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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1967/68 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1969

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1967/68
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
PubUc Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1968, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30, 1968.
  INDEX
Page
Report of the Deputy Minister  7
Report of the Director of Design  8
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance  13
Report of the Mechanical Engineer ,  19
Report of the Civil Engineer  20
Report of the Architect-Planner  22
Report of the Electrical Engineer  26
Report of the Chief Engineer, Safety Inspection Services  30
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector  34
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy  36
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector.  40
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  42
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  46
 " Wei must lead, not follow."—Department of Public Works.
 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1968.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those of the heads of divisions. These set
out work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
As reported previously, ways of combating rising costs have engaged our
attention.
In planning, closer scrutiny of programmes has revealed opportunities for
reductions in space requirements. Some strengthening of this effort is indicated.
In design, the modular concept offers distinct promise, and use should be made of
it where applicable.
In contract procedures it would appear that the time has come when some
departure from traditional methods should be considered. These offer insufficient
incentive for full use of the know-how and skills of the architectural profession and
the construction industry. On the contrary, traditional methods apply a penalty
to the conscientious representative of those industries who seek to reduce the
owner's outlay. Particularly worthy of consideration is the principle known as
contract management.
Year by year increases in capital construction are resulting in the Department using consultant services to a greater extent. There is a corresponding increase in the administrative load on senior Departmental personnel.
Favourable reaction toward the work of the Department, both from without
and within, continues and improves. Thus it is gratifying to realize that our efforts
and policies are producing better results.
I should not conclude this report without expressing my thanks to the staff of
the Department. These are very busy times, and the demands made upon them
are often beyond the usual call of duty. Nevertheless, they have invariably responded cheerfully. They are deserving of our appreciation, Sir, for without such
support the load of the Executive would be much greater.
Yours respectfully,
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
Victoria, British Columbia.
 K 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF DESIGN
" The greatest fault, I should say, is to be conscious of none."—Carlyle.
Since the work involved in this summary was produced under the direct
supervision of my predecessor, I feel it pertinent, therefore, to first pay respects on
behalf of all Design Divisions to the contribution made by the former Chief Architect, Mr. W. R. H. Curtis, whose retirement was announced on March 31, 1968.
Mr. Curtis served this Department most loyally from November 1, 1946, until
the date of his retirement. His foremost concern at all times was the improvement
in quality of the work carried out under his control. His devotion to the tasks
entrusted to him in this Department is evident, both from a perusal of previous
Public Works Reports and also from the respect which all members of the Department hold for him. No task was ever too small to merit his attention, yet he was
at all times readily available to give advice to those of us who required it.
We sincerely trust his retirement provides him the opportunity to carry out
those many activities which his devotion to the Department has limited, and that
above all he continues to be blessed with good health and happiness.
This Department is concerned, among other things, with the provision of the
spaces in which Governmental activities are to be carried out.
In all the work of the Design Divisions involving such provision, we are
extremely conscious of the many criteria which must be satisfied. These may
be categorized as:—
(a)  The aesthetic—i.e., the social value of our buildings and their influence
upon society.
(b)The utilitarian—i.e., the degree to which they fulfil their function, both
from the point of view of those occupying them as well as from those
for whom these buildings are primarily designed to serve,
(c)  The economic—i.e., have we achieved the maximum advantage in the
expenditure of public funds, both from the point of view of initial capital
cost as well as from a long-term operating point of view.
Such consideration is also influenced by two factual situations which exist:—
(a) The continuing need for space in response to Departmental requirements.
(b) The continually increasing costs of such space.
The matter of continually increasing costs is of vital concern, but in any
evaluation of such trends it becomes apparent that no simple answer is possible.
One of the basic factors is the state of the construction industry itself, which
while accounting for approximately 16 per cent of the gross national product, has
increased its productivity by only 6 per cent in the last five years.
It is thus apparent that designers acting alone cannot substantially reduce the
current cost of construction. Any such action will involve not only a revision of
our building standards, but also our construction methods and our contractual
arrangements, and must involve a closer collaboration with the construction industry and its suppliers.
It is my conviction that the next step in the continuing effort to obtain maximum value for every dollar spent on construction will require that new horizons
be envisaged and conceived by the Department's design personnel.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68 K 9
In order for us to better evaluate the needs of Government departments
serviced by us, it will be necessary to spend more time and effort on programming
building requirements and on basic research. Such effort may require us to depend
more on the use of consultants for design services than has been the practice in
the past; such a move would be in the best interests of the Department.
It seems inevitable that the role of this Department in the next few years will
change from that of a design agency to that of a programming and cost control
agency on behalf of Government.
Work undertaken by the Department of Public Works is as follows:—
Category 1:  Contracts let during the fiscal year 1967/68.
Category 2:  Projects researched and planned during the same period.
CATEGORY 1
Twenty-four principal contracts were let, aggregating approximately 13 million dollars. Of these, approximately 61 per cent were designed for the Department
of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, 26 per cent for the Department of Education, 8 per cent for the Department of the Attorney-General, and approximately
5 per cent classified as general projects.
Particulars of these contracts will be found at the end of the Public Works
Report.   Several projects of particular interest are mentioned here.
1. Victoria—Glendale School, Royal Oak, Phase 4. — A contract in the
amount of $343,596 was awarded for the construction of the shell of the boiler-
house and laundry which will be required to serve both the school for retarded
children and the Victoria Vocational School.
2. Burnaby—British Columbia Institute of Technology.—A contract in the
amount of $554,802 was awarded for the complete renovation of the interior of
the existing building. This renovation was occasioned by the moves of disciplines
due to the construction of the new wing.
3. Victoria—Eric Martin Institute {formerly named the Lee Avenue Mental
Hospital).—A contract was awarded in the amount of $5,715,000 for Phase 6 of
this project, which included the completion of the main facility with an approximate gross floor area of 190,000 square feet and accommodation for an out-patient
department, a 10-bed unit day hospital, in-patient facilities for 150 adults and for
21 children.
4. Haney—Alouette River Unit.—A contract was awarded in the amount
of $123,475 for the installation of a complete sewer and water system. This system was to provide a service for the entire Alouette River Unit, and materially to
reduce the pollution problem in the Alouette River.
5. Burnaby—British Columbia Institute of Technology Library.—A contract
was let in the amount of $1,305,073. This will provide complete facilities for a
library and book store with a gross floor area of approximately 80,000 square feet
and provision for an exhibition area, audio-visual department with motion-picture
production area, reference and collection space, and a curriculum wing.
6. Burnaby—Residential Care Centre for Children.—A contract was let for
Phase 4 of this project in the amount of $ 1,610,300. This phase provides an activity
training building, food centre, and school, and includes necessary extensions to the
boiler-house to accommodate the entire establishment.
7. Terrace—British Columbia Vocational School.—A contract was let in the
amount of $1,575,000. This provided a building which comprised the automotive
shop, heavy duty mechanics and welding shops, together with ancillary classrooms.
 K 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
8. Victoria—Motor-vehicle Testing-station.—A contract was let in the amount
of $325,000 for the provision of a motor-vehicle testing-station, located at Quadra
Street and McKenzie Avenue in the Lake Hill district.
9. Duncan—Courthouse.—A contract was let in the amount of $370,522 for
the completion of the court-house wing, which is the first unit in the Duncan Provincial Office Complex. This provides for a County Court and a Magistrate's Court,
together with the necessary ancillary features.
CATEGORY 2
Approximately 74 projects were in various stages of planning during the fiscal
year under review. Of these, 24 went out to tender during this period. Of the total
number of projects in the planning stage, 32 per cent were designed for the Department of Education, 25 per cent for general purposes, 22 per cent for the Department
of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, 10 per cent for the Department of the
Attorney-General, 4 per cent for the Department of Agriculture, and 7 per cent for
the Department of Highways.
Department of Education
Planning continued on vocational school projects.
1. British Columbia Vocational School, Kamloops.—The new establishment
will comprise approximately three basic complexes of buildings:—
(a) Classroom, administration, and workshop building.
(b) Cafeteria and dormitories.
(c) Central heating plant building and miscellaneous minor structures ancillary to the training facility.
2. British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria.—The first phase will comprise the main workshops building for welding, steel fabrication, auto body, automotive, diesel engines, small engines, plumbing, pipe-fitting, carpentry, and electrical.
3. British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.—Planning continued
on the following: Food training centre and cafeteria, required to satisfy the enlarged
student enrolment and the need for expending chef and food training programmes.
4. British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.—(a) The conversion of an
existing building to house an industrial instrumentation laboratory for the training
of students in instrumentation in preparation for employment in major industries in
the Province.
(£>) Mechanical Building: Expansion was planned to enlarge the building to
accommodate mechanical, forestry, and surveying technologies, as well as providing
additional heating capacity required by extensions to the campus.
5. British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace.—Preliminary planning continued on cafeteria and dormitory facilities which were required due to the absence
of similar facilities in reasonable proximity to the school.
6. British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo.—Planning continued on an
additional floor to the classroom block and the provision of a workshop for heavy-
duty mechanics and carpentry, together with the necessary classrooms.
7. British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George.—Planning continued
on additions to the existing school of a general purpose workshop, alterations and
additions to the existing classroom block, and an addition to the mechanical plant.
General Projects
1. Victoria—1019 Wharf Street.—Planning was carried out to remodel the
upper four floors of this building, formerly the Liquor Control Board Warehouse.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68 K 11
The space was required for relocation of all divisions of the Department of Recreation and Conservation and the Victoria headquarters of the Department of Mental
Health.
