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Province of British Columbia Ministry of Labour Annual Report For the year ended December 31, 1980 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1983]

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Full Text

 Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Labour
Annual Report
For the year ended
December 31, 1980
HON. JACK HEINRICH, Minister
JAMES G. MATKIN, Deputy Minister
Printed by Authority
of The Legislative Assembly
 To the Honourable
Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant Governor of the Province of British
Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Labour of
the Province for the year 1980 is herewith
respectfully submitted.
JACK HEINRICH
Minister of Labour
Office of the Minister of Labour,
December 31, 1980
Jack Heinrich
 The Honourable Jack Heinrich
Minister of Labour
Sir:
I have the honour to submit herewith the 62nd
Annual Report of the work of the Ministry of
Labour up to December 31, 1980.
JAMES G. MATKIN
Deputy Minister of Labour
BBjpIjjry of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1980
James G. Matkin
 Directory of Services
Ministry of Labour
Administrative Services
Finance and Administration
Personnel Services
Information Services
Manpower Programs
Apprenticeship Training Programs
Employment Opportunity Programs
Trade-schools Regulation
Manpower Advisory Services
Refugee Settlement & Immigration
Labour Relations and
Occupational Safety
Mediation
Labour Standards
Labour Education
Compensation Advisory Services
Occupational Environment
Safety Engineering
Electrical Safety
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety
Gas Safety
Elevating Devices
Special Services
Executive Advisor, Industrial
Relations, Labour Standards
& Arbitration
Construction Industry Coordinator
Planning & Information Systems
Research
Human Rights
J
 mj&m
SEfc,
^k
s§K*
^tV^i
33k
-■«
**t
::'■«.
 Contents
Personnel Directory 	
Principal and Regional Offices .
Boards and Commissions	
Part I: 1980 in Review	
Major Developments in 1980	
Labour Market Information 	
Work Stoppage Statistics	
Wages, Prices, Settlements, and Agreement Expiries
Part II: Administration and Safety Engineering Programs
Finance and Administration	
Personnel Services	
Information Services	
Safety Engineering Programs 	
Electrical Safety	
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety 	
Gas Safety	
Elevating Devices	
Part III: Manpower Programs 	
Introduction 	
Apprenticeship Training Programs A
Employment Opportunity Programs 	
Manpower Advisory Services A
Trade-schools Regulation £
Provincial Apprenticeship Board	
Part IV: Industrial Relations and Occupational
Safety Programs	
Introduction 	
Labour Standards	
Mediation Services ...i
Compensation Advisory Services	
Occupational Environment 	
Part V: Special Services  f
Arbitration  .£
Board of Industrial Relations  i
Construction Industry Coordinator .m
Boards of Review ....{
Research  ..(
Planning and Information Systems fl
Part VI: Statistical Appendix 'f.
Tables  ...,f
Acts Administered by the Ministry of Labour  /
Other Statutes Affecting Ministry of Labour  ~t
Ministry Memberships and Affiliations  i
NOTE: The annual reports of the Labour Relations Board, the Workers' Compensation Board, the
Human Rights Branch, and the Human Rights Commission are submitted separately to the
Legislature through the Minister of Labour.
 PERSONNEL DIRECTORY
stry of Labour
Tint Buildings, victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4
fck Heinrich 387-1986
§• of Labour
asMatkin 387-3282
uty Minister
iery Crimp 387-5753
Ififstrative Assistant
iBardon 387-5611
itant Deputy Minister, Administration and
fety Engineering
l» Cameron 291-7351
itant Deputy Minister, Labour Relations and
IHpational Safety
146 Canada Way, Burnaby)
LrtGray 291-7351
itant Deputy Minister, Manpower Division
146 Canada Way, Burnaby)
lisEdgett 387-6801
Imjve Advisor, Industrial Relations,
bour Standards and Arbitration
hecas 387-1226
Iffive Director, Policy, Planning, Program
Ifflation, Research, Information Systems
Honey 387-1226
[g Director,
Inning and Information Systems
lin Stackhouse 387-5141
K Officer
lie Heywood 387-5141
Iffiction Industry Coordinator
IRnducci 387-6861
(tor, Human Rights
jEchwartz 387-1615
ISr, Rnance and Administration
II 387-1564
ISr, Personnel Services
ISrtigal 387-3445
p:or, Research
Nugent 387-6575
(or, Information Services
Labour Relations and
Occupational Safety
Gus Leonidas 291-0681
Director, Mediation Services
(4946 Canada Way, Burnaby)
Ralph Sollis 387-3284
Director, Labour Standards
Ron Tweedie 291-6126
Director, Labour Education
Maria Giardini 291-0401
Compensation Advisory Services
Compensation Consultant
Ed Zurwick 291-9448
Compensation Advisory Services
Employers' Adviser
Ken Martin 291-9494
Director, Occupational Environment
Manpower Division
Blair Anderson 294-3878
Director, Apprenticeship Branch
Virginia Greene 387-1131
ffi^etor, Employment Opportunity
Programs
Ossie Sylvester 291-7591
Director, Trade-schools Regulation
Ranjit Azad 291-6116
Consultant, Manpower Advisory Services
Wayne Mullins 291-8222
Acting Director, Immigration and
Refugee Settlement
Administration and
Safety Engineering
(501 W. 12th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., V5Z 1M6)
Wilf Lawson 879-7531
Executive Director
|||ln Cole...... 879-7531
Director, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety
AILuck 879-7531
Directolfaectrical Safety
Bill Montgomery 879-7531
Director, Gas Safety
Alfred Moser 291-6446
Director, Elevating Devices
(4946 Canada Way, Burnaby)
 Principal Offices
Victoria: 880 Douglas Street
Burnaby: 4946 Canada Way
Regional Offices
Abbotsford: 116-33780 Laurel Street
Alberni: Box 1172, Court House
Campbell River: 210-437 Tenth Avenue
Chilliwack: 24 Victoria Avenue West
15-330 Yale Road West
(Safety Engineering Services Div.)
Courtenay: 479-4th Street
Cranbrook: 117 South 10th Avenue
110-12 Avenue South
(Safety Engineering Services Div.)
Dawson Creek: 1201-103rd Ave.
Duncan: 238 Government Street,
Provincial Building
Fort St. John: 10600-100th Street
Kamloops: 220-546 St, Paul Street
1168 Battle Street
(Safety Engineering Services Div.)
Kelowna: 1913 Kent Street
1921 Kent Street
(Safety Engineering Services Div.)
Ladner: RO. Box 55, 4893 Bridge Street
Langley: Box 3092, 20423 Douglas Crescent
Mission: 32818 Seventh Avenue
Nanaimo: 238 Franklin Street
20-5th Street
(Safety Engineering Services Div.)
Nelson: 310 Ward Street
New Westminster: 360-550 Sixth Street   i
100 Mile House: Box 7000, 272-5th Street
Parksville: RO. Box 759, 103-182 West Harr|
Penticton: 269 Brunswick Street
Powell River: 6953 Alberni Street
Prince George: 1488-4th Avenue
190 Victoria Street
(Safety Engineering Servig
Prince Rupert: Court House
Quesnel: 206-350 Barlow Avenue
Revelstoke: RO. Box 1700, Office 'B',
518-2nd Street West
Salmon Arm: P.O. Box, 636, Court House, i
125 Alexander Avenue N.E.
Smithers: Government Building, RO. Box 9!
Squamish: PO. Box 2330,
38066 Cleveland Avenue
Surrey: 5691-177B Street
Terrance: 4548 Lakelse Avenue
4827 Keith Avenue
(Safety Engeering Services Div.)
Trail: Federal Building
Vancouver: 501 West 12th Avenue
Vanderhoof: Box 1369, Provincial BuildinS
Vernon: Court House
Williams Lake: 307-35 South 2nd Avenue*
302-35 South 2nd AvenueB
(Safety Engineering Service
 ■         Boards and Commissions
jrd of Industrial Relations
Boards of Review
liament Buildings, Victoria
(Workers' Compensation Act)
u'rman J.R. Edgett
4946 Canada Way, Burnaby, 291-7511
lllhairman W.J.D. Hoskyn
Administrative
nbers C. Murdoch
Chairman Paul Devine
E. Ostapchuk
Chairmen W.I. Auerbach
R.K. Gervin
B. Bluman
J. Nutter
vincial Apprenticeship Board
J.L.T. Jensen
feuglas Street, Victoria
R.C. Nitikman
lirman Claude Heywood
G.D. Strongitharm
FC.J. Neylan
Members W.I. Beeby       W.N. Peain
J.S. Don           M. Salter
nbers Alexander S. Brokenshire
Donald Fearey
Jim Gray
Virginia Greene
Robert Jennings
Betsy McDonald
Kent Neilsen
DC. Fraser      L. Read
D. Haggarty     L. Kingman
H. Huebner     T. Hutchison
N. Mills             E, Wood
Fred Randall
Nicholas Smith
Victor Traynor
Workers' Compensation Board
5255 Heather Street, Vancouver, 266-0211
Chairman Dr. A. Little
Wyman Trineer
L.T. Truesdale
Commissioners    J. Miyazawa/M. Parr/S. Brown
Executive Director
our Relations Board
Legal Services .I.E. Tufts
) West 8th Ave., Vancouver, 736-2421
Executive Director,
Administrator
liers (as of February 28, 1981)
and Finance J.A. Taylor
Imian Donald R. Munroe
Executive Director
IShairman
Medical
id Registrar....Ronald F Bone
Services Dr. J. Gibbings
lEhairmen      Rod Germaine
Executive Director
Ben van der Woerd
Prevention
G. Bud Gallagher
Services J.D. Paton
Angus Macdonald
Executive Director
Gabriel M. Somjen
Compensation
Roy Gautier
Services A.H. Mullan
Stephen FD. Kelleher
Iroers Clarence J. Alcott
Human Rights Commission
Daniel Bell
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, 387-5024
John Macdonald Billings
John Brown
Chairman M.S. Strongitharm
Brian Foley
Members Dr. J. Katz
Herbert Lowell Fritz
H. Crosby
John Fryer
D. Mowat
Jack Gerow
Rev. T.N. Vant
Charles C. Loyst
G. George
James McAvoy
Jack A. Moore
Essential Services Advisory Agency
Nora Paton
659 Leg-in-Boot Square,
J. Raymond Pegley
False Creek, Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 1B2
Anthony D. Saunders
Chairman Clive McKee, 879-6881
Arnold J. Smith
Members Ed Strang
Henry Volkmann
Gordon Anderson
  W                                                    Part 1:
1                                        1980 in Review
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 Major Developments in 1980
1980 was the fourth consecutive year in which
British Columbia benefited from peaceful labour-
management relations. In the area of collective
bargaining, it was one of the most successful
years in the province's recent history, with only
129 work stoppages involving 39,265 workers and
483,823 worker-days lost. Compared to 1979,
there were decreases in the number of workers
involved in stoppages, the number of work
stoppages, and the total number of worker-days
lost. The year's major negotiations were in the
construction industry, and, although these were
protracted, they were successfully completed
without any major work stoppages.
There were 271 appointments of mediators in
1980, compared with 373 in 1979. Of 253 cases
completed during 1980, mediation officers
assisted in the successful settlement of 211 of
them, or 84 per cent of the total.
On July 9th the Minister introduced Bill 36, The
Employment Standards Act, to the Legislature.
This Act, which is to come into effect in 1981,
provides new benefits, including increased
vacation entitlement, improved maternity
provisions, and a requirement that notice of
termination of employment be increased by from
two to eight weeks, depending on the employee's
length of service. Also, for the first time, B.C.'s
agricultural and domestic workers will enjoy the
protection of employment standards legislation.
A major Ministry initiative in 1980 was a $14.4
million critical skills wage assistance program. This
program, which came into effect on September
1st, provides for wage incentives to a maximum of
$2.50 an hour for 1,400 new apprentices in seven
industrial trades. A survey conducted in 1979 by
the Ministry had revealed serious shortages in
these trades. Apprenticeships in all
apprenticeable trades totalled 16,401 at the end
of 1980, an increase of 2,606 over the preva
year.
A second and considerably expanded Critical
Skills Survey was conducted in 1980. Twelve I
hundred and sixty firms in the mining, forestrl
pulp and paper, transportation, manufacturim!
public administration, health and educational
industries were contacted. The survey coveril
the 32 designated trades commonly found if |
these eight industries.
A Women's Office was established within the r
Manpower Division on October 1st to providsl
focal point for women's employment issues  I
through the availability of a resource file, arm
information and referral service, and the
publication of labour force statistics and spell
project data. The goal of the Women's Office!
improve working conditions for women and t<
expand women's employment opportunities. I
The Employment Opportunities Branch fundel
over 16,000 jobs in 1980 at a total cost of alns
$25 million. In accepting applications from
potential employers, the Branch continued its
policy of increasing the emphasis on on-the-|l
training as a key component of the employm i
created.
In 1980 the Ministry played host to the annual
convention of the Association of Labour Relal
Agencies. This event was attended by deleg.;
from all parts of the U.S. and Canada.
Senior appointments in 1980 included Robert!
(Bob) Gray, Assistant Deputy Minister
(Manpower), who took charge of the newlwl
formed Manpower Division; Hugh Bardon, 1
Assistant Deputy Minister (Rnancial AdminSB
and Safety Engineering Services); Ms. Nola   I
Landucci, Director of Human Rights; Blair |
Anderson, Director of Apprenticeship; and Rsri
Sollis, Director of Employment Standards.
Labour Market Information
In 1980, British Columbia experienced rapid
growth in its labour force and in total employment.
Labour force growth was 4.5 per cent, or 55,000
persons, and resulted partly because of increased
migration to the province, and partly because of
higher rates of participation among the resident
population. Employment growth was 5.4 per cent,
or 62,000 persons. These figures are the result of
strong performance in the domestic sector of the
economy, especially in the construction and
service industries.
As indicated in the accompanying table, Biffi
Columbia compares favourably with the resj
Canada in both labour force increase and
employment growth. The national labour fo®
increase of 2.8 per cent and employment gS]
of 2.7 per cent were well below the correspo "i
figures for British Columbia.
 I
Annual Labour Market Growth
1979-1980 (percent)
Labour Force
Employment
Increase
Growth
nada
2.8
2.7
:ish Columbia
4.5
5.4
liries
3.8
3.8
itario
1.8
1.5
ebec
2.8
2.5
antic
3.0
3.8
•ce: Statistics Canada, The Labour Force, Ottawa
Cal. 71-00I (monthly). Source for all tables
j     unless otherwise noted.
ISiployment declined to 87,000 persons, or 6.8
Ir cent of the work force, in 1980, the lowest
liual rate since 1974.
pre were 129 work stoppages recorded during
(Bear, about the same total as in 1979.
[ippages affected 39,265 workers in the
Iffiice, resulting in a loss of 483,823 worker-
ISThis was about two thirds of the 1979 total.
total of 438 major settlements were reported
[ing the year, covering 163,137 employees. The
brage annual wage increase reported in these
rjor settlements was 11.4 per cent or $1.23 an
•jr. This was up from last year's average of 9.2
IRnt, and, in fact, was the highest recorded
['ease since 1975.
Population
The population of British Columbia reached an
estimated 2,636,500 persons on June 1, 1980, an
increase of 2.6 per cent over the previous year.
Although this increase is in line with the historical,
population-growth trends in the province,
averaging 2.8 per cent a year for the period 1960
through 1975, it is well above the increase of the
past few years. The 1979 increase, for example,
was only 1.6 per cent.
B.C. Population, 1970-1980
Increase From
Population
Previous Year
Increase
Year
f^OMpJl
Hqooo^M
(%)
1970
2,128.0
68.0
3.3
1971
2,184.6
56.6
2.7
1972
2,241.4
56.8
2.6
1973
2,302.4
61.0
2.7
1974
2,375.7
73.3
3.2
1975
2,433.2
57.5
2.4
1976
2,466.6
33.4
1.4
1977
2,493.7
27.1
1.1
1978
2,530.1
36.4
1.5
1979
2,569.9
39.8
1.6
1980
2,636.5
66.6
2.6
The major factor influencing this significant
growth in population was the sudden resurgence
Annual Population Growth, by Component
1971   1972   1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
pe: Statii
Statistics Canada, Canadian Statistical Review, Ottawa, Catalogue 11-003.
 of large-scale migration to British Columbia from
other parts of the country. For the 12-month period
ending in June 1980, it is estimated that the
number of people who arrived from other parts of
Canada outnumbered those who left the province
by 40,400. This is more than twice the number of
people who migrated to B.C. during the 1977-79
period, and it contrasts even more sharply with
the 1975-77 period, when net migration from other
provinces was negligible. The strong economic
and labour market performance in the province
during the past year has probably been a potent
influence in rekindling this movement
Immigration was also strong during 1980, with the
net movement to B.C. from outside Canada
estimated at nearly 10,000 persons. This is the
highest annual total since 1976.
Net movements into the province therefore
comprised 75 per cent of the 1980 total increase
in population. This was significantly above the 56
per cent contribution made to total population
change by this component in 1979.
Labour Force
In British Columbia in 1980, the number of persons
in the labour force totalled 1,278,000, a 4.5 per
cent increase over the previous year. This 55,000-
person increase is almost double the percentage
rise from 1978-79 (2.6 per cent), but is close to
the 4.2 per cent annual average over the 10-year
period 1968-1978 The 1980 growth was due to
increases in both total population and
participation rates.
The total participation rate (the statistic indicating
that part of the population aged 15 and over that
is considered to be active in the labour force) rose
one full percentage point over the past year to
63.7 per cent. Both male and female participation
rates rose in 1980, the former by 0.7 per cent to
78.1 per cent, and the latter by 1.1 per cent to
49.7 per cent. A comparison of participation rates
by sex and age indicates that the highest
participation rate for men, 96.5 per cent, was
among those aged 25-44 years, and the highest
rate for women, 71.5 per cent, was among those
aged 20-24 years. Overall, the labour force was
comprised of 770,000 male and 507,000 female
participants.
Participation Rates (per cent!
Labour Force (000s)
1979
1978
1977
Total
Men
Women
15-19 years
20-24 years
25-44 years
45-64 years
65 and over
1,278
770
507
145
186
595
329
22
1,223
741
481
139
179
565
320
19
1,192
725
467
133
172
551
320
16
1.144
711
433
130
168
518
310
18
1980
1979
1978
Total
63.7
62.7
62.6
Men
78.1
77.4
77.3
Women
49.7
48.6
48.3
15-19 years
61.5
58.6
55.9
20-24 years
79.9
80.1
79.0
25-44 years
79.4
78.7
79.1
45-64 years
63.7
62.8
63.6
65 and over
8.2
7.4
6.4
Educational Attainment
of the Labour Force (000s)
1980
1979
1978
0-8 years
111
119
123
High School1
746
702
668
Some Post-
Secondary
146
134
148
Post-Seconday
Diploma
120
128
128
University Degree
154
141
124
TOTAL
1,278
1,223
1,192
1 Completed or at least some secondary.
Measurement of the educational attainment I
British Columbia labour force indicates that ti
average level has moved upward. The numBI
labour force participants with only an elerrraB
school education decreased by 8,000 to 111,1
whereas the number of those in the more hiil
educated categories increased. High school i
graduates occupied the largest category-SI
746,000 persons, or 58 per cent of the total 1
force. Next to them were the university gradJ
—154,000 persons, or 12 per cent of the lab J
force. Participants with some post-secondayl
education comprised 146,000 persons, or 11 i
cent of the labour force, and those with a pit
secondary diploma, 120,000 persons, or 9 p<
cent. This latter group has experienced a stil
relative decline in numbers over the last few I
years.
Viewed from an occupational standpoint, th<l
largest concentration of manpower in the B. 3
labour force in 1980 was in the managerial al
professional category, comprising 280,000
individuals. The number of men and women I
employed in clerical occupations totalled 2111
in sales, 144,000; and in service, 198,000. Tr|
white-collar categories together representeda
per cent of the total labour force. The numbiJ
men and women employed in primary
occupations totalled 68,000; in processings
169,000; in construction, 90,000; in transports
56,000; and in materials handling, 53,000. Trfl
blue-collar categories together represented jj
436,000 individuals, or 34.2 per cent of the ta
labour force.
 J
 k examination of occupational categories by sex
k'eals that women are not highly represented in
We-collar occupations. The number of male bluett lar workers in 1980 totalled 395,000, whereas
Li number of women totalled only 38,000. These
unale blue-collar workers were distributed by
|3upation as follows: primary occupations,
■000 women, or 17.6 per cent of the total;
IRgssing, 19,000 women, or 11.2 per cent of the
■al; and materials handling and other crafts,
feOO women, or 13.2 per cent of the total.
IKcupational survey indicated that no women
Ijrad in either construction or transportationjS
but it must be remembered that the techniques
S» dretermine th6Se Statistics Yield poor
rel ability for smaller groups. Among the white-
collar occupations, the managerial and
professional group included 114,000 women-
clerical workers, 175,000 women- sales
occupations, 60,000 women; and service
occupations, 113,000 women. This data clearly
reflects the under-representation of women in
blue-collar occupations, especially in the
construction and transportation areas and the
relatively high female participation in white-collar
jobs, especially in the clerical area
Labour Market Distribution by Aqe 1980
15-19 Years 1.7
20-24
25-44
45-64
65 and Over
LABOUR FORCE EMPLOYMENT
Note: All figures are expressed as percentages.
UNEMPLOYMENT
tnployment
■ 1 total number of people employed in British
jflmbia in 1980 increased by 62,000 or 5.5 per
Ct. This is higher than the 3.3 per cent increase
rorded in 1979 and the 4.0 per cent average for
It period 1968-1978. Of this 1980 increase,
3)00 new jobs were held by men, and 28,000 by
nnen.
H age group showing the largest percentage
|Mh in employment was the teenage group,
Mi a 6.9 per cent increase. The 25-44 age group
|apd the largest numerical increase, 32,000.
i|pyment for those 20-24 years of age
Keased by 8,000, or 5.0 per cent; for those 45-
p 11,000, or 3.6 per cent; and for those 65 and
pr, by 3,000 or 1.6 per cent.
I -time employment increaltd at a much faster
ff than full-time employment, 15.4 per cent
lp 3.8 per cent. Women have traditionally held
Srger proportion of part-time joBs, and this
Pern held throughout 1980. Of the 188,000 part-
■jljpbs in B.C., 49,000 were held by men and
pOOO by women.
igght be expected, there were considerable
■ftences in the reasons men and women gave
■faking part-time work. For women, the most
■|tent reason was "did not want full-time work"
p per cent of women); the seccSd most
prevalent was "going to school" (19.4 per cent);
and the third was "family responsibilities" (15.8
per cent). There is an obvious male-female
difference in the "family responsibilities" category,
where the number of males was low.
