Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

REPORT OF THE Department of Travel Industry YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1968 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1969

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0367855.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0367855.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0367855-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0367855-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0367855-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0367855-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0367855-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0367855-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0367855-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0367855.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF TRAVEL INDUSTRY
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister R. B. Worley, Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of Travel
Industry
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1968
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  The Honourable W. K. Kiernan, Minister of Travel Industry.
  Victoria, British Columbia, January 3, 1969.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department
of Travel Industry for the year ended December 31, 1968.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Travel Industry.
 Victoria, British Columbia, January 3, 1969.
The Honourable W. K. Kiernan,
Minister of Travel Industry.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Travel Industry for the year ended December 31, 1968.
R. B. WORLEY,
Deputy Minister of Travel Industry.
 CONTENTS
Page
Introduction by the Deputy Minister     9
Estimated Tourist Revenue  15
Advertising and Research  16
Administration and Contributing Grants  20
British Columbia House, Los Angeles  24
British Columbia House, San Francisco  25
Accommodation  27
"Beautiful British Columbia" Magazine  30
Conventions and Special Promotions  31
Exhibits and Displays  3 5
Information Centre, Vancouver  3 7
Information Services  39
Personnel  42
Publicity  43
Travel Counselling  45
Film and Photographic Branch  49
 <
X
U
z
o
t—.
H
<
N
<
O
o
<
So
In
gSs
lis
bo
a_I
O
u
z %
z "
If
z S
< c
o*
u
gSo ?
<       —
au a
<° B
ii
<
&2B1 a
§11112
<**
KS«i*il_j
TOURIST
ACCOMMODATION
"Green Book"
Directory
Accommodation
(A. Abram)
z >
=- S
Q
O       £
Z 2
> |
< ui
u s
|1
INQUIRIES
Information Centres
Coupon Replies
r.ildt.F. and Folder
Distribution
Personnel Training
(E. Norman)
CONVENTIONS
PROMOTIONS
Visiting V.l.P.s
.K.Woodward.
(B.Lee)
PUBLICITY
Government News
Writing
Visiling Journalists
(H. McKeever)
8fl
~ i s
o a
u <
 REPORT OF T«E' -TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 57
The Film and Photographic Branch provided information on British Columbia's
film industry for the preparation of the " Invitation to Film in British Columbia "
colour advertisement featured in the Hollywood trade papers in August.
As a result of this advertisement, general information on the film-production
potential of the Province was provided in response to 41 inquiries. Possible filming
locations were suggested to four companies, and these were backed up by black-
.and-white and colour stills, and all available information on the areas suggested.
It is hoped that several of these prospects will result in feature films being shot in
British Columbia.
35-MM. SLIDES
Some 290 35-mm. slides were added to Branch files. Special assignments for
Travel Industry slide shows included documentation of a bus tour and coverage of
Vancouver and Victoria.
An anti-litter slide show featuring Louie the Litter Rat and Peter the Pack Rat
was prepared and has proved popular with tourist groups in the Province. Twenty-
four of these shows are in circulation.
STILLS PRODUCTION
As in previous years, the three stills photographers were employed in all parts
of the Province the major portion of the year on stories for " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine.
Three Department of Travel Industry promotion tours in the United States
were covered in black and white. In March, simultaneous promotions in the Pacific
Northwest States required the services of two staff members. One stills photographer accompanied the annual California promotion tour.
Branch photographers were also on hand to record activities during the travel
agents' tour in May, the press tour in lune, and the Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association tour in September, and the visits of the " Dating Game " principals to
the Province.
Special assignments included the formal portrait of the Twenty-eighth Provincial
Legislature, the annual presentation of 25-year certificates, and illustrations for the
Budget Speech and the Department of Finance, Department of Public Works, and
Department of Recreation and Conservation. The opening ceremonies of the new
Provincial Museum in Heritage Court were recorded.
A free-lance photographer was engaged on a contract basis in February, March,
and July. Four hundred and eighty-two black-and-white and 76 colour negatives
were obtained from this source.
A total of 4,995 colour negatives and more than 10,000 black-and-white photographs were selected and dispatched from the Branch files in response to requests
for loan. Darkroom production surpassed 3,000 negatives and 20,595 prints; 7,800
of these prints were mailed out in response to requests from writers and publications.
In addition, selection of 2,434 colour slides was made.
 Mr. Maurice Borrelly considers the most effective format for yet another photograph.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer lo the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
1,530-1168-8613
        PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF TRAVEL INDUSTRY
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister R. B. Worley, Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of Travel
Industry
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1968
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  The Honourable W. K. Kiernan, Minister of Travel Industry.
 Victoria, British Columbia, January 3, 1969.
The Honourable W. K. Kiernan,
Minister of Travel Industry.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Travel Industry for the year ended December 31, 1968.
R. B. WORLEY,
Deputy Minister of Travel Industry.
 CONTENTS
Page
Introduction by the Deputy Minister     9
Estimated Tourist Revenue  15
Advertising and Research  16
Administration and Contributing Grants  20
British Columbia House, Los Angeles  24
British Columbia House, San Francisco  25
Accommodation  27
"Beautiful British Columbia" Magazine  30
Conventions and Special Promotions  31
Exhibits and Displays  3 5
Information Centre, Vancouver  3 7
Information Services  39
Personnel  42
Publicity  43
Travel Counselling  45
Film and Photographic Branch  49
 5
<
X
z
o
hH
H
<
N
hH
Z
«.
O
o
D
Q OJ
^     M
o § g. ,g
z
<
fca.a_ .•
z w u;
<      -
5
1 8Es
y£-is
z>5 'io_og
fcBBssss
? I if 11
 Report of the Department of Travel Industry, 1968
INTRODUCTION
By Ronald B. Worley, Deputy Minister
1968 was a very good year!
The first full year of operation of the Department of Travel Industry was outstanding on three major counts: the increase in number of tourists, the excellent
co-operation of the industry throughout the Province, and the exemplary esprit de
corps of the staff of the Department.
As outlined in the 1967 Annual Report, the basic policies of the Department
are to provide leadership in the promotion of all phases of the industry by coordinating the activities of the private and public sectors, wherever practical, as
well as to encourage a high standard of accommodation and related services within
the Province, with the objective of maintaining visitor satisfaction, and to improve
the domestic appreciation of the importance of this industry to our economy so that
continued growth can be fostered by public attitudes conducive to such growth.
From the outset in 1967, when the Department was formed, it was built on a
basis of as little centralization as possible. Senior staff members were therefore
given individual responsibilities to specialize and deal direct with matters in their
respective fields.
A great tribute is due to all members of the staff. It is doubtful if anywhere
in the government services can there be found a group more enthusiastic and devoted
to their work. In the past year, six have qualified for advancement to positions of
greater responsibility to help meet the extraordinary amount of promotions being
undertaken, and also deal efficiently with the inquiries generated by these promotions
and advertising campaigns as well as the avalanche of activities created by the
growth of tourism.
Tourism today has, literally, become the most competitive business in the
world. Almost every country is seeking tourists from around the globe. Air lines
everywhere are now enthusiastically in the charter business, with rates so low that
great distances are within the reach of almost every pocketbook. For instance,
British Columbians can fly to Europe for as little as $250 return.
The advent of such inexpensive tourist transportation is another addition to
the stiff competition for British Columbia. It means that our hitherto prime markets
are being tapped with offers to visit far-off lands for little more than the cost to fly
from California or Toronto to British Columbia. Consequently even greater efforts
than ever before have to be concentrated on markets such as California, the Pacific
Northwest, and the East.
We have had to enter fully into the overseas market, not merely to keep up
with the times, but to get a fair share and to compensate for the potential loss from
our former prime markets.
To accomplish this last year, we were the first Province or State to take part in
offshore promotions with Canadian Pacific Air Lines. This year we have received
excellent co-operation from Canadian Pacific Air Lines and Air Canada for promotions in Canada and Europe.
Last March I visited six European cities in seven days to arrange with Canadian Pacific Air Lines for 35 travel agents and travel writers to visit British Co-
 P 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Presentation was made at a special luncheon ceremony, December 11, 1968,
at the Empress Hotel, Victoria.
lumbia in May. An identical group was brought in from California, and the two
groups combined saw much of the Province.
British Columbia was represented at the annual meeting of the American
Society of Travel Agents in Puerto Rico. This significant event affords us an excellent opportunity to further our promotion.
Another successful press tour was conducted in June by this Department and
Vancouver Island Coach Lines for travel editors, travel writers, and television
directors. This yearly event has become very popular with the participants for its
comprehensive coverage of British Columbia's attractions. The Kootenay Caravan
this year generated stories and photographs that, if computed on a space rate
schedule, would represent a value of more than $150,000.
In August Mr. John Buckley went to London to arrange with Air Canada for
a visit of 70 travel agents and travel writers in October.
The Department and the two Canadian air lines continue to co-operate in developing future promotions from within Canada and countries which they serve.
Such promotions are held in conjunction with U-drive companies to encourage
our visitors to visit as much of the Province as possible.
To assist visitors with other languages, three multi-lingual travel counsellors
were employed by the Department at Vancouver International Airport during the
season.
The Government of British Columbia, recognizing the importance of the European market, appointed a permanent travel representative to British Columbia House
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968
P 11
in London. Mr. Harry Harrod, who has been in our Los Angeles office, will take
up duties in London soon after the New Year.
We were very fortunate to secure the services of Mr. Victor Downard, marketing manager of Vancouver Island Coach Lines, to replace Mr. Harrod in Los
Angeles.
An increase in representation of the Department in California was also approved, and Mr. Rod Fraser was appointed to British Columbia House in San
Francisco.
9
Deputy Minister R. B. Worley greets Linda Coleman and David Vogle, participants in
the popular television series " Dating Game," on their arrival at Vancouver International
Airport, April 17th.
In an effort to carry British Columbia's image still further, it is hoped that the
ultimate will be achieved in the world of music. Mr. Nelson Riddle, one of the
industry's greatest composers and orchestra leaders, is at present writing a " British
Columbia Suite " of nine pieces. He will compose, orchestrate, and make a long-
play record for world-wide release, as well as presenting the music on national
television shows.
Western Airlines was the first company with whom we participated in cooperative advertising and promotions. Again, this year, the "Answer the Call of
North Country Adventures " campaign was most successful; the special colour
rotogravure carrying our advertisements was delivered to more than 4,000,000
homes in California, Nevada, and Arizona.
