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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1968 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1969

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1968
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  Victoria, British Columbia, November 13, 1968.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1968, is herewith respectfully submitted.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, British Columbia, November 12, 1968.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1968.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1967, to March 31, 1968
Hon. D. R. J. Campbell  Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson  Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler  Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social
Welfare.
R. J. Burnham  Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
R. I. Stringer  Director of Regional Services
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid  Departmental Comptroller.
T. D. Bingham    Superintendent of Child Welfare.
J. Noble  Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart  Superintendent, WilUngdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy  Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry  Division on Aging.
Miss M. Jamieson  Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie  Superintendent, Provincial Home.
N.S.Brooke  (Casework Supervisors, Social Assistance  and
Mrs. J. P. Scott  \    Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler  Training Supervisor.
A. A. Shipp  Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
A. G. Gilmore  Office Administrator.
Miss B. W. Snider  Research Consultant.
T. W. L. Butters  Supervisor, Emergency Welfare Services.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
C. W. Gorby  Director, Region I.
W. J. Camozzi  Director, Region II.
G A. Reed  Director, Region III.
W. H. Crossley  Director, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore  Director, Region V.
A. E. Bingham  Director, Region VI.
A. J. Wright  Director, Region VII.
J. A. Mollberg  Director, Region VIII.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I.—General Administration: Page
Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social Welfare     9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  12
Part II.—Divisional, Institutional, and Regional Administration:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  15
Child Welfare Division  18
Medical Services Division  25
Division on Aging  26
Brannan Lake School for Boys  28
Willingdon School for Girls  30
Provincial Home, Kamloops  3 3
Welfare Institutions Board  35
Region I  41
Region II  44
Region III  45
Region IV  48
Region V  51
Region VI  54
Region VII  5 7
Region VIII  5 9
Part III.—Legislation  61
Part IV.—Statistical Reports and Tables:
General Administration, Tables 1 to 3 63-64
Personnel, Tables 4 to 7 65-67
Social Allowance, Tables 8 to 10 67-70
Child Welfare, Tables 11 to 32 71-81
Medical Services, Tables 33 to 38 82-83
Division for the Aged, Tables 39 to 84 84-96
Accounting Division, Tables 84 to 87 96-97
Brannan Lake School for Boys, Tables 88 to 94 97-104
Willingdon School for Girls, Tables 88 and 95 to 98 97-99, 104-106
Provincial Home (Kamloops), Table 99  107
Welfare Institutions Board, Table 100  108
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND
DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
Change, with case loads and costs as indicators, was the predominant feature
of the year. These changes in community attitudes, behaviour, and economic life
find quick expression in welfare roles and the Department's responsibilities.
Increasing costs in our assistance programme were evident, because more citizens needed assistance and there was more use of supplementary benefits to meet
higher living costs. The increasing costs of rents and shelter, together with a scarcity
of low-rental units in many areas, is a matter of great concern to our Department
and the citizens we are helping.
The far-reaching effects of our changing technologies in primary and secondary
industry, construction, and transportation are being felt by a growing number of
people who turn to our Department for help. It is apparent that after each period
of industrial expansion there is a permanent increase in the number of social
assistance recipients.
There is no doubt the great majority of our social assistance clients want
employment and economic independence. Indeed, while 82,986 persons or family
units were granted assistance, 70,222 cases were closed during the year. The great
majority of these people are not equipped by reason of intellectual, physical, and
emotional capacities or aptitude to gain or hold continuing employment. They are
the last to get hired, the first to get fired. For them the slightest negative change in
the employment market has immediate effect.
The Department joined parents, other professional groups, and members of
the public at large in one of the universal concerns of our age—the generation gap.
For the emotionally and economically disadvantaged, dropping out of school and
difficulties in finding employment are commonplace. Drifting children in their
early and middle teens, hitch-hiking their way from area to area, have become a
recognized summer phenomena. The difficulties in which these children find themselves have been a cause for concern and Departmental activity in some areas of the
Province. Finding our teen-agers and young people from all segments of society in
our Province using various drugs is a matter of marked concern. The ready availability of materials for glue sniffing and the relative availability of marijuana and
such hallucinogenic drugs as LSD have demonstrated very vividly that no one
agency or profession can effectively deal with a community-wide social problem.
Further, those using drugs are not only the traditionally deprived or criminals of
our society, but a representative cross-section of our community.
The need for involving the community in these areas of concern is evident. In
this regard many of our local office supervisors and field staff were involved in
various community welfare programmes.
It was gratifying to note there is marked evidence of growing community
awareness of social problems and a willingness to participate in problem-solving.
 H 10 SOCIAL WELFARE
In so many of the situations where our staff is called upon to help, the understanding,
compassion, and effort of others are needed. In our complex society, people in
trouble need the help of other professions. People practising in health services, the
law, business, education, and community life have much to give. Greater coordination of effort, better communication between the various disciplines, and the
resolution and determination of common purposes are indicated. There is no
doubt our Department will have growing responsibilities in the field of community
planning and development if we are to effectively administer our programme of
services to people.
Another interesting development has been the direct involvement of people
affected by the service in the evaluation and planning of services. In commerce
the progressive businessman has traditionally carried out a programme of product
consumer testing. While there is a natural hesitancy to have clients review and
evaluate social programmes, their efficacy and administration, these meetings and
conferences have been productive and well received. To date foster-parents, foster-
children, adopting parents, and a group of mothers (widows and deserted wives
with children) have met and their ideas and opinions considered. Meetings with
other client groups are planned for the coming year.
Because of the changing needs of people and a need for our Department to
re-examine its various roles and responsibilities, an administrative study was begun.
We were fortunate to have a representative from the Department of National Health
and Welfare assist us. It is likely on the completion of the study next year the results of this survey will begin to take effect in some reorganization of the Department.
There were changes in cost-sharing for welfare programmes between Canada
and British Columbia under the terms of the Canada Assistance Plan, which became
effective on April 1st of the past year. The terms under which Canada will share
in welfare costs were broadened to include child welfare, and the definition of those
in need was broadened to those " likely to become in need " if services are not provided. The new arrangement was considered satisfactory by the Department.
Several projects as a result of the new agreement included the appointment of additional child welfare workers to the Provincial staff and one to a municipal staff;
the establishment of several new day-care centres; a referral and counselling service
for the aged; a hostel for disadvantaged women; and a unique counselling and
family life centre, staffed by voluntary professionals, in Nanaimo.
During the year the Division of Office Administration began publishing a
Departmental newsletter to keep our far-flung organization better informed about
changes, new programmes, and items of general interest about welfare. Four
district offices were relocated and two renovated to provide better accommodation.
This Division also instituted a correspondence course in welfare office administration for supervising clerk-stenographers.    Twenty-six completed this first course.
The Social Research Section has had an active year. Assessment of the Department's services continued with the co-operation of the divisions; liaison with
the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia increased. During
the year two field-staff members on educational leave at the School of Social Work,
University of British Columbia, undertook a study of children who come into the
care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the Children's Aid Societies of
the Province. Plans are under way with the University of British Columbia,
Department of National Health and Welfare, and our Department for these staff
members, after graduating in the spring of 1968, to study in considerable detail the
various factors affecting the children who come into the care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 11
Two senior personnel resigned. Mr. R. I. Stringer resigned as Director of
Regional Services after 20 years with the Department to assume responsibility as
Regional Supervisor of the Canada Pension Plan in Alberta and British Columbia.
Miss B. W. Snider, Research Consultant, took an early retirement in December
after 29 years' service with the Department. We wish them every success in their
new activities.
EMERGENCY WELFARE SERVICES
Departmental field staff and emergency welfare volunteers continued to support
peacetime disaster operations. In most cases the support was provided to municipalities and unorganized territories where local flooding situations required that
inhabitants be evacuated. Only those persons unable to meet their own needs were
cared for. Although the cost of some of these instances was met from Social
Allowance funds in a normal way, Civil Defence funds were also utilized on several
occasions. An example of this support was the care of three families for over a
month at McBride. These families had been flooded out by an ice jam at Dome
Creek in February, 1968.
Departmental personnel also supervised the operation by the Emergency Welfare Services feeding vans and trailers in actual operation on 19 occasions throughout the Province.
Three Emergency Welfare Services courses were held at the Civil Defence
College in Saanich, at which 69 municipal personnel were trained in their roles as
Municipal Directors of Emergency Welfare and Chiefs of Registration and Inquiry.
A continuing programme to orient Canadian Red Cross branch personnel in
the Red Cross role of registration and inquiry in disaster has been carried out.
Thirty-one courses were held to orient and train local feeding personnel on the use
of Emergency Welfare Services vehicles and trailers. Approximately 120 persons
have been trained in this role.
Meetings with district office staffs of the Department were held for the purpose
of acquainting field staff with their disaster responsibilities.
Supervisor of Emergency Welfare Services attended a Federal-Provincial Conference on Emergency Welfare Services at Arnprior in October to co-ordinate
Provincial activities throughout Canada. He also attended other conferences, including ones with the Civil Defence Zone Co-ordinators, the municipal welfare administrators, and the Inter-departmental Committee on Community Development.
Municipal and zone emergency welfare plans continue to be developed, and
the Provincial emergency welfare plan is now completed.
The Department was requested by Provincial Civil Defence to submit to
Canada Emergency Measures Organization a proposal for the management of civil
emergency measures in Canada. Preparation of this Provincial submission of the
emergency welfare programme to conform to the guidelines set out in the Canada
Emergency Measures Organization proposal in turn demanded a re-evaluation of
Emergency Welfare Services in the Province. This re-evaluation is currently under
consideration.
 H 12 SOCIAL WELFARE
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF WELFARE
R.   J.   BURNHAM
The Department of Social Welfare has taken a number of steps this past year
in preparation for its greater involvement with the development of community resources and services. A research project is being carried out in Nelson to assist us
in drawing up guidelines and policies that will clearly define our goals and function
in this area. During the past few years, several of our staff members who attended
a school of social work on a bursary were able to take a number of courses on community development. This training will, of course, be helpful as we expand our
operation in this field. A plan has been drawn up to establish a project worker in
the Island Cache area of Prince George, to assist in mobilizing community and
government resources, and bring about positive action and change in an area that
lacks a number of badly needed services. The next step will be to hire an experienced and knowledgeable person who will help in the final formulation of our
policies in community work, and who will head up this vital programme for the
Department.
There is no doubt about the concern on the part of the public for the growing
number of cases of child neglect, illegitimacy, and delinquency. Communities are
seeing much more clearly that they should be involved in helping resolve these
problems, and indeed some have been greatly involved over the past few years.
It is through the community that certain preventive services may be developed and
carried out. It is through our community programmes that we tap the resources of
the willing and able citizen, and help devise suitable ways of utilizing his or her
potential.
We have, through our field staff, encouraged and assisted non-profit organizations in the development of homemaker services, and this has resulted in the
establishment of 25 homemaker services throughout the Province.
A number of other communities are in the process of planning to develop this
important and practical service in their own areas. This service provides not only
an excellent means of keeping families together in periods of distress, but also a
much more economical solution to many problems which would cost a good deal
more if an attempt were made to resolve them in another way.
In past years we have concentrated on providing training grants to social
workers who have been with the Department for a period of three years or more.
This policy will continue, but we also plan to allot an increased sum to supervisors
and administrators who wish to complete their second year of training. We believe
this encouragement to senior staff to update their training will help assure the
Department of a positive and progressive administration.
PERSONNEL
Miss Margaret Jamieson, Personnel Officer
During the year ended March 31, 1968, there was no substantial increase in
total staff, although the field service staff was slightly augmented.
To a large extent the rate of staff turnover determines the volume of work in
the Personnel Division, involving the processing of all resignations, and, in conjunction with the Civil Service Commission, the recruiting of all junior clerical and
stenographic staff, and the arranging for competitions for all promotional positions.
Administrative work in connection with classification reviews, educational
leave, employee appraisals, expenses on transfer, merit salary increases, overtime,
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 13
probationary periods, reclassifications, retirements, sick and special leave, substitution pay, superannuation, vacation leave, and workmen's compensation is another
function of this Division.
As will be seen from Table 7 in Statistical Reports and Tables, out of 60 social
worker resignations this fiscal year, 21 or 35 per cent were for domestic reasons
(marriage, pregnancy, husband transferred, etc.). It may be interesting to note
here that in 1958 approximately 67 per cent of the social-work staff were women;
at the end of March, 1968, 52 per cent of the social-work staff were women. If
this trend continues, we may see in the future a marked decrease in the number
of resignations.
Another interesting fact is the number of social-work staff who resign for
various reasons and who later return. In the fiscal year under review, 14 former
social workers returned to the staff, some for short-term employment only.
Accident prevention is now recognized as a part of personnel work, and the
Personnel Officer, as chairman of the Departmental safety committee, is concerned
with safety conditions and practices in the Department, in liaison with the Civil
Service Commission. Our Department, unfortunately, despite a " low hazard"
rating, continues to have avoidable accidents.
This Division wishes to express grateful appreciation to the Training Division,
Departmental Comptroller, and the Civil Service Commission for their assistance
and co-operation.
TRAINING DIVISION
Douglas W. Fowler, Supervisor
With our joint responsibility for the recruitment and training of new professional staff for the Department, this Division has had an active year. Ninety new
appointments and two reappointments were made, which were selected from a total
of 220 applications. During the year we dealt with 525 inquiries regarding employment with the Department.
We have been pleased to note increased interest on the part of young university
graduates in social work as a professional career. This group, who wish a career
working helping people, are seeking the kind of training and experience the Department can provide prior to going on to professional education. Our new staff this
year was drawn largely from this group. Divisional staff conducted interviews at
the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria in the early spring,
seeking candidates for training.
During the year we offered nine training courses. The largest one, with 29
members, was an eight-week programme which included 22 trainees from our own
Department and 7 from other agencies (these were Children's Aid Society, 3; Vancouver City Social Service Department, 2 (members of city staff); Department of
Indian Affairs, 1; and Catholic Family and Children's Society, 1).
In addition to this course, we provided four brief orientation courses to fill
unexpected vacancies. These groups spent one week in this Division. They then
proceeded to field offices for a period of from three to six months, when they
returned for an intensive four-week programme.
The staff of this Division has been increased to three with the appointment of
Mr. William N. MacBeth, B.A., M.S.W., as Training Officer. He joined us on
May 1, 1967, on completion of his professional training at the University of
British Columbia School of Social Work.
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 15
PART II.—DIVISIONAL, INSTITUTIONAL, AND
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
The Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division provides consultation
to municipal and Provincial offices responsible for administration of social
assistance. The programme provides
monthly subsistence grants for those
unable to provide for themselves and
their dependents. Additional assistance can be made available to assist
with clothing, shelter, and other costs
when this is necessary to ensure that
basic needs are met. Rehabilitation
services are provided to assist as many
as possible to return to self-dependence. For many others extensive
staff time must be made available to
assist in resolving, preventing, or
modifying serious social problems associated with poverty and public dependence.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES
There were 82,986 applications approved for assistance and 70,222 cases
closed in the course of the fiscal year. Many were reapplications following temporary employment or movement from one part of the Province to another. The
number of recipients as at March 31, 1968, totalled 88,825. This included 22,407
single persons, 16,894 heads of family, and 49,524 dependents. There were 2,751
disabled or elderly persons being assisted with the cost of boarding- or nursing-
home care. Over-all expenditures increased sharply to $43,457,348. The actual
increase in costs was in a slightly greater proportion than the increase in numbers
of recipients owing to greater need for use of supplementary benefits necessitated
by higher living costs, particularly those related to shelter.
It is clear that the rapid rise in numbers and costs directly reflect changes in
national economics. A somewhat disturbing facet of this is the apparent tendency
for there to be a permanent increase in the number of social assistance recipients
following periods of industrial expansion. This is presumably because technological
changes associated with expansion reduce the need for unskilled employees.
Lack of public understanding of the reasons for public dependency results in
a tendency to regard all who are receiving assistance as bums. This has a highly
demoralizing effect on all welfare recipients. In fact, well over half of such persons
are not employable. Furthermore, it has been increasingly recognized that the
majority of those considered as employable but who are chronically in need of
assistance simply are not acceptable to employers because of lack of aptitude, skill,
or capacity for available job opportunities.
 H 16 SOCIAL WELFARE
While there is some indication that the incidence of fraud may have increased,
the number of these situations that come to attention are relatively few in relation
to the numbers assisted. In general, the incidence would not appear higher than
in non-public welfare programmes. Where instances of fraud do come to attention
and there is sufficient evidence, prosecution is undertaken.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
A person who applies for or receives assistance is entitled to apply for a Board
of Review with respect to decisions that he regards as affecting him adversely.
During the year there were 21 Boards of Review, 16 of which were in favour of
the applicant.
REHABILITATION
The Department primarily has been dependent on the skills of social-work
staff who provide counselling, encouragement, and other support to assist as many
persons as possible back to employment. The main reliance for actual placement
in employment has been on the Federal Department of Manpower. When indicated
and possible, referral has been made to other agencies to obtain educational upgrading and training for those persons unable otherwise to qualify for employment.
Because of the rapidly changing employment context, these measures have
proven insufficient. As a result the Department has been increasingly obliged to
provide opportunity directly by way of payment of fees and subsistence to enable
access to a more extended range of educational and training opportunities. It may
be necessary in future also to consider a more direct involvement on the part of
the Department in the creation and location of employment opportunities for public
assistance recipients.
A number of mothers with children have been sponsored in teachers' training.
The reason for this was that this was the one occupation available that could yield
sufficient income to enable payment of substitute care while the mother worked.
Experience with other vocational training for the mother with children has commonly been that employment could not be sustained because of insufficient earnings
and difficulties in providing substitute care for children. In general, neither day
care nor homemaker services have been of appreciable assistance in answering this
problem.
Manpower offices have encountered considerable difficulty in providing effective
services to assist the welfare recipient to obtain training and employment, but have
been helpful in assisting a number of social assistance recipients. Rehabilitation
committees are active in most of the larger centres of the Province. These combine
the resources and skills of the Departments of Welfare, Health, and Manpower on
behalf of disabled persons. This has resulted in a substantial number of disabled
persons achieving a productive role that would not otherwise have been possible.
Sheltered workshops, such as Goodwill Industries in Victoria, which are able to
provide both on-the-job assessment and employment opportunity have proved particularly valuable, and it is hoped that an expansion of this kind of provision will
be possible.
PREVENTIVE SERVICES
Dependence on public assistance is likely to have a damaging effect on the
human personality if prolonged over a period of time. The result is commonly the
development of social problems that so severely impair the recipient's functioning
as to greatly reduce chances for future return to self-dependence. The effects of
these problems can be disturbing for the whole community.   An even more serious
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 17
consequence may be the persistence of social impairment into the lives of successive
generations. Because of this the need for strong preventive services has long been
acknowledged, but in practice these have proved difficult to provide because of the
volume of established problems that demand immediate attention.
