9
58
0.9
0.9
0.9
59
0.8
0.8
0.8
60
0.5
0.7
0.6
61
0.5
0.4
0.5
62
0.3
0.5
0.4
63
0.3
0.3
0.3
64
0.2
0.3
0.3
65 +
0.1
0.1
0.1
TOTAL
100.0
100.0
100.0
Source: September 1979 Form J.
T83
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T84
 TABLE 2.23 provincial educational
MEDIA CENTRE SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Television
Programs broadcast      180
Schools reporting use      707
Radio
Programs broadcast     162
Schools reporting use      540
TABLE 2.24 (1) DISTRIBUTION OF
AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS
Total Films Supplied  39,003
Media Catalogues  6,000
Media Catalogue Supplements  5,000
School Broadcast Tabloids  36,000
School Broadcast Poster-Calendars  10,000
Sing-out Booklets   82,000
French Booklets — Chantez, Bric-A-Brac, A Propos, Faites Vos Jeux  47,500
Language Arts Media Resources Guides  5,000
Salut! Teaching Handbooks  5,300
Salut! Promo Posters  3,000
Trade-Off Guides  1,000
Trade-Off Promo Posters  2,000
Four Canadian Poets Guides  2,000
Four Canadian Poets Promo Posters  2,000
Videotape Programs  15,306
Audiotape Programs  3,532
T85
 TABLE 2.24 (2)
DISTRIBUTION SERVICES
CIRCULATION REPORT
District No.
