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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1968

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Full Text

 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1967
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. Donald L. Brothers, Minister.
K. B. Blakey, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
M. S. Hedley, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
R. H. McCrimmon, Chief Gold Commissioner.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch.
R. E. Moss, Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas.
 Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C, P.C., C.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mineral Industry of the Province for the year 1967
is herewith respectfully submitted.
DONALD L. BROTHERS,
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources Office,
March 31, 1968.
 Robert lames Craig, Senior Inspector, Environmental Control, died in
Vancouver on December 12, 1967, after a short illness. He was born in
Vancouver on luly 1, 1913, and it was here he received his engineering
education, graduating from the University of British Columbia with a B.A.
and a B.A.Sc. in mining engineering. He served on the engineering staff of
the Britannia mine from 1936 to 1945, when he joined the Workmen's
Compensation Board as an Inspector, silicosis branch. He was transferred
to the Department in 1962 as a Senior Inspector with office in Vancouver.
" Bob " Craig was hghly respected throughout the mining industry for his
knowledge of ventilation and dust control. He was intimately aware of
the problems of environmental control which had to be solved to improve
working conditions, and his advice was widely sought. He was a member
of the Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia and the
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. He is survived by his wife
Alice, two daughters, and a son.
 CONTENTS
Page
Introduction    A 9
Review of the Mineral Industry  A 10
Statistics—
Co-operation with Dominion Bureau of Statistics  A 15
Methods of Computing Production  A 15
Notes on Products Listed in the Tables  A 17
Table 1.—Mineral Production:   Total to Date, Past Year, and Latest
Year  A 25
Table 2.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1967  A 26
Table 3.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1958 to
1967  A 28
Table 4 (Graph).—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Value,
1887-1967  A 30
Table 5 (Graph).—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Quantity,
1897-1967  A 31
Table 6.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum, and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1967  A 32
Table 7a.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Summary  A 34
Table 7b.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc  A 36
Table 7c.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Miscellaneous Metals  A 38
Table 7d.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Industrial Minerals  A 42
Table 7e.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Structural Materials  A 44
Table 8a.—Quantity and Value of Coal per Year to Date  A 46
Table 8b.—Coal Production of British Columbia,  1967-—Production
and Distribution, by Collieries and by Mining Divisions  A 47
Table 9.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations of
All Classes  A 48
Table 10.—Average   Number  Employed   in   the   Mineral   Industry,
1901-67  A 49
Table 11a.—Employment at Metal Mines, 1967  A 50
Table 11b.—Employment at Collieries, 1967  A 51
Table 12.—Metal Production in 1967  A 52
A 5
 A 6 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Page
Departmental Work  A 56
Retirements  A 5 6
Organization  A 5 6
Administration Branch  A 56
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 58
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders  A 58
Coal  A 60
Petroleum and Natural Gas  A 60
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 61
Inspection Branch  A 63
Fig. 1.—Index map showing inspectoral districts  A 64
Mineralogical Branch  A 65
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 67
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 69
Mining Roads and Trails  A 77
Exhibits  A 78
Rock and Mineral Sets  A 79
Publications  A 79
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases A 79
Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources and the Geological Survey of Canada  A 79
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 80
Department of Energy, Mines and Resources  A 81
Geological Survey of Canada  A 81
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1967 _ A 81
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 82
Mines Branch  A 82
Mineral Resources Division  A 82
Observatories Branch  A 8 2
Lode Metals 1-274
Contents  1-16
List of Illustrations       17
Geological, Geophysical, and Geochemical Reports 275-292
Placer 293-298
Contents     293
 CONTENTS A 7
Page
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals 299-322
Contents     299
List of Drawings     299
Petroleum and Natural Gas 323-410
Contents     323
Statistical Tables     323
List of Illustrations     324
Inspection of Mines 411-448
Contents     411
List of Illustrations     411
Coal 449-460
Contents     449
List of Illustrations     449
  ANNUAL REPORT OF  THE  MINISTER  OF
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES, 1967
Introduction
An annual report of the mineral industry of the Province has been published
each year since 1874. From 1874 to 1959 it was the Annual Report of the Minister
of Mines, and since 1960 it has been the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources. It is the official document in which each year is recorded the
salient facts of activity of the industry.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources contains sections dealing with Statistics; Departmental Work; Lode Metals; Placer;
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Inspection of Mines; and Coal.
There is a general introductory review of the mineral industry as a whole,
as well as somewhat more detailed reviews of mining and exploration and of petroleum and natural gas.
The section on Statistics records the mineral production of the Province in all
its phases and in considerable detail. Current and past practice in arriving at
quantities and in calculating the value of the various products is outlined.
The organization of the Department and the work of its various branches are
outlined briefly in the section on Departmental Work.
The Lode Metals section records details of individual mining operations, as
well as the exploration and development of mineral deposits. Information is provided on every metal-producing mine in the Province, and an attempt is made to
record the progress of exploration and development work on most of the important,
newly discovered and recently explored mineral deposits. In some instances a
mining property is described in considerable detail, with special attention given to
the history of past work, to a description of the workings, the geological setting, and
to the mineral deposit itself. Some geological reports are of areas where one or
more mineral deposits occur. These geological reports provide the basic information about the mineral resources of the Province that is essential to intelligent
resource planning.
The declining phase of the once important placer-mining industry continues to
be recorded in the Placer section.
Information on occurrences and production of Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals is recorded in a separate section.
The Petroleum and Natural Gas section records in considerable detail the
development and production statistics of that expanding industry.
Information concerning mine safety, fatal accidents, dangerous occurrences,
etc., and the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department is contained in
the section on Inspection of Mines.
The section on Coal contains information on operating coal mines and on
exploration activities.
A 9
 Review of the Mineral Industry
By M. S. Hedley
The year 1967 was a good one for British Columbia's mineral industry. For
the sixth successive time a new record was set for the value of annual production.
The total of $386,796,807 was 14 per cent above the previous record set in 1966,
and brought the all-time total value to $6,297 million.
A record value was set in each of the four categories of metals, industrial
minerals, structural materials, and fuels.    The comparison with 1966 follows:—
Gain
1966 1967 (Per Cent)
Metals  $209,036,531 $235,932,026 12.9
Industrial minerals  22,865,324 29,364,065 28.4
Structural materials  46,821,264 47,359,089 1.1
Fuels  60,470,406 74,141,627 22.6
Totals  $339,193,525        $386,796,807        14.0
The most valuable single commodity was copper, and the second was crude
oil; the value and quantity of each were at unprecedented high levels.
The increase in the metals category was due to a greatly increased output of
copper, resulting from new mines and increased milling rates. Production was 63.2
per cent above that for 1966, but, because of a lower average price, the value was
up only 57.1 per cent. The quantities and values of molybdenum, nickel, and
silver were up, but lead and zinc were both down in quantity and value. The byproducts of lead-zinc mining—antimony, bismuth, cadmium, indium, and tin—were
down an aggregate three-quarters of a million dollars.
The value of industrial minerals was up due to increase in production and, to
a greater extent, the value of asbestos, which exceeded $18 million. Although the
output of sulphur was down, the total value increased substantially. This was the
result of revaluing the Cominco sulphur output, which is a by-product in the form
of sulphuric acid. The nominal value assigned to this sulphur equivalent was raised
to be in line with world prices. The sulphur recovered at the gas plant at Taylor
was valued at the average price received.
Structural materials showed little change. The value of cement production was
up about 6 per cent, and that of sand and gravel was down by a like amount. A
new 2-million-barrels-per-year kiln was installed in the plant of Lafarge Cement of
North America Ltd.    Other commodities showed no significant change.
Fuels as a whole showed a 22.6-per-cent increase in value. Coal production
was up 6.8 per cent, and this increase coupled with a rise in the price put the value
up 13.7 per cent. Crude oil was up 18 per cent in quantity and 24 per cent in
value, while natural gas delivered to pipe-lines for distribution increased 24 per
cent in quantity and 25 per cent in value.
The price for gold was 5 cents per ounce higher than in 1966. The price for
silver rose to more than $2 late in 1967 and averaged an unprecedented $1.67.
The average price for lead was down a little more than 1 cent, and that of zinc was
down three-quarters of a cent. The price for copper dropped to 50 cents per
pound from its all-time high in 1966.
The Trail custom smelter treated 13,650 tons of British Columbia crude ore,
6,403 tons of lead concentrates, and 5,562 tons of zinc concentrates, in addition to
the product of its own mines and various out-of-Province sources. American
smelters received the remainder of the lead concentrates and most of the zinc concentrates, as well as 11,667 tons of copper concentrates.    To lapanese smelters
A 10
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY,  1967
A 11
went 96 per cent of the production of copper concentrates, all the iron concentrates,
all the nickel-copper concentrates, and a small percentage of the zinc concentrates.
In summary, concentrates representing 7.4 per cent of the total value of 1967 metal
production were treated at United States smelters and concentrates representing 47.5
per cent of the total were treated in Japan.
Destination of British Columbia Concentrates
Smelters
Gold-Silver
Lead
Zinc
Copper
Nickel-
Copper
Iron
Trail
!
Tons
1,530        |
	
1
Tons
135,165
13,552
Tons
159,572
65,154
14,010
Tons
11,667
283,020
Tons
22,777
Tons
1,982,030
Six mines closed. The Aurum gold mine at Wells was a victim of fixed price
and rising costs, after 34 years' production. Iron mines closed at Benson Lake and
Kennedy Lake on Vancouver Island, as well as a copper mine on Quatsino Sound
and lead-zinc mines on Toby Creek and east of Kimberley. Not all closures were
due to exhaustion of reserves, but there is little likelihood of these mines reopening
unless conditions change considerably.
The loss in gold production from the closing of the Aurum mine was more
than made up by the output of gold as a by-product of copper-mining. Silver
production was up 11.4 per cent.
Three mines came into production—the Tasu iron-copper mine of Wesfrob
Mines Limited, the Alice mine of British Columbia Molybdenum Limited, and the
Horn Silver mine of Utica Mines Ltd. The first two are open-pit mines with a combined capacity of 14,000 tons per day.
Copper production increased by 63.2 per cent to 172.7 million pounds, largely
as the result of the first full year's operation at the Granisle and Western (Lynx)
mines and of increased capacity at Bethlehem. At the end of 1967, 10 mines were
producing major amounts of copper at an aggregate milling rate of more than 30,000
tons of ore per day. The Bethlehem mill achieved a capacity of 14,000 tons per
day, or four times its initial capacity in 1963.
Prospects for further increases in the production of copper are bright indeed.
The Granduc and Brenda mines are slated for production in 1969, and exploration
is at an advanced stage on a number of properties.
Molybdenum is in better position than is indicated by the small increase in
production from 1966. The Alice mine will have a full year's production in 1968,
and the Brenda mine will contribute a major amount in 1969. The full effect of
the increased capacity at Endako will be felt in 1968.
The production of lead and zinc was down for the third successive year, due
in large part to the fact that most of the output of Cominco's Pine Point mine in
the Northwest Territories has since 1965 been treated in the Trail smelter, thus
effectively reducing the output of the Sullivan mine. In 1967 a considerable tonnage of high-grade ore from Pine Point was concentrated at the Kimberley plant.
The exploration for metals continued through 1967 at a high rate, the measurement of which is something of a problem. The Department has at all times endeavoured to report annually on as much current activity as possible, and this has
become increasingly difficult in the last few years, with more ground to cover and
without increase in staff. The Inspectors of Mines and the Mineralogical Branch
geologists have found it increasingly difficult to obtain the information and have
instituted a short work questionnaire that forms part of the central permanent record.
At the same time a questionnaire was devised to obtain statistics on all forms of
 A 12
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
exploration expenditures, with the aid of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
In 1967 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics (D.B.S.) initiated a form to collect all
data on expenditures in the field of exploration and development, extending from
the broad field of prospecting to detailed investigation of ore zones, and including
all such work in and adjacent to operating mines. The response to the D.B.S. form
has been good, and it is hoped that further refinement of the form will result in
better coverage. For the first time it has been possible to measure with reasonable
accuracy the moneys expended by the mining industry for its own perpetuation.
Ten staff geologists of the Mineralogical Branch did geological field work
ranging from property examinations to an areal mapping project in the Unuk River
region. Results of part of this work is to be found in the Lode Metals section of
this Report, and the remainder will appear in the bulletin series.
The Geological Survey of Canada reported 28 projects involving field work in
British Columbia. These ranged from geological mapping at 4 miles to 1 inch and
1 mile to 1 inch to palaeontological and mineralogical studies. Some of this work
extended into Alberta.
Airborne magnetometer surveying under a cost-sharing arrangement with the
Geological Survey of Canada was continued in the north-central plateau region.
Sheets at a scale of 1 mile to 1 inch are issued about one year after flying is completed. Compilations on a 4-miles-to-l-inch scale are available for some earlier
work. Following release of maps, the basic data are filed with the Geological Survey
in Ottawa.
Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1967
Physical
Work
Land Costs
Head Office,
Administration,
Etc.
Exploration—prospecting and undeclared mines—
293 companies 	
$22,861,000
$1,098,000
5,000
29,000
$4,067,000
Exploration—on or near declared mines—
Two development companies	
Fourteen operating companies 	
$139,000
2,724,000
Development—on declared or operating mines—
$2,863,000
227,000
$20,791,000
6,052,000
$26,843,000
2,201,000
Totals                   -	
$52,567,000
$1,132,000
$6,495,000
Grand total, $60,194,000.
The foregoing table represents minimum figures. The total shown for head
office, overhead, and administration is certainly low because only those companies
which performed physical work made returns. Land costs, such as leases, purchases,
etc., are also certainly low. Exploration devoted to finding and investigating new
ore zones is close to being correct, as there are relatively few omissions of major
undertakings. Exploration and development expenditures related to declared or
operating mines are the most accurate. The definition of exploration and development by operating companies may vary, but, as a rule, work on a declared or
recognized orebody is " development " and work performed in search of or to prove
up new ore is " exploration."
About one-half the total expenditure on exploration work was made under
contract and of that on development work a little more than half. This refers to all
physical and technical work, including diamond drilling, stripping, tunnelling, and
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY, 1967 A 13
geological, geochemical, geophysical, and other surveys. The expenditure on work
done by contractors amounted to some $11 million for exploration and some $15
million for development. The contractors' work force was approximately equal to
the companies' work force. At the middle of the summer season the total combined
work force approximated 3,000 men.
Employment figures in exploration and development are none too certain
because of the short summer season, but the Department has record of 6,000 man-
months worked by contractors' employees and a like figure for company employees
in the conduct of general exploration for new ore deposits. The figure for company
employment is somewhat at variance with that in Table 10, which shows the total
as reported in the D.B.S. forms.
Over-all expenditures in the metal-mining industry in 1967 were as follows:—
Mining and quarrying operations—
Salaries and wages      $94,523,495
Compensation, silicosis, unemployment         3,486,232
Fuel and electricity       13,590,759
Process supplies       34,368,856
Capital expenditures       33,800,000
Repairs       12,412,172
Exploration and development       60,194,000
Total  $252,375,514
This compilation is not directly comparable with the total given in the 1966
Review because expenditures of capital and repairs and of exploration and development are on a somewhat different basis.
The total gross dividends reported amounted to $48,145,202 from companies
other than those producing or processing petroleum or natural gas. This figure
compares with $42,385,263 for 1966. Dividend tables are no longer carried in the
statistical section, and the 1965 Report is the last to list them in detail. Some
history is thus lost sight of, but because of much diversification of industry the
sources of profits and hence of dividends are not always clear. Dividends in the
petroleum industry would be particularly difficult to assign to British Columbia
operations within the scope of this Report.
In 1967 crude oil became the second most valuable product of the mineral
industry, being surpassed only by copper. The production of oil and natural gas
has expanded at a relatively steady rate for some years, as have prices. Fewer wells
were completed than in 1966, but the fact of deeper drilling was shown by the fact
that total footage remained almost unchanged at more than 1 million feet.
Drilling began on the continental shelf. The Sedco 135-F semi-submersible
drilling-vessel abandoned two holes west of Vancouver Island and was drilling a
third at the end of 1967.
Exploration activity increased as seismograph studies were extended into the
Province from the important petroleum pools recently discovered in the Rainbow
area of northwestern Alberta.
The gas-gathering system was extended to the Yoyo, Kotcho, and Sierra fields,
where there are large reserves.
The major development in the marketing of petroleum products was the completion of an oil refinery at Prince George, the seventh in the Province. A total of
about 103,300 barrels per day was delivered to the several refineries at the end of
1967, about half of which was produced in British Columbia.
 A 14 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
The net cash expenditures for the petroleum industry follow:—
Exploration, including land acquisition and drilling  $57,095,000
Development drilling  13,584,000
Capital expenditures  11,177,000
Operations of natural-gas plants  18,575,000
Operations of wells  8,684,000
General (excluding income tax)   12,699,000
Total  $121,814,000
Direct revenue to the Government from the entire mineral industry is listed
below:—
Free miners' certificates, recording fees, lease rentals, assessment payments, etc.  $1,117,354
Royalties on iron concentrates  138,172
Payments on industrial minerals and structural materials  207,754
Ten-per-cent mineral tax (received during 1967)  2,367,986
Coal licences  23,518
Petroleum and natural-gas rentals, fees, etc.  10,356,731
Sale of Crown reserves  14,297,816
Royalties on oil, gas, and processed products  9,607,437
Miscellaneous   17,917
Total     $38,134,685
 Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and tabulated
for this Report by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria.
CO-OPERATION WITH DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the various Provincial
departments have co-operated in the collection and processing of mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms prepared
for use by the Province and by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
So far as possible both organizations follow the same practice in processing the
data. The final compilation by the Dominion Bureau is usually published considerably later than the Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources for
British Columbia. Differences between the figures published by the two organizations arise mainly from the facts that the Dominion Bureau bases its quantities of
metals on returns made by smelter operators, whereas the British Columbia mining
statistician uses the returns covering shipments from individual mines in the same
period; the Dominion Bureau uses average prices for metals considered applicable
to the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining statistician
uses prices considered applicable to British Columbia production.
Peat, included under the classification of fuel by the Dominion Bureau, is not
regarded as mineral or fuel, and accordingly is not included in the British Columbia
statistics of mineral production.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the
production records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year. From
time to time, revisions have been made to figures in earlier reports as additional data
became available or errors came to light.
Data are obtained from the certified returns made by producers of metals,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal, and are augmented by data
obtained from customs smelters. For placer gold, returns from operators are
augmented by data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint, from Gold Commissioners, and other sources. For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products,
production figures supplied by the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch of the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources are compiled from the monthly
disposition reports and the Crown royalty statement filed with the Department by
the producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Weights are avoirdupois pounds and short tons
(2,000 lb.), and troy ounces.   Barrels are 35 imperial gallons.
