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Ministry of Human Resources Annual Report 1980 Services for People British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1983

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Full Text

 Ministry of Human Resources
Annual Report 1980
ervices for People
Honourable Grace McCarthy
Province of British Columbia
 Office of the Minister of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, BC.
March, 1980.
The Honourable Henry Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Human
Resources for the calendar year 1980, with fiscal
and statistical addendum for April 1,1979 to March 31,
1980, is herewith respectfully submitted.
grace McCarthy,
Minister of Human Resources.
 Ministry of Human Resources,
Victoria, BC.
March, 1980.
The Honourable Grace McCarthy,
Minister of Human Resources,
Victoria, BC.
Madam:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of
the Ministry of Human Resources for the calendar
year 1980, with fiscal and statistical addendum
April 1,1979 to March 31,1980.
JOHN NOBLE,
Deputy Minister of Human Resources.
 Foreword
On the following pages the reader will find a
summary of Ministry of Human Resources
programs and services for people during the calendar
year 1980.
Formal accounting in the ministry is on a fiscal year
basis ending March 31, and therefore calendar year
figures are estimates in a few instances. A fiscal and
statistical addendum, Section VIII of this report,
provides additional tables for the 1979-80 fiscal year.
 Table of Contents
[Highlights of 1980,
Report of the Deputy Minister  6
[Summary of Ministerial Expenditures   8
| Federal and Municipal Program Cost-Sharing .. 8
[SECTION I. Administration and
'   Organization
RegionalMap  11
I Ministry Administration and Organization .. 13
Service Delivery System 14
Organizational Chart   15
I   Ministry Comptroller's Office  17
[   Management Information Services 17
[   AuditTeam 17
I   Office Supply and Services 17
i    Personnel and Staff Training 18
I   Information Services 18
|   Lower Mainland Special Services 19
K- Program Evaluation and Planning Support ... 20
E Ministry Inspectors 20
I   Research and Statistics  21
I   Federal-Provincial Agreements  22
I   Community Human Resources
and Health Centres  22
SECTION II. Family and Children's Services
[   Introduction  24
I   Family Support Services  24
Special Services to Children 24
Family Support Homemakers  26
Infant Development 26
Child Day-Care 27
Rehabilitation Resources  29
CHANCE 29
Child Protection Services 30
I   Services for Children in Care  32
Child in Care Services  32
Foster Homes  33
Specialized Resources for Children  34
I  Adoption Services  35
I   Post-Adoption Services  36
I British Columbia Council for the Family 36
■SECTION III. Income Assistance
I   Guaranteed Available Income for Need (GAIN) 40
GAIN Income Assistance  40
GAIN for Handicapped  41
GAIN for Seniors (60-64) 41
GAIN Seniors Supplements 41
Other Services and Benefits 42
Individual Opportunity Plan  42
Earnings Exemption 42
School Start-up Allowance  42
Christmas Supplementary Allowance .... 42
Incentive Allowance 42
Community Involvement 43
Crisis Grants  43
Assistance to Employment  43
Educational, Vocational and
Rehabilitative Services  43
Transition Houses and Hostels 44
WorkActivity 44
Burial of Indigents  44
Repatriation  45
Rental Assistance  46
RentAid (Renter's Tax Credit)  46
SAFER (Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters) .... 46
SECTION IV. Health Care Services
Health Care Services  48
Pharmacare  50
SECTION V. Community Services
Community Grants 52
Family Services ..« 52
Transportation 53
Services to the Handicapped 54
Multi-service Agencies 55
Low Income Groups 55
Miscellaneous Grants  55
Crisis Centres 55
Youth Services 56
Volunteer Services 58
Achievement Centres 58
Handicapped Industries Guild 62
Community Living Society  63
Senior Citizen Counsellors 63
Seniors' Day Centres 64
Bus Passes 64
SECTION VI. Residential Care for the
Handicapped
Residential Services for the Mentally
Handicapped 66
Woodlands 66
Tranquille 67
Glendale Lodge 68
SECTION VII. Legislation 69
SECTION VIII. Fiscal and Statistical
Addendum, 1979-80 71
 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1980
Report of the Deputy Minister, John Noble
1980 was a year of significant achievement for the
Ministry of Human Resources. We implemented
some major new proposals and continued the development of initiatives from previous years.
I will deal first with the major developments of the
year — the Individual Opportunity Plan and the
new Family and Child Service Act.
The Individual Opportunity Plan was introduced
in September of 1980. It co-ordinates the assistance
of both provincial and federal ministries, and business and labour representatives, to offer individualized planning to help income assistance recipients towards independence. The basis of the plan is
the focussing of services on those clients most ready
to benefit from them.
Research by the ministry has shown that the majority of income assistance recipients find their own
jobs within three to six months of their initial application for assistance. The opportunity plan, therefore, is designed to offer services to the minority
who may need help to achieve independence. For
these selected people, the plan offers individual
counselling and assistance aimed at developing a
unique personal plan which suits each individual's
needs. In this way, a variety of government and
community services are made available to assist
clients in entering the job market.
Another major achievement for the ministry, in
August 1980, was the introduction of the new Family and Child Service Act to the provincial legislature. This new piece of legislation is the culmination
of several years' work and the review of more than
1,200 submissions on a white paper on children's
legislation. The new act represents a significant
change in approach from the old Protection of
Children Act. It takes into account the changes we
have seen in society's attitudes towards families
and children.
Although the safety and well-being of children
continue to be paramount in the new legislation, the
act moves beyond the traditional approach of treating the state and parents as adversaries in the process of protecting children. The act makes provision
for the state and parents to work together in maintaining the integrity of the family and caring for
children with special problems or needs. This reflects the new directions of the ministry in its work
with families and children in recent years.
The new Family and Child Service Act was passed
by the legislature in August 1980, and will be proclaimed in 1981, upon completion of a comprehensive staff training program to familiarize workers
with every aspect of the legislation.
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Staff training was one of the areas which received]
attention during 1980. The Staff Training division
developed a child abuse training package for social
workers and presented it throughout the province J
This program is part of the ministry's emphasis on]
dealing with the increasingly obvious problem of
child abuse and neglect.
The problem, of course, is not new; the public]
awareness of it is. In part, this has resulted from the*
introduction in 1979 of the Zenith Helpline for
Children. During 1980, the helpline continued to
show results in identifying situations of child abuse
and neglect in British Columbia. The staff training]
package was specially designed to help ministry
staff deal effectively and sensitively with this difficult problem.
During the course of 1980, the Ministry ofHuman
Resources co-operated with the office of the Auditor
General in a comprehensive audit of our income assistance programs.
Comprehensive auditing is designed to meet the
special characteristics and requirements of govern-]
ments. It is broader than the traditional financial
audit; it assesses the adequacy of management control systems to ensure due regard for economy and
efficiency. It also assesses the information provided
to the legislature and the public about the performance of the ministry. It calls for a combination of audit concepts and methods, and integrates various
disciplines ranging well beyond the traditional financial accounting procedures.
The Ministry ofHuman Resources volunteered to
be the first provincial ministry to participate in a
comprehensive audit, knowing that the process will
The Individual Opportunity Plan — a new program.
 Report of the Deputy Minister
■contribute to our own efforts to upgrade manage-
ment and financial control systems.
I   Currently, the findings and observations from
the audit are being discussed by representatives
■mom the ministry and the office of the Auditor Gen-
eral. The results of the audit will be made public in
mhe report of the Auditor General to the legislative
assembly for 1980.
■ This kind of inter-ministry co-operation represents an area of continuing development for Human
Resources. Integrated planning, both with provin-
cial ministries and the federal government, is a
Priority for the '80s and will receive a great deal of
Attention in the years to come. A first step in this
Eirection will be the'inter-ministry planning for
■1981, the International Yearof Disabled Persons. We
will be working together with the Ministries of Education, Health, Attorney General and Labour on a
: comprehensive plan for the upcoming year. This
will be an indication of the kind of co-operation and
mutual effort that various ministries can make. The
focus will be on developing an awareness of the
abilities of disabled people in British Columbia and
Broviding support for their full participation in
society.
B Finally, I want to acknowledge the dedication and
Effort made throughout the past year by ministry
staff. This commitment is the major factor in our
success in meeting our mandate of providing services to people in British Columbia.
■ The scope of services and programs this rninistry
offers presents a unique challenge to staff. This
challenge is met every day by each of the more than
5,000 ministry personnel. For this, I want to express
Figure 1 Expenditures of the Ministry, 1980
($730.3 million)
Community
Programs
2.9%       Adult
$21.2       Rehabilitation
1.3%
$9.3
my sincere appreciation and my hope that, in the
coming years, we will continue to meet the challenges we face in developing and implementing
programs and policies that respond to society's
needs.
The new plan offers individual counselling.
Table 1 Gross Expenditures, Comparison of
Fiscal Years 1974-75 to 1979-80 and
Calendar Year 1980
1980  $730,300,000
1979-80 648,800,000
1978-79 558,500,000
1977-78 544,500,000
1976-77 481,000,000
1975-76 474,800,000
1974-75 382,600,000
 Report of the Ministry, 1980
SUMMARY OF MINISTERIAL
EXPENDITURES, 1980
$        Per
Millions Cent
1. Administration     15.5      2.1
(headquarters operations, administrative and support services,
computer charges)
2. Field Operations      73.1     10.0
(field personnel, building occupancy charges)
3. Income Assistance, GAIN
for Handicapped and GAIN
for Seniors (60-64; and over 65,
not receiving federal
OAS benefits)    366.5     50.2
(GAIN assistance, special
allowances, adult residential
resources)
4. Services for Families and Children    79.0     10.8
(group, receiving and foster
homes; treatment resources;
day-care; special services to
children; adoption services;
homemakers)
5. Programs for the Retarded     47.1       6.5
(residential programs at Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale
and other institutions)
6. Health Services       63.7       8.7
(drugs; dental, optical, medical
services; medical transportation;
emergency health aid)
7. GAIN Seniors Supplement     25.9      3.5
(supplementary income to persons over 65 who are receiving
federal OAS and GIS benefits)
8. Community Programs       21.2       2.9
(grants to community-based,
non-profit societies)
9. Rental Assistance     29.0      4.0
(Renters' Tax Credit and
Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters)
10. Adult Rehabilitation Services ...      9.3       1.3
(rehabilitation and independence
programs; work activity projects;
achievement centres for
handicapped)
TOTAL   730.3    100.0
FEDERAL AND MUNICIPAL PROGRAM
COST-SHARING
The Ministry ofHuman Resources provides a wide
range of services to families and children, and those
disadvantaged because of age, handicap, or unem-j
ployment. Expenditures for the calendar year 1980 torn
tailed $730.3 million. Table 1 illustrates a comparison.!
from 1974-75 through 1980.
The federal government continued to contribute a
significant share of the ministry's operating and program costs under an agreement with the provinces!
provided for in the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) Act
of 1967.
According to the terms of the Canada Assistance
Plan and within specified limits, the province may]
claim, from the federal government, up to 50 per cent.;]
of the provincial expenditures on income assistance.?]
and social service benefits.
The province continues to negotiate towards optimum sharing and, because the federal legislation, I
sets no ceiling on the gross amount to be shared, the
federal portion of costs has been increasing. However, only some programs can be shared under the
Canada Assistance Plan Act. For instance, income assistance and child welfare services are shareable, but
Guaranteed Available Income for Need payments to
persons 60 years and over are only partially shareable,
and Pharmacare expenditures to persons 65 years and;
over are not shared.
Municipalities also contribute to the costs of income assistance programs, on a per capita basis. In
the last fiscal year, contributions were approximately
seven per cent of the shareable expenditures. In 1980,.
municipalities were charged $27,680,745.
The Helpline for Children, a child abuse hot line
 Section I
Itpnistrap
m
RegionalMap  11
Ministry Administration and Organization 13
Service Delivery System 14
Organizational Chart  15
Ministry Comptroller's Office  17
Management Information Services 17
AuditTeam  17
Office Supply and Services  17
Personnel and Staff Training 18
Information Services 18
Lower Mainland Special Services  19
Program Evaluation and Planning Support 20
Ministry Inspectors 20
Research and Statistics  21
Federal-Provincial Agreements  22
Community Human Resources
and Health Centres  22
  13
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Ministry c
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Regional 1
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Region   1: Vai
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Region  2: Vai
Region  3: Ok
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Region  4: Ko<
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Region   5: Pri:
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Region  6: Fra
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Region  7: Prii
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Region 10: Vai
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Region 11: Vic
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Region 16: Vai
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Region 17: Vai
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Region 18: Sur
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region 19: Fra;
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 Ministry of Human Resources
Regional Map   BHSS^B|
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region
Region 10:
Region 11:
Region 12:
Region 13:
Region 14:
Region 15:
Region 16:
Region 17:
Region 18:
Region 19:
Region 20:
Vancouver East
Vancouver Burrard
Okanagan
Kootenays
Prince George-Cariboo
Fraser Valley
Prince Rupert-Bulkley Valley
North and South Peace River
Kamloops Mainline
Vancouver Island North of Malahat
Victoria West
Fraser South
Fraser North
Burrard South Coast
Vancouver Downtown
Vancouver South
Vancouver West
Surrey
Fraser North
Victoria East
  Administration and Organization
13
•MINISTRY ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION
The Ministry of Human Resources delivers a
[broad range of social services and income security
programs, including income assistance, assistance
I to the handicapped and the elderly, child welfare
■services, services to the retarded, subsidies forday-
Icare, homemakers, and a variety of other programs.
■Policy, priorities and program content for these ser-
I vices and programs are determined by government
■through legislation, Orders-in-Council, and minis-
terial direction.
I   The nature of ministry programs and functions
■requires a regionalized structure, assisted by a
centralized core of tightly integrated program and
(support services. The regional, institutional, and
Iheadquarters levels are inter-related in a "matrix-
Itype" organizational structure. Working together,
Ithey combine to decentralize all practical decision-
making, as close as possible to the scene of the
action. Over-all direction and control of the organization is provided by the office of the deputy rninis-
Rer and executive staff.
■Central Administration
The deputy minister and assistant deputy minis-
Ber are responsible for ensuring that the ministry's
policies, priorities, and program content, as de-
termined by the government, are administered appropriately. Ten senior and middle management
■positions report directly to the office of the deputy.
■The assistant deputy minister carries, by delega-
tion,organizational responsibilities assigned to the
■deputy minister, and any of these 10 positions may
■report, on assignment, to the assistant deputy
minister. In addition to the deputy and assistant
Beputy, the office of the deputy minister consists of
a co-ordinator of executive staff and seven ad-
ministrative support staff.
I  Executive committee members advise the
deputy minister on matters relating to policy and
administration and assume over-all responsibility
Kor assigned programs and the delivery of all
services in designated geographic areas of the pro-
wince. The members include the deputy and assistant deputy minister, five executive directors,
End the ministry comptroller. Program and regional assignments to executive committee mem-
bers may change from time to time in response to
Shifting work-load demands and priorities. Cur-
rent assignments to executive committee members
are depicted on the organizational chart.
Institutions
I There are three institutions for residential care of
the mentally retarded: Glendale Lodge in Victoria,
Tranquille near Kamloops, and Woodlands in New
Westminster. Through these institutions, the
ministry provides comprehensive assessment,
planning, training and residential services for
mentally retarded adults and children.
Headquarters Support Services
Four program divisions provide support to regional and district staff. These are Family and
Children's Services, Income Assistance, Community Services, and Health Care. The major responsibilities of these divisions include program planning co-ordination and monitoring, policy development and documentation, plus consultative
services for regional and district staff on policy,
practice and procedural questions.
Lower Mainland Special Services provides specific centralized service to regions in the Vancouver
and Lower Mainland areas. These services include
after-hours emergency services, court services,
emergency homemakers, co-ordination of volunteers, nutritional consultation, a child abuse team,
and the Helpline for Children.
The office of the comptroller is responsible for
the provision of support services to the organization in areas related to accounting and office administration. Specific responsibilities include paying accounts and preparing the payroll, auditing to
ensure payments and practices correspond to policy, assisting in budget preparation, providing financial management reports, distributing office
supplies and equipment, managing the physical
plant of the ministry, and preparing statistics and
other research material.
Personnel and Staff Training provides support
services in the areas of organization and classification studies, labour relations, safety, and in the
recruitment, orientation, work performance evaluation, and training of staff. This division also has
responsibility for the delivery of library services to
the ministry's staff.
Other central support divisions include: Management Information Services, which is responsible for co-ordinating the development, design, implementation and maintenance of management information and operating systems; Information
Services, which provides public relations and communication services; and Federal-Provincial
Agreements, which is responsible for consultation
and evaluation of ministry programs with respect
to cost-sharing, and preparation and co-ordination
of ministry proposals for federal-provincial and
inter-provincial meetings.
 14
Ii
Report of the Ministry, 1980
SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEM
The ministry's basic delivery unit for its numerous social welfare programs is the local district
office, under the direction of a district supervisor. Region 8:
District offices are located in all larger communities
and within relatively easy commuting distance of
smaller communities, except along the British Columbia coast and in the northwest extremities of the Region 9:
province. By design and policy, the size of the
office is limited, and an effort is made to identify
the office with a particular neighbourhood or area.
The province has been divided into management
regions, each under the direction of a regional      Region 10:
manager. The regional manager, who reports to an
executive director, is accountable for delivery of
social services and income assistance programs
within his region. His responsibility is to ensure
that delivery takes place according to established
policy, and to the level of quality defined by the      Region 11:
ministry. Within these constraints, the regional      Region 12:
manager has significant autonomy in managing
staff, deploying resources, reviewing and approving contractual services, recommending grants to      Region 13:
community agencies, and approving services in
exceptional situations. His responsibilities also include monitoring services and expenditures, co-      Region 14:
ordinating regional personnel and staff training
activities, budget formulation, and handling
public complaints and appeals.
Reporting to the regional manager are the district Region 15:
supervisors of each office within the region. Dis- Region 16*
trict supervisors are responsible for the operation Region 17'
of their district offices, and also participate in re- Region 18*
gional planning activities.
The ministry's 20 regions, as of December 1980, Region 19:
are:
Region   1: Vancouver East area (6 offices);
Region  2: Vancouver Burrard area (9 offices);
Region  3: Okanagan (headquarters at Vernon),      Region 20:
offices at Grand Forks, Kelowna (2 offices), Oliver, Penticton (2 offices), and
Vernon (2 offices);
Region 4: Kootenays (headquarters at Nelson),
offices at Castlegar, Cranbrook, Creston, Fernie, Invermere, Kimberley,
Nelson, New Denver, and Trail;
Region 5: Prince George-Cariboo (headquarters
at Prince George), offices at Prince
George (5 offices), Fort St. James, Mackenzie, 100 Mile House, Quesnel, Vanderhoof and Williams Lake;
Region 6: Fraser Valley (headquarters at Abbotsford), offices at Langley, Aldergrove,
Abbotsford, Clearbrook, Chilliwack (2
offices), Hope and Mission;
Region 7: Prince Rupert-Bulkley Valley (headquarters at Terrace), offices at Burns
Lake, Hazelton, Houston, Kitimat,!
Massett, Prince Rupert, Queen Char-i
lotte City, Smithers, Terrace, and
Granisle;
North and South Peace River (headquarters at Dawson Creek), offices at
Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Ford
Nelson, Chetwynd and Cassiar;
Kamloops Mainline (headquarters at
Kamloops), offices at Ashcroft, Golden, Kamloops (2 offices), Lillooet,
Merritt, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm,
Clearwater and Princeton;
Vancouver Island North of Malahat
(headquarters at Duncan), offices at
Campbell River, Courtenay, Duncan (2
offices), Nanaimo (2 offices), Wellington, Parksville, Port Albemi and Port
Hardy;
Victoria West area (6 offices);
Fraser South (headquarters at Delta),
offices at Delta (2 offices), Richmond (2
offices), and White Rock;
Fraser North (headquarters at New
Westminster), offices at Bumaby (3 offices) and New Westminster (2 offices);
Burrard South Coast, offices at Sechelt,
North Vancouver, West Vancouver,
Squamish, Bella Coola and Powell
River;
Vancouver Downtown area (7 offices);
Vancouver South area (9 offices);
Vancouver West area (6 offices);    .