Western Airlines is becoming progressively more important in our travel promotions because of its rapidly expanding international routes. Its recently acquired
Alaska route places British Columbia in a most important position on its Pacific
routes between Mexico, California, and Alaska.
To meet all types and categories of competition, the Department instituted a
Travel Agents' Manual.   This clearly lays out numerous package deals originating
 P 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
within the Province, and shows a package price including hotel accommodation,
transportation, sightseeing, etc., within the Province, plus the commission payable
to the agent.
When this manual was first introduced to a gathering of more than 400 travel
agents and their representatives, Mr. R. W. Hemphill, past president of the American Society of Travel Agents, made the comment: " This manual is another first
by British Columbia, a place which is one of the foremost tourist promoters of this
continent! "
" Beautiful British Columbia " magazine continues to receive good critic reception.   The paid subscriptions along with news-stand sales are increasing accordingly.
As this publication continues to receive acclaim, it was decided to assemble
some 100 colour photographs in a salon for showings in prestige locations abroad.
"This ... Is British Columbia," published in November, 1967, was also
well received. It is now sold out, and demands are being received to publish another
edition.
The installation early this year of the Phillipsburg Master Mailer, a machine
which automatically assembles folders and places them in envelopes ready for mailing, has proved to be an outstanding labour-saving device, thereby releasing staff
for other duties. This machine has produced approximately 189,000 packages of
travel folders for mail distribution in 1968. The enormous task was formerly performed by hand. This machine is also used for mailing " Beautiful British
Columbia."
Not only has tourism grown as an industry, but forms of advertising have also
advanced to keep pace with the ever-expanding market. Not so many years ago
advertising was done in two distinct ways—the written word and radio. Today
these forms of advertising are supplemented by television and many other media.
Resultantly, intense competition exists for our advertising dollar. No matter how
large our budget may be, it is not possible to participate in every available media.
Extreme care and research are carried out to decide where our paid advertising
is to be placed. To extend coverage beyond paid advertising, we participate as
much as possible in national television shows that give publicity to the Province.
Vacations in British Columbia are given to winners on national television programmes, including the following:—
Network
ABC.
NBC.
NBC.
NBC-
Programme
'Dating Game"	
'Hollywood Squares ".
'You Don't Say"	
'Let's Make a Deal "...
Number of
Stations
178
193
190
153
Viewing
Audience
18,000,000
12,200,000
13,500,000
14,200,000
Advt.
Minute
$35,000
5,500
5,500
5,500
Very little cost is incurred by the Department of Travel Industry as these vacations are made up into attractive packages through excellent co-operation with air
lines and private industry, including accommodation, restaurants, transportation
facilities, sightseeing, and such.
Results from the Los Angeles Herald Examiner Social Security Number Contest were again especially gratifying this year. Editorials and advertisements sponsored by the newspapers made daily mention of the Province and the vacation
awards. Western Airlines and local private industry produced attractive vacation
packages for this promotion.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 13
Members of private industry joined with the Department, travelling to Southern
California at their own expense, and for one week carried out public appearances
before service clubs, travel clubs, automobile associations, industrial employees'
clubs, travel agents' seminars, etc., armed with a slide-film presentation, complete
with script, researched and supplied by the Department. Government and regional
literature, packaged in kits, was supplied in sufficient numbers for each of the
audiences.
Our promotion this year attracted such great names as Leslie Caron, Glenn
Ford, Kathryn Hays, Harve Presnell, Johnny Longden, Arthur Freed, and Sebastian
Cabot—all of whom helped immeasurably to publicize the Province.
Universal Studios gave us complete use of its facilities for a presentation to
travel agents. This was so successful that we were invited back for 1969. This
was one of the largest assemblies of travel agents ever held. One hundred and
seventy-five travel agents toured Universal Studios to see the moving-picture industry
in action, many for the first time. Travel agents in this area attend as many as three
promotions every week. Comments received on our British Columbia presentation
were most complimentary, and we are now able to see very tangible results from
this promotion.
It is abundantly evident that 163 speaking engagements involving 43 persons
in five working-days, together with the organization of transportation, accommodation, and assembly of materials and bodies, is a mammoth and exacting undertaking
—all done by this Department without one single hitch.
This unique type of promotion is now widely acclaimed by the travel industry
at large, and recognized by the entertainment industry in California as being outstanding.   It is now an annual event.
Prior to the Southern California promotion (April 1 to 5, 1968), an identical
Pacific Northwest promotion including Salem, Eugene, Portland, Tacoma, Vancouver (Washington), Aberdeen, Olympia, Port Angeles, Yakima, Seattle, Spokane,
Wenatchee, and Coeur d'Alene, March 4 to 8, 1968, involved 128 presentations in
five working-days.
At the present time we are working on the same type of promotion in Northern
and Southern California, to take place March 17 to 28, 1969.
An energetic drive to encourage film producers to make motion pictures on
location in the Province included a four-page colour insert in the trade papers
" Variety," August, 1968, and " Reporter," August, 1968.
Forty-one inquiries received from these insertions included something from
every major studio. Present indications are that three major productions will be
made in 1969.
The Film and Photographic Branch has been enhanced by the addition of a
colour technician for its new colour-processing laboratory, which is presently being
set up at the new quarters at 1019 Wharf Street, Victoria, British Columbia.
The senior motion-picture director-cameraman's position was filled in May.
A stills photographer was added to fill a vacant position in June, bringing the staff
to full complement.
A number of colour motion pictures have been completed, one starring Glenn
Ford. Another starring Harve Presnell is in the course of preparation. " Ferry-
liners North" was completed and will be ready for distribution in early 1969.
Some films carried over from 1967 were completed, and two new motion pictures
of a continuing nature were started.
Film and Photographic Branch films were placed on board the M.V. " Queen
of Prince Rupert" for nightly screenings to passengers on north- and south-bound
trips.   These films proved extremely popular with the passengers.
 P 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In British Columbia there are 18,884,955 accommodation units available for
tourist occupancy throughout a period of one full year. Our system of Government-
approved tourist accommodation in the Province is respected by the industry and
our visitors. Our A.T.A. signs of approval have become recognized as a symbol of
clean, comfortable accommodation. We endeavour to maintain a high level of
tourist accommodation standards by annual inspection system of all establishments.
In addition to the several publications regularly produced by the Department,
two new brochures were introduced this year. A golf folder was produced, also
postcard-size reply cards for amateur radio operators. The British Columbia Tourist
Directory was printed in the greatest number ever—750,000 copies. This popular
booklet is distributed free of charge.
The activities of the Vancouver office of the Department were characterized by
a vast increase in the number of in-person inquiries. Trends were noted in early
spring travel by United States visitors, and also in evidence was a great increase in
the number of visitors from Ontario, Quebec, and eastern States in the United States.
The British Columbia Government Information Office at Douglas, British
Columbia, opened earlier and remained open longer than in previous years. The
traffic pattern justified the extended season.
My sincere appreciation is expressed to all those in the tourist and travel industry who have supported us with their goodwill and unfailing co-operation. My gratitude goes to all members of the staff of the Department who so readily dealt with
all challenges and responsibilities which confronted them. I wish to thank the many
other Government departments that have extended their generous co-operation to
us, and whose support has contributed immeasurably to this, our second year of
operation.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968
P 15
ESTIMATED TOURIST REVENUE,  1968
The number of tourist visits to British Columbia in 1968 increased by 8.6 per
cent for automobile travel and by 6.5 per cent for public carriers compared to 1967.
The resulting tourist traffic from outside the Province produced an estimated
revenue of $271,521,480, made up as follows: 3,026,922 Americans entered the
Province by automobile across the British Columbia-United States Border and produced $121,076,880; 787,000 Americans arrived by automobile across the Alberta
Border and produced $31,480,000; and Americans arriving by public carrier
totalled 435,636 and produced $17,425,440. Thus American travellers made a
total of 4,249,558 visits, producing an estimated revenue of $169,982,320. Canadian visits by automobile totalled 2,538,479 and contributed $101,539,160, making
a total of 6,788,037 out-of-Province visits with a revenue of $271,521,480.
In addition to the above, it is estimated that British Columbians made 2,477,436
visits within the Province and spent $74,323,080.
This makes a total estimated tourist revenue to the Province for 1968 of
$345,844,560.
The upswing in off-season travel for the first six months of the year remained
very encouraging and was reinforced by much stronger gains in July and August
than usual. The fall season, however, while maintaining the high level of total visits
established in 1967, failed to establish any substantial increase. It is thought that
the poor weather that set in from the last half of August undoubtedly had an adverse
effect. It also points out the desirability of increasing our promotional efforts for
autumn travel.
One other factor tending to add to the growth of the industry is the gratifying
increase in the ratio of long-term visitors compared to the total. These figures are
available only from April on, but they do reflect additional progress in the two most
important problems facing us. They are: (1) To increase growth in the off-season
periods, and (2) to extend the length of indivdual visits.
It is felt that we have made important gains during 1968 to improve our industry in both these directions.
PERCENTAGE INCREASE OF U.S. BORDER CROSSINGS OF 1968
COMPARED TO 1967
30
25
20
15
10
Vlon(
j TERM
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
 P 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADVERTISING AND RESEARCH
Richard L. Colby, Executive Director
ADVERTISING
The Department expanded its broad programme of advertising this year. More
emphasis was given to off-season promotion and to co-operative ventures that would
build off-season tourist revenues. The promotion can be broken down into the following headings:—
Spring—Canadian-U.S.
Summer—Canadian-U.S.
Fall—Canadian-U.S.
Winter—Canadian-U.S.
New Market Development.
Co-operative Campaigns.
British Columbia.
Miscellaneous.
The over-all strategy was to maintain our peak summer business and to increase
the off-season business when we have tourist facilities that are not utilized to the
maximum.
Our theme " Beautiful British Columbia—The Four Season Vacationland " was
continued and utilized throughout all our campaigns.