Metals
Gross and Net Content
The gross contents for any metal are the sum of its total assay content in ore,
concentrates, or bullion shipped to the smelter or refinery. The net contents are
the gross contents less smelter and refinery losses.
A 15
 A  16
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
In past years there have been different methods used in calculating net contents,
particularly in the case of one metal contained in the concentrate of another. The
present method was established in 1963 and is outlined in the following table. For
example, the net content of silver in copper concentrates is 98 per cent of the
gross content, of cadmium in zinc concentrates is 70 per cent of the gross content, etc.
Lead
Concentrates
Zinc
Concentrates
Copper
Concentrates
Copper-Nickel
Concentrates
Copper
Matte
Silver	
Per Cent
98
Less 26 lb./ton
98
50
Per Cent
98
50
90
70
Per Cent
98
Less 10 lb./ton
50
70
Per Cent
85
88
Per Cent
98
Lead _
Zinc  _
Cadmium 	
Nickel	
50
Calculated Value
Prior to 1925 the value of metals produced was calculated by using the true
average prices for gold and copper, and the smelter loss of copper was taken into
account. The value of other metals was calculated from the gross metal content of
ores or concentrates by using a metal price which was an arbitrary percentage of
the average price, as follows: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85
per cent.   These percentages of the average price are listed in the table on page A 24.
For 1925 and subsequent years the value has been calculated by using the true
average price (see p. A 24) and the net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources.
In the statistical tables, for gold the values are calculated by multiplying the
gross contents of gold by the average price for the year; for the other principal
metals, by multiplying the net contents of metals as determined by means of the
above table by the average price for the year.
Iron concentrate exported to Japan is valued at the price received by the shippers. The value of the iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley is an arbitrary
figure, being the average value per ton of ore of comparable grade at its point of
export from British Columbia.
The value of molybdenum is the amount received by the shippers.
The by-product metals, bismuth, tin, and indium, are valued on the basis of the
price received by the shippers, and the value of antimony is the net content multiplied by the average price for the year.
Average Prices
The prices used in valuation of metal production are shown in the table on
page A 24.
In 1967 the price of gold, $37.76, is the average Canadian Mint buying price.
Originally when fine gold was $20.67 per ounce the price used for valuing
placer gold was established arbitrarily at $17 per ounce; between 1931 and 1962 the
price was proportionately increased with the continuously changing price of fine gold.
Since 1962 Canadian Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have been available
for all but a very small part of the placer gold produced, and the average price listed
is derived by dividing ounces of placer gold into total amount received.
 STATISTICS
A 17
Prices of the other principal metals are the average United States prices converted into Canadian funds. Average monthly prices are supplied by the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics from figures published in the Metal Markets section of the
Engineering and Mining Journal. Specifically, for silver it is the New York price;
for lead it is the New York price; for zinc it is the price at East St. Louis of Prime
Western; for copper it is the United States export refinery price; and for cadmium
the New York producer's price to consumer.
For nickel the price used is the Canadian price as set by the International
Nickel Company of Canada Ltd.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
The prices for industrial minerals and structural materials approximate the
prices received at the point of origin.
Fuel
The price per ton used in valuing coal (see p. A 24) is the weighted average of
the f.o.b. prices for the coal sold.
The values for natural gas, natural-gas liquid by-products, and for petroleum
including condensate/pentanes plus are the aggregates of amounts received for the
products at the well-head.
NOTES ON PRODUCTS LISTED IN THE TABLES
Antimony.—Antimony was produced as early as 1907 from Slocan ore exported to foreign smelters, and since 1939 it has been produced as a by-product at
the Trail smelter. Currently Trail is the only source of the metal. In Table 7c the
antimony assigned to individual mining divisions is the reported content of concentrates exported to foreign smelters; the antimony " not assigned " is the antimony
recovered at the Trail smelter from the various ores received there. See Tables 1,
3, and 7c.
Arsenious Oxide.—Arsenious oxide was recovered at foreign smelters from
arsenical gold ores, chiefly from Hedley between 1917 and 1931, again in 1942,
and from the Victoria property on Rocher Deboule Mountain in 1928. There has
been no production since 1942.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Asbestos.—Production of asbestos began in 1952 with the opening of the
Cassiar mine, from which all Provincial production continues to be derived. From
1953 to 1961 asbestos was valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver, but
beginning in 1962 it has been valued at the mine, and the values for the preceding
years have been recalculated on that basis.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Barite.—Production of barite began in 1940, and since then it has been produced continuously at several operations in the valley of the upper Columbia River,
where it is mined from veins and recovered from an old lead-zinc mill tailings pond.
See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Bentonite.—Small amounts of bentonite were produced between 1926 and
1944 from deposits in the coal measures near Princeton. There has been no
production since 1944.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Bismuth.—Production of bismuth began in 1929 at the Trail smelter. It is a
by-product of refining lead, and consequently it cannot be assigned to any specific
property or mining division.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Butane.—Butane is recovered as a by-product at the gas-processing plant at
Taylor and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7a.
 A 18 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
Cadmium.—Cadmium is recovered as a by-product at zinc refineries. It was
first produced at the Trail zinc refinery in 1928. Cadmium occurs in variable
amounts in sphalerite and is recovered from most British Columbia silver-lead-zinc
ores. Cadmium assigned to individual mining divisions is the reported content of
custom shipments to the Trail smelter and to foreign smelters. The " not assigned "
cadmium in Table 7c is the remainder of the reported estimated recovery at the
Trail smelter from British Columbia concentrates.   See Tables 1,3, and 7c.
Cement.—Cement is manufactured from a controlled mixture of limestone,
rock, and gypsum. It has been produced in British Columbia since 1905. The total
production each year fluctuates to meet current building demands. See Tables 1,
3, and 7e.
Clay and Shale Products.—Include brick, tile, sewer pipe, pottery, light-weight
aggregate, and pozzolan. Local surface clays or shale and fireclay are used. Common clays and shales are abundant in the Province, but fireclay and other high-grade
clays are scarce.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Chromite.—Only two shipments of chromite are recorded, one of 670 tons
from Cascade in 1918 and one of 126 tons from Scottie Creek in 1929. See Tables
1 and 7c.
Coal.—Coal was discovered at Suquash on Vancouver Island in 1835 and at
Nanaimo in 1850. First production: Cariboo Mining Division, 1942; Fort Steele
Mining Division, 1898; Kamloops Mining Division, 1893; Liard Mining Division,
1923; Nanaimo Mining Division, 1836; Nicola Mining Division, 1907; Omineca
Mining Division, 1918; Osoyoos Mining Division, 1926; Similkameen Mining Division, 1909; and Skeena Mining Division, 1912. The Nanaimo and Comox fields
produced virtually all the coal until production started from the Crowsnest area in
1898. The Nanaimo field was exhausted in 1953, when the large mines closed.
All the coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes
material lost in picking and washing. From 1910 the quantity is the amount sold
and used, which includes sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and
company employees; coal used under company boilers, including steam locomotives;
and coal used in making coke.   See Tables 1,3, 7a, 8a, and 8b.
Cobalt.—Cobalt was recovered in 1928 from a 22-ton shipment of arsenical
gold ore made in 1926 from the Victoria property on Rocher Deboule Mountain.
See Tables 1 and 7c.
Coke.—Coke is manufactured from certain special types of coal and has been
produced since 1895. Being a manufactured product, its value does not contribute
to the total mineral production as shown in Table 1. Up to 1966, coke statistics
have been included in the Annual Report as Table 9, but this table is being discontinued. The coal used in making coke is still recorded in Table 8b. Coke statistics
may be obtained on request to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department
of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria.
Copper.—Most of the copper production has come from the southern part of
the Province, from Britannia, Copper Mountain, Greenwood, Highland Valley,
Merritt, Nelson, Rossland, Texada Island, and Vancouver Island. Some came from
Anyox and a lesser amount from Tulsequah. Production in 1966 from Granisle in
the central interior is the first from an important new region. Copper production
started in 1894. Ore was smelted in British Columbia first at Nelson (from the
Silver King mine) and at Trail (from the Rossland mines) in 1896, and four and
five years later at Grand Forks (from the Phoenix mine) and Greenwood (from the
Motherlode mine). Other smaller smelters were built in the Boundary district and
on Vancouver Island.   In 1914 the Anyox smelter was blown in.
 STATISTICS A 19
Copper-smelting ceased in the Boundary district in 1919, at Trail in 1929, and
at Anyox in 1935. British Columbia copper ore was then smelted mainly at Tacoma,
and since 1961 mainly in Japan.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Crude Oil.—Production of crude oil in British Columbia began in 1955 from
the Fort St. John field but was not significant until late in 1961 (see Fig. 38), when
the 12-inch oil pipe-line was built to connect the old-gathering terminal at Taylor to
the Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company pipe-line near Kamloops. Oil is now
being produced from 19 separate fields, of which the Boundary Lake, Peejay, and
Milligan Creek fields are currently the most productive, accounting for 78.5 per cent
of the annual total.
In Tables 1, 3, and 7a, quantities given prior to 1962 under "petroleum,
crude" are total sales, and from 1962 to 1965 include field and plant condensates.
Beginning in 1966, total production of crude oil is given and field and plant condensates are fisted separately. Full details are given in tables in the Petroleum and
Natural Gas section of this report.
Diatomite.—Small amounts of diatomite have been quarried near Quesnel
periodically since 1928.  See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Field Condensate.—Field condensate is the liquid produced in the field from
gas wells. It is listed as condensate/pentanes plus in the Petroleum and Natural Gas
section of this Report.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7a.
Fluorite (Fluorspar).—Between 1918 and 1929, fluorite was mined at the Rock
Candy mine north of Grand Forks for use in the Trail lead refinery. In the last
several years it has been produced as a by-product of the silica quarry at Oliver.
See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Flux.—Silica and limestone are added to smelter furnaces as flux to combine
with impurities in the ore and form a slag which separates from the valuable metal.
The quantities of flux have been continuously recorded since 1911. See Tables 1,
3, and 7d.
Gold, Lode.—Gold has played an important part in mining in the Province.
The first discovery of lode gold was made on Moresby Island in 1852, and the first
stamp mill, to treat gold-bearing quartz, was built in the Cariboo in 1876.
The principal gold camps have been Bridge River, Hedley, Portland Canal,
Rossland, Sheep Creek, and Wells. At the present time the only major producing
gold mine is the Bralorne mine in the Bridge River area. Currently more than half
the gold is produced as a by-product from copper, copper-zinc-silver, and other base-
metal mining.  See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Gold, Placer.—The early explorations and settlement of the Province followed
rapidly on the discovery of gold-bearing placer creeks throughout the country. The
first placer miners came in 1858 to mine the lower Fraser River bars upstream
from Yale.
Important placers were found in the Cariboo, Cassiar, Omineca, and Princeton
areas, and at Atlin, Cedar Creek, Fort Steele, Goldstream, Rock Creek, Squaw
Creek, and many other places.
Since World War II, placer-mining has been declining steadily.
A substantial part of the production, including much of the gold recovered from
the Fraser River upstream from Yale (in the present New Westminster, Kamloops,
and Lillooet Mining Divisions) and much of the early Cariboo production, was
mined before the original organization of the Department of Mines in 1874. Consequently the amounts recorded are based on early estimates and cannot be accurately
assigned to individual mining divisions.
 A 20 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
The first year of production for major placer-producing divisions was: Atlin,
1898; Cariboo, 1858; Liard, 1873; Lillooet, 1874; Omineca, 1869.
In 1965, changes were made in the allocation of placer gold to the New Westminster and Similkameen Mining Divisions and " not assigned," to reconcile those
figures with data incorporated in Bulletin No. 28, " Placer Gold Production of British
Columbia."   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7a.
Granules.—Rock chips used for exposed aggregate, roofing, stucco dash,
terrazzo, etc., have been produced in constantly increasing amounts since 1930.
See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Gypsum and Gypsite.—Gypsum and gypsite have been produced since 1911.
Between 1925 and 1956 more than 1,000,000 tons was produced from quarries at
Falkland; latterly production has come from large deposits near Windermere. See
Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Hydromagnesite.—Hydromagnesite has been produced from deposits at Atlin
and Clinton, but no production has been recorded since 1921.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Indium.—Production of indium as a by-product of zinc-refining at the Trail
smelter began in 1942.   Production figures have not been disclosed since 1958.
Iron Concentrates.—Iron ore was produced in small quantities as early as
1885. Sustained production began in 1951 with shipments of concentrated magnetite ore to Japan. The ore has been mined mainly from magnetite and copper-
bearing magnetite deposits on Vancouver Island, Texada Island, and Moresby
Island.
Since 1961, calcined iron sulphide from the tailings of the Sullivan mine has
been used for making pig iron at Kimberley. The entire production, credited to the
Fort Steele Mining Division in Table 7c, is of calcine.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7c.
Iron Oxide.—Iron oxide, ochre, and bog iron were mined as early as 1918
from several occurrences, but mainly from limonite deposits north of Squamish.
None has been produced since 1950.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Jade (Nephrite).—Production of jade (nephrite) has been recorded only since
1959 despite there being several years of significant production prior to that date.
The jade is recovered as alluvial boulders from the Fraser River, the Bridge River
and its tributaries Marshall and Cadwallader Creeks, Kwanika and Wheaton Creeks,
and Dease Lake.  See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Lead.—Lead was first produced in British Columbia in 1887. Almost all has
come from the southeastern part of the Province, where the Sullivan mine has produced 83 per cent of the Provincial total. Other important mines are at Salmo, Pend
d'Oreille River, and North Kootenay Lake.
In 1958, revisions were made in some yearly totals for lead to adjust them for
recovery of lead from slag treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Limestone.—Limestone, besides being used for flux and granules (where it is
recorded separately), is used in cement manufacture, in the pulp and paper industry,
in agriculture, and in making builders' lime. It has been produced since 1886, and
currently most production is from quarries on northern Texada Island. See Tables
1, 3, and 7e.
Magnesium.—Magnesium was produced in 1941 and 1942 by Cominco Ltd.
from a large deposit of magnesite at Marysville.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Magnesium Sulphate. — Magnesium sulphate has been recovered in small
amounts at various times since 1915 from alkali lakes near Clinton, Basque, and
Osoyoos.  There has been no production since 1942.
Principal productive periods: Clinton, 1918-20, 1,923 tons, $39,085; Kamloops, 1918-42, 8,742 tons, $193,967; Osoyoos, 1915-19, 3,229 tons, $21,300.
See Tables 1 and 7d.
 STATISTICS A 21
Manganese.—The only manganese ore produced was shipped in 1918-20 from
a bog deposit near Kaslo and from Hill 60 near Cowichan Lake, and in 1956 a test
shipment was made by Olalla Mines Ltd.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mercury.—Mercury was first produced near Savona in 1895, and since then
small amounts have been recovered from the same source and from the Bridge River
area. The main production was in 1940-44 from the Pinchi Lake mine and Takla
mercury mine near Fort St. James.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mica.—Sheet mica has not been produced commercially in British Columbia,
but since 1932 small amounts of mica for grinding has been produced from deposits
at Albreda, Armstrong, and Oliver.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Molybdenum.—Molybdenum ore in small amounts was produced from high-
grade deposits between 1914 and 1918. Beginning in 1964, first as a by-product of
the Bethlehem copper mine, the production of molybdenum ore has increased tremendously from several low-grade mines. Now it is the fourth most valuable metal
product of the Province, and a molybdenum mine (Endako) is currently the largest
open-pit mine in the Province.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7c.
Natro-alunite.—In 1912 and 1913, 400 tons of natro-alunite was mined from
a small low-grade deposit at Kyuquot Sound. There has been no subsequent production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Natural Gas.—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954 to supply
the community of Fort St. John. Since the completion in 1957 of the gas plant at
Taylor and the 30-inch pipe-line to serve British Columbia and the northwestern
United States, the daily average volume of production has increased to more than
500,000,000 cubic feet per day (see Fig. 39). In 1967 there were 29 separately
producing gasfields.
The production shown in Tables 1,3, and 7a is the total amount sold of residual
gas from processing plants plus dry and associated gas from the gas-gathering system;
that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The quantity is net
after deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used or lost in the
cleaning plant. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature, up to and including the year 1960, and thereafter 14.65 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F.
temperature).
Gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales data are tabulated in
the Petroleum and Natural Gas section of this report.
Nickel.—Nickel was produced in 1936 and 1937 and continuously since 1958,
all being derived from one mine, the Pride of Emory near Hope. Since 1960, bulk
nickel-copper concentrates have been shipped to Japan for smelting. See Tables
1, 3, and 7c.
Palladium.—Palladium was recovered in 1928, 1929, and 1930 as a by-product
of the Trail refinery and is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates
shipped to the smelter from the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Perlite.—In 1953 a test shipment of 1,112 tons was made from a quarry on
Francois Lake.   There has been no further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Petroleum, Crude.—See Crude Oil.
Phosphate Rock.—Between 1927 and 1933 Cominco produced 3,842 tons of
phosphate rock for test purposes, but the grade proved to be too low for commercial
use.   There has been no further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Plant Condensate.—Plant condensate is liquid produced from natural gas at
field plants or at the Taylor gas-processing plant.   See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
It is listed as condensate/pentanes plus in the Petroleum and Natural Gas section of this report.
 A 22 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Platinum.—Platinum has been produced intermittently from placer streams in
small amounts since 1887, mostly from the Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers.
Some platinum recovered between 1928 and 1930 as a by-product of the Trail
refinery is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the smelter
from the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1,3, and 7c.
Propane.—Propane is recovered from gas-processing plants at Taylor and
Boundary Lake, and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7a.
Rock.—Production of rubble, riprap, and crushed rock has been recorded
since 1909.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Sand and Gravel.—Sand and gravel are used as aggregate in concrete work of
all kinds. The output varies from year to year according to the state of activity of
the construction industry.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Selenium.—The only recorded production of selenium, 731 pounds, was in
1931 from the refining of blister copper from the Anyox smelter. See Tables 1
and 7c.
Silver.—Production of silver began in British Columbia in 1887. Silver is produced from silver ores and is recovered as a by-product of silver-lead-zinc, copper-
zinc, or gold ores. Most of it is refined at Trail, but some is exported with concentrates to American or Japanese smelters or may go to the Mint in gold bullion. At
present the largest single source of silver is the Sullivan mine. See Tables 1, 3, 6,
and 7b.
Sodium Carbonate.—Sodium carbonate was recovered between 1921 and 1949
from alkali lakes in the dry belt. About 93 per cent was produced from the Clinton
area and the balance from around Kamloops. There has been no further production.
See Tables 1 and 7d.
