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VITAL STATISTICS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EIGHTY-SECOND REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1955

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
VITAL j STATISTICS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EIGHTY-SECOND REPORT
FOR THE YEAR
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
  Victoria, B.C., December 15th, 1954.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Vital Statistics in the
Province of British Columbia for the year 1953.
I 9B ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare.
 Department of Health and Welfare, j|
Victoria, B.C., December 15th, 1954.   Iff
The Honourable Eric Martin, ||-
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Eighty-second Report on Vital Statistics in
the Province of British Columbia.
I I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT,
Deputy Minister of Health and
Provincial Health Officer.
Division of Vital Statistics,
Victoria, B.C., December 15th, 1954.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Eighty-second Report on Vital Statistics in
the Province of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. DOUGHTY,
Director of Vital Statistics.
 TABLE of contents
Pagb
Introduction     11
Map
Map Showing Statistical Publication Areas, British Columbia     12
PART I.—GENERAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY BY PLACE
|r OF RESIDENCE
Tables
Table 1.—Population by Sex and Age-group, British Columbia, 1921-53  14
Table 2.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates, British Columbia, 1911-53  15
Table 3.—Live Births and Deaths by Sex, British Columbia, 1949-53:
(a) Including Indians  16
(b) Excluding Indians  17
Table 4.—Birth and Death Rates (Excluding Indians and Indians Only), British
Columbia, 1949-53  17
Table 5.—Natural Increase, British Columbia, 1949-53  18
Table 6.—Illegitimate Births by Age of Mother, British Columbia, 1921-53:
(a) Including Indians  18
(b) Excluding Indians  19
Table 7.—Births and Deaths in Institutions, British Columbia, 1944-53  20
Table 8.—Age-Sex Specific Death Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53  21
Table 9.—Summary of Important Causes of Death, British Columbia, 1944-53:
(a) Including Indians     23
(b) Excluding Indians     24
Table 10.—Mortality   from   Cardiovascular-Renal   Diseases,   British   Columbia,
1949-53     25
Table 11.—Mortality from Diseases of the Heart, by Sex and Age-group, British
Columbia, 1953     26
Table 12.—Mortality from Vascular Lesions Affecting the Central Nervous System,
Diseases of the Arteries, and Nephritis, by Sex and Age-group, British Columbia, 1953    26
Table 13.—Mortality from Cancer, British Columbia, 1950-53     27
Table 14.—Mortality from Accidents and Violence, by Nature of Injury, British
Columbia, 1953    28
Table 15.—Mortality from Accidents and Violence by External Cause, Sex, and
Age-group, British Columbia, 1953  30
Table 16.—Mortality from Pneumonia by Type, British Columbia, 1949-53  31
Table 17.—Mortality from Tuberculosis by Site, British Columbia, 1949-53  31
Table 18.—Neo-natal, Infant, and Maternal Mortality Rates, British Columbia,
1944-53     32
Table 19.—Infant Mortality, British Columbia, 1949-53  32
Table 20.—Maternal Mortality, British Columbia, 1949-53  34
Table 21.—Mortality from Notifiable Diseases, British Columbia, 1949-53  35
Table 22.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups, British Columbia, 1953:
(a) Including Indians  36
O) Excluding Indians  37
Table 23.—Stillbirths, British Columbia, 1944-53  39
5
 s 6 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 24.—Marriages by Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties, British Co- ^
lumbia, 1944-53  39
Table 25.—Marriages by Months, British Columbia, 1944-53  4Q
Table 26.—Marriages Performed According to Type, British Columbia, 1949-53  40
Table 27.—Marriages Authorized by Banns or Licence According to Religious
Denomination of Officiating Minister, British Columbia, 1953  4Q
Table 28.—Adoptions by Sex and Legitimacy of Adopted Children, British Columbia, 1944-53  42
Table 29.—Divorces by Duration of Marriage, British Columbia, 1944-53  43
Graphs
Graph A.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates, British Columbia, 1911-53  16
Graph B.—Illegitimate Birth Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53  19
Graph C.—Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53  33
Graph D.—Maternal Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53  34
Graph E.—Marriages by Months, British Columbia, 1949-53__  41
U PART H.—ADMINISTRATION AND DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES
Summary of Registration Services .___ 44
Volume of Registration—All Races \  44
Volume of Registration—Indian and Oriental Races  46
Searches  47
Certifications  48
Revenue  49
Registration of Births  50
School-teachers' Returns  50
Fraudulent Registrations I  50
Legitimations  50
Alterations of Christian Name  51
IP    Delayed Registration of Births  51
Registration of Deaths  51
Registration of Stillbirths  52
Registration of Marriages  52
Registration of Adoption Orders  52
Registration of Divorces ,  52
Registration of Notices of Filing of a WiU  53
Certification Services  53
Legal Changes of Name  54
Corrections and Amendments to Registrations  55
Registration of Ministers and Clergymen  55
District Registrars' Offices  57
Changes in Registration Districts  57
Inspections  58
Microfilming of Documents  58
General Administration   58
Statistical Section         _   __ _ __         \ 1  59
Purpose                                                                   __  59
Routine Assignments                                         59
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 7
Statistical Section—Continued Page
Staff Training 77"" "V 1     59
Statistics for the Mental Health Services     59
Standardization of Vital Statistics Tabulations in Canada  60
Infant Mortality Study  60
Population Estimates _ _  61
Nutrition Statistics —  61
Morbidity Statistics  61
Epidemiological Statistics  61
Cancer Registry   61
Crippled Children's Registry  61
Tables
Table 1.—Summary of Registration, British Columbia, 1944-53     44
Table 2.—Total Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages, Distributed
According to Statistical Areas, British Columbia, 1953     46
Table 3.—Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Indian
Population, British* Columbia, 1949-53     47
Table 4.—Registrations of Live:Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Chinese
Population, British Columbia, 1949-53     47
Table 5.—Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Japanese
Population, British Columbia, 1949-53     47
Table 6.—Searches Performed and Correspondence Received by the Central Office
of the Division of Vital Statistics, British Columbia, 1944-53     48
Table 7.—Revenue-producing Certifications Issued by the Central Office of the
Division of Vital Statistics, British Columbia, 1946-53     49
Table 8.—Revenue Collected by the Division of Vital Statistics, British Columbia,
1944-53     49
Table 9.—Change of Name Applications Granted, According to Marital Status and
Sex of Applicant, and Total Number of Persons Affected, British Columbia,
tf   1941-53     54
Table 10.—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen, British Columbia, 1953     56
Table 11.—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen, by Religious Denomination,
British Columbia, 1952 and 1953     56
#■•■ Graphs
Graph F.—Summary of Registration of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages, British
Columbia, 1921-53 .  45
Graph G.—Adoptions, British Cotambia, 1936-53  46
Graph H.—Divorces, British Columbia, 1936-53  46
PART III.—DETAILED TABLES OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, MARRIAGES, ADOPTIONS, AND DIVORCES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953 (CLASSIFIED BY
PLACE OF RESIDENCE). f
General Summary of Births and Marriages^
Table l._General Summary of Births, Stillbirths, and Marriages for Census Divisions, British Columbia, 1953_ |g     63
Table 2.—General Summary of Births, Stillbirths, and Marriages for Incorporated
Urban Places of 1,00(1 Population and over, British Columbia, 1953     64
 s 8 department of health and welfare
Births
Table 3.—Live Births and Live Births in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence
for Census Division, British Columbia, 1953  65
Table 4.—Live Births and Live Births in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence
for Urban Places of 1,000 Population and over, British Columbia, 1953  gg
Table 5.—Live Births by Month, British Columbia, 1953  66
Table 6.—Live Births for Census Divisions by Type of Attendance, British Columbia, 1953  67
Table 7.—Live Births in Incorporated Urban Places of 1,000 Population and over
by Type of Attendance, British Columbia, 1953  6g
Table 8.—Live Births by Ages of Parents, British Columbia, 1953  g9
Table 9.—Live Births by Age of Mother and Birth Order, British Columbia, 1953 __ 70
Table 10.—Multiple Births by Age of Mother, British Columbia, 1953  71
Table 11.—Stillbirths by Sex and Period of Gestation, British Columbia, 1953  71
Infant Mortality
Table 12.—Infant Deaths and Infant Deaths in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence for Census Divisions, British Columbia, 1953    72
Table 13.—Infant Deaths and Infant Deaths in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence for Urban Places of 1,000 Population and over, British Columbia, 1953   73
Table 14.—Cause of Infant Deaths by Sex and Age, British Columbia, 1953    74
Table 15.—Cause of Infant Deaths by Sex and Month of Death, British Columbia,
1953 _    76
General Mortality
Table 16.—General Summary of Mortality for Census Divisions, British Columbia,
1953  78
Table 17.—General Summary of Mortality for Incorporated Urban Places of 1,000 fe
Population and over, British Columbia, 1953  79
Table 18.—Deaths and Deaths in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence for Census
Divisions, British Columbia, 1953  80
Table 19.—Deaths and Deaths in Hospital by Occurrence and Residence for Urban
Places of 1,000 Population and over, British Columbia, 1953  81
Table 20.—Cause of Death by Sex for Census Divisions, British Columbia, 1953  82
Table 21.—Cause of Death by Sex for Urban Places of 5,000 Population and over,
British Columbia, 1953  92
Table 22.—Cause of Death by Sex and Age, British Columbia, 1953  97
Table 23.—Cause of Death by Sex, Marital Status, and Age, and Month of Death,
British Columbia, 1953  104
Table 24.—Deaths by Single Years of Age and Sex, British Columbia, 1953  m
Marriages
Table 25.—Marriages by Month of Marriage, British Columbia, 1953  113
Table 26.—Marriages by Age of Bride and Age of Bridegroom, British Columbia,
1953   I14
Table 27.—Marriages by Marital Status of Bridegroom and Bride, British Colum-
bia, 1953  _  115
Table 28.—Marriages by Marital Status and Age of Bridegroom, British Columbia,
1953  5   115
Table 29.—Marriages by Marital Status and Age of Bride, British Columbia, 1953- 115
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 9
.   , j. ^ . j Page
Table 30.—Marriages by Birthplace of Bridegroom and Birthplace of Bride, British
Columbia, 1953  116
Table 3L—Marriages by Religious Denomination of Bridegroom and Religious 1
Denomination of Bride, British Columbia, 1953  H7
Indians
Table 32.—General Summary of Births for Indians by Census Division, British Columbia, 1953  118
Table 33.—Indian Live Births and Indian Live Births in Hospital by Occurrence
and Residence for Census Division, British Columbia, 1953  119
Taye 34,—Live Births of Indians by Month, British Columbia, 1953  119
Table 35.—Live Births of Indians by Ages of Parents, British Columbia, 1953  120
Taye 36.—Live Births of Indians by Age of Mother and Birth Order, British Columbia, 1953  121
Table 37.—General Summary of Mortality for Indians by Census Divisions, British
Columbia, 1953  122
Table 38.—Cause of Death of Indians by Sex and Age, British Columbia, 1953  123
Table 39.—Cause of Death of Indians by Sex and Month, British Columbia, 1953  128
Table 40.—Cause of Infant Deaths of Indians by Sex and Age, British Columbia,
1953  132
Table 41.—Cause of Infant Deaths of Indians by Sex and Month of Death, British
Columbia, 1953  134
Adoptions
Table 42.—Registration of Adoptions Ordered by the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, by Year of Court Order and Sex of Children, and by Whom
Adopted, 1953  135
Table 43.—Registration of Adoptions Ordered by the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, by Year of Court Order and Sex and Legitimacy of Children, 1953— 135
Table 44.—Registration of Adoptions Ordered by the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, by Birthplace of Children, 1953, with the Cumulative Totals from
April, 1920, to December 31st, 1953  135
Divorces
Table 45.—Registration of Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and
Judicial Separation Ordered by the Supreme Court of British Columbia, by
Duration of Marriage, 1949-53  136
Table 46.—Registration of Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and
Judicial Separation Ordered by the Supreme Court of British Columbia, by
Number and Sex of Children Affected, 1949-53  136
Table 47.—Registration of Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage, and
Judicial Separation Ordered by the Supreme Court of British Columbia, by
Sex of Petitioner, 1949-53  136
Appendix
Causes of Death by Sex and Age According to the Detailed List, British Columbia,
1953___   137
  Vital Statistics Report, 1953
INTRODUCTION
The Division of Vital Statistics provides a wide range of service to the general public
and to other branches of Government. Its duties fall into two main categories—one
relating to matters of civil registration, and the other to statistical service on behalf of
the entire Health Branch. The former duties comprise the administration of the " Vital
Statistics Act," the " Marriage Act," the | Change of Name Act," and certain sections of
the " Wills Act." The statistical services consist of providing detailed analyses regarding
births, deaths, marriages, stillbirths, adoptions, divorces, and of other data stemming
from the registration functions, as well as providing extensive statistical service required
for the administration of other divisions of the Health Branch.
This Report is divided into three parts. Part I contains a summary of vital statistics
for 1953, and in most cases figures for previous years have also been included for comparative purposes. Graphs are provided in some instances to demonstrate more readily
the year-to-year changes in the statistics. The reader is reminded that considerable care
should be exercised when studying mortality tables which include statistics for the years
prior to 1950. It was in this year that a major change in the death-classification system
took place, with the implementation of the Sixth Revision of the International Statistical
Classification of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death. As a result, not only were
there amendments within the International Statistical Classification, but also the method
of selecting the underlying cause of death in a joint-cause sequence was changed. Previously, the underlying cause was determined by the application of arbitrary rules of
selection, whereas under the new procedure the certifying physician's preference is
accepted.
Additional tables have been added in Part I to give more complete information
regarding the ten principal causes of death. For many of the rates, five-year averages
from 1921 to date have been given for the first time this year in order to present a more
comprehensive picture of the trend of events and to reduce the effect of the chance variations observed in annual figures.
Part II presents a descriptive summary of the activities of the Division in performing
the registration and statistical functions. J
Part III of the Report contains a series of detailed tables covering the birth, deaths,
marriages, adoptions, and divorces which occurred during 1953. A separate set of tables
deals with the Indian population of the Province.
An Appendix to the Report sets forth the causes of death by sex and age according
to the Detailed List of the International Statistical Classification. Mortality tables elsewhere in the Report present data which are generally classified according to the Intermediate List only. In order to make the Appendix more useful, sub-totals have been
added to show certain groups of categories collectively.
11
 S 12
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Map Showing Statistical Publication Areas, British Columbia
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 13
PART L—GENERAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE
POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PEOPLE
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The 1953 estimate of the population of British Columbia was 1,230,000, being
32,000 higher than the figure for 1952. Of this increase, over 40 per cent occurred
among the population under 10 years of age. Over one-third of the increase in population which occurred in the last ten years has been in this same age-group.
Since the 1952 Report was published, additional information has been made available from the Ninth Census of Canada, and an account of some of the more important
features of the population of our Province which were disclosed follows.
British Columbia has the lowest average number of persons per family in Canada;
namely, 3.3, as compared to 3.4 for Ontario, which has the next lowest average, and
3.7 for Canada as a whole. The 1951 average for the Province represented only a
slight decline from the figure of 3.4 determined from the previous census in 1941.
With regard to the rural-urban population ratio, it was found that British Columbia
has a greater proportion of urban population than any other Province except Ontario.
According to the definition of an urban area as given in the 1951 Census (any city,
town, or village of over 1,000 population, whether incorporated or unincorporated, and
all parts of census metropolitan areas), over 68 per cent of this Province's population
is urban. This figure is slightly under that for Ontario, where 70.7 per cent of the
population resides in urban areas. The National average is 61.5 per cent. Whereas
over half of the rural population in Canada as a whole resides on farms, in British
Columbia the proportion is under one-third, which is not surprising in view of the