Surrey, offices at Newton, Guildford,
Whalley, Cloverdale, and Bridgeview;
Fraser North (headquarters at Coquitlam), offices at Port Moody, Port Coquitlam (3 offices), and Maple Ridge (2
offices);
Victoria East area (6 offices).
 '
1
17
com-
ficant
linals
DUgh-
:antly
ibility
man-
ionof
i two
nistry
__■__-_-_-_■
effic-
1 EXECUTIVE
of in-
views
ciety-
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?d.
ie fol-
lEXECUTnn
MINISTRY COMPTROLLER 1
D.Bii
M. Cook
.... 67
I
....   4
.... 11
....26
REGIOfl
I Financial Services
....   1
16 and V.
1 Accounting
Health C
Services
Lower W
§ GAIN for Seniors
Specia
1 Audit Services
1 Research
;from.
1 Office Supply and
i Ser
Services
if ser-
icon-
irious
f sup-
LIAISOl
lating
i dis-
CorrectiJ
., and
arters
ienior
 MINISTER OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Honourable Grace McCarthy
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
D. Bingham
REGIONS 1,2,15,
16 and 17
Health Care
Lower Mainland
Special Services
LIAISON WITH:
Corrections
^m
^^^^^m
■■■a
IllllilwMi
111111
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
S. TAvers
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
R.K. Butler
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
H.E. Saville
| MINISTRY COMPTROLLER
M. Cook
REGIONS 5,7,8,
12 and 18 S
Income Assistance
Ministry Inspectors
REGIONS 6,13,14
and 19 I
Personnel and Staff
Training
Woodlands
REGIONS 3,4
and 9 WW     ^fi
Family and
Children's
Services
Tranquille
i- .•.,;...•••;..■...■..■ ■•.:• , .,,,,.;.■:...-   . ; . ..,■■■■■■...■. ■,^.:~. .... y
LIAISON WITH:
Labour
Housing
Employment and
Immigration
Financial Services
Accounting
Services
GAIN for Seniors
Audit Services
Research
Office Supply and
Services
^.^_".-'.-;:.:^^UV:C._C:;^/.:-„YT\.^S.,.^;-C,i-_--'^
LIAISON WITH:
Health SB
Inter-ministry
Children's
Committee
BC Council for the
Family
 14
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Distr
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 Administration and Organization
17
■MINISTRY COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE
The ministry comptroller is responsible for all
I matters pertaining to financial accounting and fiscal
■control within the ministry.
The ministry's main accounting office is located
■in Victoria. A branch office serves the Vancouver
area. Reporting to the comptroller are the support
I groups of Research, Office Supply and Services, and
•Internal Audit. The activities of each group are re-
Iported separately.
I   Accounting, the division which processes all
■ministry expenditures and revenue, distributes
■monthly financial statements reflecting the current
•financial position of all areas of the ministry and in-
Istitutions. Considerable effort is directed towards
improving accounting policies and standards, and
analyzing and evaluating administration and operating procedures. The division also provides consultation to senior management throughout the
budget process and prepares financial reports.
I   During 1980, the budget process was further de-
Iveloped to improve the financial decision-making
process and to increase field management accountability.
IM ANAGEMENT INFORMATION
SERVICES
I Management Information Services co-ordinates
■the development, design, implementation, mainte-
nance and operation of all data processing systems
land services in the ministry. The division supports
Bine management and staff in identifying and form-
ula ting their needs, and co-ordinates activities with
British Columbia Systems Corporation, which provides equipment and specialized technical expertise.
I   Early in 1980, the ministry completed and installed new computerized systems for Universal
■Pharmacare and Emergency Services. Throughout
the year, considerable progress was made in the
Family and Children's Services MIS development
project. Staff training and implementation of this
Eystem is scheduled to begin early in 1982. All other
development work was deferred to give the minis-
Rry an opportunity to rationalize and consolidate its
Hong-term system requirements and related development and operational plans. The division ob-
Rained a more accurate understanding of the infor-
ma tion resources required by staff, and reorganized
and strengthened the system to simplify its use and
I make staff training easier.
I By 1985, the ministry plans to acquire integrated
Bystems supported by a province-wide on-line ter-
Briinal network. British Columbia Systems Corpora
tion has designed a government-wide shared communication network which will result in significant
cost reductions. Installation of computer terminals
is planned for 140 ministry district offices throughout the province during 1981. This will significantly
improve the ministry's service delivery capability
and control over its operations.
AUDIT TEAM
The objective of the Audit Team is to assist management to examine and evaluate administration of
ministry programs.
In 1980 the Audit Team concentrated on two
areas. First, itconducted internal audits of ministry
offices and programs to evaluate operational efficiency, compliance with policies and accuracy of information. Second, it performed financial reviews
and operational audits of institutions and society-
operated organizations receiving ministry funds to
administer social services.
The Audit Team makes recommendations to improve individual office procedures and to correct,
where necessary, claims in client cases. Based on information provided by the Audit Team, ministry
program policies may be changed and clarified.
During 1980, the Audit Team completed the following audits:
Ministry District Offices  67
Ministry Regional Offices     4
Ministry PREP Offices 11
Society-operated Organizations and
Institutions  26
Ministry-operated Institutions'
Payroll Offices     1
OFFICE SUPPLY AND SERVICES
During 1980, the division changed its name from-
Office Administration to Office Supply and Services. The division provides a wide range of services to the ministry, including analyzing and consulting on administrative requirements in various
program areas; co-ordinating the purchase of supplies and equipment; planning and co-ordinating
office space and buildings; and printing and distributing policy program procedures, forms, and
administrative information.
The division is also responsible for headquarters
mail services and for issuing bus passes to senior
citizens.
 18
Report of the Ministry, 1980
PERSONNEL AND STAFF TRAINING
INFORMATION SERVICES
Personnel and Staff Training provides support
services to the ministry's management in the areas
of organization and classification; labour relations;
safety; and recruitment, orientation, work-performance evaluation and training of staff. The division
also has responsibility for the delivery of library
services to ministry staff. As of December 31,1980,
the ministry had 4,830 full-time permanent positions.
Personnel Services
The services of Personnel include providing technical advice and consultation to line management in
areas of discipline and grievances; participating in,
and co-ordinating, the recruitment activities of the
ministry; preparing classification reports and organizational studies; representing the ministry in
negotiations with unions; co-ordinating the ministry's safety program, and providing contract interpretations.
These services are provided to the Vancouver regions by an office in Vancouver; to Woodlands and
Tranquille by personnel staff assigned to those institutions; and to the rest of the province by the
headquarters office in Victoria.
Table 2 Personnel Activities
1980 1979
Vacancies filled 452  826
Promotions  142 136
Reclassifications 309  247
Resignations  733  624
Transfers (non-promotional
movement of staff) 231  206
Staff Training
Most services of Staff Training are organized by
staff training co-ordinators, located in regions and
institutions, who report to regional or institutional
managers. This ensures that the training is relevant
to staff in the field and that there is appropriate
follow-through so that skills acquired in training
sessions will be applied on the job.
A small headquarters staff training division provides support to staff training coordinators and
gives leadership to the development of course materials . During 1980, a set of training materials in the
area of child abuse was developed, and intensive
training was carried on throughout the province. A
comprehensive program for training new district
supervisors is being developed for implementation
in 1981. Training emphasis in the regions has been
on child protection.
Information Services provides information about I
the ministry's programs and services to the public!
and to the media. It also offers support to the minister, the executive and ministry staff, in media and!
public relations.
In 1980, the division underwenta re-organization 1
to improve its response capability on behalf of the I
ministry. It improved mailing lists to reach sped f ic
target groups, established a project records system,]
built a core reference library, and expanded its
audio-visual capacity to include record ing and playback in all media forms.
Major activities of the year included producing
information packages for use during Human Re-
sources Week, completing a slide-sound produc-l
tion on child abuse for use by the child abuse teams
and volunteers in classroom situations, and devel- j
oping advertising campaigns on the Helpline fori
Children, foster parent recruitment and the ministry's new Individual Opportunity Plan.
In 1980, the division developed an information
package on the new Family and Child Service Act, a
pamphlet on the Woodlands community, and vari-1
ous material focussing on the Individual Opportun-1
ity Plan. As well, revisions were made to a number
of existing pamphlets and posters on ministry ser-1
vices.
The division is currently working to revise its
press release distribution system and develop a
series of information sheets on ministry programs
and services.
The basic delivery unit is the district office.
 Administration and Organization
19
LOWER MAINLAND SPECIAL SERVICES
Lower Mainland Special Services provides a variety of specialized services, primarily to the Vancouver and Lower Mainland areas. Staff of the 14
special services teams are trained experts in their
own fields. They act as consultants offering information and advice, and expand the services available
through the ministry's district offices.
The largest section of Lower Mainland Special
Services is Emergency Services, operating from two
i locations: Vancouver and Coquitlam. More than 60
I crisis intervention workers respond to calls relating
1 to child welfare, child abuse, family counselling and
disputes, juvenile problems and repatriation, emergency income assistance, and personal crises. In
conjunction with the Metropolitan Board of Health,
the police department, Corrections Branch and
other organizations, emergency social and health
services are available to the public 24 hours each
day, seven days a week.
A staff team specializing in child abuse continues
to man the province-wide Zenith telephone lines of
the Helpline forChildren, a24-hour child abuse hotline. Staff respond to more than 1,150 calls each
month. Most calls relate to possible child abuse or
neglect; some involve telephone counselling.
The ministry has two child abuse teams, based in
I Vancouver and Coquitlam. Social workers on these
■two teams are specialized consultants in child abuse
and neglect with expertise in recognition, intervention, reporting and follow-up procedures. The teams
offer advice, information and support to social
workers and other professionals in Vancouver and
Lower Mainland regions. They also provide staff
training for district offices throughout theprovince.
Associated with the child abuse teams is Postpartum Counselling, providing assistance to parents who are experiencing difficulty in coping with
jchanges following the birth of a child. This program
^orks with more than 525 women and their f am il i es
each year.
I The Medical Clinic offers a comprehensive health
service to children in the care of the ministry. Staff
poctors examine children coming into care and
pionitor their routine health care. Staff maintain
close liaison with responsible social workers and
pffer advice and information on health care, services
for handicapped children, and adolescent counselling.
I Working closely with the Medical Clinic are the
Esychiatris ts and psychologists in Clinical Services,
who offer consultative services and treatment. This
team also provides support to ministry staff involved in apprehension, custody and adoption
court cases.
[  Workers in Court Services provide a liaison be-
Table 3 Lower Mainland Special Services,
Court Services Division, Vancouver
Statistics: Family and Child Service Act, 1980
Families Children
Apprehensions 537 663
Supervision Orders  126 182
Temporary Orders 354 413
Permanent Orders 119 134
Other Appearances
(adjournments, reports, orders for
substitutional services, etc.) ... 1,747 2,272
Table 4 Lower Mainland Special Services,
Court Services Division, Vancouver
Statistics: Child Paternity and
Support Act, 1980
Active Cases  264
Brief Service    25
New Referrals    65
Transferred Cases     16
Closed Cases    35
Interim Lump Settlements      0
Lump Sum Settlements      3
Three-party Agreements     12
Court Action 243
(a) Laying Complaint (new cases)    28
(b) Affiliation-Maintenance Order    18
(c)ShowCause    15
(d) Application to Vary  7
(e) Application to Rescind  3
(f) Garnishee Order  0
(g) Application for Security
for Performance Order      0
(h) Provision-Reciprocal Enforcement
of Maintenance Order (REMO)      1
(i) County Court, Supreme Court Orders ....    2
(j) Adjournments 118
(k) Other (report to court, struck off list,
application dismissed, complaint
withdrawn, committal-bench warrant
order for substitute service)     54
tween the Vancouver regions and the family court
system on legal actions under the Family and Child
Service Act, the Juvenile Delinquents Act, and the
Child Paternity and Support Act. These workers
assist ministry social workers in representing the
superintendent of child welfare, and the individual
client.
In-Home Services helps income assistance recipients and low income families improve or maintain
the quality of home life. In-home workers provide
homemaking and handyman services to clients in
emergency circumstances, where such assistance
will preserve or enhance the family unit. The most
 20
Report of the Ministry, 1980
important contribution is made where the apprehension of children would be the other alternative.
In 1980,14,395 families received such services.
Transition House is a ministry-operated resource
for Vancouver area women and children in transition from situations of family violence, abuse, or
domestic breakdown. Staff assist residents in obtaining housing, medical and legal information,
and in preparing to alter or improve their circumstances. In 1980,470 women and children depended
on this facility.
Volunteer Services co-ordinates the work of 300
volunteers, and emphasizes the presentation of information on child abuse, neglect and general
welfare, to the community at large. Staff of the child
abuse teams train volunteers to present workshops,
talks, and seminars, to schools, lay and church
groups, and other community organizations. These
sessions are supervised and co-ordinated by Volunteer Services. In 1980,264 such presentations were
made.
Volunteers also provide a variety of services to
families, children, the elderly and the handicapped.
The work of these volunteers is invaluable and this
year, more than 30,000 people benefited from their
services.
PROGRAM EVALUATION AND
PLANNING SUPPORT
Program Evaluation and Planning Support provides a consultative, training and operational service to Family and Children's Services in data collection and use. Services of the section are available to
local, regional and provincial office personnel.
The section consists of three components: the
Evaluation Team; Inter-ministry Research; and
Computer Research. The major functions of the section are to:
□ provide consultation and training to ministry
staff on evaluation, systems analysis and information systems, as well as on the implementation of evaluation projects;
□ develop a system of monitoring Family and
Children's Services objectives;
□ assess divisional staff training needs and coordinate training opportunities to meet these
needs;
□ co-ordinate and review Farnily and Children's
Services annual reports;
□ review and recommend improvements to the
present Family and Children's Services computer system; respond to field and divisional
personnel's requests for computer data out
puts and analyze protection complaints registry information; and
D co-ordinate research activities for the Inter- j
ministry C_hildren's Committee.
Major evaluations completed this year included j
Zenith Helpline for Children, Systems Analysis of j
Central Records, Centred Planning Committee demonstration project and Region 8 Special Services. In 1
addition, staff provided consultation and assistance j
to the Task Force on Handicapped Children, the \
federal-provincial discussions on the proposed j
Young Offenders Act, Community Grants Policy, j
Special Care Home Policy, Insurance and Liability j
Committee, Residential Guidelines Committee, j
University of Victoria School of Child Care Profes-1
sional Advisory Committee, and both steering committees of Management Information Services Sys-1
terns.
The research co-ordinator for the Inter-ministry j
Children's Committee prepared several major reports including the Year of the Child and Family
Achievement Award Recipients Report, the Cata- ]
logue of Information Regarding Children, the
Report on Privacy and Confidentiality of Informa- 1
tion, and the Review of Management Information \
Systems.
In addition to producing monthly, quarterly and 1
annual report statistics, the computer research co- j
ordinator prepared and circulated a procedural
manual for the provincial Child In Care Computer
System, as well as a reference manual for the use of
this system.
The activities completed by the section included j
92 individual consultations, 17 group consultations, and 15 workshop/training sessions. The emphasis has shifted from training in evaluation to development of knowledge of information sys terns
which can assist managers in evaluating their pro-1
grams. This reflects increasing staff knowledge of
evaluation and its role in program operation and]
planning.
MINISTRY INSPECTORS
This program was initiated in mid-1976 to investigate alleged or suspected abuse by clients of wel-l
fare programs administered by the Ministry of
Human Resources. While the basic purpose of the
inspectors is to conduct investigations, they also
make recommendations for policy changes and p ro -
cedures to prevent potential fraud. They recover,
where possible, any client-initiated overpayments*
of benefits, and prepare and submit appropriate
cases to Crown Counsel for prosecution.
A provincial co-ordinator works with 28 in spec-
J
 Administration and Organization
21
tors located throughout the province at regional offices and one inspector working full-time on the
Pharmacare plan. The inspectors work under direct
upervision of a regional manager. They receive
I complaints and information from any source, and
i investigate allegations or suspicions of fraudulent
practices by recipients or applicants for GAIN ben-
[efits.
The inspectors concentrate their efforts towards
| identifying weaknesses in application procedures
(which might allow for fraud by those so inclined.
| They attend workshops, lectures and study groups,
j to advise field workers on methods of detecting and
I preventing fraud.
The inspectors work closely with case workers
I and keep them informed as investigations progress.
I Only the more flagrant cases result in prosecution.
■ Consideration is given to the effect of prosecution
on the family and the client, and to other possible
I recourses such as termination of benefits and repayment.
Table 5 Monthly Report of Cases Referred to
Inspectors For Investigation, 1980
IJanuary  416    July  383
•February  409    August 400
[March 370    September 433
[April  379     October 405
JMay 358    November  466
IJune  399    December 295
Table 6 Statistics For All Regions,
' January 1 to December 31,1980
[Total number of cases reported for
investigation  4,713
IChargesIaid      229
Cases still before the courts      196
■Cases still under investigation  2,174
■Unfounded complaints, or insufficient
conclusive evidence to proceed  1,173
ISeftlements negotiated, otherwise
thanbycourt      672
(totalling $586,349.22)
|Values of recoveries made, ordered, or
agreed to  $724,924.77
potal amount of monthly assistance
terminated due to the inspector's action
or involvement $263,015.11
Note: The above figures represent only the amount of
wnonthly assistance being granted at the time of termination. No attempt has been made to estimate the amount
which may have been received in the months ahead, had
assistance not been terminated.
RESEARCH AND STATISTICS
Research and Statistics is responsible for developing and maintaining income assistance statistics,
forproviding consultation to seniorstaff, and for researching special projects. During 1980, the statistical and informational systems were significantly
enhanced, the Victoria Earnings Exemption Pilot
Project was completed, and the new Region 16 Rehabilitation Project was undertaken.
The division continued to develop the use of
computer-produced statistics for income assistance. The compendium of income assistancestatis-
tics produced for senior staff and support divisions
was redesigned to incorporate full and supplemental reports on research findings. As well, a compendium of statistics for Family and Children's
Services programs was developed and turned over
to the Program Evaluation and Planning Support
unit of Family and Children's Services for ongoing
production.
The division continued its efforts to replace manual field statistical systems. The first phase in automating field income assistance statistics was completed this year. During 1981, manual field income
assistance statistics should be replaced by automated systems.
The division's computer data systems were expanded to include additional income assistance
program information, and its time-series databases
were restructured and expanded to include additional non-ministerial data. Anew sys tern formain-
taining and structuring the data bases was developed to make more efficient use of the data. Consultation and support continues to be provided to other
ministry support divisions in the use of computer
data systems.
| A major research project to monitor and analyze
the Victoria Earnings Exemption Pilot Project was
completed. The division produced, during the term
of the project, three reports to support senior level
planning.
In 1980, the division was assigned responsibility
to support and monitor the Region 16 Rehabilitation
Pilot Project. The project began in the fall of 1980 and
will continue in 1981.
The division continued its work in developing a
predictive model for GAIN caseloads and costs.
New data sources were developed this year for the
integration of the Basic Income Assistance predictive model and the model for GAIN For Seniors and
Handicapped. Full integration of these systems
should be completed in 1981.
 22
Report of the Ministry, 1980
FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL AGREEMENTS
The objectives of Federal-Provincial Agreements
are to ensure that maximum revenues are obtained
through federal cost-sharing agreements; that the
ministry's position, as itrelates to federal programs,
is presented in federal-provincial, interprovincial,
and inter-ministry meetings; and that, in the preparation of ministry program policy, the impact of
federal cost-sharing agreements is taken into
account.
The section is responsible for consultation on federal programs affecting the ministry, such as unemployment insurance and family allowance programs, and services to native people.
Responsibilities also include preparation of
ministry proposals for federal-provincial and interprovincial meetings of ministers and officials of
social services, and consultation with appropriate
ministry divisions and other ministries, regarding
program proposals developed by the Ministry of
Human Resources.