2. Victoria—British Columbia Hydro Building.—Remodelling of two floors
was planned to enable relocation of the Department of Municipal Affairs.
3. Duncan—New Government Offices.—Planning continued on the office
structure as an adjunct to the Courthouse facility already under construction.
4. Vernon.—Preliminary plans were prepared for a major redevelopment project involving landscaping and extension of the grounds of the Courthouse.
5. Williams Lake Government Offices.—Planning continued on the provision
of a major Courthouse and office building in this location.
6. Brannan Lake.—Planning was carried out for an additional unit to house
15 boys as an adjunct to this institution. The facility was to include classrooms and
dormitories.
7. Victoria—Services Building.—Planning was carried out for a building to
house the Credit Union. All costs in connection with the construction have been
refunded by the Credit Union.
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance
1. Victoria—Glendale School.—Planning was commenced on the next phase
of this project, which was to be a major complex comprising a mental health facility for retarded patients. The planning requirements provide for an administrative
treatment kitchen and ward building.
2. Burnaby—Residential Care Centre for Children.—Planning was continued on the landscaping of this site, together with the necessary circulation and road
revisions consequent upon the complete development of this facility.
3. Riverview Hospital.—Planning was carried out for an extension of the
garbage-handling facilities, which had been started previously, and which now involved provision of additional storage and handling facilities in the Crease Clinic
Building.
4. Valleyview Hospital.—Planning was undertaken for a complete revision
of the ventilation system in the 100-bed units.
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Saltair, Vancouver Island—New Men's Gaol.—Detailed planning continued to completion of sketch-drawings on this project.
2. Alouette River Unit, Haney—Kitchen and Stores Building.—Plans were
completed for the provision of this building which will provide for extended kitchen
and storage facilities to accommodate the increased size of this unit.
3. Lower Mainland Remand Centre.—Planning was put in hand on the provision of this unit to relieve the situation at Oakalla.
4. Burnaby Motor-vehicle Testing-station.—Planning was continued for the
provision of a station similar in design to the Victoria station, but with the added
provision of licence-issuing facilities. This will be located on a site on Moscrop
Avenue, Burnaby, south of the British Columbia Institute of Technology Complex.
Department of Highways
Planning was continued on the provision of a maintenance depot at Vanderhoof. Planning of this building was on a modular basis, in an attempt to establish
whether a standard construction system could be evolved for use in other buildings
of a similar function.
 K 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Agriculture
Planning continued on the provision of additional facilities for the existing
dairy laboratory. The site was changed from Cassiar Street to a location on Willing-
don Avenue and the facility was to include an infra-red milk-analysis laboratory,
chemical-test laboratory, sterilization rooms, specimen culture counting, and general
laboratories, and ancillary facilities. Provision is also to be included for future
pesticide laboratories.
General
During the fiscal year 1967/68, 10 projects for senior citizens' housing were
reviewed on behalf of the Provincial Secretary's Department, with constructive
criticisms offered on design and structural matters in order to ensure maximum
efficiency from the standpoint of capital costs and maintenance.
Similarly a review of plans was made for Lands Service for three projects to
be erected on University Endowment Lands at the University of British Columbia.
In conclusion, it is a pleasure to again record the excellent and constructive
advice and co-operation which is received from the entire Capital Design staff,
from the Division of Construction and Maintenance, and from field personnel, both
Project Inspectors and Superintendents of Works. We are all extremely conscious
of the fact that this Department owns and maintains an extremely large amount
of real estate and buildings, and that the operating costs of any building represent
by far the greatest portion of the costs of a building during its life.
We also record the excellence in co-operation received from personnel of all
Government departments, whom it is our privilege to serve.
G. L. J. Giles, M.R.A.I.C., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Director of Design.
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 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68 K 13
REPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION AND
MAINTENANCE ARCHITECT
" If government cannot stop the rain it can at least supply an umbrella."
—Charles Edouard Jeanneret-Gris.
CONSTRUCTION
New buildings under construction at the beginning of the 1967/68 fiscal period
required the retention of all Project Inspectors. During the period under review,
one Project Inspector retired on pension, and another left the Service for other employment. The decision to add the specialized services of a Mechanical and Plumbing Inspector, who was already in the Department, was a welcome one. The pressure
to expedite projects to achieve early occupancy presents a major challenge to personnel connected with the construction programme. Continual changes in building
techniques and the introduction of new materials makes for a high degree of interest.
Increased construction programme brings a heavy demand upon the staff available
at headquarters, but when difficulties arose, or explicit direction required, a member
from the Division visited the site.
Project Inspectors were appointed to the following projects under construction
during this period:—
(1) Victoria:  Glendale School, boiler-house and laundry.
(2) Burnaby:   British Columbia Institute of Technology, playing field and
track.
(3) Burnaby:   British Columbia Institute of Technology, extension to mechanical building.
(4) Victoria:  Mental health facility, Lee Avenue, Phase VI.
(5) Burnaby:   British Columbia Institute of Technology, alteration to 1962
building.
(6) New Denver: Youth centre, construction of new boiler.
(7) Charlie Lake: Alterations and addition to Department of Mines depot.
(8) Haney:   Alouette River Unit, sewer and water system improvements.
(9) Burnaby: British Columbia Institute of Technology, new library.
(10) Burnaby: Residential Care Centre for Children, Phase IV.
(11) Terrace:  British Columbia Vocational School, shops.
(12) Vancouver: Courthouse, alterations and addition.
(13) Victoria:  Motor-vehicle Inspection Station.
(14) Burnaby:   British Columbia Institute of Technology, underground hot-
water mains.
(15) Vancouver: Courthouse, alterations, Phase III.
(16) Kamloops:  Tranquille School, laundry addition.
(17) New Westminster: The Woodlands School, boiler-house, Phase II.
(18) Duncan: Courthouse, Phase II.
Major projects accepted from the contractors as substantially complete during
the period included:—
(1) Terrace: Vocational School, boiler-house and maintenance shops.
(2) Burnaby:   British Columbia Institute of Technology, Teacher-training
School.
(3) Burnaby: Residential Care Centre for Children, Phases II and III.
(4) New Westminster: The Woodlands School, Centre Building, Phase I.
 K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(5) Victoria:  Glendale School, boiler-house and laundry.
(6) Burnaby: British Columbia Institute of Technology, alterations to 1962
building.
(7) Prince George:  Men's Gaol, addition.
(8) Burnaby: British Columbia Institute of Technology, new addition.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation of the co-operation we
have received from other divisions. Their contribution in helping us discharge our
responsibilities in respect to the construction programme has been significant and
valuable.
MAINTENANCE AND BUILDING MANAGEMENT
A notable event in this fiscal period was the appointment of a Superintendent
of Works to Work Zone No. 5 (East and West Kootenay). The Division now provides field supervision of daily maintenance throughout the entire Province. The
new Superintendent is resident in Nelson and has a small mobile crew.
Space is not available in this report, nor for the matter is it justifiable, to detail
the many routine tasks performed in respect to servicing buildings and plants
throughout the Province, but the following list is a representative sample of the
Division's activities.
The headquarters component prepared drawings, specifications, and supervised the following major projects: —
(a) Victoria — Curator's Residence, Craigflower Manor. — This project entailed the provision of 1,200 square feet completed for occupancy within
three and one-half months.
(b) Victoria — 1410 Government Street. — Alterations to Executive Suite,
British Columbia Medical Plan.
(c) Victoria—1410 Government Street.—Design of Computer Centre, British Columbia Medical Plan, also co-ordination of move, Public Library
Commission.
(d) Victoria—Renovation and redesign of Civil Service Commission offices.
Installation of new dumbwaiter to remove a safety hazard.
(e) Victoria—Data Process Centre.—New conference room and staff toilets.
Work implemented by Superintendent of Works, Zone No. 1.
(/) Kamloops—Tranquille Beef Progeny.—Drawings and specifications for
cattle pens and corral complex for Department of Agriculture.
(g)  New Denver—Youth Centre.—New heating plant.
(/.) Charlie Lake—Mines Establishment.—New offices, laboratories, and core
storage.
(i)  New Westminster—The Woodlands School.—Industrial-therapy unit.
In addition to the above projects, minor work was carried out at the following
locations:—
Nelson: Forestry Building.
Campbell River: R.C.M.P.
Vancouver:  Willow Chest Centre.
Abbotsford:  Government offices.
Penticton: Courthouse.
Kelowna: Courthouse.
Nanaimo:  Courthouse.
Demolition contracts were let in respect to the following:—
Victoria:  Craigflower Motel.
Vernon:  Six structures.
Vancouver: Marpole Infirmary.
Kamloops:  Old Gaol.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68 K 15
New roof coverings were provided for seven buildings, and a total of 84 specifications were prepared and contracts awarded to implement diversified maintenance
and renovation projects.
The Division also provided plans and specifications to the Liquor Control Board
for work required to the Board's Vancouver offices and warehouse on Broadway.
Designs were prepared and arrangements made with the landlords for the conversion
of rented space for the Department of Social Welfare at Campbell River, Dawson
Creek, Duncan, Parksville, and Kitimat. Similar service was provided to the Department of the Attorney-General in respect to rented space to accommodate court
reporters, Vancouver, and the Magistrate's Court at Salmon Arm.