Another method of quantifying employment is to
measure the average number of hours worked in
a week. The British Columbia average in 1980 was
34 hours a week. But when individuals who were
counted as employed, who were not at work
during the survey week are excluded from the
calculation, the average rises to 36.6 hours a
week. This figure includes all full-time and part-
time employees. Among full-time employees, 26.3
per cent worked from 30 to 39 hours a week, and
28.0 per cent worked 40 hours a week. In 1980,
this province continued to have the lowest weekly
average hours worked in Canada. The average for
the country as a whole was 38 hours a week.
Employment (000s)
1980
1979
1978
1977
Total
1,191
1,129
1,093
1,047
Men
727
692
671
659
Women
464
436
422
388
15-19 years
124
116
110
105
20-24 years
169
161
151
147
25-44 years
563
531
514
485
45-64 years
314
303
302
291
65 and over
22
19
16
18
 1
 Full-time and
Part-time Employment (000s)
Full-Time
Men
Women
Part-Time
Men
Women
003
966
941
902
678
649
629
618
325
316
312
283
188
163
152
145
49
43
42
41
139
120
109
105
Reasons for
Part-time Employment (000s)
1980
1979
Men
Women
Men
Women
Total Part-Time
49
139
43
120
Family
responsibilities
22
17
Going to school
25
27
22
23
Could only find
part-time work
10
22
10
22
Did not want
full-time work
11
63
8
54
Other
5
4
Employment by Industry (000s)
Percentage
Change
1980
1979
1978
1977    1979-1980
Goods-Producing
333
328
319
313
1.5
Agriculture
21
22
25
21
^1.5
Other Primary
58
55
45
43
5.4
Manufacturing
175
176
174
170
-0.6
Construction
79
75
75
79
5.3
Service-Producing
858
800
774
735
7.3
Transportation,
Communication
and Other Utilities
115
115
106
106
0.0
Trade
223
208
213
194
7.2
Finance, Insurance
and Real Estate
73
65
62
562
1Z3
Community, Business
and Personal Service
366
337
316
299
8.6
Public Administration
81
75
77
68
8.0
Total
1,191
1,129
1,093
1,047
5.5
Employment by industry showed a varied pattern
of increases and decreases in 1980. In the goods-
producing sector, employment was down in
agriculture (-4.5 per cent) and manufacturing (-0.6
per cent), but up in construction (5.3 per cent)
and in other primary industries (5.5 per cent), in
the service-producing sector, increases were
experienced in trade (7.2 per cent), finance,
insurance and real estate (12.3 per cent),
community business and personal service (8.6 per
cent), and public administration (8.0 per cent).
Transportation, communications and other utilities
remained stable in numbers of employed. There
were no declines recorded in the service-
producing sector.
The measurement of job tenure indicates how
long an individual has held his or her present job.
A fairly large segment of the employed in B.C.,
1f
1
28.9 per cent, had been at their jobs for one I
or less, whereas 33.4 per cent had held therrl
between one and five years. Just under onei
had worked at their present jobs for from six
years, and only 6.6 per cent for over 20 yea|
There is a male-female difference in job tents
that fewer women held long-term jobs than d
men. In the over-10-years category, for exami
24.2 per cent of men held jobs for this perio?
only 11.2 per cent of women did so.
Unemployment (000s)
Total
Men
Women
15-19 years
20-24 years
25-44 years
45-64 years
87
94
98
44
49
53
43
45
45
21
24
23
18
18
21
32
34
36
15
17
18
Unemployment Rates (per cent)
Total
Men
Women
15-19 years
20-24 years
25-44 years
45-64 years
6.8
7.7
8.3
5.7
6.6
7.3
8.5
9.3
9.7
14.8
17.1
17.0
9.4
10.2
12.4
5.4
6.0
6.6
4.6
5.3
5.7
Unemployment
The number of unemployed in British Colur™
1980 declined, for the second year in a rowl
total of 87,000 persons, or 6.8 per cent of trie
work force. The rate in 1979 was 7.7 per cenjj
in 1978, 8.3 per cent. The drop in the
unemployment rate was consistent for both ni
and women, the rate for men declining by 0.£i
cent, from 6.6 per cent in 1979 to 5.7 per ceri
1980, and for women, by 0.8 per cent, from 9
per cent in 1979 to 8.5 per cent in 1980.
Unemployment is still a more serious problems
women than for men.
Young people also suffer higher-than-average j
rates of unemployment. When calculated as ;
proportion of the labour force in each age grif.
the 15-19-year-olds experienced a 14.8 per cej
rate of unemployment, and the 20-24 group*
per cent. By comparison, the 25-years-and-ov
group experienced a 5.0 per cent rate of
unemployment. Despite the high unemployme
the younger groups, however, a full 3,000 of hi
7,000 total decline in unemployment occurred e
the 15-19-year age group. This should be seel
a reflection of the changing age structure of 2
population in this group, rather than as an j
improved employment trend per se.
In a province-by-province comparison, the larrsl
increases in unemployment occurred in Quebl
 |K)ntario. Quebec experienced an increase of
MO unemployed, and Ontario 20,000. A
|Bess downturn in the manufacturing industries
He two provinces was largely responsible for
Jhigher unemployment figures. Both Alberta
IHEritish Columbia showed slight decreases in
IBmlovment. Alberta remains the province with
ISpwest rate of unemployment, 3.7 per cent;
C. is fourth with a rate of 6.8 per cent.
ie duration of unemployment averaged 13.1
;eks for all workers in B.C. There is a difference
long the age groups, however. The 15-14-year
IHraroup averaged 10 weeks, the 25-44 group
.4 weeks, and the 45-and-over group 18.7
ISs. A cross-country comparison of
Iffiployment duration is similar, showing that
Ijsrta had the shortest individual periods of
Iffiployment, averaging seven weeks, followed
MSskatchewan, at 10.5, and Manitoba, at 11.7.
itish Columbia was third in average duration,
lanighest provincial average duration was in
Ijwfoundland, 18.7, and the Canadian average
is 14.8 weeks.
IS has been little change in the reasons why
IBns become unemployed. In 1980, most had
IE lost their jobs through layoff or shutdown
13,000), or left their jobs for some other reason
IBr&O). New entrants into the labour force
ailed 4,000, and persons who were out of the
>our force for a period of time, and unemployed
upon re-entry, totalled 28,000. Of the unemployed
who had worked in the past, more than three
quarters had worked in the preceeding 12
months, and just over one third had worked in the
preceding three months.
The higher the educational level of the labour
force, the lower the rate of unemployment. For
university graduates, the rate of unemployment
was 3.9 per cent. For holders of other types of
post-secondary certificate or diploma, the rate
was 4.2 per cent. By contrast, the rate was 9.0
per cent for those with 0-8 years of schooling, and
7.6 per cent for those with high school
graduation.
One measure of the impact of unemployment is
the number of families with at least one
unemployed person. There were 67,000 such
families in B.C. during 1980, and 73,000 family
members were unemployed. Of this number,
21,000 were heads of families, 23,000 were
unemployed spouses, and 25,000 were adult
children living at home. The impact of this family
unemployment appears slightly less when the
number of children is taken into account. Of the
21,000 families in which the head of the family
was unemployed, 11,000 had one or more
children. Of the families with at least one member
unemployed, close to one quarter (16,000 families)
had no one employed at all, and 12,000 of these
families had one or more children.
Union Memberships in British Columbia, 1955-80
Percentage
Organized as
Change from
Total
a Percentage of
B.C. Union
Previous
Paid
Total Paid
Year
Membership
Year
Workers1
Workers
1955
186,951
4.7
381,000
49.1
1956
191,952
2.7
414,000
46.4
1957
216,07fijtssj
12.6
430,000
50.2
1958
233,972
8.3
422,000
55.4
1959
219,279
-6.3
438,000
50.1
1960
215,437
-1.8
430,000
50.1
1961
221,946
3.0
438,000
50.7
1962
216,685
-2.4
461,000
47.0
1963
222,138
2.5
488,000
45.5
1964
226,690
2.1
519,000
43.7
1965
237,864
4.9
550,000
43.2
1966
256,241
7.7
588,000
43.6
1967
273,946
6.9
626,000
43.8
1968
287,502
5.0
654,000
44.0
1969
292,842
1.9
706,000
41.5
1970
310,222
5.9
713,000
43.5
1971
316,587
2.1
743,000
42.6
1972
332,091
4.9
784,000
42.4
1973
350,175
5.5
850,000
41.2
1974
395,846
13.0
895,000
44.2
1975
401,608
1.5
914,000
43.9
1976
426,723
6.3
934,000
45.7
1977
439,730
3.0
958,000
45.9
1978
450,802
2.5
995,000
45.3
1979
465,980
3.4
1,036,000
44.8
1980
480,680
3.2
I.IOO.OOO2
43.7
i surce: The Labour Force. Statistics Canada, Ottawa, catalogue 7
-001 (monthly). Includes Agriou
rural Workers in 1976,1977
1978,1979, and 1980.
Jtimated because the figures for
July through December were not
available at time of publication.
 Industrial Distribution of British Columbia
Union Membership by Sex, 1980
Industry
Total
Membership
Percentage
Distribution (1)
Male
Membership
Fe
Membe
All Industries
Manufacturing
Food and beverage
Wood and paper products
Metals
Machinery, transportation
equipment and electrical
products
Miscellaneous manufacturing
Trade and Service
Trade
Education
Municipal services
Miscellaneous services
Construction
Other Industries
Mining
Transportation
Communication and
other utilities
480,680
134,908
30,362
68,935
10,749
12,171
12,691
211,436
5,734
48,792
22,994
133,916
51,674
82,662
9,417
51,993
2T.252
100.0
28.1
6.3
14.3
2.2
2.5
2.6
44.0
1.2
10.1
4.8
27.9
10.7
17.2
2.0
10.8
4.4
332,725
114,489
17,923
65,445
10,197
11,568
9,337
98,480
4,592
24,287
15,460
54,141
51,191
68,565
8,719
45,961
13,885
147,1
20,.
12,'
3/
3,1
112,1
1,
24,!
1
79,'
14,1
f
6,(
i May not add up to 100.0 because of rounding.
Union Membership
As of January 1, 1980, a total of 480,680 workers
in British Columbia were trade union members.
This represents an increase of 14,700, or 3.2 per
cent over the previous total of 465,980 reported
in 1979. These 480,680 union members
comprised 43.7 per cent of the estimated total
number of paid workers in the province.
Again in 1980, the union with the largest
membership in B.C. was the International
Woodworkers of America (IWA) with 51,060
members. The second largest was the B.C.
Government Employees' Union, 46,703 members;
third, the B.C. Teachers' Federation, 29,065;
fourth, the Canadian Union of Public Employees,
27,505; and fifth, the Teamsters, 22,150.
Altogether, 22 unions claimed memberships
exceeding 5,000 in the province.
Female union membership expanded by 7,982
persons in 1980, an increase of 5.7 per cent over
1979. This brought the total female membership
to 147,955 as of January 1, 1980, or 35.1 per cent
of the estimated 422,000 female paid workers in
the province. Slightly more than half of the male
paid workers belonged to unions — 332,725
members, or 50.4 per cent of the 660,000 male
paid workers in B.C. There are 21 unions with
1,000 or more females on their membership rolls.
Leading was the B.C. Government Employee
Union, with 23,459 female members; the Hos
Employees' Union, with 17,154; the B.C.
Teachers' Federation, with 15,223; the Regis!
Nurses' Association, with 13,850; and the
Canadian Union of Public Employees, with
10,753.
On an industry basis, union membership was
concentrated in trade and service. This inrjffi
category contained 44.0 per cent of the unio
members in B.C., followed by manufacturirS
with 28.1 per cent.
About three fourths of all union members in
British Columbia belonged to unions affiliat®
with a national and/or international congress
confederation of unions. The majority of ur^
members were in unions affiliated with the!
Canadian Labour Congress and its provincH
counterpart, the B.C. Federation of Labourffl
were 345,525 members in unions affiliated w
the CLC-B.C. Fed., and this comprised 71.9 r.
cent of all union members in the province. Ol
total number of workers in unions affiliated w
the CLC-B.C. Fed., 205,040 were in internaffl
unions also affiliated with the AFL-CIO, and
140,485 were in national unions. The
Confederation of Canadian Unions had affffl
with 15,787 members, or 3.3 per cent of the 1
union membership in the province.
 [lions with a Membership in British Columbia Greater Than 5,000
Relative
1 Position
1979
■ 1 International Woodworkers of America
2 B.C. Government Employees' Union
3 B.C. Teachers' Federation
4 Canadian Union of Public Employees
5 Teamsters
■ 6 Hospital Employees' Union
iHf Registered Nurses' Association of B.C.
w 8 Carpenters
9 Food and Commercial Workers' International Union
10 Public Service Alliance of Canada
11 Operating Engineers
12 United Steelworkers of America
13 Hotel and Restaurant Employees
14 Telecommunication Workers' Union
15 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
16 International Association of Machinists
17 Canadian Paperworkers' Union
18 Labourers' International Union
I   19 Office and Technical Employees' Union
20 Pulp, Paper and Woodworkers of Canada
\   21 ignited Fishermen and Allied Workers
22 Plumbers
■ lail Clerks' International Union and Canadian Food and Allied Workers merged to form Food and Commercial Workers' International Union.
Relative
Membership
January
1980
51,060
1
46,703
2
29,065
3
27,505
4
22,140
6
21,444
5
14,500
8
14,484
7
13,441
„.i
13,087
9
13,031
10
12,843
12
12,403
11
10,618
13
10,427
14
10,295
15
9,608
16
9,441
17
8,541
19
7,120
21
7,022
20
5,250
22
Work Stoppage Statistics
Jraollected for 1980 show&that there were 129
iBstoppages in Britis^^lumbia. These stop-
cies affected a total of 39,265 workers, and rein in 483,823 worker-days idle. The number of
lapages was almost the same as in 1979 (128),
insulted in a significantly lower total of worker-
ds idle.
■|Bse stoppages, 114 were within the provincial!
tidiction, down from 115 the previous year. Only 14
pipages were within the federal jurisdiction, up
Hip in 1979. The overall proportion of stoppages
fcie provincial sector was 88.4 per cent, which is
ply lower than that registered in 1979 (89.8 per
Rt), and higher than 1978 (84.6 per cent).
leverage number of workers involved in a stop-
P e fell for the fourth year in a row. On average, 304
■wrs were c"re^!y inv°lvecl in each stoppage in
B By comparison, the average number of work
ers directly involved in 1979 was 401; in 1978, 451;
and in t977,476. These figures are all well below the
1976 average of 872 workers.
Workers within the federal jurisdiction comprised 20
per cent of all those directly involved in stoppages in
1980. This is an increase when compared with 1979,
but a sizeable decrease relative to 1978. The federal
jurisdiction accounted for 13 per cent of the workers
directly involved in stoppages in 1979, and 34 per
cent in 1978. The average number of workers involved in stoppages within the federal jurisdiction
was 553, significantly larger than the average for the
provincial jurisdiction, which was 304.
In 1980, work stoppages in the province amounted
to 483,823 worker-days, a drop from the 1979 total of
669,273, and the 1979 total of 754,022. During the
year, 388,494 worker-days were lost in the provincial
jurisdiction (80.3 per cent of the total), and 95,329 in
the federal jurisdiction.
 Work Stoppages in British Columbia, 1955-1980
I
Ratio of Stoppage
Duration to     ]
Workers
Total
Time Worked     j
Number of
Directly
Duration in
Paid
by Paid
Year
Stoppages1
Involved
Worker-Days
Workers2
Workers (%)   1
1955
1956
1957
1858
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
24
35
40
36
34
14
17
28
23
34
43
39
54
66
88
81
110
101
142
139
174
97
67
104
128
129
3,599
3,197
19,452
14,663
33,443
999
1,638
1,982
9,651
9,633
9,197
24,748
11,371
12,179
22,329
46,649
53,368
106,399
96,078
86,932
67,502
84,565
31,865
46,947
51,335
39,265
44,116
39,211
330,035
421,837
1,423,268
35,848
34,659
32,987
85,372
182,489
121,374
272,922
327,167
406,729
519,663
1,648,463
275,580
2,120,848
705,525
1,609,131
1,864,596
1,470,7573
448,460
754,022
669,273
483,823
381,000
414,000
430,000
422,000
438,000
430,000
438,000
461,000
488,000
519,000
550,000
588,000
626,000
654,000
706,000
713,000
743,000
784,000
850,000
895,000
914,000
950,000
974,000
1,013,000
1,036,000
1,100,000*
0.3
0.4
1.3
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.9
0.1
1.1
0.3
0.7
0.8
0.6
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.2
1 Definitional changes made for 1976 make more current work stoppage totals non-comparable with earlier years (revisions forthcoming). See March 1976 Labour Res i
Bulletin, page 27. for details.
2 Does not include persons who operated their own businesses, farms, or professions, or persons who worked without pay on a farm or in a business owned or operati
a member of the household, to whom they were related. Totals Include agricultural workers for the first time tn 1976. Source: Statistics Canada, The Labour Force, |
Ottawa, Catalogue 71-001 (monthly).
3 Total does not include October 14th Day of Protest (est 139,150).
4 Preliminary.
It was the drop in the total number of worker-days
idle in the provincial jurisdiction—from 625,076 in
1979 to 388,494 in 1980—that caused the noticeably lower duration of strikes this year.
As can be seen from the adjacent table, the total
number of worker-days idle in 1980 closely resembled the figure for 1977, a year when the anti-
inflation program was in full force. The effect of the
program was to remove wages as a contentious
issue at the bargaining table. Be that as it may, with
the single exception of 1977, the number of worker-
days idle in 1980 because of work stoppages was
the lowest since 1971.
On an industry basis, the largest number of stoppages occurred in the manufacturing sector. The
47 stoppages in this sector involved the second-
largest number of workers, 8,718, and the largest
number of worker-days idle, 193,070. Public administration had the highest number of workers involved in stoppages, 9,648. The mining industry
was second to manufacturing in terms of worker-
days idle, with 95,835.
There were 12 stoppages resulting in 5,000 or more
worker-days idle. The parties to these stoppages,
with the worker-days idle listed in descending order, are as follows:
- Kaiser Resources, and Mine Workers,J||
7292 (74,400 worker-days);
- Brewery Employers Labour Relations Asi|
ation (BELRA), and Brewery Workers, Lc
280, 300 & 308 (53,200);
- Canadian Kenworth, and Canadian Assoc}?I
of Industrial, Mechanical and Allied Won
(CAIMAW), Local 14(53,116);
- B.C. Telephone, and Telecommunications™
ers' Union (TWU) (45,102);
■ Government of Canada, and Public Service
ance of Canada (PSAC), Clerical and Regulal
(40,000);
-B.C. Railway and Council of Trade Un
(31,000);
- Nabob Foods, and Canadian Allied ManuraSl
ers Wholesale and Retail Union (CAIvffli
(16,576);
- Government of British Columbia, and Re
tered Nurses Association of British Colun
(RNABC), Psychiatric (11,100);
■ Cullen Detroit Diesel Allison Ltd., and Ivffl
ists, Lodge 692, and Teamsters, Local
(8,580);
■ Noranda Mines, and Steelworkers, Locall
(7,220);
 taSminco, and Steelworkers, Local 480 (5,800);
and
instruction Labour Relations Association of
Wish Columbia (CLRA), and Painters, Local
K7 (5,140).
s 483,823 worker-days idle amounted to only 0.2
Mfent of the total time worked in the province.
HRieans that roughly two out of every 1,000
Rays during 1980 were interrupted by stcJK6|||
lockouts.
chnical Notes:
Hvork stoppages" series contains a record of
Bikes" and "lockouts" (as defined by the Brit-
jiplumbia and Canada Labour Codes) that in-
ved British Columbia employees, and which
/e come to the notice of the Research and Plan-
ffiiranch of the B.C. Ministry of Labour. The
Rds used to secure this information are be-
'ed to be adequate to preclude the possibility of
HJomissions. It is sometimes difficult, however,
fflSain precise information in detail, particularly
Bthe parties differ in their interpretation of the
H Consequently, despite careful processing,
data on individual work stoppages may not be
ict in all respects.
^Bajor characteristics of work stoppages are
lit with in the following terms:
rk Stoppages: The term "work stoppage" is ap-
Hto a concerted action by a group of employ-
Rho temporarily stop work or are locked out
le expressing grievances or enforcing de-
nds. Each concerted action is counted as one
ffiage, irrespeSive of the number of unions,
ffiiyers, employees, or establishments involved.
(Included in this Report are all known stoppages.)
Workers Involved: This figure includes all employees directly involved in a work stoppage. If the
number of workers involved in a stoppage fluctuates, the figure used is the maximum number of
workers involved at any one time. If the stoppage
involves more than one location, the maximum
numbers of workers involved on any one day at
each location are added together to obtain the total
number involved. The same worker can be counted
more than once if he or she is involved in more than
one stoppage during the year.
Employees in establishments that are not directly
involved in a stoppage, and who are unable to work
because of material or service shortages, or because of other secondary effects of the stoppage,
are not counted.
Duration in Worker-Days: This figure is obtained by
multiplying the number of workers involved in a
stoppage by the number of days or shifts they
would normally work. Allowances are made for fluctuation in the number of workers involved during the
period of the stoppage.
Date Commenced: The date used as the commencement date is the first day one or more workers were directly involved in the work stoppage.
Date Terminated: For statistical purposes, the principal criterion for the termination of a stoppage is
the date of resumption of work. A work stoppage is
considered ended when the parties have agreed
upon a date to resume work, and a portion of the
workers involved in the work stoppage have resumed work, or if the establishment involved goes
out of business or moves out of the province.
Work Stoppages, by Industry, 1980
Stoppages
B.C. Workers
Directly Involved
Duration
(in Worker-Days)
^Bfctional Classification
r vincial	
ft feral	
ustrial Classification
ods-Producing	
Ijahculture	
• ijrestry1	
ishing	
lines2	
nufacturing	
Construction	
Irae-Producing	
iansport3	
p rade	
inance	
IgD/ice4	
'ublic Administration	
"lis for All Industries f:/.'£
Iflw logging
B fes quarries and oil wells
'iportation, communication and other utilities
:tmunity, business and personal service
114
14
1
1
9
47
8
63
18
12
3
19
11
129
31,525
7,740
20,525
30
300
7,913
8,718
3,564
18,740
5,808
598
99
2,587
9,648
39,265
388,494
95,329
302,334
870
300
95,835
193,070
12,259
181,489
87,187
14,979
5,422
18,762
55,139
483,823
 Work Stoppages
, by Month, 1980
JANUARY
A*
B*
C*
MAY
A
B
C
Agriculture
—
—
—
Agriculture
—
—
-
Forestry2
—
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
-
Fishing
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
-"   1
Mines3
1
1,500
34,800
Mines3
1
38
152
Manufacturing
7
1,147
9,754
Manufacturing
10
618
5,223    i
Construction
1
92
552
Construction
—
—
	
Transport*
4
2,190
31,914
Transport*
3
319
919
Trade
1
1
22
Trade
4
58
936
Finance
—
—
—
Rnance
—
—
	
Service5
6
450
6,094
Service5
3
1,222
3,842    j
Public
Public
Administration
—
—
—
Administration
TOTAL
Provincial
4
25
23
4,238
6,493
6,297
12,738
23,810
23,014
TOTAL
20
5,380
83,136
Provincial
18
5,290
82,322
Federal
2
90
814
Federal
2
196
796
FEBRUARY
A
B
C
JUNE
A
B
C
Agriculture
—
—
—
Agriculture
—
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Mines3
1
1,500
34,800
Mines3
—
—
—
Manufacturing
7
1,049
13,003
Manufacturing
10
1,151
11,171
Construction
1
350
700
Construction
1
1,917
1,940
Transport*
5
1,784
2,664
Transport*
2
541
541
Trade
1
1
1
Trade
4
211
4,271
Finance
—
—
—
Rnance
—
—
—
Service5
6
436
3,426
Service6
4
1,245
385
Public
Public
Administration
—
—
—
Administration
1
40
3
TOTAL
21
5,120
54,594
TOTAL
Provincial
22
20
5,105
4,564
18,311
17,770
Provincial
18
3,636
52,430
Federal
3
1,484
2,164
Federal
2
541
541
MARCH
A
B
C
JULY
A
B
C
Agriculture
—
—
—
Agriculture
—
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
—
Fishing
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Mines3
4
2,608
6,608
Mines3
—
^fe'*-?