Negotiations with the federal government during
1980 resulted in a federal government agreement to
cost-share civil legal aid; further clarification of the
relationship between the Canada Assistance Plan
and the Established Program Financing Act; and initial examination of the Canada Pension Plan regarding benefits for handicapped persons.
Negotiations with the federal Department of
Indian and Northern Affairs resulted in the transfer,
to that department, of the administration of three
income maintenance programs for seniors and
handicapped persons living on reserves. Previously, Indian Affairs had reimbursed the province for
providing benefits under these programs on reserves.
The section participated in the Interprovincial
Task Force Conference of Ministers of Social Services through committee work with other provinces
on concerns regarding native Indians, and on the
enforcement of court-ordered maintenance payments for income assistance recipients.
The work of the Ministers' Interprovincial Task
Force on the Administration of Social Security, in
which the section participated, resulted in the publication, in September 1980, of a booklet entitled The
Income Security System in Canada: Report for the Interprovincial Conference of Ministers Responsible for Social
Services.
The inter-ministerial liaison functions of the section included discussions with the Ministry of
Health on cost-sharing implications of the Denti-
care program and cost-sharing for the Long-term
Care Program.
Cost-sharing was also reviewed with the Ministry of Attorney General regarding the upcoming
federal young offenders legislation. Consultation j
with the newly established Inter-govemmental Re- I
lations Ministry occurred in a number of subject j
areas as well.
COMMUNITY HUMAN RESOURCES
AND HEALTH CENTRES
There are four Community Human Resources and
Health Centres in British Columbia, located at
Houston, Granisle, Queen Charlotte Islands and]
Victoria (James Bay). The centres are jointly fi-J
nanced by me Ministry of HealmandtheMinistry of ]
Human Resources to deliver social services, pri- ]
mary medical care, public health nursing and mental health programs.
Elected citizen boards are responsible for the ad- ]
ministration of programs and provision of serv ices
in co-ordination with both ministries.
In 1980 me ministry'sexpendituresforeach centres
were:
Granisle  $ 54,032]
Houston       70,199
Queen Charlotte Islands       98,729]
Victoria Qames Bay)  153,1001
District offices are located in all larger communities.
 Section II
CliildrerB
Services
Introduction 24
Family Support Services  24
Special Services to Children 24
Family Support Homemakers  26
Infant Development 26
Child Day-Care  27
Rehabilitation Resources  29
CHANCE 29
Child Protection Services  30
Services for Children in Care  32
Child in Care Services  32
Foster Homes  33
Specialized Resources for Children  34
Adoption Services  35
Post-Adoption Services 36
British Columbia Council for the Family  36
 24
INTRODUCTION
Every child needs a family. But when families falter, or fail, children may suffer.
Under the statutory authority of the GAIN Act
and the Family and Child Service Act, the ministry
offers a range of services to assist families and
children.
Prevention, rather than apprehension, is the goal.
Nearly 42 per cent of the ministry's 1980 budget for
Family and Children's Services was earmarked for
family support and preventive services. In 1980,
1,000 fewer children were in the care of the superintendent of child welfare than in 1975; an encouraging measure of the success of these programs.
The safety and well-being of a child are of paramount importance but, unfortunately, these needs
cannot always be met within the child's home. It
may then become necessary for the superintendent
of child welfare to take responsibility for the care
and custody of the child through due court process
under the Family and Child Service Act. A further
group of services, ranging from foster homes to
adopting families, exists to serve these children in
care of the superintendent.
Each child in the care of the superintendent is
helped by the ministry to reach his/her maximum
potential. This is not an easy task. It can only be accomplished with the continuing co-operation and
participation of families and communities throughout British Columbia.
During 1980, me ministry strengthened several of
its family support programs. Income test levels used
for establishing parental contributions to day-care
and homemaker services were raised. Maximum
subsidy levels available for parents using day-care
services were increased.
In addition, to meet the growing demand for daycare services for children under three years of age,
the ministry introduced a further subsidy increase
for parents of these children using family day-care.
A Special Care Homes program was added to the
spectrum of resources available for children in care.
Under this program, agreements are negotiated
with house-parents to provide specialized services
for children who might otherwise require institutional care. This has already proven to be an effective
alternative for a number of very difficult-to-place
children.
Increasing attention has been focussed on the native child coming into care. More than 35 per cent of
children in the care of the superintendent of child
welfare are of native origin. The ministry is working
co-operatively with a number of band chiefs and
counsellors in developing plans for native children
at risk, which take into account their cultural ties
and heritage.
Report op the Ministry, 1980
Bill 45, an act to replace the present Family and!
Child Service Act, was introduced in the legislature!
this summer. When proclaimed, this act will im-l
prove the legal processes when intervention to pro-1
tect children becomes necessary. The role and responsibility of the family is emphasized. In addition,
the special status of a native child is recognized by
making provision for the band to be heard in any]
court proceeding under this act.
An amendment to the Adoption Act, prohibiting]
advertising or payment for the adoption of a child in
British Columbia, was proclaimed in 1980. A further ]
amendment provides for the voluntary transfer of
the guardianship of a child to the superintendent of
child welfare during the six-month waiting period]
between the placing of the child in the adoptive]
home and the hearing of the adoption order.
Through the structure of the Provincial Inter-
ministry Children's Committee, the ministry continues to work co-operatively with other government ministries in developing and co-ordinating
services for children. In 1980, special attention was!
given toprovidingresourcesforseriously disturbed
.adolescents. Plans for resources to meet identified
gaps in service are nearing completion and will be
put into effect during the coming year.
The economic, social, and emotional stresses on
families and children have never been greater. Services offering effective family support and child
protection are an essential part of any government's
responsibility. The demand for these services will
continue to be met by the Ministry of Human Resources with innovative, productive and professional programs.
FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES
The ministry's Family Support Services are preventive programs offering support to families and
children requiring special help. The services are
usually time-limited, and assist families to care for
children in their own homes and communities
without further intervention. Such services include
Special Services to Children, Family Support
Homemakers, Infant Development, Child Day-
Care, Rehabilitation Resources, CHANCE and
Child Protection Services.
Special Services to Children
Families with children who have exceptional I
physical, mental or behavioural needs can receive e
help through Special Services to Children
Special services are provided by child-care worlq
ers who are hired by non-profit societies contrad
by the ministry. These services may be offered
variety of settings, either to the children indiv
vork-
acted 1
i in a
v"idu-
 Family and Children's Services
25
Klly or in a group, depending on the particular needs
Rjf each child.
I Through the support provided by a special services worker, a child can be assisted in the transition
Krom the foster home back to his or her own home. A
Khild who is experiencing difficulties in his rela-
Bonship with his family, or who has a physical or
Biental handicap, can be helped to resolve these
[problems.
■ During 1980, approximately 65 societies provided
services to 900 children per month.
■.This year, changes were made in the way in which
contracts are negotiated. These changes are designed to provide more flexibility and improve ser
vice. Also, during 1980 the ministry discontinued
income testing for this program.
Table 7 Special Services to Children,
Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1980
and Fiscal Years 1976-77 to 1979-80
1980  $4,919,355
1979-80     4,577,625
1978-79     4,007,900
1977-78     3,200,000
1976-77     1,836,477
Homemakers supply child-care and household management services to families in times of stress.
 26
Family Support Homemakers
Family Support Homemakers provides temporary support and relief to families under stress. The
goal of intervention is maintenance of a family's
routine during a period of crisis. This service may
also be used to sustain the independence of a retarded adult living in the community.
Homemakers are trained personnel who provide
families with a wide range of services in child care
and household management. They are almost all
hired and supervised by non-profit or proprietary
agencies from whom the ministry purchases services. Families receiving this service work cooperatively with the ministry and the society in assessing the continuing need for service.
During 1980, approximately 850 families per
month received homemaker services.
Table 8 Family Support Homemakers,
Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1980
and Fiscal Years 1974-75 to 1979-80
1980   $3,726,340
1979-80   3,563,588
1978-79   3,715,111
1977-78*   7,710,403
1976-77   7,428,522
1975-76   7,000,155
1974-75   4,258,384
*/» January 1978, tlte Ministry ofHealthbecame responsible for long-term homemaker services under their tong-
term Care program. Prior to that, the Ministry of Human
Resources provided both long-term and family support
homemaker services.
Infant Development
Infant Development provides services to infants,
from birth to age three, who are exhibiting significant developmental delays. The object of the program is to optimize each infant's development and
to assist families in responding to their children in a
positive and supportive manner.
Referrals come from a variety of sources: physicians, public health nurses, family members and
social workers. After referral, a worker makes an initial assessment of an infant, and this is followed by
regular home visits or group sessions. During these
visits, the worker assists with the infant and family
by designing activities and exercises which encourage development. Regular reports on a child's progress are sent to the family physician and other consultants who may be involved. Workers may also
help the family by sharing information on and mak-
Report of the Ministry, 1980
ing appropriate referrals to other community resources and assisting in planning for the ongoing
care of their child.
Families participating in Infant Developmenj
have the opportunity to meet other parents, ancl
have access to a wide range of toys, books and rej
source materials.
Sponsoring societies negotiate an agreement
with the ministry for an operating grant to administer this program. Responsibilities of the society include hiring a worker with professional trai n i ng i n a
field related to early childhood development, and
establishing an advisory committee whose membership includes parents of developmentally delayed children, community professionals and representatives of the society's board of directors.
Table 9 Infant Development, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1980
and Fiscal Years 1977-78 to 1979-80
1980 $669,362
1979-80    569,191
1978-79    433,396
1977-78    331,10|
A provincial steering committee provides consultation to the ministry and makes recommendations
regarding new development and provincial guidelines pertaining to Infant Development.
In 1980 there were 17 programs operating in the
province: Burnaby, Castlegar, Duncan, Kamloops,
Kelowna, New Westminster, North Vancouver,
Surrey-Delta, Upper Fraser Valley, Port Albemi,
Vernon, Courtenay-Comox, Prince George, Van-
Infant Development offers positive support.
 Family and Children's Services
27
Eouver-Richmond, Victoria, East Kootenays, and
East Side Vancouver. Approximately 1,200 infants
Received regular services from an infant development worker.
phild Day-Care
: The ministry provides day-care subsidies to f am-
ilies which qualify on the Family Support Financial
Eligibility Test and on the basis of social need. Subsidized services are those which provide child care
fend supervision, including the opportunity for
social, emotional, physical and intellectual develop-
Iment. Day-care services which the Ministry of
Human Resources may subsidize are:
■ D Licenced Family Day-Care
Provides day-care in a private home (other
than the child's own home) for a maximum of
five pre-school children and two school-age
children. A Community Care Facilities Licence is required.
■ D Unlicenced Family Day-Care
Provides day-care in a private home (other
than the child's own home) for one or two
children unrelated to the care-giver.
■ D Group Day-Care
Provides day-care for a child 18 months to
five years old in a group facility, for not more
than 10 hours in any one day, up to five days
per week. A Community Care Facilities Licence is required.
■ □ In-Own-Home Day-Care
Provides day-care for children in their own
homes, under the supervision and care of a
person selected by the parent. This program is
designed to assist shift-working parents only,
for whom alternative care arrangements are
not available.
D Nursery School Day-Care
Provides supervision and social and educational training for children from 32 months of
age to the age they enter public school, for a
period of up to three hours per day. A Community Care Facilities Licence is required.
□ Out-of-School Day-Care
Provides day-care before and/or after
school, or at any time of school closure, for
child ren up to and including 12 years of age enrolled in a full-time school program. This service may be offered through family day-care
homes, or in facilities specially licenced by the
Community Care Facilities Licencing Board to
provide out-of-school group care.
□ Special Needs Day-Care
Provides specialized day-care services for
children with special needs in any of the above
programs, on an integrated basis or in programs designated as "special needs day-care".
On May 1,1980, the ministry increased by eight
per cent the maximum allowable subsidies payable
for all child day-care services, and introduced two
new categories of day-care subsidies to provide
higher rates for children under three years of age.
The new categories relate to care provided in family
day homes for children from birth to three years,
and in group day-care centres for children aged 18
months to three years. Funding for specialized daycare relates to actual program costs.
The Ministry ofHuman Resources provides subsidized child day-care to qualifying families.
 28
The changes in subsidy and new categories are:
Family Day-Care
Under3 $125to$160
Over3  $125to$135
Group Day-Care
18 months to 3 years $249
3 years to school entrance $160 to $173
In-Own-Home Day-Care
First child $105 to $114
Second child  $ 52.50 to$ 57
Nursery School Day-Care $ 50 to $ 54
Out-of-School Day-Care
Upto4hours  $ 60 toS 65
Over4hours $ 80to$ 87
Day-care services supply care and supervision.
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Eligibility for assistance with day-care fees is
based on an income or needs test and on social needs I
as established by the federal government for cost- J
sharing purposes.
Increases were also made on May 1,1980, for the
allowable exemptions for parents applying for sub-s
sidy on the basisof income. Increases are detailed inl
Table 10.
Table 10 Financial Eligibility Test
for Family Support Services
New Basic
Family Size
Previous Basic
Monthly a
Income Level
(including
children)
Monthly
Income Level
as of
May 1,1980
2
   $550	
 $608
3	
     615	
    722
4 	
     680	
    809'
5 	
     745	
    874
6 	
      810	
    93H
7 	
8 	
      875 	
      940 	
    1,014.
  i,«S
1,134 ■
9	
    1,005 	
10 	
    1,070 	
1,199
Another major development was the introduction of the Special Needs Contract, whereby thel
ministry may now purchase specialized services on i
behalf of special needs children enrolled in bothl
specialized and integrated non-profit society-
operated centres. Children enrolled in these specialized programs are fully subsidized, since fund-
ing is provided on a program budget basis.
Table 11 Children Receiving Subsidized
Day-Care, as of March 31,1980
Programs
Half Day
Full Day
Total
Group Day-Care...
...   103 	
1212 	
... 13M
Family Day-Care ..
...   256	
.3038 	
... 3294 <
Nursery School
Day-Care 	
...   482 	
6 	
...   488
Out-of-School
Day-Care 	
... 1422 	
154	
... 1576
In-Own Home
Day-Care 	
...   384 	
242	
..   626!
Special Needs
Day-Care 	
...   105 	
582 	
..   687 f
TOTAL	
...2752 	
5234 	
.. 7986S
 Family and Children's Services
29
Rehabilitation Resources
■Rehabilitation Resources offers special education
programs which assist children who are at risk of
dropping out or who have dropped out of the school
sys tern .These programs enable children who are ex-
■periencing difficulty at school for emotional or
social reasons, to remain in or re-enter the school
Kystem, or proceed to further training or employ-
Rent.
■ Programs are jointly funded by the Ministry of
Human Resources, the Ministry of Education and
local school districts. The Ministry °f Human Re-
sou rces pays for appropriate program expenses and
purchases the services of child-care counsellors who
assist with behaviour management,' and provide
counselling and life skills training.
Children are admitted to the program on the basis
of an assessment made by a local advisory committee consisting of representatives from the school
district, the Ministry ofHuman Resources, the non-
profit society from which child-care counselling
services are purchased, and if appropriate, proba-
tion and health personnel. The Ministry ofHuman
Resources and local schools work together to plan
End develop programs for individuals, or groups of
children. In addition to ministry and school district
staff, the child and his family are actively involved
in defining the goals set for the child and in evaluating the child's progress periodically.
■ In 1980, Rehabilitation Resources had the capac-
gy to serve 2,300 children at a time.
CHANCE
CHANCE provides support services within
schools to children with severe mental and/or phy-
sical handicaps who can benefit from the classroom
experience. The program ensures that children who
require assistance with personal care are given the
chance to acquire basic academic and social skills
within a classroom setting.
■■Personal attendants work with individuals or
groups of children, assisting them with activities
such as feeding, positioning and movement be-
JjWeen classrooms.
A local screening committee, with membership
from the school district, ministry staff and, as appropriate, community professionals, assesses the
ability of any referred child to benefit from the
services of a personal attendant. Following this assessment, an educational program is designed to
meet thechild'sneeds. Parents, who are involved in
jfSl stages of planning, are not required to contribute
to the cost of service.
The Ministry of Human Resources purchases the
services of personal attendants from school districts
on a contractual basis. Ministry staff participate on
local screening committees, and provide consultation on the development and evaluation of existing
CHANCE programs.
During 1980, services were expanded to 55 school
districts, increasing the access of a large number of
handicapped children to a broader educational experience.
The CHANCE program is another service reflecting the co-operative efforts of the Ministries of
Human Resources, Education and Health to improve the delivery of services to children with exceptional physical or mental needs.
Almost 8,000 children receive subsidized day-care.
Ii
 30
Child Protection Services
Child Protection Services, through ministry staff
and programs, works to maintain and strengthen
the family unit. A variety of programs exists to p ro -
vide help to families passing through a period of
crisis and to children whose safety or well-being
may be threatened.
In general, these programs provide support and
help in the home, recognizing that maintaining the
integrity of a family is the most desirable goal. In
cases of significant mistreatment, the superintendent of child welfare has the authority to bring a case
to court and request an order to remove the child
from the family. Few cases, however, require court
action. Table 12 compares reported cases of probable child abuse from 1975 to 1979. The increase in
the numbers of reported cases indicates a greater
awareness, on the part of both the public and professionals, of the problems of child abuse and neglect.
As awareness increases, so does the development of
programs and services to help deal with the problem.
A person who believes a child may be in need of
protection is required by law to report the circumstances to the superintendent. The establishment of
the Helpline for Children has provided a valuable
channel through which such reports may be received. Immediate response to these calls, many of
which come from the children or parents themselves, allows ministry staff to give help to child and
family before the situation becomes critical. Table
13 shows the number of calls to the Zenith helpline
during 1980.
Help to the family can be provided by the ministry's "non-ward care" program, which offers temporary foster care to children during periods of family crisis. Without removal of parents' guardianship
rights, children may be placed outside the home for
short periods, or in a specialized resource on a
longer-term basis if special needs must be met. Depending upon financial ability, parents contribute
towards the cost of the program. Regularcontactand
involvement with the child is encouraged during
such a period of necessary separation.
Parents who have harmed, or are concerned that
they may harm a child, may join Parents-In-Crisis.
Through this volunteer self-help organization supported by the ministry, parents are able to talk about
their difficulties and learn other ways of disciplining their children. The organization has continued
to grow this year (there are now 33 groups in British
Columbia) and offers a much-needed preventive
service.
Children come into ministry care not only
through non-ward agreements with parents, but
through court-ordered removal from their families
Report of the Ministry, 1980
under the Family and Child Service Act, the Juvenile
Delinquents Act, and the Family Relations Act. In
1980, fewer children were placed in the care of the
superintendent of child welfare. All of these child-
ren continue to receive services which aim a t reu n i t-
i ng the family as soon as possible.
If parents of a child die without naming a guardian by will, the superintendent becomes temporary guardian. Children whose appointed guardian]
is dead or refuses or is incompetent to act, are also
committed to care under the Family Relations Act.
Table 12 Reported Cases of Probable
Child Abuse
Age and Sex              1975
1976
1977
1978*
1979'
Male:
Under3years     50
58
63
48
871
3 to 10 Years     66
92
99
141
155.
11 Years and Older    25
41
46
75
811
No Age Reported
-31
Female:
Under 3 Years      31
52
43
45
71'
3 to 10 Years     46
90
93
130
164 c
11 Years and Older    44
84
104
166
233C
TOTALS  262
417
450
605
791 i
*Forms for reporting were changed January 1, 1978, re-\
suiting in more reports. These tablesdifferfrom those in thii
1978 report as later follow-up reports have come in. 19SC:\
figures will be available in spring 1981 when the final mt
ports for the year have been received.
Table 13 Admissions and Discharges of
Children to Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare, Fiscal Year 1979-80
By Agreement 2,257'
By Apprehension*
(Family and Child Service Act) 2,313.
ByCommital" 405 |
ADMISSIONS TOTAL 4,97fl
By Adoption  40_I
By Age or Similar Terminations 84f>
Returned to Parents (i.e.. Legal Guardian) .. ,3,857'
DISCHARGES TOTAL 5,l(fcl
*The detail formerly reported regarding exact legal acts in-\
volved and the methods of discharge is available on Table..
56 to 59 in Section VIII.