Our Superintendents in their respective areas completed a very full schedule of
work and a sample of the more interesting items includes: —
The gardening staff in Zone No. 2 successfully raised approximately 700 flats
of bedding plants and 450 shrubs for use throughout the Province. Zone No. 3
completed new dining-room facilities, East Lawn, H.l Ward, Essondale, in addition
to providing new bathing facilities in the same building. A new three-chair barber
shop was installed in West Lawn; 500 lineal feet of new fibreglassed pig-trough
provided at Colony Farm. First phase of the installation of a new control station
in the Fire Hall was completed. In Zone No. 4 renovation to the Courthouse, Vernon, to provide a new office. At Tranquille a small new addition to the Fire Hall
provided space for an improved alarm system. New sprinkler system was installed
in the playground area, Tranquille School. Zone No. 5, Courthouse, Kaslo, was
rewired and new fixtures installed; Courthouse, Fernie, interior redecorated and
sundry renovations completed. New fitments provided for New Denver Youth
Centre in addition to sundry work throughout the zone.
Zone No. 6, a new surface-water drainage system was installed at the Courthouse, Fort St. John. New lighting and interior decoration of Stewart offices. Interior and exterior decoration of Vanderhoof Courthouse. Skeenaview Hosiptal was
rewired and new fluorescent fixtures installed, in addition to emergency repairs to the
distribution system.
Zone No. 1, Victoria, reports the demand upon the services of the works crew
was at a very high level. Special functions and celebrations arising from the termination of our second Centennial year imposed extra work in addition to normal
routines.
The Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Section continued to provide
supervision and technical direction to personnel engaged in operating and maintaining mechanical services and equipment. In addition, the Section was engaged preparing plans and specifications in connection with alterations, additions, and renovations to existing equipment.   Some 20 projects were undertaken during this period.
A sample of these projects includes:—
(1) Phase II renovations to steam plant, The Woodlands School, New Westminster.
(2) New ventilation system, administrative office, Oakalla Prison, Burnaby.
(3) Heating and ventilation, new Industrial Therapy Building, The Woodlands
School, New Westminster.
(4) Conversion of heating boiler from heavy oil to gas-fired, Courthouse,
Kelowna.
(5) New ventilation system, Courthouse, Merritt.
(6) Conversion of heating boiler from coal to gas-firing, Courthouse, Rossland.
It has been an interesting and a challenging year.   Demands have been heavy
on the staff, but they have met the situation cheerfully and willingly, and I am appreciative of their loyalty.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Director of Construction and Maintenance.
 K 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Centre Building, The Woodlands School—entrance before renovations.
Centre Building, The Woodlands School—entrance after renovations.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
K 17
Renovated Courtroom, Law Courts, Vancouver.
Renovated Judges* Chambers, Law Courts, Vancouver.
  PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68 K 19
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
" In the creation of healthy environment nature's collaboration is not only important but
also indispensable."—Eliel Saarinen.
The first source of infra-red comfort-heating known to man was, of course,
the sun. Its radiant energy travels 93 million miles to warm our planet. Its heat
alone makes the earth habitable for humans, creates the weather, and establishes
the climatological relationships so vital to life.
The reason why the sun can have such an influence is the nature of radiation.
Though the energy passes through millions of miles, it is converted to heat only
when it falls upon a solid opaque object. The sun emits radiation energy over a
wide range of wave-lengths, providing light and ultra-violet waves in addition to
the infra-red which produce heat directly.
Artificial infra-red heat was probably first experienced also by cavemen. They
learned to make fire and felt its warmth. It is not so many years since the fireplace, although refined, was the main source of comfort heating.
Until recently infra-red heating was uncommon, even though some units were
available as far back as 1910. However, since the 1950's, new equipment and improved methods have spurred a tremendous growth in the use of high-intensity infrared heat for comfort.
The main areas where infra-red has an advantage are those which are physically
or economically infeasible to heat with conventional systems. These include loading-
docks and open worksheds, complete heating of floor-level work areas in buildings
with high ceilings, spot-heating for small work areas in sparsely occupied buildings.
Both gas-fired and electric infra-red heaters are available.
The Mechanical Division is pleased to announce that it has been able to set
up, develop, and "debug" a computer programme for calculating heat losses in
buildings. With the success of this we are planning to take a close look at setting up
a heat-gain programme. Heat gain in buildings is a more complex calculation
than heat loss. It has to take into account variables such as solar-heat gain with
its mathematical definition by latitude, azimuth angle, surface angle to sun, building-
heat lag, and others.
The variables affecting cooling-load calculations are numerous, often difficult
to define precisely, and always intricately interrelated.
With the change in the boiler units at the British Columbia Institute of Technology we have placed into operation a high temperature hot-water heat-distribution
system. The use of high temperature hot water (that is, water at 330° F. in the
system) has a number of advantages which allow for an economic installation of a
central heating plant. Some of these advantages are: (a) Smaller pipe sizes when
compared with a steam system; (b) grading of piping is much less critical, thus
allowing the piping to follow surface grade, rather than grading for drainage of
condensate, which is more costly; (c) flywheel effect, due to the high heat capacity
of water and the volume of water in the system the size of components, i.e., boilers,
pumps, can be smaller. This does not mean that the total heat transferred is less, it
means that it can be transferred evenly over a longer time. Also, besides utilizing
equipment more fully, it is actually better for the equipment and thus promotes a
longer life.
In concluding this report I wish to state that we have enjoyed the full cooperation of all the other divisions of the Department.
W. E. Mills, P.Eng., B.A.Sc, Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Mechanical Engineer.
 K 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CIVIL ENGINEER
" It is not the burden that kills us but the way we carry it."—Aristotle.
The Civil Engineering Division during the past year was engaged on many
varied and interesting projects as outlined in other sections of the Annual Report.
The former Landscaping Division has been amalgamated with the Civil Engineering
Division. Landscaping and civil engineering are so intermixed in the question of
roads, paths, earth-moving, sprinkler systems, drainage, etc., that the amalgamation
should reduce duplication.
The Division has been investigating a novel system of irrigation and drainage
in which one pipe is used .for both functions. Normally, water is provided by a
system of pipes and sprinkler-heads, while a separate buried system of pipes drains
off excess surface water, keeping the water-table at a constant level. The new
system provides buried perforated piping, approximately 2 feet to 3 feet below
ground-level, in which irrigation water is introduced in dry periods, and which
provides drainage in wet periods. Great advantages are claimed due to the fact that
water is introduced to the roots of plants and surface evaporation largely eliminated.
One of the drawbacks is that an impervious membrane must be provided if the
pipes run through a pervious layer of earth. If this were not put in, most of the
irrigation water would go down into this layer. This system has been used on
areas such as golf greens and, according to reports, has proved very satisfactory. If
the cost of separate irrigation, drainage, and attendant work is more than the single-
pipe system, the Division would seriously consider using the new system. The
feasibility of running sewage effluent into the sub-surface irrigation system during
the summer months is also being studied. During the winter, of course, the pipes
would be full of drainage water, thus precluding their use for effluent disposal.
Further studies and research are being carried out on the use of sewage
effluent for irrigation. This principle was covered in a previous Annual Report
(1966/67, page 34). This is especially important in the more arid areas where
water is at a premium. In a rough form this principle is practiced today on many
dairy farms in many countries by farmers who have holding tanks for animal waste.
To the waste is added water and the sludge is pumped away to be distributed over
fields where its fertilizing value is utilized. If this method could be refined to a
point where the effluent of human waste could be used as subsurface irrigation,
significant steps could be made towards anti-pollution measures.
One unusual and very interesting job was work on the restoration of the Indian
village at 'Ksan near Hazelton. This work consisted of water supply, roads, sewage
works and attempting to authentically match and restore Indian houses and
structures.
Another interesting job was improvement of the quality of water supplied to
the new fish hatchery near Cranbrook. Young trout are very particular about the
watery world they live in. They like it cool, unpolluted, and with just enough of
the right gases in solution.
At the hatchery at Bull River near Cranbrook, British Columbia, it had been
found that the well water contained too much nitrogen and not enough oxygen. Too
much nitrogen means that the fish get the " bends " just like a skin diver who has
surfaced too swiftly. Minute bubbles of gas form in the blood causing sickness or
death.   Too little oxygen means that the number of fish must be reduced to match
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
K 21
the oxygen in water. The fish become sluggish and off-colour, have poor appetite,
do not put on weight, and cannot fight off fish diseases.
Remedial treatment of millions of gallons of water every day, during below-
zero atmosphere temperatures, require a heated tower where the water is allowed to
fall over wooden slats and flow, by gravity, to the ponds. Provision of heated ventilating air for low-temperature operation is an unusual feature of this gas-stabilization
tower.   There are several in North America that operate in warm weather only.
At Bull River during the summer water is taken from the creek, where it has
been in contact with air and has reached a stable oxygen and nitrogen level. If the
creek water is too warm, it is mixed with well water to provide the correct environment for millions of tiny trout and prepare them for life in one of our British
Columbia lakes.
The design of the tower will allow for variations in flow, ventilation, and air
temperature, to provide valuable data for future designs. The exterior has been
designed to match the appearance of the hatchery buildings, which are visited by
thousands of tourists every year.
We wish to thank other divisions of the Public Works Department for their
co-operation and assistance during the year. Our thanks also extend to other
departments of Government, in particular the Topographic Division, Department
of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, for survey work, and the Testing Division,
Department of Highways, for soil and concrete testing.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, F.I.C.E., P.Eng., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Civil Engineer.