—
Manufacturing
11
1,829
4,598
Manufacturing
12
2,831
22,654
Construction
—
—
—
Construction
—
—
—
Transport*
3
240
950
Transport*
1
188
564
Trade
—
—
—
Trade
6
138
1,261
Finance
—
—
—
Rnance
1
58
986
Service5
3
61
1,242
Service6
4
41
314
Public
Public
Administration
—
—
—
Administration
—
—
—
TOTAL
21
4,738
13,398
TOTAL
24
3,256
25,779    !
Provincial
19
4,698
12,648
Provincial
23
3,068
25,215
Federal
2
40
750
Federal
1
188
564
APRIL
A
B
C
AUGUST
A
B
C
Agriculture
—
—
—
Agriculture
—
—
—
Forestry2
1
300
300
Forestry2
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Mines3
3
3,863
8,335
Mines3
—
—
—
Manufacturing
10
681
3,512
Manufacturing
12
2,843
39,655
Construction
1
100
227
Construction
—
—
—
Transport*
2
40
680
Transport*
2
243
2,499
Trade
2
17
75
Trade
4
251
3,020
Rnance
1
8
16
Rnance
1
58
1,160
Service6
3
72
453
Service5
5
583
957
Public
Public
Administration
2
770
948
Administration
1
500
1,000    ,
TOTAL
25
5,851
14,546
TOTAL
25
4,478
48,291
Provincial
23
5,811
13,866
Provincial
23
3,790
44,847
Federal
2
40
680
Federal
2
688
3,444
_!
 [ SEPTEMBER
Agriculture
Forestry2
Rshing
Mines3
Manufacturing
Construction
Transport*
Trade
Rnance
Service6
Public
OCTOBER
Agriculture
Forestry2
Rshing
Mines3
Manufacturing
Construction
Transport*
Trade
Rnance
Service5
Public
A
B
C
1
30
180
1
550
1,070
13
2,591
33,565
2
400
2,200
3
592
3,794
5
263
2,991
1
58
1,218
3
120
594
Administration
3
4,100
8,400
TOTAL
32
8,704
54,012
Provincial
Federal
28
4
4,102
4,602
41,908
12,104
2
10
3
4
1
3
30
1,330
739
702
63
58
33
Footnotes
1 Figures subject to revision
2 Primarily logging
3 Includes quarries and oil wells
* Includes communication and other utilities
5 Includes community, business and personal
6,930
14,737
13,369
1,386
473
Administration
2
4,050
32,050
TOTAL
26
7,005
70,591
Provincial
Federal
22
4
2,293
4,712
26,052
44,539
NOVEMBER
A
B
C
30
Agriculture
1
30
Forestry2
Fishing
	
Mines3
Manufacturing
2
13
930
1,009
3,140
16,756
Construction
2
705
2,335
Transport*
2
683
12,577
Trade
4
63
541
Rnance
1
33
363
Service6
2
22
418
Public
Administration
-
-
-
TOTAL
27
3,475
36,160
Provincial
26
2,832
23,943
Federal
1
643
12,217
DECEMBER
A
B
C
Agriculture
_
—
—
Forestry2
—
—
—
Rshing
—
—
—
Mines3
—
—
—
Manufacturing
12
1,542
18,442
Construction
1
205
4,305
Transport*
1
643
16,716
Trade
3
95
475
Rnance
1
33
693
Service5
3
28
564
Public
Administration
—
—
—
TOTAL
21
2,546
41,195
Provincial
20
1,903
24,479
Federal
1
643
16,716
*A — Number of Work Stoppages
B — Number of Workers Directly Involved
C — Duration in Worker-Days
Kjes, Prices, Settlements
d Agreement Expiries
rage Weekly Earnings
age earnings in British Columbia during 1980
^d a level of $363.30 a week, an increase of
14 or 11.1 per cent over the 1979 average of
■4. This increase was up considerably over
Ether moderate rises that occurred during the
Hwo years (8.6 per cent and 6.0 per cent),
ilid not quite match the 13.3 per cent average
Ef earnings increase experienced during the
1976 period.
igially, earnings rose at a slightly slower pace
they did in B.C. Industrial composite earnings
snada as a whole averaged $316.70 for
an increase of 9.9 per cent over 1979.
Beer, as can readily be seen from the
accompanying table, even though the increase for
Canada was slightly below that of B.C., the two
jurisdictions have experienced roughly similar percentage changes.
Elsewhere across the country, average earnings
ranged from a high of $341.94 a week in Alberta
(second highest nationally behind B.C.'s $363.30
level) to a low of $238.05 a week in Prince Edward
Island. Only two provinces had earnings levels
higher than the national average—B.C.
(exceeding it by 15 per cent) and Alberta (8 per
cent).
During the year, the highest percentage increases
in weekly earnings levels were those experienced
in Prince Edward Island (13.5 per cent) and in
Alblfta (11.5 per cent). The B.C. rise was third
highest among the ten provinces. The lowest rise
in average earnings during 1980 was the 6.2 per
cent increase in Newfoundland followed by the
8.4 per cent improvement in Nova Scotia.
 Average Weekly Earnings, Canada and British Columbia 1974-1980
CANADA
Annual
Per cent
Per cent
Average
Change
CPI
Change
Weekly
Over
(1971
Deflated
Over
Year
Earnings
Year
=100)
Earnings
Year
1974
178.08
11.0
125.0
142.46
0.2
1975
203.34
14.2
138.5
146.82
3.1
1976
228.03
12.1
148.9
153.14
4.3
1977
249.95
9.6
160.8
155.44
1.5
1978
265.37
6.2
175.2
151.47
-2.6
1979
288.25
8.6
191.2
150.76
-0.5
1980
316.70
9.9
210.6
150.38
-0.3
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual
Percent
Percent
Average
Change
CPI
Change
Weekly
Over
(1971
Deflated
Over
Year
Earnings
Year
=100?
Earnings
Year
1974
200.55
12.5
126.1
159.04
0.7
1975
229.97
14.7
140.1
164.15
3.2
1976
259.52
12.8
153.7
168.85
2.9
1977
248.13
9.5
164.7
172.51
2.2
1978
301.26
6.0
177.4
169.82
-1.6
1979
327.14
8.6
191.1
171.19
0.8
1980
363.30
11.1
209.0
173.83
1.5
■Canada averages
'Vancouver CPI
Source: Statistics Canada, Employment, Earnings and Hours, Ottawa, Cat 62-002
Annual Average Weekly Earnings, by Province (Industrial Composite)
Province as
1977
1978
1979
1980'
Percentage of
$
s
S
$
Canada Average
CANADA
249.95
265.37
288.25
316.70
100
Newfoundland
242.44
248.36
271.64
288.37
91
Prince Edward Island
172.13
196.72
209.77
238.05
75
Nova Scotia
212.10
223.72
245.23
265.78
84
New Brunswick
223.35
232.90
256.49
284.09
90
Quebec
244.79
262.83
284.35
315.16
100
Ontario
249.46
264.04
285.57
311.35
98
Manitoba
226.30
239.71
259.00
282.71
89
Saskatchewan
235.64
250.44
275.79
303.57
96
Alberta
261.97
276.33
306.79
341.94
108
British Columbia
284.13
301.26
327.14
363.30
115
1 Preliminary Source: Statistics Canada, Employment Earnings and Hours, Ottawa, cat. 72-002 (monthly).
Information concerning average weekly earnings
provides only a comparison in current dollar terms,
and does not take into account the impact that
rising price levels may be having on purchasing
power. An estimate of the real purchasing power
(or constant dollar value) can be calculated by
deflating average weekly earnings by the
Consumer Price Index (CPI), and expressing this in
terms of dollars of equal purchasing power. The
accompanying table provides an example of this
calculation.
The column "Deflated Earnings" shows average
earnings for Canada and for British Columbia in
constant (1971) dollars. This indicates that,
although average weekly earnings in British
Columbia rose 11.1 per cent in current dollar terms
during 1980, the actual increase was only 1.5 per
cent in real purchasing power, because of the
climb in the inflation rate. Nationally, constant
dollar earnings actually showed a decline of O.G
per cent during 1980, the third consecutive yS
that this has occurred.
In British Columbia, 1980 average weekly earnin
were worth $173.83 a week in 1971 dollar terra]
Canada as a whole, constant 1971 dollar earnir
were $150.38 a week.
Statistics for the year showed a great deal of
variation in the levels of weekly earnings in trS
province.
The construction industry continued to enjoy thi
highest earnings, at $547.19 a week, 51 per cerj
above the provincial industrial composite leveB
The forestry sector, at $492.24 a week, was the
second highest, and the mining and milling seci
at $484.31 a week, was third. The last two figffl
 n
IK 35 per cent and 33 per cent above the 1980
rovincial average.
I.ffihe opposite end of the scale, workers in the
llwice, trade and finance, insurance and real
|8Be industries drew the lowest levels of
|Kings in the province. Average earnings in the
IBfce industry were $225.20 a week last year, 38
IWIent below the provincial average, and nearly
|9|er cent below the earnings experienced in
Imstruction. Average earnings in trade rose to
|§|i.58 a week, and in finance averaged $327.01
week.
/hen compared with the data for 1979, the
IBest increase in earnings in 1980 on both a per-
sntage and dollar basis was that recorded in the
Iffitry industry. Average weekly earnings there
life up by $75.54 a week, or 18 per cent. The
ack markets experienced during the latter part
in which a great deal of employment is
concentrated in smaller firms. Estimated
percentage coverage of this survey is provided at
the bottom of the industry table, and varies from a
high of 93 per cent coverage in mining and
milling, to lows of only 36 per cent in construction
and 23 per cent in the service industry. During
1980 the survey included 5,223 establishments in
the province employing an average of 501,509
pj|j|ons — roughly one half of the total paid work
force in BritiljS Columbia,
Four B.C. industries — agriculture, fishing and
trapping, education and related services, and
defence and public administration — are not
covered by the survey. The earnings data cited
refer to such items as gross pay, including
straight-time wages, piecework, bonuses,
Average Weekly/
Earnings in Major B.C. Industries
Transpor
tation,
Communi—
Finance
Mining
Total
cation
Insurance
Industrial
and
Manufac
Wood
and Other
and Real
'ear
Composite
Forestry
Milling
turing
Products
Construction
Utilities
Trade
Estate
Service
1967	
....    114.40
138.57
142.97
119.76
114.66
165.24
123.55
88.55
97.19
78.63
1968	
....   120.76
150.82
152.43
128.44
123.54
162.11
131.74
96.63
105.11
83.02
1969	
....   129.20
158.07
160.23
137.78
130.76
178.65
140.15
106.15
113.89
89.99
1970	
....   137.80
162.31
177.37
146.97
138.62
196.37
153.75
113.15
118.12
94.17
1971	
    152.50
178.01
191.10
162.67
156.56
224.68
169.00
123.06
127.60
102.80
1972	
....   164.75
196.76
206.00
178.82
177.64
246.71
183.69
132.36
139.12
107.42
1973	
....   178.22
225.05
226.67
193.28
189.73
246.43
194.24
148.04
150.95
119.26
1974	
....   200.55
246.71
;»26237o
217.87
195.26
282.64
218.18
166.96
172.51
132570   '
1975	
....   229.97
&278j13.?
297.50
252.77
249.05
344.41
251.64
190.08
198.18
149.72
1976...
    259.52
327.38
330.66
288.34
290.65
378.23
268.95
212.20
219.16
169.32
1977	
....   284.13
350.11
359.60
314.65
315.89
424.69
320.98
231.00
237.21
182.09
1978	
    301.26
382.21
383.41
339.66
343.75
476.66
344.68
236.08
253.85
189.21
1979	
....   327.14
416.70
426.60
369.52
367.69
515.94
372.77
256.46
284.64
202.50
■ram'	
    363.30
492.24
484.31
412.19
415.48
547.19
410.97
285.58
327.01
1 .225.20;-»(
infflcirtr.	
    384.30
467.24
490.88
507.61
503.23
467.24
467.90
484.40
517.70
397.35
402.51
417.29
431.61
399.28
400.09
425.38
437.17
520.89
531.13
566.34
570.38
396.73
407.05
414.30
425.80
270.14
284.67
291.78
295.75
317.57
314.52
324.45
351.49
213.39
■SSortr.	
...   358.25
220.78
■ffi&tr.	
    370.46
231.45
llhQrtr.1	
    382.57
235.16
Estimated
& of Coverage2
65
71
93
84
—
36
86
55
72
23
eliminary or first estimate.
IDSilated using large-firm employment as a percentage of total employment, as in Estimates ol Employees by Province and Industry, published by Statistics Canada,
tawa. Cat. 72-008; 1979 results.
Ifflie year may have been a factor affecting
rnings, causing the layoff of some less skilled
fixers and thus a shift in the composition of the
Kirk force toward a higher classification (and
iher paid) mix. Earnings also rose by a higher-
■fflgtveraae rate in woods manufacturing, 13 per
ffi finance, 14.9 per cent, and mining and
■ling, 13.5 per cent. The percentage rise in
<ekly earnings was well below the average in
■construction industry, where earnings went up
P$31.25 a week, or 6.1 per cent.
I hould be noted that the source of most of the
■Elation used in this section is Statistics
pnada's Employment, Earnings and Hours (Cat.
'002). This survey covers only establishments
HHaying 20 or more persons, and this fact can
E3ct the reliability of the information in industries
deductions are made for taxes, unemployment
insurance and Canada Pension Plan contributions.
At the present time, Statistics Canada is in the
process of revising its employer-based earnings
survey. The main purpose of this revision, which
should be completed by early 1982, is to correct
the two major biases of the survey with respect to
coverage. The revised survey will sample firms
employing fewer than 20 workers, and will also be
expanded tomover those industries currently not
surveyed.
Besides the average weekly earnings information
that has been the basis for most of the foregoing
analyses, additional data on total labour income in
the province is available through Statistics
Canada's Estimates of Labour Income (Cat. 72-
 005, quarterly). Preliminary estimates from this
source show total wages and salaries in the
province reaching $18,425 millions in 1980, up
from $16,137 millions in 1979, a rise of 14.2 per
cent. A significant part of this increase in total
wages and salaries can be accounted for by the
fact that average provincial employment was
1,191,000 persons, which was 63,000 higher than
in 1979.
Dividing total wages and salaries by the average
employment levels yields an estimate of the
annual average wage or salary paid an employed
person in the province. For 1980 this figure was
calculated at $15,470, an increase of 8.2 per cent
over the average $14,293 earned by B.C. workers
during 1979.
Consumer Prices
The rate of increase in the Consumer Price Index
(CPI) accelerated drastically during 1980. The
Vancouver All-Items Index was experiencing an
annual rate of change of only 7.6 per cent as
recently as the first quarter of 1980, but this rose
to an average of 11.5 per cent by the fourth
quarter. As a result, the Vancouver All-Items Index
reached a level of 220.5 (1971=100) by the end of
December The Canada All-Items CPI followed a
similar pattern, although the acceleration in prices
was not as marked during the year. In the first
quarter of the year, there was a 9.4 per cent
annual increase, which rose to 11.1 per cent by
the fourth quarter.
Expectations for 1981 are for prices to rise to
somewhere in the range of 11.5 to 13.5 per cent.
Results for the first few months of 1981 suggest
the latter to be the more realistic figure. This
would move the rate of inflation back to the
historically high levels experienced during the
1974-1976 period.
As a result of higher price levels, the Canadian
dollar has continued to shrink in terms of its
purchasing power. As the accompanying table
shows, a 1980 dollar would purchase goods worth
only 48 cents in 1971. The 1971 dollar was worth
79 cents in 1974 and 56 cents in 1978.
3
Purchasing Power of the
Consumer Dollar
Vancouver
Percentage
CPI
Change Over
Purchasing
(1971=100)
Year
Power
1971
100
3.2
1.00
1972
105.3
5.3
0.95
1973
112.9
7.2
0.89
1974
126.1
11.7
0.79
1975
140.1
11.1
0.71
1976
153.7
9.7
0.65
1977
164.7
7.2
0.61
1978
177.4
7.7
0.56
1979
191.1
7.7
0.52
1980
209.0
9.4
0.48
Canada's rate of price increase occupies th^
middle range of the international scale. The
per cent rise in the Canada AH-ltems Index (ar
the 11.9 per cent rise in the Vancouver IndexJ
the period December 1979 to December 19801
was just slightly better than the 12.4 per cenffl
increase experienced in the price index of our
most important trading partner, the United Sta;
during the same period. The Canada inflatiorffl
however, was considerably higher than that
experienced in Austria (6.3 per cent), West ]
Germany (5.3 per cent), Japan (8.4 per centra
The Netherlands (6.7 per cent). It was lower tt
the rates experienced in France (13.5 per cent
Sweden (14.6 per cent), Great Britain (15.3 pe
cent) and Italy (22.0 per cent). Switzerland
remains the international leader among the   I
industrial countries, its rate of inflation holding
4.4 per cent during this 12-month period.
The food and housing components of the AM
Items Index continued to provide the main
impetus behind rising prices. These two
components provided roughly 60 per cent of t
total change experienced by both the CanarM
and Vancouver indices during the December I
to December 1980 period. In Vancouver them
index rose by 12.4 per cent during this period,
the prices of a large variety of food items
experienced sharp increases.
Most significant, on a percentage basis, waS
doubling of the price of sugar, which had
ramifications on a wide variety of processed
foods. In terms of real impact, however, the 9.I
per cent rise in the price of meat, poultry and
exerted greater influence, because of its
significant weight in the total index. Other fooc
items showing large 12-month increases were
eggs, up 18.0 per cent, and cereal productsm
16.8 per cent.
The Vancouver housing index rose by 11.4 pen
cent over the December 1979 to Decemberffl|
period. This is not too surprising a result,
considering the high increases in mortgage ra
and the price of housing in the Vancouver ara|
The shelter component of the housing indexml
12.4 per cent over this period. Within shelteml
cost of owned accommodation went up 15.5 I]
cent, whereas the cost of rented accommogal
rose only 6.4 per cent. A 25.8 per cent rise in 3
price of fuel oils helped push the costs of
operating a household up by 11.4 per cent, a
further large contributing factor in the rise of tl
Vancouver housing index.
Significant advances were registered also in ns
of the other components of the Vancouver m\
Items Index during the December 1979 to
December 1980 period. The transportation ind
rose by 13.4 per cent, tobacco and alcohol ill
per cent, clothing 10.4 per cent, health andB
personal care 12.4 per cent, and recreation J|
reading and education by 9.0 per cent.
J
 lovements in All-Items Indexes (1971=100)
Vancouver Index
1979 1980
Percentage
Change
Percentage
Change
January...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
jrce: Statistics Canada, Consumer
.62-010 (quarterly), Ottawa.
184.1 198.0 7.6 January  182.7 200.1
185.6 199.7 7.6 February  1844 2018
187.5 201.6 7.5 March  1866 2040
188.0 203.5 8.2 April  187 9 205 2
189.9 205.7 8.3 May  189 7 2076
191.2 208.5 9.0 June  1906 2099
192.3 210.3 9.4 July  1921 2115
192.8 212.0 10.0 August  192.8 2135
194.5 213.6 9.8 September  194.5 2154
194.7 215.7 10.8 October  195.9 217 3
195.8 218.9 11.8 November  197.8 220.0
197.0 220.5 11.9 December  199.0 221.3
Prices and Price Indexes
9.5
9.4
9.3
9.2
9.4
10.1
10.1
10.7
10.7
10.9
11.2
11.2
ercentage Change in CPI for Regional Cities
ecember 1979 - December 1980
nnual Averages (1971=100)
1979
1980
Percentage
Change
^ADA
191.2
221.3
11.2
John's
200.8
238.1
13.3
ffiottetown/
Summerside1
152.1
176.9
12.0
Wax
187.4
218.4
12.3
int John
191.7
222.2
11.5
|S>ec City
188.0
218.7
11.4
Ureal
188.9
219.0
11.1
Itawa
188.7
216.6
10.7
iwtto
189.8
219.3
10.9
bnder Bay
190.7
219.5
10.6
unpeg
1  192.7
222.2
10.5
igina
190.5
221.1
11.4
Sskatoon
186.8
217.2
11.4
Ennonton
192.5
224.3
12.5
lary
188.9
220.8
12.4
hcouver
191.1
220.5
11.9
('4=100
In compared with the other 14 regional cities
which consumer price indexes are published,
ISuver had the sixth highest 12-month
liase by the end of 1980. Its annual rate of
Base at the beginning of the year had been
lowest of any regional city for which
ilmation is published. As indicated in the
(Irving table, St. John's, Newfoundland,
l&enced the most rapid December-tc||||
fcsmber advance of its All-Items Index, a 13.3
Isnt rate of increase. The lowest rate of
pase was the 10.5 per cent advance in the
Biipeg All-Items Index. The fairly rapid
iteration in price levels mentioned earlier in
(section occurred consistently across the
Pitry.
Wage Settlements
During 1980, 438 major settlements affecting
163,137 employees were reported in British
Columbia. The average annual wage increase
negotiated during this period was 11.4 per cent, or
$1.23 an hour. By contrast, the average wage
settlement increase in 1979 was 9.1 per cent, or
84 cents an hour. A breakdown by industry shows
Negotiated Wage Settlements in B.C.