DETAILS OF ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
Spring Campaign
For the first time the Department undertook a campaign specifically directed to
bringing visitors to British Columbia during our spring months. Four-colour magazine pages with illustrations of our spring scenery, flowers, and activities were placed
in magazines circulated to the Canadian Prairie Provinces and the western States of
the United States. Publications were as follows: Sunset, Holiday, Seattle Magazine,
Palm Springs Life, Los Angeles Times " West " Magazine, San Francisco Examiner-
Chronicle " California Living " Magazine; Canadian Prairie editions of Chatelaine,
Reader's Digest, and Maclean's Magazine.
Large-space newspaper advertisements supported our magazine campaign in
Spokane, Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, Calgary, Edmonton, and Regina.
Part of the radio schedule for our summer campaign was scheduled early in
the Canadian Prairie cities to support the spring campaign.
Summer Campaign
We followed the spring campaign with an even stronger summer campaign
directed at our three primary markets, which are the adjoining Provinces, the United
States Pacific Northwest, and California.
Emphasis varied for each of these three areas, but throughout the campaign we
dealt with the same essential qualities of British Columbia—magnificent scenic
beauty, friendly atmosphere, exciting choice of holiday activities. We extended these
basic qualities in promoting our summer holiday season. We used full-colour magazine advertisements and two-colour newspaper advertisements to sell " Beautiful
British Columbia—The Four Season Vacationland " as a " refreshing, friendly, and
exciting holiday land."
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 17
Full-page four-colour advertisements appeared in Sunset (two), Westways,
Motorland, National Motorist, Better Homes and Gardens, National Geographic,
Redbook, Image, Los Angeles Times " West" Magazine and Los Angeles Herald
" California Living" Magazine, San Francisco Examiner-Chronicle " California
Living " Magazine, Sports Afield, and Equestrian Trails.
Large two-colour newspaper advertisements appeared in 34 newspapers in
major markets in the Western United States and seven major Western Canadian
markets. The Western Canadian newspaper campaign was supported by radio spots,
many of them voiced by the famous film and television star, Sebastian Cabot. Specific radio campaigns were undertaken in Calgary during the Stampede to encourage
visitors to visit British Columbia after the Stampede and, similarly, in Edmonton
during Klondike Days.
Fall Campaign
As with our spring campaign this year, we placed greater emphasis on attracting tourists to British Columbia during the fall months. An extensive campaign of
one-page four-colour advertisements promoting the advantage of a fall holiday in
beautiful British Columbia were scheduled in Sunset, Westways, Motorland, National Motorist, Better Homes and Gardens, Holiday, Los Angeles Times " West"
Mazagine, and San Francisco Examiner-Chronicle " California Living " Magazine.
Large-space newspaper advertisements appeared in 20 Western United States markets and seven Western Canadian markets.
Winter Campaign
Our strategy in promoting British Columbia in the winter months is to point out
that we have the mildest and the most livable climate in Canada during the winter
and the fact that there is great entertainment and other activities available in our
major cities.
In the Prairie Provinces we use a magazine campaign in Reader's Digest and
Time Magazine, supported by large-space newspaper advertisements in the major
markets in Alberta and Saskatchewan, and advertisements in the Free Press Weekly
and Western Producer, two large-circulation farm papers.
To the south of us, in the State of Washington, we use Seattle Magazine and
the Seattle and Tacoma newspapers to promote " Fun for a Weekend in Beautiful
British Columbia."
Another phase of our winter campaign is the promotion of ski-ing in British
Columbia. We use a series of advertisements in the top ski magazines serving Western United States and Canada. In one of these publications, Ski Magazine, we
arranged to have the Department's new ski folder inserted for the subscribers who
live in Washington, Oregon, Northern California, Montana, and Alberta.
Co-operative Campaigns
The Department has been a leader in both Canada and United States in undertaking co-operative campaigns with other Provinces, States, and with the private
sector of the travel industry. These campaigns allowed us to develop new markets
at a greatly reduced cost.
(1) Again this year we co-operated with Western Airlines in its " North Country Adventures " campaign. With Western Airlines we participated in a
campaign promoting the Pacific Northwest to the people of California.
We made a tremendous impact on the California market at a very small
cost to the Department.
 P 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dr. Gordon Shrum and Mr. R. L. Colby serve tea and crumpets to one of the numerous
visiting editors during the Los Angeles promotion.
(2) For many years the Department has carried on the " Two-nation Vacation " advertising campaign jointly with the States of Washington and
Oregon. This year our campaign was a four-page four-colour insert promoting the Pacific Northwest as a holiday destination. This insert appeared in Holiday Magazine, Venture, and Saturday Review. The
majority of circulation was in the Eastern United States, allowing us to
get the British Columbia message to these markets at one-third the normal
cost.
(3) We also continued with the Western Canada campaign with Alberta and
Saskatchewan. This campaign was directed to the people in Ontario and
Quebec to encourage them to visit Western Canada. This again gave us
a very great impact in these markets at a very reasonable cost because the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau paid one-half the cost and each
Province one-sixth.
(4) To capitalize on the growing " fly and drive " travel market, we entered
into a joint campaign with Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Western Airlines,
and Hertz in the California market. The theme of this campaign was " Jet
to Beautiful British Columbia, then Drive a Great Travel Bargain with
Hertz."
The Department also participated in a full-page two-colour advertisement in
Skiing Magazine with Grouse Mountain, Whistler, North Star, Red Mountain, Apex,
Big White, and Silver Star ski areas.
British Columbia Campaign
While the travel business was at its peak during July and August, a radio campaign was carried out within the Province.   This was to encourage our own citizens
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 19
to travel in British Columbia, and to encourage the visitors already here to stay
longer with us and to see still more of the Province.
Miscellaneous
Our policy of advertising in trade magazines to promote the Province as a place
to hold conventions was continued.
A new departure this year consisted of a four-colour insert in the Hollywood
Reporter and Variety. This attractive advertisement pointed out the advantages of
film production in British Columbia to producers located in the entertainment capital
of the world. The Department has received many encouraging inquiries resulting
from this promotion.
A fresh series of travel stories was prepared covering different regions of the
Province. These, illustrated by Department photographs and distributed to many
newspapers in our Canadian and American markets, resulted in additional publicity.
The Department keeps the regions, members of the Provincial Tourist Advisory
Council, and the private sector of industry informed of all advertising campaigns and
schedules, and encourages them to tie in with the Department's promotions so that
they can get greater impact for their own advertising.
PROVINCIAL TOURIST ADVISORY COUNCIL
Once again the spring meeting was held in Victoria, and the general fall meeting
was held in Nelson. The main theme for the latter, a programme on how to
extend the tourist season, resulted in many discussions focusing on this problem.
It is also apparent that the tourist regions are anxious to do what they can to
improve off-season travel.
GENERAL
The Department was represented at the following conventions or annual meetings: Cariboo Tourist Association (Region F), Northwest British Columbia Chambers of Commerce and Alaskan affiliates (Region G), Vancouver Island Publicity
Bureau (Region A), Federal-Provincial Conference on Tourism, British Columbia
Motels and Resorts Association, Western Travel Directors, Pacific Northwest Travel
Directors, and Provincial Tourist Advisory Council.
Other promotions were a fishing trip by Mr. Glenn Ford and his son Peter, and
another by Mr. and Mrs. Harve Presnell, both for the purpose of obtaining publicity
for the Province, and motion-picture footage.
American Border crossings for the last four months of the year were about equal
to 1967, but the increases to the end of August were again very satisfactory and
showed still larger gains in the number of long-term visitors. The first three months
of the year also showed more-than-average percentage increases.
 P 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION AND CONTRIBUTING GRANTS
J. Buckley, Assistant Executive Director
General administration duties involving personnel, accounts, statistics, and related correspondence again showed a marked increase in 1968, all of which reflect
the over-all growth and development of the Department.
The generally healthy condition of the visitor industry was also reflected in the
increased number of inquiries from interested individuals and organizations for a
projection of trends to assist them in their plans for expansion and development in
fields related to tourism.
PRINTING
Road Map—1,000,000. The annual revisions to the road map, fishing and
camp-site guide were undertaken in conjunction with cartographers and with the
co-operation of other departments of government. Expressions of satisfaction from
the general public regarding the major change in format undertaken a year ago
continue to be received.   The revised print run was 1,000,000 copies.
General Folder (Four-season Vacationland)—500,000.
Accommodation Directory—750,000.
Ski British Columbia—100,000.
Autumn-Winter-Spring—75,000.
Posters—12,000 (2,000 each of six subjects).
Ski Poster—5,000.
Golf Folder— 50,000.
Agents' Manual—5,000.
Calendar of Events: Spring and Summer—150,000; Fall and Winter—50,000.
Road Report—200,000.
Parliament Buildings—50,000.
Helmcken House—10,000.
Q.S.L. Cards—25,000.
Los Angeles Promotion Report—1,000.
Pacific Northwest Promotion Report—500.
EDUCATION
Liaison in this field continued during the year through representation at meetings of Chambers of Commerce at Pemberton, Penticton, Langley, Kimberley, and
Smithers. A slide presentation on the importance of tourism was presented to the
Kiwanis Club and the Bottlers' Association of British Columbia in Victoria.
On behalf of the Minister, a keynote address was delivered to the annual meeting of the Oregon State Motor Association, attended by 600-odd members.
Two half-hour programmes over station KTNT-TV, Channel 11, Seattle-
Tacoma, were undertaken as special guest on the Maury Rider show, " Outdoors,"
and the women's programme, " Today."
A special paper outlining the growth to be expected in the next decade in all
facets of the tourist industry was prepared and presented at the two-day Economic
Outlook Conference in Vernon.
Assistance was given to individual visiting travel writers and members of the
staffs of other Provincial and Federal Government travel departments.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY, 1968
P 21
;i;p
Mr. J. Buckley with his 1967 " Man of the Year " award.
TOURS, TRAVEL WRITERS, EDITORS, RADIO AND TELEVISION,
AND TRAVEL AGENTS
1968 Kootenay Caravan
The 1968 press tour, in conjunction with Vancouver Island Coach Lines, was
planned, the route researched, and co-operation obtained from individuals and
organizations along the way in early spring, with the tour taking place in June.
Thirty-two writers, editors, television directors, and cameramen were given a comprehensive six-day look at the Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley, the Boundary area,
West and East Kootenays, Columbia River Valley, and Kootenay, Yoho, and Glacier
National Parks, and the eastern portion of the Trans-Canada Highway, including
Rogers Pass, with the tour ending at Kelowna, where the participants departed for
their homes by air. Concrete evidence of the publicity return from this tour is
recorded in the tour report, which contains press clippings of stories and photographs.