predominantly mountainous nature of the Province. Except for Newfoundland, British
Columbia has a smaller proportion of rural farm population than any other Province in
Canada.
For the whole Province, the population density is 3.2 persons per square mile, a
40-per-cent increase over the figures for 1941, when there were 2.3 persons per square
mile. British Columbia ranks ninth among the Provinces of Canada in density of
population, only Newfoundland having a lower density, 2.4 per square mile. The
National average is only 3.9. If Census Areas 4 and 5, which cover the Lower Mainland
and Vancouver Island, are excluded, the population density for the remainder of the
Province is found to be just under one person per square mile. The scattered distribution of population is a factor of considerable importance in increasing the expense and
difficulty of carrying out public health work in this Province, and the accepted approach
to the many problems which arise has had to be modified accordingly.
 S 14
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Population by Sex and Age-group,
British Columbia, 1921-53
(In thousands.il
Total
Age-group
Year
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
1921
T.
524.6
293.4
49.8
25.0
54.3
27.4
45.3
22.8
37.7
19.2
76.6
39.7
101.1
60.0
80.4
50.3
1
46.3
29.1
23.5
14.6
7.8
4.4
M.
F.
231.2
24.8
26.9
22.5
18.5
36.9
41.1
30.1
17.2
8.9
3.4
1931	
_.T.
694.3
385.2
52.0
26.2
59.2
30.1
59.9
30.2
62.4
31.9
107.5
58.1
98.8
54.1
112.5
68.1
79.2
49.0
41.8
25.6
17.2
10.0
M.
F.
309.1
25.8
29.1
29.7
30.5
49.4
44.7
44.4
30.2
16.2
7.2
1941	
_.T.
817.8
435.0
59.5
30.1
54.8
27.9
60.7
30.6
66.6
33.7
141.3
70.1
117.8
63.3
100.6
53.8
106.0
61.5
72.0
42.4
30.7
17.6
M.
F.
382.8
29.4
26.9
30.1
32.9
71.2
54.5
46.8
44.5
29.6
13.1
1942	
__T.
870.0
458.5
67.6
34.4
58.2
29.5
63.0
31.7
68.1
34.1
154.2
74.8
128.6
68.2
104.6
56.0
108.2
62.1
76.5
44.8
32.7
18.7
M.
F.
411.5
33.2
28.7
31.3
34.0
79.4
60.4
48.6
46.1
31.7
14.0
1943-__	
-_.T.
900.0
471.8
74.7
38.1
60.5
30.6
63.7
32.1
68.1
33.9
159.0
76.4
135.5
71.1
106.9
57.4
108.2
61.4
79.9
46.6
34.6
19.6
M.
F.
428.2
36.6
29.9
31.6
34.2
82.6
64.4
49.5
46.8
33.3
15.0
1944	
__T.
932.0
82.1
64.3
63.4
69.4
163.5
142.3
109.9
108.0
83.4
36.4
M.
486.1
41.9
32.5
32.1
34.3
77.9
73.6
59.3
60.6
48.5
20.6
F.
445.9
40.2
31.8
31.3
35.1
85.6
68.7
50.6
47.4
34.9
15.8
1945               _
_.T.
949.0
85.7
66.5
63.7
70.1
165.4
146.5
111.5
106.8
85.6
37.8
M.
491.5
43.4
33.3
31.9
34.7
78.4
75.0
60.2
59.0
49.6
21.2
F.
457.5
42.3
33.2
31.8
35.4
87.0
71.5
51.3
47.8
36.0
16.6
1046
...T.
1,003.0
521.7
91.1
46.7
73.6
37.3
67.1
34.0
71.5
35.5
175.5
85.1
159.2
81.4
118.5
64.1
107.6
58.8
88.0
50.7
40.5
22.6
M.
F.
481.3
44.4
36.3
33.1
36.0
90.4
77.8
54.4
48.8
37.3
17.9
1947
. T.
1,044.0
98.8
78.8
70.0
72.2
179.0
166.2
123.4
108.5
91.6
43.8
M.;
542.4
51.0
40.0
35.7
35.8
86.4
84.5
66.6
59.0
52.5
24.7
F.
501.6
47.8
38.8
34.3
36.4
92.6
81.7
56.8
49.5
39.1
19.1
1948	
 T.
1,082.0
106.7
82.0
72.0?
72.4
178.4
166.6
127.8
114.1
100.5
48.5
M.
562.5
55.5
40.5
36.7
36.5
86.9
82.2
68.2
63.1
58.0
27.7
F.
519.5
51.2
41.5
35.3
35.9
91.5
84.4
59.6
51.0
42.5
20.8
1Q49
T.
1,113.0
575.3
113.7
58.9
87.5
43.9
74.6
37.7
72.3
36.7
177.4
86.4
170.9
83.6
132.1
70.0
114.9
62.5
103.5
58.6
52.3
29.6
M.
F.
537.7
54.8
43.6
36.9
35.6
91.0
87.3
62.1
52.4
44.9
22.7
1950	
 X.
1,137.0."
120.0
91.3
76.9
71.5
175.4
176.0
137.2
113.7
105.5
55.1
M.
584.3
61.5
45.7
39.0
36.3
85.3
85.5
72.5
60.7
59.2
31.1
F.
552.7
58.5
45.6
37.9
35.2
90.1
90.5
64.7
53.0
46.3
24.0
1951	
_T.
1,165.2
125.9
99.9
78.6
70.3
171.4
182.1
143.3
112.1
108.4
58.7
M.
597.0
64.2
51.0
39.8
35.8
83.1
88.1
76.3
58.5
60.1
32.5
F.
568.2
€1.7
48.9
38.8
34.5
88.3
94.0
67.0
53.6
48.3
26.2
1952	
 T.
,1,198.0
131.8
106.2
83.1
72.2
170.3
185.2
149.4
114.3
107.3
62.7
M.
613.4
67.2
54.3
42.2
36.8
83.0
89.4
79.0
59.9
58.9
34.7
F.
584.6
64.6
51.9
40.9
35.4
87.3
95.8
70.4
54.4
48.4
28.0
1953
 T.
1,230.0
628.4
138.0
70.4
112.9
57.7
88.1
44.9
74.4
38.3
168.4
82.5
187.3
89.9
155.2
80.9
115.9
60.9
106.3
57.7
66.9
36.8
M.
F.
601.6
67.6
55.2
43.2:
36.1
85.9
97.4
74.3
55.0
48.6
30.1
80 and
Over
1.8
0.9
0.9
3.8
1.9
1.9
7.8
4.0
3.8
8.3
4.2
4.1
8.9
4.6
4.3
9.3
4.8
4.5
9.4
4.8
4.6
10.4
5.5
4.9
11.7
6.2
5.5
13.0
7.2
5.8
13.8
7.4
6.4
14.4
7.5
6.9
14.5
7.6
6.9
15.5
8.0
7.5
16.6
8.4
8.2
Source:   Figures for 1921,  1931,  1941, and  1951  are census counts, while the remainder are estimates by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 15
SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
In 1953 the total number of births reached a new high of 31,74(5 an increase of
1,919 over the previous year. This was the greatest annual increase recorded since
1947. The birth rate per 1,000 population was 25.8 in 1953, higher than the previous
record of 25.2 established in 1947. British Columbia and Prince Edward Island had
the lowest birth rates of all the Provinces of Canada in 1953. The birth rate for the
whole of Canada was 28.2.
A total of 12,218 deaths occurred in 1953, yielding a crude death rate of 9.9 per
1,000 population, the lowest rate since 1939. Nevertheless, British Columbia had the
highest death rate of all the Provinces of Canada, and a rate considerably higher than
the average Canadian rate of 8.6. This is due for the most part to the higher proportion
of older people in the Province's population as compared to the rest of Canada.
There were 11,298 marriages in 1953 in British Columbia—the highest number
since 1949. The marriage rate remained unchanged from 1952 at 9.2 marriages per
1,000 population. The marriage rate in British Columbia is exceeded by the rate in
Alberta and Ontario. ^
Table 2.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates, British Columbia,
| 1911-53
(Rates per 1,000 population.)
Year
Population
Births
Number
Rate
Deaths
Number
Rate
Marriages
Number
Rate
1911-
1912..
1913..
1914..
1915_
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919..
1920..
1921..
1922-
1923-
1924-
1925-
1926..
1927_
1928-
1929..
1930..
1931-
1932..
1933..
1934-
1935„
1936.
1937..
1938-
1939_
1940.
194ILI
1942..
1943-
1944-
1943'-
194^
1947-
1948-
1949..
1950
1951..
1952.
1953-
393,000
407,000
424,000
442,000
450,000
456,000
464,000
474,000
488,000
507,000
525,000
541,000
555,000
571,000
588,000
606,000
623,000
641,000
659,000
676,000
694,000
707,000
717,000
727,000
736,000
745,000
759,000
775,000
792,000
805,000
818,000
870,000
900,000
932,000
949,000
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,113,000
1,137,000
1,165,210
1,198,000
1,230,000
5,841
8,008
9,199
10,418
10,516
9,841
9,450
9,445
9,506
10,492
10,653
10,166
10,001
10,119
10,342
10,063
10,084
10,385
10,378
10,867
10,404
10,214
9,583
9,813
10,013
10,571
11,279
12,476
12,373
13,830
15,038
16,808
18,802
18,999
18,877
22,609
26,286
25,984
27,301
27,116
28,077
29,827
31,746
14.9
19.7
21.7
23.6
23.4
21.6
20.4
19.9
19.5
20.7
20.3
18.8
18.0
17.7
17.6
16.6
16.2
16.2
15.7
16.1
15.0
14.4
13.4
13.5
13.6
14.2
14.9
16.1
15.6
17.2
18.4
19.3
20.9
20.4
19.9
22.5
25.2
24.0
24.5
23.8
24.1
24.9
25.8
3,660
4,313
4,619
3,974
3,832
3,887
3,896
5,394
5,792
4,739
4,208
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
5,750
5,910
6,397
6,400
6,114
6,150
6,221
6,378
6,857
7,222
7,973
7,460
7,517
8,315
8,505
8,869
10,012
9,697
9,756
10,137
10,613
11,316
11,315
11,581
11,638
12,080
12,218
9.3
10.6
11.9
9.0
8.5
8.5
8.4
11.4
11.9
9.3
8.0
9.1
9.0
8.8
8.4
9.0
9.2
9.2
9.7
9.5
8.8
8.7
8.7
8.8
9.3
9.7
10.5
9.6
9.5
10.3
10.4
10.2
11.1
10.4
10.3
10.1
10.2
10.5
10.2
10.2
10.0
10.1
9.9
4,509
5,235
5,012
4,296
3,393
3,169
2,861
2,858
3J40
4,690
3,889
3,763
3,943
4,038
4,223
4,418
4,720
4,942
5,155
4,697
3,879
3,604
4,048
4,771
5,034
5,451
6,191
6,135
7,862
9,624
9,769
10,877
9,385
8,434
9,262
11,762
11,852'
11,718
11,376
11,110
11,272
11,081
11,298
11.5
12.9
11.8
9.7
7.5
6.9
6.2
6.0
7.7
9.3
7.4
7.0
7.1
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.6
7,7
7.8
6.9
5.6
5.1
5.6
6.6
6.8
7.3
8.2
7.9
9.9
12.0
11.9
12.5
10.4
9.0
9.8
11.7
11.4
10.8
10.2
9.8
9.7
9.2
9.2
 S 16
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Graph A —Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates, British Columbia
1911-53
(Rates per 1,000 population.)
1911
1916
1921
1926
1931
1936
1941
1946
F953
BIRTHS AND DEATHS BY SEX
;| As has been the case each year since 1950, an increase was registered in the number
of male births per 1,000 female births, the ratio being 1,072.5 in 1953.
While deaths of males increased by 2.3 per cent over the number for 1952, deaths
of females declined by 2.1 per cent. Likewise, the mortality rate among males rose
slightly from 12.1 per 1,000 male population in 1952 to 12.2 in 1953, and the female
death rate declined from 7.9 to 7.5. The death rate for males in Canada as a whole
was 9.8, well below the British Columbia rate. The next highest rate to that for British
Columbia was recorded in Ontario and Manitoba, where 10.3 males died per 1,000 male
population. The mortality rate for females was only slightly higher in British Columbia
than in Canada as a whole, being 7.5 per 1,000 female population, compared to the
Canadian rate of 7.4. Four other Provinces have higher female mortality rates than
British Columbia.
Table 3a.—Live Births and Deaths by Sex (Including Indians)
British Columbia, 1949-53
Year
Live Births
Male
Female
1949 ___„ _
1950 	
1951 | ___
1952	
1953  """"_	
1 Number of male births per 1,000 female births
13,957
13,887
14,418
15,413
16,428
13,344
13,229
13,659
14,414
15,318
Sex Ratio1
1,045.9
1,049.7
1,055.6
1,069.3
1,072.5
Deaths
Male
7,100
7,204
7,311
7,442
7,678
Female
4,215
4,377
4,327
4,638
4,540
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 17
Table 3b.—Live Births and Deaths by Sex (Excluding Indians),
British Columbia, 1949-53
Year
Number of male births per 1,000 female births.
Male
1949.
1950
1951.
1952
1953.
13,217
13,159
13,647
14,663
15,601
Live Births
Female
12,673
12,557
13,000
13,637
14,509
Sex Ratio1
1,042.9
1,047.9
1,049.8
1,075.2
1,075.3
Deaths
Male
6,756
6,874
7,012
7,181
7,450
Female
3,927
4,126
4,062
4,380
4,341
BIRTHS AND DEATHS AMONG THE INDIAN AND
NON-INDIAN POPULATION
Table 4 shows the marked difference in the birth and death rates for the Indian and
the non-Indian population. The birth rate among Indians is more than double that for
the remainder of the population, while the Indian death rate is almost 50 per cent higher
than the rate for the population excluding Indians.
The death rate among Indians has shown a marked improvement in recent years,
having decreased by over 36 per cent since 1949.
Table 4.—Birth and Death Rates (Excluding Indians and Indians Only),
British Columbia, 1949-53
(Rates per 1,000 population.)
Year
Births
Excluding
Indians
Number
Rate
Indians
Number
Rate
Deaths
Excluding
Indians
Number
Rate
Indians
Number
Rate
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
25,890
23.9
1,411
49.5
10,683
9.9
632
25,716
23.2
1,400
48.3
11,000
9.9
581
26,647
23.4
1,430
50.2
11,074
9.7
564
28,300
24.2
1,527
52.7
11,561
9.9
519
30,110
25.1
1,636
54.0
11,791
9.8
427
22.2
20.0
19.8
17.9
14.1
 S 18
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
NATURAL INCREASE
The rate of natural increase in British Columbia in 1953 reached a record high of
15.9 per 1,000 population.   This was well above the previous record of 15.0, set in 1947
The excess of births over deaths totalled 19,528, of which 8,750 were males and
10,778 were females. Despite this year's record natural increase, British Columbia
continued to have the lowest rate of natural increase in Canada. This is the result of
the Province's low birth rate and high death rate compared to the rest of Canada. The
National rate of natural increase was 19.6.
Table 5.—Natural Increase, British Columbia, 1949-53
Year
Male
Births
Deaths
Excess
of
Births
over
Deaths
Female
Births
Deaths
Excess
off
Births
over
Deaths
Both
Sexes
Excess
of
Births
over
Deaths
Population
(Estimated)
Rate of
Natural
Increase
per 1,000
Population
1949
1950
1951
1952.
1953
13,957
13,887
14,418
15,40-8
Jl^,428
|    7,100
6,857
13,344    |
7,204
6,683
13,229    j
J    7,311
7,107
13,659
7,442
7,971
14,414
|    7,678
1
8,750
15,318    |
4,215
4,377
4,327
4,638
4,540
9,129
8,852
-9,332
9,776
10,778
15,986
15,535
16,439
17,747
19,528
1,113,000
1,137,000
1,165,210!
1,198,000
1^30,000
14.4
13.7
14.1
14.8
15.9
Census population.
ILLEGITIMATE BIRTHS
The tables below make possible a comparison of the numbers of illegitimate births
which occur to mothers at various ages. It may be noted from this table that the greatest
proportion of illegitimate births, more than a third, occur to mothers between the ages
of 20 and 24, while very few occur to mothers younger than 15 or older than 39. It is
apparent that there has been a marked increase in the number of illegitimate births per
1,000 live births since the 1921-25 period, although there was a slight decline this year
from the figure for 1952.
Table 6a.—Illegitimate Births by Age of Mother (Including Indians),
British Columbia, 1921-53
Year
Age-group
Under
15
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
Average,  1921-25-
1926-30-
Years
30-34
Years
35-39
Years
40-44
Years
45 and
Over
Not
Stated
Total
Rate
per
1,000
Live
Births
1931-35-
1936-40.
1941-45.
1946-50.
1951.
1952.
1953.
2.0
2.0
3.6
4.0
6.6
7.6
7
10
13
57.4
88.8
101.8
133.4
225.4
368.4
380
447
435
48.2
19.2
85.4
30.0
122.4
48.8
176.6
83.8
355.6
160.8
545.8
312.0
559
363
623
392
648
370
11.4
17.6
29.0
42.8
77.4
165.8
197
217
246
5.8
11.8
17.0
21.8
44.8
84.6
92
122
138
2.2
3.2
5.8
9.8
14.4
26.8
28
41
42
0.2
0.8
1.2
2.8
3.2
6
5
1
5.8
152.0 |
1.2
240.2 |
o;
330.4 |
1.4
474.8 |
0.8
888.6 |
2.0
1,5162 j
1
1,633
1,857
3
1,896
14.8
23.2
33.0
39.2
50.2
58.6
58.2
62.3
59.7
 VITAL STTATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 19
Table 6b.—
Illegitimate Births by Age of Mother (Excluding Indians),
British Columbia, 1931-53
Year
Average,
1931-35—
1936-40—
1941-45—
1946-50—
Age-group
Under
15
15-19
Years
20-24
Yea.rs
25-29
30-34
35-39
Years I Years   Years
40-44   45 and
Years I Over
: Not
Stated
Total
Rate
per
1,000
Live
Births
1
1
2.4 |
87.8
104.4 |
42.0
22.0 |
12.6
4.8
0.4
0.4
2.4 |
103.2
! 145.6 j
70.4
36.0
JL %Jp'mJEto.
7.6
0.4
311.6
4.6
158.6
288-6
125.6
61.8
31.0
9.2
1.2
0.8
5.4 |
273.0
| 433.2
248.0
f 127.4
60.6
18.8
1.0
1.6
5   I
2S7
444
292
147
75
22
2
1
5   f
342
481
.322
167
101
31
2
10
i
317
485
287
192
106
1	
~2
276.8
382.4
681.6
1,169.0
1,255
1,451
1,431
29.4
34.0
41.0
47.7
47.1
48.6
47.5
Graph B.—Illegitimate Birth Rates, British Columbia, 1944—53
(Bjates per 1,000 live births.)
RATE
1926
1931
1936
1941
19 46
1953
 S 20
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
A sugni increase uwuncu iiua y\,a.L m mw ^L^y^M.^^^. ui uuma uueumng ir
continuing the upward trend which has existed for some time.   Of the total births
the Province, 768 occurred outside of hospital, and of these, 533 were Indi;
Thus, only 235 non-Indian births took place away from hospital.   A slightly smaller
 _-_ ^£    A^^-r-Xt.^    st.j-.s-*i-tT^£\A    \tr%    l-i--*c«-_-vitol    tPlie    VPQf      r/J  *\    -Tsar    _-»__.*-« +      r.^.	
5
A slight increase occurred this year in the proportion of births occurring in hospital
otal births i
fndian birth:
no, v^jLij *pa? xxv,^ Ai_..™_-_. -—~~ ~ .x lightly smalls
proportion of deaths occurred in hospital this year, 62.3 per cent, compared to 63
per cent in 1952.
For statistical purposes a hospital is defined as | an institution operated for the
regular accommodation of in-patients in which medical and (or) surgical care is provided, and which is recognized as a hospital or nursing home by a Dominion agency or
by the Government of the Province in which the hospital is located, or by a municipality
duly authorized under the laws of the Province. The term ' hospital' includes institutions for tuberculosis and mental diseases, but excludes institutions which provide
custodial care and (or) domiciliary care only."
Table 7.—Number and Percentage of Total Births and Deaths
in Institutions, British Columbia, 1944-53
Year
Births
Deaths
In
Percentage
In
Percentage
Total
Institu
of Total in
Total
Institu
of Total in
tions
Institutions
1
tions
Institutions
18,999
17,686
93.1
9,697
5,846
60.3
18,877
17,649
933
9,756
5,734
58.8
22,609
21,470
95.0
10,137
5,911
58.3
26,286
25,134
95.6
10,613
6,419
60.5
25,984
24,960
96.1
11,316
6,739
59.6
27,301
26,387
96.7
11,315
7,007
61.9
27,116
26,281
96.9
11.581
7,030
60.7
28,077
27,310
97.3
11,638
7,315
62.9
29,827
29,068
97.5
12,080
7,671
63.5
31,746
30,978
97.6
12,218
7,616
62.3
1944.
1945.
1946
1947-
1948.
1949-
1950
1951-
1952-
1953-
AGE AND SEX MORTALITY
In order to understand the trend in mortality rates of this Province, it is necessary
to look beyond the crude death rates into the specific mortality rates for each sex and
age-group. Crude death rates have serious shortcomings, especially when used for
comparisons over a period of time, or for comparisons between different Provinces or
countries, because they may be adversely affected by changes in the age composition of
the populations concerned. This is of particular significance in this Province because
of the greater proportion of older people who now reside here. For example, over the
period 1921-53, the number of persons aged 60 and over in the Province has increased
by five times for males and nearly six times for females, while the total population has
hardly more than doubled for both sexes. The increase in the older population for the
remainder of Canada has been proportionately much less. 1 Hence, the crude death rates
for British Columbia have been increasingly affected by this increasing proportion of
older people, among whom, of course, the death rate is much higher. In actual fact,
great improvements have been made in the mortality picture of this Province, but the
ageing of the population has obscured the effect of these improvements in the crude
death rates. The very fact that during the last decade the crude death rate has declined
sBghtly in the face of the marked ageing of the population is in itself a reflection of
a very favourable situation. However, a more complete analysis of mortality trends
in this Province is presented in Table 8, which shows the specific mortality rates by age
and sex from 1921 onward.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1&5B
S 21
It may be noted from Table 8 that deaths of infants under 1 year of age have
declined very considerably since 1921. This decrease amounted to 55 per cent for
males and 58 per cent for females. Substantial improvements in mortality have been
registered in each of the age-groups from 1 to 49 during the period 1921-53. Of special
note was the reduction of 71 per cent in the rate for males aged 1 to 4 years and the
reduction of 80 per cent in the rate for females aged 10 to 19 years. The rates for