and Name
) 6mm Films
Supplied
T86
Femie  868
Cranbrook  732
Kimberley  138
Windermere  451
Nelson  264
Castlegar  31
Arrow Lakes  255
Trail  449
Grand Forks  421
13. Kettle Valley  190
14. Southern Okanagan  35
15. Penticton  512
Keremeos  394
Princeton  129
18. Golden  250
19. Revelsloke  858
21. Annsirong-Spallumcheen  217
22. Vernon  709
23. Central Okanagan  280
Kamloops  237
North Thompson  147
27. Cariboa<3tfcotin  2,802
28. Quesnel  329
29. Lillooet  123
30. Soulh Cariboo  312
Merritt  498
32. Hope  439
33. Chilliwack  2.410
34. Abbotsford  71
35. Langley  56
36. Surrey  1.647
37. Delta  749
Richmond  86
39. Vancouver  154
40. New Westminster  88
Burnaby  148
Maple Ridge  191
Coquitlam  331
North Vancouver  53
West Vancouver  148
Sunshine Coast (Sechelt)  210
47. Powell River  390
48. Howe Sound  369
49. Central Coast  411
50. Queen Charlotte  847
52.         Prince Rupert  514
54.          Smithers  359
Bums Lake  440
Nechako  582
Prince George  67
59. Peace River South  475
60. Peace River North  447
Greater Victoria  18
62. Sooke  655
63. Saanich  649
Gulf Islands  186
Cowichan  759
Lake Cowichan  90
Nanaimo...,.  1.298
Qualicum  270
Albemi  636
Courtenay  390
72.          Campbell River  454
75. Mission  263
76. Agassiz-Harrison  256
77. Summerland  61
Htimat  883
Fort Nelson  270
84. Vancouver Island. West  4.2
85. Vancouver Island, North  864
Creston-Kaslo  325
Stikine  171
Terrace  1,462
Shuswap....  1,671
Nisgha ,  1
Provincial Colleges  460
Independent Schools  2,945
Miscellaneous  241
TOTAL  39,003
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
3.      Finance
TABLE
3.1 Comparison of enrolment and expenditure for public education
at June 30 	
3.2 Expenditure for education, calendar year 1979	
3.3 Cost per pupil, calendar year 1979  	
3.4 Expenditure by school district for the calendar year 1979 ...
3.5 Revenue by school district for the calendar year 1979	
3.6 Transportation costs  	
3.7 Summary of school dormitory data, 1979/80  	
T87
 TABLE 3.1 COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND
EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AT JUNE 30
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
School
Districts
Average
Daily
Allen-
Total
Operating
Total
Expenditures
Expenditure
for
for
Education
Education
69
1892/93  267
1897/98  429
1902/03  607
1907/08  816
1912/13  1.597
1913/14  1.859
1917/18  2,246
I922.23  3.118
1927/28  3,668
1928/29  3.784
1929/30  3.854
1930/31  3,948
1931/32  3.959
1932/33  3,912
1933/34  3.873
1934/35  3.942
1935/36  3.956
1936/37  4.025
1937/38  4.092
1938/39  4.194
1939/40  4,220
1940/4!  4,248
1941/42  4,224
1942/43  4.055
1943/44  4,162
1944/45  4,354
1945/46  4.512
1946/47  4,833
1947/48  5.116
1948/49  5,496
1949/50  5,873
1950/51  6.272
1951/52  6.598
1952/53  7.105
1953/54  7,574
1954/55  8,185
1955/56  8.690
1956757  9.474
1957/58  10.171
1958/59  10.839
1959/60  11,513
1960761  12.137
1961/62  12,772
1962/63  13,571
1963/64  14,415
1964/65  15,327
1965/66  16,173
1966/67  17.7426
1967/68  19.191
1968/69  20,481
1969/70  21,828
1970/71  22,678
1971/72  23,224
1972/73  23,365
1973/74  24,5857
1974/75  26.877
1975/76  27.870
1976/77  28,390
1977/78  28,820
1978/79  28,866
1979/80  28,821
59
2.693
1.383
51.36
60.758.752
104
6,372
3.093
48.54
113.689.362
169
11.496
7.111
61.85
174.775.43
215,056.22*
213
17.648
11.055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555,10
268
24,499
16.357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
189
33.314
23,195
69.62
544.671.60
1,220,509,85
359
57.608
43.274
75.12
1.663,003.34
4,658,894.97
374
62.263
49,377
79.30
1.885,654.11
4,634,877.56
575
67,516
54.746
81.09
1.653,796.60
3.519,014.61
744
94,888
77.752
81.94
3.176.686.284
7,630.009.54*
788
108.179
91.760
84.82
3.532.518.95
9,261.094.98
792
109,588
94.410
86.17
3,765,920.69
11.149,996.27
803
111.017
96.196
86.65
3.743.317.08
10,008,255.66
811
113,914
99.375
87.23
3,834,727.19
10,061,387.99
830
115.919
103.510
89.29
4.015.074.37
9.719,333.81
821
116.816
104,978
89.86
2.849,972.02
8.941,497.34
827
115.792
103.389