Consideration, therefore, is being focused more and more on the responsibilities
of communities themselves to find answers to many of these problems. It has been
discovered that there is in fact a large reservoir of untouched talent and goodwill
in most communities, and that many are prepared to serve on a voluntary basis if
suitable opportunity for this can be provided. More and more Departmental staff
are encouraging and supporting this kind of development. The result has been an
increase in the number of local helping programmes serving the individual or family
in need. There has been, for example, a very considerable growth in the number of
homemaker and day-care agencies. Groups are forming that undertake to give
knowledgeable counselling and guidance in relation to family problems, and volunteer-manned referral facilities are being established that assist individuals to find
the most appropriate source of help possible in the community. There is a growing
interest in the possibility of self-help organizations that will enable social assistance
recipients to pool their knowledge and skills, to provide for mutual baby-sitting, and
to make more effective use of the professional knowledge and skills available in the
community.
Despite the press of other problems, a great deal of direct preventive service
has been provided by the field social workers. This has included counselling with
regard to marital and child behaviour problems, help in obtaining maintenance in
instances of family desertion, advice regarding budgeting, and access to special
opportunities such as those of an educational or health nature. Provision of home-
maker services has assisted in holding families together during the temporary absence
of the mother owing to health or other exigency. These have also enabled a number
of older persons to remain in their own homes when care in other facilities at as
great or greater cost would otherwise have been necessary.
A number of young adults who it appeared likely might become future welfare
recipients have been assisted in obtaining education or vocational training that would
not otherwise have been available to them. The anticipated result is that they will
be more likely to sustain self-dependence in future.
More and more institutions and public bodies that are charged with responsibilities for resolving human problems are conscious of frustration and failure
unless the people concerned are closely involved both in assessing the problems and
in finding solutions. This requires more effective two-way communication. The
Department is seeking to accomplish this by improving the opportunities for listening
and sharing both in individual problem solution and in programme planning. It is
also seeking to strengthen its co-operation and co-ordination with other departments
and agencies in the interests of ensuring as much opportunity as possible is available
to the public assistance recipient in finding his way to self-dependence and improved
social functioning.
The Department extends its thanks to all those public and private persons and
agencies who have assisted in the work of this programme.
 H 18 SOCIAL WELFARE
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
T. D. Bingham, Superintendent
J. V. Belknap, Deputy Superintendent
A social worker, called to assist a
family to cope with the alienation of
one of its teen-age members, is likely
to hear, on the one hand, that the
child is rebellious, defies authority,
will not conform to the customs of
the family, and is beyond communication and control. On the other
hand, the child may indicate that
parents are resistant to change, lack
understanding, are unable to communicate and are unwilling to trust
the child.
Similarly groups within our communities which are desirous of change
may find themselves in the same
struggle with society as the teen-ager
is undergoing with his parents. The community groups may " demonstrate " to
acquaint society with a particular injustice (imagined or real). Society tends to
equate demonstrations with rebellion. Thus the demonstrating group, if rebuffed,
accuses society (or the establishment) of resisting change, lack of understanding,
and unwillingness to communicate. Positions harden and further alienation of both
sides occurs.
Recognition is given to the need for individual family members to modify their
behaviour for the well-being of the whole family. Similarly communities must
emphasize that the values and mores of today must be modified or changed to meet
the needs of tomorrow.
The struggles of individuals and groups, whether it be protest marches, demonstrations, or alienation of parent and child, must be viewed as challenges for each
to effect change. Desirable social change can only come about by a realization that
all people, young and old, must work together in a purposeful way, within a climate
generated by the trust and confidence in the unique worth of every individual in
our community. Social workers are participating each day in support of positive
moves to improve the well-being of all.
The Department of Social Welfare works with each British Columbia community in searching out new patterns and different relationships to make its family
and children's service programme more viable for tomorrow's conditions.
The following sections of this report will stress some of the services undertaken
in an effort to bolster family life within our communities.
SERVICES TO FAMILIES*
Family Service
Departmental staff and Children's Aid Societies' personnel offer services to
families who are encountering severe problems. One of the pressing challenges for
all social agencies—the schools, mental health services, the Courts, churches, and
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 11.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H  19
voluntary community agencies—is to mobilize and co-ordinate effective services
when families are embroiled in difficulties that if not speedily resolved will impair
individual family members, if not shatter the entire family.
In order to assist communities to use the potential for help within them, the
Department has encouraged communities to sponsor groups which will mobilize
those willing and able to help and also co-ordinate the existing services to better
serve families at the time of crisis. An outstanding example of this type of organization is the Nanaimo Family Life Association, which is co-ordinating volunteers
with a number of skills to give meaningful service to families who require counselling.
Day Care
New day-care centres have developed in gratifying numbers during the year
as a result of the policy begun the year previously. Ongoing adjustment in the
policy to meet individual community needs is being undertaken. This is a service
that can truly ease the burden of a family where it is necessary for a mother to work,
and where secure and enriching experience for the pre-school child is of paramount
importance.
Protection Services
When it is necessary to intervene in a family situation where children are being
neglected, the best interests of the child are foremost in the minds of those responsible
for assessing the problem and planning for the future of the child. To clarify practice, the Protection of Children Act was amended at the 1968 Session of the Legislature to provide temporary care of a child while the neglectful family is helped to
overcome its problems. If the work with the family is not successful, the Act provides for permanent care, a firm legal base on which to plan on behalf of the child.
The amendment also provides for appeal, with costs being made available for
the parents if indicated, in order to further protect the rights of parents as well as
their children.
Battered Children
A battered or malnourished infant is one of the saddest objects in our society.
Unable to communicate, the child is terrified of any adult who approaches. The
only help so often is the concerned neighbour or the observant professional. Too
often both the neighbour and the skilled professional are reluctant to become involved. This reluctance and the disbelief that infants could be the subject of abuse
are a matter of urgent and continued public education if battered children are to be
detected and protected. A central registry is maintained within the Division. Any
person having information or concern about the possibility of a child having been
abused is encouraged to report the circumstances to their nearest Social Welfare
office or Children's Aid Society. Any person reporting such an incidence can be
assured that a careful investigation will be undertaken. Since reporting of abuse is
required by the Act, and since any action is initiated by the Department or Children's
Aid Society, the " reporter " is fully protected from legal action against him.
Unmarried Parents' Services
The Children of Unmarried Parents Act requires that the staff of the Department extend help as " advisable in the interest of the child." Each year an increased
number of mothers turn to the Department for help.
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 21
We know that a child's well-being is enhanced if he is raised by two loving
parents. What then is the future of the child who is to be raised by the mother
alone?
The most significant occurrence is the move by a number of young mothers to
establish co-operative homes for themselves and their children. Through support
for one another they are better able to provide care for their children. More adequate maintenance payments on behalf of children born out of wedlock must be
secured, and new ways of arranging such payments are being explored.
Slowly our society is growing to a better understanding of the problems facing
the young mother who attempts to care for her child by herself. With this better
understanding comes the promise of less discrimination and more effective ways
of helping.
Services to Children in Care*
The number of children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the
three Children's Aid Societies continues to increase each year. Care was provided
for 13,727 children during the year (Table 15), over 1,000 more than the previous
year. Every two hours, day and night, throughout the year it is necessary to admit
a child to care. The task of providing the range of appropriate placement facilities
for these children is onerous. Communities throughout the Province have joined
with the Department in developing community-owned receiving homes. These
homes are prepared to meet the needs ranging from an abandoned 3-year-old to a
run-away 14-year-old, from a newborn infant to a hostile teen-ager. The programme requires a range of facilities and a variety of skilled foster-parents with
hearts and capabilities as great as the awesome problems presented by the youngsters.
More children are continuing in care until able to earn a living, and it is
encouraging to see the increased number seeking vocational and university training.
Foster Parents
Foster parents continue to be the "backbone" of services designed to care for
the increasing number of children each year. It is difficult to express sufficient
appreciation for the outstanding job they do.
Foster parents are partners in a team composed of the agency, the youngsters
themselves, their parents, and the total community in trying to assist a child who
cannot live in his own family or with relatives.
Foster parents have joined together in forming foster parents' associations.
These associations have increased the ability of foster parents to serve children in
need and have given these special parents confidence in their own abilities and in
their position as full team members with the large group of people attempting to
assist a child move through childhood to successful adulthood. Regional meetings
and evening training programmes have been most successful. Continuing support
will be offered to the foster parents' association throughout the Province.
Special Placement Resources
The Department, through the Special Placement Section, has continued to
evaluate the effectiveness of programmes for children with a special need. These
studies indicate that intensive treatment for children with severe emotional disorders
return many youngsters to their families and communities able to carry on with a
minimum of outside help.
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 15 to 25, inclusive.
 H 22 SOCIAL WELFARE
Emphasis has been placed on our liaison with Mental Health Services to ensure
the fullest co-operation in improving and expanding programmes. The Special
Placements Section has come to be recognized by private practitioners and voluntary
societies alike as one of the most knowledgeable and skilled units serving children.
New Denver Youth Centre
The centre serves 32 boys who cannot manage to live in their own or foster
homes. Common to each lad who enters is a lack of consistent parental love and
guidance, difficulty in community schools, and the resulting need for an undue
amount of affection and training.
Through special attention in the classroom and cottage setting, the youngsters
learn to get along with each other and adults.
More and more children with these kinds of backgrounds come to the attention
of social agencies. This presents a challenge to provide better and more imaginative
ways of helping children within their own families and communities as well as
through residential care.
ADOPTION SERVICES*
Provincial Adoption Conference
The highlight of the year was the first Provincial adoption conference. Upon
the invitation of the Minister of Social Welfare, the Honourable Dan Campbell, over
100 persons attended. Besides adopting parents and adult adopted persons, leading
representatives of the church, law, medicine, education, and the business community
joined with social workers, the press, and government members to review the entire
adoption programme.
Recommendations to broaden eligibility requirements, cover the legal costs of
adoption, improve communication between all persons involved in adoption, and
improve recruitment of homes were thoroughly discussed and included in current
adoption practice.
Silver Anvil Award
The Department of Social Welfare, in international competition, won the Silver
Anvil Award. This award recognized the outstanding contribution of Departmental
staff, Children's Aid Societies, community groups, and many volunteers in their
imaginative adoption recruitment and interpretation programmes. These programmes included the first adoption recruitment campaign, the JEFF (Joint Effort
for Fostering) programme, foster parents' and youth conferences, the Open Door
Society, and the adoption conference.
The Department could not have gained such an award without the generous
help and support of the entire news media. Our special thanks go to the many
reporters and announcers who "caught the spirit" of those wishing to imaginatively
and effectively serve the children of our Province.
Placement of Children
Each year more children are placed for adoption. This year, arrangements
were improved for placing children in the United States and other countries where
this seemed best for an individual child.
The Department is co-operating with the Child Welfare League of America in
the "Adoption Resource Exchange of North America (ARENA) to ensure as far
as humanly possible that every child available for adoption quickly enters the best
available adoption home, whether that home is in the Province or is located across
our Provincial border.
" See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 26 to 32, inclusive.
 SERVING CHILDREN
Group homes.
Counselling.
Special services.
Training-schools.
 H 24 SOCIAL WELFARE
Adoption Court Orders
The Minister of Social Welfare announced at the adoption conference a policy
for the Department to provide legal services for adopting parents who so wish and
who have adopted through the Department or a Children's Aid Society. The only
cost to the adopting parents who choose this approach in obtaining an adoption
order is that of the Supreme Court Registry fee. This is another example of the
Department providing new policies in keeping with rapidly changing times.
CONCLUSION
To those who protest about the need for social change and the wish to be
involved, social work can offer a challenge as exciting as the exploration of space.
Nothing is more stimulating, yes!—and difficult, than participation in the process of
helping even one person change from gross unhappiness to reach his full potential
in social functioning.
In looking to the future, increasing emphasis will need to be placed on:
—Opportunities for those citizens who want to help their fellow man, to
make a contribution appropriate to their skill.
—Involvement of clients and client groups in self-help and policy evaluation.
—Improved co-ordination of the professional services  available in every
community.
—Developing ways and means whereby communities can clearly define social
problems and initiate corrective action.
—A more efficient way of providing for maintenance of children who are born
out of wedlock or deserted.
To the many departments of government, community groups, and countless
individuals who have concerned themselves with the well-being of this Province's
children goes the thanks of the children and the staff.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 25
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION*
P. W. Laundy, M.B., Ch.B., Director
Our 1966/67 report described in
some detail the functions and activities of this Division. During the present year there have been no major
changes in policy affecting Medical
Services Division or in the administration of programmes of health benefits
to welfare recipients.
The number of persons eligible for
health benefits and the services provided are shown in the tables in the
statistical section of this Report.
From these it will be seen that there
has been an increase during the year
in the number of persons eligible for
welfare health benefits. In 1966/67
the average monthly coverage was
76,783 persons, and in the current year it increased to 79,479.
Costs in programmes administered by Medical Services Division has also
increased, but not out of proportion to the increase in the numbers eligible for health
benefits. There has been no appreciable increase in the cost of drugs per eligible
client. This remains approximately $27 a year.
Health services are provided to welfare recipients by a number of professions
and groups. Toward the end of the year, meetings were held with three professional
organizations regarding mutual problems, including procedures and possible changes
in the methods of payment. These matters were still under review at the time of
preparation of this report.
The efficiency of the operation of health benefit programmes was increased
during the year by an expansion in the use of data processing. All dental occounts
are now paid by this means. Preparations are being made for the handling of
pharmaceutical accounts by data processing in the coming year. Statistics on drugs
dispensed by retail pharmacies under the welfare drug programme and their cost are
already available through data processing.
Much thought has been given during the year to the question of care of the
chronically ill and the part the Department of Social Welfare should take in any
future developments. The emphasis has been on co-ordination of the efforts of all
those working in this field.
« See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 33 to 38, inclusive.
 H 26
SOCIAL WELFARE
■ ."    .
DIVISION ON AGING*
E. W. Berry, Director
As of April 1, 1967, a new division
was created in the Department of
Social Welfare. This division, known
as the Division for the Aged (and
subsequently changed to the Division
on Aging), was set up to develop services and resources for elderly people.
Mr. E. W. Berry was appointed Director.
As the fiscal year progressed, it became apparent that the new authority
could become involved in a number of
activities, of which the following are
a few:—
(a)   The development of community resources designed to directly assist and encourage the
recreational, educational, physical, and emotional well-being of the aged.
(b) An information, referral, and consultative service on a Province-wide
basis.
(c) Planning, initiating, and administering such programmes and projects,
experimentations, or demonstrations concerning the aged as it is deemed
necessary or desirable and fiscally possible.
During its first year of operation, planning was done for the future. These
plans are in the initial stages, with various changes and developments expected next
year. A new development was the issuing of bus passes to many senior citizens who
had no previous contact with the Department. This reflected a trend that the Division would in future be involved with not only the economically disadvantaged, but
with all elderly persons. These passes, good for fare on British Columbia Hydro
buses in Greater Vancouver and Victoria, were available to all persons over 65 in
receipt of Supplementary Social Allowances, Old-age Assistance, or Guaranteed
Income Supplement.   There is a nominal charge of $5 for a six-month pass.
During the fiscal year the Division continued with the administration of the
Old-age Assistance Act, the Blind Persons Act, the Disabled Persons Act, and Supplementary Social Allowances to recipients of these categorical allowances as well
as to those in receipt of Old Age Security pension and the Guaranteed Income
Supplement.
The payment of the Guaranteed Income Supplement to the Old Age Security
pension had the effect of replacing Supplementary Social Allowance to many thousands of persons. Only those recipients whose need was greater than the combined
Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement qualified for a continuing
payment of Supplementary Social Allowance. Those recipients who previously
qualified for health services while in receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance were
; See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 39 to 83, inclusive.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 27
permitted to retain their health services coverage if the only reason for their not
qualifying for Supplementary Social Allowance was the fact that they now received
the Guaranteed Income Supplement.
Although the Guaranteed Income Supplement was effective as of January 1,
1967, the first payments did not take place until March and April but were made
retroactive to January. As a result, many recipients on receiving the retroactive
cheque were ineligible for Supplementary Social Allowance for the month in which
the retroactive cheque was received. The Provincial Government, however, undertook to pay its share (50 per cent) of Supplementary Social Allowance for this
month. Since all recipients did not apply for the Guaranteed Income Supplement at
the same time and the retroactive payments were made in different months, it resulted in many thousands of adjustments in the first few months of the fiscal year.
On January 1, 1968, the Federal Government increased the Old Age Security
pension by 2 per cent, or from $75 to $76.50 per month. A 2-per-cent increase was
also made in the Guaranteed Income Supplement, resulting in an increase from $30
to $30.60 per month. The maximum allowable budget limits for Supplementary
Social Allowance were accordingly increased by $2.10 per month per person, thereby
permitting the Supplementary Social Allowance to continue to the recipient at the
same rate as previously.
Mr. E. W. Berry continued as Chairman and Mr. J. A. Sadler and Mr. H. E.
Blanchard as members of the Old-age Assistance Board, the Blind Persons' Allowances Board, and the Disabled Persons' Allowances Board.
In concluding this report, the Division wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of government and many outside agencies.
 H 28
SOCIAL WELFARE
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS*
J. Noble, Superintendent
Despite the difficulties of ever-
increasing committals, we have continued over the past year toward a
truly diversified programme. We now
have staff members specifically occupied with reception, arts and crafts,
physical education, and forestry, in addition to the normal specializations of
casework, classroom, and workshop.
We have initiated experimental
programmes with selected boys and
staff. For example, our Cottage 3
project consists of a group of 15 boys
gathered together in one cottage because of their difficulties in getting
along in other cottages. Such boys
are generally of the more immature
type with emotional problems.  This group settled down quite quickly, and boys in
it are getting along surprisingly well together.
Our Cottage 4 project is designed to provide a short but very intensive programme for older boys on their first committal who are assessed as being good
prospects, although we may have to alter our criteria of selection from time to time
as the pattern of committals varies. The boys in this group have undertaken a number of work projects around the School, including a very attractive miniature park
for the use of visiting parents.
Our honour group, mentioned in the previous year's report, has continued to
function remarkably well. This is a group of up to 10 boys who run their cottage
without supervision and are selected as being capable of getting by in a group without the intensive supervision normal to other cottages.
Once more we had excellent co-operation from the officers at H.M.C.S.
" Quadra," who accepted a number of boys for the sea cadet camp at Comox.
A total of 40 boys each spent three weeks at the camp, and one boy made himself
so useful that permission was given for him to stay on there for the summer.
For yet another year the boys have volunteered their assistance to Nanaimo
projects in co-operation with the local Chamber of Commerce, Recreation Commission, Salvation Army, service groups, and other volunteer groups. We are grateful
to Nanaimo for the opportunities given to our boys to serve in this way.