**Admission for Familyand Child ServiceAct casesocaml
as soon as the child is apprehended. Forotheracts (Juveim I
Delinquents Act, Family Relations Act, etc.) committaWt
automatic or admission does not occur until court promt
dure is completed.
 fl
Family and Children's Services
31
jtrable 14 Calls Made to the Helpline for Children in 1980
Source of Calls
Anony- Neigh- Family                                Professional
mous bour Parents Member Self            or Agency
■Liuary                            471 46 n/a 38 570 11
■February                          407 44 n/a 43 443 6
Barch                              397 55 n/a 40 409 7
Kpril                                432 48 n/a 45 488 9
|fay                                 298 51 n/a 33 368 14
June                                 875 67 n/a 77 522 12
July 1,016 71 n/a 89 828 44
Migust                            912 86 38 125 765 26
September                       471 75 17 46 517 27
October                           420 82 22 60 457 20
Kovember                       471 48 22 72 332 18
December                        370 57 17 39 280 21
Nature of Calls
Counselling    Information Abuse/Neglect       Prank
Ruiary 275 560 68 35
iffebruary 231 465 119 45
Krch 216 433 96 15
Kpril 243 566 159 10
May 201 452 137 77
tune 327 628 160 405
July 434 851 223 778
Kgust 458 965 236 627
September 300 672 177 243
October 248 581 158 231
November 297 576 128 287
December 193 480 130 226
Some culls may appear in more than one column. For example, an anonymous call concerning possible child abuse, which
was dealt with by initial telephone counselling and then referred to a ministry office for follow-up, would appear as an
anonymous call, a counselling call, and a call concerning child abuse.
The figures in this table differ in some cases from previously released figures. The recording and reporting systems have
undergone extensive revision and some identified problems are still to be resolved. The figures in this table have been
generated by computer analysis of all previous recording systems.
Vie variance in calls in the prank column results from procedural changes in the recording system .Up to June 1980, there
was no computer reporting category for prank calls or hang-ups. The figures obtained prior to June 1980 came from a
manual check on written records where such observations were made.
Table 15 Cases* Receiving Services Related to Protection of Children,
by Type of Service, for Fiscal Years 1978-79 and 1979-80
Opened during Carried during Incomplete at
Type of Service                                                           year year year
1978-79     1979-80 1978-79     1979-80 1978-79     1979-80
Custody       186           194 276           358 164           125
Repatriation**       469           402 558           613 211             91
jffiimigration          9             11 13            17 6              8
TOTAL       654           607 847           988 381           224
I .Eases are family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
' **These figures do not include all of Regions 1,2,15,16, and 17; an additional 216 repatriations during theyear 1978-79
I bid 244 repatriations during the year 1979-80 were handled by Vancouver Emergency Services.
 32
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Most of the children in care under this act live with
relatives who are encouraged to apply for guardianship, provided the home appears permanent and
stable.
The Child Paternity and Support Act governs a
program of services for unmarried mothers and
their children. The act provides the legal framework
within which support for a child bom out of wedlock may be arranged, through agreement or by
court order. Other services available under the act
include medical expenses for the mother and support for a period of time around the birth date; advice and protection in any matter related to the child
and its birth; and further action deemed necessary
Foster homes are substitute environments.
in the interests of mother and child.
A substantial drop occurred in 1980 in the number
of transient children repatriated to their province or.|
state of origin by Child Protection Services. The
figure of 402 children helped by the ministry does
not include those returned to their home area in
British Columbia.
The number of child abuse or neglect cases re-:|
ported has once again shown a large rise over the
previous year (see Table 12). Concurrently, then
have been decreases in the number of children who;|
needed to be taken into the superintendent's custody, and in the number of deaths from child abuse
and neglect. The figures make clear the importance]
of early intervention to allow parents to benefit from|
the ministry's supportive programs within the
community.
During the year, the Family and Child Service Act
received third reading in the legislature. The provisions of this act, which replaces one of the same
name, represent a significant change in approach.
Based on legislation proclaimed in 1901, the for-]
mer act treated state and family as adversaries in the!
protection of children. Recognizing that the fam-!
ily's role in child protection is central, the newlegis-j
la tion makes provision for state and parents to won
in partnership in maintaining the integrity of the
family and meeting the special needs of children.
Extensive public input contributed significantly;
to the development of the act. This major initiative]
reflects the new directions the ministry has taken in]
its work in recent years. Under the new act. Child;
Protection Services is, and will continue to be, cons
mitted to providing the best possible care to families
and children in need.
SERVICES FOR CHILDREN IN CARE
A spectrum of resources is available to the child
who is in the care of the superintendent of child
welfare. These resources range from the volunteer]
foster home providing care for the average youngster, to the very specialized resource able to care for a
severely disturbed or handicapped child.
Child in Care Services
The object of Child in Care Services is to provide
services consistent with the most appropriate life
plan for the child. The goals of the program incluml
the return of the child to the natural family; adoptifflj
placement; substitute family living; specialize
care or an independent living arrangement. Tffl
success of the program can be judged by the facl
that, over the last five-year period, 30 per cent of the-
children in care have been returned home within
three months; 75 per cent within two years.
 Family and Children's Services
33
■Table 16 Children in Care, by Age and Legal Status, as of December 31,1980
Under 3
[Non-Wards   57
tamily and Child Service Act
I  Wards (before the court
I and temporary)   294
framily and Child Service
Act Wards (others)  209
mil Other Court Wards  30
■DTALS   590
Age in Years
S-5
6-11           12-15
16-18
TOTALS
53
230              434
367
1,141
265
448
556
301
1,864
250
946
1,365
1,613
4,383
63
240
364
499
1,196
631
1,864
2,719
2,780
8,584
I Services to me child in care include life planning,
placement, basicmaintenanceanddothing, education, transportation and other goods and services
Riecessary to meet the individual needs of each
BuTd.
I During the year, the ministry continued to em-
phas ize life planning and tracking to ensure that the
best possible plans were developed for each child.
To assist in this process, the Life Books, introduced
last year, remain an integral part of the ministry's
Bervice in helping these children maintain a record
of their experiences, activities and events.
I The number of children in care, as of December
Hi, 1980, was 17,168, and is shown, by age and legal
status, in Table 16. These statistics reflect a child in
■care population which continues to diminish.
Foster Homes
| The object of this program is to provide a substi-
tute family that can meet the physical, social and
Emotional needs of children admitted to care. Al-
though foster homes are just one of the placement
options available, they continue to serve the place-
ment needs of the majority of children in care. As of
December 31,1980,63 per cent or 5,427 of the 8,584
children in care were maintained in foster homes.
■ Fostering a child is a personal and demanding
Risk, and one that requires patience, understanding, sharing and commitment. When a child is
Braced, foster parents play a vital role in working
together with the social worker to achieve early
Kunion of the child with his/her natural family. In
Enrne cases, the child is not able to return home and
is committed permanently to the superintendent's
care. The foster parents then assist in preparing the
Euld for placement in an adoption home, or may
Eiemselves provide the child a permanent home
Kirough adoption or a "planned life placement".
■ Monthly maintenance payments are provided to
the foster parents according to the age of the child.
Khese provide for the child's basic maintenance and
are inclusive of family allowance. Where extra costs
Ere incurred in mamtaining the child, a special rate
may be paid. Additionally, a fee for service may be
provided where the child's special needs require
extra supervision by the foster parents.
The current schedule of foster home rates is outlined in Table 17.
Table 17 Basic Foster Care Rates for
Children Placed in Foster Homes*
Age of Child Maintenance Qothing TOTAL
Birth to 5 years $113.65     $21.23 $134.88
6-9years     138.06        25.42    163.48
10-11 years     155.88        30.08    185.96
12-13 years     179.10        30.08    209.18
14-19 years     196.76       36.00    232.76
*Effective January 1, 1980.
In partnership with the more than 50 local foster
parent associations, ministry staff provide support
services to foster homes, as well as recruiting new
homes. This year, the ministry provided a grant of
$136,747 to the BC Federation of Foster Parent Associations. The grant, which represents a 25 per cent
increase from the previous year, will enable the federation to play a stronger role in the education and
training of foster parents, the recruitment of new
homes and the development of new local associations.
The ministry and the federation are working cooperatively to provide the best possible services for
children in care and their families.
Table 18 Foster Home Care, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1980 and
Fiscal Years 1975-76 to 1979-80
1980 $17,500,000
1979-80  16,100,000
1978-79   14,900,000
1977.78   15,100,000
1976-77   12,000,000
1975-76  13,300,000
 34
Specialized Resources for Children
Specialized Resources for Children provides
specialized services and resources to assist children
with emotional disturbances or handicapping-con-
ditions. Both residential and non-residential care
are available.
Foster homes and child-care resources, together,
comprise the majority of residential options for
children in the care of the superintendent of child
welfare. Child-care resources have developed as
preferred alternatives to institutional care, as they
tend to be smaller and offer more individualized opportunities for each child.
A wide range of residential models is funded
Report of the Ministry, 1980
under the program:
□ Specialized resources programs are generally
operated on a child-care staffed model and
usually have a placement time limit of six to
eight weeks. This placement option is gen-i
erally employed only until more permanenfj
plans have been prepared.
D Group home programs provide care and treat-
ment designed to meet individual goals for
children in family or shift model settings. This
placement option is generally chosen as an alternative to foster care for children who cannon
be planned for in foster homes, or for children
who require the specialized services offered by
Foster homes continue to serve the placement needs of the majority of children in care.
 Family and Children's Services
35
■Table 19 Group Homes (Including Receiving
Homes), Ministerial Expenditures,
1 Calendar Year 1980 and Fiscal Years
1.974-75 to 1979-80
Table 21 Specialized Residential Treatment
Programs, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1980 and Fiscal Years
1974-75 to 1979-80
B980  $9,560,000
1979-80 8,710,000
K978-79 8,440,000
B977-78 8,380,000
B976-77 7,450,000
1975-76 4,420,000
K74-75 3,730,000
Table 20 Contracted Specialized Resources,
Statistical Information
■Total Expenditures for 1980  $20,000,000
Number of Specialized Resources
■Programs 6,800,000
I Capacity  61,100,000
Rumber of Group Home Programs  17,100,000
I Capacity  83,700,000
■lumber of Special Care Homes 23,300,000
Capacity 25,600,000
Blumber of Non-residential Programs ... 2,000,000
Rjumber of Families Served  62,800,000
the resource. Often programs offer a particular
approach which is especially suited to a particular group; for example, training resources
for autistic children or life skills homes for older adolescents. Time limits forplacement are
flexible and determined by the plan for the
.  child.
I D Special care homes* are specialized family
homes providing skilled child care and treat-
I   ment for one or two severely disturbed or
handicapped children and their families.
These families are often provided with the
support of respite and intermittent services to
enable them to cope. This placement option allows for individualized family care tailored
specifically to a child for whom the alternative
is often institutional care.
Tj, □ Non-residential programs include centre-
based or outreach day programs geared to pro-
^Chespecialcarehomemodelwasintroducedin 1980. This
model of service combines the provisions of the former
therapeutic homeprogram with aspects of special ratefos-
verhomes, and some additional features. It allows for max-
mium flexibility in planning services for very hard-to-
^Wcechildren. Theprogram, stillin its early stages, isal-
ready offering family-based care for children with a wide
range of men tal and physical handicaps, as well as for se-
merely emotionally and behaviourally disturbed children.
1980 $20,000,000
W79-80  16,200,000
1978-79  13,600,000
1977-78   12,700,000
1976-77   12,300,000
1975-76  13,300,000
1974-75     8,400,000
viding counselling and goal-oriented services
to families and children. Programs often include training in parenting skills, particularly
those skills necessary to work with severely
handicapped or disturbed youngsters. Nonresidential services offer support to families or
foster families in cases where the alternative
would be to remove the child.
ADOPTION SERVICES
The Adoption Act provides the mandate for
Adoption Services, the objective of which is to provide a permanent life plan for children whose birth
parents are not able to do so.
Adoption services are provided on behalf of
children for whom the ministry is responsible, for
those who are placed privately and, in some cases,
for those who are adopted by relatives or stepparents.
Ministry adoptions are those in which child
placements are planned, implemented and completed by ministry staff. A central registry, of adoption homes which have been studied and approved,
is maintained in Victoria. Children who require
placement are referred to the registry by local
offices. Based on the needs of the child referred, registry staff forward a selection of approved homes
for consideration by local staff and, where possible,
the child's birth parents. After placement, there is a
legal waiting period; subsequently a report is prepared for a Supreme Court hearing. If the requirements of the Adoption Act have been met, an adoption order may be granted.
An increasing number of people wish to adopt
healthy newborns or young children. Few such
children are available for adoption. It was therefore
found necessary, in February of this year, to curtail
the study of new adoptive applicants for this group
of children. At present, an active registry of 300 approved homes is maintained at any given time New
applications for newborn or young children are
placed on a waiting list for possible future study
 36
Table 22 Children Placed for
Adoption in 1979 and 1980
Children placed for adoption ....
Children with special
needs placed for adoption 	
Children from other
provinces placed for adoption
Children from outside
Canada placed for adoption ...
1979
1980
677
646
301
281
17
19
6
20
Table 23 Approved Homes, as of
December 31,1980, by Request of
Adoption Applicants
High demand child (0-2 years)
High demand special
needs child	
Special needs child only	
979
1980
649
482
251
298
177
282
Table 24 Adoption Reports Submitted
to the Supreme Court
Type of Adoption Number of Cases
1978       1979       1980
*Step-parent  746        563 64
'Relative   82 85 28
Private   58 62 46
*These include pre-amendment cases.
when the number on the registry drops below 300.
The pressing need for applicants willing and able
to adopt children with special needs continues.
These are children who have medical problems,
physical handicaps, emotional or behavioural problems or who suffer from developmental delay. Some
children are of school age, and are part of a sibling
group.
An amendment to the Adoption Act, proclaimed
on September 16,1980, provided for the voluntary
transfer of guardianship for a child to the superintendent of child welfare upon the signing of a consent to adoption. The intent of the amendment is to
prevent a child from being in a "legal limbo" during
the legal waiting period prior to the granting of an
order.
A further amendment prohibits advertising for a
child for adoption and also makes it an offense for
anyone to o ffer money in connection with the adoption of a child.
Non-ministry adoptions include those in which
children have been placed privately or are adopted
Report of the Ministry, 1980
by step-parents or relatives. Since a 1979 amend-j
ment to the Adoption Act removed the requirement]
that the superintendent conduct an inquiry into]
step-parent and relative adoptions, the ministry's
involvement has declined significantly. During]
1980, the British Columbia Supreme Court ordered]
the superintendent to conduct an inquiry into 20
such cases.
It is anticipated that the placement of special
needs children will continue to be the ministry's
focus during 1981.
POST-ADOPTION SERVICES
The types of services offered by Post-Adoption
Services have changed little since the section was set
up in September 1978. Demands for these services,
however, continue to grow, as each year more inquiries are received from adopted children and their,
families.
During calendar year 1980, inquiries on 1,002
adoptees were dealt with, an increase of 248 from
calendar year 1979. Inquiries are received from
adopted persons, adopting parents, Ministry of
Human Resources district offices, doctors, lawyers,
the Department of Indian andNorthem Affairs, and
others. Adopted persons usually request social,
medical and genetic information. Some request the
identities of their natural parents. Requests from
natural parents are usually for a progress report on
the child relinquished, and sometimes a request for
a reunion. The information that can be released is
restricted by the terms of the Adoption Act,
BRITISH COLUMBIA COUNCIL
FOR THE FAMILY
The British Columbia Council for the Family acts J
as a forum for representatives of communities to
communicate with each other about the needs of
families. The council helps representatives prepare
plans and self-help projects to strengthen families in
British Columbia.
In association with local, provincial, or national j
groups, the council works to promote public support for the well-being of the family.
The council is a registered non-profit society witS
representatives from religious bodies, ethnic
groups, community agencies and political parties.
The council is represented in more than 80 communities throughout British Columbia.
The council's province-wide programs include:*
D Family Month
The goal of Family Month, which was ml
J
 Family and Children's Services
37
itiated in 1977 and has become established in
the province, i s to raise public awareness of the
importance of the family in our society.
□ Family Time
This program provides communication aids
for families. More than 10,000 brochures have
been distributed, on request, to congregations
and community groups.
□ Marriage Preparation
This course prepares couples to deal more
constructively with future stresses they will
face. In co-operation with community colleges, the council sponsors leadership training
workshops and community advisory committees in the development and co-ordination of
marriage preparation courses.
□ Information Exchange
The council provides a service to voluntary
organizations by providing information about
family support programs, parenting courses,
single groups, mothers' groups, foster grandparents, family life education and babysitting.
□ Private Agency Committee
This standing committee consists of representatives from private family service agencies. The committee provides a provincial
network for the agencies and a vehicle for sharing program ideas and information on a provincial basis. A major objective is to establish
standards and ethics for lay counsellors.
Adoption Services provides a permanent life plan for children when birth parents cannot.
 38
Report of the Ministry, 1980
The Ministry of Human Resources supports the
work o f th e B ri tish Columbia Council for the Family
by providing office space and salaries for a director
and an administrative support person. Ministry
funding of approximately $46,000 was provided in
1979-80. The council also raised $17,100 through
donations and membership fees. This covered the
cost of program development and promotion and
assisted in the organization of local branches.
During 1980, more than 600 children in British Columbia were placed for adoption.
 Section III
Guaranteed Available Income for Need (GAIN) 40
GAIN Income Assistance  40
GAIN for Handicapped  41
GAIN for Seniors (60-64)  41
GAIN Seniors Supplements 41
Other Services and Benefits 42
Individual Opportunity Plan  42
Earnings Exemption 42
School Start-up Allowance  42
Christmas Supplementary Allowance 42
Incentive Allowance 42
Community Involvement 43
CrisisGrants  43
Assistance to Employment  43
Educational, Vocational and
Rehabilitative Services  43
Transition Houses and Hostels 44
WorkActivity 44
Burial of Indigents  44
Repatriation  45
Rental Assistance  46
RentAid (Renter's Tax Credit)  46
SAFER (Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters)  46
 40
Report of the Ministry, 1980
GUARANTEED AVAILABLE INCOME
FOR NEED (GAIN)
All GAIN programs are founded on respect for the
dignity of the individual. The programs provide assistance to people in need, to provide them with a
basic standard of living and facilitate health and decency in their daily lives. Assistance is provided in
such a way that the individual's or family's capacity
for self-dependence is maintained, strengthened or
restored.
Under Section 7 of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act, personal issues such as race,
colour, creed, or political belief may not enter into
determination of eligibility. The amount of assistance provided must reflect the amount allowed by
legislation, regulation or policy.
The Income Assistance division administers
three types of GAIN programs: GAIN Basic Income
Assistance; GAIN For Handicapped; and GAIN
Seniors Supplements. A fourth program, GAIN For
Seniors (ages 60-64) was amalgamated with GAIN
Income Assistance during 1980.
GAIN Income Assistance
This program provides income assistance to residents of British Columbia, aged 19 to 64, who qualify on the basis of their income and asset levels.
There are four broad categories of income assistance recipients;
□ Single-parent families
The largest category of recipients, this group is
composed mainly of mothers with dependent children, although it is becoming more common to encounter single-parent fami lies consisting of a father
and dependent children.
□ People who are temporarily unemployable for
health reasons
Where the disability is temporary, the program
provides the necessary financial and social supports
during the period of convalescence. Recipients in
this group generally return to full- or part-time employment, depending upon the circumstances.
People in this group usually require support to deal
with the stresses they encounter by not being able to
participate in the work force or social life of their
community.
□ People who are employable but temporarily out
of work
Usually the duration of income assistance to this
group is brief, as these recipients generally return to
the labour force. Some in this group receive federal
unemployment insurance but, because of family
size, require further supplementation of income. ]
Other recipients in this group are marginally em-1
ployable, as they lack the necessary skills to compete
for permanent jobs. Support services are available tea
increase their opportunities.
Those who work part-time or full-time at low
wages, or those who have large fami lies to support,]
may qualify for an income supplement from the!
ministry to bring their income level up to the income
assistance rate for their family size.