89.30
2.611,937.80
8.213.369.04
762
117.233
101.893
86.91
2,835.040.74
8,458,156.00
773
116.722
101.873
87.27
2.972,385.04
8,775.353.78
763
118.431
104.044
87.85
3,277,660.23
9,593.562.64
741
120.360
106.515
88.49
3.524.962.69
10.193.367.08
721
120,934
107.660
89.02
3.630.670.78
10,640.740.47
720
120,459
108.826
90.34
3,585.769.00
10,521,684.92
730
119.634
103.192
86.26
3.963.848.24
10.982.364.49
696
118.405
102.085
86.22
4.028,397.88
11.120,801.94
661
115.447
93.473
80.96
3,924,243.53
11,502,291.35
654
119,043
102.999
86.52
4,244,898.82
12,231.029.35
650
125,135
107.599
86.08
5,022,534.59
13,683.538.18
86
130.605
114.590
87.91
5.765.205.50
14.818.625.81
89
137,827
121.334
88.36
9.398.473.46
20.176.930.53
93
146,708
129.859
88.81
12.468,653.18
25,768.392.09
97
155.515
138.941
89.67
17.363,430.94
35.538,079.88
97
164,212
147.583
90.26
22.809,631.23
47,726,750.37
98
173,354
154,077
89.19
25,830,076.88
54,195,133.95
101
183.112
163.364
89.58
26.885.980.43
57.881.559.48
100
195.290
176.138
90.62
26,555.080.24
58,401.121.15
104
210.174
191.061
91.25
24,060,233.15
70,791.844.25
104
223.840
204.239
91.63
34.279.302.27
80.823,263.71"
102
240.674
218.303
91.12
41.067,740.34
69,314.181.24s
103
260.069
235.396
90.98
43.989.524.32
77,653.192.32
102
277.070
252.490
91.71
50,861.473.63
90,483.765.63
101
291.223
267.052
92.32
53.288,028.94
101.351.107.94
98
305,837
281.513
92.61
59.472,055.06
115.941,018.06
97
321.760
298.175
93.23
70,174,999.84
133,401,622.84
99
340,290
312,173
92.69
77.632,903.48
145,535,715.48
100
358.905
332.585
93.76
83.782,121.79
157,614,783.79
100
378.641
348.472
93.23
95,497,375.16
177.539,584.16
93
400.080
367.718
93.25
105.017.594.75
199.114.313.75
93
420.790
379.045
91.50
119.871.278.31
227,937.392.31
87
445.228
408.452
93.28
144.702,607.40
269.217,969.40
85
467.486
425.514
92.64
181.854,578.21
332.702.367.21
85
489.596
447.643
93.87
251.827.287.92
384,336.617.68
85
513.079
466.264
93.74
292.556.398.29
437.743,656.54
80
527.106
476,643
93.41
354,470.298.48
516,309.118.90
75
534,523
481,353
93.38
382,221.877.00
557,875,205.00
74
537.106
481.686
93.20
425,505.748.00
612.808,108.00
74
548.999
489.303
92.86
481.823.740.00
694,357,161.00
75
553,991
494,877
93.13
551.647,880.00
832.876.042.00s
75
555,238
495.715
92.95
704,839.307.00
1.068,408.139.00
75
547,994
484.226
93.13
822,600,150.00
1.223.758,028.00
75
539.198
478.792
92.89
923.735.364.00
1,374,983,287.00
75
528,752
477.145
93.07
939.872.187.00
1,514,050.579.00
75
525.491
477.169
93.35
1.082.192.325.00
1.689.934,617.00
T88S
1 Average daily attendance as a percentage ofFTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69, percentage of attendance is total
actual attendance as a percentage of total possible attendance.
The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
4 Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial universities and since I
1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
5 Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
6 The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on include district-wide teachers with supervisory and adminis-  1
trative duties. These district-wide teachers were excluded from this table prior to 1966/67.
7 Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is reported as of September 30 rather than June 30.
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;   —   3C   O  f.  u~.  <~".  f.   t   ©  r-t  -O  e-l   CT>  —   T   MO   -
r r> f o oo oo n - 4 ooio >o i^ - ^- ■* r- r
ttTtC.ntNtinf^w'Oi^-^Ot.Or.Oiing
g' !«.* n o" -■'n-'oo'o'in-o"ni>o'n,i
o s.gS      $      alL      IS!
'|lllllllll1lSJl5ili|llilI1|&lI|l|Jl5
r «M0 9tO-
T92
 jNSt^oo-^wmioooptTiooa^nSwN-Qi^inSoNp
fcoooCT*o*ninw^oo----oo<^r^CT*^in©oo^CT*rHioor^t^t^cMcoooOcn^-i^©©H5^^3oS
fwa^txl— OOmNlOggW— g^ggtOKMJNjJlJ^^lio"^
3 n oo w 5 » iN n 4 -■_ "I q n in - ^ eo c> q n * * « W N ^ ^ S S O N i~J ■*)■ oo iri <s — R in t
KC~o5'*t'n*OQt'*t*t ■* O-- \0 in O ^- (S ei O "-D f) N l>(il p>* iO ^cr\c£tAr*it*-rrlrA'a\tOci't^rnr-
jOMW-nooioi>^oo^g^o---r;»singt^oinL*Oov) in.-n \D — f^oOLpobij;i>c.