Settlement
Vancouver
Average
Unskilled
Skilled
CPI
1977
1st Quarter
7.4
7.4
7.0
8.3
2nd Quarter
5.8
5.4
5.7
6.4
3rd Quarter
7.1
8.0
6.2
6.7
4th Quarter
5.3
5.5
5.3
7.1
1978
1st Quarter
5.7
6.0
5.5
7.4
2nd Quarter
5.5
5.7
5.3
7.8
3rd Quarter
6.0
6.5
5.6
8.1
4th Quarter
7.4
7.7
7.1
7.6
1979
1st Quarter
7.7
7.8
7.5
7.9
2nd Quarter
9.0
9.3
8.6
7.7
3rd Quarter
9.2
9.2
9.1
7.7
4th Quarter
9.8
9.7
9.7
7.5
1980
1st Quarter
11.3
11.2
10.3
7.6
2nd Quarter
12.2
10.4
12.8
8.5
3rd Quarter
10.9
11.8
10.5
9.7
4th Quarter
12.0
12.2
11.7
11.5
that mining obtained settlements with the largest
percentage increase, 13.8 per cent per annum,
while construction realized settlements with the
largest cents-an-hour increase, $1.66.
The percentage changes in wage settlements for
skilled and unskilled workers were almost exactly
the same during 1980. The former received 11.3
per cent, or $1.45 an hour; the latter 11.4 per cent,
li.
27
 or $1.02 an hour.
Roughly one fifth of settlements reported during
1980 contained a cost of living allowance (COLA)
clause. These 103 agreements representd 29,952
employees, or 18.4 per cent of all employees
B.C. Wage Settlements, by Quarter  First Quarter 1980 to Fourth Quarter 1980
covered by settlements reported during thel
Agreements containing a COLA clause had a
average annual increase of 10.2 per cent, sM
below the 11.7 per cent rate negotiated in
agreements without such a clause.
Number of
Settlements
Employees
Covered
Average Annual Increase
Percentage                           Cents/Ho,
84
38,613
11.3
10.3
11.2
92   I
111   i
86
120
40,270
12.2
12.8
10.4
122   |
137
88
146
61,236
10.9
10.5
11.8
144
152 j
128   j
88
23,018
12.0
11.7
12.2
121   I
138
109   j
438
163,137
11.4
11.3
11.4
123
145
102
1st Quarter 1980
Settlement average1	
Skilled classes	
Unskilled classes	
2nd Quarter 1980
Settlement average'	
Skilled classes	
Unskilled classes	
3rd Quarter 1980
Settlement average1	
Skilled classes	
Unskilled classes	
4th Quarter 1980
Settlement average1	
Skilled classes	
Unskilled classes	
Average Last Four Quarters
Settlement average1	
Skilled classes	
Unskilled classes	
* As represented by the arithmetic average of the modal skilled and modal unskilled pay rates.
Information for last year shows that slightly larger
percentage increases were negotiated in the
larger bargaining units. An 11.4 per cent annual
rate of increase occurred in both the 70
settlements with 500 or more employees, and the
157 agreements representing 100 to 499 work*
The average annual wage settlement reportea
bargaining units of less than 100 employees w
11.1 per cent last year.
Number of
Contracts
Employees
Covered
Average Annual Increase
Percentage Cents/Ho
Fewer than 100 employees
100-499 employees
More than 500 employees
210
157
70
10,055
33,227
120,830
11.1
11.4
11.4
106
121
125
28
 Negotiated Wage Settlements in British Columbia
p B.C. Wage Settlements by Industry, First Quarter 1980 to Fourth Quarter 1980
Number of
Contracts
Employees
Covered
Average Annual
Increase
Percentage   Cents/Hour
Skilled Unskilled
Average Annual Average Annual
Increase Increase
Percentage   Cents/Hour Percentage   Cents/Hour
IH|ATE SECTOR TOTAL 313 93,434 11.1 135 108
Iffiufacturing Total 145 31,195 11.0 115 11.0
F Food and beverage 44 10,666 10.3 101 10.4
Wood products 18 2,192 9.6 100 94
IMfetals 26 7,841 12.2 137 12/J
Machinery, et. al.1 31 8,064 11.1 118 11.1
Imscellaneous manufacturing 26 2,432 10.7 108 10.5
IRstruction 46 37,758 10.8 166 10.5
trade 36 3,637 11.2 105 10.4
lyfcellaneous Services 32 3,775 10.5 74 12.2
|Hng 16 6,071 13.8 143 13^9
Importation 32 7,288 11.9 122 12.6
[Hsmunication and Other 6 2,735 8.4 74 8.5
IRc Sector Total 125 70,678 11.9 108 123
Ifccipal Government 23 3,220 11.2 113 11.2
bderal & Provincial Governments 26 18,003 10.4 94 10.7
llilth 17 29,086 15.2 131 17.0
ducation 55 12,713 10.1 96 10.1
IBincial Crown Corporations 4 7,656 7.7 70 8.5
Ktrial Composite 438 163,137 11.4 123 11.3
llacninery, transportation equipment and electrical products
151
126
112
109
146
127
124
166
111
124
152
143
107
135
122
118
175
117
97
145
11.4
11.0
10.3
9.8
12.3
11.2
11.0
11.9
11.7
10.0
13.8
11.5
8.4
11.5
11.2
10.0
13.9
10.1
6.7
11.4
117
106
95
91
128
110
93
165
101
66
134
113
68
85
88
71
104
76
51
102
/lajor Settlements Reported, 1980
fifty-four major settlements, covering 500 or more
imployees, wereWigned during 1980. In the first
Iffijrter, eight major settlements were concluded,
the second quarter was one of the busiest of the
par, with 20 major agreements settled. During the
lajor Settlements Reported in 1980
third quarter, 14 large settlements were
concluded. In the fourth quarter, an additional
eight major settlements were concluded. The
accompanying table lists the largest settlements
in 1980.
Number of
Employer
Union
Employees
Month
lElth Labour Relations
Hospital Employees' Local 180
17,000
February
'iovernment of Canada
Letter Carriers
2,478
February
IP Rail
Council of Trade Unions
2,048
February
:.C. Hydro
Office and Technical Employees', Local 378
3,708
February
aiser Resources
^piited Millworkers, Local 7292
1,550
February
rWkers' Compensation Board
WCB Employees'
1,200
February
nning Tractor
Machinists, Lodge 692
1,300
February
.C. Assessment Authority
CUPE, Local 1767
650
February
IBlth Labour Relations Assoc.
Registered Nurses
10,000
April
ISeries Assoc, of B.C.
Various Unions
3,880
April
overnment of Canada
Postal Workers
2,148
April
'. C Government
Registered Psychiatric Nurses
2,776
April
B.C.
AUCE, Local 1
1,400
April
CUPE
1,700
June
I 'aser Valley Milk Producers'
Assoc.
Teamsters, Local 464
1,050
April
I letal Industries Assoc.
Machinists, Lodge 692
, Jvlolders, Local 281
Pattern Makers, Local 1260
1,000
April
jtah Mines
Operating Engineers, Local 115
720
April
Macdonalds Consolidated
Retail, Wholesale Union, Local 580
825
April
IKouver Police Board
B.C. Federation of Police Officers,
Local 1
800
April
 Lower Mainland Steel
Fabricators
B.C. Printing Firms
School District No. 39
(Vancouver)
Air Canada
Noranda Mines
CLRA
Government of Canada
CPAir
Brewery Employers' Labour
Relations Assoc.
Maintenance Contractors
FIR
Prince Rupert Rshermens Co-op
Lornex Mines
SFU
Fletchers Foods
Government of Canada
Alcan
Burrard and Yarrows
Corporation
Independent Boatbuilders
Government of Canada
Metal Industries Association
21 School Districts
Pacific Western Airlines
Kelly-Douglas
Boiler and Vessel Contractors'
Association
Iron Workers, Local 712 700 April
Graphic Arts Union, Local 210 650 April
Vancouver Municipal & Regional
Employees' 550 April
Machinists 660 April
Steelworkers, Local 898 525 April
Joint Council of Trade Unions 32,000 July
Public Sen/ice Alliance of Canada
• Administration 2,615 July
• Secretarial 803 July
Machinists, Lodge 764 1,764 July
Airline Right Attendants' Assoc. 833 July
Brewery Workers, Locals 280, 300 and 308 950 July
Service Employees', Local 244 1,400 July
IWA, Local 1-217 800 July
Shoreworkers, Local 1674 750 July
Steelworkers, Local 7619 800 July
AUCE, Locals 2 and 6 1,012 July
United Food & Commercial Workers',
Local 283 500 July
Public Service Alliance
• Clerical and Regulatory 4,156 Septemba
CASAW, Local 1 1,850 September
12 unions
1,577
September
6 unions
1,200
September
Federal Government Dockyards Trades
and Labour Council
979
September
Steelworkers
1,500
September
CUPE
2,382
September
Machinists
500
September
Wholesale, Retail Union, 6 locals
600
September
Boilermakers, Local 359
700
September
Major Collective Agreement
Expiries in 1981
Expiring in 1981 are 456 major collective
agreements, covering 214,502 employees in the
province. By comparison, the 1980 Calendar of
Expiring Collective Agreements reported a greater
number of expiries (536), but fewer employees
covered (162,861). Thus, although there are not as
many agreements expiring in the coming year, the
number of employees covered by each expiry is,
on average, somewhat higher.
The expiry in 1981 covering the largest number of
employees is the coast master agreement
between Forest Industrial Relations and the IWA.
This expiry, dated June 14, covers 28,000
employees, but the total number of employees
throughout the province, for whom the IWA will be
negotiating during the summer, is in excess of
47,000. In addition, the two master agreements in
the pulp and paper industry, which cover a total of
12,744 employees, expire at the end of June. Ilil
the health-care industry, the collective agreeme
between Health Labour Relations Association al
the Hospital Employees' Union, covering some
17,000 workers, expires December 31.
The overwhelming number of expiries in 1981a
be two-year agreements that have been in effej
since 1979. There are 296 such expiries, coverir
139,840 employees.
The largest number of expiries, 86, will occuiffi
March, followed closely by April, with 75, anrJB
June, with 70. However, in terms of number oHI
employees, June has the largest number, folfflj
by December.
During 1981, the industrial category with the ■
largest number of expiries will be manufactuyffl
with 191 covering 83,914 employees. The trargl
and service sector will be second largest, witml
expiries covering 84,202 employees.
 umber of Agreements Expiring in 1981,
f Month
Wary
ibruary
[arch
m
ay
ine
ily
jgust
iptember
Dtober
wember
member
Employees
Agreements
Covered
38
.5,707
33
10,857
86
27,401
75
25,902
22
1,536
70
66,904
3,742
15
3,850
21
2,472
21
2,917
10
1,120
54
62,094
Number of Agreements Expiring in 1981,
by Industry
Industry
Agreements
)TALS:
456
214502
All Industries
Manufacturing
Food and beverage
Wood and paper
Metals
Machinery
Miscellaneous manufacturing
Construction
Trade and Service
Trade
Education
Municipal services
Miscellaneous services
Other Industries
Mining
Transportation
Communication
Employees
Covered
456
214,502
191
83,914
38
9,519
55
63,149
27
2,998
29
3,964
42
4,284
18
9,466
179
84,202
28
7,119
42
36,873
33
2,178
86
38,032
68
36,920
22
10,381
35
18,333
11
8,206
31 LARGEST EXPIRIES IN 1981 COVERING 1,000 OR MORE EMPLOYEES
C. Ferry Corporation
C. Food Industry
C. Hotels (Lower Mainland)
lj|. Hotels (Vancouver)
C. Hydro
C. Hydro
[ C. Maritime Employers (federal)
C. Road Builders Association
C. Road Builders Association
C. Road Builders Association
C. School Trustees (74 Districts)
Iffiadian National Railway (federal)
limiinco (Trail, Kimberley, Salmo)
Dvernment of Canada (federal)
ining Tractor and Equipment
Bfieries Association of B.C.
^pries Association of B.C. (Cannery)
Isneries Association of B.C.
(Fresh Rsh and Cold Storage)
irest Industrial Relations
t (Coast Master)
Kgth Labour Relations Association
t dependent Forest Companies
erior Forest Labour Relations
Iffier Resources (Sparwood Mines)
3tro Transit Operating Company
I >rth Cariboo Forest Labour Relations
rWnagan Federated Shippers
ilp and Paper Industrial
Relations Bureau
ilp and Paper Industrial
Relations Bureau
Iway Association of Canada
Iffiersity of British ColumbHIS
hite Spot (retail)
Ferry Workers
Retail Clerks, Local 1518
Hotel and Restaurant, Local 40
Hotel and Restaurant, Local 40
IBEW, Local 258
OTEU, Local 378
Longshoremen, several locals
Laboured Locals 168, 602, 1070
and 1093
Operating Engineers, Local 115
Teamsters; Local 213
B.C. Teachers' Federation
Non-Operating Unions
llllworkers, Locals 480, 651 and 901
PSAC (General Labour and Trades)
Machinists, Lodge 692
Native Brotherhood
UFAW
UFAW
IWA
Hospital Employees, Local 180
IWA
IWA, Locals 1-405, 1-417 and 1-423
Mine Workers, Local 7292
Transit Union, Locals 101-134 and 109
IWA, Local 1-424 and 1-425
Fruit andSfegetable Workers
CPU, Several Locals
PPWC
Shopcraft Unions
CUPE, Local 116
Food and Associated Services
Employees
Date of
Covered
Expiry
2,610
31 July
4,500
31 Mar
2,000
30 Apr
3,000
30 Apr
3,243
31 Mar
3,571
31 Mar
4,000
31 Dec
2,000
28 Feb
4,000
28 Feb
2,000
28 Feb
29,000
31 Dec
1,600
31 Dec
4,800
30 Apr
1,930
4 Jan
1,300
14 Oct
1,250
15 Apr
2,000
15 Apr
1,000
15 Apr
28,000
14 June
17,000
31 Dec
2,500
14 June
7,200
30 June
1,550
31 Dec
3,084
31 Mar
3,600
30 June
1,324
31 Aug
7,300
30 June
5,444
30 June
1,207
31 Dec
1,700
31 Mar
1,800
6 June
  Part II
Administration and Safety
Engineering Programs
 Finance and Administration
The responsibilities of the Finance and
Administration Branch include general financial
management of the Ministry, and related
administrative services.
Throughout 1980 the Branch continued to review
and evaluate the procedures and reporting
systems of various Ministry programs to help
facilitate effective decision making.
Two major activities of the Branch include the
coordinating of estimate and budget preparation,
and the monitoring and processing of subsequent
expenditures. The following table summarizes the
financial resources allotted to the Ministry for the
fiscal year ended March 31, 1980.
The general administrative responsibilities of t
Branch include:
• the coordination of office accommodation g
facilities, furniture and equipment
• data systems and computer services;
• telecommunications equipment;
• vehicle fleet management;
• stock control; and
• courier services.
These services are provided for the Ministry e
several related boards and commissions.
Throughout 1980, the Branch continued to
upgrade accommodation and to encourage ft
effective use of facilities, equipment,
telecommunications, data processing and wo
processing.
Statement of Expenditure
Ministry of Labour — Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1980
Actus
Expenditure:
Estimates
and Other
Purpose Authorizations
Ministers' Office   $    141,341    $    139,57"
Ministerial Administration and Support Services  2,680,120       2,793,8§
Job Training and Employment
Opportunity Programs  36,253,809     33,275,W
Occupational Environment and Compensation Advisory Services  1,566,415      1,575,73|
Safety Engineering Division  5,812,929       5,739,738
Collective Bargaining and
Labour Standards Program  2,772,487       2,701,ol
Human Rights Program   711,952         656,94?
Labour Relations Board   1,430,101       1,566,4$
Essential Services Advisory Agency   297,000          117,667
Boards of Review (Workers' Compensation Board)  14,698           14.69E
Building Occupancy Charges   1,123,000       1,419,3®
Computer and Consulting Charges  1,040,100         745,039
Total   53,843,952     50,745,271
Less Recruitment Savings  (1,235,278)
Total   52,608,674     50,745,271
Revenue Surplus of 1977/78 Appropriation
Act, 1979 - For Accelerated Job
Experience (Bill 7) See 1 (F)  5,000,000       5,000,00C
Refugee Settlement Program of British
Columbia Act (Chap. 27 Sec. 5)  240,116         240,™
West Kootenay Schools Collective
Bargaining Assistance Act (1978) Chap. 42
Sec. 8 (2) Special Mediators Expenses   33,459           33,459
Total   $57,882,249   $56,018,84f
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
 Personnel Services
^Snnel Services provides a complete range of
jrsonnel activities for the Ministry, including
[ffiiitment, staff training and development,
Unification analysis, union-management
lations, and consultation on organizational
ssign.
ie Ministry entered 1980 with 593 positions,
IBsrerred three positions in Native Indian
I ograms to the Attorney-General's Ministry, and
ven positions in Building Standards to Municipals
IBrs. However, there were five new positions
Ided to the Apprenticeship Programs Branch. At
3 close of the year the total was 591. The
Ifflftrv employed an additional 120 auxiliaries for
lEmployment Opportunity Programs Branch,
d 118 auxiliaries to fill the pressing staffing
\ms of other branches.
ijor recruitment was undertaken for cerjtain key
llnions during the year as well, including: the
sistant Deputy Minister of Manpower; the
IHaant Deputy Minister of Rnance and Safety
I gineering; the Director of Human Rights; the
Hptor of Apprenticeship Training Programs; and
|ffi)irector of Employment Standards.
cruitment to fill vacancies at all levels continued
Ibughout the year.
liumber of important organizational changes
IRed in 1980. Of particular note was an
IRtment of programs in conjunction with the
creation of a Manpower Division reporting to an
A.D.M. The Safety Engineering Services Division
was bolstered through the appending of the
Elevating Devices Branch, and a new staff
division, with a systems and planning mandate,
was created to enhance the overall operations of
the Ministry.
Along with this organizational activity, several
classification reviews were undertaken in almost
every Branch of the Ministry. A large number of
excluded positions were evaluated, and a new
classification plan for licensed professionals was
implemented. In addition, the Ministry participated
in an across-government review of the Inspector
series.
As human resource development and training
became a more frequently expressed need in the
Ministry, a development program was approved
by management for implementation in the new
year. As well, a variety of programs related to
staff development were implemented. Senior
management was actively involved in several
management workshops during the year.
The Ministry also developed a Performance
Appraisal Training Program that is currently being
delivered at quarterly workshops. A system of
course evaluation was introduced and an
information system on training activities was
developed for implementation in 1981.
Information Services
Imnation Services Branch is responsible for
Iffinunicating the activities and services of the
fmty to labour and management organizations
■representatives, academic institutions and the
pieral public, Using the resources of advertisyng*'
Imcies and graphics production companies,
[irmation Services cooperates with the line
inches of the Ministry in devising public
ligation programs that explain their functions
si describe how their services are delivered to
f people of British] Columbia.
ting 1980 the Branch continued to collaborate
h Apprenticeship Training Programs Branch on
lygng-range project initiated in 1979 to
Iffirnize, standardize and expand the Ministry's
fling literature. By year's end, another 13
lirse outlines, five study guides, seven exams,
lis wall charts, three manuals and three trade
brochures had been added to the list.
Assistance was also provided the Women's
Exploratory Apprenticeship Training program in
the production of an audio-visual presentation
titled "Two Hits to a Nail", and a brochure
detailing what the program provides for women
who aspire to work in the skilled trades.
In conjunction with Safety Engineering Services,
four public information brochures were produced
on the subject of electrical, gas, and boiler and
pressure vessel safety. Also, work was begun on
the first of a projected series of A-V presentations
planned for introduction in 1981.
Information Services again cooperated with
Employment Opportunity Programs Branch to
produce media advertisements, brochures and
news releases in support of its three annual youth
 TTm
employment campaigns, and the B.C.-Quebec
Student Exchange Program.
The multi-purpose human rights kit produced on
behalf of both the Human Rights Branch and the
Human Rights Commission was readied for
distribution early in the year.
Throughout 1980, the Branch worked closely with
Research and Planning Branch on production of
the monthly Labour Research Bulletin, and the
three annual publications, B.C. Labour Directory,
1980, Negotiated Working Conditions, 1980, and
the Calendar of Expiring Collective Agreements.
The Ministry's Guide to the B.C. Labour Code
proved so popular that a second printing was
budgeted for 1981.
Other assignments included processing of the
Ministry's 1979 Annual Report; preparing new^i
releases and advertisements; producing a styi
guide for the Labour Research Bulletin; prepaii
submissions and articles for a variety of
publications, including B.C. Government News
the Public Service Commissions Contactanjjl
the Service of the People, Corpus Almanac, B.
List, and Canadian Almanac, and processing
Ministry's segment of the Commission's manflj
Organization of the B.C. Public Service, 1979-
1980.
In addition, the Branch acted as the MinistigB
liaison link with its two agencies-of-record, tffl
Queen's Printer, graphics production firms, W
the members of the general public who useH
Information Services as their initial point of com
with the Ministry of Labour and the services®
provides.
 Safety Engineering Programs
IBB during 1980 the number and complexity of
HBsystems and equipment, as well as existing
Ifflations coming within the scope of the safety
Irarams of Safety Engineering Services,
IBfnued to increase. However, the Division was
Mpssful in meeting its objectives of ensuring a
se living and working environment for the
lople of British Columbia without increasing
inpower resources. This is evidenced by the
Hgarative statistical data on deaths, injuries to
Ijsons, and property loss as presented in the
Igrts of the Division and Branch dinlbtors.
■Kther the Government's effort to ensure that
■Bees are delivered in a cohesive and
Iffinated manner, the Elevating Devices Safety
Branch became an integral part of the Division
during the early part of the year. This has proved
beneficial as far as the utilization of engineering
and technical staff across branch lines is
concerned and in the prevention of overlapping
and conflicting activities.
Several key. appointments and changes were
made to senior positions in the branches as part
of the reorganization process undertaken to
improve administrative capability. These changes
have permitted the Division to place increased
emphasis on the benefits to be realized from the
provision of safety services in cooperation with
municipalities, industry, and trade associations.
This mode of operation has also permitted the
 Division to meet the challenge of constantly
modifying its services to deal with rapid change
and technological advances that have altered the
safety needs and expectations of B.C. citizens. In
the standards of developmental, educational, and
inspectional program areas, the policies followed
continue to reflect the advantages of using a
facilitative rather than a prohibitive approach.
During the year the stage was set for the
implementation of new defect-prevention systems
as a means of ensuring safety— a distinct
improvement over exclusive reliance on after-the-
fact inspections. In order to increase the effective
delivery of services, decentralization to local areas
was continued to enhance both the decisionmaking process and the performance of activities.
Through the Branch's educational and monitoring
programs the level of safety was increased, while
at the same time the demands for government
services were reduced.
The various programs of the branches have
continued to contribute to the national standards
system and, through representation on national
code-making bodies, have ensured that such
standards are appropriate for adoption in British
Columbia. In addition, there has been excellent
participation by industry and the general public in
the various systems used for developing and
interpreting regulations. The preliminary
committee work on the preparation of
recommendations to the Government for
upgrading legislation in the electrical, gas, anc n
boiler and pressure vessel safety areas has bel
completed.
In order to encourage the best use of Division,
resources, the safety education content wasH
again increased through the provision of imprjl
information on safety for industry and the gen #
public. The demand for information through
seminars and releases of technical information
has increased, but concerned persons have
expressed the need to become even better I
informed about the latest standards and
procedures.