D Children living with relatives
Although the ministry's goal is to keep parents
and children together, in instances of parental illness or desertion, children must sometimes be j
placed in other homes. Placing a child with a rela ti ve
is usually a very positive step; it provides a continuity of surroundings and results in less upset for
the child. This program provides relatives with fi-1
nancial assistance at the same rate as the ministry
pays for foster children.
Table 25 Monthly Average Number of
Income Assistance Recipients
1979-80  122,929
1978-79  114,622
1977-78  113,9391
1976-77  112,938
1975-76  127,551
1974-75  111,696
Note: Averaging statistical data for January to December
1980, the number of income assistance recipients by category was as follows: heads offamilies (approximately two-
thirds of which were single parents), 31,976; dependents
(mainly children), 61,060; single persons, 29,893.
Rate Schedule Tables
Effective May 1980, GAIN income assistance ra te s  I
were as follows:
Table 26 Income Assistance Rates
(applicable during first four months
of eligibility)
Maximum
Unit
1 (aged 19-59)*
2
Support
$136
218
Shelter
$130
260
Total
$266
478
3
287
325
612
4
334
365
699
5 (and more)
*For aged 60-64 rate
+ 45
(each uni
s, see Table
+ 20
t) (each unit)
27.
J
 Income Assistance
41
■Table 27 Basic Income Assistance Rates
(applicable after four consecutive months)
Maximum
KJnit
Support
Shelter
Total
1 (aged 19-30)
$136
$130
$266
1 (aged 31-64)
191
130
321
2 (aged 19-30)
218
260
478
2 (aged 31-64*
or parent/child)
273
260
533
1
322
325
647
4
369
365
734
| (and more)
+ 45
+ 20
(each unit) (each unit)
I *For a couple, both aged 60-64, add $47 to the basic rate.
■Table 28 Expenditures for
Income Assistance
B980   $291,630,000
B979-80   227,150,000
■1978-79  158,070,000
B977-78   157,480,000
m976-77    157,770,000
B975-76   171,980,000
1974-75   187,500,000
I The ministry provides a range of support services
to those who receive income assistance. These are
described under Other Services and Benefits.
GAIN For Handicapped
■ This program provides monthly benefits for those
people, aged 18 to 64, who qualify as handicapped
under the GAIN Act and regulations.
I Eligibility is determined, first, by the applicant's
or family's financial assets, income, shelter costs
End family size; and, second, on the basis of an eval-
uation, by a medical committee, of the applicant's
handicap as defined by a physician.
I Themaximum monthly benefit for a single handicapped person, as of January 1,1981, was $408.96.
Benefits vary, depending upon the recipient's
shelter costs. Since April 1979, GAIN For Handi-
Eapped benefits have increased quarterly.
■Table 29 Number of Handicapped Persons
in Receipt of Benefits*
feecember 1980  13,661
December 1979  13,269
tttecember 1978 12,162
■December 1977  11,435
Etecember 1976  10,680
WPte statistics do not include the number of dependents of
handicapped persons.
Table 30 Annual Cost of GAIN For
Handicapped Benefits
!980 $57,752,225*
1979    45,192,239
1978     37,548,798
1977    33,267,327
1976    30,817,948
*As of July 1980, the statistics include the benefits paid to
dependents of handicapped persons.
GAIN For Seniors (60-64)
Up to the end of June 1980, there existed within
the ministry a special and separate GAIN program
for persons over age 60 and not in receipt of federal
OAS/SAP. As of July 1,1980, these benefits became
an integral part of the basic income assistance
system, with recipients, however, retaining entitlement to some of the special benefits that had been
previously provided.
Statistics and other data relating to this benefit are
now incorporated in tables reporting on GAIN Income Assistance recipients.
GAIN Seniors Supplement
This program provides GAIN benefits to supplement the federal government's Old Age Security,
Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Spouses Allowance programs. The GAIN supplement is an
automatic grant to those British Columbia residents
over 65 years of age who receive federal OAS/GIS
benefits. The grant is also automatic to OAS/GIS
recipients, whose spouse is over 60 years of age, receiving Spouses Allowance from the federal government.
The ministry calculates the GAIN supplement
payments on the basis of a predetermined amount
to supplement the income reported and paid by the
federal government to the OAS/GIS recipient. The
supplement provides a minimum guaranteed income to those who qualify. Every three months, the
provincial guarantee increases by the same amount
as the increases in OAS/GIS/SPA. The provincial
guarantee, as of January 1981, was $443.96 for a
single person and $816.88 for a married couple.
Table 31 Number of People in Receipt
of GAIN Seniors Supplement
December 1980  67,830
December 1979  75,253
December 1978  81,996
December 1977  92,506
December 1976  97,198
 42
Table 32 Annual Cost of GAIN Seniors
Supplement, by Calender Year
1980 $25,880,740
1979    28,723,195
1978    31,877,781
1977  35,962,866
1976    37,324,860
Other Services and Benefits
Income Assistance administers a range of support
services which the ministry makes available to
GAIN recipients. The intent of these services, allowances and programs is to meet individual needs
and to assist people to maintain or enhance their
level of independence.
□ Individual Opportunity Plan
1980 saw the inception of a new plan at the
Ministry of Human Resources on behalf of employable income assistance recipients: the Individual
Opportunity Plan.
The goal of the Individual Opportunity Plan is to
provide intensive rehabilitation services to those
clients who can most benefit from them and, by so
doing, assist them in their progress towards independence.
Key features of the Individual Opportunity Plan
include:
□ providing of employment-related services to
those clients who could develop a long-term
dependency on income assistance;
□ enhancing of the partnership between each
client and worker in establishing goals and developing a plan; and
Individual Opportunity Plan counselling.
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Report of the Ministry, 1980
□ co-ordinating of existing services provided by
the provincial Ministries ofHuman Resources
Labour and Education, and the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission.
The increased involvement of the public sector is
also an important aspect of the Individual Opportunity Plan. Representatives from business, industry and labour throughout British Columbia
have formed the Council of the '80s and agreed to
lend their expertise and support to ministry staff
and clients, to assist them in the implementation of
individual opportunity planning.
Each region has developed a service delivery plan
which best meets the needs of its communities. In
addition to social workers and financial assistance
workers, employment rehabilitation offices are assigned, throughout the province, to work with
clients on the opportunity plan. Regions have also
improved access to the resources of other ministries
and to local employers.
The Individual Opportunity Plan reflects a renewed commitment to support individual clients in
their efforts to achieve independence.
D Earnings Exemption
It is important that clients have the opportunity to|
take employment without losing all financial gain
through deductions from their income assistance.
This is recognized in the earnings exemption
policy, which is designed to encourage clients in
their transition from income assistance to a more
self-sustaining position in the work force. This may
mean a move directly into a full-time job, or part-
time work where new skills acquired may lead
eventually to full-time employment.
Policy allows earnings exemptions of $50 per
month for a single person, and $100 per month for a
person with dependents, or a single handicapped
person.
D School Start-up Allowance
To help with the necessary extras at the beginning!
of the school year, the ministry provides a start-up
allowance to income assistance families with
school-age children. The allowance for children up I
to age 12 is $20 and for children 12 and older, $30.   I
□ Christmas Supplementary Allowance
At Christmas, the ministry provides additional
funds for income assistance recipients; $20 for a
single person and $50 for each family.
D Incentive Allowance
Incentive Allowance provides GAIN recipients
with an opportunity to obtain work experience in
preparation for entry or re-entry into the employment market.
An individual can participate in the program for
 Income Assistance
43
■up to six months. The ministry pays an additional
allowance of up to $50 per month for a single recipient or $100 per month for a person with dependents. This allowance helps with costs of clothing
and transportation.
I The program is available to recipients who may
have never worked or who have not worked for a
Hong period of time. The program offers opportunities for individuals to participate in local commun-
lity services, and gain experience and confidence in
working with others.
■D Community Involvement
■ Community Involvement provides those GAIN
recipients who are unable to work with a chance to
participate in community service endeavours organized by non-profit agencies. The ministry provides an additional grant of $50 per month to par-
tici pan ts, to meet extra expenses such as transporta-
tion. Participation in the program is not time-lim-
ited; it is guided by the needs of the individual and
■the available opportunities in the community.
D Crisis Grants
■ Occasionally an income assistance recipient is
faced with an emergency situation and does not
have the assets, family resources or availability of
credit to cope with the problem. In these situations,
a GAIN Crisis Grant may be provided to prevent
danger to the recipient's health or removal of
children from the family home.
ID Assistance to Employment
■ To aid income assistance recipients in accepting
Employment, the ministry may grant additional financial assistance to meet the costs of essential work
tools and clothing for a confirmed job. The ministry
also assists with the cost of moving the recipient to
the community where the job is located if financial
aid from other agencies is not available. Additional
assistance may be available for essential clothing for
job interviews and transportation expenses for interviews which seem likely to result in a job.
□ Educational, Vocational and Rehabilitative
Services
This program is to help income assistance recipients acquire the skills and self-confidence necessary to seek employment. The financial, educational, and training services offered by Canada Employment and Immigration, the provincial Ministries of Education and Health, Community Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and other community resources, are used to develop a training plan
suited to the individual client. Ministry staff work
together with these departments and agencies in an
effort to ensure fulfilment of training goals.
Income assistance benefits may be continued for
those involved in training programs. Where no
Table 33 Costs for Providing Training to
Income Assistance Recipients
1980  $434,189
1979  360,403
1978  302,126
1977  372,514
1976  303,566
1975  290,000
1974   185,000
 44
other financial assistance is available, the ministry
can also pay all or part of the costs of the training
itself. This may include a $30 per month grant for
persons with dependents and a $20 per month grant
for single people, to assist with transportation costs,
school supplies and miscellaneous needs.
Transition Houses and Hostels
Transition houses (also known as emergency
shelters), hostels, and residential treatment facilities, are available in several communities to provide
temporary room and board to those who may require income assistance and who are in a period of
transition. This includes families in crisis, women
undergoing marital separation, and persons recently released from hospitals, prisons or treatment
centres for drug and alcohol dependency.
Throughout the province there are 55 facilities,
which are funded by the ministry, to provide accommodation on a time-limited basis to eligible
persons. Residents who require financial assistance
may apply through the nearest ministry office serving the particular facility. Depending upon the
circumstances and the contract with the facility, the
ministry may provide assistance directly to the individual or pay the operator directly on a per diem
basis at a pre-determined contract rate.
The m i n i s try expects that facilities providing this
type of care will be licenced under the Community
Care Faculties Licencing Act where applicable.
Hotels which are sometimes used as hostel resources are locally approved by district offices of the
ministry for this purpose. The budgeting for these
facilities is part of the GAIN Income Assistance vote
and is administered through that division, although payment and eligibility are locally determined. Some facilities are jointly funded by the provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission of the Ministry of Health. In these facilities, the Alcohol and
Drug Commission funds the treatment program
and the Ministry of Human Resources pays accommodation costs of those persons who are eligible for
income assistance benefits.
By the end of 1980, approximately 1,150 beds were
available to the Ministry of Human Resources for
these three types of programs.
Work Activity
Work Activity provides an employment preparation service for people on GAIN who are having unusual difficulty in obtaining or retaining a job. The
program has proven valuable to individuals who
have been unable to fully benefit from other training
programs.
Groups of carefully selected trainees participate
in a program which may last from three to six
months. Components of the program include actual
Report ofthe Ministry, 1980
work experience in a supervised setting, educational upgrading, job search preparation, counsel]
ling and life skills education in such areas as money
management. This is provided within work placements such as forestry projects or workshops for
light industrial manufacture.
This program is provided to special groups such
as the handicapped, persons in receipt of income
assistance benefits, or other persons who may be
deemed to be in need.
At present, there are seven projects operating under the program throughout the province:
Fraser Valley Work Activity Project
Vancouver Island Work Activity Project
Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop
Vancouver Youth Project
Arbutus Work Incentive Society
Capital Mental Health Association
Boys' and Girls' Club of Victoria
Table 34 Work Activity Projects, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1980 and
Fiscal Years 1973-74 to 1979-80
1980   $1,322,581,
1979-80   1,014,854
1978-79   939,872
1977-78   357,631
1976-77   340,288
1975-76   399,604
1974-75   313,117
1973-74   366,71t|
Burial of Indigents
This program offers payment of burial or crema-j
tion costs where there are no alternative methods of
payment.
With the exception of the City of Vancouver, the
services provided come under an agreement between the Funeral Directors' Association of British
Columbia and the Ministry of Human Resources]
Services include provision of a burial plot, cremation, casket and a dignified burial and necessary
transportation. This benefit is provided when ths
Table 35 Indigent Burials Expenses
1980  $293,858 I
1979-80  290,548 i
1978-79  235,229
1977-78  191,922 S
1976-77  332,573,
1975-76  220,654 t
1974-75  187,027 \
 Income Assistance
45
deceased has neither an estate nor relatives nor
rother persons able or prepared to take this responsibility. Under the provision of the charter of the City
Rf Vancouver, financial responsibility for indigent
burials in Vancouver is assumed by that munici-
pality.
I Referrals for assistance with burial costs are received by the ministry from a variety of sources: city
officials, police, a relative, the official adminis-
trator, the public trustee, or any other interested
party. The ministry, however, pays only the cost of
Burial and does not assume the responsibility of
authorizing the burial.
Repatriation
Under its repatriation policy, the ministry assists
persons who are applying for or receiving income
assistance to return to their province or country of
origin. Assistance with such a move can be considered if it is for health reasons or is the result of sound
social planning.
Repatriation is most often requested for reasons
such as the desire to reunite with families, or the
knowledge of employment or employment possibilities in another province. All requests are assessed by ministry staff, and planning is done in
Elderly renters receive SAFER assistance based on income and amount of rent paid.
 advance with authorities in the otherprovince, who
assist by verifying the feasibility of the proposed
move.
Table 36 Repatriation Expenditures
1980  $91,788
1979-80   82,526
1978-79   93,342
1977-78   753H
1976-77   57,105
1975-76   32,482
1974-75   30,325
1973-74   11,951
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
Ren t Aid (Renter's Tax Credit)
RentAid is a tax credit program to help offset high
rents, especially for those on low or moderate incomes. Although funded by the provincial government, RentAid is administered through the federal
government's income tax system. Applicants complete a RentAid claim form included with their federal income tax return form.
The maximum annual benefit is $150 less one-
and-a-half per cent of the applicant's taxable income. No benefit may exceed 10 per cent of the total
rent paid by the applicant during the year.
Eligibility to receive RentAid and the amount to
be provided is determined by ihe applicant's age,
income, the amount of rent paid and other factors.
To meet the basic requirements, an applicant must
be 16 years or older, pay rent for his/her principal
residence in British Columbia and reside in British
Columbia at the last day of the taxation year.
In 1980, there were approximately 221,600 Rent-
Aid recipients. The ministry's expenditure for
RentAid in 1980 was $21.48 million.
SAFER (Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters)
SAFER provides direct cash assistance to senior
citizen renters to ensure they do not have to spend
an inordinate portion of their income on rent.
Monthly SAFER benefits are based on the applicant's income and the amount of rent paid. SAFER
benefits equal 75 per cent of the amount by which
rent exceeds 30 per cent of the applicant's total income.
Effective March 1, 1980, the maximum monthly
rent that could be claimed for SAFER benefits was
$225 for a single person and $245 for a couple. Applicants whose rent is higher than these amounts
may still qualify for SAFER although no more than
these amounts may be claimed.
Report of the Ministry, 1980
To be eligible for SAFER benefits, applicants I
must be 65 years of age or older, living in a rental J
accommodation and paying more than 30 per cent eg
their income towards rent. They must also be in ia
ceipt of Canadian Old Age Security and have resided in British Columbia for two years prior to applying, or for a continuous five-year period at anfl
time.
In 1980 there were 12,500 SAFER recipients. The]
ministry's expenditure for SAFER in 1980 was $73
million.
 Section IV
HealtJ^are-
Services
*Wwm.
Health Care Services 	
Pharmacare 	
48
50
 48
Report of the Ministry, 1980
HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Health Care Services arranges for provision of
quality health care for eligible persons at a reasonable cost through subscription to Medical Services
Plan of British Columbia and, in special cases,
augmentation of it.
This division offers consultation to the staff of the
ministry's district offices to ensure awareness of available health care services. In order to ensure the
best possible service, the division may retain specialists in any field for consultation.
The following groups of persons are eligible for
health care coverage through the minishy:
□ "Unemployable" persons less than 60 years of
age who receive GAIN benefits.
D Children in the care of the superintendent of
child welfare, or living in the home of a relative
who receives GAIN benefits on their behalf.
□ GAIN recipients more than 60 years of age.
Accounts from medical practitioners (doctors,
chiropractors, physiotherapists, etc.) are paid by
Medical Services Plan of British Columbia. Accounts for hospital services are paid by the Hospital
Programs Branch of the Ministry of Health.
The division processes accounts for the following
additional services:
Medical Services
D The division pays for examinations required
by the ministry in connection with the GAIN
program.
D Payment is made on behalf of eligible persons
requiring medical clearance for activities such
Optical
services may be arranged by the division.
.V-1' ,
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as camp attendance, sports, post-stroke programs, etc.
□ When an individual's yearly Medical Services
Plan limit for physiotherapy has been exhausted, the division may approve up to 10 j
additional treatments. This is helpful particuf
larly in cases where such treatment is not available in a hospital out-patient facility, or where:
the patient is too disabled to leave home.
Dental Services
D Basic dental care is provided for all persons eligible for health care coverage through the
ministry. Special dental care, such as root canal
treatments or provision of partial dentures,
may be provided with prior appoval from the
division and its consultative staff.
D Dentists and dental mechanics are paid ap-
proximately 90 per cent of their current fee
schedules.
Optical Services
D Standard single vision or bifocal glasses are
provided when prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. Unusual needs, such as
plastic lenses, trifocals, contact or intraocular
lenses, may also be provided with approval
from the division.
D Optical suppliers are paid wholesale costs of
materials, plus a fee for service, which was increased in 1980.
Ancillary Services
□ The division provides prescribed non-trans-
ferable medical needs, such as braces and surgical supports, when the client's income and
assets do not perm i t private purchase.
D Prescribed wheelchairs may also be provided.]
In such cases, the Canadian Paraplegic Association or other specialized agencies may be requested, at the division's expense, to assess
the client's physical needs and environmental
circumstances and recommend suitable
equipment. Purchases are made through the
British Columbia Purchasing Commission raj
obtain the best possible price.
□ There has been an increasing demand for i
equipment and devices to provide greater mobility to persons of all ages in the Home Care
Program.
Transportation
D Transportation to and from clinics, nursim
homes, rehabilitation centres, and hospitals I
may be provided for clients who cannot use i
public transportation. In cases of life-saving i
emergencies, transportation costs may be cov- j
 Health Care Services
ered for persons on marginal incomes. Local
transportation may be authorized by the district office, but transportation out of the province requires prior division approval, and is
subject to Medical Services Plan authorization
of the subsequent medical treatment.
Special Health Needs Program
.^ □ The division may provide any of the services
listed above to persons on marginal income,
following a budget review by local ministry
I   staff.
49
Experimental Programs
□ Although the program budget is limited, the
division will consider provision of extraordinary items or treatment which may be prescribed for eligible clients.
□ Funding continues to be available for clients
receiving sensory motor development services
in Surrey and Vancouver. As well, dietary supplements and therapeutic diets continue to be
supplied on a means test basis. The division
can, on a limited basis, provide home renovations to facilitate wheelchair access in homes.
Hea/fft Care Services — quality health care for eligible persons at a reasonable cost.
 50
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Applications for GAIN Handicapped Benefits
O With the assistance of consultant medical specialists, the division decides the medical eligibility of applicants for GAIN handicapped benefits. Approximately 4,228 applications were
processed in 1980.
D 144 handicapped status applications eligible
for long-term care services were processed in
1980.
PHARMACARE
Pharmacare provides full or partial assistance
with the cost of designated prescription drugs, ostomy supplies and designated prosthetic appliances.
Pharmacare administers four programs, each
benefiting a different group of people. While benefits are identical within the four plans, eligibility
and degrees of assistance vary.
Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the 290,000
senior citizens in the province, more than half of
whom have no taxable income. Approximately 30
per cent of the elderly suffer from one or more
chronic diseases or conditions which can be controlled or alleviated by the proper use of drugs.
Before the establishment of Pharmacare in 1974,
the expense of proper medication represented a
heavy burden for the elderly. Accounting for approximately 10 per cent of our population, the elderly receive 22 per cent of all prescriptions and
account for over 28 per cent of all drug expenditures.
Following the lead of British Columbia, most other
provinces have instituted free drugprograms for the
elderly, and 90 per cent of Canada's senior citizens]
are now covered by a provincial drug plan.
Pharmacists make their professional services
available to Pharmacare recipients in the same way]
as to all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled!
for elderly citizens than was the case prior to Pharmacare. Formerly many elderly citizens avoided
having a prescription filled due to the cost. ThS
meant incomplete therapy and possible waste of the]
medical and/or hospital care already provided. In
1980, 290,000 people were eligible for these bene!
fits, and the value of drugs, and other Pharmacare- I
eligible supplies paid on their behalf by govern- ■,
ment totalled $32 million.
Pharmacare also provides fully paid assistance to i
all citizens declared eligible for medical benefits :
from the Ministry of Human Resources (generally ;
income assistance recipients and children in care),:!
as well as to all citizens receiving attention in long-
term care facilities. In 1980, 100,000 persons were i
eligible for medical benefits through the ministry,'!
for a total cost of $7.6 million, and 18,000 persons
were eligible under the long-term care program, at
cost of $5.4 million.
Universal Pharmacare, introduced in June 19773
provides partial protection against major drug and
other expenses for all citizens not receiving benefits
on a fully paid basis. Universal Pharmacare provides 80 per cent reimbursement for all eligible expenses exceeding $100 in a calendar year. In 1980, a
total of 2,200,000 people were eligible for this ben
efit, for a total cost of $6 million on 200,000 claims.
In total, 2,585,000 people were eligible for Pharmacare benefits costing $51 million, in 1980.
Pharmacare assists primarily with the purchase of designated prescription drugs
 Section V
- -«*.-
Services
Community Grants	
Family Services	
Transportation	
Services to the Handicapped	
Multi-service Agencies	
Low Income Groups	
Miscellaneous Grants	
Crisis Centres	
Youth Services 	
Achievement Centres	
Handicapped Industries Guild	
Community Living Society 	
Senior Citizen Counsellors	
Seniors'Day Centres	
52
52
53
54
55
55
55
55
56
58
58
62
63
63
64
64
 52
Report of the Ministry, 1980
COMMUNITY GRANTS
Community Grants provides funds for services in
the community for those in need or likely to be in
need, through non-profit societies, where such services are not within the scope of statutory services.
These services are complementary to and supportive of ministry programs, and a large number of
volunteers are involved in service delivery.
In 1980,atotal of 226 grants to community projects
helped harness the immense potential of volunteer
service for community improvement.
Table 37 Community Grants Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1980 and Fiscal Years
1974-75 to 1979-80
1980   $6,780,496
1979-80   6,335,730
1978-79   5,919,600
1977-78   6,813,113
1976-77   5,856,612
1975-76   8,092,303
1974-75   9,313,165
Family Services Annual 1980
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqu i-Abbotsford Community
Services $20,850.00
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community
Service Centre Association, Family
Service Project  4,665.00
BURNABY
Bumaby Family Life Association 12,298.75
Life Line Society 47,709.75
Citizens' Development Fund  3,150.00
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Counselling and Crisis
Line Services Society  15,066.75
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services  32,462.43
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society, Family
Centre 64,592.45
COURTENAY
Crossroads Crisis and Family
Services Society 15,750.87
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health 11,253.50
CRESCENT BEACH
Crescent Beach Community Services,
Family and Youth Worker  12,896.00 I
DELTA
Deltassist 14,580.00 I
DUNCAN
Cowichan Family Life Association,
Counselling  18,007.251
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service
Society, Elk Valley Preventative
Services 12,070.20 I
GRANISLE
Granisle Daybreak 8,250.001
GANGES
Salt Spring Island Community Society .. 20,200.88 j
HOUSTON
Houston Outreach  9,917.001
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Family Life Services
Association 62,094.501
LANGLEY
Langley Family Services Association 31,648.50
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community
Services Council  73,605.661
MISSION
Mission Community Services
Association 22,109.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Family Life Association,
Nanaimo Family Life 19,911.501
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre  17,172.441
NEW WESTMINSTER
Family Services of Greater Vancouver
(New Westminster) 7,500.00l
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Neighbourhood House 22,062.40
Family Services of Greater Vancouver,
North Shore Community Family
Workers  12,762.501
PARKSVILLE
District 69 Society of
Organized Services  11,130.001
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning
Society, Special Action Groups 12,757.501
 Community Services
53
I PORT ALBERNI
I Port Alberni Family Guidance
I   Association  7,749.75
PORT COQUITLAM
IPort Coquitlam Area Women's Centre .... 3,760.66
IPROvTNCE-WIDE
■Catholic Community Services  61,215.00
■Lower Mainland Parents in Crisis  40,154.00
[john Howard Society of BC  49,551.00
| REVELSTOKE
Kevelstoke Receiving Home 978.90
•RICHMOND
■Richmond Family Place  6,154.25
■Family Services of Greater Vancouver,
[   Richmond Family Services  12,081.00
[smithers
Smithers Community Services Society,
j Mothers'Time Off 23,032.00
[surrey
Kurrey-White Rock Family
Development  37,166.75
[Guildford Family Program  30,625.00
Biayfair Recreation Society  30,233.50
■Family Services of Greater Vancouver,
I   Surrey Family Services  5,842.00
TERRACE
Rerrace and District Community Services
Society, Mothers'Time Off  22,777.70
VANCOUVER
Skeena Terrace Tenants' Association,
\ Family Place 14,437.50
East Side Family Place Society  32,250.00
Rfancouver Indian Centre Society,
I Native Family Counsellor  15,638.00
IFrog Hollow Neighbourhood House  3,508.75
B^leighbourhood Services Association,
■ Ki tsilano Neighbourhood
■ Family Focus  7,113.75
fixative Women's Honour Society, Drop-In
I Centre and Outreach Program  20,935.25
Native Women's Honour Society  31,800.00
■Native Women's Honour Society  34,020.50
Mount Pleasant Family Centre Society,
I Family Centre 39,463.25
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House,
I Family and Children's Worker 26,630.47
West End Community Centre Association,
West End Single Parents'Group 3,578.50
West Side Family Place Society  15,989.25
BVest Side Family Place 17,263.25
■First United Church, Pre-natal Project .... 2,145.00
■Downtown Eastside Women's
m Centre Association  1,590.00
Vancouver Life Skills Society,
South Vancouver Family Place 26,685.90
Neighbourhood Services Association,
South Vancouver Housing Development
Outreach and Youth Workers  37,341.50
Marpole Oakridge Area Council Society,
Neighbourhood Place  19,525.05
Riley Park Community Association,
BranchingOut 10,820.75
Divorce Lifeline of Greater Vancouver .... 7,711.50
Volunteer Grandparents'Association ... 44,758.00
VICTORIA
James Bay Community Resource Board,
Family Program 9,324.75
Single Parents'Resource Centre 22,500.00
Esquimalt, Vic West, View Royal
Advisory Society 22,790.00
Downtown Blanshard Advisory
Society 18,020.00
Saanich Peninsula Guidance
Association 17,168.00
Greater Victoria Counselling Centre  30,655.50
TOTAL $1,481,460.76
Transportation
Annual 1980
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Transportation
Services $ 36,923.25
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society,
Transportation Program  21,961.72
CRANBROOK
Cranbrook Homemaker Service 9,476.25
DELTA
Deltassist  105,740.00
KASLO
Kaslo and District Homemaker
Society  1,070.00
KELOWNA
Multiple Sclerosis Society,
Kelowna Branch  7,714.50
KIMBERLEY
Kimberley and District
Homemaker Service  12,209.79
NAKUSP
Nakusp and District Homemaker
Society  1-444.00
NELSON
Nelson and District Homemaker
Service 13,546.00
 54
Report of the Ministry, 1980
NEW WESTMINSTER
Western Society for Senior
Citizens Services 115,527.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
United North Shore Transportation
Service  116,220.25
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning
Society, Multiple Sclerosis
Wheelchair Bus 12,575.75
PORT ALBERNI
Wheels for the Handicapped Society 12,657.00
PRINCE GEORGE
Carefree Society   101,172.00
PRINCETON
Princeton and District Services Society,
Princeton and District
Community Services  29,967.00
QUESNEL
Quesnel and District Community
Aid Society 38,361.00
RICHMOND
Richmond Volunteer Transportation
Society 20,754.50
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Services
Society, Community Services Centre . 51,278.00
SLfMMERLAND
Parkdale Place Housing Society,
Lions Easter Seal Bus 7,482.75
SURREY
Surrey Community Resource Society,
Transportation  89,562.25
VANCOUVER
Hastings-Sunrise-Grandview-Woodlands
Senior Citizens' Outreach 68,439.75
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood
Development Society, KIND
Transportation  36,571.50
Neighbourhood Services Association,
South Vancouver Transportation
Service 29,748.50
VERNON
Multiple Sclerosis Society,
Vemon Branch  17,120.00
VICTORIA
Garth Homer Society for the Handicapped,
General Transportion  8,532.38
Victoria and Vancouver Island Multiple
Sclerosis Society  16,267.25
WHITE ROCK
White Rock Community Aid,
Transportation Project 64,999.751
TOTAL $1,047,322,141
Services to the Handicapped      Annual 1980
GOLDEN
Golden Community Resources Society,
Golden Association for the
Handicapped $10,956.0(1
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Citizen Advocacy 5,500.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Citizen Advocacy 19,586.251
NELSON
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped,
Silver King Workshop 42,700.001
NEW WESTMINSTER
Western Society for Senior Citizens
Services 36,500.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Projects Society for the
Low Income and Handicapped 7,244.7a
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni Citizen Advocacy Society .. 20,218.25
PROVINCE-WIDE
British Columbia Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Training and
Administrative Support  48,040.50
Pacific Association for Autistic Gtizens  45,235.00
Western Institute for the Deaf 21,369.75
Canadian Paraplegic Association 211,395.00
Canadian Wheelchair Sports
Association 12,359.7a
Optimist dub. Handicapped Skating 1.350.0B
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Services
Society 51,278.0m
VANCOUVER
First United Church, Downtown
Handicapped Program 9,148.50
Douglas Park Community Centre
Association, Douglas Park Handicapped
Outreach  11,614.50
Optimist flub, Handicapped Skating 1,350.00
Mental Patients' Association,
MPA Drop-In Centre  87,796.50 )
Coast Foundation Society,
Resocialization Team  126,456.00 }
 Community Services
55
Riwassa Neighbourhood Services,
■ Hear Hear Project 29,680.00
handicrafts by Homebound Handicapped
f Society  7,500.00
Vancouver Resource Society for the
I Physically Disabled, Handicapped
■ Resource Centre 63,625.50
KflOORIA
Karrh Homer Society for the Handicapped,
I Individual Program Plan  103,170.25
Greater Victoria Citizen Advocacy
I Society 27,216.75
Physically Handicapped Action
■ Committee  1,800.00
TOTAL $1,001,740.25
Multi-service Agencies Annual 1980
ABBOTSFORD
■Matsqui-Abbotsford Community
I Services $ 51,278.00
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services 7,213.80
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health 11,253.50
©ELTA
Deltassist 47,400.00
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service
Society, Elk Valley Preventative
■ Services  12,070.20
RlELSON
■lelson Community Services Centre  17,172.44
KORTH VANCOUVER
Kapilano Community Services 8,671.50
KENTICTON
Centicton and District Social Planning
■ Society, Co-operative Community
I Services 10,734.00
VANCOUVER
Et. James Social Service Society  101,453.75
TOTAL   $263,819.69
Low-Income Groups
Annual 1980
COURTENAY
Upper Island Low Income Society  $ 10,838.50
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Social Planning
■ Society, SHARE 17,517.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Community Employment
Advisory Society, Employment Liaison
Project   19,188.00
NEW WESTMINSTER
Self Aid Never Ends Society,
SANE Community Centre  36,455.25
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Projects Society for the Low
Income and Handicapped  7,244.75
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning
Society, Employability Project 27,825.00
QUESNEL
Quesnel TiMcum Society  7,500.00
VANCOUVER
St. James Social Service Society,
New Hope Centre 7,345.50
Red Door Rental Aid Society  52,308.50
Vancouver Community Workshop
Society 35,427.00
TOTAL  $221,649.50
Miscellaneous Grants Annual 1980
DAWSON CREEK
South Peace Senior Citizens' Association,
Community Effort for Senior
Citizens  $ 38,466.00
QUESNEL
Quesnel Community Resources Advisory
Committee  500.00
VANCOUVER
Gordon House Neighbourhood Services,
People Place  21,200.00
Strathcona Property Owners' and Tenants'
Association, Neighbour to
Neighbour 20,586.50
CUPAC 36,657.00
Greater Vancouver Information and
Referral Services, Directory of Services
and Referral Program  33,708.00
MOSAIC 113,344.50
TOTAL   $264,462.00
Crisis Centres Annual 1980
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Counselling and Crisis
Line Services Society  $ 15,066.75
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services  16,592.00
 Report of the Ministry, 1980
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society, Lifeline
Crisis Line 42,630.74
COURTENAY
Crossroads Crisis and Family
Services Society 15,750.88
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society .... 11,253.50
FERNIE
Elk Valley Crisis and Information
Line Society  12,070.20
FRASER LAKE
Nechako Valley Community Services
Society 18,498.00
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Planning Society,
Kelowna Crisis Line  20,105.50
MACKENZIE
MacKenzie Community Rehabilitation
Society, Project Serenity 10,101.75
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community
Services Council  73,605.66
MISSION
Mission Community Service $22,109.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and
Development, Crisis Centre 41,052.25
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre  17,172.44
PRINCEGEORGE
Prince George Crisis Intervention
Society 40,624.50
PROVINCIAL
Coalition of British Columbia
Rape Centres 26,499.99
QUESNEL
Quesnel Contact Line and Centre 30,051.00
RICHMOND
Richmond Distress Intervention Services,
CHIMO Crisis Centre  61,653.00
SURREY
Surrey Co-ordinating Centre,
Crisis Intervention  26,207.84
VANCOUVER
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Centre for Greater Vancouver 26,341.00
VERNON
People in Need Crisis Intervention Society
of Vernon and District 27,047.75
VICTORIA
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Society of Greater Victoria,
NEED Crisis Line 30,220.00
WILLIAMS LAKE
Canadian Mental Health Association .... 31,164.00
TOTAL $615,817,751
Youth Services Annual 19801
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community
Services :.;...'. .............. $ 20,850.501
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community
Service Centre Association,
Youth Program  :. .7,766.25
BURNABY
Citizens' Development Fund,
Project Backdoor  76,118.751
Fraser Correctional Resources Society,
Purpose 42,560.00
Big Brothers of Burnaby 13,197.00
Lochdale Area Community School
Association 13,731.0tJ
BURNSLAKE
Bums Bridge, Gap Society   11,562.60
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Youth Centre 27,658.25
COURTENAY
Comox-Strathcona Youth Chance
Society 20,418.0(1
Community grants fund many youth centres.
 Community Services
57
; CRANBROOK
■Cranbrook Boys' and Girls' Club  6,000.00
■DAWSON CREEK
■Nawican Friendship Centre,
I Streetworkers 29,197.00
:. DUNCAN
Kowichan Valley Regional District Activity
I  Centre, Youth Project 43,288.50
FALKLAND
■Falkland and District Community
I Association, Falkland Youth Centre ... 16,064.50
■•ERNIE
K'emie and District Homemakers Service
Society, Elk Valley Preventative
I Services 12,070.20
JORT NELSON
Fort Nelson-Liard Native Friendship
I Society 15,760.00
FORT ST. JOHN
Fort St. John Friendship Society,
I Streetworker  15,008.00
[HAZELTON
Klazelton's Wil Luu Sa'yd Goot Society,
I  Hazelton Drop-In Centre   17,906.16
KAMLOOPS
■Joys' and Girls' Club of Kamloops 27,234.50
[Kamloops Community YM-YWCA 35,825.00
■LAKE COWICHAN
■Cowichan Lake District Activity and
[   Resource Centre, Youth Program  18,038.25
BvIAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community
I  Association 16,265.00
IvlASSETT
Queen Charlotte Teen Outreach  6,666.00
Kueen Charlotte Outreach 6,000.00
RlANAIMO
feoys' and Girls' Club of Nanaimo 30,279.75
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and
I  Development, Youth Program 4,184.25
fcfELSON
■"Jelson Youth Activities Society 15,800.00
RJEW WESTMINSTER
KM-YWCA of New Westminister and
I District  36,587.41
■pORT ALBERNI
■Port Alberni Family Guidance,
?   Youth Worker 14,217.75
POWELL RIVER
Powell River Community Services
Association, Streetworker Project 12,702.25
PRINCE RUPERT
Prince Rupert Friendship House
Association  7 361.05
RICHMOND
Richmond Youth Service Agency  29,357.00
SALMON ARM
Shuswap Youth Centre Association 51,752.00
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association,
Smithers Youth Centre 43,007.20
TERRACE
Terrace and District Community Services,
Skeena Youth Project 6,340.00
VANCOUVER
Strathcona Community Centre 3,412.50
Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation,
Thunderbird Youth Project 5,760.75
Britannia Community Services Centre
Society, Britannia Child-Care Worker .. 8,369.52
FrarJclin Community School Association,
Franklin Youth Project   18,607.00
Kiwassa Neighbourhood Services
Association, McDonald School Project. 7,925.00
False Creek Community Association, False
Creek School Child-Care Worker
Project 4,644.00
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House, Bayview
Child-Care Worker Project  8,944.00
Gordon House Neighbourhood Services,
Davie Street Project  40,422.80
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House,
Teen Project  18,108.97
Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation,
Strathcona Youth Project (McLean)  5,760.75
Raycam Co-operative Association,
Native Youth Worker 13,014.00
Grandview Community Centre Association,
Grandview Youth Project 9,284.25
Immigrant Services Society, Walter
Moberly Child-Care Worker 8,546.91
Killarney Community Centre Society,
Carleton Elementary Child-Care
Worker 8,375.95
Dunbar Community Association, Project
for Youth with Special Needs 8,480.00
VANCOUVER
Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver 31,200.00
Big Sisters of Greater Vancouver  24,355.00
 1—                                                                          "'
58
Report of the Ministry, 1980
VICTORIA
MISSION
James Bay Community Resource Board,
Mission Community Services
12,441.75
22,109.00
Victoria West Community Development
19,600.00
83,308.10
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Volunteer Centre Society	
15,900.00
YM-YWCA of Greater Victoria	
Peninsula Community Association,
NORTH VANCOUVER
Sidney Teen Activity Group	
23395.00
North Shore Living and Learning Centre
Big Brothers and Big Sisters	
.. 7,583.34
Volunteer Program	
17,212.50
TOTAL $1
122,513.46
North Shore Association of
Volunteers for Seniors	
13,259.751
Volunteer Services                     Annual 1980
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre ....
17,172.44
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqu i - Abbotsford Community
20,850.50
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning
Society, Co-operative Community
AGASSIZ
Agassiz Community Services, Volunteei
18,377.25
16,102.25
. 26,433.7a
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni Volunteer Centre 	
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community
Service Centre Association,
Community Service Centre	
19,602.00
PROVINCE-WIDE
Vancouver Volunteer Centre  35,393.25
British Columbia Association of Volunteer
Centres/Bureaus L........J 3,000.00 '-.
CASTLEGAR
Kootenay Columbia Child-Care Society,
Castlegar Volunteer Exchange 	
10,428.37
RICHMOND
Richmond Volunteer Centre	
3,074.00
CHILLIWACK
15,870.52
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Resources
Society, Community Services Centre
. 51,278.00
COQUITLAM
G reater Coquitlam Volunteer Bureau ...