• iO^^^»N-iOiNfNNNOO!QlOO>,OlBf-l--^»Oi^m        in •■" (N* oo* oo* os ga N* in m >i
-in — oi (ii •-'(n i-. n oo o\ >o vo — ©tM^-cs>> — r"-o\cJt—r-.oo'Or-i      "—'      -'intN'n^lDMor
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itn^Ni^Nin-i'OtiNin--Q»N-5M'pmrf--OMnyjiY)N-.niJ5i>Tt«*fi
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©*—* inc>CTrCTi" — ©IJ
>r-ir- — ooiNM'OnN'oooinoii^or'iMPi-'M«m^mo
)co*ooooo)ri]»3c50iin'-inO'Omt>-oiin'f>eTOr~Oi^c
r ri in oo is oi oi — iomOt3iNOi>-^',or>iNinioooooSi>t
r" d f~" *' -i w y*      io~hT— — •oo'(Nin      — w? csT      oo %o -
' ° 2 ~" ** o* ° "■
-es©in\o(~-0<N — in(
u
iq
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111
-I
ffl
<
I-
mSOzS
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o c srl       S'E  H **
a.xu6c<4QZ£a£ot
I S "I d E 1 3L
M   3   «= .E  •*   =
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T93
 TABLE 3.6
TRANSPORTATION COSTS
Total District
Conveyance
Costs as a
Expenditures
Costs
Percentage of
District Expenditu
$
S
118.269.991
2,477.202
2.1
127.616.486
2.611.370
2.0
136.432.687
2.721.510
2.0
150.790.702
2.886.696
1.9
165,814.555
3,125.447
1.9
185.566.119
3.475.895
1.9
214.156.353
4.009.393
1.9
248.031.667
4.610.089
1.9
285.686.761
5.355.378
1.87
323.153.465
5.891.894
1.82
361.429.563
6.556.422
1.81
401.033.384
7.216.520
1.89
438.901.005
8.072.883
1.84
502.596.294
9.688.206
1.93
599.460.473
12.548.230
2.09
748.419.484
16.363,823
2.19
863.163.406
19.298.273
2.24
972.529.889
21.930.833
2.25
1,051,344.671
24.253.143
2.31
1.161.912.446
26.618.014
2.23
I960..
1961 ..
1962 ..
1963..
1964..
1965..
1966..
1967..
1968..
19691 .
19701 .
1971' .
19721 .
1973' .
I974' .
1975' .
1976' .
19771 .
I9781 .
I9791 .
1 Excluding college expenditures.
TABLE 3.7
SUMMARY OF SCHOOL
DORMITORY DATA, 1979-80
School District
Name
Part
Time
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
29. Lillooct 4r	
85. Vancouver Island North .
92. Nisgha	
TOTALS	
T94
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
4.      Schools
TABLE
4.1 Number of public schools in operation by type, September 1974 to 1979
4.2 Senior secondary schools 	
4.3 Secondary schools	
4.4 Junior secondary schools  	
4.5 Elementary-senior secondary schools	
4.6 Elementary-junior secondary schools	
4.7 Elementary schools	
4.8 Summary of all schools  	
4.9 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students, (September
1977 to 1979) 	
4.10 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students by type of
school and by size of school 	
T95
 TABLE 4.1 NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN
OPERATION BY TYPE, SEPTEMBER 1974-79
Numbers Open in September
Change
1974-79
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary.
Elementary-junior secondary.
1,232
1,229
1,234
1,235       1.225
- 9
1.582
542,688
1.602
536.192
1,611
527,771
1.615       1,606
57,786   511.671
Source: September Form B and I.
TABLE 4.2
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
:t Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE1
September 30
Enrolment
I
57.75
1.185
1
56.17
1.079
1
34.00
724
1
53.00
936
5
203.00
3,638
1
62.00
1.092
3
169.30
3,243
2
112.50
2,067
3
197.00
3,739
82.00
1.506
40.50
697
52.87
1.105
55.00
1,012
82.00
1,574
47.50
907
35.50
599
22.  Vernon	
24. Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin..
34. Abbotsford	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver..
47.  Powell River	
61. Greater Victoria...
65. Cowichan	
68.  Nanaimo	
71. Courtenay	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL	
1 In tables 4.2 through 4.8, data on teachers are expressed in full-time equivalents and apply to school-attached
personnel only, i.e., the totals do not include district-wide professional staff.