Stone.—Dimensional stone for building purposes is quarried when required
from a granite deposit on Nelson Island and an andesite deposit on Haddington
Island. Other stone close to local markets is quarried periodically or as needed for
special building projects.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Structural Materials.—Unclassified materials valued at $5,972,171 in Table 7e
is the total for structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot be allotted
to particular classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions, and includes $726,323 shown against 1896 in Table 2 that includes unclassified structural
materials in that and previous years not assignable to particular years. The figure
3,150,828 in Table 7e under " Other Clay Products " is the value in the period
1886-1910 that cannot be allotted to particular clay products or assigned to mining
divisions.   See Tables 1, 2, 3, 7a, and 7e.
Sulphur.—The production of sulphur has been recorded since 1916. From
1916 to 1927 the amounts include the sulphur content of pyrite shipped. From
1928 the amounts include the estimated sulphur content of pyrite shipped plus the
sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. The sulphur
content of pyrrhotite roasted at the Kimberley fertilizer plant is included since 1953.
Since 1958 elemental sulphur recovered from the Jefferson Lake Petrochemical Co.
plant at Taylor has been included.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Talc.—Between 1916 and 1936, talc was quarried at Leech River and at
Anderson Lake for dusting asphalt roofing. There has been no production since
1936.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Tin.—Tin as cassiterite is a by-product of the Sullivan mine, where it has been
produced since 1941. The tin concentrate is shipped to an American smelter for
treatment.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Tungsten.—Tungsten, very largely as scheelite concentrates, was produced
from 1937 to 1958, first from the Cariboo in 1937 and during World War II from
 STATISTICS A 23
the Red Rose mine near Hazelton and the Emerald mine near Salmo. The Red Rose
closed in 1954 and the Emerald in 1958.
A very small amount of wolframite came from Surprise Creek near Atlin. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Volcanic Ash.—The only recorded production of volcanic ash is 30 tons from
the Cariboo Mining Division in 1954.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Zinc.—Zinc was first produced in 1905. Currently the total value of all zinc
production is greater than that of any of the other metals, lead being in second place.
By far the greatest amount of zinc has been mined in southeastern British Columbia, at the Sullivan mine and at mines near Ainsworth, Invermere, Moyie Lake,
Riondel, Salmo, Slocan, and Spillimacheen. The greatest zinc mine is the Sullivan,
which has contributed 71 per cent of the total zinc production of the Province.
Records for the period 1905 to 1908 show shipments totalling 18,845 tons of
zinc ore and zinc concentrates of unstated zinc content. In 1958, revisions were
made to some yearly totals for zinc to adjust them for recovery of zinc from slag
treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
 A 24
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
GoId,i
Placer,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901	
S
17.00
19.30
23.02
2S.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.06
31.06
31.66
31.66
31.C6
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.00
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
27.92
29.24
29.25
29.31
29.96
28.93
29.08
28.77
$
20.67
1    	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
37.75
37.75
37.73
37.71
37.76
Cent*
66.002 N.Y.
49.55      ,.
50.78 „
53.36      „
51.33      .,
63.45      „
62.06      „
50.22      „
48.93      ..
50.812    ..
50.64 ..
67.79 ..
56.80 .,
62.10      „
47.20      „
62.38       .,
77.35       .,
91.93
105.57       ..
95.80      .,
59.52      ,.
64.14       ..
61.63
63.442    ..
69.065 ,.
62.107    „
56.370    „
58.176    .,
52.993    ..
38.154    ..
28.700    ..
31.671    „
37.832    ..
47.461    .,
64.790    ..
45.127    „
44.881    ..
43.477    ,.
40.488    „
38.249 ..
38.261    „
41.166    „
45.254    „
43.000    ..
47.000    ,.
83.650    „
72.000    ,.
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635    ,.
94.550    „
83.157    „
83.774    ..
82.982    „
87.851    „
89.373    ..
87.057    „
86.448    .,
87.469    ,.
88.633    „
93.696   „
116.029    ..
137.965    „
139.458    „
139.374    „
139.300    ,,
|167.111     „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70      .,
13.24
12.82
15.59 .,
19.28      ,.
20.00      ..
13.20      „
12.98       „
12.738    „
12.38       „
16.341    ..
15.27 „
13.60 „
17.28 „
27.202    „
27.18       ,.
24.63
18.70      „
17.45       .,
12.50       „
13.38      „
14.42
13.02       „
14.012 „
13.795    „
12.920    „
14.570    ..
18.107    .,
12.082    ,.
8.116    ,.
6.380 Lond.
7.454    ..
7.419    ,.
7.795    „
9.477    .,
13.078 ,.
9.972    ..
10.092    „
10.086    ..
10.086    ,.
10.086    „
11.750    „
12.000    ..
12.550    .,
12.800    „
20.390    ,.
22.350 U.S.
19.973    „
23.428    „
27.700    „
31.079 „
30.333    „
29.112    „
38.276    „
39.787    „
26.031     „
23.419    ,.
27.708    „
28.985    „
28.288    „
30.473    .,
30.646    „
33.412    „
38.377    „
53.344    „
50.022    „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66      „
3.81
3.88       ..
4.24       „
4.81       .,
4.80       „
3.78       .,
3.85       „
4.00       .,
3.98       ..
4.024    „
3.93       „
3.50      „
4.17       „
6.172    .,
7.91
6.67
5.19       „
7.16      „
4.09       ,.
5.16      ,.
6.54
7.287    ..
7.84 8 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    ..
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    ..
2.710    „
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133    „
3.913    „
5.110    ..
3.344    ,.
3.109    „
3.362    ,.
3.362    „
3.362    „
3.754    ..
4.500    „
5.000    .,
6.750    ,.
13.670    ,.
18.040    „
15.800 U.S.
14.454    „
18.400    „
10.121    „
13.265    „
13.680    „
14.926    „
15.756    „
14.051    „
11.755    „
11.670    „
11.589    „
11.011 „
10.301    „
12.012 „
14.662    „
17.247    „
16.283    ,,
15.102    „
Cents
2.679
1902	
19 03	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
3.125
1908	
19 09	
1910	
4.60 E.St.L.
4.90      „
5.90      ..
4.80      .,
4.40       ,.
11.25       ..
10.88      „
7.566    „
6.94
6.24
6.52       .,
3.95
4.86      „
5.62
5.39
7.892 Lond.
7.409    „
6.194    „
5.493    „
5.385    „
3.599    ..
2.564    „
2.405    „
3.210    „
3.044    ..
3.099    ,.
3.315    ,.
4.902    .,
3.073    ..
3.009    ,.
3 411     „
3.411     ..
3.411     „
4.000    ,.
4.300    ,.
6.440    „
7.810    ..
11.230    ..
13.930    „
13.247 U.S.
15.075    „
19.900    „
15.874    „
10675    .,
10417    „
12.127    ..
13.278    „
11.175    „
10 009    ..
10.978    „
12.557    „
11.695    ,.
12.422    „
13.173    „
14.633    „
15.636    „
15.622    „
14.933    „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
4.464
1 919	
1920	
1 921	
1922	
1923	
1924    	
1925	
1926     	
1927	
1929	
1930	
1931        	
4.018
1932	
3.795
1933 _.
1934	
1935	
1936	
1938     	
1939..   .              	
1940	
1941               	
1942	
1943   	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947     	
4.68
5.12
1948   	
6.09
1949	
6.51
1950         	
6.43
1951 	
6.46
1952   	
6.94
1953   	
6.88
1954	
7.00
1955         	
6.74
1956        	
6.59
6.76
7.45
1959	
7.93
I960	
6.64
1961	
7.40
1963	
7.43
7.33
1964	
6.94
1965	
1966	
7.03
7.28
1967	
7.75
1 See page A 16, under gold, placer.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets
indicated, converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London; E. St. L.=East St. Louis;  and U.S.=United States.
The prices for gold and copper are true average prices. Prior to 1925 the prices of other metals are the
following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc,
85 per cent.   Since 1925 the prices of all metals are true average prices.
 Table 1.-
STATISTICS                                                            A 25
—Mineral Production : Total to Date, Past Year,
and Latest Year
Productsi
Total Quantity
to Date
Total Value
to Date
Quantity,
1966
Value,
1966
Quantity,
1967
Value,
1967
Metals
Antimony	
Bismuth 	
Cadmium	
Chromite 	
Cobalt      	
Copper 	
Gold—placer     	
„  —lode  	
Iron concentrates _
Lead ~ 	
Magnesium   	
lb.
lb.
lb.
tons
lb.
lb.
oz.
oz.
.tons
lb.
lb.
49,859,826
6,344,049
35,999,631
796
1,730
3,718,897,656
5,233,848
16,684,295
20,257,256
15,171,777,138
204,632
1,724
4,171,110
41,960,948
32,411,701
749
1,407
731
465,859,503
17,274,649
16,019,324
13,549,404,824
-
$
14,653,918
11,765,019
61,143,642
32,295
420
788,573,005
96,911,921
491,030,265
180,150,667
1,246,368,659
88,184
32,668
10,447,358
71,354,438
26,373,985
30,462
1,405,681
47,435
1,169,570
$
745,011
198,848
3,017,491
1,267,686
142,507
994,365
$
671,874
572,878
2,784,222
105,800,568
1,535
119,508
2,151,804
211,490,107
56,438,255
44,632
4,506,646
20,778,934
34,436,934
172,739,548
891
126,157
2,154,443
208,131,894
88,135,172
25,632
4,763,688
20,820,765
31,432,079
Mercury 	
Molybdenum 	
Nickel   	
Palladium 	
Platinum   	
Selenium	
Silver     	
Tin	
Tungsten (WO3)      -   ..
lb.
-..lb.
lb.
oz.
 oz.
lb.
oz.
lb.
lb.
380
17,517,348
4,180,842
2,600
31,249,772
3,946,715
17,094,927
3,622,400
27,606,061
3,104,397
135,008
1,389
313,557,280
14,809,273
38,663,751
1,255,584,491
9,944,214
5,549,131
710,752
305,124,440
7,729,939
1,130,096
6,180,739
437,804
10,328,695
621,682
Zinc 	
Others 	
lb.
47,666,540
1,632,747
262,830,908
39,248,539
1,327,713
Totals  	
Industrial Minerals
lb.
4,631,652,312
209,036,531
235,932,026
22,019,420
683,422
275,742
791
6,616
35,643
3,988,104
302,286
3,287,757
2,253
18,108
258,445
13,894
12,822,050
522
1,112
3,842
10,492
6,289,397
1,805
30
273,201
133,692,993
3,119,031
16,858
158,166
794,833
7,229,775
4,391,005
12,235,390
27,536
155,050
Asbestos  	
Barite  	
Bentonite 	
Diatomite  	
Fluorspar 	
tons
tons
tons
tons
-tons
88,771
21,888
15,718,741
176,240
92,192
23,466
18,273,220
176,882
70
152
23,913
23,956
206,026
3,755
4,986
112,314
424,667
576,873
2,819
80
48,052
31,283
230,044
14,096
2,464
221,212
305,655
691,592
Granules	
Gypsum and gypsite   . .
Hydromagnesite   	
Iron oxide and ochre
Jade  	
Magnesium sulphate
Mica	
tons
tons
tons
tons
lb.
tons
lb.
24,341
133,109
254,352
185,818
9,398
11,633
13,225
20,160
Perlite  	
Phosphate rock	
Sodium carbonate 	
Sulphur        	
Talc   	
tons
tons
tons
tons
11,120
	
16,894
118,983
_ 9,654,603
78,100,899
34,871
300
342,478
5,834,523
314,490
Volcanic ash 	
Totals 	
Structural Materials
Cement    	
tons
tons
240,959,582
22,865,324
29,364,065
	
10,899,078
176,472,503
64,038,164
43,927,925
38,912,410
184,910,797
9,131,636
5,972,171
707,506
15,959,293
4,100,192
2,696,011
1,890,992
21,959,733
215,043
708,855
16,929,451
3,945,207
2,822,138
2,967,195
20,643,673
51,425
Lime and limestone
-tons
1,483,949
1,590,189
24,320,013
76,720
1,645,253
2,287,407
23,210,746
3,577
Sand and gravel	
Stone  	
Not assigned  ,	
tons
tons
1,158,048
Totals	
Fuels
Coal    	
Crude oil 	
Field condensate 	
Plant condensate 	
tons
bbl.
-bbl.
-bbl.
 |   523,365,606|—	
46,821,264|  | 47,359,089 .
140,633,492
86,467,553
161,741
8,618,053
1,139,229,860
3,729,197
2,227,300
602,317,732
181,915,757
355,440
4,900,300
110,335,069
1,193,343
712,733
850,821
16,638,181
39,571
974,564
161,264,334
500,973
334,315
6,196,219
36,268,683
86,265
312,360
17,339,587
160.312
908,790
19,656,799
40,570
1,016,045
198,626,177
588,118
7,045,341
44,748,477 ;
92,357
267,941
21,667,136
188,197
132,178
Nat'l gas to pipe-line...M
Butane 	
s.c.f.
...bbl.
Propane 	
Totals  '	
Grant totals 	
bbl.
106,980        413,058
901,730,374
60,470,406
74,141,627
	
	
6,297,707,874
339,193,525,- - 1386,796,807
1 See notes on indivi
lual pr
oducts listed al
phabetically 0
n pages A 17
o A 23.
 A 26 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
Table 2.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1967
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
1836-86.
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
'1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901-
1902..
1903-
1904-
1905-
1906-
1907-
1908-
1909..
1910-
1911-
1912.
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916.
1917..
1918..
1919.
1920.
1921..
1922...
1923...
1924...
1925-.
1926-
1927...
1928-
1929...
1930-
1931..
1932..
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936.
1937-
1938-
1939..
1940-
il941-
1942-
1943-
1944.
1945.-
1946-
1947...
1948-
1949-
1950..
52,808,750
729,381
745,794
685,512
572,884
447,136
511,075
659,969
1,191,728
2,834,629
4,973,769
7,575,262
7,176,870
8,107,509
'11,360,546
14,258,455
12,163,561
12,640,083
13,424,755
16,289,165
18,449,602
17,101,305
15,227,991
14,668,141
13,768,731
11,880,062
18,218,266
17,701,432
15,790,727
20,765,212
32,092,648
27,299,934
27,957,302
20,058,217
19,687,532
13,160,417
19,605,401
25,769,215
35,959,566
46,480,742
51,867,792
45,134,289
48,640,158
52,805,345
41,785,380
23,530,469
20,129,869
25,777,723
35,177,224
42,006,618
45,889,944
65,224,245
55,959,713
56,216,049
64,332,166
65,807,630
63,626,140
55,005,394
42,095,013
50,673,592
58,834,747
95,729,867
124,091,753
110,219,917
117,166,836
2,400
46,345
17,500
46,446
51,810
133,114
150,718
174,107
281,131
289,426
508,601
330,503
251,922
140,409
116,932
101,319
223,748
437,729
544,192
807,502
457,225
480,319
447,495
460,683
486,554
543,583
724,362
976,171
916,841
1,381,720
1,073,023
1,253,561
1,434,382
1,378,337
1,419,248
1,497,720
1,783,010
2,275,972
2,358,877
2,500,799
2,462,340
$
43,650
22,168
46,432
77,517
75,201
79,475
129,234
726,323
150,000
150,000
200,000
250,000
400,000
450,000
525,000
575,000
660,800
982,900
1,149,400
1,200,000
1,270,559
1,500,000
3,500,917
3,436,222
3,249,605
2,794,107
1,509,235
1,247,912
1,097,900
783,280
980,790
1,962,824
1,808,392
2,469,967
2,742,388
2,764,013
2,766,838
3,335,885
2,879,160
3,409,142
3,820,732
4,085,105
3,538,519
1,705,708
1,025,586
1,018,719
1,238,718
1,796,677
2,098,339
1,974,976
1,832,464
2,534,840
2,845,262
3,173,635
3,025,255
3,010,088
3,401,229
5,199,563
5,896,803
8,968,222
9,955,790
10,246,939
10,758,565
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
'10,549,924
10,119,303
63,610,965
1,991,629
2,260,129
2,502,519
2,682,505
3,613,902
3,119,314
3,594,851
4,230,587
5,659,316
8,394,053
10,459,784
10,909,465
12,434,312
16,355,076
19,674,853
17,445,818
17,497,380
18,955,179
22,461,826
24,980,546
25,888,418
23,784,857
24,513,584
26,377,066
23,499,071
32,458,800
30,194,943
26,382,491
29,521,739
42,391,953
37,056,284
41,855,707
33,304,104
35,609,126
28,135,325
35,207,350
41,330,560
48,752,446
61,517,804
67,077,605
60,720,313
65,227,002
68,689,839
55,763,360
35,233,462
28,806,716
32,639,163
42,407,630
48,837,783
54,133,485
74,438,675
64,416,599
65,711,189
75,028,294
77,566,453
76,471,329
67,151,016
54,742,315
62,026,901
72,549,790
112,583,082
145,184,247
133,226,430
139,995,418
 STATISTICS A 27
Table 2.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1967—Continued
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
1951	
1952    	
1953 .
1954
1955	
1956
$
153,598,411
147,857,523
126,755,705
123,834,286
142,609,505
149,441,246
125,353,920
104,251,112
105,076,530
130,304,373
128,565,774
159,627,293
172,852,866
180,926,329
177,101,733
209,036,531
235,932,026
$
2,493,840
2,181,464
3,002,673
5,504,114
6,939,490
9,172,792
11,474,050
9,958,768
12,110,286
13,762,102
12,948,308
14,304,214
16,510,898
16,989,469
20,409,649
22,865,324
29,364,065
$
10,606,048
11,596,961
13,555,038
14,395,174
15,299,254
20,573,631
25,626,939
19,999,576
19,025,209
18,829,989
19,878,921
21,366,265
23,882,190
26,428,939
32,325,714
46,821,264
47,359,089
$
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,161,089
9,005,111
9,665,983
8,537,920
10,744,093
11,439,192
14,468,869
18,414,318
34,073,712
42,617,633
42,794,431
50,815,252
60,470,406
74,141,627
$
176,867,916
171,365,687
152,841,695
152,894,663
.173,853,360
188,853,652
1957
1958    ....
1959
1960
170,992,829
144,953,549
147,651,217
177,365,333
1961   .-        .             	
IQfi?
179,807,321
229,371,484
196T
1964    .                         	
1965
1966     —
1967 	
255,863,587
267,139,168
280,652,348
339,193,525
386,796,807
Totals 	
4,631,652,312
240,959,582
523,365,606    |     901,730,374    | 6,297,707,874
1                               1
 A 28
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
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 a 30 mines and petroleum resources report, 1967
Table 4.—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Value, 1887-1967
900
800
700
600
S00
400
300
200
150
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
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 STATISTICS A 31
Table 5.—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Quantity, 1897-1967
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
150
100
90
80
70
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50
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 A 32                  MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
Table 6.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1967
Year
Placer Gold
(Crude)
Gold (Fine)
Silver
Copper
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1858-90  -
1891-1900 --
1901	
1902     -
1903   .