10,041.66
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association,
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society ...
11,253.50
9.929.69
SURREY
DELTA
19,070.5CM
Deltassist	
14,600.00
VICTORIA
DUNCAN
Greater Victoria Volunteer Society	
. 39,313.2a
Cowichan Valley Volunteer Society 	
15,900.00
Oak Bay Community Association,
FORT ST. JOHN
North Peace Community Resources Soci
ety,
27,827.00
.. 3,006.25
Volunteer Services 	
Peninsula Community Association,
Volunteer Services 	
WHITE ROCK
White Rock Community Services,
Volunteer Co-ordinator	
10,075.00
18,744.00
12,000.00 1
GOLDEN
Golden Community Resources Society,
Golden Volunteer Bureau	
KELOWNA
TOTAL $
557,632.7a
Central Okanagan Social Planning Society,
Advice Service Kelowna	
27,834.00
ACHIEVEMENT CENTRES
KITTMAT
Kitimat Community Services Society,
Volunteer Co-ordinator	
12,407.35
This program assists financially with the operating costs of achievement centres for handicapped
LANGLEY
people.
Operated by registered non-profit societies, the
Langley Community Services	
19,571.00
centres provide organized day programs
for handi-
 Community Servktjes
59
capped and disabled individuals over school-
Raving age; assisting them in improving their
social and work skills, and enabling them to en-
hance the quality of their lives and increase their
(independence.
I Some centres provide a workshop program aimed
at developing basic work skills. This is most often
Eccomplished by the manufacture or refurbishing of
products for sale, or through contract work for other
{organizations.
I To be eligible for financial support from the
ministry, a centre must:
B D be a registered non-profit society or under the
auspices of such a society;
■ □ provide services in accord with ministry
policies for the Achievement Centres program
for handicapped persons;
I D ensure mat premises in which programs or activities take place conform to fire, health and
safety standards of federal, provincial and
civic authorities; and
■ D maintain financial accounts for the centre, and
statistical records of persons who receive
service.
I Centres are paid monthly by the ministry, based
upon the number of user-hours per month. In April
1980, the user hourly rate was increased from 73
cents to one dollar per hour. These funds do not con-
stitute an allowance or wage to the participating
clients. Centres which have a small group of handicapped participants, and are unable to accrue many
user-hours, may receive a fixed sum of $1,000 per
pmonth. Such grants are to assist, first, with salary
costs; and, second, with other operating expenses.
Workslwp programs develop basic work skills.
A transportation allowance of up to $20permonth
may be provided to help eligible people to attend the
centres.
The Achievement Centres program is administered by ministry regional staff. This helps maintain
a closer working relationship between local ministry staff and community-based associations.
At year-end, 75 centres were in receipt of grants.
Approximately 5,000 persons throughout the province attend programs at these centres each month.
Achievement Centres Annual 1980
ABBOTSFORD
MSA Community Services $ 59,181.68
MSA Association for the Retarded,
Wildwood Training Centre  69,429.29
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Enderby Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Kindale Training
Centre 46,917.63
BURNABY
Burnaby Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Burnaby Activity
Workshop  100,826.49
Canadian Mental Health Association,
Burnaby Achievement Centre 77,401.00
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River and District Association for
the Mentally Retarded, "Our Place"
Activity Centre 44,410.50
CASTLEGAR
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped,
Clay Castle 28,187.81
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack and District Opportunity
Workshop 39,608.80
COURTENAY
Bevan Lodge Association,
Special Opportunity Centre 109,581.85
CRANBROOK
Kootenay Society for Handicapped
Children, Cranbrook Achievement
Centre 66,701.00
CRESTON
Kootenay Society for Handicapped
Children, Cresteramics Workshop 44,067.65
DAWSON CREEK
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded
Children, Peaceland Achievement
Centre 31,228.80
 60
DUNCAN
Duncan and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Cowichan
Opportunity Centre 77,209.42
GANGES
Salt Spring Island Community Society,
Salt Spring Island Achievement
Centre 11,790.00
GIBSONS
Sechelt and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Sunshine
Achievement Centre 11,790.00
Report of the Ministry, 1980
GRAND FORKS
Grand Forks and District Society for the
Handicapped, Broadacres Achievement
Centre 30,746.4ffl
HOPE
Hope Association for the Retarded,
Tillicum Workshop 17,132.44 j
INVERMERE
Windermere and District Social Service
Society, Lake Windermere Workshop 22,380.01
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Society for the Retarded,
Pleasant Services  142,498.(8
Organized day programs at achievement centres assist in improving social and work skills.
 Community Services
61
ELOWNA
Eanadian Mental Health Association,
■Discovery Clubs  85,035.00
Eelowna and District Society for the
■Mentally Retarded, Sunnyvale
Workshop 88,113.13
KITIMAT
Btimat Association for the Mentally
■Retarded, Kitimat Workshop 11,790.00
BANGLEY
Bangley Association for the Handicapped,
■Bridge Achievement Centre  44,028.56
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community
■Services, Council Community Service,
■Haney Achievement Centre  49,977.20
Maple Ridge Association for the Mentally
■Retarded, Harold E.Johnson Centre ..42,680.56
MERRITT
Nicola Valley Association for the Mentally
■Retarded, Ska-Lu-La Training
Centre 11,790.00
&SSION
Mission Workshop Association  66,481.19
NANAIMO
Canadian Mental Health Association, White
KSoss Centre (Contact House) 11,790.00
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally
■Retarded, Narco Centre 76,399.23
NELSON
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped,
Kiilver King Industries  45,380.68
Bfcw WESTMINSTER
Sew Westminster-Coquitlam District
Society for the Retarded,
■New Westminster Division  103,262.85
SANE Society, Sha Sha Achievement
■Centre 89,520.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
Canadian Mental Health Association,
Comer House 24,462.00
Sprth Shore Association for the Mentally
Retarded, ARC Services Workshop
■and Cooinda Progress Centre  88,182.00
EpKSVILLE
Rarksville and District Association
■for the Handicapped,
■TECH Achievement Centre 22,799.04
gENTICTON
^iticton and District Society for the
■plentally Handicapped, Penticton
■Training Centre 116,814.97
PORT ALBERNI
Alberni and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Arrowsmith
Workshop 36,403.17
PORT COQUITLAM
New View Society 59,570.88
PORT MOODY
New Westminster and Coquitlam District
Society for the Retarded, Beacon
Services, Port Moody Division  50,189.72
POWELL RIVER
Powell River Association for the Mentally
Handicapped, Artaban Services 64,570.88
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George and District Association for
the Retarded, Aurora Activity Centre . 57,563.44
PRINCE RUPERT
Prince Rupert Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Prince Rupert Achievement
Centre  14,082.00
PRINCETON
Princeton and District Community Services,
Princeton Handicapped Action and
Training Centre  11,790.00
QUESNEL
Quesnel Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Borealis Occupational
Centre 18,293.68
REVELSTOKE
Revelstoke and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Hub Achievement
Centre 11,790.00
RICHMOND
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Workshop No. 3 .. 70,649.83
SALMON ARM
Salmon Arm Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Shuswap Sheltered
Workshop 44,576.43
SARDIS
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the
Retarded, Sunshine Drive Occupational
Centre 30,965.56
SURREY
Surrey Association for the Mentally
Retarded, Clover Valley Industries ... 102,714.40
Surrey Rehabilitation Society,
Surrey Achievement Centre for
Handicapped Persons 67,104.00
 62
TERRACE
Terrace Association for the Mentally
Handicapped, Three Rivers
Workshop 18,550.26
TRAIL
Kootenay Society for Handicapped
Children, Trail Rehabilitation
Industries 30,323.58
VANCOUVER
Arbutus Work Incentive Society,
Kitsilano Workshop 11,790.00
Arbutus Work Incentive Society,
Mount Pleasant Workshop 11,790.00
Canadian Mental Health Association,
Vancouver Activity Centre 90,666.52
Coast Foundation Society  95,576.76
Kettle Friendship Centre  50,247.00
St. James' Social Services Society,
Gastown Workshop 22,371.24
Vancouver Central Lions Club,
CARSCRAFT Bluebird Shop  17,081.35
Vancouver Mental Patients' Association 72,735.00
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Berwick
Memorial Centre 11,790.00
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the
Mentally Retarded,
Workshops No. land No. 2 343,983.72
VERNON
Canadian Mental Health Association,
Vernon Workshop 39,745.71
Vernon and District Society for the
Mentally Retarded, Venture Training
Centre   118,885.24
Report of the Ministry, 1980
VICTORIA
Capital Mental Health Association,
Community Explorations  11,790.™|
Capital Mental Health Association,
Pathways ™ 23,743^
Capital Mental Health Association,
White Cross Centre  88.223.ffl
Capital Region Association for the
Mentally Handicapped 28,888.02
Capital Region Association for the
Mentally Handicapped,
Winnifred M.Clark Centre 134,203.751
Garth Homer Society for the
Handicapped 112,936.B
WHITE ROCK
Semiahmoo House Association for the
Handicapped 122,840.00
WILLIAMS LAKE
Williams Lake and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded, Summit   19,639.ffl
HANDICAPPED INDUSTRIES GUILD
The Handicapped Industries Guild provides consultation and technical assistance to non-profit
agencies which operate workshop programs designed to improve vocational opportunities for
handicapped adults.
The guild provides the following services to
operators of achievement centres:
D management support services to assist in
determining appropriate manufacturing products and services, improving production and
Programs at achievement centres are attended by 5,000 British Columbians each month.
 Community Services
63
marketing, and developing manufacturing
systems and procedures;
D financial aid based on documented business
plans for essential renovations and equipment
required to manufacture goods; and
D co-ordination of services to assist in dissemination and exchange of relevant vocational information, and liaison with the business community to promote the manufacturing and
working capabilities of the handicapped.
Funding for 1980 was $500,000.
COMMUNITY LIVING SOCIETY
■ The Community Living Society is a non-profit
society from which the ministry purchases services
to assist with the orderly planning and community
placement of developmentally disabled persons
who are, or were, residents of Woodlands. In addition, the society encourages present community
programs to serve these people and assists in developing new resources where required.
I The society works with an individual, his/her
family, and ministry staff, to identify needs, develop and implement a plan, and co-ordinate the
Services required to ensure the well-being and continued growth of the handicapped person.
I During 1980, ministry funding to the Community
Wiving Society increased significantly from
$292,817 in 1979, to more than $825,000.
SENIOR CITIZEN COUNSELLORS
Senior Citizen Counsellors provides a counselling and information service for seniors in British
Columbia. The counsellors are themselves senior
citizens, and work as volunteers.
The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen
counsellors appointed by the ministry. In 1980,
there were 178. The counsellors involve themselves
in a wide variety of activities: driving elderly people
for medical appointments; visiting the lonely; providing information, counselling, and referral services; advising on government programs; assisting
with the completion of forms; and aiding in the development of programs in the community to meet
the special needs of senior citizens.
The counsellors work closely with their local
ministry office. They maintain and update their
knowledge of services, and changes in federal and
provincial programs (OAS, GIS, GAIN, SAFER,
etc.) by attending workshops and seminars. Counsellors are appointed upon recommendations from
regional managers. They are respected members of
their communities, involved in some community
work prior to retirement.
Counsellors submit monthly reports for out-of-
pocket expenses and may be reimbursed up to a
maximum of $75 per month.
Table 38 Expenditures for Senior
Citizen Counsellors
Counsellors are seniors working as volunteers.
1980  $142,286
1979-80  126,125
1978-79  85,782
1977-78  56,208
1976-77  58,117
1975-76  54,874
1974-75  48,763
Table 39 Estimated Numbers of People
Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors
1980   120,000
1979-80  102,600
1978-79  85,500
1977-78  73,500
1976-77  70,000
1975-76  66<750
1974-75  57,000
 64
SENIORS' DAY CENTRES
This program provides community-based drop-
in centres for the elderly. The centres may provide
counselling and information, recreational activities, arts and crafts, together with an opportunity to
socialize. The objective is to enable a senior citizen
to remain in his/her own community and avoid becoming a shut-in or a candidate for some type of
long-term care.
Grants are provided to non-profit societies which
operate such centres. The grants assist with building upkeep, utilities, staff costs, and program expenses. The centres are usually open to all persons of
senior age. In some cases a modest membership fee
is charged.
Seniors' Day Centres Annual 1980
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community Services,
Seniors'Day Centre Services $ 26,446.25
CAMPBELL RIVER
OAP Branch No. 52 Activity Centre,
Seniors'Activity Centre 7,504.50
COOMBS
Coombs Hobby Pensioners' Association . 6,946.50
DUNCAN
Cowichan Lake District Activity and
Resource Centre, Seniors'Program  4,168.25
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity
Centre, Seniors' Program  7,833.25
FALKLAND
Senior Citizens Branch 95, Falkland
Seniors'Recreation Centre 210.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
Silver Harbour Manor Society 90,665.25
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Retirement
Service 27,825.00
VANCOUVER
Downtown Eastside Residents' Association,
DERA Senior Citizens' Club 12,477.75
411 Seniors'Centre Society  97,147.50
Japanese Community Volunteer
Association, Japanese Seniors' Drop-In
Centre 16,503.50
Kitsilano Senior Citizens' Recreation
and Social Club  1,596.00
Marpole Oakridge Area Council, Seniors'
Program   10,588.25
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Neighbourhood Services Association
(Cedar Cottage Neighbourhood House),
Cedar Cottage, Kensington Services
to Seniors  16,725.ft3
Renfrew-Collingwood Seniors' Society . 49,950.00
Strathcona Community Centre Association,
Seniors Co-ordinator 14,127.50
VICTORIA
Silver Threads Service
BUS PASSES
122,430.00
TOTAL  $544,444.53
The bus pass program aids and encourages mobility among low-income senior citizens and handicapped persons. All holders of bus passes are permitted travel without payment of fares on local
transit vehicles.
During 1980, a new system was designed to replace the existing six-month $5.00 passes with
12-month $10.00 passes in 1981. As well, plans were,
made in conjunction with the Urban Transit AiS
thority to extend the bus pass system in 1981 to 17
British Columbia communities having a local transit service. Since 1967, bus passes have only been
issued for Greater Vancouver and the Capital
Region.
Bus passes are issued to:
D residentsofBritishColumbia,65yearsorover,
who are in receipt of the federal Guaranteed Inn
come Supplement and/or GAIN Seniors Supplement;
D residents of British Columbia, 60 to 64 years of
age, who are in receipt of GAIN benefits; and
□ residentsof British Columbiaunder60yearsof
age who are in receipt of GAIN For Handicapped benefits.
Administrative costs, and a $50 per pass subsidy,
are borne by the ministry.
Table 40 Number of Bus Passes Issued
December 1980  32,638
June 1980  33,97|
December 1979  31,93Qj
June 1979 33,13p|
December 1978  32,100
June 1978  31,83|
December 1977  29.7W
June 1977 30,44|
December 1976  ^^Im
June 1976  28,7ffl
 Section VI
Handicapped
Residential Services for the Mentally
Handicapped 66
Woodlands 66
Tranquille 67
Glendale Lodge 68
 —l—j—-—	
 66
Report of the Ministry, 1980
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE
MENTALLY HANDICAPPED
The aim of this program is to enable mentally retarded people to live in the least restrictive facility,
in their own communities where possible, that will
most fully meet their specific needs and increase
their independence.
The program provides a number of residential options to meet the needs of handicapped people
throughout the province.
Family Homes (one- and two-bed,
unlicenced)
These small private homes for adults resemble
foster homes for children. Throughout the province, 112 such homes, providing 177 beds, have
now been developed.
Group Homes
Group homes are operated by non-profit societies
to provide accommodation for six to 12 mentally retarded adults, in a group setting. The ministry is
funding a total of 32 such homes, an increase of two
during the past year.
Short-Stay Hostels
Many parents who can keep a handicapped child
at home still need respite from time to time. Demand
for this service is highest in the summer holiday
months. The ministry has funded local associations
for the mentally retarded which operate hostels for
July and August only. In a number of cases, group
homes are maintained with one or two beds used for
emergencies or parent relief. Five short-stay hostels, with a total of 45 beds, are in regular demand on
a year-round basis.
Training Centres
There are four community-based training centres
in the province, assisting residents to develop their
abilities in preparation for living independently or
semi-independently. For persons able to move out
of the centres, the ministry funds community workers to provide a graduated system of in-home support.
The four training centres are:
Endicott Centre, Creston (capacity, 62);
Northern Training Centre, Smithers
(capacity, 29);
Beaver Lodge, Oliver (capacity, 30);
Variety Farm, Ladner (capacity, 44).
Apartment Training Homes
This type of home is sometimes called an independent living home .Non-profit societies have de
veloped three such homes; in Creston, Penticton
and Vancouver. Each home has arstaff and program
to prepare mildly and moderately retarded adults to!
live independently in apartments, in groups of two
and three.
In addition to compatibility, individuals' abilities are considered and pooled to maximize shared
responsibi 1 i ties in group living arrangements.   ]
Boarding Home Care
The ministry funds those homes in the Ministry of
Health's Long-Term Care program which provide I
care for mentally retarded adults. Supervision of]
these homes is undertaken jointly with the Mental
Health Boarding Home Staff.
Monitoring
During the year, teams completed an in-depth
training program to measure the quality of care provided for mentally retarded adults living in government-funded facilities. These teams consist of representatives from the Ministry of Health, the BC Association for the Mentally Retarded and the BC Association of Private Care Facilities.
In 1980, 55 licenced facilities were reviewed to
measure strengths and weaknesses of all facets of
residential care. Reviews should be completed on all]
facilities in 1981.
WOODLANDS
Woodlands is the resource for the Lower Mainland and Northern Coastal regions of the ministry. It
provides residential and out-patient services for
mentally retarded individuals whose needs cannot
be met by services in their home communities.   1
Woodlands' goal is to assist each individual to
achieve maximum social, emotional, intellectual
and physical development. The basic philosophy is
to help the retarded person become as independent
as possible.
To achieve this goal. Woodlands offersaspectrum
of educational, vocational, recreational, therapeutic
and care programs. The services are divided into
four program units. Each unit has one to 13 wards;
for each ward, an interdisciplinary team develops a
program plan for each resident.
Unit 1: Outreach
This unit co-ordinates services to retarded child- t
ren and adults who are notinresidence.The Assess
ment and Resource Centre offers evaluation and
planning services to retarded individuals, their
families, and appropriate agencies in the community. Outreach also includes a 50-bed residential s
program in Coquitlam.
 Residential Care for the Handicapped
67
Unit 2: Health Care
B This unit provides medical, nursing and support
■services. Residents have multiple physical handi-
caps as well as retardation. An interdisciplinary
team, comprised of medical professionals, psychologists, social workers and teachers, assesses each
resident's needs, and plans individual programs.
Programs include musical therapy, school classes,
Bind summer recreational therapy.
Unit 3: Life Preparation
B Residents in this unit benefit from a variety of development programs designed to assist skill development and community orientation. Programs for
Both children and teenagers are offered, to help
f them achieve their maximum potential. The primary focus with younger children is the team approach. Early childhood training, self-help skills,
and visual and auditory perception training are
among the approaches used. For adolescents, add i-
tional programs are offered, in pre-vocational train-
ing, behaviour management and community living
preparation. Participants in Life Preparation may
eventually be able to live in small community facil-
ities.
Unit 4: Life Education
■ This unit provides programs for adolescents and
adults who have the intellectual and social potential
to return to the community for work, recreation, and
social activities. Programs are designed to help
^these residents return to the community, and include self-care in grooming, behaviour modifica-
tion, academic schooling, vocational training, and
bachelor survival. Community jobs and social and
Recreational experiences are also arranged for these
residents.
B In 1980, the trend towards decreasing resident
population continued, as residents developed independence and community living skills and moved
into smaller facilities.
I Volunteers continue to play a major role at Woodlands. The VolunteerRecruitmentprogramwassuc-
Ressful in locating new volunteers through the video
■Presentation "Introduction to Woodlands".
B Woodlands has been accorded full accreditation
status by the School of Rehabilitative Medicine,
University of British Columbia, and so can accept
Enior interns in the Physiotherapy Department.