Publicity gathered to date from this minimum investment by the Department, computed on a space rate schedule, represents a value of well over $150,000.
Joint Tours, Department of Travel Industry and
Canadian Pacific Air Lines
Seventy travel agents from California and Europe were flown to the Province
by Canadian Pacific Air Lines and were conducted on a four-day tour from Victoria-
Vancouver to the Fraser Canyon, Kamloops, and the Okanagan. It is expected this
tour will bring to the Province additional visitors through the marketing of package
and group tours by these important agents.
 P 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy travel agents were flown to the Province from Japan and South-east
Asia. These agents were met in Vancouver and taken on a tour of the Lower Mainland and lower Vancouver Island. Interest in British Columbia package tours was
stimulated through this tour, which showed British Columbia is a gateway to the
Orient.
Joint Tour, Department of Travel Industry and Air Canada
The Department was represented in London, England, during August to arrange
details for a joint tour of 70 travel agents and writers from the United Kingdom and
Europe. Final arrangements saw this group, representing nine nations, flown to
Victoria from London and Frankfurt in October. Again, a four-day tour introduced
these visitors to the attractions of the Province, and it is expected that the resultant
publicity of the Department's minimal investment will generate sales abroad of
package tours to the Province.
Canadian Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Tour
At the request of the Speaker of the House, this Department assisted in the
10-day tour of the Province by 70 parliamentarians representing the 10 Provinces of
Canada. Major industrial developments, such as the W. A. C. Bennett Dam, the
Kitimat plant of the Aluminum Company of Canada, and logging operations at
Crown Zellerbach, were visited, showing the visitors the diversity of British Columbia
industries and its attractions as a place to visit.
Hospitality Seminars
In conjunction with the Department of Education and the co-ordinator of the
food trade and accommodation industry, seminars were held in Smithers, Grand
Forks, Radium, and Invermere. These seminars were extremely well attended,
drawing participants from primary and secondary segments of the visitor industry.
The prime purpose of the seminars is to establish in the minds of people who are
in direct contact with our visitors, both management and employees, the importance
of being well informed of the scenic wonders and attractions in the area, and to
ensure that the visitors are so warmly and hospitably received that they will wish
to return for subsequent visits. Word-of-mouth advertising, which would then
undoubtedly follow, cannot be purchased—it must be earned.
Advisory Committee, Food Trade and Accommodation Industry
The Department is represented on this Committee on a continuing basis. To
encourage the expansion of the visitor indusry, representatives from the motel, hotel,
and restaurant industry join with representatives of the National Housekeepers'
Association, Chef d'Cuisine Association, labour-union representatives, the Department of Manpower, the Department of Education, and others to discuss ways and
means to improve the services of those catering to the travelling public.
Provincial Tourist Advisory Council
The Department is represented at both the spring and fall meetings of this
Council and, in addition, is represented on two sub-committees—the Green Book
Committee and Resolutions Committee.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 23
Contributing Grants
As in previous years, the Contributing Grants Plan plays an important role in
the development and promotion of the visitor industry in the Province. The eight
tourist regions will once again utilize their shares of the 1968 allotment of $175,000
in the production of regional literature, operation of information booths, and in
approved external promotions. Administrative duties in connection with the disbursement of this fund are complex because of the diversified plans of each region.
Miscellaneous
The Assistant Executive Director also participated in the Department's annual
promotion in Los Angeles, and successfully completed the Civil Service correspondence course on basic public administration.
 P 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LOS ANGELES
H. Harrod
As of February 1, 1968, the contract with the retainer service, Transportation
Consultants Inc., in Hollywood, terminated, and the Los Angeles office of the Department was established in premises at 8833 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 407, Los
Angeles 90069.
From this office the representative concentrated during the spring months on
obtaining appointments with service clubs and employee recreation clubs for the
slide presentation of the April goodwill delegation to Los Angeles.
In view of the intention to make the Los Angeles office available to the California representatives of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce, a secretary was hired by that Department at the end of May and her
services made available to the representative of the Department of Travel Industry.
After participating in the April goodwill tour, the Los Angeles office continued
general promotion of travel to British Columbia throughout the Southern California
area by servicing mail and telephone inquiries for travel agents, transportation companies, and travel clubs, by obtaining publicity for the Province in the various media
of press, radio and television, and by activating special promotions wherever possible.
Among the special promotions in which the Los Angeles office took part were
the following: (a) The 1968 Academy Sweepstakes sponsored by the Hollywood
Citizen News and Valley Times; (b) a British Columbia luncheon of the Friday
Morning Club, attended by some 800 influential club-women; (c) a British Columbia travel display in the Canada exhibit at Topanga Plaza Mall, arranged by the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau; and (d) the Long Beach Independent Press
Telegram Metropolitan Fishing Derby. Arrangements were also made for the showing of British Columbia travel films to a number of travel-oriented clubs, including
the large Institute of Lifetime Learning in Long Beach.
Two return trips to the Province were made by the representative for the purpose of familiarization—one in June to join the Kootenay Caravan, and the other
in October-November to meet travel agents from Europe and to travel the newly
opened Yellowhead Route and Highway 16 East.
The latter part of the year was devoted to preparations for the 1969 goodwill
tour to Los Angeles, scheduled for March 24th to 28th.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY, 1968 P 25
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO
Newton P. Steacy
The distribution of literature from British Columbia House from January 1 to
December 31, 1968, was 498,000 pieces.
Office inquiries during the year amounted to 11,297; film showings, 171;
attendance at film showings, 13,507; requests for information (telephone, letters,
etc.), 4,383.
There was a total of 766 ferry reservations on the " Queen of Prince Rupert,"
as follows: Passenger reservations, 368; car reservations, 208; passenger reservations via Gray Line, 190.
The following travel shows were held: January 27th, Southland Mall, estimated attendance, 225,000; February 7th, Mayfield Mall, estimated attendance,
175,000; February 17th, Concord Mall, estimated attendance, 350,000; April
10th, Hayward Mall, estimated attendance, 300,000; May 16th, Mountain View
Mall (10 days), estimated attendance, 325,000; May 29th, Topanga Mall, estimated
attendance, 275,000; June 25th, Sunland Mall, estimated attendance, 300,000;
July 15th, Sacramento Florin Mall, estimated attendance, 250,000; a total of
2,200,000 exposures. Three of these shows were held in conjunction with the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau; Alberta, Air Canada, Canadian Pacific Air
Lines, Canadian Immigration, and British Columbia House participated.
The British Columbia display consisted of 16"x20" transparencies showing
various scenes.   It is the most attractive display we have ever shown in California.
Shopping-mall travel shows have proved to be very effective. Those attending are in the higher earning brackets of industrial areas, thus allowing them to
have a great interest to travel. These areas also include people in all walks of
life who travel in their cars with their families. Shoppers in the malls allow time
to visit the displays and discuss their interests in travel in a leisurely manner. A
shopping mall is entirely closed, with the stores opening on the concourse where
all traffic enters from the main entrances and must pass through to reach the stores
and the display areas.
Films shown in the mall theatre from time to time are provided by the organizations having displays.
I have attended and addressed six travel shows of Western Airlines featuring
travel films of British Columbia. A similar programme has been carried out in
conjunction with Canadian Pacific Air Lines in California.
Contacts are made with senior citizens' organizations, where films are shown
and talks describe British Columbia as a good place to holiday.
The growing interest in travel to British Columbia has interested transportation companies operating ships in the tourist industry to develop ship connections
between California, British Columbia, and Alaska ports.
The Italian Princess Line will have 12 trips from Los Angeles and San Francisco to British Columbia and Skagway in 1969, with a two-day stop in Victoria,
two days in Vancouver, and one day in Prince Rupert.
The Princess Line has alloted space to two travel agencies on each voyage,
one from Alaska and one from Portland. Both have offices in the United States,
and will feature British Columbia in their itineraries on these cruise ships.
Matson Line of San Francisco has finalized plans for three trips from California to British Columbia and Alaska, with stops in Vancouver and Victoria.
They will use a ship previously used on the regular run to Australia.
4
 P 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The President Line will use S.S. " Roosevelt" for three cruises to British
Columbia and Alaska, with the usual stops at Vancouver and Victoria before sailing
the Inside Passage.
In 1970 P. & O. Line plans three cruises to British Columbia and Alaska as
part of a world-cruise itinerary.
Sailing from California ports, these vessels will carry 400 passengers on each
trip, approximately an additional 5,000 tourists to British Columbia.
Air travel increases as the air lines use our films and displays at meetings to
stimulate individual and group travel.
I have also worked with aero clubs in California, now in increasing numbers
flying to British Columbia for holidays, fishing and hunting trips.
Tourist traffic from the mid-west and southern States is being increased through
the co-operation of transportation companies that sponsor tours and individual
travellers. These companies use our literature and films. The bus tours spend
increased amounts of time in British Columbia as they now operate from their own
areas, and are extending the time of longer tours to allow more time in areas of
interest. On trips to Alaska, British Columbia has these tourists for an average
of six to eight days in the Province.
British Columbia House worked with Greyhound in San Francisco to run
tours from California to Vancouver, Prince George, Prince Rupert, and to return
by British Columbia Ferries to Victoria.
Our work with the automobile clubs creates interest in developing the family
to travel by automobile.   This type of travel is increasing each year.
The Commissioner each year attends the automobile club seminar in San
Francisco, where all the officers of the Northern California clubs discuss plans for
the coming year's programme. At these meetings the Commissioner is invited to
address the gathering, show films on British Columbia, and answer questions.
Throughout the year the various offices of the automobile club use the services of
British Columbia House for general information. This stems from the seminar that
has now been attended for the past years.
Mr. Roderick Fraser of the Department has been added to the staff of British
Columbia House to assist in the continuing growth of the work by the San
Francisco office.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 27
ACCOMMODATION
Arthur E. Abram
GENERAL
The Tourist Accommodation Office of the Department completed one of its
busiest years in the inspection and registration of Government-approved tourist accommodation and production of the British Columbia Tourist Directory.
REGULATIONS
Important to the industry was a complete study and revision of the Tourist
Accommodation Regulations pursuant to the British Columbia Government Travel
Bureau Act. Several new regulations were introduced, the most important being the
publishing of tourist accommodation rates in the Directory and the posting of rates
in all units at the tourist accommodation.