Source: September 1979 Form I.
T96
 TABLE 4.3
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen.,
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merrill	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 777Y.;'.,
42. Maple Ridge	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Bums Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North...
86. Creston-Kaslo	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL .......,,
2
70.00
1,152
47.00
865
28.00
462
29.00
507
49.50
799
47.00
844
22.00
287
75.50
1.275
37.00
605
19.00
303
64.00
1.027
64.00
1.163
18.60
275
27.00
384
35.00
612
49.00
811
16.50
233
26.00
450
313.50
5,622
176:80
2.888
27.00
476
22.50
446
40.00
704
24.00
394
43.00
638
41.00 1
735
25.00
463
3
101.00
1.846
1
33.00
598
3
135.83
2,567
3
123.00
2,270
2
135.50
2,357
9
1,284.29
24,762
1
112.00
2,041
4
211.60
3,576
3
151.50
2,562
4
269.60
5.061
3
164.75
2,998
2
47.25
794
2
52.00
851
2
22.45
254
19.00
265
35.00
637
2
48.25
848
30.00
484
37.00
624
362.08
5.986
42.00
747
43.00
764
276.94
5,368
133.12
2,411
115.10
2,153
20.00
347
37.00
584
29.50
405
32.00
542
47.50
825
88.50
1,530
36.00
662
88.50
1,548
39.00
667
37.75
646
75.00
1,270
21.00
265
13.00
203
2
55.50
786
1
48.00
846
3
67.40
1,107
2
46.50
729
Source: September 1979 Form I
T97
 TABLE 4.4
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
t Number and Name
Number of
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
2
61.00
1,056
I
35.00
623
1
25.00
421
2
56.00
948
1
21.50
351
2
80.00
1,543
3
81.00
1,455
5
208.17
3,426
3
104.50
1,871
2
83.00
1.296
1
17.00
249
4
102.90
1,639
4
105.10
1,973
4
122.60
2,164
8
282.60
5,128
3
122.00
2,205
5
208.60
4,032
5
168.60
2,877
1
26.00
419
10
322.00
5.807
3
83.00
1.247
1
16.00
230
3
62.70
1,070
I
13.00
226
1
49.80
832
1
20.00
331
3
87.95
1.525
2
55.00
962
2
66.00
1,126
8
230.02
4,114
I
34.00
624
3
102.00
1.735
4
159.00
2,840
2
63.00
1,085
5
93.50
1,685
1
37.60
635
2
58.30
993
1
1.00
18
2
55.00
1.004
2
57.50
1.015
2.  Cranbrook	
7. Nelson	
11. Trail	
15-  Penticton	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
22. Vernon ,
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
27. Cariboc-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
31.   Merritt	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond .,.'.
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
52.  Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
65. Cowichan	
68.  Nanaimo	
70. Albemi	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75.  Mission	
84. Vancouver Island West..
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
Source: September 1979 Form I.
T98
 TABLE 4.5
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
19.00
260
16.70
239
16.00
240
60.00
1,263
67.00
1.121
22.00
322
26.00
416
66.00
992
24.00
461
16.00
209
25.90
609
26.00
389
21.50
353
26.70
425
21.10
315
28.50
397
7. Nelson	
10. Arrow Lakes	
32. Hope 	
37.   Delta 	
39. Vancouver	
50. Queen Charlotte 	
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Nechako	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
84. Vancouver Island West.
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
Source: September 1979 Form I.