females in the age-groups over 50 have also declined, but not so markedly. There has
been little change in the rates for males in these same age-groups.
During 1953 the characteristic pattern of mortality amongst both sexes was again
:£*„+.   tha KiqVi r^fp for those under      vear nf aop   thp«  _»  diam r.__._-.i.«~ +~  »   .	
mi& .*.^~~   - x -         j   -~ ——-c,"*- ^w-vix ovAva ifoa again
manifest:  the high rate for those under 1 year of age, then a sharp decline to a low
> to 9 VearS   and a crr^^n^l inwMcp ■Khp.rpj.ftpr       \/fale- T>-iy--iH-r,.i,4-r_ .-_*d&_*;_%_jLi_- j__     _§____
mortality in each age-group,
mamicsL.   mv^ ^&" *^-~ *— ——  - j— *g «£,~. ^vu «. oxx^^ ucvunc tu a tow
at ages 5 to 9 years, and a gradual increase thereafter.    Male mortality exceeded female
mortality in each age-group.   This has been the general pattern of mortality since 1921.
Table 8.—Age-Sex Specific Death Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53
(Rates per 1,000 population.)
Year
Age-group
Under
1
1-4
5-9
10-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Over
Total1
A,r<-rQOAlQ,>1-25
 M.
71.4
56.8
67.7
54.1
57.9
45.3
59.9
45.1
51.9
40.5
46.3
34.0
35.6
26.9
33.3
28.6
32.4
23.7
6.1
5.1
6.4
5.8
4.8
4.4
4.6
4.1
3.5
2.5
2.4
2.0
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.6
1.7
1.5
2.4
1.9
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.8
2.1
1.9
1.6
1.3
1.4
0.9
0.8
0.6
0.9
0.7
0.9
0.4
2.9
2.0
2.8
2.4
2.1
1.9
2.3
1.8
1.9
1.3
1.5
0.9
1.4
0.7
1.3
0.7
1.0
0.4
4.3
3.4
4.5
3.6
3.5
2.9
3.1
2.5
2.9
1.8
2.2
1.5
2.4
1.0
2.3
1.0
2.5
0.9
4.9
4.2
4.8
4.0
4.2
3.5
3.7
3.1
3.2
2.5
2.7
2.0
2.6
1.5
2.8
1.8
2.4
1.3
7.4
6.2
7.8
6.2
6.4
4.9
6.7
4.8
6.0
4.3
5.9
4.0
5.3
3.3
5.6
3.4
5.1
3.1
13.4
10.7
13.5
10.4
12.0
9.4
12.8
9.2
14.0
9.1
13.1
8.1
12.7
7.8
13.5
7.6
12.9
7.4
28.2
24.5
29.8
23.8
26.7
22.7
28.5
20.7
30.1
20.1
29.3
19.4
29.4
16.6
30.1
18.0
29.5
16.8
60.7
56.6
66.0
54.5
63.3
52.6
67.1
53.3
70.1
53.9
62.9
48.6
62.7
46.0
59.5
47.2
62.3
44.2
160.9
131.9
174.4
147.6
152.1
136.2
155.3
138.8
169.1
147.2
148.8
138.4
159.7
136.2
147.0
130.1
158.5
130.2
9 6
1926-30
F.
M.
7.5
10 4
ii
1Q1.1-15
F.
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9 9
ii
1936-40—
F.
M.
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11.5
ii
1941-45
F.
M.
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12.5
ii
1946-50.
F.
„ .     M.
8.3
12.1
1951
F.
.M.
8.0
12.3
1952   _
F.
M.
IS
12.1
1953   _
F.
.   M.
7.9
12.2
F.
7.6
1 Includes deaths for which age was not stated.
PRINCIPAL CAUSATIVE FACTORS OF MORTALITY IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Deaths from heart disease again constituted the principal cause of mortality in this
Province. In 1953, deaths from this cause accounted for 36.3 per cent of all deaths,
a slight increase over the 1952 figure of 36.2 per cent and a substantial increase over the
proportion ten years ago of 28.5 per cent. Deaths from malignant neoplasms accounted
for 15.7 per cent of all deaths, the same proportion as in 1952. The third of the major
groups of degenerative diseases, vascular lesions of the central nervous system, resulted
in 15.7 per cent of all deaths. These three degenerative diseases combined accounted
for 62.6 per cent of all deaths in the Province. For Canada as a whole, 58.7 per cent
of all deaths are so caused. The death rate for both diseases of the heart and malignancies
declined somewhat in 1953, while that for vascular lesions of the central nervous system
increased by over 10 per cent.
Accidents, the fourth leading cause of death, took more lives in 1953. The rate
per 100,000 population increased to 80.4 from the rate of 80.1 in 1952. The death
rate from this cause in Canada as a whole was 58.8 per 100,000 population in 1953.
It is interesting to note that for motor-vehicle accidents the British Columbia rate of
18.9 is lower than the Canadian rate of 21.2, while the rate for all other accidents was
 S 22
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
almost two-thirds higher in this Province, bemg 61.5, compared to 37.4. The death
rate for the diseases of early infancy reached its lowest level this year, declining to 35 8
deaths per 100,000 population.   This is well below the Canadian rate of 50.6.
For the second consecutive year there was a decline in the death rate from
pneumonia, the rate in 1953 being 35.4 per 100,000 population. In 1951 the rate was
38.7 and in 1952, 36.4. The rate of deaths from diseases of the arteries declined from
19.0 in 1952 to 17.7 in 1953. 1
The first seven causes of death previously described retained the same order of
importance as in 1952. Suicides, which in 1952 was ninth leading cause, was in eighth
place in 1953, the death rate being 16.1 per 100,000 population. Congenital malformation stood in the ninth place with a death rate of 15.0. Tuberculosis moved from eighth
place to tenth, the death rate from this cause having dropped considerably from 17.9 to
11.9, the seventh successive year of progressive decline.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 23
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MORTALITY FROM CARDIOVASCULAR-RENAL DISEASES
S 25
The introduction of the Sixth Revision of the International List of Diseases, Injuries,
and Causes of Death in 1950 resulted in a break in the comparability of mortality
statistics for certain causes of death, notably those making up the cardiovascular-renal
group. For this reason, this group of diseases is discussed as a single entity. The classification changes were mostly internal within this group and did not seriously affect the
totals for all cardiovascular-renal conditions combined. The reader should be mindful
of the changes resulting from the Sixth Revision when comparing deaths from any of
the specific causes shown.
The table shows that, while mortality from cardiovascular-renal diseases was higher
in 1953 than in 1952, the rate per 100,000 population decreased slightly. When Indians
are excluded, the rate shows a more substantial decrease from 520.3 to 512.5 deaths per
100,000 population.       _      -||   |||;   _
Table 10.—Mortality from Cardiovascular-Renal Diseases,
British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
Intermediate Int.
List No.
Fifth
Revision
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Including Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Excluding Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
A70
83
A79
58, 87a
A80-A83
90-95
A84
87e, 102
A85
96-99
A86
100, Ilia
_108,A109
13(M32
Vascular lesions affecting the
central nervous system1	
Rheumatic fever .	
Diseases of the heart1	
Hypertension without mention
of the heart1	
Diseases of arteries	
Diseases of veins	
Nephritis and nephrosis1	
Totals	
Per cent of all deaths	
Rate per 100,000 population	
913
1,194
1,194
1,155
15
19
22
17
3,755
4,043
4,103
4,378
19
89
78
84
176
206
195
228
38
44
40
58
390
160
126
162
1,298
17
4,441
82
218
64
115
5,306 5,755 5,758 6,082 6,235
46.9 49.7 49.5 50.3 51.0
476.3
505.7
494.2
507.7
506.9
894
1,174
1,174
1,138
9
16
20
20
3,705
3,993
4,053
4,333
19
89
76
84
175
203
191
226
36
44
40
56
382
154
119
158
1,280
13
4,384
81
216
63
110
5,220 5,673 5,673 6,015 6,147
48.9 51.6 51.2 52.0 52.1
480.9
511.5
499.1
520.3
512.5
1 The large increases and decreases in these categories between the years 1949 and 1950 partially resulted from the
changeover to the Sixth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death.
 S 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Mortality from Diseases of the Heart
1952, deaths from this cause among females decreased by 3.4 per cent. The greatest
proportion of the increase among males was due to a higher death toll from arteriosclerotic
heart disease, while deaths ascribed to hypertensive heart conditions declined by almost
rWie-th.rd.   Deaths of females from hypertensive heart disease also showed a substantial
1 disease, wiinc -a^cn^o «ow*-.^~ _~ ~jr -. _- -™« ^vuuvu uy almost
one-third. Deaths of females from hypertensive heart disease also showed a substantial
decline from the 1952 figure, but there was little change in the number of deaths due to
Mher types of heart conditions.
Table 11.—Mortality from Diseases of the Heart, by Sex and Age-group,
British Columbia, 1953
Intermediate Int.
List No.
Type of Heart Disease
Age-group
0-19
Years
20-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
A80
A81
A82
A83
Chronic rheumatic —K ~~-—.—M.
F.
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative  M.
F.
Othef diseases of the heart M.
F.
Hypertensive  M.
F.
Totals M.
F.
1
1
9
9
10
4
4
1
17
7
100
21
2
1
9
5
23
16
128
34
17
21
278
71
9
3
14
13
318
108
24
20
671
234
25
8
62
44
782
306
22
12
897
479
45
18
79
81
1,043
590
80 and
Over
5
6
534
413
24
29
44
33
607
481
Total
94
76
2,490
1,223
109
63
208
178
2,901
1,540
Mortality from Other Major Cardiovascular-Renal Diseases
^f|||; The table following shows mortality from three other important cardiovascular-renal
causes apart from heart disease. These three causes—namely, vascular lesions affecting
the central nervous system, diseases of the arteries, and nephritis—together caused 1,631
deaths in 1953. With respect to these three causes, the excess of male mortality over
female mortality is much less than was the case with diseases of the heart, whereas for
heart disease mortality amongst males was almost double that for females; for these
latter conditions the male mortality exceeded the female by only 10 per cent. Deaths
from these causes occurred mostly after the age of 60, only 12 per cent being at ages
under 60.
Table 12.—Mortality from Vascular Lesions Affecting the Central Nervous
System, Diseases of the Arteries, and Nephritis, by Sex and Age-group,
British Columbia, 1953. I
Intermediate Int.
List No.
Type of Disease
Age-group
0-19
Years
20-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
A70
A85
A108,
A109
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system m.
F.
Diseases of the arteries M.
f!
Nephritis and nephrosis M.
F.
Totals m#
F.
1
9
3
5
7
1
10
3
22
25
2
3
5
31
43
8
2
9
7
11
4
15
11
27
30
48
52
143
118
25
13
18
9
273
254
48
30
18
8
80 and
Over
171
204
41
47
12
1_
224"
252
Total
647
651
124
94
79
Jt
850
781
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 27
MORTALITY FROM CANCER
Only a slight change was recorded in the death rate for cancer in 1953. The rate
per 100,000 population was 155.7, compared with the 1952 rate of 158.2. Malignancies
of the intestine and stomach accounted for 24.7 per cent of all cancer deaths.
An increase of almost 30 per cent occurred in the number of cancer deaths ascribed
to leuteemia and aleukaemia in 1953. In the previous year there were 65 such deaths,
while in 1953 there were 84. Deaths from cancer of the breast declined by 15.5 per
cent, while deaths from lung cancer increased by 14.2 per cent.
Table 13.—Mortality from Cancer, British Columbia, 1950-53
Intermediate
Int. List No.
A44
A45
A46
A47
A48
A49
A50
A51
A52
A53
A54
A55
A56
A57
A58
A59
Malignant Neoplasms of—
1950
1951
1952
Buccal cavity and pharynx.
CEsophagus	
Stomach	
Intestine	
Rectum—„ I	
Larynx., ..—	
Trachea, and of bronchus and lung not specified as secondary.
Breast ..	
Cervix uteri 	
Other and unspecified parts of uterus |
Prostate	
Skin	
Bone and connective tissue _
Other and unspecified sites	
Leukaemia and aleukaemia  j	
Lymphosarcoma and other neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic system	
Totals ..
Per cent of all deaths	
Rate per 100,000 population.
42
32
261
168
122
5
167
148
48
42
71
21
21
452
65
64
40
34
236
160
97
12
182
162
45
41
89
18
15
459
61
80
35
34
278
226
90
13
233
155
58
24
91
24
18
473
65
78
1953
41
39
264
209
106
14
200
179
51
34
116
17
21
448
84
92
1,729         1,731         1,895         1,915
14.9          14.9          15.7          15.7
151.9
148.6
158.2
155.7
 S 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
MORTALITY FROM ACCIDENTS AND VIOLENCE
In order to obtain as much information as possible regarding mortality from
acci
dents and violence, a dual coding is used. These deaths are first classified according to
the external cause and then they are again classified according to the nature of the injury
Statistics showing both types of classification are presented in the detailed tables of Part
III of this Report. However, it is also informative to cross-classify deaths from accidents
and violence by the nature of the injury and the external cause of the injury. Such a
cross-classification is presented in Table 14, which follows.    §
In 1953 the greatest single cause of accidental death was poisoning, which resulted
in approximately one-sixth of all deaths in this group. Fractures of the skull resulted
in almost as great a number of deaths as poisoning, while internal injuries were responsible
for 14 per cent and fractures of limbs almost 10 per cent. These four types of injury
caused 700, or almost 60 per cent, of all accidental deaths in 1953. If
Table 14.—Mortality from Accidents and Violence, by Nature of Injury,
British Columbia, 1953 §
Int. List
No.
E800-E802
E810-E825
E830-E835
E840-E845
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E825
E840-E845
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E825
E900-E904
E910-E936
E960-E965
E800-E802
E810-E825
E840-E845
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E960-E965
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E825
E830-E835
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
Cause of Death
Fracture of skuU (N80O-N8O4)	
Railway accidents	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Motor-vehicle non-traffic accidents .	
Other road-vehicle accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls  	
Other accidents	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war) 	
Fracture of spine and trunk (N805-N809)	
Railw ay accidents I .	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Other road-vehicle accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war)	
Fracture of limbs (N810-N829)	
Railway accidents	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents	
Late effects of injury and poisoning	
Head injury (excluding skuU fracture) (N850-N856)	
Railway accidents !	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Other road-vehicle accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents	
Late effects of injury and poisoning	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war ) —.	
Internal injury of chest, abdomen, and pelvis (N860-N869)	
Railway accidents	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Motor-vehicle non-traffic accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls j	
Other accidents	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war)	
Laceration and open wounds (N870-N908) I	
Railway accidents ~
Accidental falls |
Other accidents	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
Total
201
9
88
2
3
8
27
42
14
8
60
1
23
2
20
10
1
3
119
1
5
105
7
1
96
2
13
1
4
25
15
2
32
2
171
5
79
3
12
7
53
10
2
20
2
2
7
9
Male
Female
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 29
Table 14.—Mortality from Accidents and Violence, by Nature of Injury,
British Columbia, 1953—Continued
Int. List
No.
E910-E936
E910-E936
E850-E858
E860-E866
E910-E936
E850-E858
E870-E888
E890-E895
E910-E936
E970-E979
E810-E925
E850-E858
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E960-E965
E970-E979
E980-E985
E80O-E999
Cause of Death
Superficial injury, contusion, and crushing with intact skin surface
(N910-N929) 	
Other accidents	
Effects of foreign body entering through orifice (N930-N936)	
Other accidents	
Burns (N940-N949)	
Water-transport accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Other accidents	
Effects of poisons (N960-N979)	
Water-transport accidents	
Accidental poisoning by solid and liquid substances	
Accidental poisoning by gases and vapours	
Other accidents .	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury	
All other and unspecified effects of external causes (N950-N959,
N980-N999)	
Motor-vehicle traffic accidents	
Water-transport accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents	
Late effects of injury and poisoning	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury _	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war)	
Total accidental and violent deaths	
Total
1
1
25
25
29
2
1
26
209
3
30
63
31
82
273
19
41
4
5
151
1
50
72
Male
1,204
1
1
17
17
19
2
1
16
149
3
21
44
20
61
226
18
37
4
4
125
1
37
Female
8
8
10
10
60
~9
19
11
21
47
1
4
1
26
75
72
905
299
 S 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Mortality from Accidents and Violence by Age and Sex
Table 15 shows a cross-classification of mortality from accidents and violence b
external cause, sex, and age-group. The most notable feature of these statistics is the
preponderance of male deaths from accidental and violent causes. The distribution of
these deaths according to age is also of interest. It is evident that accidents constitute a
real hazard at all ages of life.     |
Once again, motor-vehicle accidents caused the greatest number of deaths |
__ _ 1 -._   __,    _-./-.-m.^ ,---*-*-_ __>.r. AlmAot   O.T-   -r\e*f   /"•o-ri'fr   r\t   «-»!'    «-»/-»_■_.A~.t*a-~ 1    J       .t
to
same category.
Table 15.—Mortality from Accidents and Violence by External Cause,
Sex, and Age-group, British Columbia, 1953
Interme
Cause of Death
Age-group
diate Int.
List No.
Vi
3§
as g
Cir*
mr**
ikfi
ON*
§6
Tt
U
0
h
AE138
Motor-vehicle accidents
M.
11
7
3
2
2
3
1
1
8
7
1
1
1
1
21
5
24
13
2
18
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
4
6
14
3
9
2
1
1
31
9
30
2
9
3
5
11
4
4
1
1
11
1
23
2
16
6
3
1
24
9
18
7
2
11
3
7
2
2
4
1
10
1
25
19
6
1
1
16
8
9
7
6
7
3
6
3
1
7
1
8
1
9
1
35
11
4
2
19
12
10
1
11
2
7
1
4
7
3
1
14
1
14
1
36
12
1
23
9
14
1
10
6
12
9
3
3
1
2
11
2
7
i    £■■:
22
4
18
5
3
1
15
4
30
22
2
1
3
6
1
19
2
1
6
4
1
3
3
32
44
1
1
1
4
1
7
1
5
1
1671
AE139
AE140
Other transport accidents
Accidental poisoning
F.
.M.
F.
.... ,   _.M.
65
92
9
65
AE141
Accidental falls
F.
j    M.
28
108
AE142
Accident caused by machinery
F.
M.
83
32
AE143
Accident caused by fire and explosior
bustible material                	
F.
i of com-
M.
1
34
AE144
Accident caused by hot substance,
liquid, steam, and radiation.
F.
corrosive
.M.
19
2
AE145
Accident caused by firearm           .   .
F.
,-M.
2
22
AE146
AE147
Accidental drowning and submersion
All other accidental causes
F.
M.
F.
.     .M.
3
951
18
124
AE148
Suicide and self-inflicted iniurv
F.
.M.
20
1551
AE149
F.
Homicide  and  injury  purposely  inflicted  by
other persons (not in war .•    ....                   M
43
9
Totals -
F.
___   .M.
8
74
40
61
10
1
144
29
128
25
111
34
123
34
107 |
33
95 |
38 |
59 |
56 i
	