1904	
1905                 ~   -
Oz.
3,246,585
376,290
57,060
63,130
62,380
65,610
57,020
55,790
48,710
38,060
28,060
31,760
25,060
32,680
30,000
33,240
45,290
34,150
29,180
18,820
16,850
13,040
13,720
21,690
24,710
24,750
16,476
20,912
9,191
8,424
6,983
8,955
17,176
20,400
23,928
25,181
30,929
43,389
54,153
57,759
49,746
39,067
43,775
32,904
14,600
11,433
12,589
15,729
6,969
20,332
17,886
19,134
23,691
17,554
14,245
8,684
7,666
3,865
2,936
5,650
7,570
3,847
3,416
3,315
4,620
1,842
866
1,535
891
$
55,192,163
6,397,183
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647,000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236,928
1,385,962
1,041,772
462,270
361,977
398,591
475,361
200,585
585,200
529,524
598,717
717,911
494,756
403,230
238,967
217,614
109,450
80,990
157,871
208,973
107,418
99,884
96,697
135,411
55,191
25,053
44.632
25,632
Oz.
$
Oz.
221,089
22,537,306
4,396,447
3,817,917
2,996,204
3,222,481
3,439,417
2,990,262
2,745,448
2,631,389
2,532,742
2,450,241
1,892,364
3,132,108
3,465,856
3,602,180
3,366,506
3,301,923
2,929,216
3,998,172
3,403,119
3,377,849
2,673,389
7,101,311
6,032,986
8,341,768
7,654,844
10,748,556
10,470,185
10,627,167
9,960,172
11,328,263
7,550,331
7,150,655
7,021,754
8,613,977
9,269,944
9,547,124
11,305,367
10,861,578
10,821,393
12,327,944
12,175,700
9,677,881
8,526,310
5,705,334
6,157,307
6,365,761
5,708,461
6,720,134
7,637,882
9,509,456
8,218,914
8,810,807
8,378,819
9,826,403
7,903,149
8,405,074
8,129,348
7,041,058
6,198,101
7,446,643
7,373,997
6,189,804
6,422,680
5,269,642
4,972,084
5,549,131
6,180,739
$
214,152
13,561,194
2,462,008
1,891,779
1,521,472
1,719,516
1,971,818
1,897,320
1,703,825
1,321,483
1,239,270
1,245,016
958,293
1,810,045
1,968,606
1,876,736
1,588,991
2,059,739
2,265,749
3,215,870
3,592,673
3,235,980
1,591,201
4,554,781
3,718,129
5,292,184
5,286,818
6,675,606
5,902,043
6,182,461
5,278,194
4,322,185
2,254,979
2,264,729
2,656,526
4,088,280
6,005,996
4,308,330
5,073,962
4,722,288
4,381,365
4,715,315
4,658,545
4,080,775
3,858,496
2,453,293
2,893,934
5,324,959
4,110,092
5,040,101
5,671,082
7,667,950
7,770,983
7,326,803
7,019,272
8,154,145
6,942,995
7,511,866
7,077,166
6,086,854
5,421,417
6,600,183
6,909,140
7,181,907
8,861,050
7,348,938
6,929,793
7,729,939
10,328,695
Lb.
$
632,806
210,384
236,491
232,828
222,042
238,660
224,027
196,179
255,582
238,224
267,701
228,617
257,496
272,254
247,170
250,021
221,932
114,523
164,674
152,426
120,048
135,765
197,856
179,245
247,716
209,719
201,427
178,001
180,662
145,223
160,836
146,133
181,651
223,589
297,216
365,343
404,578
460,781
557,522
587,336
583,524
571,026
444,518
224,403
186,632
175,373
117,612
243,282
286,230
288,396
283,983
261,274
255,789
253,552
258,388
242,477
191,743
223,403
194,354
173,146
205,580
159,821
158,850
154,979
138,487
117,124
119,508
126,157
12,858,353
4,348,637
4,888,269
4,812,554
4,589,608
4,933,103
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,879
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,512
5,322,442
5,627,595
5,109,008
5,167,934
4,587,333
2,367,191
3,403,811
3,150,644
2,481,392
2,804,197
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,069
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,734,609
3,002,020
3,324,975
3,020,837
4,263,389
6,394,645
10,253,952
12,856,419
14,172,367
16,122,767
19,613,624
21,226,957
22,461,516
21,984,501
17,113,943
8,639,516
7,185,332
6,751,860
4,322,241
8,514,870
10,018,050
10,382,256
10,805,553
9,627,947
8,765,889
8,727,294
8,803,279
8,370,306
6,603,628
7,495,170
6,604,149
5,812,511
6,979,441
5,667,253
5,942,101
5,850,458
5,227,884
4,419,089
4,506,646
4,763,688
35,416,069
27,603,746
29,652,043
34,359,921
35,710,128
37,692,251
42,990,488
40,832,721
47,274,614
45,597,245
38,243,934
36,927,656
51,456,537
46,460,305
45,009,699
56,918,405
65,379,364
59,007,565
61,483,754
42,459,339
44,887,676
39,036,993
32,359,896
57,720,290
64,845,393
72,306,432
89,339,768
89,202,871
97,908,316
102,793,669
92,362,240
64,134,746
50,608,036
43,149,460
49,651,733
39,428,208
21,671,711
46,057,584
65,769,906
73,254,679
77,980,223
66,435,583
50,097,716
42,307,510
36,300,589
25,852,366
17,500,538
41,783,921
43,025,388
54,856,808
42,212,133
43,249,658
42,005,512
49,021,013
50,150,087
44,238,031
43,360,575
31,387,441
12,658,649
16,233,546
33,064,429
31,692,412
108,979,144
118,247,104
115,554,700
85,197,073
105,800,568
172,739,548
4,365,210
4,446,963
3,450,291
4,547,878
4,578,037
5,876,222
8,288,565
8,166,544
6,240,249
5,918,522
4,871,512
4,571,644
8,408,513
7,094,489
6,121,319
9,835,500
17,784,494
16,038,256
15,143,449
7,939,896
7,832,899
4,879,624
4,329,754
8,323,266
8,442,870
10,153,269
12,324,421
11,525,011
14,265,242
18,612,850
11,990,466
5,365,690
3,228,892
3,216,701
3,683,662
3,073,428
2,053,828
6,023,411
6,558,575
7,392,862
7,865,085
6,700,693
5,052,856
4,971,132
4,356,070
3,244,472
2,240,070
8,519,741
9,616,174
10,956,550
9,889,458
11,980,155
13,054,893
14,869,544
14,599,693
16,932,549
17,251,872
8,170,465
2,964,529
4,497,991
9,583,724
8,965,149
33,209,215
36,238,007
38,609,136
32,696,081
56,438,255
88,135,172
1«06
1907          	
1908
1909
1910..	
1911	
1912	
1Q11
1914
1915          	
1916
1917
1918           -   -
1919   .
1920 ....
1921
1927
1923
1924
1925
19?6
1Q?7
1928
1929     -
1Q10
1931	
1932
1933
1934	
1936
1937	
1938	
1930
1940	
1941   .
194?
1943	
1944
1945.
1946..
1947
1948	
1949
1950
1951	
1952
1953
1954
1955..    .   .
1956
1957
195»
1959
1960    .
1961
1962	
1963
1964
1965
1966    •    .
1967	
Totals	
5.233,848)96,911,921
16,684,2951491.030,265
465.859.503
313,557,280
3,718.897.656
788,573,005
 STATISTICS
A 33
Table 6.-
-Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1967—Continued
Lead
Zinc
Molybdenum
Iron Concentrates
Year
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1858-90   ...
Lb.
1,044,400
205,037,158
51,582,906
22,536,381
18,089,283
36,646,244
56,580,703
52,408,217
47,738,703
43,195,733
44,396,346
34,658,746
26,872,397
44,871,454
55,364,677
50,625,048
46,503,590
48,727,516
37,307,465
43,899,661
29,475,968
39,331,218
41,402,288
67,447,985
96,663,152
170,384,481
237,899,199
263,023,936
282,996,423
305,140,792
307,999,153
321,803,725
261,902,228
252,007,574
271,689,217
347,366,967
344,268,444
377,971,618
419,118,371
412,979,182
378,743,663
466,849,112
456,840,454
507,199,704
439,155,635
292,922,888
336,976,468
345,862,680
313,733,089
320,037,525
265,378,899
284,024,522
273,456,604
284,949,396
297,634,712
332,474,456
302,567,640
283,718,073
281,603,346
294,573,159
287,423,357
333,608,699
384,284,524
335,282,537
314,974,310
268,737,503
250,183,633
211,490,107
208,131,894
$
45,527
7,581,619
2,010,186
824,832
689,744
1,421,874
2,399,022
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
29,869
13,029
5,746
10,017
2,290
$
70,879
1891-1900
45,602
1901	
20,111
1902	
35,060
1903 	
8,015
1904.	
1905..   ...   .
139,200
17,100
46,100
99,296
400,000
192,473
129,092
316,139
324,421
346,125
1,460,524
4,043,985
3,166,259
2,899,040
3,540,429
3,077,979
1,952,065
2,777,322
3,278,903
4,266,741
7,754,450
10,586,610
8,996,135
9,984,613
9,268,792
9,017,005
5,160,911
4,621,641
6,291,416
7,584,199
7,940,860
8,439,373
14,274,245
9,172,822
8,544,375
10,643,026
12,548,031
13,208,636
13,446,018
11,956,725
18,984,581
21,420,484
28,412,593
37,654,211
38,181,214
43,769,392
67,164,754
59,189,656
40,810,618
34,805,755
52,048,909
58,934,801
50,206,681
43,234,839
44,169,198
50,656,726
45,370,891
51,356,376
53,069,163
58,648,561
1     48,666,933
1     47,666,540
|     39,248,539
|1,255,584,491
1906.     .... _
2,667,578
2,291,458
1,632,799
1,709,259
1,386,350
1,069,521
1,805,627
2,175,832
1,771,877
1,939,200
3,007,462
2,951,020
2,928,107
1,526,855
2,816,115
1,693,354
3,480,306
6,321,770
12,415,917
18,670,329
17,757,535
14,874,292
13,961,412
15,555,189
12,638,198
7,097,812
5,326,432
6,497,719
8,461,859
10,785,930
14,790,028
21,417,049
13,810,024
12,002,390
15,695,467
15,358,976
17,052,054
16,485,902
13,181,530
16,848,823
23,345,731
42,887,313
57,734,770
41,929,866
41,052,905
50,316,015
45,936,692
39,481,244
45,482,505
45,161,245
44,702,619
39,568,086
34,627,075
33,542,306
j     38,661,912
'     42,313,569
|     34,537,454
37,834,714
39,402,293
43,149,171
34,436,934
1     31,432,079
1907  ...
1,500
5,250
1908	
1909	
8,500,000
4,184,192
2,634,544
5,358,280
6,758,768
7,866,467
12,982,440
37,168,980
41,848,513
41,772,916
56,737,651
47,208,268
49,419,372
57,146,548
58,344,462
79,130,970
98,257,099
142,876,947
145,225,443
181,763,147
172,096,841
250,479,310
202,071,702
192,120,091
195,963,751
249,152,403
256,239,446
254,581,393
291,192,278
298,497,295
278,409,102
312,020,671
367,869,579
387,236,469
336,150,455
278,063,373
294,791,635
274,269,956
253,006,168
270,310,195
288,225,368
290,344,227
337,511,324
372,871,717
382,300,862
334,124,560
429,198,565
443,853,004
449,276,797
432,002,790
402,342,850
403,399,319
387,951,190
413,430,817
402,863,154
400,796,562
311,249,250
305,124,440
262,830,908
13,549.404,824
1910
1911
1912	
1913..     .   _
1914	
1,987
3,618
12,342
6,982
960
662
2,000
20,560
11,636
1,840
1915...
1916	
1917  _
1918 	
1919	
1,000
1,230
1,472
1,010
1,200
243
5,000
6,150
7,360
5,050
3,600
1,337
1920	
1921..	
1922   „.
1923
1924	
1925.
1926	
1927.     ..   _
1928...     .._
20
1929	
1930	
1931
1932..     .
1933	
1934...	
1935
1936..
1937
1938 _
1939    _
1940	
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947   _
1948
679
5,472
3,735
1949
27,579
1950
1951
113,535
900,481
991,248
535,746
610,930
369,955
357,342
630,271
849,248
1,160,355
1,335,068
1,793,847
2,060,241
2,002,562
2,165,403
2,151,804
2,154,443
790,000
5,474,924
6,763,105
3,733,891
3,228,756
2,190,847
2,200,637
4,193,442
6,363,848
1952
1953
1954
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960	
1961
5,414
9,500
10,292,847
12,082,540
18,326,911
20,746,424
20,419,487
21,498,581
20,778,934
20,820,765
196?
1963
1964	
1965
1966
1967	
28,245
7,289,125
17,094,927
17,517,345
47,063
12,405,344
27,606,061
31,249,772
Totals
15,171,777,13s
|1,246,368,659
41,960,948|71,354,438
2O,257,256|180,150,667
 A 34
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Table 7a.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and
Division
Period
Placer Gold
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Quantity
(Crude)
Value
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1066
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1066
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1006
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
196G
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
Oz.
$
S
6,745,495
12,878,212
65,773,468
4
22
38,047,133
6,504,568
5,570,941
57,061,739
$
$
174,161
417,822
Atlin    	
1,617
19
85
735,713
622
2,609,164
33,253
556
2,529
17,386,199
17,163
17,478
54,128,080
9,398
2,267,649
6,038
12,844
20,325
3,755
14,096
301,646
330,891
1,619,973
856,015
10,146,368
56,498
515,846
10,171
243,069
848,377
55,650,951
49,837,128
1,984,139,159
1,716,665
1,710,318
60,369,735
6,863,121
7,249,851
156,913,601
14,861,062
20,466,017
61,996,575
124
102,427
1,865,100
3,293,298
13,758,869
753,113
868,474
8,728,241
760,191
304,305
335,094
20,531
468,450
6,298,071
381,964
141,842
469
11,268
2,451,858
156,704
207,946
Kamloops 	
5,074
115,662
2,323,897
1,321,137
1,040,519
1,236,825
27,595
604,785
6,528,308
17,443,990
20,403,509
145,882,187
4,577
4,627
103,476
68,786
110,057
1,144,357
118,368
485,859
50,000
62,000
1,277,256
13,889,417
641,364
520,891
50,184
836
118
92,870
1,248,151
25,356
3,661
1,923,321
6,522
1,641,589
1,856,414
142,226,659
19,692,301
17,479,327
152,219,600
16,505,791
8,339,265
311,172,204
3,930,536
4,803,044
31,503,328
17,660,303
29,968,349
121,171,508
22,302,413
37,709,824
103,097,546
4,597,221
143,010
52,038
2,539,910
3,561,079
3,212,674
866
19,300
49,167,615
427,106
1
3,586
89,026
427,580
4,653,071
8,398,108
14
31,279
189
593,762
8,819,722
112,374,054
134,219
234
4,764
10,050
826,256
998,139
10
56,289
302
1,499,482
1,625,385
15,860
304,673
357,134
5,919,571
7,807,533
394,683
743,805
51,884,200
256,324
240
5,466
2,025,661
48,083
7,173
11,244,631
492,331
7,582
164,477
2,032,784
Similkameen	
279,687
45,507
878,204
120,195,258
5,643,654
7,075,817
235,028,160
9,275,129
7,873,945
237,763,482
745,213
1,204,469
85,701,433
5,339,748
6,669,215
239,177,359
664
10,695
209,230
992,729
1,523,437
15,444,922
12,859,839
12,929,126
251,544,472
18,558
3,253,932
592,571
928,616
4,603
105,569
1,229,400
10,028,873
86,049
84,101
1,342,476
366
9,397
250,614
228,604
851
24,260
2,639,937
40,322
122,640
6,733,153
10,193,600
10,745,614
91,632,989
271,748
182
5,306
659,442
2,732
72,885
3,978
140
140
188,791
2,212,500
4,128,090
46,113,975
4,033,847
10,330,132
9,879,862
Not assigned 	
628
58
50
1,525,515
15,680
1,557
1,435
17,262,105
159,091,569
6,330,910
5,459,723
27,852,296
Totals	
1066
1967
To date
1,535
891
5,233,848
44,632
25,632
96,911,921
208,991,899
235,906,394
4,534,740,391
22,865,324
29,364,065
240,959,582
46,821,264
47,359,089
523,365,606
 STATISTICS
Total to Date, by Mining Divisions—Summary
A 35
Fuels
Coal
Crude Oil and
Condensates
Natural Gas Delivered
to Pipe-line
Butane and
Propane
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
M S.O.F.
$
Bbl.
$
$
6,919,656
13,296,034
68,083,768
6,598
15,395
55,784,548
8,145,459
6,458,530
290
1 100
121,638,933
56,498
515,846
2,014,064
823,350
5,919,353
6,939,184
260,597,088
63,739,709
895,429
60,404,704
58,169,961
2,271,262,237
2,851,742
2,720,634
71,561,102
7,019,825
7,457,797
160,674,297
15,901,581
21,702,842
15,087
59,705
83,078,850
17,652,316
20,713,414
95,247,347
36,667,308
45,108,775
187,171,497
161,264,334
198,626,177
1,139,229,860
17,339,587
21,667,136
110,335,069
835,288
1,001,176
5,950,407
267,292
320,375
1,906,076
72,359,665
88,020,686
99,433
099,521
451,846,244
1,814,532
1,916,740
146,793,366
15,400
169,091
5,362
301,143,250
23,491,257
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20,807,420
74,324,378
503,694,122
17,051,265
8,766,883
316,400,160
12,378,644
13,684,955
145,748,400
17,794,522
30,093,329
2,020,584
11,975
12,987
470,159
11,080,836
107,775
100,795
133,093,414
23,468,327
39,436,306
3,176,723
699,356
1,357,263
1,122
5,008
59,839,996
48,083
499,504
13,441,892
279,687
116,968
4,617,442
19,553,725
143,899,077
6,236,225
8,004,433
36
116
246,392,118
9,361,178
7,958,046
239,115,355
995,827
1,433,073
88,365,630
15,573,670
17,537,469
337,548,807
272,412
670,137
4,319,940
11,323,001
11,403,439
174,740,962
21,404,806
22,518,374
342,772,848
850,821
908,790
140,633,492
6,196,219
7,045,341
602,317,732
17,652,316
20,713,414
95,247,347
36,667,308
45,108,775
187,171,497
161,264,334
198,626,177
1,139,229,860
17,339,587
21,667,136
110,335,069
835,288
1,001,176
5,056,497
267,292
320,375
1,906,076
339,193,525
386,796,807
6,297,707,874
 A 36
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
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1967
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1966
1967
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1966
1967
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1966
1967
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1906
1967
To date
1966
1967
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1966
1967
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19G6
1967
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1900
1967
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MINES AND PETROLEUM
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mines and petroleum resources report, 1967
Table 7d.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total
Period
Asbestos
Barite
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1966
1967
To date
1966
1367
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
I960
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
I960
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
I960
1967
To date
I960
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Atlin   — 	
Cariboo	
70
2,819
6,616
3,755
14,096
158,166
48
168
8
21,888
23,466
275,734
80
170,240
176,882
3,118,951
Golden	
3,259
12,612
Greenwood   	
1,790,502
1,540,319
Kamloops	
Liard
88,771
92,192
683,422
15,718,741
18,273,220
133,092,993
3,583
3,300
0,883
4,184
68,786
21,836
801,933
50,057
1,015,571
60,000
128,786
118,368
7,601
8,174
16,008
3,100
3,700
92,547
421,784
50,000
62,000
1,277,256
23,899
26,202
783,666
112,174
171,015
3,600,892
13,089
24,283
146,843
187,513
183,655
1,987,325
601,019
1,050,722
29,692
418,606
Vernon	
Victoria	
14
14
124
140
140
1,485
9,605
157,080
Not assigned	
Totals...