TABLE 4.6
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Nan
berc-r
Number ofFTE
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
18.50
283
30.60
477
11.00
137
7.00
70
22.00
413
17.00
291
28.05
533
16.20
307
5.20
84
37.60
699
7.40
93
9.20
115
12.00
202
37.00
646
32.50
565
47.30
900
20.00
282
8.90
139
11.00
172
34.00
435
13.00
174
7.50
131
44.00
758
27.00
486
4.00
23
81.70
1,489
11.30
143
15.00
261
4.00
34
30.67
631
52.00
908
20.00
333
10.50
189
- 4.50
72
64.00
985
15.76
226
9.70
185
8.20
136
1. Femie	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.  Nelson	
9.  Casilegar	
II.  Trail	
22. Vemon	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
30. South Cariboo	
32. Hope	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby	
44. North Vancouver	
47.  Powell River	
50. Queen Charlotie	
52.  Prince Rupert	
55.  Bums Lake	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
6i. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Albemi	
72.  Campbell River	
81.  Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North..
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL SSE5
Source: September 1979FormL
T99
 TABLE 4.7
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
T100
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number ofFTE
Teachers
September 30
109.00
135.50
51.52
40.80
116.60
76.90
28.98
116.40
44.30
25.90
67.20
126.90
17.75
31.50
51.20
71.50
42.50
234.30
442.00
503.05
41.80
241.50
167.60
39.70
62.85
80.30
37.00
210.10
280.50
402.80
830.20
529.90
544.70
1.593.28
120.50
588.30
232.57
657.80
541.74
151.80
86.00
111.30
89.39
34.60
29.00
114.50
88.90
47.00
81.50
654.26
148.30
147.90
585.61
235.60
130.80
33.40
226.50
33.90
346.50
62.20
203.60
180.52
163.50
144.60
22.00
37.00
93.70
34.00
25.00
73.60
62.25
4.50
166.10
145.75
13.00
               16
2.405
1,555
                 6
1,305
19.  Revelstoke	
                 3
                 5
                 9
348
630
871
1.347
4.886
               40
                 6
10.193
777
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet 	
                17
                 6
3,328
663
32.   Hope 	
                 4
1.536
738
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
37. Delta 	
38. Richmond 	
               31
               32
               63
               26
37
6.085
8,331
18,409
10,879
10,599
40. New Westminster	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam 	
 Trrrr™*     9
               41
22
               46
2,335
11,637
4.849
13.103
46. Sunshine Coast 	
                11
1.716
50. Queen Charlotte 	
52. Prince Rupert	
54.   Smithers	
                 4
                 7
                 8
510
2.349
1.733
57.  Prince George	
59.   Peace River South	
                11
               58
                16
1.698
13.483
3,063
62. Sookc 	
63. Saanich 	
                19
               13
4.915
2.556
               27
4,302
69. Qualicum	
70. Albemi	
               34
                 7
               20
                16
7,228
1,304
4.153
4,084
                18
2,972
                 3
735
2
742
457
1,405
1.146
87. Stikine	
92. Nisgha ,
2
                15
               21
47
3,305
3,116
158
TOTAL 	
14,345.02
291,564
Source: September 1979 Form I.
 TABLE 4.8
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
12
197.50
3,616
12
243.50
4,843
9
110.12
2,000
9
80.80
1,388
21
227.10
4,157
14
145.90
2,812
7
67.68
1,024
15
233.90
4,420
4
81.30
1,428
7
44.90
735
8
131.20
2,332
15
246.90
4,904
4
36.35
623
6
58.50
1,014
8
86.20
1,483
10
120.50
2,158
4
80.50
1,421
20
426.10
8,597
50
836.50
16.091
52
960.39
17,893
8
74.00
1.337
42
440.10
8,585
23
298.00
5,421
7
63.70
1,057
II
115.05
1,899
10
138.30
2,520
7
90.00
1,643
31
414.00
8,011
37
471.60
9,592
39
661.23
13,062
79
1.438.80
29,445
34
946.40
18,442
46
955.10
18,439
112
2,944.57
57,499
10
232.50
4,376
53
1.128.30
21.057
26
410.07
7,830
59
1.176.80
22,649
43
996.34
18,493
17
316.55
6,240
14
149.25
2.740
17
223.40
4,191
13
154.39
2,930
7
57.05
787
8
81.00
1,269
12
233.30
4,253
II
157.15
2,912
10
116.00
1,979
14
184.50
3,314
69
1.104.29
20,994
22
276.80
5,364
25
316.90
5,953
55
1,198.34
24.169
27
406.72
7,973
20
327.60
6.198
7
64.70
1.045
32
420.50
7,633
8
78.40
1,309
41
623.50
12,218
11
140.37
2,760
27
407.10
7,676
23
357.52
7,338
19
309.60
6,013
21
241.90
4,632
4
48.00
799
4
74.75
1.381
7
168.70
3,074
4
65.50
1,196
8
65.00
1,103
16
193.10
3,176
12
136.95
2,417
6
40.36
588
21
298.20
5.601
27
293.45
5,595
1. Femie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen.,
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel t	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast.	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Bums Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Albemi	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
176. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland ,
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North...