B By the end of October, all wards in Woodlands
were on "resident medication profiles". This system prevents errors in distribution of drugs, and
alerts physicians to possible drug interactions.
B The fire regulation manual for Woodlands has
been completely revised, with special evacuation
w>rocedures and training instituted.
1980 saw the beginning of a feasibility study as to
the role of Woodlands in overall ministry planning
for services to the retarded.
Table 41 Woodlands Resident Population
1980 1979
Admissions, 12 months           32 35
Discharges, 12 months            46 42
Resident population at
December 31,1980        367 856
TRANQUILLE
Tranquille is a residential facility which provides
assessment and training services to mentally retarded people from the interior of the province who
cannot be cared for in their own homes or communities.
Tranquille has two primary objectives. The first,
to maximize the development potential of each resident, is accomplished through an individual approach in resident care and framing, and through
the use of a multi-disciplinary approach involving
psychologists, doctors and social workers. The second objective is to provide a range of outreach
services to supplement community programs for
the mentally retarded.
In 1980, Tranquille initiated a program unit organizational structure to deliver the various levels
and types of care for residents. Four units have been
established:
Youth Program
This program provides care and training to
children and young people. As a result of special
programming and co-operation from the local
school district, the number of children attending
community schools in 1980 increased from 30 to 50.
A new school bus, now in operation after being extensively modified to improve wheelchair carrying
capacity, has greatly improved school transportation. Pre-vocational training continues to be provided.
Adult East Program
A Community Living Skills program, initiated
this year, offers training to ambulant adults in daily
living skills, social sight-reading, and money handling, in preparation for community living. Adult
East has also initiated a pilot project with family-
style meals in the resident cafeteria.
Adult West Program
Two different groups of residents receive care and
 68
training in this program: (1) ambulant adults, and
(2) handicapped, non-ambulant children and
adults. Services for ambulant residents focus on developing individuals' self-care skills to enable them
to become more independent within Tranquille or,
where possible, robe placed within the community.
Non-ambulant residents participate in physiotherapy and activation programs to main tain or improve
their present physical state. Special attention is given to provision of physical aids, such as customized wheelchairs, which allow severely handicapped individuals more physical freedom for various activities. Five children from this unit began a t-
tending a community school during 1980.
Outreach Program
This program provides comprehensive assessments, consultation and selective home management services to non-resident retarded children and
adults from the interior of the province. The Outreach Resource Team, developed in 1979, has experienced significant community requests for assessments and related clinical services. Through
these services, communities have been able to increase their capabilities to care for retarded individuals in their communities.
A number of developments have been initiated in
1980 to provide expanded service to both residents
and the local community.
A major task completed this year was the development of a more accurate method of assessing the
needs of individual residents and planning realistic
ways to meet these needs. As well, work continued
on the development of a manual for resident life staff
touseasa guide in the care and training of residents.
The establishment of the Volunteer Services department continues to increase interaction between
the community and Tranquille, and emphasis has
been placed on developing communications between staff and volunteers.
Table 42 Tranquille Resident Population
1980 1979
Admissions, 12 months          42 38
Discharges           42 51
Resident population at
December 31,1980          367 367
GLENDALE LODGE
Glendale Lodge is a residential facility which provides tiaining and assessment services to handicapped and mentally retarded persons from Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands.
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Services and facilities provided at Glendafl
Lodge include:
D 300 beds for the care and development of severely and profoundly retarded persons on a
long-term basis.
□ 20 beds for the retarded on a short-term basis
(one week to three months) to provide parent I
relief, parent vacation, or parent respite in
family illness or emergency, or behaviour
shaping to facilitate individual accommodation in own home or a community resource. B
□ Short-term training for severely handicapped
persons.
□ Comprehensive assessment service for handi-
capped individuals, where there is an indication of retardation or severe communication
problems. This service also includes a travelling clinical team which covers the major centres on Vancouver Island. This team operates
in conjunction with the Ministries of Health,
Human Resources, and Education, and provides training programs for teachers in
schools, parent counselling, and advice and
guidance to parents who wish to keep their
handicapped child at home.
D A screening assessment for those with inn
paired hearing, in conjunction with the Min-
istry of Health and other related professional
groups.
D A nine-to-five day-care program, five days a
week, for the physically handicapped and
mentally retarded of the Greater Victoria area
who are residing at home.
D Dental service for retarded persons in the
Greater Victoria area.
Glendale Lodge is operated by the Glendafl
Lodge Society, a non-profitsociety registered under
the British Columbia Societies Act. In addition to
the lodge, the society operates three group homes
accommodating 25 severely retarded residents, in
Victoria.
Table 43 Glendale Resident Population
1980 1979
Admissions, 12 months        125 14M
Discharges          114 146
Resident population at
December 31,1980        326 315
  70
LEGISLATION
The Ministry of Human Resources administers
the following legislation. These statutes were revised and consolidated in 1979-80.
Ministry of Human Resources Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter 274
This act establishes the Ministry of Human Resources as having jurisdiction overall matters relating to social and public welfare and income
assistance.
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter 158, and regulations
(BC Regulation 479-76) and amendments
This act and regulations provide a guaranteed
minimum income to the handicapped, all residents 60 years of age and older, and financial assistance and social services that are essential for
individuals and families. The social services include day-care, homemaker services, residential
care, counselling and rehabilitation services.
Adoption Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter4, and regulations
(BC Regulation 278-78)
The purpose of this act is to provide the same
rights and privileges for adopted children as
those of children bom to both parents in a fam i ly.
Child Paternity and Support Act
(formerly Children of Unmarried Parents Act),
RSBC 1979, Chapter 49
This act is to ensure that the interests of the
mother and her child bom out of wedlock are
protected.
Family and Child Service Act
(formerly Protection of Children Act),
RSBC 1979, Chapter 119
The purpose of this act is to provide protection
and care for children who are neglected, abused,
abandoned, or without proper supervision or
guardianship.
Human Resource Facility Act
(formerly Human Resources Facilities
Development Act), RSBC 1979, Chapter 185,
and regulations (BC Regulation 586-76)
The purpose of this act and regulations is to
authorize provincial grants to non-profit organizations for the development of residential facilities or centres for children, disabled persons,
and senior citizens.
Community Resource Board Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter 58
This act permits the government to establish
Human Resource and Health Centres where the
Report of the Ministry, 1980
.
provincial income assistance programs, social
services, and health services may be administered by boards composed of local citizens.
Social Workers Act
(formerly Social Workers [Registration] Act),
RSBC 1979, Chapter 389, and regulations
(BC Regulation 45-69)
This act permits the government to establish the
Board of Registration for social workers.
Shelter-Aid for Elderly Renters Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter385, and regulations
(BC Regulation 411-78), and amendments
The purpose of this act is to provide monthly
direct cash assistance to eligible residents of the
province who received Old Age Security benefits
and who pay rent.
Residence and Responsibility Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter 364
This act requires municipalities to contribute to
the costs of specific social assistance programs
for persons in need of aid.
 Section VIII
lui-itKi-psitrt
Statisticat
1979-80
 72 Report of the Ministry, 1980
Table 44 Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditures
1978-79 1979-80
Value       PerCent Value       PerCent
Administration and Community Services   $ 74,885,601 13.4 $ 80,005,701 12.3
Services for Families and Children      59,819,061 10.7 66,726,479 10.3
Services for Seniors and Handicapped    104,940,145 18.8 104,157,318 16.1
Health Services       48,915,786 8.8 59,282,888 9.1
Community Programs      23,301,383 4.1 24,888,172 3.8
Income Assistance    206,013,263 36.9 247,699,000 38.2
Special Programs for the Retarded
(includes Woodlands, Tranquille and Glendale)       40,637,205 7.3 42,975,747 6.6
Rental Assistance Programs  — 23,112,269 3.6
Totals      558,512,444 100.0 648,847,574 100.0
Municipal Share of Costs       23,481,114 4.2 26,091,403 4.0
Federal-Provincial Cost-Sharing:
Canada Assistance Plan     204,111,652 36.5 254,873,813 39.3
Department of Indian and Northern Affairs        1,699,903 0.3 —*
"While no revenue was received from the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs during the fiscal year 1979-80, a
cost-sharing payment of $1,850,939, relating to that year's operations, was subsequently received. This revenue will
shmv as part of the contribution of the Department of Northern and Indian Affairs to welfare expenditures in the fiscal
year 1979-80, and will be included in next year's annual report.
 Fiscal and Statistical Addendum
73
Table 45 Number of Cases of Income Assistance,"' by Category, as of March 31,1979 and 1980
REGION 1
VANCOUVER
EAST
REGION 2
VANCOUVER
BURRARD
REGION 3
OKANAGAN
REGION 4
KO0TENAYS
Income Assistance                    1979 i9so 1979 wso
f Single Person  5,281 1,554 4,051 4,409
[ Couple      309 150 289 317
Two-Parent Family       241 178 198 212
One-Parent Family   1,027 892 1,125 1,127
I Child With Relative         61 45 49 46
I TotalCases  6,919 2,819 5,712 6,111   3,1
1979
1,229
258
447
1,624
130
1,235
322
510
1,728
118
1979
1,108
110
297
953
107
772
163
297
926
109
REGIONS
PRINCEGEORGE
CARIBOO
1979 1980
1,477
193
532
1,703
198
1,230
230
464
1,637
190
3,913   2,575   2,267   4,103   3,751
REGION 6 REGION 7 REGION 8 REGION 9
FRASER VALLEY       PRINCE RUPERT   NORTH AND SOUTH       KAMLOOPS
BULKLEY VALLEY        PEACE RIVER MAINLINE
REGION 10
VANCOUVER
ISLAND NORTH
OFMALAHAT
Income Assistance                    1979 wso
Single Person  2,263 1,359
Couple      229 307
Two-Parent Family      640 649
One-Parent Family   2,125 2,189
Child With Relative       156 144
1979
1980
492
426
398
61
43
37
165
152
122
492
478
388
223
179
81
337 1,009 922
58 148 239
119 361 424
389 1,267 1,371
75 111 140
2,459    1,919
303      319
710
602
2,210   2,147
226
195
TotalCases  5,413   4,648    1,433    1,278    1,026      978   2,896   3,096   5,908   5,182
"REGION 11 "REGION 12               REGION 13
VICTORIA WEST; FRASER SOUTH;        FRASER NORTH
REGION 20 REGION 18
VICTORIA EAST SURREY
"REGION 14
BURRARD, SOUTH
COAST;
REGION 19
FRASER NORTH
COQUITLAM
[Income Assistance 1979 wso 1979 1980
Single Person  3,488 2,161 1,483 1,290
Couple   275 225 170 231
Two-Parent Family   507 505 419 430
One-Parent Family   2,179 2,128 2,409 2,528
Child With Relative   134 128 131 136
TotalCases  6,583 5,147 4,612 4,615
1979
1,739
189
254
1,606
72
3,860
1,567
204
259
1,523
85
3,638
1979
1,598
204
363
1,914
110
4,189
1,355
169
319
1,805
112
3,760
REGION 16
VANCOUVER
SOUTH
Income Assistance 1979 1980
I  SinglePerson  1,486 1,470
I  Couple   137 164
I Two-Parent Family   255 307
One-Parent Family   1,295 1,318
I  Child With Relative   70 79
I TotalCases  3,243 3,338
REGION 17
VANCOUVER
WEST
1979
861
58
90
527
39
1,575
1980
963
70
87
474
31
1,625
REGION 15
VANCOUVER
DOWNTOWN
STRATHCONA
1980
4,544
204
59
156
10
4,973
PROVINCIAL
TOTAL
1979 1980
30,422 27,513
2,970 3,415
5,601 5,573
22,844 22,816
1,898 1,822
63,735 61,139
■SOURCE: March, 1979, Caseload Report Form, W2, Version II, Master File; March 1980, Version II, HR File.
■"Regions 11 and 20, 12 and 18, and 14 and 19 are reported together, as these regions were split during 1979-,
Separate figures for each region will be available in 1981.
 74
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Table 46 Average Monthly Number of Income Assistance Recipients, 1978-79 and 1979-80
Category
Heads of Family	
Single Persons 	
Total Caseload (Average)
Dependents	
Average Monthly Total ...
Average Caseload and
Recipients per Month
1978-79
1979-80
30,129
30,681
24,744
25,663
54,873
56,344
59,749
59,570
114,622
115,914
Table 47 Number of Family Service Cases Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance
From the Ministry ofHuman Resources, by Regions
Region
1	
2 „,
3 ....
4 	
5 	
6 	
7 	
8 	
9 	
10 	
11 	
12 	
13 	
14 	
15 	
16 	
17 	
Emergency Services
Total  '..
March 31,1978
March 31,1979
March 31,1980
1,223
1,393
854
1,412
1,776
1,524
408
401
431
392
426
506
378
404
515
270
300
311
373
386
529
112
138
123
230
327
516
421
423
523
716
767
877
729
713
982
609
592
651
808
1,093
1,053
—
—
473
1,010
1,162
1,165
887
1,043
1,023
187
238
256
10,165
11,582
12,312
J
 Fiscal and Statistical Addendum 75
Table 48 Gross Costs of Health Services, Fiscal Years 1968-69 to 1979-80
jyear Medical      Drugs*
$ $
B979-80  1,480,852 46,257,728
p78-79   1,204,134 37,321,647
B977-78   1,378,781 30,129,270
B976-77  1,008,073 26,716,886
B975-76   1,099,479 23,642,347
|974-75   754,422 17,303,892
il973-74   634,136 6,461,400
1.972-73   677,194 3,626,268
B971-72   614,365 3,334,159
p970-71   591,206 3,102,874
|969-70  465,738 2,444,968
p68-69  1,403,378 2,423,798
"Included under Drugs are drug costs incurred under Pharmacare, which commenced January 1, 1974.
Table 49 Cost of Children's Programs, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Gross Cost of Maintenance of Children in Family and Children's Services:
Foster Homes $15,370,129
Other Residential Resources    24,924,504
Receiving Special Services      6,482,532
Total    46,777,165
Eross cost of Transportation of Children in Care of Superintendent       703,925
Gross Cost of Hospitalization of New-bom Infants Being
Permanently Planned for by Superintendent   76,300
Gross Expenditures     47,557,390
Less Collections    11,648,151
Net Cost to Provincial Government as Per Public Accounts     35,909,239
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
$
$
$
$
$
8,784,374
1,230,356
807,215
722,358
59,282,888
7,905,683
1,096,989
767,564
619,769
48,915,786
6,033,887
790,638
588,942
784,326
39,705,844
5,487,320
644,315
438,963
524,832
34,820,389
4,209,007
486,080
374,850
310,623
30,122,386
2,380,266
409,213
387,554
257,808
21,493,154
2,655,573
322,489
419,451
328,510
10,821,559
2,429,538
304,695
367,888
264,700
7,670,283
2,403,257
290,116
342,712
165,980
7,150,589
2,491,589
282,272
326,166
121,892
6,915,999
1,611,115
219,858
252,999
72,862
5,067,540
792,475
140,591
212,550
53,571
5,026,363
 76
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Table 50 Number of Children Under Care and Legal Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare, by Legal Status, by Regions, as of March 31,1980
PCA Wards
3
EGIA,5
FRA and
Other
Prov
Perma
-
Before
JDA4
Similar
ince
Non-
nent1
Other
Court
Wards
Wards
Wards
Wards
Total
Region l2 ....
85
67
49
3
7
4
18
233
166
291
79
61
30
29
5
16
8
24
4
43
34
101
326
Region 3 	
565
Region 4 	
174
30
42
7
19
17
51
340
Regions 	
335
60
37
38
102
10
90
672
Region 6 	
429
57
26
24
33
31
111
711
Region 7 	
194
26
25
16
110
14
52
427
125
367
60
53
17
36
18
19
38
63
13
16
25
96
296
650
486
109
59
22
101
24
117
918
447
65
38
19
43
23
79
714
Region 12 ....
457
121
78
14
34
29
92
825
Region 13 ....
180
56
54
11
15
3
67
386
Region 14 ....
310
98
31
23
58
9
129
658
Region 152 ...
27
24
11
0
2
0
5
69
Region 162 ...
213
84
56
5
12
7
51
428
Reeion 172 ...
127
34
17
5
7
8
65
263
Other Supervising
Offices ....
1
0
2
0
0
2
5
10
Wards Supervised
by Another
Province
169
21
5
3
46
0
0
244
Total of
Superintendent
of Child Welfare	
4,583
1,105
642
248
722
247
1,188
8,735
1 Pre-1968 wards are now being included with "permanent" wards; 1,068 of these wards were involved, as of March
31, 1980.
2 These five regions cover the Vancouver city area; Region 15 hasbeen separated since September 1,1979.
3 PCA: The Protection ofChildren Act,uiasrepiacedbythenewFamilyandChildSewiceActintroducedin 1980. Children
who have been admitted to the care of the superintendent of child welfare are neglected, abused, abandoned, or without
proper supervision or guardianship.
4 JDA: Children who havebeen admitted to the care of the superintendent of childwelfare under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act after committing an act of delinquency.
5 EGIA,FRA:Childrenwhohavebeenadmittedtothecareofthesuperintendentofchildwelfarewhere,atthedeathofthem
guardian, no other person has been named in the will. The Equal Guardianship of Infants Act was repealed in 1979 ana
children hove since been admitted under the Family Relations Act. The EGIA is used only to distinguish the children
admitted under the two different acts.
 Fiscal and Statistical Addendum
77
Table 51 Number of Children Under Care and
Legal Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare, by Type of Care,
as of March 31,1980
Table 52 Children Under Care and Legal
Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare, by Age Group,
as of March 31,1980
hype of Care Number of Children
Kaid Foster Home Care   5,616
Eidependent
I (Own or Relatives'Homes)  1,146
Boarding Home,
Child Maintains Self      170
■ Free Home and Free Relatives'
(or Parents') Home     789
■ RunAways      187
RdoptionHome  450
Resources*   1,523
Dotal   8,735
"This covers a wide variety of placements ranging from
subsidized receiving homes to federal institutions.
Age Group Number of Children
Under3 Years 661
3 to 5 Years Inclusive 672
6 to 11 Years Inclusive  1,902
12 to 15 Years Inclusive  2,841
16 to 17 Years Inclusive  1,906
18 Years  753
Total  8,735
 78
The following tables are available, on request,
from Information Services, Ministry ofHuman Resources, Victoria:
Table 53 Number of Family Services Cases Not in
Receipt of Financial Assistance from the Ministry
of Human Resources, by Months, Fiscal Year 1979-
80
Table 54 Number of Children Bom Out of Wedlock
in British Columbia, by Age Group of Mother,
Fiscal Years 1978-79 and 1979-80
Table 55 Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, During and At End of
Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 56 Number of Children Admitted to Care of
Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal Status,
Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 57 Reasons for New Admissions of Children
to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, Fiscal
Year 1979-80
Table 58 Number of Children Discharged From
Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal
Status, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 59 Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care
of Superintendent of Child Welfare, Fiscal Year
1979-80
Table 60 Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of
Superintendent of Child Welfare, Receiving Care
in Resources, as of March 31,1978
Table 61 Number of Adoption Placements Made by
Ministry of Human Resources, by Type of Placement, by Regions, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 62 Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting
Placements and Those Closed by Type of Child
Requested, as of March 31,1980, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 63 Number of Adoption Placements Made by
Ministry of Human Resources, by Religion of
Adopting Parents, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 64 Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by
Ministry of Human Resources, in Regions 1 to 19
and Outside BC, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 65 Number of Children With Special Needs
Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human Resources, Fiscal Year 1979-80
Table 66 Number of Legally Completed Adoptions,
by Type of Placement, by Regions, Fiscal Year
1979-80
Table 67 Number of Children Placed for Adoption
by the Ministry of Human Resources, Fiscal Years
1977-78 to 1979-80
Report of the Ministry, 1980
Table 68 Total Number of Persons Eligible foi
Health Care, as of December 31,1974 to 1980
Table 69 Payments to British Columbia Medical
Plan and Doctors (Gross Costs), 1973-74 to 1979-80
Table 70 Dental Expenses, 1973-74 to 1979-80

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