1966
1967
To date
88,771
92,192
683,422
15,718,741
18,273,220
133,692,993
21,888
23,466
275,742
176,240
176,882
3,119,031
70
2,819
6,616
3,755
14,096
158,166
23,9131    112,314
48,052     221,212
3,988,104|7,229,775
I
23,956
31,283
302,280
424,667
305,655
4,391,005
Other: See notes on individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 17 to A 23.
i Arsenious oxide. 3 Fluorspar. 5 Iron oxide and ochre.
2 Bentonite.
4 Hydromagnesite.
6 Magnesium sulphate.
 STATISTICS                                                            A 43
to Date, by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Jade
Mica
Sulphur
Other,
Value
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Lh.
$
Lh.
$
Lb.
$
$
$
9,3987
9,398
20,3254
20,325
3,755
14,096
301,646
10,013,800
143,012
30012
873
6,230
156,1914 6 10
162,427
1,865,100
3,293,298
13,758,869
753,113
868,474
8,728,241
124,340
109,777
702,304
1,805,100
3,293,298
13,443,071
112,878
200,020
230,044
1,924,431
298,824
576,873
691,592
5,595,402
16,8949
1,2765 11
783,5783
2,323,897
1,240,918
0,323,178
424,700
2,075
203,0556 10
6,528,308
17,443,990
20,403,509
145,882,187
4,577
4,627
103,476
68,786
110,057
1,144,357
118,368
8,493
14,920
25,413
3,140
5,240
230,832
8,648
19,714
30,362
4,577
4,627
98,347
66,461
59,160
553,159
1,716,601
2,110,575
12,158,832
5,12911
55,9015
485,859
50,000
62,000
1,277,256
2,407
10,050
10,050
2,200
4,400
11,4001 8
4,9863
2,4643
305,4161 3 6
15,860
304,073
357,134
5,919,571
1,588,800
25,938
250
1,700
10,8582
18,558
41,624
4,177
7,950
654,899
178,678
40,322
1,229,400
40,322
122,640
6,733,153
034,250
10,815
6,206,343
97,3895
100,500
3,978
3,978
140
140
188,791
2,212,500
4,128,090
46,113,975
30,22611
147,500
137.603
2,212,500
d.1 28.090
 1	
4,277,411|46,113,975
206,026
230,044
3,287,757
576,873
691,592
12,235,390
11,633
20,160
258,445
13,225
24,341
133,109
342,478
314,490
6,289,397
5,834,523
9,654,603
78,100,899
4,986
2,464
1,713,396
22,805,324
29,364,065
240,959,582
12,822,050
185,818
7 Natro-al
s Perlite.
unite.
9
10
Phosphate l
Sodium car
ock.
bonate.
11 Talc.
12 Vole,
nic ash.
 a 44             mines and petroleum resources report, 1967
Table 7e.—Production, 1966 and 1967, and Total
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
1900
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1066
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1906
1967
To (late
1966
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
19 00
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
1900
1967
To date
1966
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1960
1967
To date
1906
1967
To date
I960
1967
To date
$
$
S
$
19,389
46,100
280,011
S
154,772
371,722
1,987,038
6,038
12,844
231,305
1,432,024
673,248
8,613,920
49,726
342,400
578,367
237,393
Atlin
1,108
98,478
182,939
82,251
1,375,545
6,772
173,446
181,824
00,912
44,616
52,110
43,873
71,941
24,840
1,601,099|     4,505,240
114,012
2,214,264
139,836
108,536
833,197
814,942
899,280
7,027,473
590,447
490,599
4,419,000
69,502
22,686
1,827,046
932,545
731,780
5,223,669
346,056
345,606
3,521,572
4,315,711
4,359,718
48,133,479
134,219
101,625
661,560
828,428
1,267,191
6,313,604
349,732
227,656
1,750,161
42,805
478,775
1,663,409
215,187
114,688
2,570,457
539,872
304,654
5,775,312
86,049
84,101
1,107,799
246,203
226,804
2,295,693
2,721,765
2,137,636
35,152,996
265,376
630,764
3,467,983
819,255
969,840
17,718,644
6,265,576
5,384,621
17,251,603
1,000
50,840
10,888
29,646
83,014
120,189
69,764
241,083
225,977
337,545
6,759,565
50,917
30,292
178,215
73,508
29,352
710,764
127,305
121,299
1,061,183
4,838
5,762
509,589
312,443
701,405
10,080,895
42,560
Liard                                         	
12,000
18,000
100
2,336,751
2,359,595
38,253,030
72,601
72,601
179,745
231,098
321,495
2,324,577
2,000
104,478
3,450,735
3,611
3,611
420,191
Nicola
20,974
23,355
150,696
169,711
358,194
1,485,578
44,951
10,500
208,698
5,278
13,556
362,800
64,500
2,280
618,049
10,638
612,835
2,451,012
8,000
Osoyoos                                	
3,077
18,168
33,018
33,784
1,000
5,575
10,500
11,571
42,061
11,127
1,645,300
24,000
144,000
Trail Creek	
1,000
115,143
4,036
118,534
375
1,800
226,224
449,872
147,049
8,105,309
6,372
28,678
277,059
2,511
4,423
464,233
65,334
75,102
627,178
32,500
85,520
1,200
7,020,763
8,460,929
43,232,047
40,885
4,012,560
40,499
13,500
12,704
886,696
81,052
10
8,938,530
8,468,522
133,229,356
55
Totals                 _ 	
315,498
505,018
1966
1967
To date
15,959,293
16,929,451
176.472,503
2,696,011
2,822,138
43,927,925
215,043
51,425
9,131,036
1,890,992
2,967,195
38,912,410
21,959,733
20,643,673
184,910,797
 statistics                                           a 45
to Date, by Mining Divisions—Structural Materials
Brick
(Common)
Face,
Paving,
and
Sewer
Brick
Firebricks,
Blocks
Clays
Structural Tile
(Hollow
Blocks),
Roof Tile,
Floor
Tile
Drain Tile
and
Sewer
Pipe
Pottery
(Glazed
or Un-
glazed)
Other
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Material
Division
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
174,161
417,822
2,267,649
6,038
12,844
330,891
1,019,973
856,015
10,146,368
56,498
515,846
760,191
304,305
335,094
6,298,071
381,964
141,842
2,451,858
156,704
207,946
1,321,137
1,040,519
1,236,825
13,889,417
641,364
520,891
4,597,221
143,010
52,038
2,539,910
3,561,079
3,212,674
49,107,015
427,106
427,580
4,653,071
8,398,108
8,819,722
112,374,054
134,219
124,980
826,256
998,139
1,625,385
7,807,533
394,683
256,324
2,025,661
48,083
492,331
2,032,784
279,687
116,968
3,253,932
592,571
928,616
10,028,873
86,049
84,101
1,342,476
250,614
228,604
2,639,937
10,193,600
10,745,614
91,032,989
271,748
659,442
4,033,847
10,330,132
9,879,862
159,091,569
6,330,910
5,459,723
27,852,296
5,010
55,900
82,952
1,193
184
4.651
15,807
7,800
8,118
27,830
59,505
114,361
6,922
72,379
1	
1,104,295
38,939
35,758
19,110
16,950
2,628
1,828,019
2,864
994,175
1,048,938
8,091,904
822,670
768,351
15,993,680
34,801
18,668
1,023,978
59,815
36,247
3,029,149
1,003,518
856,238
16,807,021
25,568
28,029
457,722
581,293
678,005
3,970,656
5,274
	
	
11,992
1,303
8,324
4,925
	
	
	
	
142,208
241,216
580,778
12,724
23,362
88,304
131,407
0.202
1.011
5
18,224
4,325
20
550,326
424,373
2,912,735
1
1,814,047
29,552
119,930
1,050
705,821
1,072,346
136,504
3,180,828
5,972,171
16,956
2,628
5,240,753
994,175
1,048,938
8,410,861
822,070
768,351
16,700,050
34,861
18,668
1,102,532
59,815
36,247
3,753,194
1,003,518
856,238
17,883,692
25,568
28.029
1,142,029
1.186.108
46,821,264
617,588 110,329,494
5,972,171
1523,365,006
 a 46 mines and petroleum resources report, 1967
Table 8a.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
1836-59-
1860	
1861	
1862	
1863	
1864	
1865	
1866	
1867 _
1868	
1869	
1870	
1871	
1872	
1873	
1874	
1875.	
1876 _.
1877	
1878	
1879	
1880	
1881	
1882	
1883	
1884	
1885	
1886	
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901 _
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,458
55,458
55,459
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
152,590
925,495
,095,690
,134,509
,052,412
,002,268
999,372
,263,272
,435,314
781,000
,894,544
,838,621
,624,742
,887,981
,044,931
,126,965
,485,961
.362,514
,688,672
,314,749
,541,698
.211,907
713,535
237,042
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918.
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923..
1924..
1925-
1926.
1927..
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933..
1934.
1935-
1936-
1937..
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941-
1942..
1943...
1944...
1945...
1946.
1947-
1948...
1949.
1950-
1951...
1952...
1953-
1954...
1955..
1956..
1957...
1958-.
1959...
1960...
1961...
1962-
1963...
1964..
1965..
1966-
1967-
Totals..
2,076,601
2,583,469
2,436,101
2,575,275
2,433,540
2,852,535
2,670,314
2,726,793
2,636,740
2,027,843
2,541,212
2,406,094
2,553,416
2,680,608
2,375,060
1,994,493
1,765,471
1,614,629
1,377,177
1,430,042
1,278,380
1,352,301
1,446,243
1,388,507
1,561,084
1,662,027
1,844,745
1,996,000
1,854,749
1,931,950
1,523,021
1,439,092
1,696,350
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
788,658
919,142
825,339
850,541
911,326
950,763
850,821
908,790
$7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,937,860
5,472,064
5,242,223
6,802,134
6,133,986
6,237,997
6,327,678
6,713,590
6,196,219
7,045,341
140,633,492     $602,317,732
i Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
For
 STATISTICS
A 47
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 A 48
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
Table 9.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
Metal-mining-
Exploration and development-
Placer	
Coal	
Petroleum and natural gas (exploration and production)..
Industrial minerals  	
Structural-materials industry-
Totals, 1967	
Totals, 1966-
1965..
1964..
1963-
1962..
1961-
1960..
1959-
1958.
1957..
1956.
1955..
1954..
1953	
1952	
1951	
1950	
1949	
1948	
1947	
1946	
1945	
1944	
1943	
1942	
1941	
1940	
1939	
1938	
1937	
1936	
1935	
$65,294,038
10,886,506
843
2,753,653
4,250,196
4,990,010
6,348,249
$94,523,495
93,409
74,938
63,624.
57,939,
55,522,
50,887,
52,694.
49,961.
48,933,
56,409.
57,266,
51,890
48,702
55,543
62,256
52,607
42,738.
41,023
38,813
32,160
26,190
22,620
23,131
26,051
26,913
26,050
23,391
22,357
22,765
21,349
17,887
16,753
528
,736
,559
294
171
275
818
996
560
056
026
,246
,746
490
,631
,171
,035
786
,506
338
,200
,975
,874
,467
160
491
330
035
,711
,690
,619
367
$9,310,948
214,840
1,127,194
2,937,777
$13,590,759
12,283,477
11,504,343
10,205,861
10,546,806
9,505,559
8,907,034
7,834,728
7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$29,161,044
526,407
1,945,911
2,735,494
$34,368,856
28,120,179
30,590,631
27,629,953
12,923,325
14,024,799
17,787,127
21,496,912
17,371,638
15,053,036
24,257,177
22,036,839
21,131,572
19,654,724
20,979,411
27,024,500
24,724,101
17,500,663
17,884,408
11,532,121
13,068,948
8,367,705
5,756,628
6,138,084
6,572,317
6,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
Note.—This table has changed somewhat through the years, so that the items are not everywhere directly
comparable. Prior to 1962 lode-mining referred only to gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc. Prior to 1964 some
expenditures for fuel and electricity were included with process supplies. Process supplies (except fuel) were
broadened in 1964 to include " process, operating, maintenance, and repair supplies . . . used in the mine/mill
operations; that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electrical, etc. . . . not charged to Fixed
Assets Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company operated cafeteria or commissary." Exploration and development other than in the field of petroleum and natural gas is given, starting in 1966.
 STATISTICS A 49
Table 10.—Average Number Employed in the Mineral Industry, 1901-67
u
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Lode Metals
Coal Mines
Structural
Materials
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Mines
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1901	
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,080
2.704
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1.239
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,300
3,710
3.983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,836
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
7,610
8,283
8,835
8,892
7,605
6,035
4,833
6,088
8,040
7,915
8,197
9,616
10,192
10,138
10,019
9,821
8,939
7,819
7,551
7,339
7,220
9,683
10,582
10,724
10,832
12,831
13,730
11,006
9,412
9,512
9,846
9,006
7,434
7,324
7,423
7,111
8,228
8,264
8,681
9,051
10,864
10,151
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3.694
933
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1.721
1,465
1,283
1.366
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5.170
7,922
1902	
7,356
1903	
7,014
1904	
7,759
1905	
8,117
1900	
8,788
1907	
7,712
1908	
2,567|1,127
2,18411,070
2,472|1,23T
2,43511,159
2,472|1,364
2,77311,505
2,741|1,433
2,709|1.435
9,767
1909	
9,672
1910	
11,467
1911	
10,467
1912	
10,966
1913	
10,949
1914	
9,906
1915	
9,135
1916	
3,35712,036
3,29012,198
2.626|1,764
2,513|1,740
2,074|1,605
1,355|    975
1,510|1,239
2,10211,510
2,35311,680
2,298|2,840
2,006|1,735
10,453
1917	
3.76011.410
10,658
1918	
....
3.65811.76915.427
9,617
1919	
4,145|1,821
4,191|2,158
4,722|2,163
4,712|1,932
4,342|1,807
3,894|1,524
3.82811,615
3,757|1,565
3.64611,579
3,81411,520
3.67511.353
5.966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5.322
5,225
5.334
5.028
10,225
1920	
10,028
1921	
9,215
1922	
9,393
1923	
9,767
1924	
9,451
1925	
10,581
1920	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1 371
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,910
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,801
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
1.704
1,828
1,523
909
1,293
1,079
1,269
1,309
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
557
508
481
460
444
422
393
372
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
501
647
422
262
567
028
586
14,172
1927	
14,830
1928	
2,707
2,926
2,310
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3 603
2,409
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1 81R
15,424
1929	
15,505
1930	
3,389|1,25614,645
2.957|t,125[4,082
2,628|    980|3,608
2,2411    853|3,094
2,050|    843|2,893
2,145|    82612,971
2,0151    79912,814
2.2861    80713.153
14,032
1931	
12,171
1932	
10,524
1933	
11,369
1934	
12 985
1935	
13,737
14,179
1930	
1937	
16,129
1938	
1,303|3,849|2.2G0
1,252|3,905|2,050
1,004|3.92312,104
93913.901 11.8">3
2,088
2,167
2,175
2,229
1,892
2,240
2,150
1,927
1,773
1,694
1,594
1,761
1,745
1,462
1,280
1,154
1,076
1,100
908
1,020
826
765
894
705
548
501
446
87412,962
80912.976
16 021
1939	
15,890
1940	
1,04812.944
1,025|3,072
9G0|3,555
891|2,835
849|2,981
82212,834
672|2,813
960|3,461
1,126|3,884
1,203|3,763
1.25913.759
699
494
468
611
689
503
532
731
872
545
516
463
401
396
358
378
398
360
260
291
288
237
228
247
267
2,874
2,723
2,360
2,851
2,839
2,430
2,305
2,425
2,466
2,306
2,261
1,925
1,681
1,550
1,434
1,478
1,366
1,380
1,086
1,056
1,182
942
776
748
713
649
614
457
15,705
1941	
15,084
1942	
48912,920
21212.394
1,504
1,699
1,825
1,750
1.817
2,238
2,429
2,724
2,415
3,695
3,923
2.589
13,270
1943	
12,448
1944	
255
209
347
3G0
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
1,890
1,933
1,918
3,024
3,143
3,034
3,399
3,785
4,171
3.145
12,314
1945	
11.820
1940	
11,933
1947	
869
754
020
060
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
446
459
589
571
517
528
509
639
582
584
	
1948	
1949	
16 621
1950	
16,612
1951	
1,307
1,516
1,371
1,129
1,091
1.043
4,044
4,120
3,901
3,119
3,304
3 33n
1952	
18,257
15,790
1953	
1954	
2,644|2,520
2,564|2,553
14 128
14,102
1950	
2,637|2,827
2.39312.447
14,539
1957	
	
838|3,328
62513,081
618|3,008
648|3,034
02013,118
949|3,356
85013,239
82213,281
90513,529
1,01413,654
1958	
7611,919 1,809
99|l,937ll,761
8011,78211,959
74|1,785|1.582
3511.07711.971!
	
11,201
10,779
1900	
11 541
1961	
11,034
11,560
10,952
1962	
270
450
772
1963	
43
5
2
2
1,71312,012
1,839J1,967
1  759.12 ft IO
1964	
1965	
441
478
507
12,283
14,202
13,380
1966	
2,000|2,296|1,894
1.92812.K32!1.2fia
347|   267
1967	
i Commencing with 1967, does not include employment in by-product plants.
Note.—These figures refer only to company employees and do not include the many employees of contracting firms.
 A 50
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
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 STATISTICS
Table 11b.—Employment at Collieries, 1967
A 51
Colliery
Average Number Employed!
Underground
Above
Total
258
1
1
9
188
9
446
1
1
Totals       ...                	