British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria, under construction (as going to print).
 K 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
" Where no one is consulted, plans are foiled;  where many are consulted, they succeed."
—Proverbs XV, v. 22.
Periods of time or history, whether short or long, pose questions. The answer
to these lies in gaining experience and knowledge, then turning both into practical
use. Estimates tell us that a doubling of Canada's population can be expected by the
turn of the century. While this may vary from Province to Province, it would
appear that British Columbia may exceed the over-all pattern.
Such an expansion of population will bring with it a demand for increased
government services and for the buildings and institutions from which, and in which,
these services will be administered or given. Realization of this situation results in
being aware of an obligation to plan wisely and well.
It might be justifiably asked just how the foregoing affects Government planning, lust as no man is an island unto himself, so all tiers of government have an
obligation to find better ways to plan their operations in an effort to help solve some
of the problems which do, and will, beset us. Any senior official working for a
government must weigh each situation carefully with a view to improvement.
We are proud to report that over recent years a realization that this was
necessary has been translated into action. A degree of co-operation and co-ordination that would not have been thought possible some years ago has been achieved.
Land and property transactions continue to occupy much of the time of this
Division. Appraisals, legal agreements, easements, rights-of-way, and reservations
all require documentation. One of the highlights of this year's operations was the
acquisition of nearly 200 acres for one dollar. This was done by asserting, and
then proving, that the land should have been included in the original Order in
Council describing a complete establishment.
Requisitions for the provision of space for working purposes take much of the
Division's thought and time. The expansion of government activities, and thus
personnel, results in almost continuous change. Many problems have been overcome by increasing the amount of space rented.
In similar vein, a major decision had to be made in the use of the Courthouse
in Vancouver. In order to provide space for more Court facilities, it was recommended that the Land Registry be moved in its entirety. Policy agreed with this
proposal, and the Division was able to negotiate reasonable terms in one of Vancouver's new high-rise office blocks immediately adjacent to the Courthouse site.
This is further proof that this Department unceasingly endeavours to provide suitable
office accommodation for a growing Civil Service.
The Division's work involves public relations with municipalities covering
technical and non-technical policies, in so far as the responsibilities of the Department of Public Works Act dictate. A great deal of time is spent in liaison work with
Federal Government departments such as Crown Assets Disposal Corporation and
statutory authorities.
While the administrative side of the Division's work keeps pace with its
demands in the writing of special briefs, Orders in Council, conveyances, agreements, recording of Government lands and improvements, space requirements,
reservations, property exchange, purchase sale and assessment, the development
of Government acreage throughout the Province proceeds at high speed. A case
in point is to be seen on the Burnaby precinct at Grandview and Willingdon.   Here
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
K 23
the Province has some 300 acres of land. A decade ago development consisted of
an industrial school, a mental health clinic, a Highway's yard. A vocational school
came next, and then during the last five years the flood-gates of development opened.
Today's position is that more than two-thirds of the acreage has been used. The
Vocational School has been forced to take up a large rental 15 minutes' traffic-time
distant, the British Columbia Institute of Technology has doubled in content and
continues to demand further land assembly for contingent uses. The clinic has
trebled in size with the addition of the Residential Care Unit, the Burnaby Motor-
vehicle Testing-station is designed and has received policy approval, furthermore,
the Department of Agriculture is developing laboratory requirements west of Wil-
lingdon Avenue.   This story can be repeated in detail throughout the Province.
A fresh look at many of our fundamental concepts is required, but many will
ask, " Can we try to guess what life will be like in the future and design for it? "
Or better, can we envisage a pattern of urban development and city construction
sufficiently flexible to absorb and ride with the changes in the pattern of human life
and living which will occur within the life of these massive objects that we have
to build?
There are three principal reasons for new thinking—the explosive increase in
population, fast increasing use of the automobile, and the fact that a large proportion of our present building stock is soon coming up for renewal.
The Province is in a cycle of building investment in a period when we must
spend more than we used to do, but plans and projects which involve a level of
expenditure beyond the limit which the economy can bear do not make any great
contribution to the solution of the problems which face us.
In spite of the above, however, the criteria for our building in the 20th century
is that those responsible for planning should never forget the most important factor
about any place is the people who will inhabit it.
The Planner must provide a suitable container for the people's activities. It
also means that for good or bad, it is the activities themselves that shape the urban
area.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
F.I.L.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.I.Struct.E.,
A rchitect-Planner.
 K 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 K 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
" The first stage toward doing something is to know what is wrong."—Ian Nairn.
The projects undertaken by the Electrical Engineering Division continued to
be numerous, varied, and most interesting. In addition to work undertaken as part
of the Department of Public Works' team, designs were effected and assistance was
provided for other departments of the Government, including Highways; Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources; Recreation and Conservation. There was no time
during the year when the work load reached what might be called a slack period.
The majority of the work of the Division has been concerned with the design
of new buildings such as the British Columbia Archives and Museum, vocational
schools at Terrace and Victoria, Government building at Duncan, Glendale Hospital, Eric Martin Institute, British Columbia Institute of Technology library, and
many others. However, in addition to such major design work, a considerable effort
has been applied to projects under the supervision of the Director of Construction
and Maintenance. These include remodelling designs for such buildings as the
Liquor Control Board Warehouse in Vancouver, the former Mc and Mc Building
in Victoria, The Woodlands School Centre Building, and many others.
An extremely important and active function of the Division has been the provision of assistance and advice on electrical matters to the Director of Construction
and Maintenance and his staff, in connection with projects under construction, and
maintenance requirements throughout the Province. Working relationships with
Project Inspectors, Superintendents, and foremen have without exception been most
rewarding, but manpower limitations have undesirably limited the necessary services.
It is in this area that the greatest future improvement is foreseen.
With the increase in Government buildings, facilities, and personnel, there has
been an increased demand for the services of this Division in relation to communications. The telephone operation administered by the Department is now a two-
million-dollar-per-annum business, comprised of a vast number of transactions.
A system has now evolved by which prompt consideration is given to all requests
for service, and all requirements for additional funds very carefully scrutinized.
There has been extensive technical and administrative planning for major necessary
extensions and additions. Improved methods of controlling costs have been devised,
and it is expected that these will be further improved with the passage of time.
The all-electric buildings are now becoming a fact. As long ago as 1961/62
the Annual Report dealt with this topic and, somewhat cautiously, the principle was
incorporated in the design of the Ganges Courthouse, completed in 1965. Results,
in the case of this building, have proved the innovation very, successful, both as to
convenience and cost. Encouraged by this, the Division, in co-operation with the
Mechanical Division, has incorporated " all-electric " principles in the design of
several buildings, including the Duncan and Williams Lake Courthouses. It is visualized that this form of energy has much wider application, and studies are continuing.
During the period under report the Electrical Division was under the supervision of the Supervisor, Electrical Design and Communications, Mr. J. R. Walker,
who retired shortly after the beginning of the new fiscal year. For generations, many
fine buildings in British Columbia will bear his significant professional imprint.
J. B. Hall, P.Eng., M.E.I.C,
Senior Electrical Engineer.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68
K 27
 K 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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  K 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  ENGINEER, SAFETY
INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION
With a view to improving efficiency and promoting better use of our facilities
and staff, a programme of integration of inspection services is being pursued.
It has been necessary to undertake a rather extensive study of the work load
which is imposed by the several Statutes currently in effect. This information indicated areas where certain members of our staff could conveniently carry out inspections in two or more technologies following a period of training and orientation.
Investigations revealed that several staff members had suitable technical ability
and experience which could be employed to mutual advantage.
Accordingly, three pilot programmes were organized—one in the Peace River
District, one in the Victoria and Central Vancouver Island District, and one in the
Salmon Arm-Vernon District. The first two involved gas installations and low-
pressure heating boilers, while the third included gas and electrical installations.
These programmes have worked successfully and further studies are being made
with a view to extending this type of service.
The procedures in the accounts office are also under review. Additional and
better space facilities are badly needed. It is hoped to implement improvements in
this respect in the near future.
A move toward decentralization in the boiler inspection service is being pursued. Arrangements have been made to locate a Resident Inspector in Nanaimo
to service the central and northern part of Vancouver Island. This will materially
improve the service to industry and provide a greater degree of efficiency.
A study of the fee structure for boiler and pressure vessel inspection service
indicated a need for upward revision. This was recommended and adopted in
November. The service, as a result of this amendment, is operating on an improved
economic base.
An educational programme for certain members of our staff was undertaken
with the co-operation of the Vancouver Vocational Institute. This is intended to
provide up-to-date instruction on automated control procedures.
A staff conference and workshop was held in April for five days and was attended by all technical staff. This was the first time that all three branches have
met together. The problems of integration were discussed as well as ways and means
of accomplishing it. Also included in the programme were technical presentations,
which were very beneficial.
It is planned to continue these sessions with amended programming to suit the
particular needs of the Division.
I would like to express my appreciation to you and to the members of the staff
of this Division for support during the past year.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Chief Engineer.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
— 1
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Teacher Training College, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.
British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace.
  K 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF BOILERS
AND PRESSURE VESSELS
GENERAL
The steady growth of industry throughout the Province has continued during
the year, and is reflected in every phase of our operations. There are still additions
and modifications being carried out to increase the efficiency of pulp-mills, oil refineries, and thermal power plant stations, in addition to new pulp-mills under
construction.