FIELD WORK
The field work of inspection, approval, and registration was completed within
the period required by the programme, and considerably more time was required in
completing calls due to the inclusion of rates in each establishment listing.
Again the work was completed by six tourist accommodation counsellors who
have many years' experience in the motel, hotel, and resort classifications of the
industry. The experience of these men working with the industry is invaluable to
operators of tourist accommodation, and particularly to those who are new to the
business. The scope of their assistance can be better evaluated when consideration
is given to this recent statistic: 14 per cent of our tourist accommodation establishments changed ownership during the year.
The co-operation of the fieldmen to complete the enormous job of covering the
Province in the limited time required before Directory publication is to be commended, as is the effort by all staff members in completing the work on the Directory
to the deadline date.
REGISTRATION
Registration of tourist accommodation establishments to July 31, 1968, totalled
1,993, with 7,920,351 units of accommodation available during peak periods. One
hundred and fifty-eight establishments were removed from the register of Government-approved accommodation. Of this number, some declined registration, while
others did not meet the standards required. Seventy-one new establishments were
registered.
DIRECTORY PUBLICATION
Deadline dates affecting publication of the British Columbia Tourist Directory were met as required by the programme designed to have the 1969 Directory
available for distribution on January 1st.
The inclusion of comprehensive rates in each Directory listing required a change
in the number of words permitted, and it was necessary to print the Directory in
smaller type size to maintain the book in its present desirable format.
During the year the Department distributed 750,000 copies of the British Columbia Tourist Directory, and in the closing months of the year 750,000 copies were
requisitioned for 1969.   Distribution is to Canada, United States, and abroad.
 P 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
sign!
TOURIST ACCOMMODATION RATES
As mentioned previously, the regulation making it mandatory to publish rates
for each Directory listing was adopted, and a complete range in rates for all accommodation is quoted in the forthcoming edition. The industry is to be commended
for its interest and co-operation in submitting rates for publication.
INQUIRIES
During the year 173 inquiries sought information related to the building and
operation of tourist accommodation in the Province.
DEPARTMENTAL CO-OPERATION
With the introduction of new Camp-site and Mobile-home Parks Regulations
by the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, it was necessary to
work closely with this Department regarding the new regulations by our system of
Government approval of tourist accommodation.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY, 1968 P 29
Again, as in previous years, this office appreciated the willing co-operation of
the Department of Highways and the Fish and Wildlife Branch of the Department of
Recreation and Conservation in the field coverage.
PROMOTION
During the year senior staff members of the Accommodation Office assisted in
the promotional programme of the Department in the " kla-how-ya " tour to the
Pacific Northwest and in various sport-show promotions.
MEETINGS
The Director, as Chairman of the Green Book Committee, attended all meetings of the Provincial Tourist Advisory Council and other meetings within the
industry.
BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL ESTABLISHMENTS AND UNITS
BY CLASSIFICATION
Number of Approved
Classification Establishments
Hotels  197
Motor hotels  99
Apartment hotels  8
Motels   605
Motor courts   25 8
Auto courts  20
Resorts—Year round   2 3
Summer   111
Winter  Nil
Fishing  28
Lodges  65
Dude ranches  24
Beach cottages  59
Bungalows   15
Cabins   88
Trailer parks   71
Houseboats  4
Camp-sites  175
Camping cabanas  1
Fishing camps   122
Hunting camps  19
Total   1,993
 P 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA" MAGAZINE
B. H. Atkins
The summer of 1968 issue of "Beautiful British Columbia" magazine saw
the printing order reach 190,000. Paid subscribers exceeded 110,000 for the
year, and a slight increase was shown in news-stand sales.
Paid subscriptions in favour of United Kingdom residents still headed the
mailing list to the amount of approximately 40 per cent, with British Columbia 20
per cent, rest of Canada 16 per cent, United States 15 per cent, and the remainder
being shipped to other countries.
The magazine in 1968 reproduced more than 350 photographs in 31 articles
with supporting maps and feature paintings. The stories portrayed a wide cross-
section of our way of life, the natural beauty of the Province, while the articles
were of definite interest to the potential visitor to British Columbia. The promotional value of the publication cannot be shown in dollar returns. However, at
a recent convention of North American publishers, attended by magazine representatives, we were made aware that " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine is
known, read, and held in very high esteem as a leader in the field of promotional
literature in North America.
" This ... Is British Columbia," a special full-colour 100-page publication produced by " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine, and released in November, 1967, proved most successful. The original 100,000 print order is virtually
sold out. The remaining few are expected to be sold by the business office to
meet the 1968 Christmas demands.
Initial plans are now under way to produce and release Volume 2 of " This
... Is British Columbia" in 1969. Other promotional pieces are also under
consideration.
The editorial office assisted the parent department in the layout and design of
new maps, brochures, and advertising material.
A photographic exhibit of 100 framed full-colour prints from "Beautiful
British Columbia " magazine collection was produced. This salon will be displayed in Canada and the United States.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 31
CONVENTIONS AND SPECIAL PROMOTIONS
K. B. Woodward
CONVENTIONS
Since 1963 the number of conventions held in British Columbia has shown a
steady increase. In 1963, conventions contributed $6,668,400 to our economy.
In 1968, revenue derived from conventions is tabbed at $15,237,126, which is an
increase of $878,141 over 1967. We must point out that convention revenue is
derived by projecting the number of conventions one year in advance. The conventions booked after our lists were computed are not included in these figures.
Mr. P. D. Crofton represented British Columbia at the American Society of
Association Executives convention in Atlanta, Georgia, during 1968. Here an
effective programme outlining British Columbia's convention facilities was presented to more than 1,000 convention organizers.
Special attention was given to the promotion of pre- and post-convention tours
to British Columbia, and has proved an important part of group business to our
Province.
SPECIAL PROMOTIONS
British Columbia's Los Angeles promotion has become an annual event. Tourist promoters from all over Canada and the United States view with envy this
gigantic blitz that British Columbians aim at the Los Angeles tourist market. It
is obvious from the steady increase of tourist traffic from this area that these promotions are most successful. In 1968 the Department of Travel Industry, under
the direction of the Deputy Minister, organized and carried out the biggest-ever
Southern California promotion. More programmes than ever before were presented in five working-days. Personnel from the Department of Travel Industry
along with civic and tourist-minded people from British Columbia explained to
thousands of potential visitors to British Columbia the advantages of vacationing
in Canada's most beautiful Province.
Thirty-five accredited travel agents from California and 35 selected travel
agents from 10 countries in Europe were invited to tour British Columbia in a
joint promotion of the Department of Travel Industry and Canadian Pacific Air
Lines. This novel situation of mixing Californians and Europeans proved most
successful and resulted in increasing traffic from both areas.
In co-operation with Canadian Pacific Air Lines, 325 Canadian travel agents
were contacted in Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton, and Calgary to encourage visitors from our neighbouring Provinces to consider British Columbia for their
vacations.
The American Society of Travel Agents met in Puerto Rico in 1968, and the
Department of Travel Industry of British Columbia was there to encourage travel
agents from all over the world to sell British Columbia as a destination.
In October, 400 travel agents from Los Angeles and San Francisco were
presented a programme offering tourist packages that originate in British Columbia
for retail throughout the Southern California area. This particular promotion was
geared to encourage off-season travel and ski packages to British Columbia.
 P 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
"adding the SSSS^B^^to^JJTJJ
April promotion.  Left to right: WorldChampio*JockeyJJ   y ^ ^     ^
SfiSTStSoSl^d.t and general manager of Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer.
■J" umoul t0 the WO-member Los Angeles Breakfast Club in
Dr. O. M. ^ ^eecP Aat was broadcast Hve over radl0 station KRKD.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968
P 33
Mr. K. B. Woodward addressing a meeting of Southern California travel agents at the
Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles.
Mrs. J. Gear McEntyre, wife of the Consul-General of Canada, the Honourable J. Gear
McEntyre (right), chats with guests at a reception in Los Angeles, April 1st. Dr. Gordon
M. Shrum, British Columbia Hydro Authority Chairman (left), shares in the pleasantries,
while Mr. Laurie J. Wallace, Deputy Provincial Secretary (extreme left), looks on.
 P 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following is a list of other promotions organized and carried out during
1968:—
KNEW—San Francisco radio promotion.
Thrifti-Mart—shopping-centre promotion.
Independent Press Telegram—Long Beach Fishing Derby promotion.
American Women in Television and Radio Society promotion.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner promotion.
Guess the Oscar Winner.
Television promotions—" Dating Game," " Hollywood Squares," " You
Don't Say," " Let's Make a Deal."
Japanese travel agents—visitors.
Two innovations arranged and completed have changed the trend of our travel
agents' promotion for this Department:—
(1) The printing and distributing of the Travel Agents' Manual, which lists
independent and escorted travel packages that originate in British Columbia. These lists show prices and commission arrangements that can be
made by retailers with British Columbia travel wholesalers. Five thousand
copies were printed, with the subsequent demand so great that the stock
was depleted in three months.
(2) A British Columbia folder shell for use by travel agents to advertise packages of their choice was printed and distributed during this period. Here
again the demand quickly depleted our stock, and requests are still being
received for these important promotional pieces.
This section of the Department of Travel Industry is also charged with the responsibility of meeting visiting dignitaries interested in travel and to show them as
much of this Province as possible. Visitors to British Columbia in 1968 included
people from Holland, Japan, United States, Great Britain, and most of the other
Provinces in Canada.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968
P 35
EXHIBITS AND DISPLAYS
P. D. Crofton
The Department of Travel Industry participated in six travel and vacation
shows during 1968. They were: Portland Boat, Trailer and Sport Show, Portland,
Oreg.; San Francisco Sport and Boat Show, San Francisco, Calif.; Los Angeles
Sports Vacation and Travel Show, Los Angeles, Calif, (in this show, participants
from private industry on the Los Angeles promotion helped man the booth); Canadian National Sportsmen's Show, Toronto, Ont.; Calgary Fish and Game Association Sportsmen's Show, Calgary, Alta.; and the Northwest Canadian Trade Fair,
Edmonton, Alta.