A variety of individuals and groups visited the School during the year. It is
always interesting to note the surprise of visitors who find the reality in conflict with
preconceived ideas of the School. We shall continue to fight prejudice and misunderstanding about our work at every opportunity.
The total number of committals for the year was 470. This included 103
recommittals, giving a recidivist rate of 21.9 per cent, which compares with 23.1
per cent for the previous year and 31.9 per cent for the year before that. Thirty
boys were recalled from provisional release, which makes a total of 500 admissions,
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 88, 89, and 93, and Graphs 90 and 91.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 29
an increase of 28 over the previous year. We worked with 997 boys during the
year, both in the School and on provisional release. The average length of stay was
4.3 months.
We have shown some of our statistics in graphic form in this report.* It is
interesting to note the apparent relationship between the number of admissions and
the number of run-aways from the School. Interpretation of this would still be
largely conjecture, but we intend to take a closer look at this in the future. The
number of committals per 5,000 youth population is shown in column graph for the
various regions of the Department of Social Welfare. The large discrepancy could
be due to a variety of factors, including availability of community services, varying
social conditions, sentencing policies, and simple geography. The third graph shows
that the bulk of our population straddles both sides of the school-leaving age. This
is also the case in other countries, and it would appear that the years immediately
preceding and following the school-leaving age are the critical ones for our young
people. We should examine our community services to young people passing
through these dangerous and decisive years.
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 90 to 93, inclusive.
 H 30
SOCIAL WELFARE
WILLINGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS*
Miss W. M. Urquhart
I am pleased to submit the annual
report for Willingdon School for Girls
covering the year April 1, 1967, to
March 31, 1968. While our statistical
tables show no outstanding change
from the previous year, and although
our average daily population is slightly
£_j_ down, we have had every room full
through the greater part of the year.
When this occurs, even the cooks in
the kitchen notice the tension in the
girls; the staff work under considerable pressure, and I note an increase
in their absenteeism. Assessment of
the new girls in the Admission Unit
during their first two weeks in the
School is carried out by the social
worker, the Chief Supervisor, child-care supervisors in the unit, along with the girls,
and at the end of this period the girls are ready to move to a cottage. However,
when we are operating at capacity, some have to be held for unnecessary longer
periods in this unit.  The same is true in the Security Unit.
The changes that have taken place are more subtle than spectacular. When
once this year the girls in Security ripped up their mattresses, soaked the stuffing
in water, then threw it everywhere, the supervisors on staff less than two years were
horrified by such behaviour. The rest of us realized how seldom it occurred now.
During the year we have had more than our usual number of seriously disturbed
girls, ones who really should have been cared for in a treatment setting where groups
are smaller and staff ratio higher. These children have a difficult time getting along
with their less disturbed peers and are so demanding of staff they take time from the
other children.
We have had no major change in staff this year. About 60 per cent of our staff
have over five years' service, and I am pleased to report there is a steady growth in
their ability to work with our " disorganized " teen-agers. The child-care supervisors
are seeking more knowledge and have expressed a desire for reading material and
instructional classes, which we hope to start early in the new year.
There has been a change in the Mental Health Clinic service to the School since
our last report. This year we have not had a regular psychiatrist and psychologist
working with us as in the past. We have received very few psychological assessments, which have always been valued. Generally our referrals are assessed for
treatment by a clinic social worker, no doubt in consultation with other members
of the mental health team. A few of the more disturbed girls have received weekly
treatment periods or have been included in clinical group treatment. Case conferences have been held at the Mental Health Clinic rather than at the School, which
limits the number of our staff members able to attend. Emergencies have always
been taken care of immediately. We appreciate all the assistance we do receive and
consider it not just a valuable but necessary part of our treatment programme. We
recognize the apparent shortage of psychologists and psychiatrists and the changing
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 88 and 95 to 98, inclusive.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 31
emphasis in their programme. However, we hope this service can be increased and
that we can plan with mental health staff for a regular and imaginative service in
the coming year.
Our three social workers have had their efforts strained to the limits to provide
frequent individual casework interviews for all the girls and to maintain a steady
flow of girls returning to the community on provisional release to make room for
new-comers. It gives rise for serious concern when children have to be released just
at the time they are beginning to show progress, and when they themselves do not
feel quite ready. Pressure frequently has to be put on the community agencies to
plan for the girl's return, and we still feel that some fall between the two major
services—probation and social welfare. The Family and Children's Service in Victoria is to be congratulated in that it has provided a liaison social worker who visits
Willingdon once a month to see the girls and discuss future plans with our social
workers. This is a valuable service and much appreciated. One hundred and forty-
eight girls were tried on provisional release, and at year-end 35 had been recalled or
recommitted for a further period of training.
We welcomed the addition of a fourth social worker this year (as a project
worker) to work with the families and then to supervise the girls provisionally released to the City of Vancouver. These cases would normally have been carried by
the Vancouver City probation service, and we appreciate the co-operation of the
city's chief probation officer in allowing the opportunity for this project. While it is
too early to give any significant figures, there is no doubt of the value of this service.
This social worker is able to establish a close relationship with both the girl and her
family and, being always available, provides consistent support to both as the girl
becomes re-established in either employment or back in school. We look forward to
the time when this service can be extended to all children returning from training-
schools and other special placements to their own communities.
The group of seven master's degree students from the University of British
Columbia School of Social Work, all experienced workers, doing their field work at
Willingdon entered into the programme with much interest and spirit and spent
many hours more than required carrying out group discussions, organizing a drama
programme, etc.
The three academic classes and beauty-parlour, sewing-room, and kitchen
continued to provide schooling and training for our girls. By early spring this year
the school classes doubled in numbers, creating a difficult situation as most of the
girls have a short concentration span and need individual attention. We were fortunate to have our regular summer-school teacher for six weeks in July and August.
Nearly all the girls who attend academic classes leave Willingdon having completed
at least one more grade. Our leisure-time programme has increased in variety, with
everyone participating in some activity, and does a lot to provide a pleasant relaxed
atmosphere throughout the School. A "sing-along" group and guitar class plus an
occasional amateur skit night organized by the girls keep everyone lively. Then
there is the young people's group of boys and girls, our regular Wednesday night
visitors, some of whom have not missed a week in five years, winter or summer. The
Elizabeth Fry Society monthly parties are always an occasion for new hair styles and
best dresses. The girls had the honour to be asked to participate in the Kitsilano
Show Boat Centennial Festival of Flowers on the last Sunday in July. Twenty girls
took part, and after a six-week course in modelling and having made their own
dresses, presented a first-class floral fashion show. One of our Indian girls was a
great hit as the commentator. During July and August most girls were out for a
picnic or trip to Stanley Park and a good number had a day at the Pacific National
Exhibition.
 H 32 SOCIAL WELFARE
The School library has become a popular spot on Friday afternoons, when the
girls gather to chat with Mrs. M. Sims, our volunteer librarian provided by the
Elizabeth Fry Society. We are grateful for Mrs. Sims' services and the personal
interest she takes in the girls.
We were called on during the year to provide tours and discuss our programme
with an ever-increasing number of groups; each of these takes up the best part of
half a day. We have also been besieged by individual university students requesting
to see the institution and discuss the programme in order to write a paper for one of
their courses. Much as we regret having to do so, we have had to curtail this service
to a minimum.
Through the medium of this report, we would take the opportunity to thank
publicly all the volunteers who work so untiringly with us and bring so much kindness and interest into the lives of the lonely girls.
Our effectiveness could be increased and overtime and pressures on senior and
professional staff lessened with the addition of more staff, to include a business manager, a part-time recreation director, welfare aide, and a group supervisor with skills
in arts and crafts. It is realized such increases will only be made gradually, but the
need for a more enriched programme becomes more apparent as we develop in our
treatment service.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 33
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS*
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
Like our own personal homes,
the Provincial Home staff strives diligently to have consistent harmony and
good care for the residents. Creating
a homelike atmosphere requires the
continuing confidence of the residents.
Besides the personal aspect of
the Home there is the physical, with
its sleeping accommodation, dining-
room, recreation and sitting rooms,
plus the sick-ward facilities, laundry,
and cleaning areas, which help us
maintain comfort and efficiency. Outside, the Home has beautiful grounds,
which are well cared for and provide
much pleasure to the residents.
Inside, as in most homes, some improvements occur each year. The air-conditioning has been completed, and we now
enjoy full comfort by its use throughout the Home. Showers and exhaust fans were
installed, and toilet facilities were improved in Wards 1 and 2. The main upstairs
hallway and large front staircases were redecorated. New electric-light switches
with an extra outlet were installed in each room of Wards 3, 4, 5, 7, 12, and 13. The
bake-shop was renovated and painted. New equipment purchased during the year
included an automatic clothes-washer for the laundry, a food-mixer for the kitchen,
an action cycle and belt vibrator for the physiotherapy area, and an adjustable
walker, plus many smaller items.
The year ended with 119 in residence. This year 84 men left the Home, 27
expired, and 110 were admitted. The Home has not been used to capacity for some
time, having an average of 25 vacancies over the past years.
An examination of the cost of operation shows that the per capita cost has risen
slightly. This is attributable in part to the lower rate of occupancy and the rise
in the cost of commodities and salaries. The increase in pensions over the previous
year helped to offset somewhat the rising cost of living.
Excellent medical service, good diets, and recreation suitable for the aged continue to be supplied.
The residents are encouraged to help one another over rough spots and give
each other simple convalescent care and companionship. Room-to-room visits are
encouraged at all times, as little chores are needed as much as professional nursing
care by offering a helping hand and showing a friendly concern, with the result we
have brighter and happier residents.
Physiotherapy is provided, which helps disabled persons to be brought back
to where they were before, to some extent, particularly if the patient takes it as an
individual battle and accepts limitation.
The Home has been regularly inspected by the Provincial and city health, fire,
and sanitation authorities, and all have been most satisfied.
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 99.
2
 H 34 SOCIAL WELFARE
There are many letters of appreciation received; the following is but one:—
I wish to express to you and to the staff of the Provincial Home my sincere thanks
for the thoughtful care and kindness shown to my father during his stay there. The
pleasant atmosphere was apparent to me when first I came to visit and saw for myself.
All that one would expect to find in an institution for the aged was there, and I am sure
my father's time spent there were happy times to remember.
I wish to express appreciation to all who have assisted in many ways during the
past year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 35
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD*
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report
of the Welfare Institutions Licensing
Act for the year 1967. As licences
are issued on the basis of the calendar
year, this report covers the period
from January 1, 1967, to December
31, 1967.
x y  , U
LICENCES
A total of 188 new licences were
issued during 1967. The case load at
December 31, 1967, totalled 1,258,
an increase of 67 over that of 1967.
Of these, 1,027 are licensed institutions and 231 have licences pending.
BOARD MEETINGS
Thirteen regular Board meetings and two special meetings were held during 1967.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
No new specialized institutions for the care of children were licensed in 1967,
and none were closed.
Total number licensed as of December 31, 1967     10
Total capacity of licensed institutions  243
Number of children cared for  411
Private Boarding Homes
Of the total number of licensed children's boarding homes, three are homes
licensed for the care of emotionally disturbed children, and four are operated by the
Central City Mission in the City of Vancouver. The number of privately operated
homes continues to decrease.
New licences issued in 1967       3
Total number of homes licensed     13
Total capacity of licensed homes     76
Number of children cared for  121
B. Day Care of Children
Family Day Care
The number of licensed family day-care homes in the Lower Mainland continues to increase as more people become aware of the need for licensing. A very
few people from the Interior and the Island have applied for licensing.   A new
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 100 and 101.
 H 36 SOCIAL WELFARE
policy has been introduced in Vancouver City whereby the supervision and recommendation for licensing of family day-care homes is done by the public health nurses.
This has proved most satisfactory, and has resulted in better standards in homes and
a closer supervision being maintained, particularly in those homes which operate
privately and are not working under the auspices of the Department of Day Care
Services of the Family Service Centres.
Number of family day-care homes newly licensed in 1967     47
Total number of homes licensed as of December 31, 1967     86
Number of files closed in 1967     24
Capacity of homes licensed  277
Number of children cared for in 1967  413
Group Day Care
The number of group day-care centres operating and licensed in the Province
has risen from 21 in 1966 to 27 as of December 31, 1967. There were 22 centres
whose licences were pending at that time. Many of the centres operating were nonprofit groups receiving subsidy through the Child Welfare Division, although a few
private centres were still in operation, mainly in the Lower Mainland area. The
addition of a Pre-school Consultant on the Welfare Institutions staff is resulting in
better supervision and higher standards being maintained in these group centres.
Number of new licences issued in 1967        11
Total number licensed as of December 31, 1967        27
Total number closed during 1967  2
Capacity of licensed centres      728
Number of children cared for in 1967  1,421
Kindergartens, Play-schools, Etc.
As kindergartens became a part of the public-school system in various parts of
the Province, some licensed groups are closing. However, the general picture remains very much the same as that of 1966, as new groups are opening which are
accepting the lower age-groups. The trend toward a mixture of half-day children
and day-care children in the same premises is being discouraged.
Number of new licences issued in 1967  53
Number of files closed  35
Total number of schools licensed as of December 31, 1967        364
Number of licences pending  51
Licensed capacity of schools  10,191
Schools for Retarded Children
No new licences were issued in 1967 for these schools, and five files were closed.
Total number of schools licensed as of December 31,1967     20
Licensed capacity  437
MATERNITY HOMES
The number of homes for unmarried mothers remains the same as in 1966,
with no licences pending.
Total number of licensed homes as of December 31, 1967       3
Total capacity of homes     71
Number of mothers cared for  389
 SERVING SENIOR CITIZENS
1T7F8*
In their homes.
Rehabilitation.
L
Health services.
 H 38 SOCIAL WELFARE
AGED-CARE
Proprietary Institutions
Although 53 new licences for proprietary homes were issued in 1967, many of
these licences were for existing homes which changed ownership and had to be
relicensed. There were very few new premises licensed. The majority of the proprietary homes are converted older homes, but the trend for this type of home would
seem to be on the wane. More stringent municipal and zoning by-laws, high building costs, and a general shortage of housing have made it more difficult for this type
of accommodation to be established.
Number of new licences issued for proprietary institutions in 1967       53
Number of files closed        43
Total number licensed as of December 31, 1967      321
Capacity of licensed homes  3,833
Licences pending        5 8
Number of persons cared for  5,427
Non-profit Institutions
Although only two new licences were issued in 1967 for non-profit homes, there
were several new plans for the construction of homes submitted to the Board for
approval in principle during the year. While most of the interest is in the large urban
Lower Mainland centres, there has been some shown in the Kootenays and in the
Okanagan. Construction of accommodation for senior citizens in the Interior has
been mainly in the area of self-contained units which do not require licensing.
Number of new licences issued in 1967  2
Number of files closed  4
Total number of institutions licensed as of December 31, 1967        40
Total capacity  2,225
Number of persons cared for  3,030
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
Two new licences were issued in 1967, both for small hostels. None were
closed.
Total number licensed as of December 31, 1967         13
Total capacity      285
Number of persons cared for during 1967  5,647
ADULT DISABLED PERSONS
These are small proprietary homes licensed for the care of patients from River-
view, Tranquille, and The Woodlands School. There were only five new licences
issued in 1967, again probably because of zoning restrictions and the high cost of
renovating homes for this purpose. Although there are only 21 homes licensed
specifically under this category, many patients from Riverview are being cared for
in homes licensed for elderly persons. These homes are catering to both the aged
and the ex-patient from the mental hospitals.
Number of new licences issued in 1967       5
Number of files closed       4
Total number licensed as of December 31, 1967     21
Total licensed capacity  152
Number of persons cared for in homes licensed in this category  207
 SERVING THE COMMUNITY
Assistance to community projects
and institutions.
Grants to community groups.
Planning.
Planning and consultation with
community groups.
 H 40
SOCIAL WELFARE
SUMMER CAMPS
The new Regulations Governing Summer Camps under the Health Act were
approved by Order in Council on September 14, 1967. These regulations should
result in a better standard of premises and a higher standard of care in summer
camps.  The number of licensed camps continues to increase slowly.
Number of new licences issued in 1967  12
Number of camps closed  3
Total number of camps licensed as of December 31,1967        115
Total capacity     8,604
Number of children attending  37,907
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 41
REGION I
C. W. Gorby, Regional Director
The population of Vancouver Island increased in 1967/68 by an estimated 10,000 people. Among these
people there were those with means
who visited and decided to stay, those
who came to settle, those who came
to retire, and those who came with
high hopes only to find themselves
stranded and requiring financial aid.
Among the increase of 2,401 persons assisted over the previous year
there were 354 single people, 75
couples, 242 families with both parents, 100 families with only one
parent due to death or desertion of
bread-winner, and 27 children requiring help in the home of a relative.
There were altogether 4,879 families and single people assisted financially throughout the year. Out of the
total population there are recorded 336 families where the children required protective care.   In spite of all efforts, only 46 per cent were reunited.   Fifty-four per
cent remained in care.
Our social agencies and welfare offices in 1967/68 had not undertaken full
placement responsibility for convalescent mentally ill persons other than in their own
homes, yet well over 200 of these persons could not return home. They found their
way into boarding homes where we undertook to pay the full boarding-home costs.
At a time when a great many more private boarding-home resources are being
required for convalescent mentally ill people, the City of Victoria social welfare
department reports an increase in the ordinary boarding-home population of 107
persons. It is pointed out that 16 to 20 per cent of the residents in Victoria are over
65 years; therefore, the demand for boarding- and nursing-home space for elderly
people other than mentally convalescent persons will continue to be at a premium.
Among those boarding homes who cater more to general boarding-home need,
the welfare-assisted guest is in a difficult competitive position. The guest with means
can pay more for a facility which is not too plentiful.
In all areas of the region, low-rental housing for low-income groups continues
in short supply. The search for employment and better housing among this group
causes frequent moves. In addition, Indian families are moving every week from
reserves into populated centres. This housing shortage for low-income groups and
Indian families has brought about overcrowding and lack of privacy. Under these
conditions, current family problems become worse and others are created.
Not only the actual rise in numbers of people seeking help has increased the
worker and supervisory load, but also the job complexity itself. The rehabilitation
of financially assisted people has now become complicated by the demands of employers for special skills. The planning which must go into the preparation of the
individual and selection of training courses is difficult and time-consuming. Care
for the family in one community while father obtains training in another community
is a frequent occurrence.
 H 42 SOCIAL WELFARE
Most communities identify a real need for family counselling services to prevent
family breakdown. Although public health, mental health, probation, our own
department, and frequently the ministry assist, all of us together cannot meet the
need.
Through family breakdown large numbers of children are coming into care
with special problems. These in turn require us to develop special facilities to care
for child problems.