Arrangements are being made to open a district office for the Boiler Inspection
Branch at Nanaimo, with a Resident Inspector stationed in the Courthouse. This
will provide a much-improved service to the pulp-mills located on the central and
northern portions of Vancouver Island.
OPERATIONS
Vocational training centres (welding) in Vancouver, Burnaby, Nanaimo,
Prince George, Dawson Creek, and Kelowna have again been extremely busy all the
year, and the usual influx of welders from European countries and other Provinces
continues. This year, 2,633 welders were tested, compared to 2,564 during
1966/67.
An interesting fact is the number of operating engineers who have written
examinations, which are 71 in excess of the 800 examined in 1966/67.
The British Columbia Black-liquor Advisory Committee have adopted the
" Recommended Good Practice—Safe Firing of Auxiliary Fuel in Black-liquor
Recovery Boilers " and the " Guide to the Preparation of—An Operator Training
Manual, An Operator Training Programme, A Preventative Maintenance Programme for Black-liquor Recovery Boilers," prepared by subcommittees of the
Black-liquor Recovery Boiler Advisory Committee.
There are now 23 of these boilers operating in the Province. This number
should increase to 25 in 1968. Several recovery boilers were taken out of service
during the past 12 months.
ACCIDENTS
There was one fatal accident recorded during the year. A workman modifying
a high-pressure gas valve accidently caused the valve cover to blow off, which struck
him in the head, causing instantaneous death.
BOILERS
Emergency shutdowns on chemical recovery boilers     14
Failures to pressure parts (recovery boilers)  800
Control malfunctions (recovery boilers)     50
Inadequate purge (recovery boilers)  	
Low-water conditions       2
Defective safety or relief valves       7
Complete investigations were made of all the foregoing accidents and full reports are on file. Recommendations to prevent recurrence of accidents involving
equipment covered by the Act were made as deemed necessary.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
K 35
SUMMARY OF WORK,  1967/68
Designs registered  867
Amendments to designs  153
Boilers built under inspection  22
Pressure vessels built under inspection  1,519
Total boilers inspected  5,589
Total pressure vessels inspected  2,189
Total number of pressure vessels imported from United States,
Eastern Canada, and other countries  331
New boilers installed  446
Engineers examined  871
Welders examined  2,633
ENGINEERS' EXAMINATIONS
Class
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
First, A	
31
28
111
87
179
342
40
38
15
14
21
54
71
140
234
31
26
9
17
First, B	
7
Second, A  	
57
16
Third   	
39
Fourth    ..
108
9
Boiler Operator, L.P.B	
12
Boiler Operator, H.P.B	
6
871        1
600
271
WELDERS' TESTS
Grade
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
D.P.W. 1, 2, 3, 5	
D.P.W. 4	
2,119
202
131
181
1,724
186
103
165
395
16
28
16
2,633
2,178
455
Renewals, 1,302 (without tests);  procedures, 76;  total number of ce
tifkates issuec
S. Smith
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, 3,935.
P.Eng.,
lief Inspec
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 K 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF  ELECTRICAL ENERGY
PERMITS
The work load of the Branch, represented by the number of electrical permits
issued, was up 12 per cent over the previous year. This represents a recovery from
the mildly recessive figure for the year 1966/67, which was 3.7 per cent below the
previous year.
The total number of permits issued were as follows:—
Residential  47,431
Non-residential   10,118
Total  57,549
INSPECTIONS
The number of inspections carried out during the year is listed below, for the
districts:—
Office
Inspections
Increase or
Decrease,
Per Cent
Installations
Approved
without
Inspection
3,187
2,230
2,3891
2,136
1,499
2,464
1,530
1,455
2,426
1,745
1,932
2,789
3,144
2,652
2,069
4,733^
2,558
1,589
5,9363
1,634
2,137
4,7882
1,892
1,943
1,558
6,8923
+ 20.0
— 3.5
447
275
138
— 3.5
— 12.0
—23.0
+ 2.0
— 7.0
— 10.0
+ 17.0
+ 8.0
+ 15.0
+ 2.0
+ 17.0
— 0.5
+ 86.0
+ 18.0
— 4.5
-12.0
—40.5
+ 5.0
+ 31.5
— 4.0
— 4.5
— 4.5
+ 8.0
241
433
Courtenay   	
532
10
94
407
Fort St. John    	
33
1,376
391
1,010
1,133
87
535
Penticton  _   	
248
185
728
121
2
213
217
80
Trail	
55
241
Totals 	
69,337
+ 8.0
8,832
Grand total, 78,169.
1 New office.            2 Two Inspectors.            3 Three Inspectors.
The increased activity is concentrated largely in the Lower Mainland area,
covered by the New Westminster, Richmond, Delta, Langley, and Abbotsford offices.
The life of a District Electrical Inspector is not always a humdrum affair, as
is illustrated by the following first-person report.
This is a true report which may illustrate how it can happen that what appears
to be a simple, straightforward inspection can sometimes become quite involved.
This particular inspection I refer to as the " Cellar Door Caper."
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68 K 37
Inspection was requested for a panel change and water-heater installation.
The place was a small farmhouse located out in a rural area, on a little-used road.
The time was a brisk afternoon in February.
After driving in to the yard and approaching the back door, I suspected that
there was no one home. However, there was a note on the back door that read,
" The door is unlocked, please go in." Assuming that this invitation included me,
I opened the door and was boisterously greeted by a medium-sized brown dog of
the Heinz variety, who for the sake of brevity, I will henceforth refer to as " the
mutt." After ascertaining that the mutt's intentions were friendly, I proceeded to
take a look at the panel change and new cables, etc., but could not locate the water-
heater.   Eventually, I concluded that it must be located under the house.
On going outside again, I located a cellar door which was one of those old-
fashioned types, built on a slant and consisting of two doors that opened in the
middle by grasping the handle, and with a firm pull you raise and open the door.
This I proceeded to do, finding the door to be quite heavy, requiring quite a positive
pull. As the door opened, a spaniel and an alley-type torn cat came bounding out.
They had obviously been crouched inside, ready to go, as soon as the door was
opened.
It was not until I noticed that the mutt was in hot pursuit of the spaniel that
I realized that I had left the back door open when I came out, and along with this
realization came the horrible suspicion that I had just triggered a situation that
required immediate action if I was going to avoid an embarrassing situation and
save the spaniel from " a fate worse than death," so to speak.
At this point I should mention that there was about a foot of snow on the
ground, which had enough of a crust on it to support the dogs but hardly enough
to support me, sort of two steps on and one through.
Well, the chase was on, the spaniel keeping just far enough ahead of the mutt
to enjoy herself, the mutt, deadly serious, in hot pursuit, and yours truly, a poor
third, leaping and floundering along. We completed two large circles in the back
field when I, somewhat winded, decided that there must be a better way to handle
this situation; so I stopped on the back porch to assess it.
This was when I noticed that the torn cat had gone into the house and was now
on top of the fridge making passes at the caged budgie, who was by now quite excited
and had lost some feathers, but had not been touched. I immediately put the run
on the torn cat, and then saw that the two dogs had arrived on the back porch.
This was a break, so I cautiously approached them and with exact timing and dexterity managed to grasp the two of them by their collars. Actually, this was not as
difficult as it may seem, as they were in pretty close contact at this time. Then,
without releasing the spaniel, I threw the mutt into the kitchen and closed the door.
I took the spaniel around to the cellar door and tossed her into the cellar and closed
that door. I then went back in the house, picked up a few budgie feathers and,
without too much trouble, captured the torn cat, then took him out to the cellar door
where, with some difficulty, I managed to open the door just enough to insert the
cat without releasing the spaniel.
As I was driving away, it occurred to me that I still had not checked the wiring
of the water heater! I therefore hope that you will concur that I was justified, in
this case, in assuming that it was probably a satisfactory installation.
I have since wondered what the owners thought when they saw the tracks in
the field, and whether the dogs will ever forgive me for so rudely terminating the
call of the wild, or did I?
 K 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXAMINATIONS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
Four hundred and seventy-seven examinations for electrical contractors were
written during the fiscal year.   The results of these follow:—
Pass Fail
Class A     69 53
Class B     96 80
Class C  105 74
Sub-total     270 207
Total, 477
This is an increase of 52.3 per cent over the previous year.
CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
During the fiscal year the following numbers of certificates of competency for
electrical contractors were in effect:—
Class A  235 Class PB  166
Class B  448 Class PC  230
Class C  487 Class TA       1
Class PA     82
Total, 1,649
This is an increase of 15.3 per cent over the previous year.
APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT
The number of applications for approval of electrical equipment made or sold
in the Province reached a new high, with 822 such applications processed. This is
an unprecedented 45 per cent increase over the previous year, and speaks very highly
indeed for the efforts and ability of our Approvals Inspector, Mr. A. C. Short.
PLANS INSPECTION
The plans inspection service laboured under a heavy handicap during the year.
A total of 3,269 drawings, representing 820 separate construction projects, were
submitted for examination and approval. However, only 637 of these projects were
actually processed, leaving a backlog of some 183 projects pending approval as of
March 31, 1968. This is a drop of over 14 per cent below the previous year and is
accounted for by the phenomenal increases in contractor's examinations and applications for approval of equipment, which formerly required the attention of only
one Inspector, but which now occupy most of two men's time, leaving the plans
inspection service short-staffed.