These shows had an attendance of 1,078,980 and were staffed by personnel
from this Department. There were wide varieties of questions, not only on travel
to British Columbia, but also from people interested in starting their own business,
finding employment, or retiring.
In addition to these shows, the Department, through its membership in the
Pacific Northwest Travel Association, was represented and had its literature distributed at travel and vacation shows in Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Dallas, and St. Louis, with a total attendance of 1,751,208.
Department personnel also participated in Western Airlines' " North Country
Adventures," and the Henry Davis New York Travel Industry Trade Show in conjunction with Air Canada.   These travel seminars were attended by specially selected
Public Information Officer Barry Lee explains British Columbia at the 23rd Annual
Los Angeles Sportsmen's Vacation and Travel Show, March 29 to April 7, 1968.
 P 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Stole was first prize for the delegates' draw.
interest in group and individual travel to this P^mce Det)artment in
The Department's exhibit at the Niagara International Centre Exhtbition BmW
-^^^^
,lo(t„M f„r in excess Gf 4,000,000 visitors during 1968.
place to visit.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY, 1968 P 37
INFORMATION CENTRE, VANCOUVER
G. Ed Meade
Record numbers of visitors made use of the Vancouver Information Office
during 1968. Early spring travel by United States visitors was again a significant
factor in the 13-per-cent increase over 1967 in travel inquiries. These increases
began to show in February, and reached a peak in May. July was also a high
month, showing a 32-per-cent increase over the previous year. Of particular interest was the heavy volume of local inquiries during midday periods in summer, and
it would be safe to estimate that fewer than 80 per cent of the total number of
persons coming into the centre are recorded on tally sheets at the counters. The
self-serve literature racks required servicing twice daily.
The Vancouver gain compares favourably with the 12-per-cent increase in
border crossings into British Columbia at Douglas and a 1%-per-cent decrease in
westbound Rogers Pass traffic.
A study of camper-trailer travel, done through co-operation of, the Director of
Information Services, showed that on the Trans-Canada Highway 46 per cent of
all inquiries from May 1st to September 30th were made by operators of self-
contained accommodation. The critical shortage of camper-trailer accommodation
in the Lower Mainland area was again quite apparent, although one large trailer
park, able to accommodate 200 vehicles, came progressively near to completion
during the season. A significant step was made in the acceptance of trailer caravans
in Richmond Municipality, and the Vancouver office serviced several other large
trailer groups in the Lower Mainland area. A series of meetings with Richmond
businessmen prompted an excellent format for the entertaining of a " Good Sam "
trailer group through liaison with the Canadian Government Travel Bureau in Los
Angeles and the publishers of Camper Coachman Magazine.
Also noted in the Vancouver Centre was a sharp increase in the number of
travellers from Ontario, Quebec, and Eastern United States.
Writers and broadcasters from many countries were given assistance throughout
the year: Raymond Wohlrabe, completing a book on the Northwest which has been
published by Lippencott; Hugo Volkersz from Amsterdam, compiling photography
for a lecture tour covering the Lower Mainland area; Louie Hamel, senior editor
from Reader's Digest, doing a tour book on Canada; Edmund Parks, travel writer
for the Montreal Star; Ray Epsteen from California; and Samuel Cohen, a Spanish
writer. Dr. Otto Schonherr, chief of the Austria Press Agency, was among the
important writer-visitors.
An example of the importance of the Department's policy of ensuring that
visitors are always well served came with the visit of Ion Garnett-Orme, a British
banker. He had been referred to this office by Lord Fraser of Lonsdale, who toured
Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland two years ago.
One of the most significant organizations to come into full-scale operation
during the year was the Garibaldi Olympic Development Association, which received the support of the Canadian Olympic group in its plans to bring the 1976
Winter Olympics to Whistler Mountain. The fact that Whistler has reached this
high level of approval has already brought much greater public interest in this local
ski area.
Another Mainland attraction which should now be rated as an international
spectacle is the trained killer whale at the Vancouver Aquarium. This outstanding
visitor highlight has now been joined by the MacMillan Planetarium, opened in
late fall.
 P 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Travel counsellors in the Vancouver office also noted that British Columbia's
historic sites gain rapidly as attractions and account for many extra travel days.
In 1967 it was noted that technical and vocational courses were turning more
and more toward a better understanding of the visitor industry. This trend continued in 1968, and the Vancouver supervisor took an active part in a number of
the courses offered by British Columbia Vocational School and British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
While the subject lies outside the Department of Travel Industry, it should also
be recorded that there is a definite increase in the number of business and industrial
inquiries at the Vancouver office. Every attempt has been made to maintain
materials from the appropriate Government departments to fill these requirements.
It would appear that many business visitors to Vancouver return as vacationers,
and vice versa.
During the year the Vancouver supervisor took part in a number of radio and
television broadcasts in the Vancouver area and while on promotion trips out of the
Province. One of the most consistent users of Film and Photographic Branch films
is KTNT-TV, Seattle, the result of a long-standing friendship with Maury Rider
of that station.
The Vancouver Centre maintained window displays to attract the public. One,
a collection of Indian art and books about our native people, was very popular.
This office was particularly fortunate in its stability of staff throughout the
year, and full credit should be given to counsellors, permanent and temporary, for
the excellent way they handled even the most complicated inquiries.
TRAVEL INQUIRIES OUTSTRIP ALL OTHER INFORMATION SERVICES AT THE
BRITISH COLUMBIA INFORMATION CENTRE IN VANCOUVER
30,000
29,000
28,000
27,000
26,000
25,000
24,000
23,000
22,000
21,000
20,000
T
R
A
T
V
R
A
E
L
T
O
V
E
L
O
T
r
H
T
O
A
V
E
H
E
T
R
H
E
E
R
L
R
1966
1967
1968
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 39
INFORMATION SERVICES
Ed Norman
TRAVEL INFORMATION CENTRES
The trend toward a longer tourist season continues; May and September
showed considerable increase over previous years. Key information centres are
being kept open longer to accommodate and assist this trend.
Statistics to the end of September for outside centres showed heavy increases
over previous years. Abbotsford, 98,099 visitors compared to 69,547 for 1967;
Douglas, 89,045 compared to 62,442; Osoyoos, 21,763 compared to 20,397; Sicamous, 19,658 compared to 19,410; and Banff, 9,120 compared to 7,694.
Douglas Centre remained open to the end of November to care for continued
United States traffic. Traffic through this centre for October and November was
10,754 visitors.
A slight decline in camper, trailer, and tent-trailer traffic was shown this year
at Abbotsford, with 47 per cent of its total in this type of traffic compared to 51 per
cent during 1967.
Douglas shows only 12 per cent of this type of traffic, while Sicamous and
Osoyoos show 58 per cent, compared to 53 per cent for 1967.
Ontario and Quebec traffic continues to show a marked increase. It is to be
noted that the traffic through the Abbotsford Information Centre has increased 145
per cent since its opening in 1964.
Travel counselling service was maintained on board the ships on the main
routes of British Columbia Ferries during the summer months. This service requires
20 trained travel counsellors, and continues to be an excellent sales programme.
Three counsellors were employed during the summer months at Vancouver
International Airport. These girls were multilingual and met visitors arriving from
overseas flights. This was a pilot programme and received great assistance from
the Department of Transport, customs and immigration officials, as well as major
air lines. It is intended to continue this programme next year at the new terminal
facilities in Vancouver.
LITERATURE DISTRIBUTION
In February we took delivery of the Phillipsburg Master Mailer. Following a
personnel-training period, this machine is now packaging the majority of our travel
brochures and also " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine. We received excellent
co-operation from the Canadian Government Travel Bureau in setting up this operation. It sent out its chief machine operator for one week, and his assistance was
invaluable.
This machine and the Freiden Flexowriter have speeded up our operation so
that we no longer have any backlog and can keep all our mailing service up to date.
To reduce the demands on our mailing service, we are increasingly exploiting
areas that can be served with bulk shipments. The Canadian Government Travel
Bureau, with its far-flung outlets, is one field now being served in this fashion. The
two major Canadian air lines are giving excellent co-operation in this endeavour.
Very shortly arrangements will be completed with the Department of External
Affairs to gain global distribution via its 125 world-wide offices.
Shipping costs of bulk material have been drastically reduced by utilizing a
central shipping warehouse in Vancouver.   At the present time this service covers
 P 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Moving some of the tons of travel literature necessary to fill the demands of the
Los Angeles tourist promotion.
our three major promotional items.    Other items will be added to this system as
details can be worked out which will further reduce shipping costs.
PERSONNEL TRAINING
In May the Travel Counsellors' Training Course was held. Through the cooperation of the Department of Education and the Vancouver School Board, space
was provided for us at Vancouver College, which proved to be a good central
location.
Instructional assistance was given by experts in many fields, drawn from many
Government departments at all levels, and also from many transportation and tourist
areas. The course enrolment was much higher than in the past, and as a result it
was necessary to run two classes simultaneously. The course was followed by a
familiarization tour throughout the Province by 35 of our own counsellors.
In-service training of permanent staff continues in order to train effective travel
counsellors.
PROMOTION
During January, assistance was given in transporting and staffing our display
in the San Francisco Sports and Vacation Show.
As part of our Pacific Northwest promotion, carried out from March 2nd to
8th, it was my duty to head the team covering Vancouver, Wash., and Portland,
Salem, and Eugene, Oreg.
Also during March, I assisted in staffing our display at the Toronto Sports and
Vacation Show.
Under the direction of the Deputy Minister, it was my task to act as coordinator of the extensive Southern California promotion from March 31st to April
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 41
6th.   During this period I also worked in transporting, setting up, and staffing our
display in the Los Angeles Sports and Vacation Show.
FIELD WORK
During May the travel counsellors' training programme under my direction
made a fairly extensive tour through the Province. Throughout the summer, inspection and liaison trips were made to all information centres on a regular basis.
Two trips were made through the new Yellowhead route to ascertain future
information centre requirements.
Several trips were made concerning the relocation of our Abbotsford Information Centre. This will be set up in the future, with the co-operation of the
Parks Branch, in the boundaries of Atchelitz Creek Park.
I attended the ceremonies at the inauguration of 'Ksan Village.
Two extensive trips were made through the Province checking on visitor attractions, fishing, accommodation, camping facilities, and other tourist matters.
 P 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERSONNEL
G. L. Levy, Administrative Officer
The Personnel Office processed 73 personnel requisitions through the Civil
Service Commission to fill permanent and temporary positions in the Department.