9052
F.
299
1 Includes 1 case where age was not stated.
2 Includes 3 cases where age was not stated.
MORTALITY FROM DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY
The group of causes listed in the International Statistical Classification under the
heading " Certain Diseases of Early Infancy " (rubrics 760-776, inclusive) follows accidental deaths in importance. This classification includes birth injuries, asphyxia, infections of the new-born, and certain other less frequent conditions peculiar to early infancy.
However, it is more meaningful when studying infant deaths to relate them to the number
of live births which have occurred, and to consider at the same time other causes wlucn
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 31
result in infant deaths which do not fall within the more restricted group of diseases
neculiar only to early infancy. For this reason, these conditions are discussed under the
general heading of | Infant Mortality," beginning on page 32.
MORTALITY FROM PNEUMONIA
Table 16 shows deaths due to pneumonia for the five-year period 1949 to 1953,
inclusive. While total deaths from this cause remained the same from 1952 to 1953^
there was a considerable drop in Indian deaths from pneumonia, but a corresponding
increase in these deaths amongst the non-Indian population. The number of deaths
due to pneumonia fluctuates considerably from year to year. About two-thirds of all
pneumonia deaths are ascribed to bronchial pneumonia, another 18 per cent to lobar
pneumonia, and the remainder, 21 per cent, to other and unspecified pneumonia.
Table 16.—Mortality from Pneumonia by Type, British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
Fifth
Revision
Int. List No.
Type of Pneumonia
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
Intermediate
Int. List No.
1949 1950 1951 1952 1953
1949 1950 1951 1952 1953
A89
A90
A91
108
107
109
Lobar pneumonia 	
125
251
116
95
222
83
82
276
93
76
267
93
79
286
71
106
222
67
82
187
45
69
250
57
62
232
64
73
Bronchopneumonia      	
256
Other and unspecified types of pneumonia
Totals 	
Per cent of all deaths    .
Rate per 100,000 population	
51
492
400
451
436
436
395
314
376
358
380
4.3
3.5
3.9
3.6
3.6
3.7
2.9
3.4
3.1
3.2
44.2
35.1
38.7
36.4
35.4
35.6
28.31 33.1
30.6
31.7
MORTALITY FROM TUBERCULOSIS
A further major decline was recorded in tuberculosis deaths during 1953. Whereas
the 1952 rate was 17.9 per 100,000 population, the rate in 1953 stood at only 11.9. In
the population excluding Indians, the death rate dropped from 15.3 in 1952 to 10.2 in
1953. The total number of deaths from this disease in 1953—namely, 146—represented
a 31-per-cent decrease from the 1952 figure and nearly a 75-per-cent drop from the
figure only ten years ago. Tuberculosis of the respiratory system accounted for 83 per
cent of all tuberculosis deaths. British Columbia ranks sixth among the Provinces wiffi
respect to its tuberculosis death rate. Ontario, the three Prairie Provinces, and Nova
Scotia all have rates lower than this Province.
Table 17. — Mortality from Tuberculosis by Site, British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
Fifth
Revision
Int. List No.
Organ or Site Affected
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
Intermediate
Int. List No.
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Al
13
14
15
16-17
18-22
Respiratory system                  	
362
24
5
4
11
271
22
1
3
16
254
15
2
3
18
192
14
1
1
6
121
10
3
12
273
9
4
2
7
215
7
1
3
13
197
4
1
3
10
164
7
1
1
6
106
A2
A3
Meninges and central nervous system	
Intestines, peritoneum,  and mesenteric
glands  	
5
3
A4
Bones and joints                      	
A5
8
Totals   	
406
313
292
214
146
295
239
215
179
122
Per cent of all deaths -
3.6
2.71   2.5
1.8
1.2
2.8
2.2
1.9
1.5
1.0
Rate per 100,000 population	
36.4127.5125.1
17.9
11.9
27.2
21.6
18.9
15.3
10.2
 S 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
INFANT MORTALITY
During 1953 the lowest infant mortality and neo-natal mortality rates ever record d
in this Province were attained. The infant mortality rate was 27.1 per 1,000 live births
while the neo-natal mortality rate was 16.8. A decline of 26 per cent occurred in the
infant mortality rate amongst the Indian population. Although this rate is still relatively
high, it dropped from 121.8 per 1,000 Indian live births in 1952 to 89.9 in 1953.
The infant mortality rate in this Province was the lowest in Canada, the National
rate being 35.4 deaths per 1,000 live births. The neo-natal mortality rate was second
lowest in Canada, but well below the National rate of 21.3. Prince Edward Island
recorded the lowest rate with only 12.1 neo-natal deaths per 1,000 live births.
Immaturity remained as the leading cause of infant deaths, while it was reported as
being a contributing factor in many other infant deaths ascribed to specific causes. Congenital malformation caused the second greatest number of infant deaths in 1953. The
number of infant deaths charged to congenital malformation has increased steadily during
the last few years. In 1950 congenital malformations were said to have caused 11.2 per
cent of all infant deaths, whereas, in 1953, 17.2 per cent of the deaths were so caused.
Table 18.—Neo-natal, Infant, and Maternal Mortality Rates,
British Columbia, 1944-53
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Neo-natal mortality rates per 1,000 live
births—
Including Indians	
Excluding Indians I —
Indians	
Infant   mortality   rates   per   1,000   live
births—
Including Indians	
Excluding Indians	
Indians : _.
Maternal mortality rates  per  1,000 live
births—
Including Indians	
Excluding Indians	
Indians	
23.7
22.0
49.1
40.4
32.8
153.1
2.6
2.4
5.8
24.1
23.1
39.0
42.0
34.3
151.1
2.6
2.4
5.7
22.1
19.7
47.2
37.7
29.6
168.3
1.7
1.4
6.1
22.4
20.8
52.9
36.5
29.5
163.0
1.2
1.2
7.2
21.1
20.1
40.1
33.4
28.0
133.4
1.1
1.0
3.0
19.8
18.7
39.7
31.4
25.8
134.7
1.0
1.0
2.1
17.8
17.1
31.4
29.7
24.1
131.4
1.0
0.9
2.1
18.3
17.4
34.3
29.9
24.6
128.0
0.7
0.7
1.1
18.3
17.4
35.4
29.2
24.2
121.8
0.6
0.6
m
1953
16.8
16.3
26.3
27,1
23.6
89.9
0.6
0.5
1.2
Table 19.—Infant Mortality, British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
Int. List
No.
Fifth
Revision
Int. List
No.
001-019
13-22
056
9
085
35
273
64
480-483
33
490-493,
763
107-109
500-502
106
571.0,
572,764
119
750-759
157
760-761
160
762
161a
774-776
159
800-962
169-195
Cause of Death
Including Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Excluding Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952
Tuberculosis	
Whooping-cough	
Measles	
Diseases of the thymus gland
Influenza	
Pneumonia.
Bronchitis...
Diarrhoea and enteritis	
Congenital malformations	
Injury at birth1	
Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis1	
Immaturity1	
Accidents	
Other causes	
Totals	
Live births	
Rate per 1,000 live births
6
1
12
17
11
123
7
35
120
93
35
274
41
83
2
5
5
14
26
101
10
24
90
105
84
147
33
157
4
7
3
12
14
99
14
43
130
82
97
158
37
139
15
101
10
2
137
90
102
183
42
177
3
5
9
5
15
119
10
15
148
85
99
171
31
144
858      805      839      870      859
27,301 27,116 28,077 29,827 31,746
31.4     29.7     29.9     29.2     27.1
2
1
3
15
6
49
7
20
113
91
11
6
44
9
7
89
100
1
2
10
4
47
9
19
125
78
2
2
2
5
48
9
10
128
83
1953
3
1
5
4
79
5
140
81
621|    656I
2p90J25^90l2^
24.21  23.6
25.8
changed to8^ these categories between the years 1949 and 1950 partiaUy' ^d"ftf
cnange-over to the Sixth Revision of the Internationa] Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes ot v
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
Graph C—Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53
(Rate per 1,000 live births.)
S 33
20
10
'     I     I L
1921
1926
EXCLUDING
INDIANS
J I I L
I     >     I
1931
1936
J I L_L
1941
llll
1946
I      i      I
1953
 S 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
MATERNAL MORTALITY f---
The maternal mortality rate among the total population was 0.6 per 1,000 live
births in 1953, the same rate as last year. However, the non-Indian rate declined to 0.5
a new record. The number of deaths was the same as in 1952, 18 in the total population'
16 in the population excluding Indians. As mentioned in the 1952 Report, the number
of deaths from any one cause is so small that variations from year to year are possible
solely as a result of chance and it would be unwise to ascribe significance to such changes.
Table 20.—Maternal Mortality, British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
lidterme-
diate Int.
List No.
A115
A116
A117
A118
A119
A120
Fifth
Revision
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Including Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Excluding Indians
1949
1950   1951
147
144,
148
143,
146
141
140
142,
145
149,
150
Sepsis of pregnancy, childbirth,
and the puerperium	
Toxaemias of pregnancy and the
puerperium	
Haemorrhage of pregnancy and
childbirth	
Abortion without mention of sepsis or toxaemia	
Abortion with sepsis	
Other complications of pregnancy,
childbirth and the puerperium	
Totals™	
Rate per 1,000 live births	
6
7
6
2
2
8
2
6
5
2
1
5
1
2
28
27
20       18
18
1.0
1.0
0.7
0.6
0.6
6
7
3
2
2
3
8
1
1
6
3
2
1
5
2
1952
2
4
1
1
4
1953
2
4
4
1
1
25       24      19      16     16
1.0      0.9     0.7     0.6    0.5
Graph D.—Maternal Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-53
(Rates per 1,000 live births.)
1921
1926
1931
1936
1941
1946
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 35
MORTALITY FROM NOTIFIABLE DISEASES
Mortality among the total population from the notifiable diseases shown below
declined by 1.9 per cent from the 1952 figure this year and was almost unchanged from
the figure for 1951. When Indians are excluded, however, there was a decrease of only
0.4 per cent from the 1952 figure. f
Most of the drop in notifiable disease morbidity was attributable to the substantial
improvement in tuberculosis mortality, although deaths from syphilis, poliomyelitis, and
influenza also showed a decrease. Cancer mortality was up somewhat, as was mortality
from pneumonia. Cancer is the cause of death in 74.5 per cent of all deaths from notifiable diseases. The respiratory diseases tuberculosis, pneumonia, and influenza accounted for another 21.2 per cent of these deaths, leaving only 4.3 per cent resulting from
the other notifiable diseases shown.
Table 21.—Mortality from Notifiable Diseases, British Columbia, 1949-53
Sixth
Revision
Intermediate Int.
List No.
Fifth
Revision
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Including Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952 I 1953
Excluding Indians
1949
1950
1951
1952 I 1953
A1-A5
13-22
A6-A10
30
All
25b
A12
1
A13
2
A16
27a, b
A17
8
A18
115b
A19
11
A21
10
A22
9
A23
6
A25
23
A26
12
A28
36
A29     |
37
A32
35
A34
32
A36     |
39A-C
A44-A59
44-55
A88
33
A89
108
A90
107
Tuberculosis	
Venereal disease—
Syphilis	
Gonorrhoea	
Typhoid fever	
Paratyphoid fever	
Dysentery, all forms	
Scarlet fever	
Septic sore throat	
Erysipelas	
Diphtheria	
Whooping-cough	
Meningococcal infections
Leprosy	
Tetanus	
Poliomyelitis.	
Encephalitis	
Measles	
Infectious hepatitis	
Typhus fever	
Cancer.	
Influenza—	
Pneumonia—
Lobar	
Bronchial	
Totals	
406
78
1
2
3
1
5
1
2
1,637
37
125
251
313
37
5
1
3
2
3
10
2
3
2
4
7
22
17
4
4
1
1,729
53
95
222
292
24
1
2
1
1
8
6
1
6
1
6
3
1,731
127
82
276
214
33
1,895
46
76
267
146
26
3
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
1
2
5
7
7
8
1
1
40
30
1
12
17
9
12
1
1,915
34
79
286
2,583 |2,506 |2,568 [2,619 |2,569
295
73
5
3
1
5
1
2
3
4
7
4
1
1,615
30
106
222
239
34
3
1
2
1
3
2
1
6
2
1
7
9
4
1,713
28
82
187
215
21
3
1
5
6
1
3
3
1,718
108
69
161
179
30
1
4
4
1
3
7
40
5
6
1,873
30
62
232
122
26
2
5
8
1
30
1
5
12
1
1,900
21
73
256
2,372 |2,322 12,313 12,477 |2,466
THE FOUR CHIEF CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE
I DIFFERENT AGE-GROUPS
Information regarding the leading causes of death in the various age-groups for the
population, including and excluding Indians, is shown in Tables 22a and 22b.
Again this year immaturity was the leading cause of infant deaths for the population including Indians as well as that excluding Indians. Congenital malformations
followed for both groups, but while pneumonia was in third place for the total population,
followed by postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis, postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis was in
third place among the non-Indian population and injury at birth was fourth. These four
causes accounted for over three-fifths of all infant deaths.
In the groups from 1 to 39 years of age, accidents were the leading cause of death,
having resulted in 42.9 per cent of all deaths at these ages. This was a further increase
over the proportion for 1951 and 1952, when accidents caused 37 per cent and 38.8 per
cent respectively of all deaths from 1 to 39 years of age.  An additional 9.9 per cent of
 S 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
the mortality was caused by malignant neoplasms, slightly less than the 10.4 per cent so
caused in 1952. Whereas, last year, tuberculosis appeared in the first four causes in all
but one of the age-groups from 1 to 39, in 1953 it appeared only once as fourth leading
cause in the 20-29 group.
There was a slight decline in 1953 in the proportion of deaths at ages 40 and over
caused by heart disease, as compared to the proportion so caused in 1952. This year
42.4 per cent of these deaths resulted from heart conditions, while in 1952, 42.8 per cent
were due to heart disease. Cancer caused 17.5 per cent of the deaths among those 40
and over in 1953; vascular lesions, 12.4 per cent; and accidents, 5.2 per cent, a total for
the four causes of 77.5 per cent. In 1944, 69 per cent of the deaths at ages 40 and over
resulted from these four causes. Among the non-Indian population, 78.7 per cent of the
deaths from age 40 on were due to one of the four causes described above.
Table 22a.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Including Indians), British Columbia, 1953
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-
groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 100,000
Population
774, 776
750-759
490-493, 763
762
800-962
490-493, 763
750-759
140-205
800-962
140-205
080-081
510
750-759
490-493, 763
400-402
800-962
140-205
400-402
590-594
963, 970-979
800-962
963, 970-979
140-205
410-443
800-962
140-205
963, 970-979
410-443
410-443
140-205
800-962
330-334
Under 1 Year—Deaths, 859
1. Immaturity	
2. Congenital malformations	
3. Pneumonia	
4. Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis	
1-4 Years—Deaths, 172
1. Accidental deaths	
2. Pneumonia	
3. Congenital malformations	
4. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
4.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
5-9 Years—Deaths, 72
Accidental deaths	
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Poliomyelitis	
Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids	
Congenital malformations	
Pneumonia	
Rheumatic fever	
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
10-19 Years—Deaths, 113
Accidental deaths	
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Rheumatic fever	
Nephritis	
Suicide	
20-29 Years—Deaths, 284
Accidental deaths	
Suicide	
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Diseases of heart	
30-39 Years—Deaths, 341
Accidental deaths	
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Suicide	
Diseases of heart	
40-49 Years—Deaths, 641
Diseases of heart	
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Accidental deaths	
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
171
148
119
99
48
21
14
11
33
9
3
3
2
2
2
67
9
8
3
3
147
22
17
15
126
51
25
24
162
136
93
47
19.9
17.2
13.9
11.5
27.9
12.2
8.1
6.4
45.8
12.5
4.2
4.2
0.4
0.4
0.4
59.3
8.0
7.1
2.7
2.7
51.8
7.7
6.0
5.3
37.2
15.0
7.3
7.0
25.3
21.2
14.5
7.3
560.7
485.2
390.2
324.6
44.7
19.5
11.5
10.2
29.2
8.0
1,915
2.7
30
2.7
4
1.8
184
1.8
460
1.8
17
41.2
5.5
4.9
1.8
1.8
87.3
13.1
10.1
8.0
67.8
27.2
13.3
12.8
104.4
87.6
59.9
30.3
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
171
184
460
99
989
460
184
1,915
989
989
1,915
17
115
198
989
198
1,915
4,441
989
1,915
198
4,441
4,441
1,915
989
1,298
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953#
Table 22a.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Including Indians), British Columbia, 1953—Continued
S 37
Int. List
No.
410-443
140-205
800-962
330-334
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
140-205
330-334
490-493,763
410-443
330-334
140-205
490-493,763
Cause of Death
50-59 Years—Deaths, 1,193
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Accidental deaths	
4. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
60-69 Years—Deaths, 2,521
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths	
70-79 Years—Deaths, 3,623
1. Diseases of heart __.
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Pneumonia	
80 Years and over—Deaths, 2,395
1. Diseases of heart .—
2. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
3. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
4. Pneumonia 	
Deaths in
Age-
groups
by Cause
of Death
426
276
108
74
1,088
535
261
114
1,633
608
527
116
1,088
375
262
120
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
35.7
23.1
9.1
6.2
43.2
21.2
10.4
4.5
45.1
16.8
14.5
3.2
45.4
15.7
10.9
5.0
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 100,000
Population
367.6
238.1
93.2
63.8
1,024.5
503.3
245.5
107.2
2,441.0
908.8
787.8
173.4
6,554.2
2,259.0
1,578.3
722.9
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
4,441
1,915
989
1,298
4,441
1,915
1,298
989
4,441
1,915
1,298
460
4,441
1,298
1,915
460
Table 22b.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Excluding Indians), British Columbia, 1953
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-
groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 100,000
Population
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
774,776
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
Under 1 Year—Deaths, 712
Immaturity  	
161
140
91
81
44
21
13
11
31
9
3
2
2
60
9
5
3
3
22.6
19.7
12.8
11.4
33.6
16.0
9.9
8.4
47.7
13.8
4.6
3.1
3.1
60.0
9.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
543.8
472.9
307.4
273.6
42.6
20.3
12.6
10.7
28.6
8.3
2.8
1.8
1.8
3.85
5.8
3.2
1.9
1.9
161
750-759
762
Congenital malformations	
Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis—   	
184
91
760-761
Injury at birth	
81
800-962
1-4 Years—Deaths, 131
Accidental deaths.-                            	
916
490-493,763
Pneumonia    	
401
750-759
Congenital malformations                 	
184
140-205
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues     	
1,900
800-962
5-9 Years—Deaths, 65
Accidental deaths.—                         	
916
140-205
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues    	
1,900
080-081
Poliomyelitis                                      	
30
510
Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids	
3
750-759
Congenital malformations  	
184
800-962
10-19 Years—Deaths, 100
Accidental deaths.—                          	
96
140-205
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues                 	
1,900
400-402
Rheumatic fever
13
590-594
Nephritis	
110
963,970-979
Suicide „_
197
 S 38
department of health and welfare
Table 22b.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Excluding Indians), British Columbia, 1953—Continued
Int. List
No.
800-962
963, 970-979
140-205
410-443
800-962
140-205
963, 970-979
410-443
410-443
140-205
800-962
330-334
410-443
140-205
800-962
330-334
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
140-205
130-334
490-493,763
410-443
330-334
140-205
490-493, 763
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-
groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
20-29 Years—Deaths, 255
1. Accidental deaths	
2. Suicide.
3. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
4, Diseases of heart. ~-	
30-39 Years—Deaths, 315
1. Accidental deaths	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Suicide	
4. Diseases of heart	
40-49 Years—Deaths, 631
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues .	
3. Accidental deaths j	
4. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
50-59 Years—Deaths, 1,162
1. Diseases of heart —
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues \
3. Accidental deaths	
4. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
60-69 Years—Deaths, 2,501
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths	
70-79 Years—Deaths, 3,568
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Pneumonia .	
80 Years and over-
Diseases of heart	
-Deaths, 2,347
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
Pneumonia  	
128
22
17
14
110
51
25
21
159
134
91
46
421
274
102
71
1,081
533
259
110
1,614
602
522
113
1,070
368
259
119
50.2
8.6
6.7
5.5
34.9
16.2
7.9
6.7
25.2
21.2
14.4
7.3
36.2
23.6
8.8
6.1
43.2
21.3
10.3
-4.4
45-2
16.9
14.6
3.2
45.6
15.7
11.0
5.1
Age-specific
Death Rate
Per 100,000
Population
78.1
13.4
10.4
8.5
59.7
27.7
13.6
11.4
104.1
87.7
59.6
30.1
369.1
240.2
89.4
62.2
1,027.6
506.7
246-2
104.6
2,440.6
910.3
789.4
170.9
6,581.8
2,263.6
1,593.2
732.0
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
916
197
1,900
4,384
916
1,900
197
4,334
4,384
1,900
916
1,280
4,384
1,900
916
1,280
4384
1,900
1,280
916
4,384
1,900
1,280
401
4^84
1,280
1,900
401
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 39
STILLBIRTHS
While the number of stillbirths in the total population remained unchanged from
the 1952 figure, the rate was down to 11.8 per 1,000 live births from the 1952 figure
of 12.6.   The rate in the population excluding Indians was 11.9.
The Canada-wide stillbirth rate in 1953 was 16.7, and British Columbia again had
the lowest rate of any Province in Canada.
Table 23.—Stillbirths, British Columbia, 1944-53
Year
1944.
1945..
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949..
1950:
1951-
1952-
1953-
Including Indians
Number
of
Stillbirths
Number of
Live
Births
Rate per
1,000 Live
Births
298
328
321
340
339
394
369
365
375
375
18,999
18,877
22,609
26,286
25,984
27,301
27,116
28,077
29,827
31,746
15.7
17.4
14.2
12.9
13.0
14.4
13.6
13.0
12.6
11.8
Excluding Indians
Number
of
Stillbirths
Number of
live
Births
Rate per
1,000 Live
Births
291
3T6
305
317
322
372
345
343
347
357
17,797
17,646
21,296
24,906
24,642
25,890
25,716
26,647
28,300
30,110
16.4
17.9
14.3
12.7
13.1
14.4
13.4
12.9
12,1
11.9
    .        H H .- . marriages!-    -   - - 4^.  - - -.4.    ..
The rate of marriages this year remained at 9.2 per 1,000 population, the same as
in 1952. This is the first year there has been no decline in the rate since 1947. Table
24 shows that of the total number of people marrying, over 83 per cent were single.
Almost 10 per cent were divorced and the remainder, 7 per cent, were widowed.
Marriages by banns continued to increase. This year 25.8 per cent of all marriages
were performed on the authority of banns, 62.9 per cent by licence, and the remainder,
11.3 per cent, by civil ceremony.      1 ^
Table 27 indicates that of 10,026 marriages performed by religious ceremony, 77.9
per cent were performed by officiants of the United, Anglican, or Roman Catholic
Churches.
Table 24.—Marriages by Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties,
British Columbia, 1944-53
Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties
Total
Number
of
Marriages
Marriage
Rate per
1.000
Population
Year
Single
Widowed
Divorced
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
1944
7,176
7,811
9,957
9,835
9,668
9,467
9,266
9,480
9,301
9,506
7,116
7,733
9,723
9,676
9,618
9,329
9,137
9,388
9,164
9,279
669
619
652
684
676
701
683
694
653
705
657
751
838
827
805
842
831
812
815
849
589
832
1,153
1,333
1,374
1,208
1,161
1,098
1,127
1,087
661
778
1,201
1,349
1,295
1,205
1,142
1,072
1,102
1,170
8,434
9,262
11,762
11,852
11,718
11,376
11,110
11,272
11,081
11,298
9.0
1945
9.8
1946
1947                   :             	
11.7
11.4
1948                              "
|       10.8
1949
10.2
9.8
|         9.7
[         9.2
9.2
— .___..
 S 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 25.—Marriages by Months, British Columbia, 1944-53
Year
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
552
532
632
650
655
607
498
513
461
566
526
539
697
754
668
651
562
579
618
698
555
571
845
749
794
634
562
815
649
583
784
643
900
955
881
972
914
784
913
990
642
657
886
1,034
977
918
828
874
970
1,000
992
1,096
1,444
1,361
1,293
1,361
1,323
1,458
1,302
1,258
735
928
879
1,022
1,244
1,097
1,132
975
1,006
982
711
900
1,177
1,241
1,048
1,073
1,105
1,179
1,301
1,327
785
932
1,214
1,140
1,181
1,213
1,380
1,213
1,054
1,143
693
804
1,007
980
1,078
1,032
984
894
925
1,006
Table 26.—Marriages Performed According to Type,
British Columbia, 1949-53
Religious
Ceremony
fS*      •«   ^%
Year
Licence
Banns
V/ivu v^erei-iuny
lotal
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
1949
7,296
7,240
7,327
6,912
7,107
64.1
63.2
65.0
62.4
62.9
2,686
2,638
2,738
2,756
2,919
23.6
23.7
24.3
24.9
25.8
1,394            12.3
1,232            11.1
1,207      I      10.7
1
11,376
11,110
11,272
11,075
11,298
100
1950
1Q51                                  	
100
100
1952	
1953
1,407
1,272
12.7
11.3
100
100
Table 27.—Marriages Authorized by Banns or Licence According to Religious
Denomination of Officiating Minister, British Columbia, 1953
Religious Denomination
of Minister
Banns
Number
Per Cent
Licence
Number
Per Cent
Total
Number
Per Cent
Adventist	
Anglican	
Apostolic	
Baptist	
Brethren 	
Christian Scientist	
Christad elphian	
Christian Missionary	
Church of Christ (Disciples)
Church of God	
Eastern Orthodox __.
Evangelical _
Gospel	
Greek Catholic	
International Bible Student-L
Je wish	
Lutheran	
Mennonite, including Hutterite
Methodist . .   •  .
Moravian ____;	
Mormon \	
Oriental religions.	
Pentecostal Assembly-
Plymouth Brethren	
Presbyterian	
Reformed Church__
Roman Catholic	
Salvation Army	
Spiritualistic _________„
Swedenborgian	
Unitarian	
United Church of Canada	
Other religions	
Totals.
10
899
60
1
8
10
6
10
20
107
134
2
3
23
74
11
728
6
1
773
33
55.6
43.6
15.7
33.3
32.0
21.7
10.5
47.6
57.1
21.7
85.9
66.7
17.6
14.9
18.6
21.6
53.6
13.3
16.7
17.6
24.4
2,919
29.1
8
44.4
1,163
56.4
3
100.0
322
84.3
2
100.0
1
100.0
2
66.7
17
68.0
2
100.0
4
100.0
36
f&3
51
89.5
11
52.4
15
42.9
47
100.0
42
100.0
387
78.3
22
14.1
18
100.0
1
33.3
14
82.4
22
100.0
131
85.1
22
100.0
323
81.4
40
78.4
630
46.4
39
86.7
5
83.3
4
100.0
4
100.0
3,617
82.4
102
75.6
7,107
18
2,062
3
382
2
1
3
25
2
4
46
57
21
35
47
42
494
156
18
3
17
22
154
22
397
51
1,358
45
6
4
4
4,390
135
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
 I        VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 41
Graph E.—Marriages by Months, British Columbia, 1948-53
MARRIAGES
1,600
1,400
1,200-—
1,000
400
200
n    I    I    I    I    I    I    I    I    I    I    t    I     I    I    I    I    I    I
I     I    I    I    '    I    '    »    '    I    '
I    '    I    '    '    I    I     '    I    I    I    I    '    I    '    I    »
JFMAMI   JASONO  JFMAMJ  J   ASONDJFMAMJ   JASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND
1$49 1950 1951 1952 1953
 ImP T^Mm
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
ADOPTIONS
since
Since 1944 the number of adoptions in the Province has more than tripled.   Th
ortion of these that are adoptions of legitimate births has gradually decrease"     *
!, while an increasing proportion are shown as status not given or unknown.
Table 28.—Adoptions by Sex and Legitimacy of Adopted Children
British Columbia, 1944-53
Year off _.■
Registration
Legitimate
Births
Number
Per Cart
Illegitimate
Births
Number    PerCent
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.
91
30.0
102
29.8
115
31.9
159
3L2
243
35.7
255
33.6
242
30.0
233
29.5
262
28.2
268
25.9
199
234
238
339
436
498
547
534
611
719
65.7
68.4
66.1
66.6
64.1
65.5
67.8
67.7
65.8
69.5
Status not
Given or
Unknown
Number j Per Cent
13
6
7
11
1
7
18
22
56
47
4.3
1.8
2.0
2.2
0.2
0.9
22
2.8
6.0
4.6
Total
Number
303
342
360
509
680
760
807
789
929
1,034
PerCent
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
DIVORCES
The table following shows that, while there have been year to year fluctuations in the
proportions of people obtaining divorces who have been married for the various numbers
M. years shown, there has been no indication of a significant trend for any particuk
duration of marriage. Over 50 per cent of the divorces were granted to couples who
ha^e been married under ten years. The number of divorces granted in 1953 was down
slightly from the figure for 1952, but higher than the 1951 total.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 43
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 S 44
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
PART II.—ADMINISTRATION AND DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES
SUMMARY OF REGISTRATION SERVICES
The Division of Vital Statistics carries out major registration services under four
Acts, namely, the | Vital Statistics Act," the | Marriage Act," the 1 Change of Name
Act," and the I Wills Act." Registration of births, deaths, and marriages has been
mandatory in this Province since it was formed in 1872 and the entire set of registrations
is on file with the central office of the Division in Victoria.
Volume of Registration—All Races.—Volume of registrations filed with the
Division, as shown by Graph F, continued the upward trend which has developed since
1933 with but one interruption in 1944. In 1953 there were 58,977 registrations filed,
or 184 per cent more than were filed in 1932, the year which marked the beginning of
the rapid and steady rise in the volume of registration. Birth registrations accounted for
55 per cent of the 1953 registrations, being over three times the number filed in 1932.
Marriage registrations reached a high point in 1946 and have since remained fairly
constant, while death registrations have been increasing gradually over the years in line
with the increasing population. The most dramatic increase in the volume of registrations
filed has been with respect to adoptions, the Division having registered 1,034 in 1953,
which was over six times as many as it did twenty years ago. Graph G shows the
sudden increase in the registration of adoptions after 1946. Divorce registrations, on
the other hand, have been declining in numbers since 1946, as seen on Graph H, although
they rose rapidly from 1941 to 1946.
Table 1.—Summary
of Registration,
British Columbia
, 1944-53
Year
Live Births
Deaths
Marriages
StiUbirths
Adoptions
Divorces
Total
1944..     .                   .     .
19,962
20,229
23,870
26,758
26,965
27,786
28,079
28,509
30,394
32,487
9,833
9,848
10,212
10,768
11,444
11,311
11,506
11,658
12,319
12,234
8,549
9,317
11,875
11,892
11,773
11,374
11,076
11,374
11,207
11,326
321
340
331
355
343
399
373
348
359
383
303
330
402
509
680
760
807
789
929
1,034
1,031
1,366