OVERHEAD ELECTRIC-LINE CONSTRUCTION
During the fiscal year 1967/68, 1,196 applications for permits to construct or
alter overhead electric-lines on public highways or Crown lands were processed.
In addition 130 applications for permits to install television equipment on poles
carrying power-lines were handled. This is approximately the same as for the previous year.
PROIECTIONISTS
The Branch assisted the Fire Marshal in conducting 15 examinations for
motion-picture projectionists, 10 first class and five second class. Five first-class
and two second-class candidates passed.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
K 39
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
The Chief Inspector attended meetings of the Approvals Council (Electrical)
and of the Committee on Canadian Electrical Code Part I at Montreal in June and
at Ottawa in November. The work connected with these meetings continues to be
most informative and rewarding both to the Chief Inspector as an individual and
to the Branch.
The problem of public relations is one of which the District Inspector must
always be conscious. Indeed, it is difficult not to be aware of it, as the following
tale illustrates.
I was called upon to make a reinspection of a farm residence several miles
out into the bush beyond the Village of Golden. This was a job which was being
wired on an owner-permit and I had already made several inspections, each time
pointing out the items to be corrected. On this particular day I arrived at the house
and was met at the door by a young daughter. Her mother was sick in bed. I completed the inspection and, writing out a list of the items still to be corrected, asked
the daughter if she would take it to her mother and inquire whether she had any
questions. When she returned, after a few minutes, she said, " My mother has
only one thing to say to you.   Drop dead! "   I almost did.
ACCIDENTS
A total of 61 incidents alleged to have been caused by electrical equipment
were investigated during the fiscal year. These resulted in 11 fatalities, 13 non-fatal
injuries, and 44 fires. In five cases our Inspectors reported that the fires were not
of electrical origin, and in six others the origin could have been electrical, but was
doubtful. Of the 11 fatalities, six were caused by contact of the victim with live
electrical conductors, four resulted from fires of electrical origin, and one was the
result of unexpected starting of electrically driven machinery due to disregard for
safe operating procedures during maintenance. Five of the six contact accidents
involved qualified electrical workers. The sixth, involving a child, occurred when
a high-voltage distribution-line fell across a parked car.
May I express to you, sir, my appreciation for your continued interest and cooperation in the affairs of this Branch, and for the able assistance which we have
received from your Departmental staff.
G. A. Harrower,
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
 K 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
There were no amendments made to the Gas Act or pursuant regulations.
THE DIVISION
The Gas Inspection Branch did not institute inspection service in any municipality, nor did any municipality institute its own inspection service.
There was a total of 1,044,400 feet of gas distribution mains installed by gas
utilities.
Night schools for Grade I gas-fitters were held in Vancouver, Burnaby, Abbotsford, and Prince George.
Night schools for Grade II gas-fitters were held in Burnaby and Prince George.
The production and use of liquefied natural gas continues to expand in the
Province. A mobile supply was used to sustain the Villages of Williams Lake and
Lac la Hache while design changes were being carried out on the natural-gas
supply-lines.
The Chief Inspector continues to represent the Province on the following
Canadian Standards Association committees:—
(1) The B 149 Installation Code for Gas Burning Appliances and Equipment.
(2) The B 200 Canadian Standards Association Sectional Committee on Specifications for Certification of Gas Burning Appliances.
(3) The Sub-committee for the Design, Installation, and Testing Section of the
Z134 Installation Code for Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping
Systems.
(4) The Task Force Committee of the B 137.4 Plastic Piping for Gas Services,
and the B 137.14 Recommended Practice for the Installation of Plastic
Pipe for Gas Service.
The Chief Inspector attended the Canadian Gas Association workshop in
Kelowna, which dealt with problems encountered when distributing natural gas.
The industrial growth of the Province continues to increase, and more-
specialized gas-fired equipment is being designed for industry. More intricate
electronic flame safeguard equipment is appearing on the market.
Two Gas Inspectors Grade I have undertaken the duties of Boiler Inspectors
Grade I, along with their own duties.
ACCIDENTS
There were 18 incidents investigated by this Branch. Nine of these were attributed to either flammable liquid vapours ignited by natural-gas appliances, or
natural-gas appliances igniting combustible materials.
Two incidents were caused by recirculating products of combustion into
premises.
The remainder were not attributed to gas. There were no fatalities or serious
injuries caused by gas in the Province.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF WORK
K 41
1967/68
1966/67
1965/66
1,345
1,180
862
1,516
537
596
152
73        1
151
8,527
14,443
1,289
1,057
898
1,496
521
536
183
61
167
9,479
13,943
-1,319
970
881
1,570
533
486
155
43
Number of gas-fitters passed examinations 	
Number of gas permits issued, municipalities  	
150
10,048
13,898
FUTURE
In the coming year it is evident that the demand for natural gas will, grow substantially. Pacific Northern Gas Limited will be installing a gas transmission-line
from Summit Lake to Prince Rupert and Kitimat. Inland Natural Gas Company
Limited will be expanding into several towns in the Okanagan and into the Village
of Princeton. Columbia Natural Gas Limited will be expanding its services into
Skookumchuck, and the other gas companies will be greatly expanding their distribution systems.
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
 K 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions, etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of
Public Works.
On March 18, 1968, this Branch and the Department as a whole was saddened
by the death of Mr. J. D. McKinnell, Assistant Comptroller of Expenditure, and a
veteran of 35 years of public service.
A. E. Rhodes,
Comptroller of Expenditure.
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, FISCAL YEAR 1967/68
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 286—Minister's Office	
Vote 287—General Administration	
Vote 288—Government Buildings (Maintenance)  (Gross)
Vote 290—Rentals (Gross)
Vote 291—Safety Inspection Division, Vancouver	
$28,546.82
252,226.74
9,860,351.96
1,583,913.59
862,236.17
$12,587,275.28
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and
vocational schools (Government Building Vote) 	
Items recovered re vocational training, energy board, etc.  (Rental
Vote) 	
1,254,618.16
299,609.13
$11,033,047.99
CAPITAL
Vote 289—Construction of Provincial buildings {see expenditure by buildings
listed)  (Gross)  $18,833,285.12
Less credits—Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and vocational schools       6,484,430.20
$12,348,854.92
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works-
Administration and maintenance	
  $12,587,275.28
Capital         18,833,285.12
Less credits—
Maintenance
Capital 	
Net expenditure
$31,420,560.40
1,554,227.29
6,484,430.20
$23,381,902.91
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68
K 43
Project No.
599-B
458-B
612-B
421-B
539-B
299-B-2
548-B
598-B
6-B-13
6-B-34
6-B-36
25-B-13
468-B-l
451-B
619-B
482-B
289-B
289-B-l
384-B
123-B-12
499-B
79-B-10
79-B-ll
508-B
541-B
623-B
621-B
615-B
613-B
519-B
534-B
39-B-18
39-B-62
39-B-65
39-B-70
39-B-71
39-B-72
31-B-9
31-B-12
544-B
479-B
470-B
547-B
600-B
455-B
614-B
5-B-102
5-B-116
5-B-119
5-Bh121
5-B-133
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Alouette River Unit—sewage-disposal system „ 	
Animal Pathology Building, Abbotsford  	
Abbotsford, purchase of property  _ 	
Bull River Fish Hatchery
Burnaby Residential Care Centre for Children	
Burnaby Vocational Training School, Public Works building	
Charlie Lake,  alterations  and  addition  to  Department  of  Mines
(Petroleum Branch)    	
City of Chilliwack, purchase of property 	
Colony Farm—
Strengthening dykes  	
Repairs to piggery	
Scullery and can-washing
Dellview Hospital—roads, paths, and drainage
Duncan Courthouse	
Fernie Courthouse—exterior restoration	
Fernie—purchase of property	
Fort Nelson Government office building and residence
General expenses, planning, survey supplies, etc.	
Wages and expenses, Casual Design staff .
Grounds improvement, various Government buildings (Provincial)._.
Haney—alterations, workshop area	
Hutda Lake (Men's Camp)—prefabricated building for use as correctional institution	
Jericho Hill School—
Dormitory unit and development	
Classroom and industrial arts building	
Remodel certain buildings on Department of National Defence site
(for Attorney-General's Department) 	
Kootenay base camp (Salmo-Creston summit) 	
Lytton ferryman's house 	
Nanaimo—purchase of property	
Nanaimo area—structural alterations   	
Nelson Department of Highways residence	
New Denver Dormitory—alterations	
New Westminster Courthouse—external renovations
Oakalla—
Security fence	
Roads 	
Renovations, kitchen	
Central Classification Sections, alterations and improvements..
Piggery and cooker
Ventilation in Administration offices
Pearson TB. Hospital—
Modifications 	
Boiler plant.
Port Hardy Department of Health staff, prefabricated houses
Structural alterations, Zone 5, Prince George area	
Prince George Men's Gaol—addition	
Prince George—living trailers	
Penticton—purchase of property	
Quesnel Courthouse
Fencing Highways yards, Region No. 4	
Riverview—
Alterations   and   renovations   to   kitchen
changing-rooms 	
Landscaping roads, parking, etc.	