The appeals procedure implemented during tr t
year proved most effective in dealing with
conflicts in the application of safety legislation k
limited number of problems were placed befoo
the gas, boiler and pressure vessel, and electis
advisory committees or the appeals tribunals Ie
impartial hearings. The fact that appeals reacto
the formal stage in isolated cases only confirm
the fact that the overall system is working
effectively in providing information on the propB
application of standards, and ensuring that till
standards are being uniformly interpreted.
(Table 1 on page 68 provides a summary of
Division activities during 1980.)
Electrical Safety
Electrical Safety Branch is primarily responsible
for ensuring a safe electrical environment for the
citizens of British Columbia, at home, at work and
at leisure.
During 1980, electrical construction activity, as
evidenced by the number of electrical permits
issued, showed an increase of 16 per cent over
1979. Similarly, the number of annual permits
issued to industrial establishments to facilitate
repair and replacement of electrical equipment on
short notice increased by 72 per cent. Inspections
conducted increased by 30 per cent.
In examining the statistics, it is evident from the
number of fires and accidents that occur that
continued emphasis must be placed on the
educational aspects of safety programming.
Electrical safety cannot be achieved by inspection
alone; there must be a parallel effort to foster and
encourage public awareness of the need for
personal commitment to safety.
During the year a number of inspectors attended
training programs designed to assist them in
presenting seminars to the public and industry on
the subject of regulations and related matters
affecting electrical safety.
The Branch's Electrical Safety Review Commiie
met on four occasions to consider and advisf I
upon proposals for changes to legislation. Thjl
Branch's Technical Advisory Committee and th
Electrical Wiring and Equipment Standards
Committee met on six occasions to consideBI
recommendations for revisions to technical
standards.
The Branch sponsored a number of technical
meetings that were attended by both municM
chief electrical inspectors and provincial
supervising electrical inspectors. In additionM
meetings were held and seminars presented!!
many centres throughout the province to
dispense information related to requirements!
contained in the 13th edition of the Canadian I
Electrical Code, which was adopted for use ir"
province.
Increased activity in the North Okanagan-Shffll
area made it necessary to subdivide the formiW
Okanagan Region, in order to create a new SM
whose centre is Salmon Arm. Included in this 3
region are areas previously served from the
f
 Imch's Vernon, Salmon Arm and Revelstoke
[Ices.
■fig the year, Parks Canada announced that
f eral legislation related to electrical installations
Igferal parks had been rescinded, and that
IRnsibility for electrical safety in such areas
Mfestored to provincial authorities. The areas
listed include five national parks: Kootenay,
lunt Revelstoke, Glacier, Pacific Rim, and Yoho.
■Ring an accident in which a child suffered the
loss of an eye when a specialty lamp exploded,
the Branch arranged for an investigation to
determine whether the failure was typical or
unusual. The investigation included testing of
lamps obtained from various centres in British
Columbia and elsewhere in Canada. Although all
of the lamps were tested to end-of-life, it was not
possible to duplicate the explosion.
(Tables 2 and 3 on page 68 provide a summary of
Branch activities during 1980.)
g)iler and Pressure Vessel Safety
lljbjective of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel
lety Branch is to develop and provide a safe
■Konment for the people of British Columbia
Isrever boilers, pressure vessels, pressure
p ng systems and refrigeration plants are
Iffifactured, installed, operated and maintained.
T se objectives are attained through the
Selopment of standards and education,
BKCtion and investigation, and design of quality
Bwance systems.
Ire were no fatalities or serious injuries to
Irons during 1980. Property damage that did
||r was caused largely by human error, and
f firms the need for continuing industrial training
^Event personnel from becoming complacent,
i to keep them abreast of technological
lances. It is also evident that educational
Bfams designed to encourage thorough testing
^rarating controls and safety devices must be
Rued in conjunction with the development of
liquate maintenance procedures on all types of
lipment. Avenues for improving safety
tisures are continually being reviewed with the
Iple concerned.
Jng the year, Branch personnel conducted
scational seminars, particularly in welding and
aication, and also on the numerous
^Hruction standards adopted under B.C.
BJtes. Many consultations on repair,
litenance and operation took place around the
wince, reflecting concerns examined at national
■ffiternational standards committee meetings.
Imphasize the importance of prevention,
greater responsibility for quality control is being
placed on the owner-user, installer and fabricator.
As well, revised frequencies for the inspection
interval of various types of equipment was
initiated during 1980.
Concern over the need to improve quality control
in the nuclear field continues to make demands
on Branch resources. The time allocated to this
area continues to increase, and technological
advance makes it mandatory that Branch
inspectors avail themselves of periodic technical
refresher courses.
Once again, the most important potential and
aGtual hazards uncovered in the operation of
boiler and pressure vessel equipment were related
to problems with low-water controls, safety valves,
cracking of tubes and tube sheets, welding
failures and human error. There were nine
accidents to boilers caused by low-water
conditions. Two were of a very serious nature,
having considerable potential for a violent
explosion. The boilers burned themselves out, but
did not explode. A total of six boilers were
damaged beyond repair as a result of accidents
caused primarily by failure of automatic controls.
Black liquor recovery boiler operations suffered
one serious explosion when a plugged tube failed.
Extensive damage resulted to another recovery
boiler when caustic entered the feed water
system after a conductivity meter probe failed in
service. In both cases, measures were taken to
ensure that similar failures do not recur.
(Table 4 on page 69 provides a summary of
Branch activities during 1980.)
 Gas Safety
A safe living and working environment for the
citizens of the province in matters concerning the
distribution and utilization of natural gas and gas-
air mixtures is the primary responsibility and
objective of the Gas Safety Branch.
This is achieved by:
• development and interpretation of codes and
standards
• examination and licensing of gas fitters
• licensing of gas contractors
• examination and certification of inspectors and
local inspectors
• on-site inspections of installations;
• field testing and certification of appliances;
• incident investigation; and
• processing of appeals.
The proposed Gas Safety Act has been reviewed
with Legislative Counsel and is nearing its final
form. It is hoped that it will be adopted in the
spring of 1981, to be followed by revised and
updated regulations under the Act. An updated
schedule of fees for services performed under the
authority of the Gas Safety Act became effective
on January 1, 1981. It is projected that Branch
revenue will increase by 100 per cent when this
schedule is implemented.
The Gas Safety Review Committee has met
regularly during the year to consider proposed
revisions to the Gas Safety Act, as well as
Regulations Governing Gas Permits, Certification
of Appliances, General Installation Procedures,
Inspections and Fees, and the Regulations
Governing the Installation, Protection and
Maintenance of Gas Mains, Services and Meters.
Regular meetings of supervising inspectors and
head office staff have been continued, as well as
meetings with municipal inspectors, at which
mutual problems and concerns have been
discussed. These meetings have been beneficial
to all participants and have resulted in more
uniform interpretation of regulations, and
improved service to the gas trade and the ger|
public.
The Branch is organized into 15 district offices!
and grouped into six regions, each directed by
regional supervising inspector. During the year,J
some regional boundaries were altered result™
an improvement in service in all affected areas.
The decentralization of procedures formerly  ,]
carried out in Vancouver head office— e.g.,
issuance of permits, processing of applicatiorfa
certification of appliances, and the survey of ne
designs— is now complete, and service to
industry and the public is much faster and mog
efficient as a result. The workload of the Branct
has increased in all areas of the province, but
especially in the Fraser Valley and Peace Riven
areas. In the latter area, the Branch establishtS
new district office in Fort St. John to provide |
service to that rapidly expanding centre.
The number of gas permits issued during 1980
increased by 40 per cent, and applications fori
certification of equipment increased by 20 pel
cent over the previous year. The number of   j
candidates for gas fitters examinations increaS
dramatically during the year, with a 65 per cem
increase in the number of examinations writt™
The number of successful candidates increase
by 15 per cent during the same period.
The number of licensed gas contractors increS
at the same rate as in 1979, whereas the nurffl
of home-owners licenses issued increased
considerably. The number of special investigam
conducted during the year decreased slighthfl
(Table 5 on page 69 provides a summary of
Branch activities during 1980.)
 Elevating Devices
ie safe operation of passenger and freight
Pators, escalators, moving walkways, hoists,
I fficialized lifts for the handicapped, lift platforms
IB midway amusement rides is the responsibility
: the Elevating Devices Branch.
IBrther consolidate safety services within the
I Wastry, the Branch was moved tgjSafety
IKieering Services Division in 1980.
(Bating devices for the disabled received more
IRtion in 1980 because of increased interest in
[Kpving access to more buildings. The addition
these special devices has increased the
i imber of opportunities for the disabled to gain
seful employment and to participate in functions
i at were inaccessible before. The Branch not
\m provided inspection and consultative
IWpes, but also served on the (Banadian
andards Association Committee, where it
ISsted in the preparation of a revisedjsafety
ide for Elevating Devices for the Disabled.
Hartion of Branch resources were allocated for
Ifflnspection of amusement rides in travellffil§|
• .rnivals across the province, as well as for the
l&nanent rides in parks such as the Pacific
itional Exhibition in Vancouver. Throughout the
mmer and early fall, B.C. residents logged more
an 30 million rides on amusement devices, yet
lanumber of acddents was the lowest ever
laorted— a record for Canada. Since 1978,
sre has been a steady decline in the number of
^paccidents in the province. The cooperation
of the ride operators helped to ensure safe
operation.
During 1980, greater control and accuracy of
Branch operations was achieved through
improvements in standards development, training
of staff, fine-tuning of computerized systems,
increased monitoring of registered contractors,
and participation in safety committee activities,
including, for the first time, international
participation through membership on the
Technical Committee of the International
Organization for Standardization.
In addition to the number of regular inspections
listed in Part VI, the Branch made 2,011 special
calls in response to inquiries from the general
public.
The growth in building construction in the province
was reflected in the scope and growth of Branch
activities in 1980, as the number of elevating
devices, and their complexity, increased
accordingly.
The effectiveness of the Branch program to
ensure the safety of all users in the province of
British Columbia of the various elevating devices
within its jurisdiction, is measured not only by
statistics but also by the improvement in
IpSbperation with the various parties interested in
the safe use of elevating devices.
(Table 6 on page 69 provides a summary of
Branch activities during 1980.)
  Part
Manpower Programs
 Introduction
During 1980, Manpower Division, in keeping with
changing labour force and economic needs and
conditions, undertook several major program
initiatives to define and alleviate skill shortages.
Based on advice from the Provincial
Apprenticeship Board (RA.B.), a 13-member group
representing employers and trade unions, the
Minister of Labour introduced a $14 4 million wage
assistance program on September 1, 1980.
This program, administered by both the
Apprenticeship and Employment Opportunities
Branches of the Manpower Division, provides
employers with a maximum wage subsidy of $2.50
an hour for new apprentices in seven industrial
trade skill areas. The intent of the program is to
increase the number of indentured apprentices in
the province and address a fundamental problem
of apprenticeship training — that is, the
unwillingness of many employers to undertake
the expense of training apprentices who are
subsequently hired away by other employers who
do not train their own employees. The
development of recommendations for long-term
policies for apprenticeship and training is now
underway and will be assisted by the dialogue
generated at a conference on apprentice training
organized for early 1981.
During 1980 the Employment Opportunity
Programs Branch continued to place an
increasing emphasis on assisting private sector
employers in providing on-the-job training for
young people. In support of this emphasis, the
Ministry increased the level of funding to private
sector employers to $10.5 million in 1980, creating
over 10,000 training positions for young people. In
addition, private sector employers are eligible for
up to 12 months of funding if the jobs they offer
lead to permanent employment.
In recognition of the need to provide a special
service to women, a Women's Office was
established within the Manpower Division as of
October 1, 1980. This office provides a focal point
for women's employment issues through the
availability of a comprehensive resource file,
information and referral services, and publication
of labour force statistics and special project data.
The mandate of the Women's Office is to improve
working conditions for women and to expand
women's employment opportunities by
broadening their participation across a wider
range of occupations.
The Manpower Division, through the Employmeffl
Opportunity Programs Branch, also administers a
joint program with the Ministry of Human
Resources to provide on-the-job training and vM
experience for persons receiving income
assistance.
1980 also witnessed the development of a mora
rigorous pre-registration and monitoring system o
private trade-schools by the Trade-schools
Branch. The Branch now provides a complete
cum'culum evaluation by Ministry officials or
independent authorities. Teacher qualifications ar
examined and physical plant and course deliveffl
ability determined. Following such evaluations, I
recommendations are made to the Minister of I
Labour concerning registration, re-registration,
requests for changes in tuition fees, and request:
for approval of new courses.
The Ministry views private trade-schools as an 1
important adjunct to both the formal institutional
training system and to the Ministry's training and;
subsidization initiatives.
The immigration and adjustment functions of the
Manpower Division continue to play an importara
role in the policy and program area. 1980 saw a
continuation of the settlement of Vietnamese   j
refugees by Ministry and private settlement
agencies. Discussions with the federal
government regarding immediate and future   j
immigration levels and policies are ongoing. TT»
Manpower Adjustment Services functions
continued to assist employers to find ways to
adjust to changing technologies and market
conditions. A primary objective of the Branch is t
stabilize and reduce unemployment through the
design and implementation of programs that
promote occupational, industrial and geographic!
mobility.
In summary, 1980 was a year in which the
Manpower Division of the Ministry initiated the
development of programs and planning to assure
that all industries in British Columbia share in the
responsibility for training the skilled work forces™
required.
 r
Apprenticeship Training Programs
9 he Apprenticeship Training Programs Branch
HSrks with employers, trade unions and
Bwernment agencies to promote and manage
| pprenticeship training programs throughout the
irovince. The Branch is also responsible for the
■Suance of tradesmen's qualification certificates
ind the administration of interprovincial standards
examinations.
3 he Branch supervises the on-the-job work
Ixperience of apprentices, assigns their in-school^"
: ichnical training, and prepares and conducts
Examinations to certify the competence of
BDprentices and tradesmen. It is also responsible
ir operating extensive pre-apprentice trades
lining for young men and women seeking
■ffihission to apprenticeship programs. The
■Bnch works closely with vocational schools,
.1 jlleges, school boards, the Ministry of Education,
.id the Canada Employment and Immigration
■ffiimissibn in the development of these
■Sgrams. In addition, apprenticeship training
■Smsellors investigate requests for training under
e Canada Manpower Industrial Training Program
Bid the federal Critical Trade Skills Training
Sogram.
> of December 31, the BrancljBlisted 16,401
pprentices on its records, an increase of 2,606
■er the same date last year.
■pprenticeship Training
ie Branch is responsible for the scheduling of
Hiprenticeship technical trainirra!c|§ses in the
Hisignated trades and the apprehticeable trades,
■©se classes are scheduled into the various
llgional colleges throughout the province; each
lliprentice is assigned by the Branch to the
wipropriate technical training class.
lie apprentice technical training^classes are
primarily day-school programs varying from three
£ eight weeks in duration, depending upon the
■§ie. Apprentices normally attend one term of
hiining in each year of their apprenticeship.
Ichnical training for apprentices is conducted at
H; following institutions in the province: Pacific
Kcational Institute, Burnaby Campus and Maple
p1ge Campus; Camosun College, Victoria;
BDaspina College, Nanaimo; Northwest
■fljimunity College, Terrace; Northern Lights
■lege, Dawson Creek; College of New
Siledonia, Prince George; Cariboo College,
Hmloops; Okanagan College, Kelowna; Selkirk'';,,
Hillege, Nelson; East Kootenay College,
nanbrook; Vancouver Vocational Institute,
Hncouver. Training is also conducted in two
<L
private trade schools: B.C. Hydro Training Centre,
Burnaby, for Lineman Training; and Finning Tractor
Training Centre, Vancouver, for Partsman and
Heavy-Duty Mechanic Training.
During 1980 the Branch provided day-school
training for 11,578 apprentices in 843 classes for
48 different trades.
The Branch also arranged evening classes for
trades in which there are insufficient numbers to
support day-school classes. A total of 49 classes
were arranged with 333 apprentices assigned.
Additional training is available to interested
apprentices through upgrading courses offered as
evening programs by various regional colleges. If
a particular upgrading program is determined to
be of value for an apprentice, the Branch assigns
the apprentice and pays for this training. In 1980
the Branch reimbursed 668 apprentices who
attended 176 different upgrading courses.
Pre-apprenticeship Training
Pre-apprenticeship training is offered by the
Apprenticeship Training Programs Branch in 25
different trades. This training is designed to
provide the opportunity for selected individuals to
determine their suitability and enhance their
employability for a particular trade. Basic training
in the trade is presented to prepare the individual
for entry into the skilled labour force as an
apprentice.
The courses offered vary in duration from four to
six months, and are made available at various
times during the year. The Branch pays all tuition
posts for the students selected for enrolment in
pre-apprentice classes, and provides training and
travel allowances. The Canada Employment and
Immigration Commission also participates in the
funding and assigning of students to the pre-
apprenticeship courses.
In 1980 the Branch provided training for 1,980 pre-
apprentices in 125 classes. These classes were
conducted in 11 regional colleges in the province.
Several extra classes were presented to
accommodate an anticipated need for additional
graduates.
Pre-apprenticeship trades training continued in
several secondary schools during the year. These
programs are monitored jointly by the Ministry of
Labour and the Ministry of Education. Successful
graduates of these programs are provided with a
Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate, together with their
Secondary School Graduation Certificate.
 Trade Advisory Committee
Trade Advisory Committees representing the
respective trades are established by the
Provincial Apprenticeship Board to provide advice
and recommendations, through the Director of the
Apprenticeship Training Programs Branch, to the
Board on such matters as:
• the need for occupational and manpower
research;
• development of curricula for the training of
apprentices and journeymen; and
• qualification and examination for certification.
A total of 94 meetings involving the 58 established
Trade Advisory Committees were held in 1980. Of
those meetings, four were held at locations
outside the lower mainland.
An item of significance in 1980 was the holding of
Provincial Apprenticeship Board public hearings to
receive submissions concerning the Electrical
Trades Advisory Committee's request that the two
major electrical trades be combined into one
category of "Electrician", the requirement for
which would be compulsory tradesmen's
qualification certification. Another item of
importance involved the approval of a new
technical training program for the Heavy-Duty
Mechanic Repair Trade developed by the Trade
Advisory Committee and due to commence in
January, 1981.
Program Development Section
The Program Development Section of the Branch
again worked closely with industry through the
Trade Advisory Committees in the review,
development and revision of program curricula
and information material pertaining to skilled
trades. The material produced included skill
analysis profiles, course outlines, study guides,
work record books, wall charts, slotting
examinations, tradesmen's qualification
examinations, interprovincial standards
examinations, trade manuals and information
brochures dealing with all areas for which the
Branch is responsible.
National occupational analyses are prepared and
published by the federal government with the
cooperation of the provinces and territories.
These documents provide a "road map" for
developing national standards in key trade areas
to permit mobility and acceptability of workers
throughout Canada. In 1980, the Branch was
involved in the validation of three national
analyses, and in the development of six
interprovincial standards examinations.
For provincial programs, work was completed or
continued on 23 course outlines, eight
tradesmen's qualification examinations and three
manuals. Study guides and wall charts were
developed in conjunction with the course outline!
to provide trainees and employers with informal!
on forthcoming technical training.
A new Millwright Manual was printed and
scheduled for sale in 1981. Advance orders fori
this publication were in excess of 2,000 copies.
is anticipated that sales of the Manual will exca
4,000 copies during 1981. In cooperation with th
Ministry of Education and the federal governmetj
a manual of instruction for the first year of the
heavy-duty mechanic program was prepared, Tf
manual, in conjunction with on-the-job training, j
provide an alternative to the first period of
institutional technical training. Apprentices and
employers can negotiate with the Branch to
conduct in-service technical training, upon
completion of which the apprentices may try trfl
first-year examination, and, if successful, progra
to the second year.
Federal-Provincial Cooperation
Under the Adult Occupational Training Act, the!
federal government provides funding for
designated training programs.
Procedures have also been developed wherebg
under the aegis of the Interprovincial Standards
Coordinating Committee, directors of
apprenticeship and coordinators of examinations
from the provinces and territories meet with the!
Canada Employment and Immigration Commissi)
to discuss interprovincial examinations, analyses
course outlines, evaluation methods, and other
topics related to apprenticeship training and
journeymen upgrading programs.
With the participation of the Commission, Britisa
Columbia continued to enroll apprentices from tl
Yukon and Northwest Territories in its technical
training programs. Funding for the programs wa
provided by the Commission.
Industrial Training
The Ministry of Labour and the Canada
Employment and Immigration Commission jointlfl
administer the Canada Manpower and industrial
Training Program. Staff of the Branch investigate]
report upon, and recommend or reject industriajl
training contracts directly related to skill trainingl
and apprenticeship.
During 1980 the Branch collaborated with
Commission officials to process approximate!™!
7,916 contracts, 2,317 of which were in
apprenticeable areas.
This program has been instrumental in providing!
job opportunities for many individuals who migml
not otherwise have obtained employment. It alsal
contributes financial assistance to employers I
during the period of initial instruction, when thai
productivity of new trainees is characteristically I
low.
 I
 pecial Projects
June 1, 1980, the Minister announced a $14.4
[Iron Critical Skills Trade Shortages Program
signed to increase the enrollment of
erentices by providing wage assistance to
lployers. The program was initiated on
ptember 1, 1980.
ider its provisions, employers are paid a wage
fentive of up to a maximum of $2.50 an hour for
00 new apprentices in the seven industrial
Ses most seriously affected by shortages of
md manpower— namely, millwright, machinist,
ffistrial instrumentation, industrial electrician,
avy-duty mechanic, diesel engine repair and
Btronics.
3 wage incentive program was intended to
fcome the reluctance of some employers to
and train apprentices because of the initial
fjense of training and the possibility of losing
in to other employers at the end of the
Senticeship period. Between September 1 and
Icember 31, more than 900 additional
lorentices had been indentured or committed to
llnture under the program.
lother reason for the reluctance of employers to
I; apprentices— the lack of an equitable
lection procedure—was determined in a joint
Idy by the Interior Forest Labour Relations
Siociation and the International Woodworkers of
Erica. Adoption of such a procedure would
le management reasonable assurance that a
Ispective apprentice possessed academic skills
adequate to cope with the tecnnical training
requirements of apprenticeship, and, upon
completion of training, to become a proficient
tradesman, while at the same time fulfilling the
union's seniority requirement.
The Branch was invited to participate with the
Association and the I.W.A. in devising a solution.
Their combined efforts resulted in the
development of a series of self-evaluation
examinations and formal entrance-standard
evaluations for use by the interior forest industry.
These materials were designed to identify a
candidate's potential for handling the required
technical training. Being acceptable to both
labour and management, they have since become
part of the industry's regular selection process for
apprentices. This agreement led to an increase in
the number of apprenticeship positions. Between
June 1 and the end of December, 44 new
apprentices were hired under the revised
procedure.