2,052
1,880
1,744
1,554
1,424
1,394
1,593
1,512
39,999
1945
41,430
1946 _.     _    ___
48,742
1947 ___   _.__   _____
52,162
1948.     . .         	
52,949
1949   ___ _
53,184
1950
M 53,265
1951
54,072
1952.
56,801
1953..       ...     	
58,976
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
Graph F.—Summary of Registrations of Live Births, Deaths,
and Marriages, British Columbia, 1921-53 '
S 45
60,0D0
50,000
40, 000-L—
30,000
20,000
10,000
1921
1926
1931
1936
1941
1946
1953
 S 46
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND  WELFARE
Graph G.—Adoptions, British
Columbia, 1936-53
Graph H.—Divorces, British
Columbia, 1936-53
i, 250
1. 000
750
500
250
2,500
2,000
1,500
1, 000
500
1936
1941
1946
1953
1936
1941
1946
1953
Table 2.—Total Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages,
distributed According to Statistical Areas, British Columbia, 1953
Area
Live
Births
Deaths
Marriages
Area
Live
Births
Deaths
Marriages
la_
lb.
lc.
2a.
2b-
2c.
32L.
3b.
3c_
4ft.
4b.
5a_
5b-
5c.
5d.
5e..
5JL
6a.
6b-
6c_
6d_
6e_
6f_.
116
37
30
496
107
95
196
66
50
134
37
34
871
183
230
785
250
178
1,058
439
402
751
176
193
124
54
30
4,475
1,767
1,563
12,074
5,497
5,387
4,022
1,889
1,493
43
23
14
519
115
144
602
113
135
35
12
5
124
42
29
4
7
7
140
66
64
844
241
216
1
2
1
5
9
12
99
23
25
7a..
7b.
7c.
8a_.
8b.
8c.
SOSes'
8g~
9a..
9b.
9c
9d_
9e..
9f„
10a.
10b-
10c.
lOd	
Indian reserves.
Totals,
113
26
1
11
290
54
613
86
43
16
7
3
429
80
205
46
295
48
6
8
2
1
11
1
16
5
509
138
31
24
34
14
16
8
119
25
388
64
1,841
420
12,234
32,487
20
79
175
19
~94
51
61
3
~2
~134
p
4
~31
113
199
11,326
Volume of Registration—Indian and Oriental Races.—Tables 3 to 5, inclusive,
show the volume of registrations for births, deaths, and marriages among the Indian and
Oriental populations in the Province for the five-year period 1949 to 1953.
There were 1,841 Indian births registered in 1953. Although this was a 10-per-cent
increase in volume over the 1952 figure, it represented only a slight increase met the
1,812 Indian births registered in 1950. On the other hand, the number of deaths registered decreased considerably from 649 in 1952 to 420 in 1953, which was a 35-per-cent
reduction in volume. A larger reduction occurred in delayed death registrations, 149
being filed m 1952, as compared to only 37 in 1953. This large decline in delayed registrations accounted for 50 per cent of the reduction in the total volume of Indian death
registrations. Stillbirth registrations of Indians totalled 18 in 1953, which was 11 ^
than the number filed in 1952.   Ten were males and 8 females.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
Table 3.—Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages among
the Indian Population, British Columbia, 1949-53
S 47
Year
Live Births
Male
Female
Deaths
Male
Female
1949
1950
1951.
1952
1953.
790
969
777
872
945
730
843
708
806
896
Marriages
311
291
287
337
223
276
234
237
312
197
184
177
209
184
199
There were 789 registrations filed relating to persons of Chinese racial origin in
1953. Of these, 321 were birth registrations, 358 were death registrations, and 110 were
marriage registrations. Only three of these registrations covered events which occurred
prior to 1953. The death registrations of the Chinese were still indicative of the marked
excess of males over females in the Province, which has been noted for many years.
Although the number of marriage registrations increased slightly over 1952, it did not
reach the figure of 116 recorded in 1951. The number of stillbirths registered increased
from 2 in 1952 to 6 in 1953.   Three of these were male and 3 female.
Table 4.—Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages among
the Chinese Population, British Columbia, 1949-53
Year
Live Births
Male
Female
Deaths
Male
Female
Marriages
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953.
88
78
270
13
98
98
301
13
132
130
324
18
152
145
335
29
173
148
339
19
69
80
116
97
110
The Japanese population in the Province filed 265 registrations during 1953, of
which 152 were birth registrations, 54 death registrations, and 59 marriage registrations.
In addition, there were 3 female stillbirths. I
Table 5.—Registrations of Live Births, Deaths, and Marriages among
the Japanese Population, British Columbia, 1949-53
Live Births
Deaths
Marriages
Year
Male
Female
Male
Female
1949..
66
70
68
84
73
73
59
62
71
79
39
36
45
31
42
11
15
17
14
12
33
1950_
1951	
35
50
1952	
44
1953__
59
-
Searches.—The original documents covering all civil registrations of vital-statistics
events occurring within the Province are filed with the Division. Upon public or Governmental demand for certain information from a registration, a search for the original
registration may be made. These searches are of two types, revenue producing and non-
revenue producing, as shown in Table 6.
 S 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Revenue-producing searches have two set fees, depending upon the extent of the
search. A search covering a period of not more than three years costs 50 cents. If
a registration is not located in the series covering the year stated in the application
a search is made in the records of the year immediately preceding and the year immediately following. During 1953, 30,792 50-cent searches were made, this being 1,608
more than in 1952. Searches covering a more extended period of time cost $2. A total
of 128 such searches were carried out in 1953. |
Non-revenue-producing searches are made on behalf of other Governmental departments or as a result of applications for certificates from current registrations, when such
applications are received within one month of registration. During past years, revenue
searches have considerably outnumbered non-revenue searches, but in 1953 the volume
for each type was almost the same. The increased volume of non-revenue searches was
almost entirely confined to searches of current registrations. These have almost doubled
over the past four years, from 12,981 in 1950 to 24,358 in 1953. This is a direct indication of the greater use of birth certificates.
Table 6 also shows the amount of correspondence received by the Division during
the year. Since 1947 the volume received has been steadily increasing, which is in
keeping with the greater activity in registration and certification services.
Table 6.—Searches Performed and Correspondence Received by the Central
Office of the Division of Vital Statistics, British Columbia, 1944-53
Revenue Searches
Non-revenue Searches1
Correspon
Year
Regular 50*.
Special $2
Of Current
Registrations2
For
Governmental
Departments
dence
Received
1944
20,431
21,320
23,932
22,682
23,645
24,059
24,397
28,368
29,184
30,792
892
847
101
83
104
104
115
127
125
128
35,397
1945
37,600
1946
46,732
1947	
46,137
1948    _    ___...
51,190
1949
12,981
14,120
19,179
24,358
57,550
1950_     _
5,569
5,103
6,926
6,060
62,208
1951
68,979
1952    .
75,171
1953     	
82,514
1 The number of such searches is not available prior to 1950.
2 There is no search fee chargeable if application is made within thirty days of the date of registration.
Certifications.—The number of certifications issued, either as full reproductions of
the original document or certified extracts therefrom, has been increasing yearly since
1946, as shown in Table 7. There were 6,754 more issued in 1953 than in 1952. The
greatest part of the increase has resulted from more extensive demand for birth certificates. Over the eight-year period shown in Table 7, birth certificates issued annually
have increased from 15,309 to 39,101. The number issued in 1953 was 6,741 more
than the number issued in 1952, the largest yearly increase recorded since 1946. The
wallet-sized laminated certificate remained the most popular form of birth certification,
accounting for 80 per cent of the total issued during the year. There were 31,307
laminated certificates issued in 1953, as compared to 24,807 in 1952. The number (rf
dearth certificates issued has remained relatively unchanged since 1948. On the other
hand, marriage certificates declined in volume from 1946 to 1950, then increased
markedly in 1951. -if
A slight increase has occurred in the other major form of certification, the certified
copy. These copies, which are a full photographic reproduction of the original registration, increased in number from 5,331 in 1952 to 5,579 in 1953.
In addition to the above certifications, there may be issued by the District Regtftrars
offices certificates from those registrations of births, deaths, and marriages for which tiie
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1953
S 49
original registration is still on file in the district office.    This enables an applicant to
.   • ^rtifimte from the local District Registrar withrmt ha™™ y_. „.,.:* -.^i __*
certificate from the local District Registrar without having to wait until the
l/l/ltlrt""" m . I       • T   T'        i • "I-» « • rt«--.V_»_.        Hlv
1        _____*-__>_-*-'>%*-   ic   ■r.or'^ix/P'ri   in    Vinton c. D <=-mo +*•«-_ + __-_•_■.,-   _.-.,-.   .c      i   _       ..
office fron
tinues to produce the greatest number of these local certifications.
Table 7.—Revenue-producing Certifications Issued by the Central Office of
the Division of Vital Statistics, British Columbia, 1946-53
am d vw»"v— — - -o——    -v. "umu6 iu wait until me
original registration is received in Victoria.    Registrations are forwarded to the central
from the districts on a weekly basis.    The Vancouver office of the Division con-
_. rt/lii^ thp Greatest number of these Inral rp.rtifinot^«o
Type of Certification Issued
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Certificates-
Birth 	
Death	
Marriage	
Change of Name	
Divorce 	
Baptismal	
Certified copies-
Photographic1	
Typewritten	
Total certifications
1
5,309
4,047
5,468
756
72
16
209
27
17,531
4,289
4,728
692
87
20
235
15
18,338
4,912
4,338
860
101
22
234
849
18,073
5,397
2,668
665
119
29
2,940
949
25,904
27,597
29,654
30,840
1952
1953
20,271
5,451
2,155
544
120
30
5,081
18
26,566
5,076
3,492
622
165
83
6,098
5
32,360
5,327
3,706
623
189
46
5,329
2
39,101
5,367
3,520
576
173
20
5,577
2
33,670
42,107
47,582
54,336
i Includes photostatic copies of registrations from 1946 to  1948, and photostatic copies and positive prints of
registrations from 1949.
Revenue.—The part of this Province's general revenue collected by the Division of
Vital Statistics continued its upward trend of the past two years. Revenue under the
"Vital Statistics Act I increased from $52,566.95 in 1952 to $53,948.34 in 1953. This
year, total moneys collected amounted to $99,893.84, compared to $98,814.95 received
in 1952. § |
Revenue derived under the " Marriage Act" declined slightly during 1953, totalling
$45,944.50, compared with $46,248 for the previous year.
A major portion of the total | Vital Statistics Act" revenue was received through
the central office of the Division. Revenue from this source amounted to $48,389.04,
or 90 per cent of the total. However, only $4,892 or 11 per cent of the moneys derived
from the issuance of marriage licences and the performance of civil marriages was
received by the central office.
Table 8 indicates the revenue received by this Division during the years 1944 to
1953.
Table 8.—Revenue Collected by the Division of Vital Statistics,
British Columbia, 1944-53
Year
Total Revenue
| Vital Statistics
Act" Revenue
" Marriage Act"
Revenue
1944.
$76,070.67
80,733.80
93,397.00
92,240.50
90,895.74
90,059.10
89,104.25
95,648.00
98,814.95
99,893.84
$37,691.67
38,536.80
42,250.00
41,385.50
41,214.74
41,941.10
43,021.75
48,743.00
52,566.95
53,948.34
$3^379.00
1945
42,197.00
1946.
51,147.00
1947...
50,855.00
1948.
49,681.00
1949.
48,118.00
1950..                                                          '     .
46,082.50
1951 .
46,905.00
1952.
46,248.00
1953..                                                           '     '
45,944.50
•—_____
 s 5o department of health and welfare
REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS
The | Vital Statistics Act" requires that all births occurring within the Province be
registered within thirty days. The responsibility for effecting this registration rests with
the parents. As with other vital-statistics events, births must be registered in the
registration district in which they occurred. In most registration districts, blank registration forms and instructions are mailed to the parents by the District Registrar as soon as
he has been informed of the birth by the attending physician. The physician is required
by law to report the birth within forty-eight hours of the event, although this reporting
by the doctor does not constitute registration. The hospitals are also required to report
-all births which occur within their jurisdiction. The Division maintains continuous
routine checks on the registration of births, and actively pursues registrations which are
known to be delinquent. In this connection, the returns received from physicians and
from hospitals are checked against the birth registrations which are actually submitted,
M order to ensure that the parents do not neglect their duty.
School-teachers' Returns.—The purpose of this return is to provide another means
of checking the completeness and accuracy of birth registration amongst children enrolling
in school for the first time. Within recent years the number of unregistered births discovered through this checking became very low, reflecting the high level of completeness
4}f present-day birth registration. It appears that the other checks referred to above,
plus the increasing demand for birth certificates for very young children, has resulted in
the detection of errors and omissions in registration before the children attain school age.
For this reason, it has been possible to relieve teachers of the work of completing these
reports, except in those areas of the Province where registration problems are known to
exist. However, reports are submitted by all schools which have Indian children enrolled,
as the Division is carrying out an extensive programme designed to raise the standard of
registration amongst the Indian population.   §
Within the white population, reports were received from 59 schools during the
school-year 1952-53, covering a total of 144 children. Of the 141 of these children
who were born in British Columbia, it was found that the births of 13 were unregistered.
Steps were immediately taken to obtain registrations for these children.
During the same term, 168 schools submitted reports covering Indian children.
Of these, 130 indicated that Indian children had enrolled for the first time during the
year, and records of these children showed a high percentage of discrepancies. In 15
cases the birth of the child had not been registered, and in 710 cases incorrect Christian
names or surnames were being used. In another 235 cases the incorrect date of birth
was shown.
Fraudulent Registrations.—The 1 Vital Statistics Act 1 makes provision for the
j^ncellation of a registration of birth which has been fraudulently or improperly obtained.
Most fraudulent registrations are made by mothers who are attempting to conceal
the fact of an illegitimate birth. Before a registration is cancelled, a hearing is ordered,
at which all parties to the registration are required to attend. Any person possessing a
certificate with respect to a cancelled registration is required to return it to the Director
for cancellation. 1
During 1953, 26 registrations of birth were cancelled after being shown to be
fraudulent or improper. The careful cross-checking of registrations by the District
Registrars and at the central office prevents many more fraudulent registrations from
being accepted.
Legitimations.—The " Legitimation Act " provides for the legitimation erf a child
born out of wedlock upon the subsequent marriage of the parents. The " Vital Statistics
Act" contains provisions which makes possible the substitution of a new registration in
cases of legitimation when evidence satisfactory to the Director is filed by the parents.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 c <__
This new registration gives the details as they were at the time of birth, except that the
parents are shown as being married to one another. The original registration is removed
from the files and kept separately thereafter.
The number of legitimations accepted during 1953 totalled 218, a marked increase
over the 143 processed during 1952.
Alterations of Christian Names.—The | Vital Statistics Act" permits parents to
change the Christian names of their children at any time prior to the twelfth birthday.
During the year 297 such changes were made in the given names of children.
Delayed Registration of Births.—As noted in previous Reports, the greatest proportion of applications for delayed registrations again stemmed from those persons
born prior to the year 1920. Extremely few applications for delayed registration are
received for events which took place during the last twenty years, indicating that the
registration system in this Province has been very satisfactory during this time.
Realizing the difficulty which often confronts an applicant when he is called upon
to produce evidence in support of his application for a delayed registration of birth, the
Division has continued its efforts to gather independently material which may be of
assistance in this regard. This material consists of baptismal records obtained from the
various religious denominations, physicians' records, and the records from hospitals and
nursing homes. These pieces of information are being tabulated and indexed so that
they may be available as occasion requires to assist in providing the necessary evidence.
In 1944, at a Dominion-Provincial conference on vital statistics, a schedule of
minimum standards of evidence to be used in applications for delayed registration of
births was drawn up and accepted by all the Provinces. Briefly, this schedule requires
that documentary evidence of good quality verifying the date of birth, the place of
birth, and the names of the natural parents must be furnished to the Director before a
delayed registration may be accepted. It is unfortunate that sometimes this requirement
for independent supporting evidence is not understood or appreciated by the general
public, who tend to assume that the request for proof to accompany the registration
form is a reflection on their own honesty. However, it must be pointed out that registrations and the certificates which are issued from them are important documents upon
which may hinge important rights to the individual. It is, therefore, very much in the
public interest that the utmost of care be taken to ensure the accuracy and validity of
all registrations accepted.
Toward the end of the year a brief but informative pamphlet was drawn up and
placed in use for the purpose of assisting applicants to obtain delayed registration. It
is hoped that this action will materially assist the applicants to obtain the required
supporting evidence with the minimum of time and effort.
With the assistance of the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia and the
various Indian Superintendents, efforts were continued toward the completion of delayed
registrations amongst the Indians. Good progress was made, although in the older age-
groups great difficulty was encountered in obtaining verification of the essential details.
REGISTRATION OF DEATHS
The responsibility for filing the registration of death rests with the undertaker who
disposes of the body. An integral part of every death registration is the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death, which is completed by the attending physician or the Coroner.
The registration of deaths which occur in the Province is virtually complete, except
in isolated localities. As with the other series of registrations, a system of cross-checking
is used as a means of ensuring full reporting and satisfactory cause of death certification.
 s 52 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
REGISTRATION OF STILLBIRTHS
The term | birth," where used in the | Vital Statistics Act," also includes stillbirth
and, therefore, the registration of stillbirths as defined by the Act is required.   A special
form is provided by the Division for this purpose.   A stillbirth is defined as being "the
birth of a viable foetus after at least twenty-eight weeks' pregnancy in which pulmonary
respiration does not occur, whether death occurs before, during, or after birth."
A slight increase occurred in 1953 in the number of stillbirths registered, from the
figure of 359 in 1952 to 383 in 1953.
REGISTRATION OF MARRIAGES
The responsibility for registering a marriage rests with the person solemnizing the
event; namely, the officiating clergyman or Marriage Commissioner. This method of
obtaining marriage registrations has proven very satisfactory over a period of many years
and is the method generally used in other Provinces and countries.
Marriage registers are provided free of charge to clergy and Marriage Commissioners.
These are returned to the Division periodically in order that they may be checked against
the indexes of registrations filed with the Division. If it is thus ascertained that an event
has been unrecorded, steps are promptly taken to obtain a registration.
Marriage registrations are also checked to ensure that the marriage has been
solemnized by a duly registered minister or clergyman, or Civil Marriage Commissioner,
as required by the | Marriage Act." Occasionally marriages are discovered which,
through ignorance or inadvertence, have been performed by an unregistered clergyman.
Where possible, steps are immediately taken to secure validation of the marriage.
REGISTRATION OF ADOPTION ORDERS
The requirements regarding adoption of unmarried minor children are set forth in
the "Adoption Act." Where the Court hearing the petition for adoption is satisfied
regarding the circumstances of the adoption, an order may be made that the adoption be
effected. A copy of the adoption order is forwarded by the Registrar of the Court to
the Director of Vital Statistics, together with any other information needed to enable him
to carry out the provisions of the | Vital Statistics Act " in respect to the registration of
adoptions. Inspection of the documents filed with the Director in connection with the
adoption is allowed only to officials of the Crown in discharge of their official duties, or
to a person authorized by the Provincial Secretary in writing, or to a person authorized
by a Judge of the Court presiding in Chambers.
When an order regarding an adoption is received by the Division, a marginal
notation is made on the original registration of birth showing the child's name by adoption,
and this name appears on any certificates subsequently issued from the registration. No
information regarding the natural parents of the child may be released.
There were 1,034 adoptions ordered by the Supreme Court during the year, an
increase over the 1952 figure of 929. For the children born in this Province who were
adopted, notations were made in the registration of birth.1 For those children who were
born outside of this Province, photostatic copies of the adoption orders were forwarded
to the Province or State concerned.
REGISTRATION OF DIVORCES
Details regarding dissolutions and nullities of marriage are entered in the registry
of the Supreme Court having jurisdiction over the area concerned. The Division is
supplied with a certified copy of the decree of dissolution or nullity, and on receipt oi
this a notation is made on the registration of marriage if the marriage occurred in this
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 53
Province. The notation indicates the date and place of dissolution, and any certificate
subsequently issued from the registration contains this information. In cases where the
marriage occurred outside the Province, the Province of marriage is notified in order that
the necessary notations may be made on the marriage registration. Where the Division
is notified of a dissolution or nullity taking place in another Province and involving a
marriage occurring in British Columbia, the necessary notations are made in this office
on the original marriage registration.
The number of dissolutions and nullities filed with the Division decreased slightly
from 1,581 in 1952 to 1,512 in 1953. Of the total, 1,478 were dissolutions and 34
nullities.
REGISTRATION OF NOTICES OF FILING OF A WILL
In 1945 an amendment was made to the | Wills Act" making it possible for anyone
to file a notice with the Director showing the date of execution and location of his will.
Provision was also made for the addition of codicils. During 1953, 4,279 notices were
filed under sections 34 to 40 of the I Wills Act." This number was almost 300 higher
than that for the previous year. Over 19,000 notices have now been filed and are
preserved in the records of this Division. These notices have been indexed to permit
speedy searching of applications received. «;g§
CERTIFICATION SERVICES
While a great deal of attention is directed toward ensuring that all vital events
which occur within the Province are completely and accurately registered, an even
greater amount of work is taken up with the issuing of certifications, mostly in the form
of certificates, from the some million and a half registrations which are now on file with
the Division. The certification services embrace several functions and are closely
correlated with the other activities of the office. During 1953 over 5,000 separate
applications for certification were received and cleared each month. Many of these
requests are for documents urgently required for Court hearings, travel visas, and other
legal matters. All applications are therefore screened by the chief certification clerk,
who indicates the action which is to be taken in the office and the degree of priority
which is attached to the application. An attempt is made to give consideration to all
priority requests while at the same time maintaining a good flow of work. In addition,
there are statutory restrictions placed upon the furnishing of information regarding
illegitimate and adopted children, and the chief certification clerk has the further responsibility of ensuring that all certification is supplied strictly in accordance with the Statutes.
Before any certification can be issued, it is necessary for the original registration
to be located by a search through the appropriate indexes. Not only must the entry be
located in the index, but also the actual record itself must be produced so that the
information may be extracted from it. In order to make this searching as simple, yet
as thorough, as possible, many refinements have been made in the indexes of the Division.
Originally, index books were handwritten and listings were made alphabetically according
to the numerous registration districts of the Province. In later years the books were
replaced by typewritten volumes, and these have now been superseded by machine-run
indexes prepared from punch-cards set up within the Division. All entries are now
arranged alphabetically in one continuous sequence for the entire Province regardless
of the locality in which the event occurred, with each type of event indexed according
to the year in which it occurred. In addition, as a further aid in searching, certain
indexes have been consolidated into single five-year sequences. These indexes are
particularly valuable when the applicant is uncertain as to the exact date of the event.
Within the last three years there has been over a 40-per-cent increase in the yearly
total of searches performed. Searches for the year 1953 numbered 61,338, including
6,060 that were made on behalf of other Government offices.
 S 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
AM certificates, other than those involving photographic processes, are prepared
by typists from the original registration. Because of the great importance of accuracy
in the transcription of these documents, every certificate is checked against the original
registration by two independent checkers. Photographic prints, on the other hand, are
prepared independently by trained operators. Special machines are used to produce
the wallet-sized laminated birth certificate, which has gained great popularity since is
introduction because of its convenient size and its durability. |
I In spite of the many procedures which are involved in the handling of applications
for certification, most certificates are now issued within two working-days of receipt erf
the application. This service compares very favourably with that provided by registta-
tion offices in other Provinces and States.
LEGAL CHANGES OF NAME
A major responsibility of the Division is the administration of the " Change of Name
Act" Sifice this Act was assented to in December of 1940, it has been illegal for a
person to change his or her name in this Province except in accordance with this Statute.
The principal requirements for a change of name are that the person be 21 years of age
or over, a British subject, and resident in this Province. An application for change of
name may cover more than one individual in a family. Thus, a married man need only
file an application to cover a change of surname and (or) given names for himself, Ms
wife, and any unmarried minor children in his family.
In 1953 the number of applications for change of name, 450 in total, was little
changed from the figure of 444 in 1952. The total number of persons affected by the
450 applications was 768, with 292 applications involving only one individual. Of ik
158 applications involving two or more individuals, 476 persons were affected or, on
the average, three persons per application.
Table 9 shows applications for change of name granted since January 1st, 1941, by
sex and marital status of applicant, and also the total number of persons affected by these
changes of name.
Table 9.—Change of Name Applications Granted, According to Marital Status
and Sex of Applicant, and Total Number of Persons Affected, Britm
Columbia, 1941-53.1
TTear
1941.
1942.
1943-
1944.
1945.
1946-
1947_
1948_
1949_
1950_
195t_
1952-
1953	
Marital Status of Applicant
Single
M.
1
Married
M. 1   F.
1
Widowed
M. I   F.
Divorced
M. I   F.
I
Separated
Total
M. I   F.
M.
55
72
59
67
103
128
117
143
128
128
140
155
159
7       37
17       67
25
27
33
36
32
35
46
33
39
59
48
92
74
119
146
128
134
140
138
154
167
175
2
5
8
10
14
7
3
11
8
12
11
13
2
1
3
2
2
6
3
m
3
2
2
3
2
3
2
5
10
3
7
4
1
3
6
4^ m
2       25
4
8
7
5 I 15
4   4
5
9
3
8
9
5
6
9
21
39
29
17
19
25
17
40
35
i *«
Change of Name Act" assented to December 6th, 1940.
__!__
i
98 | 13
i
141  27
i
158 | 45
145 ] 65
228 | 74 ]
1
288  92 j
11 i
256 | 75
i
302 ] 60
11 —
276  80 1
	