To meet the increasing load on social workers and supervisors, more staff has
been added, both in the field and clerically. But we have always recognized that
merely adding more staff is not the whole answer to job pressures. Within the past
year in Region I, one new office has been added, one renovated, and new space
found for a third. All offices in the region now provide generally adequate and
pleasant quarters for people to work and clients to visit. The addition of staff space
and a new office has made possible a reorganization of district office boundaries
and a redeployment of staff to the end that supervisory responsibility and case loads
are more nearly equitable. New boundaries now coincide with school district
boundaries, and contacts with schools are more clearly defined. In five out of the
seven district offices within the region, a new administrative system has been
installed.
With regard to services themselves in 1967/68, we broadened the scope of
rehabilitative planning to help people who had a greater employment problem.
With rehabilitative help, mothers with children were enabled to subsidize their
budget through part-time work.
To further assist working mothers and families where home pressures required
some relief, day-care services were expanded in Metropolitan Victoria and are
presently in process at two up-Island points. Government grants are provided to
assist.
Community groups have now organized or are in process of organizing a
homemaker service in every large centre on Vancouver Island. Where budget is
low, government meets the cost of this fine preventive service, which is already
making itself felt in holding families together. Communities are coming to our aid
to meet the family counselling problem. A counselling service is already in operation in one centre, and there are alternative approaches in others. Metropolitan
Victoria has its own private agency which responds to the need.
In 1967/68 groundwork for special facilities to meet the needs of children
was laid in many areas. The Beaufort Association for Retarded Children in
Courtenay was organized. The Duncan Child and Family Service Society organized
homemakers and planned a group-living facility at Westholme. The Nanaimo
Chapter for Retarded Children has a facility in process at Nanaimo. There is a
new receiving-home facility in Victoria district.
A special part-time worker has been provided in the Duncan area to assist the
many private boarding-school resources in placement of children with special
educational problems.
Within the past year there has been an exploratory institute involving both
foster parents and children. A seminar was organized by the regional council of
Island foster parents' associations.
Interest is rising in communities regarding boarding-home resources and low-
cost housing. Through government and municipal sharing of costs, Saanich is
purchasing houses for low-rental units. Port Alberni is involved in planning. Other
communities such as Saltspring and Port Alberni are sponsoring new housing and
boarding facilities for the aged.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 43
Clearly these preventive programmes involving community have also involved
a good deal of extra staff time, and we may have to review the job of the district
social worker.
To supervisors, social workers, and clerical personnel may I extend my appreciation for their fine teamwork and co-operation with their divisions. The problems of our ever-changing society are making ever-increasing demands on all our
social agencies, but with the help of our local communities we are developing a
better preventive programme.
 H 44
SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION II
W. J. Camozzi, Regional Director
..T^r^-H,
Although the costs and our clientele
increased in Region II, these were not
significant compared to other regions,
where the percentages tended to be
higher. However, it is of increasing
concern that these go up even though
the economy has not been depressed.
Indeed, in Powell River, where the
new kraft mill was completed and
there is a real-estate boom, the work
of our department increased.
Housing costs have gone up, though
housing in all categories increased in
the region, apart from commercial
apartment houses. For example, the
Raymur housing development in Vancouver has been completed and the
Pacific Hostel for 250 single men is in
operation, and shows signs of great
success as well as economy. New
housing planned includes the Garibaldi Estates with 2,000 homes.
There is increased interest and activity in communities to take advantage of
available grants for various kinds of housing. For instance, there is a new 40-bed
extended-care wing for Powell River General Hospital and rapid growth of day-care
facilities for children, including one on University of British Columbia Endowment
Lands. Richmond's receiving-remand home is a distinct asset to that community.
Experimentation has gone ahead with co-operative homes for husbandless women
and their children, as well as half-way housing for drug addicts.
More work has been done in the service field, not only by staff, but by the
community. Adoption and protection work are at a high level. There has been
more community work with Indians, who are taking more initiative. For instance,
the Squamish Band has a day nursery, and there are 12 new homes on the Mount
Currie Reserve. Joint efforts to solve problems are more evident. Any success in
this field does credit to all departments concerned, but enrichment of service demands
time, which we must learn to maximize by more efficient administrative methods, as
well as enrichment of staff rather than mere increase in numbers. Region II needs
this in its supervisory establishment, in light of more untrained workers and increased
demands for service.
More interest is being taken in co-ordinating social welfare enterprises in communities. Vancouver formed a social planning section and hired a director to coordinate activities and achieve co-operative and more efficient effort. This type of
interest and concern is growing in the region. There are more meetings of people
of like interest wanting to combine endeavours. Mayors are taking more personal
interest in this. Welfare has become less a detached enterprise, fit only for the
well-meaning. More people are becoming well meaning and are working at it.
There are many to thank individually, but all know who I mean when I extend
our collective thanks for their active and good-humoured co-operation through
the year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 45
-:■!' ~"~^ ^— X--L.S
REGION III
G. A. Reed, Regional Director
The keynote of the past year and
continuing into the year ahead is that
of growth and expansion, accompanied by the element of change. This
report will record this as it pertains
to the economy, the demands for service, the problems faced, the resources developed, and the interest
and participation of communities. The
meeting of increased demands for
service and the development of new
resources was made possible because
of the conscientious dedication of all
staff, municipal and Provincial. To
this was added the increased interest
and participation in our programme
of many concerned citizens in the
communities, the volunteer support
and help of many community groups,
and the co-operation of other professional agencies and departments of government.
One of the administrative changes involved the transfer of the Golden area
from Region IV to this region. With the reduced distance to Golden, more frequent
service is possible. A district supervisor was appointed for the Salmon Arm-Revel-
stoke offices. The other major administrative change involved the offices in the
Kamloops area. With amalgamation of Kamloops and North Kamloops, our North
Kamloops office was brought under the Kamloops City welfare office, and this office
now administers all services in Kamloops. During the year we moved our Penticton
office to new quarters adjacent to the Courthouse, and this has provided much better
office accommodation.
One evidence of growth or expansion is the increase in case loads during the
year. There was an increase in all categories of service except the allowance to the
blind, disabled, and aged, as is shown in the statistics tables. While there should
be concern for increasing case loads, this does not mean inactivity or ineffectiveness
to those asking for service. While the total case load in the region increased by 111
cases between March, 1967, and March, 1968, each month there was an average of
approximately 1,611 cases opened and 1,577 closed. This increase is particularly
noticeable in the social assistance programme, and the statistical table will show an
increase in March, 1968, over March, 1967, of 1,881 in persons served and $86,411
in costs.*
During the year there was a big increase in assistance granted to employable
persons, which was partly due to the economic situation, persons affected by strikes
in other industries, movement of families into the region, and the loss of jobs requiring unskilled labour. Mobility is a fact of life, and this is noticed in the considerable
increase of transient or migrant workers. This increase in costs and the number of
persons does not mean that all persons remain on assistance indefinitely, as may
be suggested by statistics.   In the region the average monthly social assistance case
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 3.
 H 46 SOCIAL WELFARE
load was 3,829 cases, and each month an average of approximately 1,203 cases
were closed. In other words, this high turnover of cases indicates that many who
received assistance at one time were self-supporting at another. Staff are constantly
trying to help individuals and families to become self-supporting, and although there
are failures, so are there many success cases. A source to assist individuals and
families to become self-supporting, when they cannot do so by their own efforts, is
the rehabilitation committee, which involves the co-operative effort of many, and
during this year additional ones were established in Salmon Arm and Kamloops.
Thus a rehabilitation committee is operating in each major centre, and we have
appreciated the co-operation of this committee. The establishment by community
groups of hostels for single transient men in Kamloops and Vernon has been of great
help in giving service to this group, and it is hoped further hostels will develop in
other centres during the coming year.
Again growth is evidenced in the child welfare programme, both in terms of
number of cases and in resources. There have been more children placed for
adoption, more children taken into foster-home care, and more families offering
themselves and their homes for adoption and foster-home care. Still more homes
are needed. We are very concerned about the increase of admission of children
to care which exists throughout the region, and this is under constant study by the
supervisors. Some areas show a higher incidence than others, and of particular
concern is the Merritt area. The incidence of social and family breakdown, particularly on reserves near Merritt, is very high, and it may require a special programme
to reverse this trend. During the latter part of the year, planning was under way for
adoption forums in Kelowna and Penticton, following the Provincial one in Victoria.
During the year we have appreciated the interest and concern of many in communities in our foster-care programme. Foster parents' associations have continued
to be a real resource to us in the major centres, and we hope others will form in
smaller communities; as an example, an active foster parents' association was formed
in Lillooet. Some progress has been made in the day-care programme with one
operating in Vernon for some time, and a day-care centre for retarded children
opened in August, 1967, in Kamloops. Active planning is under way in Kamloops
and Penticton for day-care centres for working mothers and also for family day-care
homes. In the coming year it is hoped that some group-care resources for foster
children with special problems may be developed.
Arising from the experience of the previous summer, our Penticton staff were
concerned about the influx of transient youth and started planning for this. It is
expected a number of youths under 18 years will be taken into care during the
summer months. Approximately one-quarter will come from out of the Province
and over half from homes where both parents are present and the father is working.
Many parents will be unaware of the predicament their child is in and anxious that
he or she be returned. Our staff are most concerned with the ease in which youngsters aged 13 to 16 years can hitch-hike their way about the Province and, for their
age, get into some very difficult and undesirable situations. This activity will put
considerable demands on our staff time.
Many additional activities were carried out, and we worked closely with many
community groups in new developments. We continued our programme of placement of improved retardates from The Tranquille School into boarding homes in
Kamloops, Vernon, and Kelowna. This reached a maximum of 40 retardates.
We also worked closely with Dellview Hospital in the placement of its improved
patients into boarding homes in communities. Marion Hilliard Home for unmarried
mothers opened in Kamloops in July, 1967, and has been most successful in its
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 47
operation. This has created the need for further receiving homes for babies pending
adoption placement. Homemaker services are operating in the major centres and
receiving grants from the Department, and activity is under way for the establishment of them in smaller communities, with one starting in Lillooet.
Many of the problems our staff face are also of concern to many in the community, and we have enjoyed greater co-operation and participation with community
groups interested in solutions to these problems. In Kelowna we have worked
closely with the Information and Volunteer Bureau. We have also participated in
the formation of a Community Social Planning Committee. In Penticton we have
continued our membership and participation in the Penticton and District Health
and Welfare Association. In particular, we have worked with their committees
studying the need for additional family services and a family planning clinic. Community directories of community services are completed in Penticton, Kelowna,
and Kamloops, and ones are under way in Vernon and Salmon Arm, and our staff
have participated in this.
Progress recorded here and much not recorded has been in part due to the
concern and interest of many citizens in our programmes and a staff, Provincial
and municipal, devoted to giving to people the best service they can. On behalf of
the staff, our appreciation for the community interest and concern we have received,
and we look forward to greater co-operative participation with community groups.
 H 48 SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION IV
W. H. Crossley, Regional Director
v \^--._, It is interesting to compare some
VVv* i^*f'<:-'* °^ ^e regi°nal case-load percentages
vnflV        ~>T-—   , of increase or decrease with the Pro-
Hfc-Tfc'                  V<X       1 vmcial averages shown in the first
flffl s~\                    7"S3, i table.    Numbers of single and two-
W.»v^h '■ /        ^~"\ s
"Mj&V          yA '    / parent Social Allowance families were
3yky.   3        \ i higher, one-parent families nearly the
W^wJCC?      \ I same,   but,   for   unknown   reasons,
i^y^fs7y\.\           c-^.i couples  receiving  Social  Allowance
'• 2;    W***^ ^^_   \      l increased only 3.4 per cent in Region
'"-%   ^^\'^\yyrC\    I IV against 26.5 per cent Provincially.*
|      w j^          1 s*\s \ The higher number of single men,
~,  'fpT^           1 ^r\\. as  in other increased categories of
JET", c'lyy^-    ) h'- Social Allowance, was largely the re-
f»|1 r, yy, suit of two economic conditions. First,
Vffc1     Sr^y^  ,   \\ there was influx due to rumoured and
\s-^f«'-.v.\J     /-~ / j   \ \ real employment on the dam clearing
t^t^T^ tlj§"'f ~\ 'lv projects, as well as the pulp-mill con
struction in the East Kootenay.   Second, the lengthy strike in the forest
industry made fringe-job opportunities non-existent.
We had a greater decline in both old-age categories than the Provincial average
due to a high death rate in a region where waves of people now aged arrived in the
boom years at the turn of the century.
The child welfare case load is, taken altogether, encouraging when a Region
vs. Province contrast is made. Our JEFF campaigns resulted in an 80-per-cent
increase in adoptions pending, little increase in approved homes awaiting placement,
but a 22-per-cent increase in children in adoption homes. This showed a rapid
placement in homes approved. The employment of two experienced workers part
time on this campaign paid off doubly because our foster homes, both pending and
approved, also increased much above the Provincial average. This allowed us to
offer some resources to other regions. The " child in care " figure, while increasing
less than the Provincial average, is of great concern. We are unable to meet the need
for homes for teen-agers who are now coming in asking for help, and we are unable
to find enough resources for children who require intensive treatment or specialized
foster-home care. Efforts are being made to develop the latter resources in cooperation with several communities.
The region added one per capita municipality this year when Kinnaird, on
January 1, 1968, became responsible for welfare costs and grants-in-aid to meet
them.
In May the Golden area, with some 90 cases, was transferred from the Cranbrook office in this region to the Revelstoke office in Region III.
Ernest Hemingway said it was impossible to describe in one article the happenings on one small beach-head in World War II. It is impossible in the same way
to do justice to a year's action in a region in one report. We had staff shortages due
to illness, and changes of staff. Services continued to clients through other staff
adjusting case loads and working even harder.   Trail was hardest hit in April when
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 3.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 49
services were badly dislocated, though staff additions helped considerably. An
Assistant Supervisor was appointed in Trail in November. This, plus the overlap
of a summer replacement in Trail with an existing staff member, overcame a serious
backlog of work. The additional staff member added to Creston late last year began
to show results this year when the number of children admitted to care dropped over
a half, in part through improved services to troubled families.
Two offices, Trail and Creston, were renovated and made larger, more cheerful
and efficient in May.
An important resource for senior citizens became available on October 21st
when the Tom Uphill Memorial Home in Fernie opened, with a capacity for 50
boarding-home cases.
The Emergency Welfare Services feeding vehicles were of immense help on
two occasions: in late June during the tragic mine disaster at Michel, and again
on July 9th when a child was lost at a beach resort on Kootenay Lake. The vehicles
served many meals and coffee to search and rescue personnel in both emergencies.
This is a small catalogue of events in the region. To the staff perhaps other
events were more inspiring because they carried " seeds of hope."
In November a " thank you " dinner was held in Trail, with 105 foster parents
attending. The Assistant Deputy Minister presented voluntarily prepared illuminated scrolls to those with five years' or more service. This event caused widely
favourable comment and publicity.
However, the major effort was in adult education in the Region. Three examples follow:—
(1) In co-operation with the School Board of School District No. 8, an evening
course for citizens of Russian origin in the Slocan Valley area was completed. Basic English and mathematics were offered to a class of 25 from
young adulthood to pension age. Seventeen finished. Drop-outs were
due to a conflict in working-hours or change of location. The results
were good; all upgraded themselves, some to the point that next year
they will be able to reach a level allowing them to take vocational training.
I should stress that the course was designed primarily for social upgrading
so that people could read newspaper advertisements, write to sons and
daughters, and generally feel more part of the non-Russian culture around
them. This broader focus, rather than total emphasis on vocational training, certainly paid off.
(2) In Nelson the District Supervisor, Adult Education Director, and School
Board members sponsored and developed a successful " Family Life
Workshop " series, held eight consecutive Thursday evenings. The workshops, using other professional personnel in the community but largely
on a group discussion basis, had five aims:—
(a) Insights into themselves as family members.
(b) Understanding the needs and feelings of others.
(c) Increased confidence in themselves as people and parents.
(d) More satisfying family and community relationships.
(e) Increased knowledge of law, money management, food buying,
and investments.
It was gratifying to see several Social Allowance clients, one protection
family, and one of our young wards and her fiance planning marriage
attend each session.   This is a preventive approach to family breakdown.
 H 50 SOCIAL WELFARE
(3) In Cranbrook a four-way co-operation between management, Canada
Manpower, our Department, and the School Board led to daytime upgrading classes on a full eight-hour daily basis to enable people to reach the
educational level required for work in the developing pulp-mill.    Two
classes were held most successfully, with a number of Social Allowance
recipients attending and graduating.
These efforts will in some instances break the " poverty cycle."
The community welfare resources development project commenced in earnest
when a worker was recruited in May.   In November the results of the first survey
dealing with staff participation in community work were submitted to Victoria.
Much valuable insight has and will be gained from this project.
The year has been encouraging on the whole. We have enjoyed outstanding
interest and support from communities, other professions, and the all-important
ordinary citizen. Next year looks even more challenging, with our goal being, in
co-operation with the community, to " reach out" more into preventive and rehabilitative ways to involve people in our programme.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 51
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Director
Region V continued its pattern of
recent years in population growth,
which was estimated for this fiscal
year at between 10 and 12 per cent.
However, the actual numbers of persons spending some time in the region seemed to be greater than usual,
transients, an uncountable number,
seeming to be more numerous than
in previous years. The latter statement is based on the fact that our
single-transient men's hostel in Prince
George was more fully occupied
throughout the year; in fact, it has
been inadequate to the need for some
time and dependent upon the utilization of other resources. Further,
Canada Manpower centres in the area
have reported an increasing number
of inquiries for work from United
States citizens, either visiting the area or writing to inquire about it.
Also a number of persons unemployed due to strikes in other parts of the
Province sought work in the region. These skilled persons have usurped many jobs
which less skilled residents may ordinarily expect to acquire.
At the same time, employment was lessened by a decrease in construction and
further hampered by a slow break-up in the spring, which seriously affected the
logging industry.
The brightest spot in the region was in the Vanderhoof district and particularly
in the area of Fort St. James, where mining development and lumbering industries
showed expansion of considerable importance. This was no doubt encouraged by
the progress in construction of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway spur to Fort St.
James.
Social-work staff numbered 27 full-time workers and one half-time worker on
March 31, 1968, as against 25 full-time workers and one half-time worker one year
previously. This meant a staff increase of 7.8 per cent, but since the half-time
worker was on a temporary project, relating to the finding of foster homes, which
ended in May, the actual increase was one full-time and one half-time worker, or
5.9 per cent. This did not compare favourably with the increase in total case
load, which in the same period paralleled the population's estimated increase and
amounted to 11.2 per cent.