Garbage-handling incinerator    _
Structural alterations 	
Admitting suite, Centre Lawn Building	
storage   and   staff
Expenditure
$113,153.72
16,203.13
20,859.50
43,056.49
1,220,343.24
14,991.35
263,767.09
1,263.50
19,555.77
12,433.00
1,176.70
5,000.00
117,442.31
14,354.00
2,300.00
3,473.87
74,188.09
525,707.54
110,141.87
5,641.66
31,452.08
18,476.38
15,840.30
33,103.19
69,048.80
192.62
14,000.00
27,700.15
10,923.99
105,847.10
17,216.56
5,000.00
5,772.19
643.68
195.68
28,726.91
11,427.71
25,000.00
6,000.00
35,729.77
28,736.68
44,297.97
1,470.86
35,151.47
3,951.78
20,458.58
50,262.07
38,120.62
30,728.06
63,662.26
41,612.45
 K 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                 Description Expenditure
Riverview—Continued
5-B-134          Renovations of fire-alarm system  $9,274.09
5-B-136          Transformers and main switch panels, East Lawn Building  21,903.76
5-B-137 Valleyview Hospital—ventilation and electrical systems  1,538.84
504-B         Ruskin Women's Prison (Twin Maples Farm)   15,872.00
Skeenaview Hospital—
24-B-9              Sanitary sewerage   3,675.58
24-B-10            Alterations and renovations  7,601.78
24-B-12            Wiring   7,972.49
506-B         Stewart Department of Highways residence  5,334.00
553-B         Terrace weigh-scale station  20,178.55
Tranquille School—
10-B-12            Water supply and sewage disposal  5,000.00
10-B-49            Playground   10,000.00
10-B-51             104-bed unit  1,072.51
10-B-52            Extension of kitchen facilities  49,980.88
10-B-53            Greaves Building—air conditioning  99,996.99
10-B-54            Dairy building  769.61
10-B-55            Walkway   25,000.00
10-B-56            Structural alterations, Zone 3   49,999.84
10-B-57            Renovation of fire-alarm system  9,999.53
10-B-58            Laundry extension   53,065.53
476-B         Vancouver Island Gaol   11,294.06
408-B         Structural alterations, Vancouver area  49,798.93
537-B         Vancouver Courthouse, Centennial Terrace  23,779.72
610-B         Vancouver Courthouse—new courtroom facilities, 3rd floor  135,591.85
546-B         Willow Chest Centre—alterations   25,085.16
605-B         Vancouver, 411 Dunsmuir Street—exterior renovation  14,042.77
617-B         Vernon Courthouse—elevator and renovations  13,290.86
604-B         Vernon Courthouse—purchase of property and demolition of buildings   168,399.37
Victoria area—
290-B-2               Government House—conservatory     202.29
292-B                 Structural alterations  115,236.28
385-B                 Parking facilities, Parliament Buildings  33,082.78
464-B                 Mental Hospital, Lee Avenue (Victoria)   3,039,718.62
486-B                 British Columbia Museum and Archives Building (Victoria)  3,009,939.81
487-B                 Acquisition of property, Parliament Buldings Precinct  58,471.91
492-B                 Motor-vehicle Building Data Processing Centre (Victoria)   33,033.70
518-B                 Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street (Victoria)   123,186.74
536-B                 Parliament Buildings—new electrical distribution system  144,505.62
550-B                 Motor-vehicle Testing-station (Victoria)   268,452.44
552-B                 Windermere Building—purchase  20,000.00
554-B                 Glendale School (Colquitz)   499,123.89
596-B                Wilkinson Road Unit—barn    11,154.35
601-B                Victoria International Airport—purchase of the two hangars  154,758.08
607-B         Williams Lake—purchase of property  6,200.00
The Woodlands School—
7-B-40           Landscaping, fencing, and paving, etc.   15,829.96
7-B-46           Structural alterations     30,262.06
7-B-48           Renovations, Centre Building    526,797.23
7-B-49            Industrial-therapy unit ___   88,167.50
7-B-50            Renovations to boiler plant  167,344.75
7-B-52            Cedar Cottage—dumbwaiter  2,556.42
Vocational—
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby—
401 -B-1                      Addition  1,616,732.35
401-B-2                      Library  813,114.29
401-B-3                      Extension to the Mechanical Building  469,614.99
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68
K 45
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
401-B-4
401-B-6
299-B-3
507-B
369-B
481-B
481-B-l
231-B-5
407-B
597-B
603-B
Description
Vocational—Continued
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby—Continued
Alterations to (1962) building	
Playing-field and track .
Burnaby Vocational School—trowel trades and painting shop..
Burnaby Vocational Teacher Training College
College of Education, University of British Columbia
Dawson Creek Vocational School	
Dawson Creek Vocational School—purchase of property
Nanaimo Vocational School—relocation of huts	
Terrace Vocational School	
Highways garages, etc.—
Rolla—equipment shed
Fraser Lake—equipment shed
Expenditure
$632,264.17
140,983.36
56,424.86
1,092,096.97
302.44
70,772.39
25,000.00
12,210.81
1,266,122.62
28,000.00
16,300.00
$18,833,285.12
 K 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
FOR BUILDINGS
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Playing-field and Track, Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
A. C. McEachern Ltd..	
Johnson's Trucking Ltd..
Progressive Cartage & Contracting Co. Ltd-
Sutherland Construction Co. Ltd.	
McPhail's Construction Co. Ltd.	
Tide Bay Dredging Co. Ltd.
Janitorial and Night Watchman Services, Government Buildings, Work Zone
No. 2:
Banner Building Maintenance Ltd..  	
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd _ _.	
Mercury Maintenance Division of Dustbane Enterprises Ltd. 	
National Building Maintenance Ltd _...  	
Best Cleaners & Contractors Ltd     	
Renovations to Steam-boiler Plant, Phase I, The Woodlands School:
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd _   _	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd.   	
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd   _ —  	
Cain-Truscott Contractors Ltd _   _	
Kelsey Construction Ltd  	
Reroofing Fernie Government Building:
Maurice Fox & Associates Ltd   	
Homewood Roofing & Contracting Ltd   _	
Alterations  to   (1962)   Building,   British   Columbia   Institute   oj  Technology,
Burnaby:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd   	
Hodgson, King & Marble Ltd	
A. W. Gillis Ltd     _   _	
Extension to Mechanical Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology,
Burnaby:
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd  _   _
A. W. Gillis Ltd. _  ..     	
Mutual Construction Ltd. and W. Watt  _	
Electrical Alterations of Primary Service and Secondary Distribution, Legislative Buildings, Victoria:
Mawson Gage Ltd     - _ 	
Camosun Electric Co. Ltd _	
Ricketts Sewell Electric Ltd..
Residential Care Centre for Children, Burnaby:
H. Haebler Co. Ltd   	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd..
Imperial Construction Ltd _ 	
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd _	
Manson Bros. Ltd  _ 	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd  	
British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace, Phase III, Workshops:
D. Robinson Construction Co. Ltd. 	
Basarab Construction Co. Ltd. _ _ _	
Jarvis Construction Co. Ltd    _	
Ross-Crest Contractors    	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
East Lawn Building, Essondale, Electrical Changes:
Tide Bay Construction Ltd  	
Paragon Electric Co. Ltd._	
Motor-vehicle Testing-station, Victoria:
Bird Construction Co. Ltd  	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd 	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd... _	
W. Campbell Ltd - _	
Farmer Construction Ltd   	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd   	
R. A. Hall Ltd _ 	
Burnaby Institute of Technology, Library Hardware:
McLennan, McFeeley & Prior Ltd _	
Marshall Wells Ltd   _ _	
Norwest Contract Hardware - _ —
Fred C. Meyers Ltd.....  	
$134,440.00
97,291.00
106,586.00
104,659.00
115,063.00
105,347.00
145,068.00
123,048.00
128,500.00
112,680.00
116,136.00
37,596.00
39,950.00
37,983.00
33,450.00
45,979.00
14,354.00
16,495.00
554,802.00
561,396.00
622,495.00
387,866.00
390,666.00
373,976.00
55,982.00
55,440.00
56,400.00
1,809,000.00
1,707,000.00
1,756,925.00
1,740,940.00
1,610,300.00
1,789,527.00
1,709,143.00
1,586,000.00
1,605,838.00
1,650,000.00
1,575,000.00
24,268.00
25,332.00
343,535.00
337,000.00
333,926.00
358,550.00
340,333.00
334,120.00
336,810.00
26,540.60
26,440.00
25,805.46
26,361.37
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68 K 47
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Weigh-scale Station, Terrace:
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Strachan Construction Co. Ltd 	
Lodon Development & Contracting Co. Ltd..
Calla Bros. Cement Contractors Ltd	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
Reroofing, Brannan Lake School:
Hay's Roofing & Sheet Metal Ltd	
Willow Chest Centre, Valve Station and Sprinkler System:
Grinnell Sales Ltd	
Demolition of Properties, Vernon:
Simmons Snappy Service Ltd _	
Le Due Pairing Ltd.
Budgemarr & Son Excavating Ltd..
Prymer Contracting _	
KAL Excavating.
Western Builders & Contractors Ltd..
Renovations to Steam-boiler Plant, Phase II, The Woodlands School:
Cain-Truscott Contractors Ltd _ _.
Hanssen Construction Ltd	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd _	
Kelsey Construction Ltd	
Kennett Contracting Ltd _ 	
Bird Construction Ltd	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd _  	
Elevator and Alterations, Courthouse, Vernon:
Gustavus Construction Ltd	
Dairy Building, Tranquille Farm, Tranquille:
Bud HannisLtd	
McGregor Construction Ltd	
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd	
Provincial Government Offices, Duncan:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd __ ,	
Burak Construction Ltd	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd	
Construction of Provincial Government Employees' Parking-lots U and V:
Victoria Paving Company Ltd..