277 j 71 ]
301  77 j
( 331 | 113
i
345 1 105 |
m  i
\_J.
Total
Number
of
Persons
Affected
180
298
351
362
524
638
555
586
628
591
646
777
768
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 55
CORRECTIONS AND AMENDMENTS TO REGISTRATIONS
Many types of records remain unchanged once they have been filed, but this is not
true in the case of vital-statistics registrations. Through such procedures as adoptions
divorces, changes of name, alterations of given name, legitimation of birth, and others'
it is constantly necessary to revise registrations in order to add the additional information
During the year 1,034 adoptions were recorded, 1,512 divorces, 450 legal changes of
name, 326 correction declarations, 297 alterations of given name, and 218 legitimations
of birth. In each of these instances a notation was placed upon the original registration,
provided that the birth or the marriage to which it was related had occurred in British
Columbia. In addition to the above, 26 fraudulent registrations were uncovered and the
necessary steps taken to cancel them. The Division routinely notifies other Provinces
of adoptions, divorces, and changes of name which affect registrations filed in those
Provinces.
The project of revising and correcting Indian vital-statistics registrations was continued. Prior to 1943, registration of Indian vital statistics was on a voluntary basis and,
in consequence, many errors and omissions were found to exist among these earlier
records. The discrepancies and omissions are being eliminated wherever possible by
checking against Indian-band membership records, hospital reports of births, baptismal
registers, and various other sources. J[
The maintenance of up-to-date registrations for the Indians presents the Division
with a particularly difficult problem, due to the fairly common practice amongst this group
of changing names at will. Efforts are being made, however, through encouraging the
use of birth certificates and by comparing school registers with the birth records, to ensure
greater continuity and accuracy in names and birth dates on the registrations for Indians,
especially for those in the younger age-groups.
In the 1952-53 school term 168 schools submitted reports of 1,130 Indian pupils
enrolled for the first time. By checking these school reports against the original birth
registrations, it was found that a high percentage of error existed on both sets of records.
Steps were immediately taken to determine the correct information and to amend the
entries where necessary.
REGISTRATION OF MINISTERS AND CLERGYMEN
The I Marriage Act" requires that before a minister or clergyman may solemnize
marriage in this Province, he must first be registered with this Division. For denominations previously recognized, the registration of a new minister or clergyman is made upon
the advice of the governing authority of the denomination. However, denominations not
previously recognized must first comply with certain requirements of the Act relative to
continuity of existence and established rites and usages respecting the solemnization of
marriage before their ministers may be registered.
During the year three new religious groups were granted recognition pursuant to the
" Marriage Act," thus enabling their ministers to solemnize marriage. Inquiries as to
the qualifications for recognition were made by six groups. ^      *
By checking marriage registrations received at the central office, it was discovered
that five marriages had been performed by ministers who had not been authorized to
solemnize marriage. In each case the parties concerned were contacted and the marriages were validated pursuant to section 37 of the g Marriage Act."
Fourteen applications for remarriage pursuant to section 47 of the Act were
approved. Most of these involved couples who had previously been married to each
other, subsequently were divorced, and then wished to remarry each other.
The number of ministers and clergymen on the register increased from 1,735 in
W52 to 1,802 in 1953. Although there were 8 less authorizations for registration m
1953 over 1952, the number of cancellations of registration fell from 280 to 207.   It was
 S 56
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
this marked reduction in cancellations which accounted for the over-all increase in the
number registered. |
Tables 10 and 11 show registrations of ministers and clergymen for 1953 and the
number of registrations by religious denominations for 1952 and 1953.
Table 10.—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen,
British Columbia, 1953 |
Permanent
Temporary
Total number on register, December 31st, 1952
Total number authorized during 1953	
Total number cancelled during 1953	
Total number on register, December 31st, 1953.
1,735
250
186
1,799
24
21
3
Total
1,735
274
207
1,802
Table 11.—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen, by Religious
Denomination, British Columbia, 1952 and 1953
Denomination
Adventist —
An gli c an	
Apostolic Church of the Pentecost	
Associated Gospel Churches of Canada	
Baptist Convention of British Columbia	
Baptist Convention (Regular) of British ColumMa.—
Baptist Churches, Independent	
Baptist Pacific Conference (North America)	
Buddhist Church (Nichiren Shu)	
Buddhist Mission of North America	
Canadian Temple of More Abundant Life	
Catholic Apostolic	
Chaplaincy Service j	
Quista delphian :	
Christian and Missionary Alliance	
Christian Reformed	
Church of Christ	
Church of Christ (Chinese Independent)	
Church of God	
Church of God in Christ (Mennonite)	
Church of the Nazarene	
Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian)	
Churches of God j	
Covenant Kingdom Ministry I	
Disciples of Christ	
Dr. Clem Davies' Ministry	
Doukhobor sect -. I \	
Evangelical Church of British Columbia	
Evangelical Church of Pentecost	
Evangelical Church, North West Canada Conference.
Evangelical Free Church of North America	
Evangelical Mennonite Brethren	
Evangelical Missionary Covenant of America	
Evangelical Church (Russian)	
Evangelistic, Open Door	
Free Church of England in Canada	
Free Church of Scotland in Canada j
Free Methodist Church of North America.
Fkee Presbyterian Church of Scotland	
Glad Tidings Temple Missionary Society...
Greek Catholic (Russian Orthodox)	
Greek Catholic (Ukrainian)	
Holiness Movement—.	
International Foursquare Gospel	
Jehovah's Witnesses -
Jewish Congregation (Beth Israel)-
Jewish Congregation (EmanuEl).
Jewish Congregation (Schara Tzedek)	
Jewish Congregation Beth Hamidrosh, Bnai Jacob
Khalsa Diwan Society \	
Latter-day Saints ■ "
Latter-day Saints (Reorganized)	
1953
16
278
8
1
48
34
16
10
1
7
1
4
10
2
14
12
3
2
9
3
14
1
3
5
1
- 1
7
11
3
19
1
5
3
2
10
1
16
1
10
3
22
3
19
7
1
2
3
1
5
20
22
1952
29
263
6
62
34
14
5
1
7
1
2
10
2
i3
9
3
1
8
1
15
1
4
6
1
~1
5
9
2
15
1
5
3
2
10
1
16
1
6
3
19
4
17
|I
2
2
i
7
19
21
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 57
Table 11 .—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen, by Religious
Denomination, British Columbia, 1952 and 1953—Continued
Denomination
Liberal Catholic 1	
Lutheran (American)	
Lutheran (Augustana Evangelical)	
Lutheran (Danish Evangelical)	
Lutheran (Finnish)	
Lutheran (Free)	
Lutheran (Icelandic).	
Lutheran (Missouri Evangelical)	
Lutheran (Norwegian)—	
Lutheran (Pacific Evangelical)	
Lutheran (United)	
Lutheran (United Evangelical)	
Mennonite Brethren	
Mennonite, Conference of the United Mennonite Church of British Columbia
Mennonite (Old Colony Church)	
Mennonite (Sommerfelder Church)	
Mennonite (United Missionary or Brethren in Christ)	
Methodist and Episcopal (African)	
Moravian	
New Presbyterian	
Orthodox Church (Greek)	
Orthodox Church (Ukrainian) of America	
Orthodox Church (Ukrainian Greek) of Canada	
Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada	
Pentecostal Holiness	
People's Fellowship	
Plymouth Brethren	
Presbyterian 	
Roman Catholic	
Salvation Army j .	
Shantymen's Christian Association	
Society of Friends 	
Spiritualistic Association (British Columbia)	
Spiritualistic Association (National)	
Standard Church of America, Inc....	
Unitarian	
United Church of Canada .	
Unity Metaphysical Centre	
Victoria Truth Centre	
Zion Tabernacle	
Totals	
1953
6
9
3
1
1
1
19
5
7
4
1
37
30
6
3
1
3
3
2
3
1
5
100
10
1
17
76
322
61
4
2
6
19
6
2
318
1
1
4
1952
5
8
4
1
1
1
19
5
7
4
1
33
29
7
4
1
3
3
2
3
1
5
93
8
1
17
65
324
54
3
2
5
20
6
2
311
1
1
4
1,802
1,735
DISTRICT REGISTRARS' OFFICES
f Changes in Registration Districts.—With the opening of Government Sub-
Agencies at Terrace and Vanderhoof, the Division was able to appoint the Sub-Agents
as District Registrars and Marriage Commissioners, and this has resulted in a more
satisfactory service in these areas.
During the year it became necessary to transfer the vital-statistics duties at Trail
from the Motor-vehicle Branch to a private firm. This terminated the temporary arrangements which have been in force since November, 1951, when the Motor-vehicle Branch
took over the vital-statistics responsibilities at Trail in response to an urgent request from
the Division. The generous co-operation of the Motor-vehicle Branch enabled uninterrupted service of a very satisfactory nature to be given in this district, and appreciation
is expressed for the work done by that Branch. The Division has now been fortunate
in securing the services of a firm which has had extensive previous experience in vital-
statistics work, and which has an office centrally located in the business section of the
city.
The sub-office of the Registration District of Stewart, located at Alice Arm, has
been discontinued, due to the small volume of business which has been handled through
this office in recent years. f|
 S 58 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
With the closing of the Government Sub-Agency at Greenwood, arrangements were
made for the City Clerk to be appointed as District Registrar and Marriage Commissioner
for the Registration District of Greenwood.      |pr
Inspections.—Twenty-two offices and sub-offices in the East and West Kootenays
and the Fraser Valley were visited by the Inspector of Vital Statistics during the year.
Visits were also made to the Vancouver, North Vancouver, and New Westminster offices.
These visits have again proved very beneficial both to the Division and to the
district offices in maintaining the smooth functioning of the registration system. Several
modifications of existing forms and procedures have resulted from the on-the-spot discussion of problems which have confronted the District Registrars.
Inspections of the district offices indicate that the standard of work is generally of
a very satisfactory nature and that the present organization of these offices appears to
be serving the needs of the people and the requirements of the central office in a very
adequate way. The district offices are doing an excellent job of collecting and transmitting vital-statistics returns to the Division, and it is rarely necessary to remind a District
Registrar of his responsibilities. It is a pleasure to be able to express appreciation of
the work carried out in the district offices. ^
At the close of the year there were ninety offices and sub-offices operating in seventy-
one registration districts, this being one less sub-office than in the previous year. Thirty-
eight of the offices are served by Government Agencies or Sub-Agencies, while Royal
Canadian Mounted Police personnel hold the Registrar's appointment in twenty-three
other districts. Eight offices are served by other Provincial Government employees, six
offices by Municipal Clerks, and fifteen offices by private individuals, including Game
Wardens, Postmasters, Stipendiary Magistrates, business-men, and a Canadian Customs
officer.
MICROFILMING OF DOCUMENTS
The microfilm equipment of the Division was in constant use during the year.
All current registrations of births, deaths, stillbirths, and marriages were photographed
on a weekly basis. In addition, amendments to registrations resulting from adoptions,
divorces, changes of name, and other types of documentary revision were photographed
and the amended images spliced into the appropriate rolls of microfilm.
Several miscellaneous filming projects were undertaken, as listed hereunder, in
order to permit removal of some of the original files and to allow for a better utilization
of space:—
(a) Delayed registration files for the period from 1949 to 1952, inclusive.
(b) Baptismal records of several churches.
(c) The refilming of rolls which had become overloaded due to amendments
and additions.
(d) Special files concerning delayed registrations of marriages, 1932 to 1952.
(e) Marriage licence applications.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
g*Although the incidence of staff changes was less than in 1952, the turnover was
still high. Several members resigned, and several others were dismissed when their
services were found to be unsatisfactory during the probationary period of employment.
Replacements were difficult to obtain, and in a number of cases a period of several weeks
elapsed before successors were appointed. Most of those reporting for duty had little
or no previous office experience, thus necessitating a longer period of training than otherwise would have been required.
The Vancouver office experienced unprecedented difficulties, occasioned by staff
shortages and changes throughout most of the year.   One of the senior employees retired
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 59
on superannuation in January, and her departure was followed almost immediately by
the resignation of another senior person by reason of marriage. Several employees transferred to higher-paid positions or other types of employment. In almost every case the
vacancies were not filled for several weeks, and there were instances when several months
elapsed before a replacement could be obtained. It was largely through the splendid
co-operation of the junior staff with their two seniors that the functions of the office were
able to be carried on without a major disruption. || |
The widespread use of ball-point pens has created a problem for the Division in
several respects. Of these, the most important is the great range of permanency of the
various inks used by the manufacturers. Documents written with a ball-point pen may
last for months or years, but some are known to have deteriorated very quickly, and it is
doubtful whether they will stand up for the extended periods of time required of vital-
statistics registrations. The use of such pens for the completion of registration forms has
been strongly discouraged in the ultimate interests of the persons concerned. However,
this type of writing medium has gained such popularity that it has become impossible to
refuse to accept registrations completed with ball-point pens. The use of ball-point pens
causes further difficulties in establishing identification of handwriting. The actual identification of signatures is often of great importance in dealing with registration matters.
STATISTICAL SECTION
Purpose.—A public health statistics section can be said to be fulfilling its proper
function only when it combines sound statistical routines with critical analyses of the
statistics produced and of the policies and procedures underlying them. The Division
attempts to perform this function through its statistical section on behalf of the Health
Branch in this Province and, in addition, to give consultative service on all matters
involving statistics, record-keeping, and form preparation. Hence, an important part of
the duties of the statistical section is the critical examination and analysis of the statistics
which are compiled in order that they may be of maximum value to the various Divisions
of the Health Branch in the planning, developing, and carrying-out of their programmes.
Routine Assignments.—The extent of the routine work of the statistical section is
very broad and includes the completion of numerous reports, listings, summaries, and
other statistical compilations, and the performance of analyses of the statistics. A detailed
list covering the more important of these routine activities was shown on page 62 of the
1952 Report. Apart from the compilation of extensive statistics from the birth, death,
stillbirth, and marriage registrations, the Division's largest routine commitments are to
the Divisions of Tuberculosis Control and Venereal Disease Control in the processing of
their records for statistical purposes. ||\-
A great deal of statistical information on morbidity, mortality, natality, and other
items of public health significance is kept on file in the statistical section. This has
proven to be very useful in the course of the regular duties of the section, as well as in
providing a valuable source of reference material to aid in the planning of special
statistical assignments.
Staff Training.—Through formal postgraduate training as well as through in-service
training, the Division is developing a small but competent staff of biostatisticians. During
the summer one member returned from a course of postgraduate training in public health
statistics at the University of Minnesota, while another member enrolled for similar
training in September at the University of Toronto. Funds for this professional training
have been made available through National health grants.
Statistics for the Mental Health Services.—Progress was made during 1953 in
carrying forward several projects of considerable importance started in the previous year,
™, in addition, several new tasks were undertaken.   Among the former was the work
 s 60 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
begun on the reorganization of the record and statistical system of the Mental Health
Services. This project has consumed a considerable amount of time of the staff, both
Vancouver and Victoria, but satisfactory progress has been made. The first important
phase of the job has been completed. This involved the setting-up of a routine fo
transferring the information appearing on the admission and separation reports of
individuals entering and leaving institutions to punch-cards. A number of problems arose
in establishing the necessary codes and procedures required for this phase of the work
but by the end of the year the new system was in operation and the routine processing had
begun in this Division.
Incidental to the foregoing work, it was found that certain nominal rolls required
by the Mental Health Services could be prepared mechanically by this Division on a
monthly basis, thus saving the Services considerable time in this regard.
The organization of the second phase of the statistical system for the Mental Health
Services was well under way by the close of the year. A staff member has worked closely
with the medical and administrative staff at Essondale and Crease Clinic in determining
the nature and extent of the statistics to be produced, and in designing the system and
routine to be followed. This phase of the work will yield important information on the
status of patients in residence in the various institutions of the Services and on the treatments which have been used.
This difficult work of replacing and augmenting the recording and statistical procedures of a large service involving a number of separate institutions has been made a
pleasure to all concerned by the splendid co-operation and patience of the staff of the
Mental Health Services.
Standardization of Vital-statistics Tabulations in Canada.—A major advance
was made during the year in the standardization of the vital-statistics tabulations for all
Provinces of Canada. Because Canadian vital statistics are presented on a place-of-
residence basis, it is necessary to have an interprovincial exchange of registration information relating to births and deaths of residents who are temporarily absent from the
Province. Thus, no Province has been able to publish its final vital-statistics data for a
particular year until the last Province has submitted its registration returns. The Provinces have now agreed upon uniform dates for closing off the separate birth, death, and
marriage series of events each year, and this alone will speed up the production of the
final tabulations by several months. In addition, the Provinces have all agreed upon a
uniform set of basic Provincial tabulations for publication purposes, and this action will
further advance the publication date of the Annual Vital Statistics Reports.
This work on the uniform tabulation programme was undertaken by the Vital
Statistics Council for Canada in co-operation with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
It has involved extensive research and study in order that the tabulations might fully
accommodate present statistical needs as well as anticipating further requirements.
A system of priority for the production of the specific tabulations was also set up, and
this will furth&r expedite the publication of the Annual Vital Statistics Reports. These