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL	
Source: September 1979Forml.
T101
 TABLE 4.9
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION
FOR SCHOOLS ENROLLING SECONDARY STUDENTS,
SEPTEMBER 1977 TO 1979
Partial
School Year
10-Month
Semester
Semester
Semester
and Partial
10-Month
Other
Total
1977/78
139
63
4
18
116
12
352
1978/79
145
48
3
12
136
24
368
1979/80
155
45
4
11
135
21
37]
Source: September 1977,1978 and 1979 Form K.
T102
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T103
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
TABLE 5.1    GENERAL INFORMATION, 1979-80
1. PUPILS
Number of qualifying pupils
(group 1 and 2 schools)         18,251
2. TEACHERS
Number of teachers
(group 2 schools)  1,350
3. FINANCE
Percentage of average operating costs of the school district in which
the independent school is located applicable to grant.
Group 1 schools 9 percent
Group 2 schools 30 percent
4. SCHOOLS
Number of schools receiving grants  109
Classification of group 1 and 2 schools
Elementary (K-VII)  75
Elementary-junior secondary (K-X)  7
Elementary-senior secondary (K-XII)  11
lunior secondary (VIII-X)  2
Secondary (VIII-XII)  14
109
T104
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6.   Colleges and Institutes
TABLE
6.1 Summary of credit enrolments at B.C. community colleges and institutes by major
program area and enrolment status, 1969/70 to 1979/80 	
6.2 Total (full-time plus part-time) Academic and Career/Technical enrolment at B.C.
community colleges and provincial institutes, 1969/70 to 1979/80	
6.3 Number of faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes bymajor
program area and employment status, 1972/73 to 1979/80  	
6.4 Enrolment in B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, October 31, 1979
6.5 Full-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and institutes, by
institution, by discipline cluster, October 31, 1979 	
6.6 Part-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and institutes, by
institution, by discipline cluster, October 31, 1979 	
6.7 Full-time vocational enrolments in B ,C. community colleges and provincial institutes
by program and by institution, luly 1979 to June 1980	
6.8 Number of course registrations in university trasfer courses at B. C. community
colleges, and provincial institutes, by discipline cluster, and by institution.
October 31, 1979 	
6.9 Number of course registrations in career/technical courses at B .C. community
colleges and provincial institutes, by discipline cluster and by institution, October
31, 1979  	
6.10 Professional and instructional staff at B. C. community colleges and provincial
institutes, by major program area, by employment status and by institution,
October 31, 1979 	
6.11 Total faculty at B .C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by discipline
cluster and by institution, October 31, 1979	
6.12 University transfer faculty at B .C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
discipline cluster and by institution, October 31, 1979  	
6.13 Career/Technical faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes by
discipline cluster and by institution, October 31, 1979 	
6.14 Vocational faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
discipline cluster and by institution, October 31, 1979 	
T105
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.618
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,700
,288
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B.C. COMMUNITY
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AND EMPLOYMEN
80 (FALL REPORT1
c
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371                         90
415                       112
451                        193
635                       226
726                       179
885                       286
971                       613
1,031                       604
hey are presented only to
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74/7
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T108
 TABLE 6.4
ENROLMENT1 INB. C. COMMUNITY
COLLEGES AND PROVINCIAL INSTITUTES,
OCTOBER 31,1979
University
Career/
College
Preparatory
Institution
Transfer
Technical
Vocational
Total
WSTITUTES
Kfl™™
Bcrr	
Full-time
—
3,800
—
_
3,800
Part-time
—
10,722
—
—
10,722
Total
—
14,522
—
—
14,522
B.C. Mining School 	
Full-time
—
—
—
38
38
Part-time
—
—
—
	
Total
—
—
—
38
38
Emily Can- College of Art	
Full-time
—
498
—
—
498
Part-time
—
12
—
—.