Many interviews were held as a result of competitions for vacant positions.
The Accounts Section processed all requisitions for supplies and equipment,
and all expenses incurred by the Department.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 43
PUBLICITY
Harry P. McKeever
Seven issues of the British Columbia Government News were prepared, one
a special edition to encourage tourism. One hundred and twelve special stories
were written for editors and publishers in several countries. In this respect the cooperation of the Film and Photographic Branch, by making appropriate pictures
available, is hereby acknowledged.
The year 1968 saw a marked increase in the influx of copy from free-lance
writers, editors, and publishing houses for checking. This varied from two-page
stories to full-length booklets and brochures. The development indicates the emphasized interest in British Columbia throughout North America and elsewhere.
The text for new folders on ski-ing, canoeing, and golfing was written, and
those publications to be updated were processed in the customary manner. Several
press releases were prepared. Various Department of Travel Industry folders were
placed under the scrutiny of writers and editors attending the conference of the
Society of. American Travel Writers held at San Diego in January, and earned many
favourable comments. The book " This ... Is British Columbia " was enthusiastically received.
In conjunction with the Canadian Government Travel Bureau's "Visit
Canada" programme, writers, broadcasters, and columnists were hosted and accompanied on tours of the Province. These visitors represented publicity media in
North America, Europe, and Guyana. Overseas visitors under the auspices of the
Department of External Affairs, Ottawa, were also met. Nine ski editors were
accompanied on a two-day trip to Whistler Mountain. Also, 21 A.A.A. editors
were met at Seattle and escorted by coach to that area. A journalist representing
Clarke, Irwin Ltd., Toronto, was accompanied to Barkerville for research purposes
on a book project originally proposed by this office; the book is scheduled for publication in early 1969.
Presumably as a result of extended advertising and promotional projects, 1968
witnessed a considerable correspondence increase and requests entailing extensive
research. Judging, further, by the all-round intensified activities of this office, the
projected image of British Columbia becomes still more evident.
 P 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A selection of information pieces distributed by the Department of Travel Industry.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 45
TRAVEL COUNSELLING
Miss Elaine Johnston
During January, 1968, requests for information amounted to 14,952, an increase of 2,568 over January, 1967. A letter requesting information to be contained in the spring and summer edition of the British Columbia Calendar of Events
was circulated to 135 Chambers of Commerce and visitors' bureaux. Travel Counsellor Mrs. Cherie Kahn was guest of the Greater Vancouver Visitors' and Convention Bureau for a familiarization tour of the Greater Vancouver area. Three hundred and fifty copies of a press release for the 1968 edition of the British Columbia
Tourist Directory were sent out. The section sent out 2,062 1968 Tourist Directories for the Accommodation Section, and did mailings to regional authorities and
Provincial Tourist Advisory Council delegates re 1968 spring advertising campaign.
During February, requests for information amounted to 8,850. Revision was
started on the 1968 Road Report, with assistance from the Statistics Engineer of
the Department of Highways. Two temporary-assistance clerk-typists were added
to the staff. A calendar of events was prepared for " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine, covering the period between May and August. An events list was
prepared for the Canadian Government Travel Bureau for inclusion in its booklet
" Events in Canada." A temporary delay in sending out British Columbia kits
arose when supplies of the 1968 Tourist Directory were exhausted. A new shipment received later allowed for resumption of outgoing mail.
Inquiries totalled 21,765 during March. Coupons from the "Two-nation
Vacationland " advertisements (a co-operative advertising campaign with British
Columbia, Washington, and Oregon) started to arrive. The senior travel counsellor
assisted the Director of Publicity to conduct a familiarization tour of Whistler Mountain ski area for a group of visiting ski editors and ski writers. Seven thousand kits
were prepared for the Los Angeles promotion. The senior travel counsellor, along
with the Director of Information Services, started preparation of the course outline
for the 1968 travel counsellors' school, later held in May at Vancouver College.
Inquiries during April reached 33,148, an increase of 4,025 over April, 1967.
Additional equipment was added to facilitate the handling of mail. Special assistance was extended to the British Columbia Forest Service in preparation of literature for project " Survey '68." Course preparation continued for the travel counsellors' school: speakers were contacted, information kits prepared, and materials
assembled for transfer to Vancouver. Itinerary of the travel counsellors' tour was
prepared, and arrangements finalized with Vancouver Island Coach Lines and other
carriers.
May inquiries were 38,229, an increase of 3,760 over May, 1967. The spring
and summer edition of the British Columbia Calendar of Events was delivered, and
distribution commenced immediately. The senior travel counsellor instructed at the
travel counsellors' school at Vancouver College. Two travel counsellors from the
permanent counselling staff in Victoria office attended as students. The senior travel
counsellor and the same two travel counsellors participated in the tour following
the travel counsellors' school. These three travel counsellors were subsequently
able to provide a more comprehensive travel counselling service than before. During their absence, however, a backlog of inquiries developed. The Counselling
Section worked two or three evenings a week until mail inquiries were caught up.
June inquiries were 17,675. Regular serving of inquiries continued, and stocks
of Chamber of Commerce and regional literature were ordered.
 INQUIRIES BY MAIL (EXCLUDING REFERRALS)
34,000
32,000
30,000
28,000
26,000
24,000
22,000
20,000
18,000
16,000
14,000
12,000
10,000
!,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
1968
m
'**
y
1
t
f          #
#          t
f        t
f       t
%*>
k
f #
i
t
/
1962
%
t
\
i
r
r
\
\  ir
/
*   INI
4
^
^
.----
t
Jan.        Feb.       Mar.       Apr.        May       June        July
ug.      Sept.      Oct.       Nov.       Dec.
ftg
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 47
In July and August the strike by Canada Post Office employees resulted in a
great reduction in the number of inquiries for those months. Hence July inquiries
of 15,413 showed a decrease of 9,477 from July, 1967. The senior travel counsellor accompanied the Director of the Tourist Accommodation Section to Campbell
River, where arrangements had been made to do annual fly-in coverage inspection
of accommodation facilities on Northern Vancouver Island and surrounding islands.
The senior travel counsellor later travelled to Kamloops to join the accommodation
inspector for that region on his annual fly-in coverage of accommodation facilities
in the Chilcotin region. The knowledge gained on these two trips proved most
useful. Stocks of information sheets on climate, newspapers, and real-estate boards
were brought up to normal.
August inquiries were 8,063, a decrease of 6,788 from August, 1967. Travel
counselling staff made use of time not required to process mail by updating reference and information materials, and by visiting local points of interest in the Greater
Victoria area. Travel Counsellor Mrs. Cherie Kahn accompanied the accommodation inspector to Southern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands on his annual
inspection of accommodation facilities in the Gulf Islands. A master mailing list
was compiled for all outlets that receive bulk supplies of Department of Travel
Industry literature. A questionnaire card was ordered from the Queen's Printer,
and an accompanying form letter drafted. Miss Mary Kavanagh, of the Canadian
Government Travel Bureau in Ottawa, was given a familiarization tour of the
Greater Victoria area. The senior travel counsellor visited seasonal information
centres at the Vancouver International Airport, Douglas, Abbotsford, Sicamous,
Banff, and Osoyoos for the purposes of literature inventory and staff evaluation.
September inquiries were 10,849. A calendar of events was prepared for the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau for inclusion in its booklet " Events in Canada." Approximately 1,200 questionnaire cards and letters were mailed to travel
agents, automobile associations, and Chambers of Commerce. Sixty kits were prepared for the Canadian Government Travel Bureau's hunting and travel counselling
seminar in Ottawa. The senior travel counsellor represented British Columbia at
this seminar.
October inquiries were 7,182, an increase of 472 over October, 1967. Revision and additional events were assembled for Canadian Government Travel
Bureau's publication " Something Different in Canada." Corrections and additions
to tear-sheet of " Calendar of Events " in the Rand McNally " Vacation Guide "
publication were completed. A calendar of events for the fall and winter was prepared and forwarded to International Travel Information, Chicago, 111., for inclusion in its " OAG Travel Planner " publication. A new mailing list was assembled
for bulk distribution of Departmental literature, and address stencils prepared for
addressograph machine.
November inquiries were 5,639. Information for the 1969 ferry information
sheet was prepared. A summary of events for the spring and summer of 1969 was
prepared for the Canadian Government Travel Bureau, for publication in English,
French, German, and Spanish. A list of Christmas events was prepared, with information on the Victoria and Vancouver areas.
December inquiries were estimated to be 7,000. Up to December 16th, 3,132
inquiries had been received. Preparation for the 1969 edition of the Spring and
Summer Calendar of Events was undertaken.
The present travel counselling staff consists of a Clerk 4, two Clerks 2, and
two Clerk-Typists 1. The senior travel counsellor successfully competed for the
position of Public Information Officer 1 in the Department, and assumed new duties
in October. Mrs. G. Long successfully competed for the Clerk 4 position, and
assumed her new duties as senior travel counsellor in October.
 P 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Counselling Section is grateful for the assistance of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, in replying to numerous requests for information on settlement in British
Columbia. The Counselling Section also gratefully acknowledges the co-operation
and goodwill of many other civic, municipal, Provincial, and Federal departments.
Publications produced: Calendar of Events—Spring and Summer, Fall and
Winter; British Columbia Road Report, 1968.
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS
An increase in the amount of direct mail (excluding referrals from other
sources) received by the Department of Travel Industry is shown in the table below.
Monthly Direct Mail Inquiries, Victoria Office, 1966, 1967, and 1968
Month
1966
1967
1968
January	
February-
March	
April-
May—.
June—.
July..
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
4,926
7,472
8,941
20,489
33,350
15,642
11,714
5,803
5,200
4,746
5,220
3,242
6,965
9,126
10,019
17,472
24,013
16,504
10,865
5,877
5,978
5,336
4,137
4,231
6,885
9,300
20,003
32,861
33,709
14,906
6,156
7,441
8,727
5,828
4,762
4,0001
Totals..
126,745
120,523
154,578
i Estimated total.   Complete monthly figures not available at time report was prepared.