Journeyman Upgrading
In addition to participating in and promoting the
Canada Manpower Industrial Training Program, the
Branch worked in conjunction with employers,
unions, and joint training committees to arrange
and finance upgrading courses for journeymen.
During 1980 the Branch sponsored more than 100
courses in a wide variety of trade-related subjects.
(Tables 7 and 8 on page 70 provide a summary of
Branch activities during 1980.)
Employment Opportunity Programs
li Employment Opportunity Programs Branch is
Iponsible for the administration of provincial job
i^gion and on-the-job training programs under
authority of the Apprenticeship Act (RSBC
!9). In addition, the Branch is responsible for
HvVomen's Office. In 1980, the Branch funded
B 16,000 jobs across British Columbia at a total
It of almost $25 million.
Hprovincial Youth Employment Program
^^nistered by this Branch provides employment
Mpaining opportunities to youth throughout the
Knee. The objectives of the drogram are to
Biote the development of job-related skills that
sst young people in entering the labour force,
■promote employment that contributes to the
sal and economic development of British
Kribia.
Be 1976, the Program has placed increasing
nhasis on assisting private-sector employers in
■jKling on-the-job training for young people. In
Beort of this emphasis, the Program increased
1 	
the levefof funding to private sector employers to
$10.5 million in 1980, creating over 10,000 training
positions for young people. In addition, following
an initiative first introduced in 1979, private sector
employers have become eligible for up to 12
months of funding if the jobs they offer lead to
permanent employment. In 1980, approximately
500 employers participated in this aspect of the
Program. A follow-up study of youth employed
under this initiative in 1979 revealed that over 40
per cent were still with their employer
approximately nine months after funding was
terminated. An additional 40 per cent had
obtained other employment or returned to school.
In September 1980, the Branch, in cooperation
with the Apprenticeship Training Programs
Branch, implemented the Critical Skills Shortage
Program. This major initiative resulted from the
Critical Skills Survey conducted by the Planning
and Policy Development Branch of the Ministry,
which identified a critical shortage of over 1,400
 apprentices in seven trade areas. The Program
has committed $14.4 million over a two-year
period, and offers employers a wage subsidy of
up to $2.50 an hour during the first two years of
the apprenticeship period. By December 1980,
nearly 500 new apprentices had been processed
under this initiative.
In October 1980 the Women's Office was
established to serve the needs of women in the
B.C. labour force. The Office provides a wide
range of data, information and referral services.
The role of the Women's Office is to improve
working conditions for women and to expand their
employment opportunities across a wider range of
occupations.
The Branch also administers a joint program with
the Ministry of Human Resources for the creation
of on-the-job training and work experience
opportunities for persons receiving income
assistance. Through this endeavour, 955 income
assistance recipients were provided with training
in the private sector at a cost of $1.2 million. The
primary objective of this activity is to provide
these persons with skills, self-confidence and
work habits that will assist them in gaining
permanent independent employment.
In 1980, non-profit organizations created 895
summer job opportunities for young people under
the Provincial Youth Employment Program at a
cost of $1.8 million. Local government provided
1,770 jobs under the Program, at a cost of $2.4
million. Universities, colleges and institutes
created 1,250 jobs at a cost of $3.1 million.
In recognition of the key importance of tourism to
the economy of British Columbia, over $500,000
was used in 1980 to fund 162 positions at 81
tourist information centres, and 84 positions at 56
museums throughout the province.
Through the Work-in-Government component of
the Provincial Youth Employment Program, the
Branch provided $5,041,000 to provincial
ministries to assist in the hiring and training of
1,515 students and young persons. These
positions enhanced the services of the ministries
and provided the students and youth with
valuable work experience and job skills.
Another program offered under the Provincial
Youth Employment Program in 1980 provided
$185,000 to provincial ministries to offer four-
months work experience to 41 graduate students
enrolled in the University of Victoria Cooperative
Education Programs. These work experiences
were directly related to the students' courses of
study, and were designed to enhance their
prospects of obtaining permanent employment
after graduation.
In conjunction with the Public Service
Commission, the Branch provided funding through
the Personal Placement Program in the amount of
$283,000 to assist provincial ministries in hiring
48
and training handicapped and disadvantaged d
persons. As a result of this assistance, 70
individuals were placed in employment
opportunities.
In cooperation with the Province of Quebec, thl
Branch operated a student exchange employml
program. Twenty-eight university students from
British Columbia worked in the Quebec PubliqB
Sen/ice during the summer months, and 25
Quebec university students were employed in tl"
British Columbia Public Service during the sarrH
period. At a cost of $92,800, the program was
successful in introducing these students to the!
culture and language of the host provinces, as
well as providing them with valuable training anc
work experience.
The Branch operates 16 offices throughout thS
Province to provide year-round assistance to i
employers. Reld staff receive specialized trainin;
to enable them to provide a consultative serviffl
to employers in the development of on-the-jobl
training programs.
 q
Manpower Advisory Services
m Manpower Advisory Services Branch of the
Mstry was established in 1977 and is composed
Kwo units of responsibility, Manpower
Icljustment Services, and Immigration Seivices*||
«3 former deals with labour market and
Biomic problems arising out of expansions or
witractions of the work force of a firm, an
Bistry or a geographic area of the province. The
■Mer is responsible for all matters related to
BBigration and refugee settlement.
Manpower Adjustment Services
he main activities of Manpower Adjustment
BS/ices during 1980 were foo^ped on the
[solution of specific manpower problems
pjisulting from:
t) technological change
Iffimarket contractions cafjsed by seasonal,
IByclical or structural factors
■) permanent closuraj^
) partial layoffs, and
) industrial expansion.
ie services of Manpower Adjustment are
i'ailable to workers, employers, industries, and
Bgcific regions of the province, to assist in:
;) stabilizing the labour force
b) planning for manpower expansions and
■■contractions
Mcontributing to economic development and
b employment in the various regions of the
province'
II) increasing productivity levels
Hffnaintaining or increasing personal income
analyzing the strengths and weakness of
■Potentially endangered industries, and
developing appropriate adjustment programs,
and
Bjninimizing potential structural problems of
lunarginal firms to improve tfieir
BpSompetitiven^^ffl
[liring 1980, the Ministry of Labour was a
«|natory to 103 Manpower Incentive Agreements.
Inese agreements are intended to treat a variety
[adjustment problems a^Siated with:
Irolant closures—temporary and permanent
(technological change
■Slant expansion and contraction
■(employee turnover and attrition
m mobility programs
kwork-sharing agreements
U Native Indian programs
■gommunity-related services
;<7ianpower planning
■Evestment and joKSMJIati&n incentives
(k) training and upgrading
J(l|income maintenance, and
(m) research and analysis.
A primary objective of the adjustment process is
to stabilize or reduce unemployment through the
design and implementation of programs that
promote occupational, inter-industry and
geographic mobility of labour. In view of this, a
stronger emphasis was placed on training and
retraining workers in the forestry and
manufacturing industries to improve their ability
and employability.
Additionally, the program is attempting to promote
the principle of maintenance of employment as an
objective, not only of government, but also of
employers and employees. The Employment
Standards Act, introduced by the Minister in 1980,
requires employers to provide employees with
advance notice of layoffs. This requirement
should ensure that provincial and federal training,
mobility and placement programs are fully
applied, thereby mitigating the adverse effects of
layoffs and dismissals on the economy of British
Columbia.
Immigration Services
The Branch's Immigration Services is the point of
contact with Canada Employment and
Immigration Commission officials in routine
immigration matters requiring consultation with the
provincial government. These include the
admissibility of persons requiring medical
treatment, the transfer of foreign students from
one British Columbia institution to another, and the
impact of immigration on job opportunities for
residents of the province.
Immigration Services also provides information
and advice to the Minister, who is responsible for
immigration matters in the province, and to other
provincial ministries and Crown Corporations on
immigration matters that affect them.
The late 1970s saw the exodus of hundreds of
thousands of Vietnamese, Laotians and
Kampucheans from their homelands.
Subsequently, British Columbia and other
provinces responded to the emergency by
cooperating with the federal government to
resettle in Canada, during 1979 and 1980, a total
of 60,000 Indochinese refugees, some 7,000 of
whom took up residence in British Columbia. To
facilitate their resettlement, the Legislature
unanimously passed the Refugee Settlement Act
in July of 1979. Under this Act, the Ministry of
Labour provides grants province-wide to nonprofit settlement agencies that offer such services
 as orientation programs, interpretation and escort,
counselling, translation of documents, and help in
finding employment and accommodation.
Agencies that received grants for all or part of
1980 were as follows:
• B.C. Association of Social Workers
• City of Vancouver
• Immigrant Services Society of B.C.
- Immigrant Services Centre Branch (Vancouver)
- Prince George Branch
- Seymour Street Branch (Vancouver)
• Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria
• Jewish Family Service Agency (Vancouver)
• Kamloops Chinese Cultural Association
• Knox Presbyterian Church Refugee Committee
(Cranbrook)
• Matsqui Abbotsford Community Services
• M.O.S.A.I.C. (Vancouver)
• Multicultural Society of Kelowna
• Nanaimo Refugee Coordination Society
•S.U.C.C.E.S.S. (Vancouver)
• Surrey Delta Immigrant Services Society
• Vernon Social Planning Council.
Immigration Services has also worked closely
other ministries in establishing a health care
package for refugees during their first year in
province and a program for the settlement of
number of unaccompanied refugee children.
Immigration Services continues to provide
information and advice to private sponsors of
refugees.
1
witil
the
a
Trade-schools Regulation
Trade-schools Regulation Branch is responsible for
the supervision of private trade-schools. Such
supervision includes approval of: premises and
equipment; health, sanitary and safety conditions;
hours of operation; course content; fees; form of
contract; teacher qualifications; performance
bond; cancellation provisions, advertising copy;
and any other procedures that serve to protect
the public and prevent unscrupulous practices.
The issuing of a Certificate of Registration
authorizes an institution to operate a trade-school,
and provides the public with the assurance that
Ministry standards have been met.
During 1980, the pre-registration process for
private trade-schools has become rigorous and
exacting, with the complete curriculum being
evaluated by the Ministry of Labour and
independent authorities. Teacher qualifications
have been defined and physical plant and course
delivery ability have been determined. Following
such evaluations, recommendations were made to
the Minister of Labour concerning registration, re-
registration, requests for changes in tuition fees,
and requests for approval of new courses. As in
previous years, a Branch representative attended
school graduation ceremonies.
As of December 31, 1980, 165 schools offering
correspondence and practical courses, or
combined correspondence and practical training,
were registered under the Apprenticeship Act.
One hundred and thirty-seven schools were reregistered from 1979, and the 34 new schools
evaluated were recommended to the Minister, and
approved for Certificates of Registration duringm
year. Six schools discontinued operation. These
figures represent a net growth rate in the numbs
of trade-schools of 20.43 per cent. Based on yM\
end statistics provided by the schools, the
student population exceeded 24,000.
In addition to the inspections conducted in each
school at least twice a year, special visits were
made to resolve specific problems and
complaints. Students who had prepaid tuition fjm
and subsequently decided to discontinue trairffl
were granted refunds.
The Third Interprovincial Conference of PrivateB
and Vocational and Trade Schools Act
Administrators was held in Vancouver on
September 18 and 19, 1980. The first such
meeting was held in Toronto in 1975, the second
in Banff in 1977. The purpose of these meetings i
to develop comprehensive legislation that will be
applicable in all provincial jurisdictions. Such
legislation would be of considerable benefit to th
trade-schools administration in each province, ar*
a boon to residential and correspondence schS
planning to offer their courses in more than orH|
province.
During the year, the Branch published a Private
Trade-Schools Directory. It provides ready
reference to all of the private trade-schools
registered in the province, and to particular
courses of instruction, and includes the
regulations governing these schools. The directoi
has been widely circulated and has drawn
favourable comments from many users.
 Provincial Apprenticeship Board
i 'he Provincial Apprenticeship Board, established
mder the Apprenticeship Act, came into being on
anuary 1, 1980. Its 13 members were appointed
ly the Minister. The Board held its inaugural
ISeting on January 21, 1980 and embarked on a
IBIrse of action that produced significant
Iwances in a number of areas during the year.
arly in 1980 the Board initiated discissions
etween the Ministries of Labour and Education,
imed at resolving jurisdictional difficoties arising
[ ut of the fact that the Ministry of Labour is
IBonsible for administration of the
IBrenticeship program and on-the-job training,
E nd the Ministry of Education is responsible for
IP institutional segment of the training.
»he outcome of these discussions was the joint
Iffiiorsement, by the Ministers of Labour and
ducation, of a document that clearly establishes
111 functional relationships between the two
Iflnistries. Expectations are that this clarification
Id stimulate closer cooperation and greater
Ifflciency in the promotion of apprenticeship
aining.
ie Board also took steps to improve liaison with
■^Education Ministry's Occupational Training
uouncil, in order to prevent duplication of effort
id activities. Consequently, the PAB chairman
iw attends OTC meetings, and the OTC
l&rman attends PAB meetings. One of the first
leations of the two bodies was a joint committee
Hstudy pre-employment and pre-apprenticeship
aining.
Ii/age Assistance Program
Bffi Critical Skills Survey conducted in 1980 by the
■ffistry of Labour for the Occupational Training
■Sincil revealed a shortage of at least 1,400
Hsrsons in the seven skilled trade areas surveyed.
King on the Board's recommendations for
Haling with this situation, the Minister introduced
■|hort-term wage assistance program presiding
[14.4 million to assist employers by paying a
Hirtion of the wages of apprentices during their
list two years of indentureship. The program
rsnt into effect in September 1980; by the end of
ti year, more than 500 additional apprentices
lid been indentured or committed to indenture.
tt other project undertaken by the Board was the
llnvassing of a wide cross section of Britisrnlp
■limbia's employers, representatives of
lljanized labour, educators and government
.(icials for ideas, suggestions and support for
HJB-term government policies that would be
;(signed to promote and expand apprenticeship
'L
training in B.C. Among the questions the Board
will examine, prior to drafting policy
recommendations, are the following:
—What must be done to ensure that
apprenticeship training can produce the number
of journeymen required by industry durinq the
'80s?
—Can a plan be developed that will be self-
financing?
—How can the participation of women in the
apprenticeship program be expanded?
—How can programs for the upgrading of
journeymen be enriched?
—What must be done to provide greater access
to apprenticeship for Native Indians, the
handicapped and the socially disadvantaged?
Plans for a Board-sponsored apprenticeship forum
were put in place late in the year, and the event
was scheduled for early 1981.
Trade Advisory Committees
The Trade Advisory Committees are joint
employer-union committees, established to
identify problems associated with apprenticeship
training for the various trades, and to propose
solutions and improvements.
Under a new procedure established by the Board,
requests and proposals put forward by the Trade
Advisory Committees are now dealt with promptly.
The process is normally time-consuming, because
the Board must assess the impact that one
trade's recommendations may have on the overall
apprenticeship system before action can be
taken. To assist matters, the Apprenticeship
Training Programs Branch now reports monthly to
the Board on the activities of the various
committees.
Pre-Entry Training
The question of where pre-employment and pre-
apprenticeship training fit into the skills training
system has been a matter of concern for some
time. The problem was examined at length by the
Melville^Kirchner Task Force, appointed in 1979 by
the Ministries of Labour and Education, but it
remains unresolved. PAB has initiated a joint
review by the two ministries, and expects that a
report will be issued sometime in 1981.
Other activities of the Board during 1980 included
a meeting with the chairman of the federal
Parliamentary Task Force on "Employment
Opportunities in the "80s", and another with a
visiting delegation from Australia.
  Part IV:
i\4ta&&teitil
Industrial Relations and
Occupational Safety Programs
 Introduction
The Industrial Relations and Occupational Safety
Division of the Ministry provides the services
required to promote harmonious and productive
labour-management relations throughout the
province.
With respect to industrial relations generally, and
collective bargaining specifically, 1980 proved to
be one of the most successful in the Ministry's
history. Preliminary statistics show that there were
127 work stoppages involving 39,223 workers with
482,055 worker-days lost. Compared to 1979,
there were decreases in the number of workers
involved, the number of work stoppages, and the
total number of days lost. The average number of
workers involved in disputes fell for the fourth
consecutive year— an average of 309 workers
directly involved, compared with 872 in 1976. In
part, this reflects the excellent record of the
Mediation Services Branch which, in 1980, was
involved in 403 disputes, and which resolved 84
per cent of the cases that came before it.
1980 was also an eventful year for the Labour
Standards Branch. On July 9, 1980 the Minister
introduced to the Legislature the Employment
Standards Act (Bill 36), which is to come into
effect early in 1981. The Act introduced new
benefits, such as increased vacation entitlement,
improved maternity provisions, and a requirement
for notice of termination of employment ranging
from two to eight weeks, depending on length of
service with an employer.
The workers and employers Compensation
Advisory Services were required to contend with
heavy work schedules in connection with their
function of giving assistance, advice and
information with respect to claims and appeals
under the Workers' Compensation Act. Increasing
emphasis was put on holding educational
seminars for employer and trade-union groups ar^
associations, to assist them in discharging thefflf
respective obligations in the claims process.   I
The Occupational Environment Branch, which H
responsible for the application and enforcement
of the Factory Act and the Occupational
Environment Regulations, was successful in
increasing the range of its activities in 1980. An '
per cent increase was recorded in the number o
inspections of factories, offices and shops, and
educational activities were highlighted by its
"Light an Aid to Sight" workshops.
Officials of the Ministry continued to monitor 1
developments in the labour relations
infrastructure, and to make recommendations foi
improvements in the services provided by the
Ministry.
During 1980, the Ministry provided speakers and
panelists for trade unions, employers
organizations and educational establishments.
Officers of the Ministry met for formal and inform
exchanges with labour officials from other
jurisdictions. Representatives of the Ministry
attended the International Labour Organization
Conference, the Annual Meeting of the Canada
Association of Administrators of Labour
Legislation, and the Annual Conference of the
Association of Labour Relations Agencies. In I
connection with the last-named organization, 1
which is comprised of ministries, labour relations
boards, state agencies and mediation servic^B
throughout Canada and the United States, the
Ministry played host to its 1980 Convention in
Vancouver, which was attended by delegates
from all over North America.
 Labour Standards
I abour Standards Branch is responsible for
IBrninistration of a multiplier^ of labour-related
i tatutes, orders and regulations, including the
[ 'ayment of Wages Act, Minimum Wage Act,
: 'mployment Agencies Act, Control of
YQployment of Children Act, and Annual and
Ignera/ Holidays Act
IB July 9, 1980, the Employment Standards Act
3HI36), was introduced to the Legislature by the
Iffiister. Second reading took place on August 19,
nd third reading, followed by Royal Assent,
It&urred on August 22.
Imen proclaimed, this legislation will consolidate
Igtain aspectsjof existing legislation, and provide
=w and important benefits to the labour force of
Iffish Columbia. These benefitsffiwll increase
Igation entitlements, improve maternity benefits,
id require an increase in notice of termination of
IRloyment ranging from two weeks after six
IBnths of employment, to eight weeks after eight
ISrs of employment. In addition, other
txupatiohs not previously covered, such as
KRestic and farm workers, will enjoy the same
snefits and protection.
Ijpether with these improvements, former wage
ders were repealed and replaced by regulations
Ipng the minimum rate of pay from $2.60 to $3
i hour for persons 17 years of age and under,
lid from $3 to $3.65 an hour for persons 18 years
I age and over.
■King 1980, Branch officers made a total of
BJ210 calls in connection with the enforcement of
libour Standards legislation. Adjustments
tailing $1,837,683.03 were made on behalf of
901 employees by 2,936 employers. The majority
b wage arrears came about as a result of the
nployers financial instability,
■ffirther erosion of the rights of wage earners
BSirred when the Supreme Court of Canada
liad that claims of the Crown take priority in
■|ers of distribution under the federal
unkruptcy Act. It is anticipated, however, that the
Iff Employment Standards legislation to be
|plaimed in 1981 will restore the situation for
llge earners.
|jfneet the challenge of the expanded mandate
liposed by the new legislation, the Branch
[mtuted an intensive public awareness and staff
Iffcation program. One half of the program
TffiHSted of seminars aimed at informing
siployer and employee groups and other
llfested parties about the new Act. The other
Iff featured in-house staff training seminars
lEjned to equip Labour Standards personnel
Ih the background necessary to cope with the
upsurge of public inquiries expected after
proclamation of the new Employment Standards
Act.
In addition to staff training seminars, the Branch
has undertaken studies to determine the impact
of its expanded legislative mandate. In
conjunction with these studies, the Branch is
drawing on the experience of other provinces with
similar legislation— specifically Ontario and
Alberta. Attempts have also been made to ensure
that the distribution of industrial relations officers
assists the Branch in meeting the growing needs
of the public. Of significance in this regard is the
opening of a new office at Courtenay, and the
stationing of additional industrial relations officers
at Dawson Creek and Terrace.
The Branch continued to obtain voluntary
compliance with the legislation during 1980. This
compliance is obtained primarily through
education and moral suasion. Only after these
approaches have failed does the Branch resort to
litigation. During the year the Board of Industrial
Relations issued 764 certificates, an action
followed by issuance of 442 demand notices that
were served on various institutions and third
parties indebted to the employers named on the
certificates. Other action that followed from the
issuance of certificates was the issuance of writs
of seizure and sale, and certificates of judgment.
Although the Branch was primarily occupied with
wage recovery, which represents approximately 70
per cent of its functions, it continued to discharge
its other responsibilities. For example, the Branch
is required to register employment agencies
throughout the province. This procedure
necessitates having an officer of the Branch meet
with and counsel the applicant agency to ensure
compliance with the provisions of the Act.
Following investigation, 126 registrations were
issued to agencies throughout British Columbia.
Another area of activity is the issuing of permits
under the Control of Employment of Children Act.
Following inflstigation to ensure that the health
and welfare of the children concerned would not
be adversely affected by employment, 241
permits were issued.
The Branch is also deeply involved in assignments
on behalf of the Labour Relations Board of British
Columbia. These assignments dealt with such
|fl|i|es as applications for certification, unfair
labour practices, Section 96 (1) applications,
Section 34 applications, wildcat strikes and
lockouts.
pgMsWal information providing details on Branch
activities is contained in Tables 9, 10, and 11 on
pages 73 and 75)
 Mediation Services
Settling labour-management disputes within the
province is the prime objective of the Mediation
Services Branch. To this end, the Branch provides
assistance to both management and trade unions
during negotiations for an initial collective
agreement or for the renewal of an existing
agreement.
During 1980, officers of the Branch were involved
in a total of 403 disputes: 271 occurred in 1980,
eight involved no official appointments, and the
remaining 124 were carried over from 1979. In
addition, the officers were involved on a
continuing basis in 18 disputes, subsequent to the
report of the officer. Of the 253 cases completed
during 1980, mediation officers assisted in the
successful settlement of 211 of them, or
approximately 84 per cent of the total.
The assistance of a mediator is available, on an
unofficial or informal basis, if a labour-
management dispute has resulted in a strike or
lockout. Mediation assistance is also provided to
government employees in labour disputes coming
under the Public Service Labour Relations Act,
and to teachers under the Public Schools Act.