A feature this year was staff interest in development of their skills and techniques, particularly in the Prince George and Vanderhoof offices. The social-work
staffs of the latter two offices met monthly following a proposal laid down in their
June meeting that they organize themselves into groups to make special presentations. These presentations were considerably researched and well presented so as
to induce spirited discussion. Included in this programme was a public meeting on
" Your Child Welfare Programme," which was attended by Mrs. Fowler and Miss
 H 52 SOCIAL WELFARE
Evans, of Child Welfare Division, and a discussion on " The Generation Gap "
with a student panel from the Prince George Senior Secondary School. Dr. Poulos
gave a session on group therapy.
The supervisory situation in Prince George and Vanderhoof was improved by
the appointment on May 30, 1967, of Miss Angela Budnick, who took over responsibility for supervising the rehabilitation section in Prince George and the district
office in Vanderhoof. An early interesting contribution of hers was the inauguration of a series of " Get to Know You " luncheons, including our staff along with
those in public health, probation services, gaol and police services, and doctors,
lawyers, Magistrates, and the ministers.
The administration in the Prince George office remained difficult during the
integration of cases from the two sections which were amalgamated toward the end
of the last fiscal year and took until March of this fiscal year for completion. The
clerical end of this integration was significantly assisted by the Division of Office
Administration.
Two fringe areas of the region had services improved by the establishment of
office accommodations in the Villages of Fort St. James and 100 Mile House. These
premises are staffed two days per week by social workers commuting from Williams
Lake or Vanderhoof.
Services through the medium of social assistance increased significantly, and
by the end of this fiscal year social assistance cases numbered 2,742 and comprised
54.7 per cent of the total regional case load. The most significant change occurred
in the fiscal-year end months of February and March, when there was a sharp
increase in the number of social assistance applicants mostly needing only short-term
help. This is related to the increase in transiency into the area, at a time when the
usual increase in employment opportunities in the bush was delayed by the slow
spring break-up.
In the Quesnel and Williams Lake districts, services to social assistance recipients was enhanced by the establishment of rehabilitation committees.
Child welfare cases increased during the year, but became a smaller proportion
of the total case load, being reduced from 24.2 to 23.6 per cent. The increase did
add an onerous pressure to staff nevertheless, the number of children in care increasing by 45 and the number of adoption cases increasing by 38.
Great efforts were made to improve resources for handling children's cases. In
Prince George a receiving home for infants was opened in June, 1967, and in October of that year a receiving-home society was established with the express purpose
of establishing a home for older children.
A foster parents' association was organized in Prince George in January, 1968,
and members assisted with the JEFF (Joint Effort for Fostering) programme, which
put on a drive for foster homes in the week of February 26, 1968. The appointment
of two half-time social workers to work on the JEFF programme and with foster
parents in general was important to the success of this programme.
In Vanderhoof plans proceeded for establishment of a boarding home for retarded children, and plans were initiated for a receiving home. The Voth Group
Living Home for Boys continued its operation.
An interesting event in relation to this resource was the transformation of a
meeting of citizens called to criticize its operation into a supportive group offering
to help in developing the boys' relationships in the surrounding area.
Some interest has been shown in the development of resources for both the
Quesnel and Williams Lake areas. In Williams Lake a public meeting on adoptions
was sponsored by the Catholic Women's League. It was particularly well attended,
and the programme, which included Mrs. Fowler and Miss Evans from Child Wel-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 53
fare Division, was further enhanced by participation of an adoptive mother from
Prince George. A successful public meeting on adoption, utilizing staff from the
Williams Lake office, was also held at 100 Mile House.
Community services, particularly in the Prince George area, developed most
significantly. These included the appointment of a co-ordinator of special services
for the Prince George School Board; establishment of a committee on subsidized
housing by the City of Prince George; the initiation of a homemakers service; the
staffing of the long-awaited mental health clinic with a psychologist, psychiatric
nurse, and a psychiatric social worker; and the opening of a half-way house for
alcoholics.
Another significant development was establishment of the Community Resource
Planning Board, comprised of people working in the areas of health, welfare, and
education, and its acceptance as Advisory Committee to the Community Welfare
Council.
A particular study of educational, health, and welfare needs of the unorganized
area of Island Cache, contiguous to the City of Prince George, led to a recommendation for appointing a project worker to work with the local citizens in improving
their area.
The numerous developments in community involved staff in many activities
beyond the usual expectation of social work in the Department. All had some
involvement in speeches, committee work, work with community groups concerned
with welfare, health, and education, and community betterment in general. I wish
to thank them for their imaginative drive and success.
Equally do I thank those many persons who have done so much for the developments as citizens self-dedicated to these community matters. Welfare in its broadest
sense will continue to enliven and enhance the communities of this region most
significandy because of them.
 H 54
SOCIAL WELFARE
Yj 7-H--H.
\fc,* if v   y~
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Director
This is a report on some of the
developments and trends in Region
VI, the Fraser Valley Region, during
the past fast-moving year.
An irreversible change process
proceeds in the region, but with considerable unevenness of pace. This
is the change to an urban society,
which brings about an increased complexity and an increased interdependence. This change process causes
upheavals for many individuals and
families.
An example of this change is the
relation of education to employment.
At one time most of the jobs available in the Fraser Valley were unskilled or semi-skilled. Now a great
number of these have been automated
out of existence. Those that remain,
or are being created, involve perceptual and conceptual skills or interpersonal skills.
The administrative pattern for providing social welfare services in the region
is established in the Social Assistance Act and regulations. In Surrey, because of
its population, the responsibility rests with the municipality, and services are provided by the Surrey municipal social welfare department. Mr. W. P. Merner heads
the municipal department.
The balance of the region is served by Provincial district offices, located at
Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Haney, Langley, and White Rock. At the end of the year
the field staff totalled 50 social workers, 7 district supervisors, 1 deputy municipal
administrator, 1 municipal administrator, and Regional Director.
To be an informed and effective staff member of a modern social welfare office
is a many-sided task. Social workers and supervisory staff had an opportunity to
attend Department conferences which involved a variety of skill and knowledge
areas. Three potential supervisors participated in an institute on social-work supervision conducted by the School of Social Work, and four of the senior clerical staff
of the region took part in a social welfare office administration course offered by
the Department of Social Welfare.
There is a positive correlation between good service and adequate modern
office space and equipment. Through the co-operation of the Municipality of
Maple Ridge, the Haney district office was enlarged, modernized, and refurbished.
Social assistance is designed to meet the essential needs of individuals and
families when, for various reasons, they are unable to do so themselves. When
economic need exists regardless of cause, it should be relieved with adequate safeguards so that dependency is neither encouraged nor prolonged.
At the end of the year, 2,882 families and 2,669 single persons were in receipt
of social assistance in the region. This is an approximate 10-per-cent increase
over the previous year.   The largest increase was in the two-parent families.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 55
Several innovations were attempted during the year. Efforts were made to
identify adults and children in social assistance case loads who had ability and
interest in further education. As many as possible were launched into vocational
schools, colleges, and night-school courses. There is no longer employment for
the unskilled, and so an all-out effort was made to present employable persons with
opportunities for training and retraining. This includes providing income maintenance for the trainee and his family during training period, as well as fees, books,
and transportation.
An experiment was carried out in Chilliwack in group counselling of one-
parent families. It was more productive and successful than had been hoped. The
group experience appeared to stimulate self-confidence and self-worth, and thus
an improvement in family and social relationships.
The Chilliwack office co-operated with other agencies in a night-school course
" How to Improve Your Job Opportunities." It was designed for young single
men and included a visit to a vocational school.
A project was established in the White Rock area in which several men who
had been in receipt of Social Allowance for some years were given physical training.
The aim is to improve their general health and thus prepare them for employment.
In its broadest sense, child welfare is primarily concerned with ensuring the
well-being of all children and youth. Within its scope is the protection of children
from neglect, fostering, adoption, and services to unmarried mothers.
There were 457 children taken into care in the year, a decrease of 11 from
the previous year. Many of the children who come into our care are disturbed
children who have been badly hurt and their emotions twisted. For some a certain
expertise is required over and above regular foster-home care. Thus we are developing group homes, and there was an expansion in the number of group homes during
the year. These are private homes and homes operated by community groups set
up for everyday living for from four to eight children. The group living serves as
the means and context of a corrective living experience. The " Twin Firs " receiving home at Abbotsford is one group home opened during the year. It is sponsored
by the Mennonite Central Committee of British Columbia in co-operation with the
Department of Social Welfare.
Foster-parent training courses were conducted in Chilliwack and in Cloverdale.
These courses were jointly sponsored by the Department of Social Welfare and the
local department of adult education.
As the Federal social insurance provisions expand, the need for Provincial
financial programmes diminish. This is reflected in our regional case load. There
was a decrease of 544 during the year of persons age 65 years and over.
However, there are developing needs for service for this group. One factor
is that people are living longer. If chronic illness occurs, or in the upper age-groups
a loss of strength and vigour, our social workers are contacted for assistance in making a plan. Homemaker services and boarding-home care are two resources used
in these situations. Our staff see a growing need to involve the community in the
development of meals on wheels and friendly visitation programmes.
An emphasis was evident in community organization during the year. This
was reflected through the region in two or three ways. First there was an emphasis
on co-ordinating and integrating the services and resources available in the community. This was done by getting together with other professionals working at the
local level.
 H 56 SOCIAL WELFARE
Then there was some exploration of the role of our staff in the provision of new
resources. It is an interesting question as to the role and the responsibility of Provincial Civil Servants in this regard. Along with other regions, we are seeking
guidelines in this work.
Also, staff worked co-operatively with local social planning councils and other
local structures. There are many examples of joint efforts in meeting community
problems. Perhaps it would be helpful to review briefly but more specifically a few
developments.
The services of rehabilitation committees were extended to Surrey and are now
available to the entire population of the region. A number of people, some in receipt
of public assistance and some not, are potentially employable, but are out of touch
with the active labour market. They see no chance of finding work, or possibly
family disintegration or repeated failure has left them distraught or hopeless. The
needed services are provided through rehabilitation as well as " habilitative " committees. The committees meet monthly and involve Health, Social Welfare, and
Manpower. Other private and public agencies are added, depending on the nature
of the problems.
Community-based homemaker services continue as community agencies as well
as an integral part of the social welfare programme. The Langley Homemaker Service got under way with help from a grant from the Department. The Abbostford-
based homemaker service was extended to include Mission, under the new name of
Central Fraser Valley Homemaker Service. At the end of the year, five community
homemaker services were receiving Provincial grants.
The Surrey municipal office and, as of this year, each Provincial office in the
region are co-operating with the Provincial Mental Health Services in a programme
of improved patients in boarding homes. There are close to 350 of these placements
in the region.
The region is increasingly used by private agencies for homes and institutions.
During the year, Fraser House, a half-way house for alcoholics, was established at
Mission. This, along with an expanded Miracle Valley operated by the Salvation
Army and the Maple Ridge Half-way House, now provides accommodation for the
care and treatment of some 200 alcoholics.
The Salvation Army is to be congratulated on the British Columbia House of
Concord, which in April opened its doors to serve young men. It provides a home
for youths (15 to 19 years) who come before the Courts and whose homes are not
suitable for a good probation period.
Social welfare services cannot be given through a mechanical administration or
in a vacuum. This is an area of service that involves the greatest of skills in all staff.
In the past year we have again received excellent co-operation from municipal officials, school authorities, public health and Manpower personnel, and many other
community agencies and people.
We appreciate the help extended by our senior administration. They were
always prepared to allow us to give assistance in a flexible way when extraordinary
problems were encountered.
Our thanks to clerical staff, social workers, and supervisors, Provincial and
municipal alike, who combined their ideas and skills with hard work to provide
constructive services.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68
H 57
REGION VII
A. J. Wright, Regional Director
Steady growth has been noted in
all areas of the region during the past
year, which has resulted from a fairly
good and stable economic picture.
Kitimat has shown the greatest potential with the announcement of the
start of construction of Eurocan pulp-
mill and further development as a
deep-sea port by British Columbia
Wharves Ltd. At the same time
several small industries started in
Terrace, which provided greater scope
to the community. Labour disputes
disrupted the fishing industry to some
extent in Prince Rupert, but this did
not affect the general economy of the
area to any great extent. Mining developments in Smithers, Stewart, and
Alice Arm took on a greater degree
of permanency, which has been reflected in their steady growth. Hazelton, unfortunately, had not really shown any
signs of recovery from a serious setback suffered during the previous year.
Toward the end of the year the Kitimat district office opened. This is staffed
by 1 V_ social workers and one clerk. The main reason for its establishment was to
improve services to the people in the Kitimat area. It was also opened in anticipation of the increase in demand for service which will be caused by the increase in
population resulting from the developments noted above. Although there was not
an actual increase in the number of social workers, the savings of time through
increased efficiency made up for this.
A project was started in the Smithers area to help alleviate the mounting problems that resulted from the economic depression in Hazelton. A part-time social
worker was hired to deal with multi-problem families on an intensive casework
basis. The results toward the end of the year have been gratifying and rewarding.
A large number of children who would ordinarily be apprehended have been kept
in their own homes, and the family situations have improved.
In Prince Rupert there were many staff changes during the year, as well as the
retirement of the District Supervisor.
Throughout the region there were once again increases in nearly all categories
of services. Largest proportion of increases was in the Terrace and Smithers areas.
This is primarily due to the economic climate. Social Allowance for the region
showed a significant increase, resulting in a corresponding increase in costs. This
was particularly evident in the Terrace area, although Smithers showed a sharp
increase in single persons, due mainly to the increase in the number of transient men.
Heaviest increases for Prince Rupert were with families. These were mainly seasonal workers who were not able to obtain sufficient employment to carry them
through the year.
The end of this year saw the opening of a senior citizens' housing development
in Terrace.   This is a low-rental complex consisting of 18 units for either single
 H 58 SOCIAL WELFARE
persons or married couples. Prince Rupert has already one such development
operating and is negotiating for land to establish a second. Contracts have been let
for the construction of similar developments in Smithers and in Burns Lake. It is
hoped that these developments will be ready for occupancy sometime in the next
year.
A hostel for transients was opened in Terrace during the year, sponsored by
the Terrace District Welfare Council. They have rented a small house near the
centre of town and hired a caretaker. It has a capacity of 10 men. We are trying
to limit it to the younger age-group and make it a resource for employers who might
be looking for labourers. As there is a heavy transient population in Terrace, this is
a needed resource.
Special resources for children continue to be developed. This year saw the
opening of the Applewhaite Hall for Boys in Prince Rupert. This is a group-living
home for teen-aged boys primarily in their early teens. Many months of hard work
and negotiations by community-spirited citizens lay behind this home. Through
co-operation of the City of Prince Rupert, Department of National Defence property was leased and the building renovated to make it a home-life atmosphere for
six to eight boys.
McCarthy House for Girls, operating on the same principal, continues to
operate effectively. Four girls this year have been discharged and are now useful
citizens in their community.
Negotiations are in progress for a new receiving home in Hazelton. The need
for the present receiving home is ever present, but the building is reaching the end
of its usefulness. Negotiations are therefore underway with the local Indian Agency
and the local Indian Band council.
A similar project is being undertaken in Kitimat. The local Lions Club is at
present negotiating with the Aluminum Company to purchase a duplex house. After
necessary renovations, it is hoped that they will be operating a group-living home
for children sometime in the next year.
The Hazelton Children's Home continues to function at full capacity, and
results from it are encouraging. Although it is somewhat too early to tell, all indications are that the number of readmissions to hospital by children after a stay in the
home has been cut drastically. In Wi years of operation this has been from 3,000
hospital-days to 500 for 40 children.
Community interest in the work of this Department continues at high standard,
with active participation by the social-work staff. Committees have been established
in Kitimat, Terrace, and Prince Rupert to study problems in their respective communities and try to co-ordinate activities. A mental health committee is in operation
in Smithers and is trying to point out to its community the problems that exist in
this area and stimulate interest in attacking the problem.
The work of these committees point up the fine co-operation that exists between
the Department and the community.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 59
REGION VIII
J. A. Mollberg, Regional Director
Welfare services in the Province's
most northern region represent a vital
and integral part of all community
services. The economy has remained
stable, although the Peace River dam
is nearing completion, and the number of staff employed on the project
has already decreased. Unemployment has been a major problem, not
only in the region, but throughout
British Columbia and, for that matter,
Canada. The effects of this will be
shown in the section on social assistance and rehabilitation. Another
major problem facing the people of
this region is the perennial and general housing problem. The City of
Dawson Creek has continued with its
''" efforts to develop low-cost housing,
and, hopefully, this will materialize
this year. Similar developments are also necessary in the other communities in the
region, particularly Fort St. John and Chetwynd.
Our Dawson Creek staff was increased by one worker in September, 1967, and
an additional project worker was hired from December 1, 1967, to March 31, 1968,
to conduct our foster- and adoption-home campaign. The additional staff greatly
facilitated the provision of services in the region.
In May, 1967, an institute was held in Dawson Creek on the topic of "Administration " under the auspices of the School of Social Work and was attended by
all staff. Our regional conference was held in November, 1967, in Fort St. John,
and we were pleased to have the Honourable Dan Campbell present at our meetings.
Our main speaker was Dr. Bennet Wong, child psychiatrist from Vancouver, along
with Mr. R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Welfare, and Mr. T. D. Bingham,
Superintendent of Child Welfare. The conference was an excellent learning experience for all staff members.
As mentioned above, the major problem facing the people in the area was
unemployment. The effect of the unemployment can be seen in the statistics for
the region shown in Part IV. The Social Allowance case load increased by 90 cases
between April, 1967, and April, 1968. Unemployment for the region changed from
5.3 per cent to approximately 7.4 per cent for the same period, which directly
accounts for the increase in our Social Allowance case load.
The rehabilitation committee has continued to function, and several people
have been sent for retraining, either through Canada Manpower, Division of Rehabilitation, or ourselves. However, with unemployment at its present level, available counselling and training resources are soon overutilized and their net effect
negated. Unemployment cannot be solved by the provision of social assistance.
Retraining schemes are excellent and essential, however, more effort must be taken
to keep our employment figures at a manageable level.
 H 60 SOCIAL WELFARE
In May, 1967, an agreement was worked out with Canada Manpower where
all new employable applicants for assistance go to the Manpower office first, and if
employment or retraining are not available, applicants are then referred to our office
for assistance. Canada Manpower first completes an initial assessment outlining
the client's work history, education, and present circumstances. This gives our staff
the information necessary to do a thorough assessment, and thus provide a more
appropriate service to the client. This procedure is still in effect and working most
satisfactorily.
In November, 1967, approval was received for the construction of a receiving
home for teen-age children in Dawson Creek under the auspices of the Dawson Creek
Rotary Club. Construction has commenced on the home, which will provide a
real service to meet the needs of children in this region. We are most grateful to
the Rotary Club and the City of Dawson Creek for their support of this project.