12
Total
—
510
—
—
510
Full-time
154
154
Part-time
—
—
—
Total
—
—
—
154
154
Open Learning Institute	
Full-time
—
—
37
—
37
Part-time
169
—
126
—
295
Total
169
—
163
—
332
Pacific Marine Training
Institute 	
Full-time
	
	
	
106
106
Part-time
—
—
—
Total
—
—'
—
106
106
Pacific Vocational Institute ...
Full-time
—
—
—
2,341
2,341
Part-time
—
—
—
1,296
1,296
Total
—
—
—
3,637
3,637
Sub-total	
Full-time
	
4,298
37
2,639
6,974
Part-time
169
10.734
126
1,296
12,325
Total
169
15.032
163
3,935
19,299
COLLEGES
Full-time
414
665
119
1,275
2,473
Part-time
740
313
450
756
2,259
Total
1.154
978
569
2,031
4.732
Full-time
709
633
—
391
1,733
Part-time
992
677
—
528
2.197
Total
1.701
1.310
—
919
3,930
Cariboo	
Full-time
427
340
16
802
1,585
Part-time
529
416
255
1,530
2,730
Total
956
756
271
2,332
4,315
Douglas 	
Full-time
1,520
693
—
758
2,971
Part-time
2,759
674
—
815
4,248
Total
4.279
1,367
—
1,573
7,219
Full-lime
50
19
2
238
309
Part-time
175
50
78
434
837
Total
225
169
80
672
1,146
Full-time
316
225
438
979
Part-time
624
322
43
1,077
2,066
Tola!
940
547
43
1.515
3,045
Malaspina	
Full-time
382
323
58
783
1,546
Part-time
819
404
32
608
1,863
Total
1,201
727
90
1.391
3,409
Full-time
Part-time
329
400
320
272
—
743
457
1,392
1,129
Total
729
592
—
1,200
2,521
Full-time
Part-time
99
1.213
30
117
6
306
182
980
317
2,616
Total
1.312
147
312
1,162
2,933
Full-time
29
8
7
334
378
Part-time
165
327
12
554
1,058
Total
194
335
19
888
1,436
Full-time
44
12
—
378
434
Part-time
399
76
32
581
1,088
Total
443
88
32
959
1,522
Full-time
655
522
148
749
2.074
Part-time
589
451
104
1,302
2.446
Total
1,244
973
252
2,051
4,520
Selkirk	
Full-time
198
374
12
515
1,099
Part-time
251
167
25
166
609
Total
449
541
37
681
1,708
Full-time
1.708
1,126
236
2.322
5,392
Part-lime
1,903
600
907
6,565
9,975
Total
3.611
1,726
1,143
8,887
15,367
Full-time
Part-time
6,880
11,558
5,290
4.966
604
2,244
9,908
16,353
22,682
35,121
Total
18,438
10,256
2,848
26,261
57.803
TOTAL 	
Full-time
6,880
9,588
641
12,547
29,656
Part-time
11.727
15.700
2.370
17.649
47,446
GRAND
TOTAL
18,607
25,288
3,011
30,196
77,102
Source:
Note:
Academic/Technical data: College Statistical Reports. Data reported as at October 31,1979.
Vocational Data: Form TV-27 and Form TV-27A.
1 Continuing Education enrolments are excluded from this table. General Studies enrolments
are included with University Transfer and Career/Technical enrolments.
T109
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T123
 CONTINUING EDUCATION
7.   Course Registrants
TABLE
7.1 Continuing Education course registrations for B. C. community colleges and
provincial institutes, 1979/80	
7.2 Continuing Education course registrations for B.C. school districts, 1979/80
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T126

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