Total of All Types of Inquiries, Victoria Office, 1966, 1967, and 1968
It can be seen that while the 1968 over-all total (January to December) of
189,765 is down 41,797 from the same period in 1967, 1967 totals included the
referrals from the Western Canada Pavilion at Expo '67. 1967 was an abnormal
year because of Expo '67, and the figures do not reflect the actual growth in response
to our own advertising campaign. If a more accurate comparison were used—for
example, 1966 with 1968—the 1968 total would show an increase of 27,833 over
the corresponding period (January to December). It must also be remembered
that the postal employees' strike during 1968 caused a serious reduction in the
number of inquiries received.
Month
1966
1967
1968
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Totals..
12,107
12,384
14,952
11,359
12,530
9,850
15,687
26,505
21,765
24,554
29,123
33,148
38,273
34,469
38,229
21,210
23,027
17,675
14,066
24,890
15,513
7,823
14,851
8,063
6,266
18,908
10,849
5,612
6,769
7,182
8,707
14,392
5,639
9,496
13,714
7,0001
175,120
231,562
189,765
i Estimated.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 49
FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
F. W. E. Round
Early in 1968 a change in the title of the Film and Photographic Branch was
approved, in recognition of the role that motion pictures are playing in the promotion of tourism in British Columbia.
While the pattern of steady progress, established in previous years, continued
throughout 1968, the same cannot be said of the weather. It could not be compared to 1967. The stills photographers and motion-picture cameramen battled
inclement weather in all areas of the Province throughout the year. Despite this
difficulty, more than 1,780 colour prints and negatives and 600 black-and-whites
and 290 colour slides were added to the files.
Field personnel travelled better than 70,000 miles in all parts of the Province, in
all seasons, on stills and motion-picture assignments.
For the first five months of 1968 the Branch was understaffed. Early in May
the senior motion-picture director-cameraman's position was filled with the appointment of Mr. Norman E. Keziere, a native Victorian with wide experience in motion-
picture production. On June 1st Mr. Peter E. Tasker reported for duty in the vacant
stills photographer position. For the first time in nine months the Branch was at full
establishment. On November 1st Mr. Hans Kerchner was appointed to the new
position of colour laboratory technician in anticipation of the move to our new quarters in the Dogwood Building at 1019 Wharf Street.
MOTION-PICTURE PRODUCTION
The Branch concentrated on the completion of films carried over from 1967.
A review of footage previously obtained on the East Kootenay film resulted in a
re-evaluation of the project to include winter sequences and additional summer
coverage.
With the resumption of the ferry service between Prince Rupert and Kelsey
Bay, the Branch was able to proceed with the completion of " Ferryliners North."
Four days of intensive on-board filming in late June saw the live sound and
interior sequences "in the can." Despite unfavourable weather, the balance of the
necessary footage was obtained, and by mid-November editing of the sound sequences was completed. Final editing of both the East Kootenay film "A Place of
Refuge" and "Ferryliners North" is proceeding, and both films will be ready for
distribution early in 1969.
Two new motion pictures of a continuing nature were started during the year.
One is on project " 'Ksan," the re-creation of a Tsimshian Indian village at Hazelton, where the opening ceremonies by His Honour Lieutenant-Governor G. R.
Pearkes were recorded in detail. The second production, which will take at least a
year to film, deals with sport fishing and includes angling for all species of sport
fish in selected areas of British Columbia.
The Branch re-edited a film on winter steelhead-fishing on the Cowichan River,
previously purchased from a local cinematographer, and released it under the title
"Steelhead River." This film has been accepted for the Canadian Travel Film
Programme abroad, and is now in international distribution.
The 15-minute film featuring Mr. Glenn Ford fishing for salmon at Campbell
River, taken in 1967, was also completed, and prints have been ordered.
The Branch also shot a short film on the visit of Mr. and Mrs. Harve Presnell
to Campbell River for salmon-fishing.
 FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH NON-THEATRICAL SCREENINGS
45
40
35
Q
Z
<
CO
O
a
H
O
z
I
u
CO
30
25
20
15
10
UNITED
STATES SH
3WINGS   j
1962
1963
1964
1965
YEAR
1966
1967
1968
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968
yymyyyyyyyyyiyyyEyyyyyy
P 51
Mr. G. Whittaker (top) assesses the choice scenery of Victoria's Beacon Hill Park for
Mr. Hans Kerchner (bottom) to process in the darkroom.
 P 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
[\      +u c^r, PPtpr Heft) and guide Mike Rippingale
Game" principals to vanous resorts in the Province, ror
programme. MOTION-PICTURE DISTRIBUTION
Two hundred and eight prints of ^^J^l^ZlZ^r^
distribution through the Canadian^* hf^lrZ^ by an independent
of "A Place to Be,' a travel3ta^on the Otyo^V ^ number pur.
S^^ Bureau^hould result in even greater
cnasea oy «« rolumbia travel films abroad.
exposure of British Coiumoia uav ,.      Travel Film Programme
T^ee .ea.of ^S'b^dSSS*  The lU»
t^^rS ^Sr.otSc^owi„8S av.,a8.a so.e ,2,
screenings a day. 5Q    . t j   non-theatrical
audience totalling close to 2,000,000 persons.
 W
H
?S
co
Q
w
H
l-H
P
w
co
l-H
HH
s
o
u
P4
«
fe
o
CO
O
HH
o
CO
O
>
CO I
W    1
>-)    1
B 1
rt     1
^     1
o     1
u       1
CO
H
CO
I   <
I     W
ll
rt
  REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY, 1968
P 55
The Canadian Travel Film Programme, in its first full year of operation to promote interprovincial travel, reports 605 prints of British Columbia films and 8,500
screenings to an audience of more than 500,000.
Distribution of films through the Department of Education library in Vancouver, our own local library, and other outlets in British Columbia indicates 3,153
showings during the year to an audience of approximately 211,200. United States
television travel circuits report 220 prints, all in colour, with 438 telecasts to a possible 78,000,000 sets.
Canadian Television Travel Library reports 66 British Columbia prints on the
circuits, with 245 telecasts to a possible 5,900,000 sets, with 91 telecasts in colour.
1968 also saw better circulation of our films in Europe. United Kingdom
libraries report 115 prints with 725 screenings to an audience of 40,000. There
were 20 prints in France, reporting 190 screenings to an audience of 21,000, while
10 prints in Germany had 415 showings to 28,000 persons. In The Netherlands,
five prints sub-titled in Dutch accounted for 118 showings and audience figures
of 12,200. 6
^a
	
Cameraman W. L. Wiley " almost up to the ears " to capture the early-morning atmosphere
for a forthcoming movie on the East Kootenay region.
 P 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOREIGN-LANGUAGE VERSIONS
Production of foreign-language versions, on a cost-sharing agreement with the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau through the National Film Board of Canada,
have not proceeded as quickly as expected. The French- and Japanese-language
versions of " Breath of Spring " were completed during the year.
Arrangements were made direct with a film studio in Munich for the translation
and voice recording of a German-language version of " Big Game Camera Holiday,"
a departure from the usual reliance on the National Film Board of Canada for this
work.  The first trial print was delivered in October.
Sixty prints of our films were purchased to augment the Branch film library,
and for deposit with Department offices and transportation companies. Thirteen
of these were foreign-language versions, with special emphasis on German and
Japanese prints.
Filming sound sequences at Prince Rupert dock for " Ferryliners North."
1968 also saw another innovation in our travel-film showings, when prints of
18 of our productions were placed on board the M.V. " Queen of Prince Rupert"
for nightly screenings to passengers on the north- and south-bound trips. These
proved highly popular and are being continued through the winter schedule.
In April our film library was made available to Mr. Ron Morrier, of Vantel
Broadcasting, Channel 8, Vancouver, for his travel programme aimed at residents
of British Columbia. Twenty-six 15-minute programmes were supplied for telecasting in colour.
In September the Branch Director attended the annual meetings of the Canadian Travel Film Committee and the round-table discussion with film producers.
He was very gratified to learn that the guidelines for travel-film producers he compiled subsequent to the 1967 meeting in Montreal have been adopted by the Travel
Film Evaluation Committee.
 REPORT OF THE TOURIST INDUSTRY,  1968 P 57
The Film and Photographic Branch provided information on British Columbia's
film industry for the preparation of the " Invitation to Film in British Columbia "
colour advertisement featured in the Hollywood trade papers in August.
As a result of this advertisement, general information on the film-production
potential of the Province was provided in response to 41 inquiries. Possible filming
locations were suggested to four companies, and these were backed up by black-
and-white and colour stills, and all available information on the areas suggested.
It is hoped that several of these prospects will result in feature films being shot in
British Columbia.
35-MM. SLIDES
Some 290 35-mm. slides were added to Branch files. Special assignments for
Travel Industry slide shows included documentation of a bus tour and coverage of
Vancouver and Victoria.
An anti-litter slide show featuring Louie the Litter Rat and Peter the Pack Rat
was prepared and has proved popular with tourist groups in the Province. Twenty-
four of these shows are in circulation.
STILLS PRODUCTION
As in previous years, the three stills photographers were employed in all parts
of the Province the major portion of the year on stories for " Beautiful British Columbia " magazine.
Three Department of Travel Industry promotion tours in the United States
were covered in black and white. In March, simultaneous promotions in the Pacific
Northwest States required the services of two staff members. One stills photographer accompanied the annual California promotion tour.
Branch photographers were also on hand to record activities during the travel
agents' tour in May, the press tour in June, and the Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association tour in September, and the visits of the " Dating Game " principals to
the Province.
Special assignments included the formal portrait of the Twenty-eighth Provincial
Legislature, the annual presentation of 25-year certificates, and illustrations for the
Budget Speech and the Department of Finance, Department of Public Works, and
Department of Recreation and Conservation. The opening ceremonies of the new
Provincial Museum in Heritage Court were recorded.
A free-lance photographer was engaged on a contract basis in February, March,
and July. Four hundred and eighty-two black-and-white and 76 colour negatives
were obtained from this source.
A total of 4,995 colour negatives and more than 10,000 black-and-white photographs were selected and dispatched from the Branch files in response to requests
for loan. Darkroom production surpassed 3,000 negatives and 20,595 prints; 7,800
of these prints were mailed out in response to requests from writers and publications.
In addition, selection of 2,434 colour slides was made.
 Mr. Maurice Borrelly considers the most effective format for yet another photograph.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
1,530-1168-8613
       

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0367855/manifest

Comment

Related Items