The number of children in care in the region has increased during the past year,
as well as the number of unmarried parents. The above shows the need for an
increase in preventive service to families in order to enable them to solve or alleviate
some of their problems. Unemployment and housing are factors related to this
problem; however, day-care services are still a much-needed resource.
The Honourable Isabel Dawson visited the region in June, 1967, to survey the
needs of our senior citizens. Extended-care facilities have been completed at the
Pouce Coupe Hospital and will soon be opened for service. Plans have been drawn
up for the development of a boarding home in Pouce Coupe, and when this has been
completed will meet the immediate needs of our senior citizens in the Dawson Creek
area. Old-age Assistance has decreased during the past year due to the lowering of
the eligibility age for Old Age Security.
Staff have been active throughout the region, not only with regard to our JEFF
campaign, but speaking and working with groups in the community for the development of further services. The Homemaker Housekeeper Association continues to
operate in Dawson Creek, and is proving to be a necessary and worth-while service.
We have appreciated the co-operation we have received from all members of the
community in helping us meet the needs of the people in Region VIII.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 61
PART III.—LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. Ill)
This Act establishes the Department of Social Welfare as having jurisdiction
of all matters relating to social and public welfare and social assistance.
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 360, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial assistance
and other services that are essential for a reasonably normal and healthy existence
to individuals and families who are unable to maintain themselves by their own
efforts.
PROTECTION OF CHILDREN ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 303, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are
neglected, abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship.
CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED PARENTS ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 52, as Amended)
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of
wedlock are protected.
ADOPTION ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 4, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted
children as those of children born to both parents in a family.
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 270)
The purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance to persons between
65 and 68 years of age who have limited assets or income.
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 113, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to persons over 18 years of age who are
totally and permanently disabled and who have limited assets or income.
BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 29, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to blind persons over 18 years of age
and who have limited assets or income.
 H 62 SOCIAL WELFARE
TRAINING-SCHOOLS ACT
(1963, Chap. 50)
The purpose of this Act is to provide training, reformation, and rehabilitation
of children committed to the training schools.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS LICENSING ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 406, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to ensure that adequate standards of care and supervision are provided for persons who receive services from such institutions as
boarding homes, orphanages, maternity homes, hostels, creches, day-nurseries, playschools, and kindergartens.
PROVINCIAL HOME ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 307, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to
maintain themselves by their own efforts.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 63
PART IV.—STATISTICAL REPORTS AND TABLES
Table 1.—Comparison of Number of Cases by Category of Service
in the Province as of March 31, 1967 and 1968
Category
Cases at March-
1967
1968
Change
Per Cent
Change
Family Service	
Social Allowance-
Single person..
Couple.
Two-parent family..
One-parent family...
Child with relative-
Totals	
2,047
18,119
1,669
4,896
7,436
767
2,041
20,619
2,111
6,417
8,463
951
f 2,500
+442
f 1,521
f 1,027
+ 184
—0.3
+ 13.8
+26.5
+31.1
+ 13.8
+24.0
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance _.
Old Age Security-
Adoption home pending....
Adoption home approved.
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved	
Child in carei.	
Unmarried parent 	
Welfare institution	
Health and institutions	
Area development projects-
Totals 	
32,887
38,561
+5,674
+ 17.3
591
607
+ 16
+2.7
2,813
2,874
+ 61
+2.2
5,966
4,974
—992
— 19.9
26,127
24,432
— 1,695
—6.9
644
858
+214
+33.2
197
183
— 14
—7.7
827
1,003
+ 176
+21.3
1,038
1,051
+ 13
+ 1.3
2,558
2,865
+307
+ 12.0
5,222
5,956
+734
+14.1
1,008
999
—9
—0.9
835
832
— 3
-0.4
30
23
- 7
-30.4
99
51
—48
—94.1
82.1
87,310
+4,421
+5.3
1 The total number of children in care shown in this table differs slightly with the Child Welfare Division's
statistics because of the approximate one-week delay in reporting.
2 Research project providing total service in a Vancouver City area.
Table 2.—Number of Cases Receiving Service in the Province by
Category of Service during the Year 1967/68
Category
Cases Open
First of
Year
Cases
Opened
during
Year
Cases
Closed
during
Year
Cases Open
End of
Year
Cases
Served
during
Yeari
2,047
18,119
1,669     '
4,896
7,436
767
591
2,813
5,966
26,127
644
197
827
1,038
2,558
5,222
1,008
835
30     '
99
2,407
54,393
4,221
13,312
10,050
1,010
208
852
2,720
5,986
1,650
783
1,673
1,447
1,678
5,043
1,645
309
275
37
2,567
51,751
3,777
11,917
8,942
835
198
799
3,737
7,573
1,406
790
1,489
1,413
1,396
4,360
1,654
313
281
80
2,041
20,619
2,111
6,417
8,463
951
607
2,874
4,974
24,432
858
183
1,003
1,051
2,865
5,956
999
832
23
51
4,454
Social Allowance—
72,512
5,890
18,208
17,486
1,777
Blind Persons' Allowance            	
Disabled Persons' Allowance —
Old-age Assistance  	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance
799
3,665
8,686
32,113
2,294
980
2,500
2,485
4,236
10,265
2,653
1,144
305
Foster home pending   	
Foster home approved	
136
Totals	
82,889
109,699
105,278
87,310
192,588
1 Cases served during year is total of cases open first of year and cases opened during year.
2 Research project providing total service in Vancouver City area.
For Individual Categories.—Cases open first of year plus cases opened during year minus cases closed during
year does not equal cases open at the end of the year as redistributed cases have been subtracted from open and
closed and these are sometimes opened in one category and closed in another. Total opened and closed
redistributed balances.
 H 64
SOCIAL WELFARE
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 65
The following Tables 3-1 to 3-8, inclusive, are available from the Department
of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, on request:—
Table 3-1.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region I as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-2.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region II as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-3.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region III as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-4.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region IV as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-5.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region V as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-6.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VI as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-7.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VII as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 3-8.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VIII as of March 31, 1967 and 1968.
Table 4.—Total Number of Casual and Permanent Staff (Clerical, Professional, and Technical) That Were Employed, and Their Location
in the Department, as of March 31, 1962, and March 31, 1968.
General Administration 	
Field Service	
Medical Services Division	
Child Welfare Division	
Provincial Home	
Brannan Lake School for Boys	
Willingdon School for Girls	
Old-age Assistance Board	
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division
New Denver Youth Centre	
Japanese Pavilion, New Denver	
1962
1968
16
12
322
447
13
18
27
38
34
35
62
62
50
50
76
77
5
5
605
744
	
25
14
813
 H 66
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 5.—Total Social-work Staff Employed for Fiscal Years Ended
March 31, 1961, and March 31, 1962; and March 31, 1967, and March
31,1968.
1961/62
1967/63
University
Trained
In-
service
Trained
Total
University
Trained
In-
service
Trained
Total
Total staff March 31,1961
Completed formal training
89
+5
147
-5
236
Total staff March 31,1967
including (institutions)...
Completed formal training
during fiscal year	
Staff appointed April 1,
1967, to March 31, 1968
Resignations, deaths (1),
and transfers (1), April
1, 1967, to March 31,
1968  	
134
+ 10
235
^10
369
94
24
28
142
54
37
236
78
65
Staff   appointed  April   1,
1961, to March 31, 1962
Resignations,  deaths   (2),
and transfers (2), April
1,   1961, to March  31,
1962        ...
144
7
19
225
79
41
369
86
Total    staff,    March    31,
1962   (excluding institu-
90
5
159
2
249
7
60
Totals 	
Brannan Lake School for
Boys    and    Willingdon
95
161
256
132
263
395
Table 6.—Total Social-work Staff, According to Degrees and Training,
as at March 31, 1962, and March 31, 1968
This table available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 report of the department of social welfare, 1967/68      h 67
Table 7.—Social Worker Separations Which Occurred during
Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1967/68, by Reason
Domestic 	
To further education	
To accept other employment
111 health	
Deaths 	
Transferred 	
Services unsatisfactory 	
To accept municipal job	
Voluntary retirement	
Temporary only	
Personal 	
To return to another Province or country	
To accept Federal Government employment
Totals
1961/62
._ 19
._ 14
_ 10
- 3
- 2
- 2
.. 2
_ 2
.. 1
_ 10
65
1967/68
21
8
13
2
1
6
3
1
60
1 Twenty-four of whom not shown in Table 5 because of short-term temporary employment.
Table 8.—Expenditures for Social Allowances, 1967/68
  $38,263,411
Basic Social Allowances	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing-
and boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis),
special allowances and grants	
Housekeeping and homemaker services	
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its
home by fire or similar circumstances	
Tuberculosis cases—
(a) Boarding-, nursing-, and private-home
care   $ 126,3 69
(_•)  Transportation  89
(c)  Comforts allowance    	
4,497,968
491,325
63,921
 • 126,458
Hospitalization of social assistance cases (short stay, etc.) 14,265
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts __ $43,457,348
Municipal share of costs	
Reimbursement from other Provinces
Federal-Provincial cost sharing	
$4,111,102
179,935
21,535,549
 H 68
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Regions
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1967 and 1968
Persons
March, 1967    March, 1968
Costs
March, 1967      March, 1968
Provincial—
Alberni..
Region I
Campbell River..
Courtenay	
Duncan	
Nanaimo	
Victoria	
Parksville...
Totals..
Municipal—
Alberni-
Campbell River-
Court enay	
Central Saanich..
Duncan 	
Esquimalt..
Ladysmith..
Nanaimo.—.
North Cowichan..
Oak Bay	
Port Alberni	
Saanich  ~
Victoria  —
Totals-
Region totals-
Region II
Provincial—
New Westminster-
Vancouver—	
Westview  —
Totals	
Municipal—
Burnaby_
Coquitlam-
Delta	
New Westminster 	
North Vancouver City	
North Vancouver District-
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody 	
Powell River	
Richmond	
Vancouver...  	
West Vancouver-
Totals	
Region totals-
Provincial—
Kamloops..
Kelowna.-
Region III
Lillooet..
Merritt-
North Kamloops..
Oliver 	
Penticton	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm	
Vernon	
Totals...
Municipal—
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Merritt	
476
249
607
444
1,079
754
3,609
258
292
152
57
170
234
94
767
354
63
560
692
2,050
5,743
9,352
50
561
77
688
2,891
990
457
1,937
791
448
411
203
218
649
17,337
234
1,264
812
325
254
337
442
515
164
487
800
5,400
469
452
669
515
580
1,286
435
4,406
625
212
188
361
76
852
379
92
951
823
2,788
$16,642
9,305
23,419
20,026
48,884
30,982
$18,396
19,367
26,278
27,707
33,299
53,637
18,471
$149,258
$197,155
$8,897
7,729
6,253
2,372
8,394
15,498
3,527
30,692
13,192
1,750
22,979
40,187
115,507
$17,747
8,227
8,138
20,648
3,223
36,428
15,330
4,136
41,794
49,581
146,283
7,347     $276,977     $351,535
11,753     $426,235
$548,690
25
740
95
$1,213
20,442
3,550
860
$25,205
3,934
1,068
539
2,191
1,102
638
586
242
217
885
19,851
217
$145,154
44,843
20,533
83,935
39,491
22,939
21,815
7,131
8,448
29,908
977,041
16,182
$1,130
29,324
4,932
$35,386
$206,753
58,888
27,440
110,334
60,809
35,206
32,525
10,861
8,323
40,258
1,130,209
16,423
26,566   |  31,470
$1,417,420
$1,738,029
27,254     32,330
1,169
1,000
505
261
476
630
485
580
878
$1,442,625
$41,225
30,798
11,002
7,390
12,143
16,963
19,508
4,119
15,458
27,053
$1,773,415
$40,977
41,198
21,746
9,238
20,748
21,891
12,438
18,568
30,800
5,984     $185,659     $217,604
$20,300
35,241
6,859
$78,953
33,903
10,661
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68
H 69
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Regions
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1967 and 1968—Continued
Persons
Costs
March, 1967
March, 1968
March, 1967
March, 1968
Region III—Continued
Municipal—Continued
446
837
102
179
136
392
$21,906
34,749
3,848
6,915
6,264
13,950
Penticton   _	
Revelstoke  	
1,014
no
160
168
420
$43,725
3,769
6,690
Summerland 	
Vernon..   .	
7,750
19,047
Totals                     	
3,712
5,009
$150,032
$204,498
9,112
10,993
$335,691
$422,102
Region IV
Provincial—
744
508
349
321
513
264
664
633
558
370
380
673
500
984
$26,722
20,498
12,017
15,231
27,179
11,489
28,559
$26,025
25,012
Fernie	
12,295
19,542
Nelson	
32,083
18,785
Trail 	
42,148
Totals 	
3,363
4,098
$141,695
$175,890
Municipal—
243
137
222
195
80
336
243
399
163
207
141
138
436
324
$8,447
6,307
9,052
6,161
3,310
17,499
12,378
$13,817
6,934
8,952
7,218
Fernie  	
Kimberley —	
Nelson   	
Trail      	
5,063
19,106
15,760
Totals	
1,456
1,808
$63,154
$76,850
4,819
5,906
$204,849
$252,740
Region V
Provincial—■
2,106
615
202
808
2,729
747
271
927
$83,293
19,688
6,620
21,556
$114,671
29,067
Vanderhoof-	
9,794
33,053
Totals	
3,731
4,674
$131,157
$186,585
Municipal—
681
306
33
1,275
571
44
$36,512
11,366
985
$65,880
19,117
1,463
Quesnel 	
Totals	
1,020
1,890
$48,863
$86,460
4,751
6,564
$180,020
$273,045
Region VI
Provincial—
376
696
123
559
783
134
$14,511
28,880
4,430
$22,973
36,792
5,381
Haney.	
Totals	
1,195
1,476
$47,821
$65,146
Municipal—■
Chilliwack City 	
479
1,399
146
199
1,166
1,342
864
425
280
213
4,364
447
552
1,533
168
239
1,177
1,275
1,460
711
345
268
4,298
472
$21,141
53,179
5,433
7,951
48,632
70,752
40,890
19,993
10,913
10,651
184,996
25,851
$25,779
62,663
7,169
11,510
54,901
77,883
55,375
27,187
13,217
13,816
202,813
26,539
Hope 	
Langley City..  .... _
Sumas  	
Surrey 	
White Rock 	
Totals. 	
11,324
12,498
$500,382
$578,852
12,519
13,974
$548,203
$643,998
 H 70
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Regions
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1967 and 1968—Continued
Persons
Costs
March, 1967
March, 1968
March, 1967
March, 1968
Region VII
Provincial—■
308
287
827
280
363
326
1,029
390
$9,982
9,353
32,631
9,724
$12,009
11,844
45,122
14,887
Smithers    -	
Terrace  .   	
Totals   _	
1,702
2,108
$61,690              $83,862
Municipal—■
450
453
819
695
$19,469
15,054
$35,957
29,333
Terrace -  _
Totals	
903
1,514
$34,523      |        $65,290
2,605
3,622
$96,213      |      $149,152
Region VIII
Provincial—
Dawson Creek   ~  	
Fort St. John 	
1,235
695
1,930
1,335
753
2,088
$48,633
27,472
$54,271
31,449
*«■; lit.
Totals                  	
S76 ins
Municipal—
1,166
338
1,247
348
$47,149
14 t\ir>
$56,142
1_ or>
Fort St. John	
Totals	
1,504
1,595
$61,791      |        $71,074
Region totals	
3,434
3,683
$137,896
$156,794
Table 10.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs
by Regions in March, 1967/68
Persons
March, 1967     March, 1968
Costs
March, 1967       March, 1968
Region I 	
Region II	
Region III ...
Region IV—
Region V	
Region VI	
Region VII —
Region VIII..
9,352
27,254
9,112
4,819
4,751
12,519
2,605
3,434
Totals...
73,846
11,753
32,330
10,993
5,906
6,564
13,974
3,622
3,683
88,825
$426,235
1,442,625
335,691
204,849
180,020
548,203
96,213
137,896
$548,690
1,773,415
422,102
252,740
273,045
643,998
149,152
156,794
$3,371,732
$4,219,936
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 71
Table 11.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial
Assistance from Department of Social Welfare) Served by Department of Social Welfare during Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Year
April, 1967	
May, 1967	
June, 1967	
July, 1967	
August, 1967	
September, 1967-
October, 1967	
November, 1967-
December, 1967...
January, 1968	
February, 1968—
March, 1968	
2,047
2,064
2,139
2,134
2,115
2,100
2,058
2,045
2,067
2,091
2,086
2,043
244
303
264
215
249
294
220
275
201
304
298
227
227
228
269
234
264
336
233
253
177
309
341
229
2,064
2,139
2,134
2,115
2,100
2,058
2,045
2,067
2,091
2,086
2,043
2,041
1,886
1,887
1,887
1,890
1,892
1,926
1,976
1,993
1,994
1,976
2,030
2,047
Table 12.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare
and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children by
Type of Service for Fiscal Years 1966/67 and 1967/68.
Type of Service
Opened during
Year
Carried during
Year
Incomplete at
End of Year
1966/67
1967/68
1966/67
1967/68
1996/67
1967/68
Custody 	
122                105
376                511
77        ;          87
15         ;            17
163
418
122
19
150
561
118
20
45                  27
50                  31
31                  32
Legitimation  _ 	
3                    4
Totals
590        !        720
722        '.       849
1-9        !          94
1 Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
- Children's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Family and Children's Service of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table 13.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of
Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1967/68
Number at
Beginning
of Fiscal
Year
Number
Opened
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Served
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Closed
during
Fiscal Year
Number
at End of
Fiscal Year
Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver  	
Catholic Family and Children's Service, Vancouver 	
Victoria Children's Aid Society- _
Totals...  	
706
697
127
15?
1,687
1,416
1,036
366
261
2,122
1,7I33!
483
418
1,424
1,147
308
259
698
586
175
159
3,069
4,756
3,138
1,618
 H 72
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 14.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia
by Age-group of Mother during Fiscal Years 1966/67 and 1967/68
Age-group of Mother
Fiscal Year
Under 15
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40 Years
and Over
Total
1966/67       , .,              	
1967/68
Percentage increase or  decrease
over previous year	
3®
23
—65.2
1,490
1,621
8.8
1,304
1,429
9.6
S58
556
-0.4
453
432
—41.9
54
54>
3,897
4,115
5.6
Table 15.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during and at End of Fiscal
Year 1967/68. During At March 31,
1967/68 1968
Superintendent of Child Welfare  8,794 6,067
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  2,689 1,683
Catholic Family and Children's Service,
Vancouver  1,381 978
Victoria Children's Aid Society      863 617
  4,933   3,278
Totals  13,727 9,345
Table 16.—Number of Children in Care1 of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, by Regions,
and by Societies as at March 31, 1968.