Trade unions and employers, either separately or
jointly, may apply to the Branch for the assistance
of a mediator by making application, under the
Labour Code of British Columbia, to the Director,
Mediation Services Branch, Deer Lake Centre,
Suite 320, 4946 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C. V5G
4J6.
When the parties fail to reach agreement, the
mediation officer prepares a report on the dispute
for the Minister. Upon receipt of copies of that
report from the Minister, the parties to the dispute
are free to initiate strike or lockout action, but the
mediation officer remains available to assist the
parties in concluding a collective agreement. His
report to the Minister simply indicates the staB
of negotiations between the parties at that fjrjH
does not relieve him from further participatiorW
The function of the Branch has been broadenec
to include the role of "preventive mediation". Th
is based on the conviction that establishing and
maintaining a sound relationship between union
and management is of paramount importances
their mutual well-being. The adversary systemra
collective bargaining does not preclude the
parties working together during the term of a
collective agreement on the many problems of ti
workplace that cannot be effectively dealt witm
a win-lose atmosphere.
The Branch retains copies of collective
agreements and certifications, and these are I
available for scrutiny by trade unions and
employers, on request. Throughout 1980, the  i
Branch maintained contact with a variety of
conciliation and mediation services in Canada ai
the United States for the purpose of exchange
information on matters of administration,
legislation, trends, and problems of mutual
interest and concern. Upon request the Branchl
provides speakers, panelists and moderators™
educational institutions and employer-trade unioi
organizations. Numerous inquiries were receivH
from many parts of the province and from otrS
centres in Canada concerning legislation affectii
collective bargaining.
In 1980 the Ministry played host to the annua]
convention of the Association of Labour RelatiS
Agencies. The Branch was responsible for all
arrangements, and the convention attracted ■
delegates from many parts of the United Staffl
and Canada.
(Table 12 on page 75 provides a summary of I
Branch activities during 1980.)
 i     Compensation Advisory Services
WCompensation Advisory Services Branch of
ie Ministry consists of two entities — a Workers
llfflsor and an Employers Advisor — both
Igablished under provisions of Section 93 of the
IRers' Compensation Act. One provides
liters and their dependents with advice,
Instance and information concerning claims
ade under the Act, the other provides a similar
lEice to employers.
/orkers Advisors
lie Workers Advisor and a staff of four additional
Iffisors communicate with or appear before
bards of review and commissioners of the
orkers' Compensation Board on behalf of
Ijtsons who have entered compensation claims
laer the terms of the Act. Generally, however,
l^onal representation by an advisor is limited to
lams that are of such complexity or significance
[ at assistance is required.
|b advisors also provide counsel concerning
■Bistration and interpretation of the Act as it
^cts regulations and policy.
Iffiough they are independent of the Workers'
^Bpensation Board, the advisors do not make
ISisions or policy with respect to matters under
e Act. Their function is primarily an advisory and
Ideational one, limited to providing useful
ormation to workers and worker representatives.
iring 1980, the Branch participated in or
l^sored 38 seminars for various labour union,
pal and para-legal organizations. The Branch
iio dealt with 1,274 claims for workers and
leeived over 20,500 telephone inquiries.
rang the year, the Branch published a brochure
iffming workers and worker representatives
^ffit the services available. In the near future, it
feso be producing a comprehensive reference
and training manual dealing with matters related
to legislation, policy, procedures, and the appeal
system within Workers' Compensation. The
contents of the manual will include information
brochures on specific aspects of Workers'
Compensation, a series of case studies, and a
bibliography of compensation literature.
Employers Advisors
The two Employers Advisors on the staff of
Compensation Advisory Services prepare written
submissions on appeals to the boards of review,
commissioners of the Workers' Compensation
Board, and independent medical review panels.
Personal representation before appeal tribunals is
provided to employers seeking assistance on
claims of such complexity or significance that
assistance is required.
Branch advisors are independent of the Workers'
Compensation Board, and, as in the case of
employees advisors, do not make decisions or
policy concerning matters under the Act. They do,
however, have access to the Workers'
Compensation Board claims files. At the request
of employers, these files are reviewed in depth
and evaluated with respect to. adjudication and
claims management. Employers are advised and
directed accordingly. They are encouraged to
appeal improper claims, and discouraged from
appealing claims that have merit and are properly
managed.
By way of providing an educational service, staff
members participate in seminars at which
employee and employer organizations are shown
how to handle claims they believe to be improper
and deserving of protest or appeal. During 1980
Employers Advisors pursued and processed 626
such cases.
 Occupational Environment
3
The role of the Occupational Environment Branch
is to ensure that employees in factories, stores
and offices in British Columbia enjoy the benefits
of acceptable working conditions, and to assist
employers in determining the most suitable
method of providing a good working environment.
To fulfill this role, the Branch is given responsibility
for the application and enforcement of the Factory
Act and of the Occupational Environment
Regulations that establish minimum standards and
requirements for a healthy, safe and comfortable
working environment. The primary objective of this
program is the promotion of improved labour-
management relations in the province.
Field Inspections
Physical inspections of existing workplaces
conducted by Branch inspectors ensure that
acceptable working conditions are being
maintained in existing industrial establishments.
Inspectors examine, test, and assess the
adequacy of lighting, heating, ventilation and
make-up air systems to ensure compliance with
the legislation. Building maintenance related to
sanitation, interior finishes, and housekeeping,
together with employee amenities for personal
hygiene and comfort, such as washrooms,
lunchrooms, shower facilities, clothing lockers and
seating provisions, are priority items. The number
of individual visits to work places totalled 12,614
during the year, and 5,102 separate items were
brought to the attention of employers for
improvement. This represents an 11 per cent
increase in inspections, and an 8 per cent
reduction in directives issued, due in part to a
greater awareness and voluntary compliance with
the legislation by employers. Contributing to the
increased inspection activities is a 33 per cent
growth in the number of employee complaints
investigated, which reflects growing employee
awareness of working conditions.
Whenever possible, employee representatives
participate in the inspections in an effort to
develop cooperative solutions to problems in the
working environment, and to enhance labour-
management relations. Efforts to achieve
voluntary compliance with directives issued as a
result of inspections conducted during 1980 were
satisfactory, and no legal action was required.
During 1980 considerable emphasis was placed
on inspections of the forest products industry. In
spite of a significant staff turnover in the Branch,
inspections of virtually all the sawmill and plywood
plants were conducted. The majority of these
plants have subsequently made substantial
progress toward meeting the requirements
detailed in the directives issued. Consequent™!
there was a significant improvement in the
working environment of employees in this indus:
Plan Approvals
A review by Branch inspectors of architectural
and engineering plans and specifications forffl
factories, or for additions and alterations to
existing industrial buildings, ensures that all
requirements of the Act and Regulations will fflj
met prior to the start of construction. This is a fn
service offered by the Branch in order to avogj
costly changes following construction. A totaH
653 separate projects were reviewed and
approved during 1980. This is a 15 per centB
reduction from the previous year, the result of a
slowdown in construction of commercial and
industrial projects in the province over the last
few years.
Education
In addition to inspection and plan approval   I
activities, the Branch continued to provide   ,
educational services aimed at explaining the
requirements of the Act and Regulations will be
promote voluntary compliance, and at providffl
basic instruction in designing and maintaining
building environmental systems.
Throughout the year, the Branch presented its
lighting workshop, "Light an Aid to Sight," and
provided representatives to speak at various^
seminars and conferences, such as the B.C.
Safety Council, the I.W.A. Safety Seminar, and t
Provincial Safety Officers Conference.
The "Light an Aid to Sight" workshops contOT
to be a success. Presentations were made to
electrical apprentices at the Pacific Vocations
Institute, and to representatives of the foresM
products industry, government, and lighting  j
designers. The Department of Continuing
Education at B.C.IT. has requested a seriesjM
presentations for inclusion in the program of th<
new Downtown Education Center in Vancou^
Consultation
Throughout the year, the Branch continued to
provide consultative services to employers,i|
architects, consulting engineers and contracW
concerning the design and performance
standards for building environmental systemM
employee amenities. The purpose of this ser®
to assist employers and building owners in
providing acceptable working conditions.
 Instance provided by the Branch in the
IBlopment of mercury-handling procedures at
IBrancouver General Hospital, and in the
IHjIishment of design standards for the
IBSgency Health Services Commission's
Iffipulance attendants stations are significant
llamples.
IHfollowing table provides a statistical summary
the Occupational Environment Branch's
itivities for 1980:
K Site
Inspections
Plans
Directives
Consultations
;tories
•ices
lops
[als
7,001
5,080
533
12,614
550
69
34
653
3,668
1,813
86
5,102
854
201
8
1,063
I-cent
range
IT, 1979
11.0
-15.0
-8.0
-5.5
[ojects
'part of its summer employment program, the
l.nch employed a graduate student from Simon
[ser University to undertake a study on the
lonomic factors affectinmcashiers in
Igrmarkets. The purpose of the study was to
IBigate the effect of work station design on
lEifety, health, efficiency and comfort of these
ISpyees. A report on the study was completed
il is currently under review by the Ministry.
■Sponse to inquiries from employees regarding
I problems encountered when working with
Hffonic data processing equipment, the Branch
I be developing an information pamphlet on the
^ct for distribution early in 1981.
h Branch is also planning to hold a series of
iilic seminars on a wide spectrum of working
Iffipncerns. The aim will be to provide first-hand
Iwledge of innovative improvements in the
»king environment, job design and productivity.
Work on the labelling project, initiated through the
Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour
Legislation in an effort to develop a model
standard for labelling hazardous industrial
chemicals, continued during the year. Methods of
implementing a national standard are currently
being considered. The objective of this program is
to reduce employee exposure to toxic chemicals
by ensuring that manufacturers provide product
labels that contain the necessary information, and
to reduce the need for enforcements of labelling
by inspectors at the plant level.
The computerized inventory and reporting system
implemented in 1979 entered the production
stage in 1980. Although a considerable number of
improvements were made in the quality of the
reports provided by the system, delays in
obtaining monthly reports were encountered.
Some minor enhancements to the system are
planned for the coming year in an attempt to
improve turnaround time and reduce operating
. costs.
Administration
The Branch's 20 inspectors continue to provide
service throughout British Columbia from its main
office in Burnaby and seven regional offices
located in Victoria, Nanaimo, Chilliwack,
Kamloops, Kelowna, Nelson and Prince George.
New inspectors were recruited for Prince George,
Kamloops and Nelson. The opening of a new
regional office in Terrace will provide improved
service to this rapidly developing area of the
province.
The establishment and staffing of a codes
engineer's position will enable the Branch to
become actively involved in the formulation and
review of standards for the working environment
and to provide improved technical support to the
inspection staff.
  Part V:
Special Services
 Arbitration
Arbitration Branch maintains a library of arbitration
awards that are provided to the Branch by
arbitrators in accordance with requirements of the
Labour Code. Information about these awards is
provided to interested parties. Copies of awards
may be viewed at the Arbitration Branch, 880
Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C. (387-1981), or may
be obtained at a charge of 25 cents a page.
Cheques or money orders should be made
payable to the Minister of Rnance.
Summaries of all arbitration awards received are
prepared and published monthly in the Ministry's
Labour Research Bulletin. A topical index
classifying awards by subject is prepared each
year and is available upon request. Copies of all
arbitration awards received are forwarded for
publication in Labour Arbitration Cases, and
Western Labour Arbitration Cases.
Most arbitration boards are selected by the
parties to a collective agreement. The Labour
Code, however, states that if there is a failure to
appoint or constitute an arbitration board under a
collective agreement, the Minister, at the request
of either party, shall make the appointments
necessary to constitute a board. The Arbitration
Branch advises the Minister on such appointments
in grievance and interest disputes. In addition, the
Branch deals with submissions to the Minister
regarding arbitration proceedings.
In order to assist in the preparation of the
Canadian position on I.L.O. questions, the Branch
provides the International Relations Branch of
Labour Canada with information concerning
British Columbia's response to proposed
conventions and recommendations, compliance
with ratified instruments, and practices and
conditions within the province on subjects chosen
for technical co-operation.
The Branch also continues to circulate
descriptions of I.L.O. Technical Co-operation
Program job vacancies in foreign countries. These
positions call for expert help in vocational training,
manpower and employment planning, and related
labour fields for fixed-term contracts. Further
details may be obtained from the Branch.
Arbitration Awards
During 1980, 388 arbitration awards were filed
with the Ministry of Labour. This represents a  I
decrease of 12 per cent from the 442 awardsM
received in 1979, and an increase of 14 per cen
over the 340 received in 1978. Awards by three-
party arbitration boards constituted 161 of thai
total for 1980, and 227 were awards of single
arbitrators. This distribution is consistent withH
pattern established over the last few years wtH
approximately 60 per cent of arbitrations werejB
heard by single arbitrators and 40 per cent by
three-person boards.
Ministerial appointments of arbitrators under tH
Labour Code and Essential Services DisputesWt
accounted for 34 of the awards received in 198C
Thirteen of the awards were for chairmen of j
arbitration boards, and 21 for single arbitrators.
The number of ministerial appointments in 198M
represents a slight decline over the 36 of 1979
and the 41 of 1978.
Eighty-six of the awards submitted during 1980
dealt with the discharge of employees. The
average length of time between the date of   j
discharge and date of award for these cases wj
187 days, an improvement over the 1979 averag
of 212 days. This improvement is further reflecte
by the fact that awards were issued within 200
days in 67 per cent of the cases in 1980, wh^S
only 52 per cent of the discharge cases fell with,
this limit in 1979.
With respect to the length of time between
hearing dates and dates of awards in all
categories however, the figures for 1980 indie™
a continuation of the trend toward greater delays
The average number of days between the hearin
date and the date of award for single arbitrators
was 45 days in 1980, up 26 per cent over 19^B
and 50 per cent over 1978. For three-person  I
boards the average in 1980 was 66 days, an
increase of 11 per cent from 1979 and 37 per ce
from 1978. Table 14 on page 77 indicates the
average number of days required to complete
arbitration cases in 1980.
(The frequency of occurrence of various issut^
arbitration awards submitted during 1980 is   j
outlined in Table 13 on page 76 . A complete ■
topical index is available upon request from tha
Arbitration Branch.)
 Board of Industrial Relations
iring 1980, the Board considered numerous
Wests for permission to vary hours of work and
ertime rates to accommodate short-week,
lljme, and other working arrangements. Where
Is requirements of the legislation were satisfied,1
IBssion was granted. The Board considered
Ed granted several applications for overtime
Kits. It also granted permits to mentally
IBicapped persons to allow them to be
nployed at less than the minimum wage in work
IStherapeutic nature.
The Board confirmed many certificates for wages
owing under the Payment of Wages Act. (For
details, reference should be made to the Labour
■ggjjgards Table 10 on page 75.) Requests for
exemption from Section 15A of the Act were also
dealt with.
During the year, the Board held 62 regular
meetings and 55 hearings throughout British
Columbia.
Construction Industry Coordinator
Iraonstruction Industry Coordinator is
Iponsible for government-industry liaison, Kaicyg
Ijfilopment, assessment of manpower
Wrements, project forecasting, and the
|slopment of industrial relations procedures
Iropriate to this sector of the economy.
ISjffice serves as a focal point for labour and
snagement in the constrEtion industry. Its
■Bess is dependent upon daily contact with
rjstry and union leaders.
Hconstruction Industry Coordinator acts as
Brman of the Construction Industry Advisor^g:
-jncil. The members of the Council during 1980
BUoyd Blain, Executive Vice-President of the
KFruction firm of Dawson and Hall, Vancouver;
I' Gautier, President, B.C. & Yukon Territory
3ding and Construction Trades Council,
Epuver; James McAvoy, Business Manager,
HS230, International Brotherhood of Electrical
H'kers, Victoria; Charles McVeigh, President,
jistruction Labour Relations Association of
i sh Columbia, Vancouver; Michael Parr,
■Bdian Conference President and Business
[Bger, Local 115, International Union of
Iwating Engineers, Burnaby; and Robert
ffiraers, President and General Manager, Smith
3i:hers and Wilson Limited, Vancouver. Mr. Parr
'egned on being appointed as a Commissioner
'he W.C.B. and was replaced by Gary Short,
lliness Agent, Local 97, International
IKsiation of Ironworkers, Vancouver. Mr.
loders resigned when his role as an officer of
IConstruction Labour Relations Association
ended. He was replaced by Ken Sewell, General
Manager, Ricketts-Sewell Electric Limited,
Vancouver.
The Council acts in an advisory capacity to the
Minister of Labour in all matters affecting labour-
management relations in the construction industry.
More specifically, the Council deals with matters
related to legislation affecting the construction
industry, industrial relations questions referred to it
by the Minister, construction demand forecasts,
manpower availability, training requirements, and
other matters deemed appropriate by the Council
or referred to it by the Minister.
Activities of the Council during 1980 were
overshadowed by the protracted negotiations for
a new collective agreement. However, good
progress was made by both the manpower and
the safety committees. The former has now
launched a comprehensive manpower supply and
demand survey, and the latter has appointed a
task force to produce recommendations for an ongoing safety awareness program for the industry.
The Coordinator acted as Chairman of the
Consultative'C'ommittee on Building Safety
Standards legislation. The Committee consists of
some 30 representatives of all types and facets of
construction. It presented a unanimous report to
government on legislative measures to alleviate
the present overlaps and conflicts in the
"legislation and regulations that have an impact on
the design, construction and occupancy of
buildings.
 Boards of Review
The boards of review are established under
Section 89 of the Workers' Compensation Act to
provide for an appeal agency independent of the
Workers' Compensation Board. The members and
chairmen are appointed to serve on the boards of
review by the Lieutenant Governor in Council, and
are not employed by the Workers' Compensation
Board.
Under the Workers' Compensation Act, appeals
to the boards of review may be made by a worker,
employer or dependent after any decision made
by an officer of the Board with respect to a
worker. Therefore, appeals from those decisions
of officers of the Board that relate strictly to
matters concerning employers under the Workers'
Compensation Act are not dealt with by the
boards of review.
An appeal must be filed within 90 days of the
disputed decision, although the boards of review
have the discretionary power to extend time
beyond that deadline in meritorious cases.
Appeals are conducted either by reviewing the
claim file without a meeting, or by holding a
meeting prior to the decision at the request of one
of the interested parties.
Meetings are conducted at the office of the
boards of review in Burnaby or at major
population centres throughout the province.
Whether or not a meeting is held, the boards of
review will consider the evidence on the Workers'
Compensation Board claim file, and undertake
additional investigations they deem appropriate.
The procedure at meetings is informal and ii!
intended to be adversarial in nature. A worktS
dependent, or employer need not appear at]
meeting with a representative, although
representation is often provided by union offj
company officers, lawyers, the office of the
Compensation Consultant, or the office of tlB
Employers Advisor.
Late in 1979 and early 1980, the boards of r]
began to experience a sharp increase in appi
over those received in previous years. This he
resulted in a delay in processing these appea
proved difficult for the boards of review to I
respond to all requests for meetings in both]
lower mainland and communities outside the]
lower mainland. To remedy this situation, the]
Minister of Labour appointed a sixth panel ta
serve on the boards of review. The panel wi]
become functional on January 1st, 1981 andl
permits an increase in the number of hearinr]
the boards of review are capable of dealing]
throughout the Province.
During 1980, 2,775 new appeals were receiva
and 2,372 were resolved. To deal with these]
appeals, the boards held 892 meetings at tha
Burnaby Office and 639 in 14 locations throw
the province. At the end of 1980, the board]
review had 1,402 outstanding appeals, and 16
requests for appeals that had not by then bet
checked in to their office.
(Tables 14, 15, and 16 on page 77 provide a]
summary of boards of review activities during
1980.)
Research
The function of the Research Branch is to apply
the techniques and methodologies of social
science to problems in the field of labour relations,
employment standards, human rights, safety and
manpower. The Branch is primarily a service unit,
providing advice and information to Ministry
officials, as well as support for the various
program areas within the Ministry.
The Branch also engages in joint activities with
other ministries, assists various boards and
commissions, distributes labour force statistics
and related information to the public through a
variety of publications, and provides answers to
inquiries on labour and manpower matters.
The Branch has a well-established library of m
3,000 titles, maintained by a full-time
paraprofessional librarian. The library collect]
and services are directed primarily to MinistH
staff, but other individuals and organizations]
encouraged to make use of these facilities.
The Branch's regular publications include 198
editions of the B.C. Labour Directory, the Cal
of Expiring Collective Agreements, and
Negotiated Working Conditions. Twelve issues
the Labour Research Bulletin were published,
featuring a number of articles, including
"Occupational Health and Safety Update", ']
Symposium for Labour Educators on
Occupational Safety and Health", "A Histori]
 few of Immigration to British Columbia",
lour Market Information 1979", "Issues in the
pitory Retirement Debate", "Industrial
ing in Canada", "The Cost of Employer-Based
ling", "Picketing of Allies Under the B.C.
Sir Code", "Interest Arbitration in British
Rbia", "An Analysis of Sick Leave Protebtion
]', and "Maternity Leave and Job Protection".
Branch participated in, or assisted with, the
|of a number of committees and task forces,
fe included the Accreditation Task Force, the
|-economic Coordinating Committee, the
Biittee on Asbestos Hazards, and the
struction Industry Advisory Committee.
| research projects undertaken in 1980
!ded a survey of piece rates for agricultural
iers, a study of technological change in the
piling and plywood milling industries
(incomplete as of the end of 1980), and a study of
future manpower requirements for the
construction trades, the results of which are
expected in 1981.
A major reprogramming of the computer systems
used to compile settlement statistics was
completed in 1980. A large number of brief
research projects and analyses was undertaken,
including background notes on pension issues for
speeches and cabinet committees, reports on
minimum wages, an analysis of the WCB accident
prevention program, analyses of the impact of the
breweries dispute on the hospitality industry,
notes for speeches on labour relations, and
analyses of a number of reports, briefs, and
committee recommendations. A fact sheet on
labour relations and the economy was instituted in
1980 for the use of senior management.
Planning and Information Systems
Eritical Trade Skills Phase II report has
me the largest project undertaken by the
ging and Information Systems Branch. Both
and small employers in eight categories
i contacted, including: mining, forestry, pulp
paper, transportation, manufacturing, public
laistration, health and education. This involved
lying approximately 1,260 firms, of which 707
ended. The survey covered the 32
anated trades commonly found in those eight
Itries. The construction trades are to be
wed and analyzed separately by the
arch Branch.
Jdition, the Acting Director of the Branch is
gisible for the operation of the Word
essing Management Steering Committee,
group has been delegated the task of
sloping the implementation plan for word
essing in the Ministry. The project is currently
Irway.
processing is a closely allied field in which
the Branch is also involved. The Acting Director
serves as Chairman of the Ministry's Systems
Working Committee. In addition, the Branch
prepares the Ministry's data processing budget,
currently at $9.8 million, and assists other
branches with their particular problems and
needs. At present, planning is underway to
develop a Ministry-wide information system.