measures will enable a saving of approximately six months in the time-lag in printing the
detailed Vital Statistics Report in this Province, and, in addition, it will greatly speed
up publication of the preliminary and final Reports of Vital Statistics published by
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, which contain national rates and interprovincial
comparisons.
Infant Mortality Study.—As noted in the 1952 Report, a special infant mortality
study has been set up to correlate information from the Physician's Notice of Live Birth
or Stillbirth and the associated birth and death registrations. A complete year of experience covering 1952 infant mortality was available this year, and tabulations .were run
from the punch-cards. Information was tabulated revealing many interesting features,
but the number of cases involved is still relatively small for detailed analyses, and farther
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953 s 61
data must be collected before reliable inferences may be made. However, the results
were important in that they revealed several problems which will have to be overcome
before a satisfactory study can be completed. One of these relates to the lack of sufficient
detail for a study of this nature in the code of the International Statistical Classification
covering complications of pregnancy and birth injuries.
Population Estimates.—During the year, counts were obtained from the Census
Branch showing populations for each of the census enumeration areas in the Province.
These figures were utilized in conjunction with the enumeration-area descriptions to
produce population estimates by school districts. These estimates are necessary in order
to compile vital-statistics rates for the health units of the Province and are also used in
health-unit financing.
Nutrition Statistics.—As in previous years, the Division carried out analyses of
food studies conducted by the nutrition consultants of the Health Branch, and which
related to the Provincial gaols. In addition, a pilot study was conducted to determine
and compare the nutritional status of those old-age pensioners with and without dentures
in the Greater Victoria area.
Morbidity Statistics.—Information on the health status of the people in this Province is at the best difficult to obtain and interpret, yet it is of utmost importance to those
who administer the programme of the Health Branch. The National Sickness Survey,
mentioned in the 1952 Report, was carried out to provide some of the information on a
sample basis, and some of the results of this Survey became available during the year.
These first releases related to expenditures for health services. Estimates of the incidence
and prevalence of specific morbid conditions are expected to appear in the near future.
During 1953, negotiations have been under way between this Division and the
British Columbia Government Employees' Medical Services with a view to obtaining
morbidity statistics for this group of the population. A co-operative arrangement is being
suggested whereby the Division will process the statistics of the Employees' Medical
Services, particularly relating to cost and the utilization, in return for the morbidity
statistics which will ensue as a by-product. Information on the sickness experience of
this group will help to fill in an important part of the health picture in this Province.
Epidemiological Statistics.—The Division continued to operate the Province-wide
notifiable disease reporting system and to compile statistics therefrom. In addition,
special statistical studies relating to the epidemiology of poliomyelitis and venereal disease were carried out at the request of senior medical personnel.
Cancer Registry.—The Division also continued to supervise the registry of new
cases of cancer reported within the Province. This reporting system is designed to make
possible the provision of up-to-date data on cancer incidence in British Columbia and
to make these data available to the medical profession and to other agencies interested
in the cancer problem. Reports of new cases are received from private physicians, the
British Columbia Cancer Institute, general hospitals, and from pathology laboratories.
Death registrations are also used as a source of reporting cases which have not been
reported prior to death.
Preliminary figures showed that 2,785 new cases of malignant growth were reported
during the year, of which 1,366 were reported alive and 1,419 reported for the first time
at death. Detailed statistics regarding cancer notifications and live cancer cases reported
during 1953 are given on pages 74 and 75 of the Annual Report of the Health Branch
for 1953.   I
Crippled Children's Registry.—During 1949 and 1950 a survey was carried out
to determine the size of the problem which existed in this Province with respect to
cnppling diseases of children.   As a result of this survey, a voluntary Registry of Crippled
 S 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Children was set up. The purpose of the Registry is twofold. In the first place the
Registry is designed to provide accurate knowledge of the nature and extent of the
problem of crippling diseases of children in British Columbia. Only with such information can there be intelligent planning of the additional facilities which might be required"
or of the programme which should be undertaken. The second purpose of the Registry
is to assist those children with handicaps to receive the best possible treatment available
for those specific handicaps. The Registry has available the services of an advisory panel
of fifteen specialists, the chairman of which reviews all new registrations received with
a view to recommending the best possible treatment or disposition of each case. The
Division of Vital Statistics supervises the statistical aspects of the Registry and assists in
tabulating the statistics which derive from it.
Physicians throughout the Province have been made aware of the purpose of the
Registry and have been encouraged to register on a voluntary basis those children under
their care who are suffering from any one of a group of specified disabilities which might
prevent them from completing their education and becoming self-supporting. The
Registry has established close liaison with all public health authorities in the Province, as
well as with numerous private agencies concerned with the care of children. The advisory
service of the medical panel is available to any physician upon request. The Registry
also provides what might be termed a clearing-house of medical history regarding each
individual case, and this has proved valuable in those instances where the child does not
remain under the continuous care of one doctor.
Impairments which are noted at birth and reported on the Physician's Notice of Live
Birth or Stillbirth are routinely registered by the Division of Vital Statistics with the
Crippled Children's Registry. Additional information is obtained where necessary from
the reporting physician. A check is later made on these cases to determine whether the
condition is still present, has disappeared, or has become inactive.
The Registry is receiving data on about 150 new cases each month. By the end of
the year over 2,000 cases were on the Registry files.
During the year a follow-up was conducted of all post-poliomyelitis cases with
residual paralysis from the epidemic of 1952. An inquiry was made to determine whether
or not further treatment was required. When it was found that a case required additional
treatment, but this treatment had not been forthcoming, the reasons were investigated
and, where possible, assistance was made available.
In order to enlarge the scope of the Registry, it was suggested toward the end of the
year that a procedure be set up whereby cases known to the Welfare Branch would be
routinely registered. Regular social-assistance cases continued to be handled by the
Welfare Branch, their addition to the Registry being primarily for record and statistical
purposes. It is hoped that the care of border-line social-assistance cases which are
sometimes handled by the Welfare Branch would be facilitated if they are made known
to the Registry.
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 63
PART III.—DETAILED TABLES OF BIRTHS, DEATHS
MARRIAGES, ADOPTIONS, AND DIVORCES
I IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
ft       (Classified by Place of Residence)
TABLE 1.—GENERAL SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, STILLBIRTHS, AND MARRIAGES
I      FOR CENSUS DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
Census Division
Live Births
Total
Male
Female
Live
Births in
Hospital
British Columbia
Division No. la~
DivisionNo. lb-
Division No. Ic—
Division No. 2a~
Division No. 2b-
Division No. 2c_
Division No. 3a.-
Division No. 3b—
Division No. 3c_.
Division No. 4a_.
Division No. 4b~
Division No. 5a.-
DivisionNo. 5b...
Division No. 5c ._
Division No. 5d _
Division No. 5e—
Division No. 5f—.
Division No. 6a~
Division No. 6b...
Division No. 6c...
Division No. 6d..
Division No. 6e...
Division No. 6f...
Division No. 7a._
Division No. 7b...
Division No. 7c.-
Division No. 8a...
Division No. 8b~.
Division No. 8c
Division No. 8d_
Division No. 8e._
Division No. 8f __
Division No. 8g._.
Division No. 9a...
Division No. 9b._
Division No. 9c.
Division No. 9d
Division No. 9e._
Division No. 9f._.
Division No. 10a
Division No. 10b
Division No. 10c
Division No. lOd
31,746
153
480
184
146
1,000
634
1,068
659
158
4,509
11,775
3,976
73
681
593
139
237
105
278
676
27
129
194
182
58
306
583
94
67
407
328
285
91
11
33
87
545
122
84
72
5
151
361
16,428
86
245
89
84
528
333
564
338
82
2,258
6,138
2,053
43
350
304
69
122
60
140
343
14
55
101
96
33
154
301
52
33
210
176
163
47
7
18
51
279
68
42
38
~-~
183
15,318
67
235
95
62
472
301
504
321
76
2,251
5,637
1,923
30
331
289
70
115
45
138
333
13
74
93
86
25
152
282
42
34
197
152
122
44
4
15
36
266
54
42
34
5
73
178
30,978
150
480
151
146
997
626
1,058
657
155
4,462
11,727
3,949
72
675
591
111
218
102
270
652
8
109
164
172
52
292
567
90
33
398
269
264
57
8
7
48
522
53
67
59
__
348
Illegitimate
Births
1,896
7
19
5
2
28
37
48
38
1
186
759
189
8
14
19
28
21
5
27
85
10
10
28
14
7
7
35
4
8
32
48
13
8
4
10
5
54
16
12
2
1
9
33
Stffl-
births
375
3
2
11
9
17
4
42
151
44
~~9
9
2
8
'~2
2
5
1
4
11
1
1
4
4
8
1
5
3
Marriages
3
3
11,298
31
97
50
34
230
178
403
196
29
1,581
5,382
1,518
15
150
134
11
42
8
67
234
1
17
28
33
2
80
177
18
5
97
58
65
8
2
4
148
9
7
Excess of
Births
over
Deaths
32
113
19,528
109
359
115
102
809
376
585
473
98
2,910
6,261
2,101
23
495
447
117
181
81
172
419
21
101
137
152
28
247
497
68
47
318
243
226
74
4
26
69
391
100
65
65
3
117
296
 S 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE  2.—GENERAL SUMMARY  OF  BIRTHS,  STILLBIRTHS,  AND MARRIAGES Pno
INCORPORATED   URBAN   PLACES   OF   1,000   POPULATION  AND  OVER, kpi
COLUMBIA,  1953.
City or Village
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Campbell River—
Castlegar	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranberry Lake—
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Dawson Creek	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Hope	
Kamloops-	
Kelowna	
Kimberley	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan	
Meiritt !	
Mission City	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster-
North Kamloops—
North Vancouver-
Oliver  -	
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon _	
Victoria	
Westview	
Live Births
Total
172
17
106
63
181
135
51
175
64
236
133
92
53
30
283
208
188
60
79
50
96
360
211
610
79
873
75
251
268
112
61
375
310
170
109
134
43
84
408
7,880
218
1,174
125
Male
Female
Live
Births in
Hospital
93
10
55
29
94
81
27
94
42
120
72
45
23
13
140
112
89
32
37
19
54
194
114
296
44
469
37
130
144
48
26
190
159
82
59
68
25
42
219
4,077
105
624
69
79
7
51
34
87
54
24
81
22
116
61
47
30
17
143
96
99
28
42
31
42
166
97
314
35
404
38
121
124
64
35
185
151
88
50
66
18
42
189
3,803
113
550
56
170
17
106
62
181
135
51
175
63
235
132
92
53
29
283
208
188
60
79
50
96
359
210
608
79
870
75
251
268
112
61
370
306
169
109
134
43
79
408
7,857
217
1,174
124
Illegitimate
Births
5
1
4
2
10
2
"io
2
23
5
4
1
22
12
2
3
1
3
2
13
7
37
3
29
3
16
5
3
2
25
28
10
~~4
3
6
9
605
6
64
1
Stillbirths
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
s
__
1
5
1
9
8
4
2
92
4
14
2
Marriages
BRITISH
Excess of
Births
over
Deaths
49
18
24
8
96
66
2
59
41
96
79
37
19
22
167
126
35
31
10
10
82
201
104
586
23
161
38
111
70
26
15
171
127
59
32
36
47
32
155
4,646
150
773
18
138
6
87
53
105
-in
46
128
38
208
92
58
32
15
163
97
133
37
72
34
69
232
138
337
68
653
68
168
205
81
45
312
^ 216
137
78
110
32
62
342
3,584
83
414
103
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 65
TABLE 3.-LIVE BIRTHS AND LIVE BIRTHS IN HOSPITAL BY OCCURRENCE
AND RESIDENCE FOR CENSUS DIVISION, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1953
Census Division
Total Births
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence, Occurrence
Elsewhere
British Columbia
Division No. la-
Division No. lb-
Division No. lc-
Division No. 2a-
Division No. 2b.~
Division No. 2c~
Division No. 3a.~
Division No. 3b-
Diyision No. 3e~
Division No. 4a...
Division No. 4b-
Division No. 5a_.
Diyision No. 5b-
Division No. 5c._
Division No. 5d...
Division No. 5e~
Division No. 5f—
Division No. 6a...
Division No. 6b„.
Division No. 6c.
Division No. 6d-
Division No. 6e.~
Division No. 6f—.
Division No. 7a...
Division No. 7b...
Division No. 7c.
Division No. 8a...
Division No. 8b-.
Division No. 8c~
Division No. 8d._.
Division No. 8e.„
Division No. 8f.._
Division No. 8g-
Division No. 9a~.
Division No. 9b~
Division No. 9c.
Division No. 9d...
Division No. 9e.-
Division No. 9f...
Division No. 10a
Division No. 10b
Division No. 10c.
Division No. lOd
31,615
116
494
186
128
853
767
1,080
766
110
4,516
12,059
4,097
38
534
611
79
203
4
137
951
18
22
143
188
4
302
619
43
37
446
288
342
34
3
26
53
632
72
68
24
5
130
387
31,746
153
480
184
146
1,000
634
1,068
659
158
4,509
11,775
3,976
73
681
593
139
237
105
278
676
27
129
194
182
58
306
583
94
67
407
328
285
91
11
33
87
545
122
84
72
5
151
361
104
1
31
9
8
14
160
85
124
7
511
782
204
4
45
55
4
39
12
312
5
2
2
12
"22
63
3
8
76
4
73
1
4
108
1
2
17
58
235
38
17
7
26
161
27
73
17
55
504
498
83
39
192
37
64
73
101
153
37
14
109
53
6
54
26
27
54
38
37
44
16
58
8
7
38
21
51
18
51
38
32
Total by
Occurrence
30,861
113
494
152
128
849
760
1,070
765
107
4,470
12,014
4,078
37
529
609
51
185
1
129
929
111
177
287
605
40
437
230
323
15
606
4
50
10
121
375
Births in Hospital
Total by
Residence
30,978
150
480
151
146
997
626
1,058
657
155
4,462
11,727
3,949
72
675
591
111
218
102
270
652
8
109
164
172
52
292
567
90
33
398
269
264
57
8
7
48
522
53
67
59
~"l42
348
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence, Occurrence
Elsewhere
99
1
31
8
8
13
160
85
124
7
509
780
204
4
45
54
3
38
11
312
9
"20
62
3
76
2
73
2
101
1
16
56
216
38
17
7
26
161
26
73
16
55
501
493
75
39
191
36
63
71
101
152
35
8
109
53
4
52
25
24
53
33
37
41
14
57
8
7
35
17
50
17
51
""37
29
 S 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 4.—LIVE BIRTHS AND HOSPITAL LIVE BIRTHS BY OCCURRENCE ANn
RESIDENCE FOR URBAN PLACES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1953.. '       	
City or Village
TotSl Live Binhs
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
Alberni ._—
Armstrong	
Campbell River™.
Castlegar	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranberry Lake...
Cranbrook	
Creston  —
Dawson Creek	
Duncan _—
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Hope	
Kamloops	
Kelowna .	
Kimberley .—'..
Ladysmith.. ..„
Lake Cowichan	
Merritt ~.
Mission City	
Nanaimo L—
Nelson	
New Westminster
North Kamloops _
North Vancouver.
Oliver	
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Trail -__
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria :	
Westview	
1
46
202
2
1
153
374
473
148
107
1
753
451
221
96
73
348
583
524
2,703
~~800
194
398
530
609
451
257
128
157
129
160
647
10,197
437
2,771
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence, Occurrence
Elsewhere
Live Births in Hospital
Total by
Occurrence
172
17
106
63
181
135
51
175
64
236
133
92
53
30
283
208
188
60
79
50
96
360
211
610
79
873
75
251
268
112
61
375
310
170
109
134
43
84
408
7,880
218
1,174
125
33
107
1
95
151
345
57
60
479
247
46
43
37
256
244
314
2,167
"247
124
150
273
254
149
91
24
36
92
80
260
2,763
222
1,616
171
4
11
62
181
133
51
174
6
13
5
1
6
29
9
4
13
7
79
14
4
21
1
74
79
320
5
3
11
112
61
20
8
4
5
13
6
4
21
446
3
19
125
46
202
1
152
373
473
148
107
753
451
221
96
73
348
583
523
2,700
"798
194
398
529
605
449
256
128
157
129
156
647
10,173
436
2,771
Total by
Residence
170
17
106
62
181
135
51
175
63
235
132
92
53
29
283
208
188
60
79
50
96
359
210
608
79
870
75
251
268
112
61
370
306
169
109
134
43
79
408
7,857
217
1,174
124
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
33
107
95
150
345
57
60
479
247
46
43
37
256
244
314
2,166
"245
124
150
272
252
149
91
24
36
92
80
260
2,759
222
1,616
By Residence, Occurrence
Elsewhere
170
4
11
62
181
133
51
174
6
12
4
1
6
29
9
4
13
7
79
14
4
20
1
74
79
317
5
3
11
112
61
17
6
4
5
13
6
3
21
443
3
19
124
TABLE 5.—LIVE BIRTHS BY MONTH, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
o
H
Months
a
jo
o
a
Tt
p.
<
>.
o
a
G
Tt
00
G
<
P.
o
Ui
Total for the Province.
31,746
2,449
2,318
2,726
2,712
2,745
2,635
2,744
2,703
2,752
u
O
2,751
o
Z
2,577
o
p
2,634
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
TABLE 6.—LIVE BIRTHS FOR CENSUS DIVISIONS BY TYPE OF
ATTENDANCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
S 67
British Columbia-
Division No. la—
Division No. lb—
Division No. Ic—
Division No. 2a—
Division No. 2b—
Division No. 2c—-
Division No. 3a—
Division No. 3b—
Division No. 3c—
Division No. 4a~
Division No. 4b-
Division No. 5a~
Division No. 5b_
Division No. 5c
Oivision No. 5d~
DivisionNo. 5e...
Division No. 5f~
Division No. 6a.
Division No. 6b.
DivisionNo. 6c
Division No. 6d.
Division No. 6e~
Division No. 6f..
Division No. 7a_
Division No. 7b-
Division No. 7c
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
No. 8a
No. 8b.
No. 8c
No. 8d.
No. 8e-
No. 8f-
No. 8g.
No. 9a.
No. 9b.
No. 9c
No. 9d-
No. 9e.
No. 9f_.
Division No. 10a.
DivisionNo. 1 Ob-
Division No. 10c
Division No. lOd.
Census Division
Total
31,746
153
480
184
146
1,000
634
1,068
659
158
4,509
11,775
3,976
73
681
593
139
237
105
278
676
27
129
194
182
58
306
583
94
67
407
328
285
91
11
33
87
545
122
84
72
5
151
361
Attended by—
Physician
Nurse
Midwife
Unattended
or
Not Stated
31,265
44
38
199
152
1
480
183
1
146
1,000
633
1
1,065
3
658
1
157
1
4,487
1
21
11,765
2
8
3,955
2
2
17
72
1
681
593
112
1
1
25
223
1
13
105
273
1
4
656
20
14
6
7
112
17
180
1
13
175
1
6
54
4
300
1
5
573
10
92
1
1
36
8
23
403
4
275
1
12
40
272
13
59
32
10
i
14
1
18
59
8
4
16
528
8
9
87
6
29
68
3
13
61
1
10
2
3
143
1
3
4
352
3
6
 S 68
TABLE 7
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
.—LIVE BIRTHS IN INCORPORATED URBAN PLACES OF 1,000 POPUi atthx
AND OVER BY TYPE OF ATTENDANCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
City or Village
Total
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Campbell River...
Castlegar.
Chilliwack.
Courtenay.
Cranberry Lake.
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Dawson Creek-
Duncan	
Fernie	
Grand Forks.
Hope.
Kamloops j	
Kelowna I—
Kimberiey j	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan.
Menstt___	
Mission City.
Nanaimo	
Nelson -
New Westminster-
North Kamloops-.
North Vancouver-
Oliver	
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam.
Port Moody	
Prince George-
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel       	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm r	
Smithers	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon ____
Victoria	
Westview
172
17
106
63
181
135
51
173
64
236
133
92
53
30
283
208
188
60
79
50
96
360
211
610
79
873
75
251
268
112
61
375
310
170
109
134
43
84
408
7,880
218
1,174
125
Physician
172
17
106
63
181
135
50
175
64
236
132
92
53
30
283
208
188
60
79
50
95
359
211
610
79
873
75
251
268
112
61
373
308
170
109
134
43
80
408
7,877
218
1,174
125
Attended by-
Nurse
Midwife
Unattended
^    or
Not Stated
2
2
3
1
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 69
TABLE 8.-LIVE BIRTHS BY AGES OF PARENTS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
13 ye
14 ,
15 ,
16 ,
17 ,
18 ,
19 ,
20 ,
21 ,
22 ,
23 ,
24 ,
25 ,
26 ,
27 ,
28 ,
29 ,
30 ,
31 j
32
Age of Mother
Age of Father
Total Bora to
Married
Mothers
Total Bora to
Unmarried
Mothers
o
Ih 0-
OJh
Tt
CS   •
-12
CSt-*"1
Os
CS    •
CS?"*
n
On
CO J3"*
Tt
On
Tt
J"
rtf.^
ON
in?*
Tt
vo^i
M
o ^
Zu\
9 S*
OrS
PQ O
■3«<rti
°_a
1
1
7
25
54
73
45
27
18
10
3
2
1
46
185
385
582
777
749
692
522
331
188
116
62
40
20
23
8
4
5
1
3
1
2
1
_
10
36
96
226
379
578
753
1,025
1,085
1,112
937
823
639
459
294
177
97
51
45
34
26
9
7
2
2
1
_
2
6
16
37
62
125
198
312
375
489
595
693
735
832
807
656
586
423
250
165
104
52
47
23
13
6
3
2
	