Children in Care
Other
P.C.A.
Before
J.D.A.
Prov
Wards
Court
Wards
inces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Other
Agency
Non-wards,
Wards,
and Before
Court
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare—■
Region I_
Region II	
Region Ill-
Region IV	
Region V	
Region VI—
Region VII-
RegionVIII.
S.C.W. and agency wards supervised by
another Province 	
Total of Superintendent of Child
Welfare 	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society	
Catholic   Family   and   Children's   Service,
Vancouver— 	
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Total of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid
Societies   	
655
55
83
8
859
60
54
20
820
82
46
33
324
49
26
2
440
40
17
3
679
56
33
32
347
22
17
2
154
18
4
7
156
1
7
4,434
383
287
107
1,271
25
47
6
726
70
26
2
338
37
79
4
6,769
515
439
119
115
107
159
41
65
163
22
25
698
239
105
79
1,121
42
20
17
11
14
25
6
6
17
158
95
49
80
382
958
1,120
1,157
453
579
988
416
214
182
6,067
1,683
978
617
9,345
1 " In care " is denned as the actual number of children being cared for by the agency, regardless of which
agency has legal responsibility for the child.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68
H 73
Table 17.—Number of Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal
Status, by Regions, and by Societies as at March 31, 1968.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Provinces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare—
Region I._	
655
859
820
322
440
679
347
154
145
156
55
60
82
49
40
56
22
18
4
1
83
54
46
26
17
33
17
4
21
7
8
20
33
2
3
32
?
14
	
115
107
159
41
65
163
22
25
30
1
916
1,100
1,140
440
565
963
Region VII     - -	
410
Region VIII                                         	
208
214
165
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Superintendent of Child
Welfare ...,„..	
4,577
387
308
121
728
6,121
Vancouver Children's Aid Society—
1,271
65
25
47
7
1,
1      239
     1         3
1,582
Children in S.C.W. or other agency caret	
75
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Vancouver Children's Aid
1,336
25
54
1
     j      242
1,657
Catholic Family and Children's Service of Vancouver—
726
70
70
	
26
	
105
927
Children in S.C.W. or other agency caret	
70
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Catholic Family and Chil-
796
70
26
___    1      105
997
Victoria Children's Aid Society—
338
28
37
79
7
79
     1          6
533
Children in S.C.W. or other agency caret	
41
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility  of  Victoria  Children's  Aid
366
37
86
f
     |        85
574
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of  Superintendent of  Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies
7,075
519
474
121
1,160
9,349
1 The Children's Aid Societies' children in another Province are shown in Table 16, section " S.C.W. and
agency wards supervised by another Province," " Other Agency Non-wards, Wards, and Before Court." There
is a total of 17 of these children.
Table 18.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Age-group at March 31, 1968
Age-group
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
1,045
776
1,664
1,334
702
546
367
259
352
287
209
209
233
120
273
178
82
92
66
65
148
159
99
80
1,711
1,220
2,437
1,958
1,092
927
3- 5 years	
6-11    „    	
12-15    „      	
16-17    „     	
18-20   „    	
Totals  	
6,067        I      1,683
1
978
617
9,345
 H 74
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 19.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care as at March 31, 1968
Type of Care
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Paid foster-home care..  	
Boarding home, child maintaining self—	
Free home and free relatives' (or parents') home
Adoption home  _	
Institutional- 	
A.W.O.L  	
Totals  	
4,631
227
298
329
511
71
6,067
1,291
66
55
70
187
14
1,683
722
23
39
81
103
10
415
27
57
15
98
5
978
617
7,059
343
449
495
899
100
9,345
Table 20.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during
Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act
Committed under Juvenile Delinquents Act.—
1,849
121
1,158
56
227
16
221
7
87
30
165
2,384
174
2,054
56
Other Provinces'wards	
         I         	
Total new admissions —	
Transfer of supervision   	
3,184                   804
192        |         220
398
64
2821
34
4,668
510
Total new admissions and transfers —
3,376                 1,024
462
316
5,178
i The drastic reduction over previous years is the result of an adjustment in the internal method of counting,
not a true reduction in activity.
 report of the department of social welfare, 1967/68      h 75
Table 21.—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies during
Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Reason
Number of Children
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Physical abuse-
Parental neglect-
Desertion or abandonment	
Emotional disturbances, needing treatment-
One parent deceased- 	
Sole parent deceased .
Parental illness, mental	
Parental illness, physical.
Awaiting adoption placement-
Removed from adoption placement-
Awaiting permanent plan 	
Rehabilitation plan for parents	
Physical handicap	
Mental retardation 	
Delinquent behaviour {Juvenile Delinquents Act only).
Transient 	
Unmarried mother 	
Parental failure to provide needed medical treatment
or prevention  	
Parent or parents imprisoned-
Inability of family to provide needed education and
training
Requested by other Province .
Transfer of guardianship	
Change of legal status	
Request by other agency	
Total new admissions-
Transfer of supervision from other agencies...
Total new admissions and transfers_
24
537
376
112
47
37
125
240
536
10
86
313
25
35
116
176
54
24
79
76
55
101
3,184
192
1
179
53
18
4
4
35
52
235
1
119
24
2
2
20
32
3
2
13
804
220
3,376 1,024
4
22
48
1
2
23
27
140
78
1
24
2
2
4
13
398
64
462
59
9
17
4
22
17
45
1
16
23
4
3
30
5
282
34
316
29
797
486
148
57
41
205
336
956
12
299
361
31
40
190
215
67
32
114
96
55
101
4,668
510
Table 22.—Number of Children Discharged from Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status
during Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service.
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Protection of Children Act wards 	
664
84
763
942
51
242
1
77
489
146
1
53
132
43                 1,095
14                   100
15                   908
143                 1,706
Other Provinces' wards 	
--        1             51
Total direct discharges from care —	
2,504
208
809        j        332
197                  45
2151                3,860
27        j           477
Total direct discharges and transfers —
2,712
1,006                377
1
242
4,337
i The drastic reduction over previous years is the result of an adjustment in the internal method of counting,
not a true reduction in activity.
 H 76
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 23.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1967/68
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Wards
Twenty-one years of age-
Married (female)	
Deceased	
Committal order rescinded ...
Guardianship transferred	
Returned to other Province..
Adoption order granted	
Sub-totals 	
Before the Court (Protection of Children Act)
Withdrawn from Court  — 	
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (6) and 8 (4).
Deceased    	
Adoption order granted _	
Married (female)— 	
Apprehended but not presented..
Sub-totals 	
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age	
Married (female) _
Deceased  	
To parents or relations	
Placed for adoption 	
Change in legal status 	
Other.   	
Sub-totals.
136
47
11
232
6
45
325
940
Total direct discharges.
Transfer of supervision	
Total of direct discharges and transfers..
52
12
1
24
83
71
20
9
1
16
1
100
332
149
118
18
2
1
16
12
3
98
42
489
132
143
2,504
208        j
809
197
332
45
215
27
2,712        |   1,006
377
242
226
70
14
288
98
45
508
7
2
3
1,338
349
1,704
3,860
477
4,337"
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68
H 77
Table 24.—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1968.
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Health Institutions
24
1
5
3
41
3
12
34
25
1
3
9
20
3
24
2
6
58
47
8
4
17
19
7
1
4
23
9
38
39
53
3
1
9
31
3
1
2
9
11
53
8
13
1
2
3
1
--
1
8
8
4
4
1
18
1
7
2
5
2
25
3
4
3
5
2
5
8
1
4
2
~4
2
3
1
2
--
3
25
14
4
3
9
8
2
4
41
1
Special children's hospital 	
Riverview and other mental health institutions
Woodlands, Tranquille, etc	
Other	
Educational Institutions
8
21
76
1
3
Private boarding schools (except below) 	
24
37
26
Other	
Larger Residential Institutions
2
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A....  	
3
3
38
5
19
161
47
8
4
Other                  	
Small Residential Units
C.C.M. group homes	
Other agency receiving or group homes	
Other. _ 	
Treatment Centres
Children's Foundation  	
28
Other special treatment centres outside British
Anderson Treatment Centre   _	
33
Other                	
Correctional Institutions
50
60
City and Provincial gaols — ,.	
71
7
2
Other    	
4
Totals 	
547
168
96
93
9041
iThe total of this figure does not agree with that of Table 19 as this one refers to legal responsibility, the
other to supervision.
 H 78
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 25.—Cost of Maintaining Children
The cost to the Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal
year 1967/68 was as follows:—
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes	
Gross cost to the Provincial Government of maintenance of
children in care of Children's Aid Societies	
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being permanently planned for by the Superintendent of Child
Welfare	
$4,752,458
5,459,788
61,753
Gross expenditures __
Less collections
95,928
$10,369,927
3,421,857
Net cost to the Provincial Government as per
Public Accounts     $6,948,070
Table 26.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department
of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Years
1966/67 and 1967/68.
1966/67 1967/68
Regions      985 1,047
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver  276 320
Catholic Family and Children's  Service,
Vancouver  103 118
Victoria Children's Aid Society   107 116
Sub-totals      486 554
Grand totals  1,471 1,601
Table 27.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption
by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during
Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Department of
Social
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
144
67
67
22
14
31
11
6
13
11
6
7
188
93
Over 1 year of age*.. _
118
Totals  	
278
67
30
24
399
1 Children over . year of age who are of interracial origin and origin other than white or have a health
problem have been shown in either one of the first two categories and are not shown in the category " Over >1
year of age."
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68
H 79
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 H 80
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 29. — Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Social Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Type of
Placement for Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Type of Placement
Direct Placement
Foster Home to Adoption
Total
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation!
Within
Same Home
In Another Home
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation1
61
121
62
19
25
58
18
20
18
31
13
9
8
16
9
2
1
79
156
67
48
38
82
30
21
25
4
1
1
1
2
1
162
Region II 	
Region III-	
309
142
77
Region V  —	
Region VI  	
Region VII	
Region VIII 	
72
156
59
44
Outside Province.—  	
26
384
232
102
51        1
1
107
45
16
7
546
42
58
10
1,047
Vancouver Children's Aid Society	
Catholic Family and Children's
Service, Vancouver	
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
320
118
116
769
1
175
646
10
1,601
1 These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
Table 30. — Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Social Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Religion
of Adopting Parents for Fiscal Year 1967/68.
Religion
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Hebrew
Other
Total
Region I	
Region II—
Region Ill-
Region IV—
Region V	
Region VI-
Region VII-
Region VIII-
Outside Province.
Sub-totals _
Vancouver Children'sAid Society 	
Catholic Family and Children's Service, Vancouver-
Victoria Children's Aid Society 	
Grand totals	
144
289
121
60
58
142
51
37
20
922
311
96
1,329
18
18
22
17
12
13
8
7
2
117
3
118
20
258
10
162
308
143
77
72
156
59
44
26
1,047
320
118
116
1,601
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 81
Table 31. — Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of
Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the Fiscal Year
1967/68.
Number of Children
Ages
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's
Service,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Regions I
to VIII
Outside
Province
Aid
Society
332
165
190
107
88
47
25
23
13
5
7
2
5
5
3
2
1
1
2
5
1
8
9
1
163
17
32
24
32
19
13
6
4
5
1
2
1
1
29
12
27
17
9
8
6
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
9
44
34
8
6 months up to but not including 1 year ,.
1 year 	
2 years 	
3 „    .               ...                ..                 	
10
7
2
2
4    „    —                                         	
5    „	
6    „              ..   .
7    „             ....              	
8    „	
9    „     	
10   „     	
11    „ —  	
12    „ 	
	
13    „	
	
14    „    	
15    „     —                        	
	
16   „     -	
17    „     —
18    „    	
19    „        	
20   „    	
Totals 	
1,021
26
320
118
116
Table 32.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by Regions, and Children's Aid Societies during Fiscal Year
1967/68.
Type of Placement
Region and Society
Agency
Relative
Private
Total
Stepparent
Other
Region 1—	
Region II         	
155
260
99
81
62
139
46
31
62
132
43
23
37
76
29
29
13
18
4
5
2
5
9
5
22
5
4
7
5
2
3
235
432
151
113
Region V	
108
225
86
Region VIII   	
63
873
431      |       56
53
1,413
244
86
92
82
27
55
6
3
5
6
1
3
338
Catholic Family and Children's Service, Vancouver..	
117
155
Sub-totals 	
422
164              14
10
610
1,295
595
70
63
2,023
 H 82
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 33.—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years
1963/64 to 1967/68.
Year
Medical
Drugs!
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1963/64	
1964/65—	
1965/66	
1966/67	
$2,015,598
1,970,136
1,985,970
2,422,702
2,344,676
$2,157,448
2,204,123
2,148,641
2,095,733
2,157,182
$534,820
588,500
590,074
670,580
773,979
$104,671
104,057
113,337
118,003
145,588
$116,709
133,268
144,757
183,285
187,357
$35,698
34,986
40,510
48,723
50,524
$4,964,944
5,035,070
5,023,289
5,539,026
1967/68...	
5,659,306
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table 34.—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Other
Total
1963/64     	
1964/65	
1965/66                                         	
$2,009,854
1,965,208
1,979,597
2,414,967
2,335,238
$5,744
4,928
6,363
7,735
9,438
$2,015,598
1,970,136
1,985,970
1966/67   - 	
1967/68                    	
2,422,702
2,344,676
Table 35.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with
Average Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1963/64	
1964/65	
1965/66	
1966/67	
1967/68	
34,388
35,016
36,219
38,072
41,697
5,359
5,953
6,558
7,270
8,099
28,522
26,347
25,010
24,533
23,864
6,259
5,863
5,582
4,593
3,427
2,214
2,215
2,276
2,315
2,390
76,742
75,394
75,645
76,783
79,479
Table 36.—Drug Costs
Fiscal Year
Number of Prescriptions
Provincial
Pharmacyi
Drugstores
Total
Cost of Medicines
Provincial
Pharmacy2
Drugstores
Total
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66..
1966/67-
1967/68.
21,055 | 689,038
19,665 I 703,071
18,972 I 619,845
18,318 1 629,085
17,258 I 820,262
710,093
722,736
638,817
647,403
837,520
$190,911
226,291
274,239
267,836
225,247
$1,966,537  $2,157,448
I
1,977,832
1,874,402
1,827,897
1,931,935
2,204,123
2,148,641
2,095,733
2,157,182
1 The number of prescriptions shown for the Provincial Pharmacy covers only the number supplied to individual patients and those drugs which, by law, are required to be numbered. The bulk of the volume goes to
nursing homes and are not counted in the number of prescriptions.
2 The cost of drugs for the Provincial Pharmacy includes all costs with the exception of the cost of those
supplied to certain Provincial Government institutions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68
Table 37.—Dental Expenses
h 83
Starting in 1965/66 newer statistical reporting has resulted in more detailed
information on dental costs. This detailed information cannot be given for the years
prior to 1965/66.
Fiscal Year
Examinations,
Prophylaxis,
Miscellaneous
Surgery
Restorations
Dentures
and
Repairs
Total
1965/66.
1966/67..
1967/68..
$64,209
80,893
101,391
$49,652
73,568
89,782
$237,004
312,686
378,476
$239,209
203,433
204,330
$590,074
670,580
773,979
Table 38.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1963/64.
1964/65..
1965/66..
1966/67..
1967/68..
$20,803
20,268
24,384
27,005
36,586
$83,868
83,789
88,953
90,998
109,002
$104,671
104,057
113,337
118,003
145,588
 H 84
SOCIAL WELFARE
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 85
Table 40.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  1,762
Reapplications  116
Applications granted  1,655
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)  335
Table 41.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not of age  52 15.52
Unable to prove age  1 0.30
Not sufficient residence  6 1.80
Income in excess  94 28.07
Unable to prove residence       	
Transfer of property  4 1.20
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance  10 2.99
Information refused  35 10.46
Applications withdrawn  91 27.11
Applicants died before grant  22 6.57
Whereabouts unknown  15 4.48
Assistance from private sources  1 0.30
Receiving Old Age Security  3 0.90
Miscellaneous   1 0.30
Totals   335        100.00
Male 	
Table 42.-
—Sex of New Recipients
Number
      795
Per Cent
51.23
Female	
      757
48.77
Totals   1,552        100.00
Table 43.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married         589 37.95
Single      287 18.49
Widowed       384 24.74
Separated     230 14.82
Divorced        62 4.00
Totals  1,552        100.00
 H 86
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
social welfare
Table 44.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Men
621
121
54
Totals.
Women
621
110
26
Number
1,242
230
80
1,552
Per Cent
80.03
14.82
5.15
100.00
Table 45.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 46.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men Women Number
British Columbia  93 96 189
Other parts of Canada  257 230 487
United States of America  59 77 136
British Isles  133 156 289
Other parts of British Commonwealth   12 3
Other foreign countries  252 196 448
Totals   1,552
Per Cent
12.18
31.38
8.76
18.62
.19
28.87
100.00
Table 47.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 48.—With Whom New Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 49.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 87
Table 50.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1968, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta             8
Saskatchewan 	
     1
Manitoba 	
     1
Ontario                                           	
     4
Total  14
Table 51.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According
to the Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $75)
Amount of Assistance                                                                                                                   Per Cent
$75      __._                            79.85
$70 to $74.99                           	
       2.61
$65 to $69.99                	
       3.53
$60 to $64.99                                                                 	
      2.91
$55 to $59.99                                  	
       2.27
$50 to $54.99                                  	
.____      1.43
$45 to $49.99                                  	
1.64
$40 to $44.99                                      -
1.35
$35 to $39.99         	
1.22
$30 to $34.99                   _          	
0.88
$25 to $29.99             	
.      0.38
0.63
$20 to $24.99	
Less than $19.99                            	
1.26
Total                                	
100.00
Table 52.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number
Age 65                  29
Per Cent
24.17
35.83
40.00
Age 66                  43
Age 67 (to December 31, 1967)     48
Totals   120
100.00
 H 88 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 53.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia  3
Reinstated   119
Suspended   273
Deaths   120
Transferred to other Provinces  14
Transferred to Old Age Security  2,892
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  2,326
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  36
Transferred to British Columbia  2
Reinstated   2
Suspended   9
Deaths   1
Transferred out of British Columbia  22
Transferred to Old Age Security  84
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  51
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  2,377
BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES
Table 54.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  52
Reapplications   2
Applications granted  41
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  6
Table 55.-—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not blind within the meaning of the Act __ _ 	
Number
4
Per Cent
66.66
Income in excess             _ _	
Applications withdrawn      .
1
16.67
Died before grant                  ___ 	
War Veterans' AUnwance   ______           __ _              ....  _
Information refused           __ -                 -
     1
16.67
Whereahnuts unknnwn        _   _        _               _
Other                                     	
     6
Totals	
100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 89
Table 56.—Sex of New Recipients
Male ___
Female
Totals
Number
___. 23
__„ 15
38
Per Cent
60.53
39.47
100.00
Table 57.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married ..