260
197
457
1 The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained by
adding the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
 A 52
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
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MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
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Lead concentrates, 56 tons; zinc
concentrates, 84 tons
Lead concentrates, 129 tons;
zinc concentrates, 356 tons
Molybdenite concentrates, 7,770
tons; molybdenum trioxide,
4,820 tons. Total content,
13,716,016 lb. of molybdenum
Copper concentrates, 36,064
tons
Crude ore   	
Lead concentrates, 37 tons;
lead ore, 117 tons; crude,
ore, 80 tons
Silver concentrates, 1,254 tons	
Crude ore	
Molybdenite concentrates, 15
tons containing 16,249 lb. of
molybdenum
Iron concentrates, 417,852 tons..
Gold- silver concentrates and
precipitates, 276 tons
Ore
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RETIREMENTS
Robert B. Bonar retired as Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines on July 31, 1967.
Mr. Bonar was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and immigrated to Canada in 1910. He
received his early education on Vancouver Island and later attended the Tri-State
College of Engineering in Indiana, where he graduated with a degree of B.Sc. in civil
engineering. He holds a first-class certificate of competency and a mine surveyor's
certificate in coal-mining. He joined the Department as Inspector and Resident
Engineer at Cumberland in June, 1941, after some years as mine foreman at Michel
Colliery, Michel, and mine manager at Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Cumberland. He served as Inspector and Resident Engineer at Fernie before moving to the
headquarters office in Victoria in 1956. He is a member of the Association of Professional Enginers of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute of Mining and
Metallurgy.
E. R. Hughes retired as Senior Inspector of Mines on August 31, 1967. Mr.
Hughes was born in Wales and educated in Yorkshire, England. After employment
in Yorkshire Collieries he came to Canada in 1928, where he worked in coal mines
in Saskatchewan, Alberta, and at Telkwa, Cumberland, and Nanaimo in British Columbia and at the Hidden Creek copper mine at Anyox. He was appointed Inspector
of Mines and Resident Engineer at Cumberland in 1938. He was transferred to
Princeton in 1941 and was moved to the Victoria office in 1956 as Senior Inspector
in charge of administering the Department's road and trail programme and the grubstaking of prospectors. He holds a first-class certificate of competency in coalmining and is a member of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy and the
Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia. He served with the
R.A.S.C. in the Army of Occupation in Turkey after the First World War.
ORGANIZATION
The organization of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources is displayed in the diagram on page A 57.
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and coal, petroleum, and
natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the Department or for any branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act, administer these Acts
and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard
to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed.
Similar duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims
but not in respect of placer-mining leases.
Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as required by the
Mineral Act and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the
Placer-mining Act must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
A 56
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 57
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 A 58
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning claims and
leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any mining division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in
which the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and
Room 320, 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1. Officials in the offices of the
Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as
Sub-Mining Recorders for all mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as
forwarding agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They
are authorized to accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the
Mining Recorder for the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various
parts of the Province are listed below.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
Transcripts of all recordings in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims. These
records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by record
and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office hours at
Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room 320, 890
West Pender Street. The approximate position of mineral claims held by record and
of placer-mining leases are plotted from details supplied by locators.
During 1967, 14 investigations were carried out pursuant to section 80 of the
Mineral Act. Two investigations with regard to certificates of work being wrongfully
or improperly obtained resulted in 36 certificates of work being cancelled. Twelve
investigations with regard to mineral claims having been located or recorded otherwise than in accordance with the Mineral Act resulted in 99 mineral claims being
cancelled.
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
T. G. O'Neill	
T. G. O'Neill.
Atlin
Atlin  	
D. P. Lancaster 	
F. E. P. Hughes	
R. H. Archibald	
B. J. H. Ryley	
W. G. Mundell	
F. E. P. Hughes.
Clinton   .    ,, 	
R. H. Archibald.
Frvrt Steele.
B. J. H. Ryley.
W. G. Mundell.
Grand Forks..
R. Macgregor   	
F. J. Sell  	
E. J. Bowles...
J. A. Baker   .
E. B. Offin   	
G. L. Brodie 	
J. F. McDonald.. '	
T, s. Dobson
G. H. Beley	
T. S. Dalby. 	
D. V. Drew..	
B. Kennelly
T. H. W. Harding 	
T. P. McKinnon
W. L. Draper _ 	
J. Egdell	
W. T. McGruder 	
E. J. Bowles
F. J. Sell.
E. A. H. Mitchell (Deputy).
J. A. Baker.
E. B. Offin.
G. L. Brodie.
New Westminster	
New Westminster	
E. W. Pedersen.
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley.
Osoyoos
T. S. Dalby.
D. V. Drew.
Prince Rupert _
T. H. W. Harding.
T. P. McKinnon.
Rossland	
W. L. Draper.
W. T. McGruder.
E. A. H. Mitchell (Deputy).
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
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 A 60 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Coal
Information concerning the ownership and standing of coal licences and coal
leases may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps showing
location of coal licences and coal leases are also available upon application and payment of the required fee.
j . _ Coal Revenue, 1967
Fees     $7,650.00
Rental     15,8 68.45
Total  $23,518.45
Petroleum and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and the collecting of revenue from fees, rents, dispositions,
and royalties. Information concerning all forms of title issued under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief
Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps
showing the locations of all forms of title issued under the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Act are available, and copies may be obtained upon application to the office of
the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Monthly land reports
and monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-location maps and
listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases, and related matters are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application and payment of
the required fee.
During the year there were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and
natural-gas rights resulting in tender bonus bids of $14,297,815.64.
As at December 31, 1967, 34,822,715 acres, or approximately 54,410 square
miles, of Crown petroleum and natural-gas rights, issued under the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, were held in good standing by operators ranging from small independent companies to major international ones. The form of title held, total number
issued, and acreage in each case were as follows:—
Form of Title Number Acreage
Permits   346 23,214,363
Natural-gas licences      	
Drilling reservations  38 462,138
Leases (all types)  4,056 11,146,214
Total  34,822,715
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1967
Rentals and fees—
Permits   $ 1,369,232.18
Drilling reservations  86,303.30
Natural-gas licences  	
Petroleum, natural-gas, and petroleum and natural-gas leases     8,901,195.69
Total rentals and fees  $10,356,731.17
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 61
Disposal of Crown reserves—
Permits   $8,428,408.91
Drilling reservations  3,013,978.50
Leases  2,855,428.23
Total Crown reserves disposal
Royalties—
Gas 	
$14,297,815.64
$2,870,655.93
Oil      6,678,244.53
Processed products  58,536.56
Total royalties
Miscellaneous fees	
9,607,437.02
17,916.73
Total petroleum and natural-gas revenues  $34,279,900.56
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
Staff
S. W. Metcalfe Chief Analyst and Assayer
N. G. Colvin Analyst
R. J. Hibberson Analyst
R. S. Young Analyst
F. F. Karpick Assayer
Samples
A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector
who makes application for free assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer. A form for use in applying
for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder.
During 1967 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 2,402 samples from prospectors and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination of a
prospector's samples generally consist of the following: (1) A spectrographic
analysis to determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2)
assays for precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis
to be present in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured on
all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric
assays are not listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospectors'
Grub-stake Act, and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
2,017
165
220
1,947
164
961
5,337
410
546
Totals	
2,402
2,207
6,293
1 An additional 124 spectrographic analyses were done for Departmental engineers but the results were not
reported.
 A 62 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
Samples submitted to the laboratory for identification are examined by the
Mineralogical Branch of the Department. During the year 56 such samples were
examined.
Reports were issued on 48 petroleum and natural-gas samples. Of this number, 27 were samples of formation waters from wells being drilled for gas and oil in
the Province and 15 were natural-gas samples of the same origin, three were suspected gas seeps, and two were suspected oil seeps. In addition, a sample suspected
to be asphalt was examined and found to be excretion of a pack rat.
Reports were issued on 81 samples of coal submitted by the Purchasing Commission for proximate analyses and calorific values.
Reports were issued on 458 samples of a miscellaneous nature. Six hundred
and eighty-nine assays and 32 spectrographic analyses were reported in this category; an additional spectrographic analysis was not reported.
For the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, three samples of ore were
assayed.
For the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, one sample of ore
was assayed.
For the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, the fuel-oil content of three samples of AN/FO was determined.
For the Field Crops Branch of the Department of Agriculture, one marl sample
was analysed for its content of calcium and magnesium oxides, and a sample of soil
was spectrographed.
For the Purchasing Commission, the water contents of three samples of liquid
soap were determined.
For the Fish and Game Branch of the Department of Recreation and Conservation, a white material near a coal pile was examined and found to be aluminium
sulphate.
For the Materials Testing Branch of the Department of Highways, 39 water
samples were analysed; brown particles in a sample of water were spectrographed
and found to contain iron as the major constituent; a white powder in the Centennial
Fountain was examined and found to be calcium carbonate; scum on a water sample
and 18 samples of clay were spectrographed.
For the Forest Research Branch of the Department of Lands, Forests, and
Water Resources, a rock sample was spectrographed and its potassium content determined.
For Ocean Cement Limited, two samples of slag and two of cement were
spectrographed.
For the Smoke Inspector of the City of Victoria, determination was made of the
weight of residues collected in 356 bottles of water placed in various locations in the
city; for the City Engineer, the specific gravity of seven samples of sea water was
determined, and 12 samples of sea water were examined for their fluorescein content.
For citizens of the Province, one sample of natural gas was analysed; a sediment in water was spectrographed, one ore sample was assayed, one coal sample
was analysed, one alloy was spectrographed, and a yellow stain on a rock, believed
to be due either to uranium or vanadium, was examined and found to be a lichen.
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses
Seventy-three analyses of this type were performed for identification purposes.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 63
Examinations for Assayers
The Provincial Government examinations for certificates of efficiency were held
in May and December. As a result of the May examination, five candidates passed,
two were granted supplemental, and four failed. In the December examination
nine candidates were examined, of whom two passed, four were granted supple-
mentals, and three failed.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
I. E. Merrett, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Inspector, Electrical-Mechanical Victoria
D. R. Morgan, Senior Inspector, Mining Roads Victoria
V. E. Dawson, Inspector, Mechanical Victoria
R. J. Craig, Senior Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
S. Elias, Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
T. M. Waterland, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
P. E. Olson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
Harry Bapty, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
W. G. Clarke, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince George
An inspection office is maintained at Cranbrook, but at the end of 1967 this
appointment was vacant. Inspectors are stationed at the places listed above and
inspect coal mines and other mines and quarries in the districts shown on the accompanying Figure 1. They also examine prospects, mining properties, roads and
trails, and carry out special investigations under the Mineral Act. The Environmental Control Inspectors conduct dust, ventilation, and noise surveys at all mines
and quarries, and where necessary make recommendations to improve environmental
conditions. D. R. Morgan supervises the roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Fernie Station
W. H. Childress Nanaimo Station
T. H. Robertson Kamloops Station
G. J. Lee Nelson Station
Staff Changes
J. E. Merrett was transferred from Vancouver to Victoria to replace R. B.
Bonar on his retirement at the end of July. D. R. Morgan was transferred from
Cranbrook to Victoria to replace E. R. Hughes on his retirement at the end of
August. W. C. Robinson was transferred from Victoria to Vancouver to replace
J. E. Merrett. His position, that of a special investigator and claims inspector under
the Mineral Act, was cancelled. On December 12, 1967, R. J. Craig died, and in
February, 1968, S. Elias was appointed to his position.
 A 64
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
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 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 65
Board of Examiners (Coal Mines Regulation Act)
J. W. Peck, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member Vancouver
D. R. Morgan, Member .Victoria
A. R. C. James, D. R. Morgan, and the mine-rescue instructors for the district
in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of
competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for
a period not exceeding 60 days between regular examinations.
Board of Examiners (Mines Regulation Act)
J. E. Merrett, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member Vancouver
W. C. Robinson, Member Vancouver
The Board conducts written examinations in various mining centres for applicants for underground shiftboss certificates. The Board is also empowered to grant
provisional certificates without examination and under such conditions as the Board
considers necessary.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
The Mineralogical Branch supplies general geological information, and information regarding mineral deposits and the mineral industry, provides rock and mineral identification of specimens submitted by prospectors and others, contributes
lectures in courses on prospecting, and participates in scientific discussions and educational exhibits.
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes areal geological
mapping, detailed geological examinations of mineral deposits, examination of properties of current interest, and studies related to engineering geology. The results of
major projects are published in a series of bulletins, and shorter reports are published
in the Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources and other publications is the responsibility of Stuart S. Holland. Copy
for printing is prepared by and under the direction of Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir.
Professional Staff
On December 31, 1967, the professional staff included the following geolo
gists :-
M. S. Hedley	
Stuart S. Holland
J. M. Carr	
N. C. Carter (on leave of absence)
G. E. P. Eastwood	
James T. Fyles	
E. W. Grove	
R. V. Kirkham (on leave of absence)
J. W. McCammon	
N. D. McKechnie	
K. E. Northcote	
 Chief of the Branch
.Deputy Chief of the Branch
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 A 66 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
V. A. G. Preto Geologist
A. F. Shepherd Geologist
A. Sutherland Brown Geologist
All are registered professional engineers or are applying for registration, and
most have a Ph.D. degree.
Staff Changes
W. G. Jeffery, geologist, resigned, effective June 20, 1967.
V. A. G. Preto, geologist, a graduate of the University of British Columbia and
a Ph.D. from McGill University, joined the staff on July 1, 1967.
K. E. Northcote, geologist, a graduate of the University of British Columbia
and a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia, joined the staff on November
1, 1967.
R. V. Kirkham continues to be on leave of absence to continue postgraduate
study at the University of Wisconsin.
N. C. Carter continues to be on leave of absence to continue postgraduate study
at the University of British Columbia.
Field Work, 1967 Season
J. M. Carr mapped the geology of the Brenda Lake area west of Peachland.
N. C. Carter made a study of the age of copper and molybdenum deposits in
the Babine, Tahtsa, Smithers, and Alice Arm areas.
G. E. P. Eastwood began an inventory of the mineral deposits of Vancouver
Island.
James T. Fyles spent about a month with E. W. Grove in the Unuk River area
and studied several molybdenite and other deposits in the Kootenays.
E. W. Grove completed the geological mapping of an area between the Granduc
mine and the Unuk River.
R. V. Kirkham completed a geological study of Hudson Bay Mountain and the
Glacier Gulch molybdenum deposit.
J. W. McCammon studied non-metallic industrial mineral deposits in the southern part of the Province.
N. D. McKechnie examined various mines and prospects in the southern interior and on Vancouver Island.
V. A. G. Preto studied copper deposits in the Kamloops-Princeton region and
elsewhere.
A. Sutherland Brown continued the investigation of deposits of copper and
molybdenum in the central interior of the Province, combined with R. V. Kirkham
to map an area north of Hudson Bay Mountain, and studied coal resources in several
areas.
A total of 11 field assistants was employed on the various mapping projects
undertaken in 1967.
Airborne Magnetometer Mapping
The project of airborne magnetometer mapping, jointly financed by the Geological Survey of Canada and the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, continued in 1967. The contractor, Spartan Air Services Ltd., did
the field work, covering 46 map-sheets, mostly in 93n, 93m, 103p, and 94d lying
between latitudes 55 degrees and 57 degrees.
Seventeen aeromagnetic maps at a scale of 1 mile to 1 inch covering part of the
area flown in 1966 were released on May 21, 1968.   The maps may be obtained
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 67
from the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Room
411, Douglas Building, Victoria, or the Geological Survey of Canada, 326 Howe
Street, Vancouver 1.
The basic data used in compiling the maps are on open file at the Geological
Survey of Canada in Ottawa, where interested parties may arrange to obtain them for
special processing.
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Observatories Branch)
operates a magnetic observatory at Victoria. Services available to geophysical
exploration companies and other interested agencies include:—
(a) Three-hour range indices of magnetic activity; these provide a measure of
the intensity of the magnetic disturbance (on a 0-9 scale) for each three-
hour period. The monthly listings of these indices are normally mailed
within a few days after the end of each month.
(b) Copies of magnetograms are available through a local duplicating firm at
a charge of $7.50 for a monthly set. These recordings of the magnetic
field can be used to control field surveys, in particular to correct for the
diurnal changes and magnetic disturbances. The area over which this
control is valid depends on the required accuracy; for ±5 gamma accuracy, it covers an elliptic region reaching roughly as far as longitude
118 degrees to the east and latitude 50.5 degrees to the north.
Further details can be obtained by writing to the Officer-in-charge, Victoria
Magnetic Observatory, R.R. 7, Victoria.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration
of the Regulations Governing the Drilling of Wells and the Production and Conservation of Oil and Natural Gas, and the Regulations Establishing Gas-Oil Ratio Adjustment Factors, Oil Production Allowables, Overproduction and Underproduction,
made pursuant to the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
The drilling regulations provide for the use of efficient and safe practices in
the drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of
fields discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of
waste of oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
The regulations concerning gas-oil ratio factors, production allowables, and
overproduction and underproduction provide for conservation of reservoir energy
by limiting the volume of oil that can be produced during any day, month, or year
from a well or pool in accordance with the schedule of gas-oil ratio adjustment factors. The factors, which are applied against oil production, are applicable when the
average volume of gas produced with each barrel of oil exceeds a specified level, and
when applied result in reduction of the producing rate. Overproduction and underproduction are adjusted on a monthly basis.
Every well location must be approved by the Branch before the well is drilled.
All operations related to drilling and production are inspected frequently to ensure
compliance with all regulations, including such features as facilities and practices
used, adequate plugging of abandoned wells, surface restoration of well-sites, well
testing and measurement procedures employed, disposal of produced water, protection of installations against fire, and general conservation.
Investigations are made of complaints of property damage resulting from drilling and producing operations, and from geophysical work programmes.
Comprehensive records of all drilling and producing operations are maintained
at Victoria and are made available for study, or are published, for the use and benefit
 A 68 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
of anyone interested in oil or gas development in British Columbia. Samples of bit
cuttings, as well as all core, obtained from every well drilled in the Province are
collected and retained at the field office at Charlie Lake, where they may be studied
by interested persons. Charlie Lake is adjacent to the Alaska Highway about 5
miles northwest of Fort St. John.
Detailed reservoir engineering and geological studies are conducted on the basis
of technical information submitted to the Branch from operating companies, as well
as information acquired through field work by Branch personnel. Estimates of the
reserves of oil and natural gas are made twice a year, at the end of June and December. Crown-owned oil and natural-gas rights are evaluated prior to their disposal
by public tender.
Administration
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is subdivided for administrative purposes into three sections—namely, Development Engineering, Reservoir Engineering, and Geology. The Development Engineering and Geology sections are supervised by W. L. Ingram and S. S. Cosburn respectively. Following the resignation,
in July, of the Senior Reservoir Engineer, responsibility for the Reservoir Engineering section was assumed temporarily by K. C. Gilbart.