Wakeman eft Trimble Contractors Ltd.-
Chew Excavating Ltd 	
O.K. Trucking Co. Ltd..
Alterations to Ventilation and Electrical Systems, 100-Bed Unit,  Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale:
Metro Mechanical Co. Ltd       _	
United Power Ltd     	
Fenk Heating & Plumbing Ltd..
Argus Installations Ltd 	
Gordon Latham Ltd	
Keith Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd..
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd	
Demolition of Structures, Vernon:
J. & P. Contracting Ltd _	
Prymer Contracting..
Twin City Bulldozers Ltd	
Arrow Transfer Co. Ltd 	
Turner Construction Co. Ltd...
Neldoe Contracting Ltd.	
Quaife Bros...
Spencer Construction & Equipment Ltd	
Alouette River Unit, Sewer and Water, Haney:
Townes Construction Ltd	
Fred Welsh Ltd 	
Van's Contracting Co. Ltd _	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
G. W. Ledingham & Co	
Casano & Sons Bulldozing, Nanaimo Ltd	
Tide Bay Construction Ltd	
Securities Vault, Queen's Printer, Victoria:
Grant Marcus (Marcus-Askew Construction Ltd.) _ 	
Provision and Installation of Elevators, Legislative Buildings, Victoria:
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd _ __	
The Dover Corporation (Canada) Ltd. (Turnbull Elevator Division)..
$26,629.00
33,794.00
24,980.00
21,825.00
28,000.00
18,170.00
11,894.00
2,450.00
10,500.00
2,835.00
1,260.00
2,000.00
5,489.00
74,928.00
74,302.00
71,789.00
71,792.00
76,404.00
82,758.00
71,850.00
39,727.00
125,242.00
127,395.00
125,150.00
393,230.00
378,790.00
375,500.00
370.522.C0   I
374,737.00
9,485.50
9,839.97
18,766.00
11,998.00
79,567.00
70,231.00
77,267.00
83,809.00
79,896.00
81,673.00
85,975.00
4,800.00
1,995.00
8,500.00
14,700.00
12,000.00
2,310.00
4,850.00
7,150.00
163,860.00
123,475.00
131,685.00
129,150.00
131,785.00
165,970.00
185,989.00
6,888.00
23,840.00
26,635.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 K 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Janitorial Services, British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek:
Best Cleaners & Contractors Ltd 	
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd	
Demolition of Old Gaol, Kamloops:
Twin City Bulldozers Ltd                 	
1
$63,312.00
101,760.00
8,882.00
4,992.00
29,360.00
5,760.00
100.00   i
1,250.00   .
1,500.00
2,801.00
700.00
1,200.00   •
800.00
3,030.00
1,820.00
30,961.00   '
31,681.00
30,265.00
26,631.00
26,885.00
29,850.00
29,569.00
27,710.00   1
5,715,000.00   ■
5,868,000.00
5,940,135.00
5,796,070.00
56,870.00
61,200.00
169,690.00
175,440.00
196,475.00   i
30,347.00
28,584.00
39,522.00
26,380.00
34,490.00
1,388,000.00
1,499,700.00
1,419,881.00
1,519,000.00
1,387,000.00
1,497,253.00
1,399,501.00
1,550,000.00
1,305,073.00
1,797,747.00
106,000.00
116,850.00
102,157.00
107,861.00
102,900.00
93,120.00
299,440.00
282,102.00
364,480.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
B. & D. Demolition Ltd          	
Sale of Property, Princeton:
I. A. McKay            	
Mrs. E S MacDonald                                                                        	
H. H. Avery 	
Industrial   Therapy   Building,   The   Woodlands   School,   New   Westminster,
Heating and Ventilation:
Mechanical Installations Co. Ltd	
Fenk Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Awarded.
Piggery and Cooker, Oakalla Prison Farm, Burnaby:
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
Pacific Coast Construction Co. Ltd..	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd _	
Cain-Truscott Contractors Ltd   _	
A. W. Gillis Ltd..  _  	
Mental Health Facility, Victoria, Phase VI:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
Awarded.
Supply of High  Temperature Hot-Water Boilers, Mechanical Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
Awarded.
Elevators, Mental Health Facility, Victoria:
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd	
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, Exterior Renovation:
A. W. Gillis Ltd	
B.C. Tuckpointing Ltd	
Awarded.
M. Sleightholme & Co. Ltd 	
Library, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
Van Construction Co. Ltd. (Division of Van Vliet Construction Co. Ltd.).-.
Ross-Crest Contractors  	
Awarded.
New Boiler-house, Youth Centre, New Denver:
Awarded.
Alterations  and  Additions  to  Department   of  Mines   (Petroleum   Branch),
Charlie Lake:
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1967/68 K 49
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
General   Alterations,  Department  of  Health   Storage  Building,   818   Yates
Street, Victoria:
Marcus Askew Construction Ltd _ _  	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd..
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd _	
M. P. Paine Co _	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd	
Dillabough & Luney Ltd..
Williams, Bray & Williams Ltd.
Herb Bate Ltd  	
W. Jensen Construction Ltd	
J. Bobiak Construction _
W. Campbell Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd.-	
T. Lambie & Son Ltd _.
British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo, Janitorial Services:
Best Cleaners & Contractors Ltd _	
' Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd	
Super Cleaning Service —  	
British Columbia Institute oi Technology, Site Works, Burnaby:
Jack Cewe Ltd... _.„. _ __	
Winwon Gravel & Supply Ltd _	
Imperial Paving Ltd _  	
Renovations to E. 5 Area, Attic Floor, Centre Lawn Building, Riverview
Hospital:
A. W. Gillis Ltd. — 	
Kelsey Construction Ltd _	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd... _	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd   	
Seaward Construction Ltd   .„ _ _  	
Cain Truscott Contractors Ltd.... _ _	
J. H. Wilson Construction Co. Ltd _  	
Deitcher's Construction _  	
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd..
Kingston Construction Ltd..
British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase V:
Farmer Construction Ltd.- _.	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd   _ 	
Burns & Dutton Construction Ltd..
G. H. Wheaton Ltd — _
Renovation of 1019 Wharf Street, Victoria, Phase II:
W. Campbell Ltd..
Bird Construction Co. Ltd.
Farmer Construction Ltd.—
M. P. Paine Co  ....
Burns & Dutton Construction Ltd.-
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd _..
G. H. Wheaton Ltd ...	
Stage Curtains, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria:
D. G. Simpson Drapery..
Spectacular Productions Ltd...
John Baker Ltd	
The Woodlands School, Renovations to Steam-boiler Plant, Phase II:
Cain-Truscott Contractors Ltd _ _ 	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd _	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd   	
Alterations and Additions, Courthouse, Vancouver, Phase 11:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Beach Construction Ltd „	
Mutual Construction (1960) Ltd..
A. W. Gillis Ltd.—  	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd _ _	
High  Temperature Hot-water  Underground Mains, Institute  of Technology,
Burnaby:
Kingston Construction Ltd.— _ _ _
Mutual Construction (1960) Ltd - 	
A. W. Gillis Ltd _..
Janin Western Contractors Ltd	
Mathies & Nicol of Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd..
Leckerbig & Hole Western Ltd	
$18,691.00
17,359.00
17,700.00
17,959.00
17,190.00
18,277.00
16,618.00
16,463.00   I
20,486.00   .
15,400.00    |
16,580.00
18,066.00
15,791.00
56,640.00
66,096.00
59,880.00
15,621.00
15,600.00
15,561.00
38,957.00
35,451.00   I
38,255.00
38,879.00
32,682.00
38.200.00
49,356.00
45,550.00
36,625.00
37,250.00
2,287,266.00
2,299,100.00
2,242,000.00
2,341,000.00
415,912.00
428,432.00
406,931.00
436,681.00
429,000.00
436,556.00
423,775.00
419,167.00
7,492.70
9,499.90
3,944.78
99,876.00
93,800.00
94,289.00
22,814.00
39,504.00
33,782.00
28,771.00
23,571.00
44,764.00
49,810.00
51,050.00
58,215.00
56,560.00
57,800.00
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 K 50                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Janitorial Services, Pit-par Building, Burnaby:
Canus Buildings Maintenance (Division of Canus Camp Services Ltd.)	
$14,400.00
9,792.00
10,200.00
11,952.00   1
16,536.00
8,684.00
69,800.00
64,424.00
65,700.00
33,634.00
36,975.00
35,120.00
37,052.00
36,693.00
139,926.00
125,818.00
124,736.00
110,750.00
9,450.00
10,913.00
11,003.64
5,800.00
8,595.00
5,267.00
Not awarded.
Banner Building Maintenance Ltd -	
Best Cleaners and Contractors Ltd	
Alterations and Additions to Laundry Building, Tranquille School:
Bud Hannis Ltd  ___	
Residential Care Centre for Children, Burnaby, Supply of Finishing Hardware:
Fred C. Myers Ltd 	
Marshall Wells Ltd                       	
Alterations to Vancouver Courthouse, Phase III:
A. W. Gillis Ltd             	
H Haebler Co. Ltd                                        	
Hut Relocations, British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo:
W. A. Brown Ltd                    	
Cedar Cottage, The Woodlands School, Dumbwaiter Installation:
Bennett & White Ltd	
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  

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