Single	
Widowed
Separated
Divorced .
nber
Per Cent
6
15.79
26
68.43
2
5.26
3
7.89
1
2.63
Totals
38
100.00
Table 58.—Ages at Granting of Allowances
Ages 18 to 19
Ages 20 to 24 .
Ages 25 to 29
Ages 30 to 34
Ages 35 to 39
Ages 40 to 44
Ages 45 to 49
Ages 50 to 54
Ages 55 to 59
Men
_ 12
. 2
.    1
     2
     2
Ages 60 to 64     2
Ages 65 to 67	
Totals 	
ien
Number
Per Cent
8
20
52.64
1
3
7.89
-
1
2.63
-
2
5.26
1
1
2.63
2
4
10.53
2
4
10.53
1
3
7.89
38
100.00
Table 59.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 H 90                                                     SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 60.—Birthplace of Nev
Men
British Columbia  12
Other parts of Canada           6
/ Recipients
Women      Number
9          21
4          10
1
1            1
1            5
15          38
Per Cent
55.27
26.32
United States of America             1
2.63
British Isles     __      	
2.63
Other parts of British Commonwealth	
Other foreign countries     4
13.15
Totals   23
100.00
Table 61.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 62.—With Whom New Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 63.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 64.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1968, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta 	
Saskatchewan
Manitoba	
Ontario	
Total
1
1
4
14
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 91
Table 65.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According
to the Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$75   94.03
$70 to $74  1.77
$65 to $69.99  0.44
$60 to $64.99  1.77
$55 to $59.99  0.22
$50 to $54.99  0.67
$45 to $49.99      	
$40 to $44.99 1      	
$35 to $39.99      	
$30 to $34.99      	
$25 to $29.99      	
$20 to $24.99  0.22
$19.99 and less  0.88
Total  100.00
Table 66.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 29     1 12.50
Ages 30 to 39     1 12.50
Ages 40 to 49  	
Ages 50 to 59     2 25.00
Ages 60 to 69     4 50.00
Totals      8 100.0
Table 67.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   45
Reinstated   26
Transferred to other Provinces  4
Returned to British Columbia  1
Transferred to Old Age Security  40
Deaths   8
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  7
Retransferred to British Columbia     	
Reinstated  2
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  2
Deaths      	
Transfers to Old Age Security       5
Suspended        4
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  407
Other Provinces     44
  451
 H 92
SOCIAL WELFARE
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES
Table 68.—Disposition of Applicants
New applications received.
Reapplications 	
Applications granted
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
346
53
218
209
Table 69.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number
Not 18 years of age	
Too much income	
Refused information	
Whereabouts unknown
10
13
1
Unable to meet medical test  164
Mental hospital
Hospital	
Nursing home
Application withdrawn	
Died before grant	
Not sufficient residence	
War Veterans' Allowance	
Allowance under Blind Persons' Allowances Act.
Receiving Old Age Security	
Referred for rehabilitation	
Institutions	
Unable to prove residence	
1
1
11
2
1
2
Per Cent
Totals   208
4.80
6.26
0.48
78.85
0.48
0.48
5.29
0.96
0.48
0.96
0.48
0.48
100.00
Table 70.—Sex of New Recipients
Male  _.
Female
Number
__    91
__ 106
Totals
197
Per Cent
46.29
53.71
100.00
Table 71.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married     27 13.70
Single  150 76.14
Widowed        8 4.06
Separated       9 4.57
Divorced       3 1.53
Totals   197 100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68        H 93
Table 72.—-Ages at Granting of Allowance
Men Women          Number
Ages 18 to 19  40 47            87
Ages 20 to 24   11 16            27
Ages 25 to 29     7 3            10
Ages 30 to 34     3 1              4
Ages 35 to 39     4 7            11
Ages 40 to 44     4 15
Ages 45 to 49     5 2              7
Ages 50 to 54     3 10            13
Ages 55 to 59     6 11            17
Ages 60 to 64     8 8            16
Ages 65 to 69	
Totals  197
Per Cent
44.20
13.70
5.07
2.03
5.58
2.53
3.55
6.59
8.63
8.12
100.00
Table 73.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 74.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men             Women          Number Per Cent
British Columbia  47            52            99 50.27
Other parts of Canada  31            40            71 36.05
United States of America     1              1              2 1.01
British Isles      3              7            10 5.07
Other parts of British Commonwealth    1              1              2 1.01
Other foreign countries     8              5            13 6.59
Totals  197 100.00
Table 75.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 76.—With Whom Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 77.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 H 94 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 78.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1968, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta  10
Saskatchewan   1
Manitoba  5
Ontario  9
Quebec  2
Nova Scotia  3
Yukon Territory  1
Total  31
Table 79.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to
the Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Per Cent
$75   94.02
$70 to $74.99  0.74
$65 to $69.99  0.74
$60 to $64.99  0.06
$55 to $59.99  0.90
$50 to $54.99  0.53
$45 to $49.99  0.78
$40 to $44.99  0.33
$35 to $39.99  0.40
$30 to $34.99  0.25
$25 to $29.99  0.29
$20 to $24.99  0.12
$ 19.99 and less  0.24
Total  100.00
Table 80.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19     1 2.22
Ages 20 to 24     1 2.22
Ages 25 to 29     1 2.22
Ages 30 to 34     3 6.67
Ages 35 to 39     1 2.22
Ages 40 to 44     3 6.67
Ages 45 to 49     3 6.67
Ages 50 to 54     4 8.89
Ages 55 to 59     5 11.11
Ages 60 to 64  18 40.00
Ages 65 to 69     5 11.11
Totals  45 100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 95
Table 81.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   170
Reinstated   103
Transferred to other Provinces  9
Returned to British Columbia  4
Transferred to Old Age Security  64
Deaths   44
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended   17
New transfers to British Columbia  26
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  12
Reinstated   9
Deaths   2
Transferred to Old Age Security  3
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year-
British Columbia  2,245
Other Provinces       200
  2,445
Table 82.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases       4 2.03
Neoplasms        5 2.53
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases       5 2.53
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs       1 0.51
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  103 52.29
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs     42 21.31
Diseases of the circulatory system       4 2.03
Diseases of the respiratory system       1 0.51
Diseases of the digestive system       1 0.51
Diseases of the genito-urinary system       1 0.51
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues       1 0.51
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement     17 8.63
Congenital malformations       3 1.53
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions    	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury) ___.      9 4.57
Totals  197 100.00
 H 96 SOCIAL WELFARE
GENERAL INFORMATION REGARDING OLD AGE
SECURITY CATEGORY
Table 83.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  269
Reapplications received  61
Applications granted  192
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, dead, etc.)  233
Table 84.—Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social
Allowances as at March 31, 1968
British Columbia cases  14,506
Other-Province cases        195
Total  14,701
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
Table 85.—Average Monthly Case Load Showing Heads of Families, Single
Persons, and Dependents in Receipt of Social Assistance for 1966/67
and 1967/68.                                                        Average Average
Case Load Case Load
and Recipients and Recipients
per Month, per Month,
1966/67 1967/68
Heads of families  12,366 14,384
Single persons  17,404 19,541
Total case load  29,770 33,925
Dependents   36,307 42,181
Total recipients  66,077 76,105
Table 86.—Monthly Average Number of Children-in-care and Monthly
Average Number of Days' Care by Supervising Agency for Fiscal
Years 1965/66 to 1966/67 and 1967/68.
Monthly Average
Number of Children
Monthly Average
Number of Days' Care
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1,351
718
352
3,494
1,409
759
391
3,980
1,445
820
460
4,661
38,156
20,598
9,891
101,109
40,155
21,830
11,113
114,149
41,698
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver   	
23,803
13,335
Child Welfare Division foster homes	
133,878
Totals -	
5,915
6,539
7,386
169,754    1    187,247
212,714
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 97
Table 87.—Comparison of Gross Expenditures and per Cent of Total
Expenditures of Department of Social Welfare by Major Categories
of Expenditure for Fiscal Years 1966/67 and 1967/68.
Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1966/67
1967/68
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
$884,000
1,128,600
3,037,300
8,988,000
5,539,000
37,372,500
IS R67.900
1.2
1.6
4.2
12.3
7.6
51.3
91 8
$899,874
1,199,708
3,554,038
11,831,129
5,659,512
43,784,078
9,027,750
1.2
Institutions      	
Field service 	
Maintenance of dependent children	
1.6
4.7
15.6
7.4
Social Allowances, etc                           	
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Social Allowances
57.6
11.9
Totals   _.
$72,812,300
100.0
ST. QSf, 080     1     100.0
Summary of Gross Welfare Expenditures in 1967/68
Value of
Services
Per Cent
of Total
Per Cent
Increase (4-) or
Decrease ( —)
over 1966/67
$899,874
22,244,387
52,811,828
1.2
29.3
69.5
+ 1.8
+ 19.0
Allowances  	
-0.8
Totals    	
$75,956,089
100.0
+4.3
INSTITUTIONS
Table 88.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1967/68
Location of Family and
Children's Court
gion I—
Alert Bay          .
Girls
Committed
Boys
Committed
1
Campbell River     	
1
1
Chemainus	
2
Courtenay 	
6
Duncan   	
         2
1
Ladysmith   	
2
Nanaimo   	
     3
13
Port Alice	
1
Port Alberni     -
    .        2
13
Sidney     	
2
Tahsis -           	
2
Victoria 	
           9
43
Zeballos	
1
 h 98 social welfare
Table 88.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1967/68—
Continued.
Location of Family and                                                                                    Girls Boys
Children's Court                                                                                     Committed Committed
Region II—
Bella Bella  2
Bella Coola  2
Burnaby      6 27
Coquitlam      1 12
Ladner   2
New Westminster     2 13
North Vancouver     5 14
Pemberton  1
Port Moody     3 3
Powell River     4 11
Richmond     2 3
Sechelt     3 12
Squamish    3
University Hill  1
Vancouver  35 69
West Vancouver     1 1
Region III—
Armstrong      2
Ashcroft     1
Clearwater  4
Enderby     1 2
Kamloops      1 11
Kelowna      3 5
Lillooet  9
Lytton      3 5
Merritt   8
Oliver      1
Osoyoos    1
Penticton     5
Princeton    3
Revelstoke      2 3
Salmon Arm    4
Vernon      2 3
Region IV—
Castlegar   6
Cranbrook    2 1
Creston     2 1
Fruitvale  2
Golden     1 1
Grand Forks     2 1
Invermere     1
Kimberley  4
Nakusp   1
Nelson  3
Rossland     2
Silverton  1
Trail      1 6
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68        H 99
Table 88.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1967/68—
Continued.
Location of Family and
Children's Court
Region V—
Alexis Creek _       	
Girls
Committed
Boys
Committed
2
Fort St. James
1
Prince George          	
       1
13
Quesnel
1
2
Vanderhoof             	
.                    1
3
Williams Lake
2
5
100 Mile House	
Region VI—
Abbotsford __
....    ___.    ..    1
8
1
Chilliwack        .__
     2
3
Cloverdale     ....
22
Haney	
Hope      ,
     1
4
____         _____    3
3
Langley  	
3
Matsqui 	
4
Mission ____     	
3
Sumas         	
     1
1
White Rock        _____        	
2
Region VII—
Burns Lake	
       2
3
Hazelton    .   _
1
2
Kitimat	
1
6
Masset _   _
5
5
Prince Rupert	
Smithers 	
     2
         6
9
1
Terrace           .
4
3
Region VIII—
Chetwynd 	
1
Dawson Creek    	
4
Fort Nelson      	
1
2
Fort St. John	
_____    ____    ___             2
1
Telegraph Creek	
                          2
Yukon Territory ____    	
1
 H 100 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 89.—Financial Statement, Brannan Lake School
for Boys, 1967/68
Salaries   $396,290.24
Office expense   3,588.07
Travelling expense   1,153.33
Office furniture and equipment  81.26
Medical and dental services  17,172.84
Clothing and uniforms  16,637.78
Provisions and catering  73,559.76
Laundry and dry-goods 1  11,704.51
Equipment and machinery  3,389.98
Medical supplies  2,149.31
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  7,152.84
Maintenance and operation of equipment  3,604.03
Transportation  6,352.81
Incidentals and contingencies  5,329.17
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  1,322.44
Training programme expense  5,539.04
Less—
Board	
Rentals    __        ____   	
$2,331.00
3,953.02
159.70
$555,027.41
Sundry  	
6,443.72
$32,911.91
27,111.87
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory as at March 31, 1968	
Inventory as at March 31, 1967 .___
$548,583.69
5,800.04
$108,978.32
912.00
Add—■
Public Works expenditure	
Less rental credit
$542,783.65
108,066.32
$650,849.97
Per capita per diem cost: $650,849.97-=-65,881=$9.88.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68      H 101
Table 90.—Age Distribution of Boys Committed to Brannan Lake
School by Number of Boys, Age, and Recidivism, 1967/68
140 AGE DISTRIBUTION
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
^^
11 yrs.  12 yrs.  13 yrs.  14 yrs.  15 yrs.  16 yrs.  17 yrs.  18 yrs.
 _.    Recidivists.
<yyyy\ First committals.
 H 102
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 91.—Number of Committals of Boys to Brannan Lake School per
5,000 Boys and Girls Aged 10 to 19 Years by Social Welfare Regions
in the Province, 1967/68.
12
11
10
Number of Committals.
Per 5,000 youth population.*
(* 1966 population—boys and girls 10 to 19 years of age.)
B.C.
Region Region  Region  Region Region Region  Region Region
12 3 4 5 6 7 8
 report of the department of social welfare, 1967/68    h 103
Table 92.—Monthly Committals and Monthly "Away without Leave "
by Calendar Months, April, 1967, to March, 1968
30
MONTHLY
COMMITTALS
50
25
20
15
MONTHLY
A.W.O.L.
10
45
40
35
30
25
Apr.  May  June  July Aug. Sept. Oct.   Nov.   Dec.  Jan.  Feb. March
1967 1968
 H 104
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 93.—Record of Population Movement for 10-year Period at
Brannan Lake School for Boys, 1957/58 to 1967/68
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 94.—Court Charges for Boys Committed to Brannan Lake
School for Boys for Fiscal Year 1967/68
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 95.—Record of Population Movement for 10-year Period
at Willingdon School for Girls, 1958/59 to 1967/68
Fiscal Year
V.
CO
V.
as
c
I/.
Os
SO
~H.
o
so
(3s
Os
cn
so
a
3
S,
m
so
so
Tf
SO
Os
SO
SO
<n
so
OS
so
so
so
os
oo
SO
SO
Os
58
7
66
9
91
5
77
11
82
11
22
94
7
101
6.9
99
17
1
87
17
88
18
97
14
3
55
100
15
115
13.0
125
11
1
51
92
82.0
29,928
10.5
130
92
11
88
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st 	
14
Number elsewhere/other institutions,
1
51
118
11
129
8.5
103
14
2
72
88
87.5
31,926
9.5
150
2
Number on provisional release, April
1st             	
4
66
15
81
18.5
72
9
3
96
10
106
9.4
79
5
9
81
13
94
13.8
100
11
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
12
102
15
117
12.8
113
19
13
119
15
134
10.4
79
14
3
55
97
89.1
32,524
9.2
164
72
Number of new admissions	
126
16
143
11.3
125
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
13
Number elsewhere/other institutions,
1
Number on provisional release, March
31st     . ....
3
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
9
91
76.5
28,010
10.4
147
11
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
22
82
73.4
26,788
11.4
213
12
87
80.0
29,216
12.5
195
12
88
86.7
31,735
10.8
186
70
99
83.8
30,690
9.2
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year
150
Table 96.—Range of Age upon Admission to Willingdon School
for Girls for Fiscal Year 1967/68
Age
Number of
Girls
12 years     2
13 „     15
14 „     29
15 „     46
Age
Number of
Girls
16 years  30
17 „     20
18 „        1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1967/68      H 105
Table 97.—Court Charges for Girls Committed to Willingdon
School for Fiscal Year 1967/68
Unmanageability   64
Theft (4 of auto, 25 under $50)  29
Government Liquor Act infractions	
Unsatisfactory probation (original charge,  unmanageable in most
cases)	
Unlawful damage	
Breaking and entering	
Sexual immorality	
Assault 	
Fraud	
10
31
1
12
3
2
2
Causing a disturbance (generally under influence of alcohol)     6
Arson      1
Three girls had two charges, one girl had three charges, one girl had four
charges, one girl had five charges, and one girl had seven charges.
 H 106
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 98.—Financial Statement of Willingdon School for Girls
for Year Ended March 31, 1968
Salaries  $282,598
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment
Medical and dental services	
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering	
Laundry and dry-goods	
Good Conduct Fund	
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies	
Maintenance of buildings and grounds
Maintenance and operation of equipment.
Transportation 	
Vocational and recreational supplies	
Incidentals and contingencies	
2,379
1,832
348
2,870
5,807
39,582
157
1,373
1,008
1,884
2,448
2,171
2,878
2,318
1,199
$350,852
Less—
Board _
Rentals
$1,959
2,130
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory at March 31, 1968  $13,591
Inventory at March 31, 1967     12,518
4,089
$346,763
1,073
Add Public Works expenditure
Per capita cost per diem: $409,892-^-30,690=$13.36.
Maintenance receipts, $2,337.56
$345,690
64,202
$409,892
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1967/68      H 107
Table 99.—Expenditure for Provincial Home, Kamloops,
Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1968
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1967
Inmates admitted during the year	
Inmates discharged
Inmates deceased __
120
110
84
27
230
111
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1968
Total number of inmate-days	
____  119
_43,994
Financial Statement
Salaries 	
Expenses-—
Office expense __
Medical services
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering	
Laundry and dry-goods 	
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Transportation 	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Burials 	
Less—
Board
Rent _.
$144,843.00
10
1
37
7
2
5
1
428.04
,258.95
,796.95
655.00
723.74
,599.94
,293.17
,101.31
517.75
715.04
,611.57
,800.00
$218,344.46
$480.00
300.00
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure
Public Works expenditure	
780.00
$217,564.46
$217,564.46
15,365.73
Cost per capita:   $232,930.19-M3,994=$5.2946.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $129,724.96.
$232,930.19
 H 108 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 100
This table provides a record of the number and type of institutions licensed,
their capacity, the number of persons served, and the total days' care or attendance-days for the calendar years 1964 to 1968, inclusive, and is available on
request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 101a
This table provides a record of the number of institutions by type of care,
which operated as of January 1, 1967, and closed and licences operated as of
December 31, 1967. The table is available on request from the Department of
Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 101b
This table provides a record of the licences pending as of January 1, 1967, and
December 31, 1967, and is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
1,530-1168-9279
    

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