The field office at Charlie Lake, which includes the core and sample laboratory,
is supervised by the District Engineer, G. E. Blue.
Staff
Headquarters, Victoria
J. D. Lineham Chief of Branch
W. L. Ingram ...Deputy Chief of Branch and Senior Development Engineer
M. B. Hamersley Development Technician
J. F. Tomczak Statistician
R. R. McLeod (until July 24th) Senior Reservoir Engineer
K. C. Gilbart Reservoir Engineer
G. V. Rehwald (until August 31st) Reservoir Engineer
P. K. Huus Reservoir Technician
S. S. Cosburn Senior Petroleum Geologist
H. B. Fulton (until October 17th) Petroleum Geologist
D. L. Griffin Petroleum Geologist
J. E. Hughes Petroleum Geologist
A. S. Nemeth Petroleum Geologist
The headquarters staff includes also two geological draughtsmen, one clerk-
stenographer, four clerks, and three clerk-typists.
Field Office, Charlie Lake
G. E. Blue District Engineer
D. L. Johnson Field Engineer
D. A. Selby Field Technician
G. T. Mohler Field Technician
W. B. Holland Field Technician
L. A. Gingras Field Technician
The field office staff includes also three core and sample laboratory assistants
and one clerk-stenographer.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 69
Staff Changes
L. A. Gingras, field technician, joined the staff on January 3rd.
A. S. Nemeth, petroleum geologist, joined the staff on March 1st.
R. R. McLeod, reservoir engineer, resigned, effective July 24th.
G. V. Rehwald, reservoir engineer, resigned, effective August 31st.
H. B. Fulton, petroleum geologist, resigned, effective October 17th.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: A. W. Hobbs, solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General.
Members: S. G. Preston, agrologist, Department of Agriculture; J. D. Lineham,
engineer, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. The latter was appointed
on June 27th, replacing R. R. McLeod.
The Board of Arbitration, established under the authority of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, grants right of entry by oil and gas companies upon alienated land
and determines conditions of entry and compensation therefor. It also terminates
the right of entry when a company has ceased to use the land.
A hearing was held at Fort St. John on July 24th at which 10 applications carried over from 1965 and 1966 were heard and subsequently settled by Board awards.
Also heard was the matter of a dispute concerning whether or not the Board had
jurisdiction to grant right of entry for the purpose of installing pipe-line facilities
necessary to transport gas from a well-head to the gas-gathering system. It was
decided that the Board had jurisdiction and, subsequently, six orders were made for
immediate right of entry.
Two applications on which right of entry had been granted in July, 1966, were
settled by agreement between the parties involved.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: K. B. Blakey, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Members: N. D. McKechnie, geologist, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources; M. H. A. Glover, economist, Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
The Conservation Committee is responsible to the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources and was established on October 11, 1957, under the authority
of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.   Its duties are as follows:—
(1) To act as an advisory committee to the Minister on such questions of conservation that the Minister, in writing, shall refer to the Committee for
consideration and recommendation.
(2) To deal with such questions of conservation and production in the various
fields of British Columbia as may arise between two or more operators in
the same field or between operators and the Branch when appeals on such
questions are made to the Minister and referred by him to the Committee.
The Conservation Committee did not meet in 1967.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under the authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department has
provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able
to qualify.
Grub-stakes up to $500 for food, shelter, and clothing, plus a reasonable travelling allowance, are available to a limited number of qualified prospectors who undertake to prospect in British Columbia in areas considered favourable by the Depart-
 A 70                  MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
ment in accordance with a long-range plan for the development of the Province.
Experienced prospectors may be granted a maximum of $300 for travelling expenses where prospecting is to be done in remote areas where air transportation is
necessary.
Application forms and terms and conditions under which grub-stakes are
granted may be obtained from D. R. Morgan, Senior Inspector, Department of
Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria.
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943                               ....                  ...    ...
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
21,575
28,115
29,175
26,730
29,000
31,751
24,717
26.787
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
38
50
47
52
50
53
42
43
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
358
309
233
150
213
241
224
87
135
181
162
142
138
103
95
137
95
141
123
183
217
101
211
202
241
325
189
843
351
219
239
432
JQ44
1945	
1146
1947	
1<>48
1949                 	
1«50
1951	
105?
1953  	
1954      ~  -      	
1955 .	
105fi
1957   	
1958           ......      ..
1959 _	
1960                               	
1961	
1062
1963 	
1064
1965   	
1966
1967      .                	
29,891        |           47          ]          148
1                         1
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectrographed, assayed, and tested for radioactivity.    Mineralogical identifications are
made on request.
Seventy-two applications were received in 1967, and 47 grub-stakes were
authorized.   Two grantees were unable to go out, and their initial payments were
returned.   Grantees who were unable to complete the terms and conditions of the
grant received only partial payment.   Fourteen prospectors were given grants for
the first time.   Seven grantees proved to be unsatisfactory.    A few grantees used
aircraft for transportation to their prospecting areas.   Two grantees were taken ill
and were unable to continue prospecting.
D. H. Rae interviewed applicants in Vancouver and contacted 26 grantees in
the field to give advice and direction to those who needed it.   The following notes
are Mr. Rae's summaries of the prospecting activities and results.   They are based
on observations made by him in the field and from information contained in the
diaries of the grantees.
Alberni Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in the west Cameron
River valley; a considerable amount of graphitic material in schistose rock was reported.   Prospecting was also carried on in belts of limestone near Home Lake.
Nothing of interest was reported there, or near Patterson or Father and Son Lakes.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 71
On the east side of Great Central Lake, about 10 miles from Port Alberni, an
important mineralized zone was discovered; claims were located and a considerable
amount of prospecting was done. The main zone exposes a width of 10 feet of
gossan material containing copper carbonates and chalcopyrite.
North of Sproat Lake, about 20 miles from Port Alberni, copper mineralization
in andesite was thoroughly prospected; some good assay values were obtained from
a wide zone. Other outcrops of granite and volcanics were investigated. Narrow
stringers and disseminations of bornite were found in the granite.
A camp was established on Silver Creek at the head of Uchucklesit Inlet, and
this rugged area was prospected. Limestone, pyritized skarn, and diorite containing
some magnetite were reported.
Close to the half-way point on the Port Alberni-Ucluelet road, claims were
located on a small exposure of magnetite showing minor amounts of molybdenite.
A considerable amount of work was done on this ground, but no further information
was submitted.
Atlin Mining Division.—A base camp was established beside a small lake,
locally known as Redfish Lake, lying about 15 miles due south of the east end of
Swan Lake. Three weeks were spent prospecting the area within reasonable reach
of the camp, but the results of the work were disappointing. The underlying rock
throughout the area is coarse-grained granite showing considerable reddish feldspar.
Several small barren gossans were examined; a few narrow pegmatite dykes were
seen; small amounts of molybdenite and chalcopyrite were found in quartz stringers;
and a few small pieces of copper-bearing float were picked up. Panning of the
streams in the area was unproductive.
Some work was done north of Tootsee Lake. It was found that granite underlies much of the area. Some fairly important gossans were found containing minor
amounts of pyrrhotite and magnetite, and one exposure of quartzite containing
limonite was examined, but nothing of economic interest was discovered.
In the Talbot Creek area (6 miles south of Mile 90 on the Haines Road),
outcrops of limestone, marble, and some shale were observed. Nothing else was
reported.
A short time was spent prospecting an area adjacent to Datlaska Creek (4 miles
west of Kelsall Lake). The geology of the area is fairly complex. Outcrops of
pyroxenite, gneiss, volcanic breccia, argillite, serpentine, and limestone were examined; float containing minor amounts of scheelite and chalcopyrite was picked
up, but nothing of importance was reported.
Cariboo Mining Division.—Prospecting was done in the Torpy River valley,
where some trenching on several outcrops exposed heavy mineralization of pyrite,
chalcopyrite, and copper carbonates. There seems to be very little continuity to
this mineralization, but further work is warranted. The rock exposures are mainly
quartzite showing a considerable amount of quartz and calcite, schist, and black
limestone containing small amounts of pyrite and chalcopyrite.
Six miles north of Sinclair Mills some work was done in an area underlain by
basic rocks.   Nothing of interest was reported.
Prospecting was done 20 miles southwest of Prince George where the exposed
rocks are mainly basic types including some serpentine.
East of Prince George, near Purden Lake, a granite-limestone contact was
prospected, and along the Willow River some barren-looking quartz veins were
examined.   Nothing of interest resulted from any of this work.
A base camp was established at an old placer mine in Pearce Gulch, about
a mile south of the Cariboo-Hudson mine.   From this camp, and by setting up a
 A 72 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
number of fly camps, a large area was prospected. Nothing of economic importance
was found, but the following observations were made: Grouse Creek—barren quartz
veins in schist; Mount Guyet—folded black limestone, phyllite, quartzite, and a
few narrow quartz veins; McNeill Creek—limestone and quartzite carrying some
iron pyrites. A considerable amount of work was done in the Cunningham and
McBean Creek areas, but nothing of interest was reported. At Nugget Mountain
the rock exposures are mainly pyritized slate, grey quartzite, and chlorite schist; at
Craze Creek—schistose quartzite; at Antler and Victorian Creeks—quartz-sericite
schist; at Pitman Creek—black argillaceous schist; at Copper Creek—minor
amounts of scheelite associated with a fault zone; at Pearce Gulch—limestone and
schist; at Roundtop Mountain—limestone. Eight claims were located in the Tre-
house Creek valley, and the ground was carefully prospected. The underlying rocks
were found to be slate, slaty schist, and quartz-sericite schist containing narrow
quartz stringers. Very few rock outcrops were seen near Simlock or Harveys
Creeks. At Peter Gulch argillaceous schist, a gossan area, some shear zones, and
barren quartz veins in quartzite were reported. At the head of French Snowshoe
Creek some prospecting was done in an area underlain by dark-coloured sericite
schist, quartzite, and conglomerate. At the head of Cunningham Creek an anticlinal structure was examined.
Clinton Mining Division.-—-Some work was done in the Maiden Creek area,
where the underlying rocks are mainly limestone, conglomerate, and red sandstone.
Nothing of interest was reported.
Near Jesmond, veinlets of grey copper were found along a limestone contact.
Greenwood Mining Division.—The following information was submitted from
the Goatskin Creek-Rendell Creek areas. Observed rock exposures include syenite
with narrow quartz stringers, granite, rhyolite, basalt, micaceous schist, quartz diorite, limestone, and serpentine in varying amounts over a wide area. Nothing of
economic interest was reported.
In the Conkle Lake area the geology was reported to be fairly complex. Several
fault zones, pyritized serpentine, narrow dykes and sills, granite, and granodiorite
were observed.
In the vicinity of Baldy Mountain, coarse granite, quartz pegmatite dykes,
rusty-coloured chert, limestone, and schist were reported.
Kamloops Mining Division.—Near Lytton, dolomitic seams in a quartzose dyke
were found to contain disseminated cinnabar, and just south of Walhachin small
pockets of chalcocite were noted in several rock exposures.
Some work was done in the Raft River valley, a very rugged area where outcrops of basalt, granite, and barren volcanics were reported.
A base camp was established at O'Connor Lake, which lies on the west side of
the North Thompson River about 20 miles from Kamloops. From there a large
area was prospected, both conventionally and by using geochemical methods.
Nothing of economic importance was reported, but the following general information was submitted: Discouraging results were obtained from the soil-testing, which
was conducted after careful traversing of the area; much of the ground is covered
with deep overburden; outcrops of limestone, various types of metamorphic rocks,
granite, schist, and shale were investigated; some minor mineralization was noted
in both metamorphic rocks and granite in the form of disseminated hematite, pyrite,
and arsenopyrite; several old mine workings were examined. No staking was done,
and little of economic interest was reported.
In the Mount Hagen area, near Gorman Lake, granite intrusives were encountered, and some exposures of chloritic-sericitic rock containing quartz and
graphite were examined.   In the Fadear Creek valley, and near Cicero Creek, ser-
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 73
pentine was found, and some lead-zinc float was picked up near Mount Fadear.
Some work was done near Forest, Saskum, and North Barriere Lakes, and in the
Harper and Chuck Creek areas. On the Wood Lake road, outcrops of granodiorite
and andesite were examined. Northeast of Barriere, the underlying rocks are diorite,
granite with considerable feldspar, and graphitic schist.
Several base camps were established in an area roughly 10 miles north and
northeast of the north end of Adams Lake. This sector is made accessible by
numerous logging-roads, but field work was hampered by excessive overburden. In
general the geology was not favourable. The following general information was
furnished by the prospector: Beaver Creek valley—granodiorite; Harbour Creek
valley and Harbour Lake area—chlorite schist and mica schist; Gannett Mountain
—granite and some metamorphic rocks; Wallace Creek—chlorite schist and mica
schist; Meadow and Cayeene Creek areas—argillite; Samatosum Creek—some
sedimentaries and some volcanics; and Spapilem Creek—granite, gneiss, and
quartzite. In the Tumtum Lake area much overburden was encountered, but some
outcrops of granite and mica schist were examined.
South of Johnson Lake, outcroppings of both sedimentary and volcanic rocks
were investigated.
On the west side of Mara Lake, phyllites and schists were found to be well
pyritized.
A short aerial survey of part of the Adams Plateau was undertaken by helicopter; numerous landings were made, float material was examined, rock exposures
investigated, and silt samples were taken.   Nothing of importance was found.
Liard Mining Division.—Several main base camps were established in the general vicinity of Dall Lake. Fly camps were also used at a number of convenient
locations, and a large area was prospected during the season. Near Colt Lake and
east toward the Kechika River, the underlying rocks are mainly quartzite, sericite
schist, and a few greenstone dykes. Veinlets of radioactive fluorite, some copper
sulphides in narrow quartz stringers, and limestone containing narrow bands and
disseminations of pyrrhotite were prospected. In the Hizaza Creek valley, metamorphosed limestone and shale; quartz veinlets showing green chlorite, muscovite,
and siderite; and quartz stringers in graphitic schist were noted. Near the southeast
corner of Dall Lake the following features were reported: Limestone gossans with
associated calcite and other carbonates; pyritization along an intrusive contact;
small pieces of lead and zinc sulphide float; limestone float with some iron pyrites;
and narrow quartz veins with minor amounts of chalcopyrite in schist. Along
Moodie Creek some faulting and shearing were found, and chloritic quartz stringers
in schist carry minor amounts of chalcopyrite. Eight miles northwest of Moodie
Creek, on the Turnagain River, a medium-sized pyritized zone in sediments was
prospected. Nothing of immediate economic interest was reported from all this
work.
Lillooet Mining Division.—A small amount of prospecting was done up the
Yalakom River valley and in the Bridge River district.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—Some work was done at the headwaters of the
Gold River. This was a continuation of a programme that was started in the area
in 1966.   Nothing of importance was reported.
Some distance north of the Gold River valley, copper-bearing float was found
in an area underlain by andesite.
The Mount Kains area near the north end of Vancouver Island was prospected.
Access is by logging-road, and the area is difficult to prospect owing to rugged terrain, lack of rock exposures, and heavy undergrowth.   It was found that the posi-
 A 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
tions of certain magnetic anomalies were hard to reach.   Sketch maps showing the
complex geology were submitted.
Some prospecting was done about 10 miles west of Duncan.
Nelson Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done 8 miles west of Tye, in
the Cultus Creek valley, and between Lake and Midge Creeks. In the Hughes
Creek valley, oxidized and copper-stained float was picked up, and a fine-grained
oxidized dyke was prospected. In the Midge Creek valley, some float was found
but nothing of further importance was reported.
By using an old cabin 12 miles up Cultus Creek from Tye as a main base of
operations and establishing several other temporary camps at convenient locations,
a considerable area was prospected in the general vicinity of the old Bayonne mine.
Nothing of economic importance was reported.
In the Rossland area, at Grouse Ridge and Baldy Mountain, granite and argil-
lite are the common underlying rocks. A considerable amount of chalcopyrite was
found in the dump at the old Lake Mountain mine, and in the vicinity both mon-
zonite outcrops and conglomerate containing small amounts of galena were reported.
Near Monte Cristo Mountain, float quartz showing minor amounts of molybdenite
was picked up; at Deer Park Mountain, exposures of granite and argillite were seen;
and up Tiger Creek, float containing some mixed sulphides was found. Nothing of
economic interest was reported.
In the Boundary Creek area, along Grass Creek, some work was done along
a schist-gneiss contact, where a quartz vein carrying values in copper, silver, and
molybdenite had been uncovered. Near the junction of Nun and Monk Creeks,
some chalcopyrite float was picked up, and altered limestone carrying low values
in lead and silver was prospected. At North Star Mountain, limestone outcrops
showed minor amounts of fine galena. In the Corn Creek valley, some work was
done on quartz veins which occur in limestone, on altered limestone containing some
siderite, and on quartz veins containing small amounts of chalcopyrite and galena.
No commercial ore was discovered.
New Westminster Mining Division.—In the Chehalis River area a 9-foot quartz
vein, showing complex copper, zinc, gold, and silver mineralization, was prospected.
Assay values were low.
Nicola Mining Division.—North of Stump Lake, near Frogmoore Creek, claims
were located on an exposure of chalcocite in andesite, and on narrow bands of bor-
nite along a granite contact.   Further work will be done on the claims.
Omineca Mining Division.—Close to the north end of Whitesail Lake, some
magnetite float and pyritized granite containing minor amounts of chalcopyrite were
found. At Coles Creek a considerable amount of argillite is exposed and a gossan
area was examined. At the east end of Tahtsa Lake a heavily pyritized zone was
exposed. At Cheslatta Lake the rock exposures are schist, gneiss, granite, and
granodiorite. On Huckleberry Mountain copper-stained outcrops were examined.
Near Mosquito Hills float carrying bornite and chalcopyrite was picked up, and on
Smaby Creek patches of magnetite were found to contain narrow stringers of bornite
and chalcopyrite. Some inconclusive work was done near Musclow and Michel
Lakes and in the McCuish and Falls Creek areas. Near Goodrich Lake several
narrow copper-bearing veins were exposed, and at Cosgrove Lake a gossan containing small amounts of bornite and chalcopyrite was investigated. Some work was
done around Sandifer Lake; at Spud Lake several small gossans were prospected,
and exposures of basalt, gabbro, and limestone were noted; traces of chalcopyrite
and pyrite were also seen. Near Coyote Lake the underlying rocks are basalt and
limestone, and some quartz stringers and a small amount of perlite were seen.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 75
Some inconclusive work was done near Gale Lake, on Chikamin Mountain,
and up Troitsa Creek. Near Sweeney Mountain, outcrops of pyritized volcanic
rocks were investigated.