The Branch has also continued its research and
coordinating role in the area of federal-provincial
relations. The Manpower Needs Committee and
Training Subcommittee have continued to meet
approximately every quarter. The Branch serves a
coordinating function for the provincial ministries
involved, and shares the co-secretariatship with
the C.E.I.C. The Branch also continues to provide
the Provincial Apprenticeship Board with both
secretarial and research facilities.
Program evaluation is a newly assigned function.
The Branch is slowly building a capability in this
area, and has undertaken an evaluation project for
Employment Opportunity Programs Branch.
  Part VI
Statistical Appendix
 II
Safety Engineering Services Division
Table 1 — Summary of Activities, 1980
Inspections conducted  166,5]ffl
Work permits issued  99,367:
Home-owner permits  12,684 a
Equipment certified  23,4ffll|
Examinations given  8,339:
Individuals or contractors certified or licensed  15,9®||
Investigations conducted  2,CKS|
Plans examined or designs surveyed  5,976
Meetings or seminars conducted  7451
Written recommendations and reports on defects and hazards (estimated)  15,979
Fatal and non-fatal injury incidents investigated  53111
Accidents investigated  293
License suspensions and prosecutions  22!
Property loss, approx  $5,000,000'
Electrical Safety Branch
Table 2 — Summary of Activities, 1980
Inspections conducted  85,180l
Work permits—Contractor  58,0071
— Annual  4601
— Home-owner  12,061 j
Total permits issued  70,5<3l
Pieces of equipment certified  9,2401
Examinations given  5791
Individuals or contractors licensed  3,3381
Investigations conducted— fire/accident  191
— hazard elimination  ^^11
Plans examined  760
Meetings or seminars conducted  250l
Certificate suspensions and prosecutions  21
Table 3 — Fire Accident Investigations
Electrical Municipal
Safety Branch Authorities1
Incidents involving human
fatalities (11 fatalities)  7 —
Incidents involving animal
fatalities (465 fatalities)  2 —
Electrical burns  9 2
Electrical shock & misc. injury  4 1
Failure of equipment (no fire)  6 1
Overhead line contact without injury  — —
Fires
Attributed to human failing  13 1
Attributed to damaged or substandard wiring  35 1
Undetermined origin  39 1
Equipment failure  51 1
Non-electrical causes  21 —
Miscellaneous incidents  4 —
Total  191 8
1 Not all municipal Incidents are included. Procedures are being introduced to ensure a more representative Indication of total Incidents reported to fire officials.
_J
 f
■	
Boiler Safety Branch
fable 4 — Summary of Activities, 1980
Inspections concluded  19 000
(work permits issued  i'2qo
)Equipment certified  12000
•Examinations given  7000
IRiividuals or contractors certified  8000
Investigations conducted  300
Iglans examined, designs surveyed  1 ggg
(meetings and seminars conducted  '400
[written recommendations and reports on defects and hazards  2,500
JGas Safety Branch
'Table 5 — Summary of Activities, 1980
lifew designs checked  3,125
IBspliance certifications  2,170
lias permits||sued  27,539
Inspections conducted  55,000
Igasfitter examinations - Grade 1  715
-Grade II  45
Igasfitter licenses issued (new) - Grade 1  291
- Grade II  19
Igasfitter licenses renewed - Grade 1  2,974
-Grade II  214
|3as contractors licenses issued (new)  115
|3as contractors licenses renewed  951
IHome owners' licenses issued  623
prosecutions  10
license suspensions  5
lias bonds carted  2
Ijjleetings conducted  95
■Special investigations—
Explosrons  5
Fires  17
Other yjeidents  7
Fatalities	
Injuries	
Near asphyxiations	
Iffritten recommendations on defects and hazards (estimated)  3,195
3
Ijlevating Devices Branch
[Table 6 — Summary of Activities, 1980
■regular inspections  ?]„
Inspections of new installations
412
—Kigineering drawings registered  ™j
(Erections issued  it
Kimplaints investigated	
Incidents investigated.
62
 Apprenticeship Training Programs Branch
Table 7—Tradesmen's Qualification Certificates andExemptSI
ISSUed   in     I 9oU Certificates Exemptions    I
"Trade Issued Issued
Automotive body repair  50 —
Automotive mechanical repair  363 —
Boilermaker (erection)  23 —
Bricklaying  32 —
Carpentry  434 —
Cooking  66 —
Heavy-duty mechanic  425 —
Industrial electrical  201 —
Industrial instrumentation  34 —
Ironwork  58 —
Joinery (benchwork)  34 —
Lumber Manufacturing Industry—
Benchman  27 —
Circular-saw filer  51 —
Saw fitter  70 —
Machinist  93 —
Millwright  422 —
Oil-burner mechanic  6 —
Painting and decorating  91 —
Plumbing  165 12
Radio and TV, domestic  9 —
Refrigeration  55 2
Roofing, damp- and waterproofing  28 —
Sheet-metal work  90 4
Sprinkler fitting  38 1
Steamfitting and pipefitting  87 8
Totals 2952 27
Table 8 — Summary of Apprentices in Trades
Total
Number          Corn-
Terms                              Year of Apprenticeship Being Served of pletet
Trade or Occupation                                      In Appren-            in
Years                  First        Second           Third Fourth            Fifth       Sees in            1980
Air compressor and
pneumatic tool mechanic  4
Aircraft-
Maintenance mechanic  3
Painter  2
Antique furniture restorer
and reproduction  4
Anvllman  3
Armature winder  4
Autoglass Installation  3
Automatic transmission
repair  3
Automotive—
Body repair  4
Electric and tune-up  3
Electrical  3
Machinist  4
Mechanical repair  4
Painting and refinishing  2
Parts, warehousing and
merchandising  3
Radiator manufacturing
and repair  3
Trimming  4
Baking  3
Bandsaw benchman  3
Barbering  2
Benchman-lumber manufacturing
industry  1
1
6
1
1
1
3
1
3
7
1
2
16
2
2
3
18
18
9
45
i
155
152
103
74
484
3'
9
21
16
46
'
4
1
5
10
14
22
6
15
574
428
434
278
292
1,432
209
38
56
94
2'
36
32
39
107
11
12
22
19
53
11
6
6
6
5
23
1
52
31
45
128
j
38
77
115
51
24
24
21
 Trade or Occupation
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First        Second Third Fourth
Total
Number Com-
of pleted
Appren- in
tices in 1980
Training
Blacksmith	
jigktbuilding	
ffiilermaking	
Boilermaking (erection)	
[Bokbinding (1)	
|8»kbinding (2)	
Ifflcklaying	
Ifableman .j||	
Krman....S.	
Carpentry	
lament mason ..SH	
Circular-saw filer—
Lumber manufacturing industry....
Cladding	
Ijpllator	
Compositor	
ISnstruction millwright—
■ jmber manuf. industry	
: Cooking	
.Jutting machine operator	
•)ental mechanic	
■lental technician	
iliesel—
i   Engine machinist	
I   Engine repair    	
[Fuel injection	
domestic radio and TV
: servicing       	
Iraftsman—
i Construction S.	
I Hull	
:  Mechanical	
; Irapery making	
dressmaking & dress designing	
irywall finisher   	
lectric metering	
ilectrical—
Construction section	
i Marine section 
Neon section 
Jehop section..;...	
lectrical—
Appliance repair	
Storing	
E Operator H	
lectro plating	
lectronics	
Audio and radio servicing	
Commercial antenna TV	
lectronics—
Industrial	
Instrument repair and calibration..
Marine	
: Panels and controls	
: Radio communication	
: Sound communication	
Telecommunications	
I   Technician	
I levator mechanic	
imbalming	
arm machinery mechanic	
j cor covering	
looriaying (hardwood)	
orist	
>: aiding machine operator	
Ilorklift mechanic	
I com end—
I 'Alignment and brake service	
I 'Alignment and frame
I straightening	
4
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
3.5
4
4
4
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
3
3
2
5
4
2
4
2
2
2
13
15
12
11
5
2
5
3
24
30
46
8
11
6
6
2
7
51
44
27
51
3
3
10
3
2
6
530
475
326
452
13
5
9
57
11
30
1
2
4
10
10
4
1
1
5
64
50
33
10
6
6
15
14
13
1
13
17
12
15
1
22
22
1
5
1
5
1
1
5
7
1
1
1
25
21
19
2
2
346
295
215
380
3
1
1
4
2
2
3
1
2
11
9
7
7
3
4
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
7
4
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
4
8
6
7
3
6
8
1
3
1
2
36
28
22
12
7
3
2
23
26
8
1
2
3
6
51
15
100
31
9
173
6
21
1,783
27
57
41
3
30
7
147
37
57
1
71
2
22
2
1
1
1
1
65
4
1,236
5
27
10
10
4
3
16
2
3
1
6
5
24
14
7
86
19
5
49
14
15
4
3
29
1
232
5
29
2
2
14
3
11
13
1
12
7
1
1
1
3
3
1
16
2
2
20
1
71
 Wf.
Trade or Occupation
Gas fitting  4
Glassblowing (scientific)  4
Glazier  4
Graphic arts  5
Hairdressing  2
Heat and frost insulation  4
Heavy-duty mechanic  4
Hydraulic servicing  5
Inboard/outboard mechanical
repair  4
Industrial—
Electrical  4
Instrumentation  5
Mechanic  4
Warehousing  3
Ironwork (union)  3
Ironwork (Cominco)  4
Jewelry—
Engraver (machine)  2
Manuf. and repair  4
Joinery (benchwork)  4
Leadbuming  4
Letterpressman  4
Lineman  3
Lithography—
5 to 6 years  6
Artist  5
Camera  5
Platemaking  5
Preparation  5
Press feeder  2
Pressman  4
Stripping and assembly  5
Loftsman  5
Machinist  4
Fitter  4
Mold shop  3
Maintenance mechanic  4
Maintenance mechanic (pipeline)  4
Marine engine repair  4
Marking & stamping device
technician  5
Meat cutting— 3
Union Indentured  2.5
Millwright  4
Motorcycle repair  4
Moulding  4
Moulding and coremaking  4
Multilith operator  4
Office machine mechanic  4
Oil-burner mechanic  4
Optical technician  4
Ornamental ironwork  4
Painting and decorating  3
Partsman  3
Patternmaking  5
Piledriver and bridgeman  3
Plastering  4
Plastic and rubber
fabrication  4
Plastic—
Fabrication  3
Sign making  4
Plumbing  4
Power-saw repair  2
Practical horticulture  4
Practical nursing  1
Precast concrete moulder
6 fitter  1
Printer (5 to 6 years)  6
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First        Second Third Fourth
5
5
1
1
60
54
40
72
165
703
6
28
22
27
439
402
342
325
4
1
15
10
10
139
172
117
160
38
36
15
17
2
12
13
20
59
55
30
12
13
16
5
20
1
6
10
8
85
61
27
39
5
2
3
40
36
57
3
1
2
1
5
2
3
2
10
19
13
4
5
13
21
22
11
16
2
1
1
1
133
159
105
75
3
5
4
1
2
Total
Number
Com-
of
pletec
Appren
m
tices In
1980
Training
12
226
3'
868
41!
83
3!
1,508
231
5
20
46
588
126
2
45
144
46
44
212
10
2
133
7
1
16
2
50
18
70
6
472
14
1
34
11' I
1;
i
4SI
49
1
48
43
31
1
122
1
11
7
13
20
2
267
312
180
179
938
151
3
7
3
13
2
2
11
2
3
18
2
2
2
6
4
11
11
6
32
6
2
5
5
2
14
1
71
41
89
201
42
62
81
44
187
23
1
4
1
3
1
2
10
2
1
7
6
1
14
5
3
4
12
2
2
1
5
219
178
84
150
631
99
19
21
18
14
72
5
2
2
11
5
4
12
1            43
7
 Trade or Occupation
Total
Number
Com
Being Served
of
pleted
Appren
in
Fourth
Fifth
tices in
Training
1980
Printing (flexographic) .Brass
[Refrigeration .S|fei
Rigger sailmaker	
Hoofing, damp- & waterproofing..
Eailmaking .jjjpp
Sawfitter (lumber
■manufacturing industry)	
Saw-making and filing	
Sheet-metal work	
Sheet-metal manufacturing	
Ship & boatbuilding ind	
[ship plater V...MB.	
Shipbuilding	
Shipwright	
Bgn painting .>;.:..,.
Silversmithing & plating	
Small-engine repair	
Springmaking	
Sprinkler fitting	
Standard transmission repair	
Steam engineer	
Steamfitting & pipefitting	
Steamfitting & pipefitting—
Umber manuf. industry .ggjjji
Steel fabrication	
Bailor	
Telecontrol technician s^
Tile setting	
Ere repair	
Tool & die maker	
Truck-body building	
ffijick mechanic,	
fflpholstery	
Wall and ceiling installation	
Watch repairing $&??.?.
l'Welding	
■Winder electrician	
1
2
32
43
40
42
4
1
2
58
1
55
1
19
46
97
5
47
115
110
105
3
1
2
1
2
4
6
14
11
7
6
11
3
5
13
8
1
7
4
27
24
5
1
23
13
76
70
73
1
1
99
109
72
58
5
1
3
5
3
9
3
20'. ,
3
2
1
2
1
1
17
15
4
6
13
45
30
2
1
3
44
27
44
18
21
13
19
3
1
157
22
7
1
132
15
2
143
31
5
1
477
62
1
10
1
2
38
3
25
3
2
32
2
1
79
5
1
2
332
54
2
1
338
24
1
15
3
17
4
23
5
11
2
2
2
42
3
188
28
1
115
13
71
2
TOTALS..
5,000       5,309       3,145       2,894
53     16,401       2,728
Labour Standards Branch
wable 9 — Comparison of Investigations and Wage
Adjustments, 1980 and 1979
48,210
||SD@Qtions and Investigations	
annua/ <S General Holidays Act
Firms involved	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid	
minimum Wage Act
Firms involved	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid	
Payment of Wages Act
Firms involved	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid      $1,626,685.20
Total atljijstments      $1,837,683.03
701
960
128,119.92
220
367
82,877.91
2,015
4,574
1979
49,958
1,019
1,269
143,629.74
280
599
90,039.14
3,176
8,124
,719,843.19
,953,512.07
 (K.yWM
wmmmmm
 feble 10 — Payment of Wages Act
jfertificat.es made under Section 5 (1) (c)	
iBgtificates confirmed under Section 5 (2) (a)	
Kftificates cancelled under Section 5 (2) (b) (ii)	
Krtificates cancelled and remade under
Section 5 (2) (b) (i)	
Stificates paid before confirmation	
Certificates paid before filed in Court I
&tificates confirmed under Section 5 (2) (b) (i)
I   filed with Registrar of:
I County Court	
I Supreme Court	
remands made under Section 6 (1)	
able 11 — Summary of Permits Issued, 1980
Under Control of Employment of Children Act
1980
1979
764
745
549
546
37
32
35
27
82
46
38
16
541
510
8
8
442
459
2
_Q
Amusement  26
iutomobile  3
Ktering  27
^stjTjction  2
.aundry, etc  1
Manufacturing  9
mercantile  17
fliscellaneous  13
btals  98
=      s
.c cd
O        Q
1        2
4
E        o
4
12
1
19
4
24
2
2
21
1
1
5
10
3 2
3 4
8 1
23 15
O =
2
20
Mediation Services Branch
lable 12 — Analysis of Mtiliation Services, 1980
Rpointments continued from previous year.
[ppointments made	
lo official appointment	
OTAL	
ppointments rescinded	
ppointments continuing	
OTAL appointments completed	
ettlements—
Bring term of officer's appointment
fflowing officer's report	
Bofficial appointment	
IdTAL SETTLEMENTS	
imployers involved	
bargaining units involved
rnployees involved         107,866
1980
1979
124
118
271
373
8
14
403
505
8
73
142
124
253
308
185
232
18
25
8
14
211
271
449
667
479
669
866
68,815
onstruction industry dispute listed as 1 Employer - 1 Unit
ansport Labour Relations listed as 1 Employer - 1 Unit
 Arbitration Branch
Table 13—Frequency of Occurrence of Issues Reported, 198C
..
Frequency
of
Issues Occurrence
Abandonment of grievance  3
Absence without leave  4
Absenteeism  6
Appeal  1
Apprenticeship  1
Arbitrability  2
Assault  2
Auxiliary employee  1
Bargaining-unit work  5
Benefits  2
Bereavement leave  1
Bumping  7
Call-out pay  2
Child care expenses  1
C.O.L.A  1
Collateral agreement  1
Collective agreement  3
Company rules  1
Compensation  3
Consent award  4
Contracting out  8
Damages  1
Deductions  2
Demotion  7
Discharge  88
Discipline  18
Elimination of job  1
Essential Services DisputesAct  3
Estoppel  4
Evidence of current negotiations  1
Expiration of collective agreement  1
Flexible workweek  1
Foreman requirement  1
Functus officio  3
Grievance procedure  1
Hiring procedures  1
Hours of work  5
Insubordination  3
Insurance earner  1
Interest arbitration  14
Interpretation  23
Job classification  6
Job content  1
Job evaluation  2
Job posting  11
Job functions  1
Jurisdiction  4
Layoff  17
Leave of absence  2
Living-out allowance  1
Management rights  3
Manning requirements  1
Maternity leave  2
New classification  1
On-call employee  2
Onus of proof  1
Issues Occurrer
Overtime  ic|
Pay-rate adjustment  j
Pay rate  2
Part-time employees  1
Pay structure  1
Payments  1
Pension plan  1
Personal appearance  1
Premium pay  2
Probation  £
Production bonuses  1
Promotion  1(
Qualifications  1
Quitting  2
Rate of pay  1
Recall  i
Reclassification  25
Rectification  2
Rehiring  1
Reinstatement  C-
Res judicata  1
Replacement employee	
Resignation  2
Rest periods  1
Retirement  i
Retroactive pay	
Safety  1
Scheduling  A
Seniority  21
Settlement  2
Severance pay  i
Sick leave  2
Sick pay  1
Special work projects	
Statutory holiday pay  4
Substitution pay  1
Suspension  22
Technological change  i
Terms of settlement	
Termination	
Theft of employee property	
Timeliness  l
Time limits  £
Transportation	
Transfer  £
Travel allowance	
Union activity	
Union dues	
Union-preference clause	
Union rules	
Vacation pay  £
Wages	
Work at higher classification	
Work classification	
Work now, grieve later	
Work stoppage	
 lible 14 — Average Number of Days to Complete
irbitration Cases in 1980
Ine of Discharge to Date of Award	
lite of Appointment by Minister to Date of Award.,
lie of Hearing to Date of Award	
Single
Arbitration
Arbitrators
Boards
178
203
84
147
45
66
ISards of Review
able 15 — Meetings Held, 1980
Inuary	
Sbruary	
Jarch	
roril	
By	
wie	
fly/August..
eptember...
Eitober	
Iravember....
lecember....
Iftals	
77
74
54
94
71
63
164
70
79
81
65
892
Out Of Town
62
59
40
65
46
80
96
52
32
72
35
639
Cancellations
3
1
17
9
7
12
27
13
2
15
7
113
able 16 — Appeals Considered
1977
■.ppeals received      1,884
Ippeals adjudicated      1,513
1978
2,155.
2,411
1979 1980
2,477    'MMm
2,633 2,372
lable 17 — Results of Appeals
1977
l/orkers appeals allowed  689
workers appeals disallowed  880
rmployers appeals allowed  8
Employers appealsBJjsallowed  62
Miscellaneous dispositions
ippeal suspended, no appealable issue,
Ip extension of appeal period etc.)  174
Itals  1,513
1978
893
1,148
20
77
273
2,411
1979
1,004
1,293
20
84
232
2,633
867
1,093
18
84
310
2,372
Its of December 31,1980
repeals pending	
repeals received (holding for W.C.B. files).
1,402
162
fcts Administered by the Ministry of Labour
■Apprenticeship Act
KBoiler and Pressure Vessel Act
I Electrical Energy Inspection Act
(employment Standards Act
I Essential Services Disputes Act
Ipictory Act
■Gas Act
Human Rights Code
• Labour Code
• Ministry of Labour Act
• Wage (Public Construction) Act
• Refugee Settlement Act
• Workers' Compensation Act
 Other Statutes Affecting Ministry of Labour
Barbers' Act
Builders' Lien Act
Coal Mine Regulation Act
Rre Department Act
Hairdressers Act
Labour Regulation Act
Mining Regulation Act
Public Service Labour Relations Act
Repairers Lien Act
Woodworkers' Lien Act
Ministry Memberships and Affiliations
The British Columbia Ministry of Labour is an
active member of, or variously affiliated with, the
following organizations:
Advisory Council on Electrical Safety
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and
Air Conditioning Engineers
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Association of Chief Inspectors of Canada
Association of Labor Relations Agencies
Association of Professional Engineers
Atomic Energy Control Board
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Advisory and
Review Board
British Columbia Research
British Columbia Safety Council
Canadian Association of Administrators of
Labour Legislation
Canadian Association of Statutory Human Rights
Agencies
Canadian Gas Association
Canadian Government Standards Bureau
Canadian Standards Association
Canadian Vocational Association
Committee on the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I
Committee on the Canadian Electrical Code, Part II
Electrical Inspectors Association of
British Columbia
Electrical Safety Review Committee of
British Columbia
Electrical Wiring and Equipment Standards
Committee
Gas Safety Review Committee
Illuminating Engineers Society
International Association of Electrical Inspecffl
International Association of Government Laboi
Organizations
International Labour Organization
Interprovincial Labour Organization
Interprovincial Gas Advisory Council
Interprovincial Standards Co-ordinating
Committee
Interprovincial Standards Examination
Committee
Manpower Training Needs Committee
National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vess^
Inspectors
National Energy Board
Occupational Safety and Health Committee
Pacific Association for Continuing Education
Power Engineers Review Board
Professional Engineers Association of B.C.
Refrigeration Committee
Social Planning and Review Council
Swimming Pool Association
Underwriters Laboratories, Canada
Vocational Counselling Services of B.C.
Welding Review Committee
_y
  The Ministry of Labour wishes to acknowledge
the kind assistance of the following organizations
and individuals in assembling the photographs
for Otis publication:
B.C. Federation of Agriculture
Ministry of Energy, Mines & Petroleum Resources
Ministry of Forests, B.C. Forest Service
Ministry of Tourism
Provincial Archives of British Columbia
Victoria City Archives
Impact Audio-Visual
Ms. Barbara Davles
Mr. Bob Garlick
Mr. Michael Gluss
British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia. Ministry of Labour.
Annual report. -1976-
Continues: British Columbia. Dept. of Labour. Annual report. ISSN 0381-2898
ISSN 0705-96983 Annual report - Ministry of Labour (Victoria)
1. British Columbia. Ministry of Labour. 2. Labor and laboring classes - British Columbia - Periodicals.
3. Labor policy - British Columbia - Periodicals.
HD8109.B71B74      354.711"0683

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