Some work was done around a pinkish-coloured plug of diorite in the Shelford
Hills, where epidote and narrow quartz veins were seen.
The easterly slopes of the Wolverine Range due east from Manson Creek
received some attention, and outcrops of limestone and quartzite were examined;
traces of copper sulphides were found but assays of samples taken were disappointing. Some prospecting was done near Manson Creek: Near the first of the Manson
Lakes, one outcrop showed traces of nickel; in the Darkwater Creek area, quartzite,
skarn, limestone, and lightly mineralized schist were reported; at central Lost Creek
a small showing of nickel silicate was examined; at upper Lost Creek altered argillite showed small amounts of scheelite; and at Boulder Creek small amounts of
galena, scheelite, and nickel silicate occur along a granite-limestone contact.
Sixty miles south of Manson Creek and about 5 miles east of the mining-road,
a fairly extensive outcropping of skarn was located and prospected; disseminated
molybdenite and powellite are visible in part of the skarn, but assays of samples
were low.
Base camps were established about 60 miles from Finlay Forks, to the north
and to the northeast, and some prospecting was done in these areas. The following
information was submitted at the end of the season: Chowika Creek valley—thin
beds of limestone; Deserters Peak—sandstone and narrow coal seams, and iron
pyrites in quartz stringers; Akie River area—schist, shale, conglomerate, and limestone, with minor showings of chalcopyrite and galena; Akie Range—quartz veins
containing interesting amounts of pyrite; and at Del Creek—outcrops of barren
chlorite schist.
A base camp was established 80 miles south of Burns Lake, on the north side
of Oppy Lake near the west end. The season was spent prospecting the north side
of the lake commencing at about a mile from the shoreline. The area is underlain
by volcanic rocks, some syenite, argillite, quartzite, and a few lightly mineralized
porphyry dykes. A considerable amount of time was spent stripping and opening
up a shear zone containing copper carbonates, chalcopyrite, and pyrite. This work
was hampered by deep overburden and very bad weather. The area adjacent to the
shear zone is covered with heavy underbrush and windfalls. These showings warrant further investigation.
Two discoveries were made in the McConnell Lake area—one copper, the
other copper and molybdenum. No information regarding the geology or extent
of these mineral zones was submitted, but the samples brought out are interesting
and assays returned commercial values. The following general information on the
area was submitted: At Meadow Creek—copper float was picked up; at Dewar
Peak—copper float was also found; at Fredrickson Peak—a granite-greenstone contact was prospected; and at Serrated Peak—finely disseminated chalcopyrite was
found associated with epidote and magnetite.
In the Kitsumkalum Lake area, diorite and granite exposures were common
around Sand Lake and in the Goat River valley, and at Maroon Creek argillite and
greywacke were observed. Southwest of Kispiox, outcrops of pyritized diorite,
granodiorite, and argillite were examined; and at Date Creek, outcrops of shale,
argillite, granodiorite, and sandstone were reported. East of Cedarvale a sample
of float containing low values in gold, silver, and lead was found in an area underlain
by argillite and greenstone showing patches of magnetite. North of Cedarvale, at
the Cranberry River and at Mill Creek, outcrops of shale and argillite were observed.
 A 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1967
In the Blunt Mountain area (southeast of Hazelton) some prospecting was
done where argillite, chert, and obsidian containing narrow quartz stringers are
fairly common. At Mount Thomlinson, shale, argillite, granodiorite, and greywacke
outcrops were exposed. In the Sediesh Creek valley, the underlying rocks appear
to be mainly argillite and pyritized bands of quartzite. Several pieces of float, well
mineralized with molybdenite and other sulphides, were picked up, but the source
of these was not found. At Utsun Creek, outcrops of argillite were found to contain
large crystals of pyrite.
North of Perow volcanic rocks are common, and near Topley Landing some
inconclusive soil-testing was done.
Osoyoos Mining Division.—Near Apex Mountain, heavy pyritization was prospected along a granite contact. Samples were taken of massive pyrrhotite carrying
disseminations of chalcopyrite, and fairly good assays were obtained. Granite and
limestone were found in the Mount Brent area.
In the Ashnola River valley, younger granitic dykes were found to contain some
chalcopyrite, and quartz stringers with minor galena.
More prospecting was done near Allendale Lake, where bornite and copper
carbonates were found in coarse-grained granodiorite. This area warrants further
prospecting.
Some work was done in the Peachland Creek valley, in an area underlain by
granite, andesite, and conglomerate.
Revelstoke Mining Division.—Some work was done on Legerwood Creek, 5
miles northeast of Malakwa, where the principal underlying rocks are pinkish granite, gneiss, and mica schist. Small amounts of fine molybdenite were seen in the
granite.
Some work was done in the Tangier Creek watershed, around Mount Tilley,
and on Quartz Creek.
On the east side of Trout Lake north of Gerrard, outcrops of siltstone and
phyllite mineralized with pyrite and pyrrhotite were examined. In the Trout Creek
valley skarn float fairly well mineralized with mixed sulphides was found.
The following information was submitted from work done in the general
vicinity of Revelstoke: Greely Creek—porphyry with much disseminated pyrrhotite
and pyrite, and minor chalcopyrite; between Anstey Arm and Columbia River—
many gossans were observed; Silver Creek—phyllite, schist, and calcareous rocks,
but no mineralization; Hanner Lake—peridotite; Freeze Creek—muscovite granite,
phyllite containing pyrrhotite, granodiorite (sulphides more common in altered
sediments); at Montana Lake—heavily mineralized skarn was prospected; some
work was done in the valleys of Drimmie and Greenslide Creeks; near Mount Mac-
pherson, between Begbie Creek and Tumtum station, outcrops of highly siliceous
metamorphic rocks, schists, and gneisses were found to be fairly well mineralized;
at Horsefly Creek—a mineralized shear zone was investigated; at Watson Creek—
breccia float was found to contain flakes of graphite.
Similkameen Mining Division.—In the Princeton area, on the north side of
Granite Creek, exposures of volcanic rocks and chlorite schist were prospected.
Skeena Mining Division.—An attempt made to get up the Exstew River by
canoe failed because the water was too high at the time. Some prospecting was done
south of Williams Creek, but nothing of importance was reported. East of Kitimat,
exposures of impure limestone were examined and near Fire Mountain prospecting
was done where outcrops of diorite and limestone were exposed.
East of Horetzky Creek near The Jaws, an important mineral zone was located.
The zone is characterized by large pods of bornite and chalcopyrite in granite plus
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 77
extensive areas of green and blue copper carbonates. High assays were obtained
from samples taken from the zone.
Slocan Mining Division.—Near the headwaters of Eagle Creek, east of Granby
River, small arounts of copper, mercury, and zinc mineralization were reported; at
Galloping Creek some copper mineralization was seen; and at Winnifred Creek
some quartz float containing molybdenite was found. In the Inonoaklin Mountain
area, float carrying fine disseminated molybdenite was picked up and some pieces
of silver-lead float were found. The source of this material was not found. Near
Barnes Creek lightly mineralized quartz float was found. At Bisson Lake some
claims were located on what was reported to be showings of cinnabar in volcanics.
North of Lightning Peak, claims were located on a mineral zone carrying values in
nickel, silver, and lead.
Using a float camp at Verandah Point on the east side of Kootenay Lake as
a base, considerable work was done north and south along the lakeshore. The
geology is not favourable; most of the rock exposures encountered were unaltered
crystalline limestone with no evidence of mineralization, barren mica, or hornblende
schist.   Specks of scheelite were seen in several narrow pegmatite dykes.
Claims were located up the Kaslo River, on Blue Ridge, where encouraging
mineralization of bornite and galena was found in quartz veins. Much galena float
was picked up, and some high assays in lead and silver were obtained.
Some prospecting was done on the east side of Duncan Lake.
Some inconclusive work was done in the New Denver area, where float containing galena and sphalerite was picked up.
On Perry Ridge, south of Slocan City, gneisses and schists showed considerable
graphite and garnet.
Between Needles and Nakusp some exposures of granite and altered granite
with a varied sporadic showing of sulphides were examined. Nothing of interest
was reported.
Vancouver Mining Division.—North of Alice Lake in the Squamish area, exposures of galena and sphalerite in altered limestone received some attention.
Vernon Mining Division.—Prospecting was continued in the area close to the
junction of Harris and McAuley Creeks.
Some work was done in other parts of the Vernon area.
Early in the season an attempt was made to initiate a prospecting programme
a few miles south of Monashee Pass. Snow conditions interfered and the work was
abandoned.
Some claims were located north of Kingfisher Creek, west of the north end of
Mabel Lake and in the Joss Mountain area.
High up in the Whiteman Creek valley, outcrops of gneiss were found to contain pyrrhotite and minor amounts of both chalcopyrite and pyrite. Geochemical
investigations were made in the Ewings Landing area.
Victoria Mining Division.—Some prospecting and locating was done a few
miles west of Duncan.
MINING ROADS AND TRAILS
Provision is made in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Act
whereby the Minister may, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
authorize the expenditure of public funds for the construction or repair of roads and
trails into mining areas. Assistance on a half-cost basis may also be provided on
roads and trails to individual properties. Application forms may be obtained from
D. R. Morgan, Senior Inspector, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources,
Victoria.
 A 78 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1967
Requests for road and trail assistance must be made to the Department before
the commencement of work. The type of access upon which assistance may be
given depends upon the value of the property, the stage of development, and the
amount of work to be done. A trail is sometimes sufficient for initial exploration,
and a tractor-road may be adequate for preliminary work. Subsequent development
might warrant assistance on the construction of a truck-road. A carefully drawn
sketch or plan of the location of the road is required to be submitted and, where
warranted by the amount of assistance requested, a report on the property by a
professional geological or mining engineer may be required. An engineer from
the Department may be required to report on the property before a grant is made
and to inspect the road after the work has been done.
The total mileages and disbursements under " Grants in Aid of Mining Roads
and Trails " during the 1967/68 fiscal year were as follows:—
Roads—                                                                      Miles Cost
Construction   146.1 $229,010.12
Maintenance  235.5 40,220.32
Bridges—
Maintenance  23,000.00
Construction  2,630.99
Total      $294,861.43
In addition to the above, work was continued on the Stewart-Cassiar road,
which is being constructed under the " Roads to Resources " agreement between the
Governments of Canada and British Columbia. The construction is supervised by
the Department of Highways on behalf of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources. The only new road construction was on Project No. 1391, the 29.08-
mile section between Burrage River and Ningunsaw River, the contract for which
was awarded on November 18, 1965, to Ben Ginter Construction Company in the
amount of $3,978,553.50 and started in 1966. Operations have been suspended
each winter owing to climatic conditions. The project was 30 per cent completed
at the end of 1967.
Further construction was done on the Bell-Irving No. 1 bridge, which is approximately 58 miles north of Stewart. The Benray Bridge Company completed
the substructure, for which it was awarded a contract in the amount of $116,872
on July 2, 1965, and Canada Iron Foundries Ltd., Western Bridge Division, completed the fabrication and erection of steelwork, for which the company was awarded
a contract in the amount of $384,696.40 on June 16, 1966. A temporary deck
has been erected for the transportation of supplies, and the permanent deck is
expected to be installed in 1968.
The Federal Government's contribution of $7,500,000 on the construction of
this road was expended toward the end of September. Since that time the whole
expense has been provided by the Provincial Government.
EXHIBITS
The Department has an exhibit of rock and mineral specimens in the Douglas
Building, Victoria; collections are also on display in the offices of the Inspectors of
Mines at Nelson, Prince Rupert, and Vancouver.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria are displayed in wall cases lining the
corridor of the fourth floor of the Douglas Building.   The collection includes speci-
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 79
mens of ore from many mines and prospects in the Province, and also type rocks and
special minerals from British Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected over a period of more
than 60 years by officers of the Department. Some type specimens have been purchased and other valuable specimens or groups have been donated or loaned.
ROCK AND MINERAL SETS
Information regarding sets of rocks and minerals available for sale to prospectors, schools, and individuals in British Columbia may be obtained from the
Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, bulletins,
and other publications of the Department, with prices charged for them, are listed
in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources List of Publications, available
from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch or Chief of the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria
and from the office of the Geological Survey of Canada in Vancouver. They are also
available for reference use in the Departmental library, Room 430, Douglas Building,
Victoria, in the reading-room of the office of the Geological Survey of Canada in
Vancouver, and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert,
as well as in public libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on mineral reference
maps that may be inspected in the central records offices of the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources in Victoria and Vancouver. Copies of these maps may be
obtained on request made to the Chief Gold Commissioner, Victoria (price, $1.25
per print).
The boundaries of surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference maps
and other maps of the British Columbia Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources.
OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND
PETROLEUM RESOURCES AND THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF
CANADA.
The Provincial Inspectors of Mines and Resident Engineers for the Vancouver
Island and Lower Mainland districts, the Silicosis Control Inspectors, and the Gold
Commissioner and Mining Recorder for Vancouver Mining Division occupy offices
at Room 320, 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1. Officers of the Geological
Survey of Canada are stationed at 100 West Pender Street.
The combined services offered to the public at these two offices include technical information on mining and the geology of the Province, the identification of
mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining and geological
publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central records office.
 Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
The Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service, 1967, describes in
detail the activities of the Legal Surveys, Topographic, Air, and Geographic Divisions of the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
Indexes to air photographic cover, to published maps, reference maps, and
manuscript maps are available through the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
British Columbia Lands Service, Victoria.
A 80
 Department of Energy, Mines and Resources
The Canadian Government Department of Energy, Mines and Resources performs many functions related to mining and the mineral industry in general. The
Geological Survey of Canada, Mines Branch, Mineral Resources Division, Observatories Branch, and Surveys and Mapping Branch all provide services of direct interest
to the mineral industry.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
The Geological Survey of Canada each year has several geological parties in the
field in British Columbia.
Over a period of nearly a hundred years numerous reports and maps covering
areas of the Province have been published by the Geological Survey of Canada.
These publications provide geological information of great benefit to mining, exploration, and prospecting activities in the Province.
The Geological Survey of Canada maintains an office at 100 West Pender Street,
Vancouver 3, with Dr. J. E. Armstrong in charge. Geological reports and maps may
be obtained there.
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1967
Geological mapping and special studies were done in the following areas:—
Officers
Area
Remarks
H. Gabrielse and S. L. Blusson
N. W. Rutter	
D. T. A. Symons	
T. N. Irvine	
J. E. Reesor and E. Froese	
J.  A.  Fortescue,   E.   H.   W.
Hornbrook,  and L.  Usik
R. B. Campbell  	
C. A. Giovanella	
J. E. Muller _   _.
J. G. Souther 	
F. G. Young	
J. O. Wheeler	
J. W. H. Monger	
J. A. Roddick, W. W. Hutchison, and S. L. Blusson
H. W. Tipper and J. A.
Jeletzky
B. E. Lowes	
H. R. Balkwill	
J. E. Armstrong and S. F.
Learning
R. J. Fulton	
J. D. Aitken..
W. H. Fritz...
104 O, 104 I, 104 J	
Parts  of 94 B,   C,  F,
93 H, O
93 C, D, 103 A, 104 G
94 C/W.	
82 L/l, parts of 82L/9
and 82 K/4
Central  and  southern
British Columbia
93 H	
Parts   of   83D/11E,
83D/6E,   83D/7W,
83 D/10W
Part of 92 F	
Parts of 104 G/7,
G/10, G/15, G/16
Parts of 93 H, A, 83 E
82K/W	
Parts of 104 J, 104 N,
104 K
92 M, 92 N, 92 L, 92 K,
92 J, 92 G/W, 92 F
Northeastern   part   of
92 N
Parts  of  92H/5  and
92 H/12
82 N/7W and parts of
N/7E, N/2, N/10W,
N/6E
93 G  	
Columbia and Kootenay Valleys
Part of 82 N...	
R. Mulligan-
Eastern Cordillera in
British Columbia
and Alberta
104 O, 104 P	
Complete Operation Selwyn and unmapped sheets of
Operation Stikine.
Surficial geology of the Peace River dam and reservoir
area.
Pateomagnetic studies in Dean Channel and vicinity
and at Mount Edziza.
Complete  sampling  and mapping of ultrabasic rocks
in the Lay Range.
Study   of   granitoid   and   metamorphic   rocks   of   the
Pinnacle Peaks area.
Biogeochemistry — test field methods by surveys over
known mineral deposits.
Structure and stratigraphy of the Cariboo Mountains.
Complete study of structure and metamorphism of the
gneisses straddling the Rocky Mountain Trench.
Complete Alberni map-area.
Volcanology of Mount Edziza area.
Structure and stratigraphy of the Cariboo and Gog
Groups.
Structure and metamorphism of the Monashee Mountains.
Structure and Permian stratigraphy of part of the
Atlin Horst.
Reconnaissance in Coast Mountains south of latitude
52 degrees north.
Mezozoic stratigraphy and structure, Mount Wadding-
ton area.
Structural study of the Cascade Mountains.
Structural analyses of the western ranges of the Rocky
Mountains in the Golden area.
Surficial geology of the Prince George area.
Surficial geology of the reservoir area in the Columbia
and Kootenay River valleys.
Palaeontology and stratigraphy of the Burgess shale.
Cambrian biostratigraphy in the eastern Cordillera.
Metallogeny of the Cassiar batholith.
A  81
 a 82 mines and petroleum resources report, 1967
Publications of the Geological Survey
All current publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating to British
Columbia were added to the library of the British Columbia Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources in 1967.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has divisions concerned with mineral dressing and process
metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels. Current publications of
the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia were added to the library of the
British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources in 1967.
MINERAL RESOURCES DIVISION
The Mineral Resources Division publishes studies on mineral resources, mineral
economics, mineral legislation, mineral taxation, mining technology, and miscellaneous subjects related to the mineral industry. Current publications of the Mineral
Resources Division were added to the library of the British Columbia Department
of Mines and Petroleum Resources in 1967.
OBSERVATORIES BRANCH
The Observatories Branch operates a magnetic observatory at Victoria. Services available to geophysical exploration companies and other interested agencies
include:—
(a) Three-hour range indices of magnetic activity; these provide a measure
of the intensity of the magnetic disturbance (on a 0-9 scale) for each
three-hour period. The monthly listings of these indices are normally
mailed within a few days after the end of each month.
(b) Copies of magnetograms are available through a local duplicating firm at
a charge of $7.50 for a monthly set. These recordings of the magnetic
field can be used to control field surveys, in particular to correct for the
diurnal changes and magnetic disturbances. The area over which this
control is valid depends on the required accuracy; for ±5 gamma accuracy, it covers an elliptic region reaching roughly as far as longitude
118 degrees to the east and latitude 50.5 degrees to the north.
Further details can be obtained by writing to the Officer-in-charge, Victoria
Magnetic Observatory, R.R. 7, Victoria, B.C.

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