	
1
z:z;
i
'"il
	
l
4
10
11
20
31
38
44
44
65
95
111
131
167
165
157
166
187
190
197
155
146
80
58
36
18
7
1
2
4
1
2
6
7
10
13
10
21
23
30
46
41
43
58
52
64
80
101
79
70
53
56
45
18
8
6
3
1
1
_
l
2
-
1
j
1
1
1
1
19
84
284
574
905
1,273
1,512
1,708
1,953
1,939
1,971
1,866
1,791
1,762
1,745
1,630
1,407
1.349
1,083
962
793
700
616
574
423
331
198
176
117
49
28
11
5
3
2
5
3
10
22
48
100
119
146
136
135
143
116
118
84
82
76
66
62
65
53
46
47
35
29
29
34
26
20
16
6
9
9
2
	
4
	
1
11
2
2
10
16
30
40
62
104
125
158
151
249
304
350
373
433
381
435
347
292
245
197
119
63
28
25
12
1     1
2
41
132
384
693
1,051
1,409
1,647
1,851
2,069
2,057
2,055
1,948
1,867
1,828
1,807
1,695
1,460
1,395
1,130
997
822
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
6
8
8
13
12
16
10
14
17
17
25
13
37
22
22
21
16
8
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
4
4
1
5
6
5
7
7
11
7
7
2
3
4
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
1
2
2
4
2
1
1
1
33
14
35   ,
36
2
2
2
2
729
37
1
650
38
600
39
443
dO
2
347
41 ,
42 ,
43
,   .	
	
2
——..—.
204
185
126
44
,  	
	
	
	
51
45   ,
1
28
46
,	
	
11
47
5
48
1
3
4
49
2
50 ye
Nots
ars and over	
	
	
	
_
	
	
3
8
.
total fathers       	
26814.752
8,907
7,6171
4,556
2,336
9541   305!     89
34
19
13
29.85011.896131.746
1
1
1
 S 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
CO
On
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o
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T      »       *>       *
Vi
ii
>
r^a
tn
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tH
CO
VO
r-
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OV
rS
00
o
00
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rt
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CO
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0
z
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 71
TABLE 10.-MULTIPLE BIRTHS BY AGE OF MOTHER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
:==-
Total
Children
Born
Single
Sets of Twins
Sets of Triplets
Quadruplets
Age of Mother
Live-
born
Stillborn
Both
Live-
born
Both
Stillborn
1 Live-
born,
1 Stillborn
3 Live-
born
3 Stillborn
2 Live-
bora,
1 Stillborn
1 Live-
born,
2 Stillborn
4 Live-
born
4
11
41
132
386
702
1,060
1,418
1,665
1,867
2,092
2,073
2,070
1,969
1,887
1,850
1,829
1,712
1,474
1,412
1,151
1,009
838
740
665
612
458
351
205
193
129
56
28
11
5
4
2
10
4
11
41
132
380
689
1,031
1,391
1,628
1,827
2,026
2,031
2,013
1,898
1,826
1,782
1,773
1,649
1,417
1,350
1,101
983
795
710
634
575
429
333
202
181
125
51
26
11
5
4
2
7
2
9
9
9
15
16
22
16
13
21
17
20
22
15
13
15
18
12
15
10
15
9
15
4
1
8
2
5
•
1
2
2
10
9
9
12
21
11
20
25
19
23
17
23
21
20
14
7
13
9
8
11
7
7
1
2
1
1
1
"l
1
1
1
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
	
—
——
"
18                 -        -   —
■■
10                               	
90                  	
91                              ..   .
17                   -   -    -
23   „         	
24
1
25   ,.         ...     	
26                  	
27    .
28   „          	
29   „
30                      	
H   „
32   „
33   „
34   |
35   „   	
36   „
37   I     _..    .
38   „   .......
39   „       ...
40   „   .
41 I
42 „   _
43   „   ....
44   „   ..    .
45   „
46   „
47   „   . .
48   „
49   „
50 years and over
Not stated. ..
—
Totals 	
32,121
31,073
349
324
4
18
1
1    ......
1
1
TABLE 11.—STILLBIRTHS BY SEX AND PERIOD OF GESTATION,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
Period of Gestation
Male
Female
Period of Gestation
Total
Male
Female
15
1
10
2
18
2
11
5
21
4
15
16
7
13
2
6
5
13
6
24
9
20
39 weeks	
40 „   _______
41 „   	
42 „   	
43 „    	
44 „	
45 „	
Not stated	
Totals
11
115
15
E~S
1
1
2
375
6
59
7
179
5
56
8
~~2
1
1
2
196
 S 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 12.—INFANT DEATHS AND INFANT DEATHS IN HOSPITAL BY OCCURRED
AND RESIDENCE FOR CENSUS DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
Census Divisions
Total Infant Deaths
Total by
Occurrence
British Columbia	
Division No. la	
Division No. lb	
Division No. lc_	
Division No. 2a_-	
Division No. 2b	
Division No. 2c	
Division No. 3a	
Division! No. 3b_,	
Division No. 3c~,	
Division No. 4a_	
Division No. 4b	
Division No. 5a_-	
Division No. 5b	
Division No. 5c_	
Division No. 5d	
Divisiori No. 5e	
Division No. 5f	
Division No. 6a	
Division No. 6b_	
Division No. 6c	
Division No. 6d	
Division No. 6e_—;	
Division No. 6f	
Division No. 7a_	
Division No. 7b_!	
Division No. 7c	
Division No. 8a_	
Division No. 8b	
Division No. 8c	
Division No. 8d	
Division No. 8e	
Division No. 8f	
Division No. 8g	
Division No. 9a	
Division No. 9b	
Division No. 9c	
Division No. 9d .	
Division No. 9e	
Division No. 9f	
Division No. 10a	
Division No. 10b	
Division No. 10c	
Division No. lOd	
857
3
19
4
7
9
17
37
25
2
98
284
86
14
11
4
15
5
45
4
8
11
6
"7
15
2
7
13
11
24
6
1
1
2
30
6
3
2
1
4
8
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
Infant Deaths in Hospitals
Total by
Occurrence
859
3
20
3
8
10
16
39
24
3
88
269
88
3
19
11
4
10
4
11
33
2
13
13
6
10
6
14
3
9
14
15
18
11
1
2
5
24
8
4
3
1
5
6
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
13
26
1
6
14
2
1
1
2
"7
2
3
1
4
2
1
3
11
6
3
5
1
4
6
2
i
2
10
1
2
3
4
1
5
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
670
2
17
4
6
9
15
34
24
2
82
242
75
12
9
2
12
4
30
5
4
~~6
10
2
~9
5
14
24
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
2
8
673
2
18
3
7
10
14
36
22
3
72
228
77
3
17
9
2
8
4
10
18
"4
7
4
9
5
9
3
1
10
8
9
5
1
3
20
1
1
1
"1
6
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
13
25
1
~5
13
1
1
I
~6
2
3
1
4
1
1
3
11
6
3
5
1
4
6
1
"4
2
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 73
TABLE 13.-INFANT DEATHS AND INFANT DEATHS IN HOSPITAL BY OCCURRENCE
AND RESIDENCE FOR URBAN PLACES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1953.
City or Village
Total by
Occurrence
Total Infant Deaths
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
Infant Deaths in Hospitals
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Resir
dence.
Occurrence
Elsewhere
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Campbell River__.
Castlegar	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranberry Lake—
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Dawson Creek—
Duncan	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Hope	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kimberley	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan—
Merritt	
Mission City	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster-
North Kamloops--
North Vancouver-
Oliver	
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria :	
Westview.	
2
3
1
4
7
15
4
2
24
17
9
5
16
12
58
12
3
14
13
13
23
5
6
1
4
6
8
245
12
47
1
2
2
6
1
"i
3
5
4
1
3
1
9
8
9
2
1
10
4
10
2
12
ii"
7
5
1
12
14
7
7
1
1
3
2
187
8
28
3
2
3
12
3
15
10
5
7
8
48
"~5"
3
4
7
1
11
3
3
6
68
5
19
2
6
1
6
1
1
1
~1
1
2
3
2
5
T
1
5
1
"2
2
2
10
1
3
7
15
4
2
23
17
8
5
15
11
58
11
3
14
12
10
20
5
6
1
4
5
8
212
12
43
2
2
6
1
"6
3
5
4
1
3
1
8
8
8
9
3
10
2
12
11
6
5
1
9
11
7
7
1
1
2
2
154
8
24
2
2
1
1
3
12
3
15
10
5
7
8
48
~4
3
4
7
1
11
~1
~3
3
6
67
5
19
2
6
1
6
1
1
1
T
1
2
5
"1
1
5
1
2
2
2
9
1
 S 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 14.—CAUSE OF INFANT DEATHS
Cause of Death
o"
m
*»
09
Total
under
1 Year
o £"
S2
Tt
05
>.
a
1
Vi
>.
Q
0.
>>
as
Q
.tt
•
A->
G
tM
T'l
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
9
"4
2
2
2
2
1
"1
""2
M.
5
|f
'"2
Z.\
1
F.
859
3
1
5
3
9
1
1
5
6
22
6
15
95
10
1
10
12
148
85
44
41
99
27
72
24
10
14
3
2
1
1
1
15
4
11
14
8
6
5
1
4
7
3
4
16
5
11
171
8
1
1
11
16
5
2
1
3
3
5
2
8
508
1
4
""3
1
"~2
4
13
4
12
53
6
—TJ
10
88
51
23
28
59
18
41
12
6
6
3
2
1
~~8
4
4
3
1
2
4
1
3
3
2
1
9
4
5
108
4
1
1
7
9
2
2
1
3
2
2
6
351
3
1
3
6
1
3
2
9
2
3
42
4
1
3
2
60
34
21
13
40
9
31
12
4
8
"l
1
7
7
11
7
4
1
~T
4
1
3
7
1
6
63
4
Hi
7
3
[--
3
3
m
153
n
14
27
12
15
22
4
18
2
1
1
~"4
2
2
2
2
"~4
4
75
1
103
"2
Ti
18
9
9
15
3
12
1
1
'"a
3
3
~5
1
4
38
46
S
13
5
8
15
6
9
u
12
28
_____
2
1
1
10
4
6
1
1
_____
___-.
To
l
39
17
19
1
""4
2
"2
5
2
3
1
"T
______
___„
""2
"2
____
1
2
13
-.__
2
2
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3
______
—-.
3
1
2
"~3
10
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1
1
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2
"l
1
iti
1
"2
001-019
045-048
056
057
085
204
210-229
273
340
391,392
470-475
480-483
490-493
500-502
543
b
—
T *»nlfflpmin and __leukaemia          	
______
7
4
3
10
2
8
1
1
"T
1
.___
2
2
7
2
5
__.-.
______
2
H
—
FHqm^ps of thvmus eland       	
"M>«incritic (r\on-meninfiococCciO	
—
Acute upper respiratory infection	
Influenza —        	
Pneumonia (4 weeks and over)	
Bronchitis                                 	
—
•Gastritis and duodenitis          	
—
560-570
571
Hernia and intestinal obstruction...   	
—
Gastro-enteritis and colitis     	
—
750-759
Coneenital malformations    	
760 761
Iniurv at birth                                .	
1
2
1
o
Without mention of immaturity	
5
With immaturity            	
l
1
762
Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis	
1
o
Without mention of immaturity	
.5
With immaturity -	
763
Pneumonia of newborn  	
—
.0
Without mention of immaturity	
.....
.5
With immaturity	
—
764
Diarrhoea of newborn	
.0
Without mention of immaturity	
	
.5
With immaturity	
765-768
Other infections of the newborn |
.0
Without mention of immaturity	
769
Maternal toxaemia	
.0-.4
Without mention of immaturity |	
.5-.9
With immaturity ..  __
770
Erythroblastosis	
1
.0-.2
Without mention of immaturity	
1
.5-.7
With immaturity	
771
Haemorrhagic disease of newborn	
.0
Without mention of immaturity	
.5
With immaturity	
772
Nutritional maladjustment	
.0
Without mention of immaturity	
.5
With immaturity	
2
1
1
8
1
~T
"T
2
773
.0
Ill-defined diseases peculiar to early infancy
Without mention of immaturity	
1
.5
With immaturity-	
1
774-776
795
Immaturity
Ill-defined and unknown causes...
1
E900-E904
Accidental falls	
	
E916
Accidents caused by fire
E921,E922
E924, E925
Inhalation and ingestion of food or other object
Accidental mechanical suffocation
—
Residual I  (001-138).    Other infective and
parasitic diseases	
Residual III  (240-289).    Other allergic endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases 	
Residual IV (290-299.)   Diseases of "the blood
and blood-forming organs
Residual VI (330-398).   Other diseases of the
nervous system and sense organs
Residual VII (400-468).   Diseases of the circulatory system	
._-
Residual IX (530-587).   Other diseases of the
digestive system.
Residual XVII (E800-¥9~99~).   Other accidents
and violent deaths
I
.|.___.
i
Residual.  All other causes
r
—1—!—
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 75
BY SEX AND AGE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
AGE AT DEATH
09
>>
a
0
VO
cn
Ti
I
OS
>>
P
14-20
Days
21-27
Days
28 Days
■ and under
2 Months
C
o
i
Vi
-C
a
o
I
cn
O-
£5
+_>
q
o
l
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0
o
Cft
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d
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0
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s
II
09
ft
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9
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1
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1
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1
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2
~~1
1
—
 S 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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S 77
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 S 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 16.—GENERAL SUMMARY OF MORTALITY FOR CENSUS DIVISIONS
BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1953
Census Division
Total
Deaths
British Columbia-
Division No. la-
Division No. lb-
Division No. lc.
Division No. 2a_
Division No. 2b.
Division No. 2c.
Division No. 3 a.
Division No. 3b.
Division No. 3c~
Division No. 4a	
Division No. 4b	
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
No. 5a_
No. 5b.
No. 5c_
No. 5d.
No. 5e_
No,5f_
No. 6a-
No. 6b-
No. 6c.
No. 6d.
No. 6e_
No. 61.
Division No. 7a.
Division No. 7b.
Division No. 7c
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
Division
No. 8a.
No. 8b.
No. 8c_
No. 8d.
No. 8e.
No. 8f_
No. 8g-
No. 9a.
No. 9b.
No. 9c.
No. 9d_
No. 9e_
No. 91.
Division No. 10a
Division No. 10b.
Division No. 10c.
Division No. lOd.
12,218
44
121
69
44
191
258
483
186
60
1,599
5,514
1,875
50
186
146
22
56
24
106
257
6
2o
57
30
30
59
86
26
20
89
85
59
17
7
7
18
154
22
19
7
2
34
65
Hospital
Deaths
7,616
30
93
45
33
141
311
126
35
968
3,452
1,258
35
124
81
10
31
15
68
134
2
13-
22
14
13
m
49
14
5
47
51
25
8
4
4
8
91
3
8
3
1
21
38
Infant
Deaths
859
3
m
3
8
10
16
39
24
3
88
269
88
3
19
11
4
10
4
11
33
2
n
13
6
10
6
14
3
9
14
15
18
11
1
2
5
24
8
4
3
1
5
6
Neonatal
Deaths
534
1
17
3
4
9
10
28
20
2
56
181
56
2
14
9
1
4
3
7
16
~4
5
2
8
3
8
2
3
11
4
7
3
2
2
16
2
3
1
3
Maternal
Deaths
18
2
6
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 79
TABLE 17.-GENERAL SUMMARY OF MORTALITY FOR INCORPORATED URRAM
PLACES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
City or Village
Total
Deaths
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Campbell River.-
Castlegar -----
Chilliwack	
Courtenay—-—
Cranberry Lake—
Cranbrook	
Creston r—
Dawson Creek—
Duncan	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Hope	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kimberley	
Ladysmith—
Lake Cowichan.-
Merritt -
Mission City 1
Nanaimo	
Nelson —
New Westminster
North Kamloops-
North Vancouver.
Oliver	
Penticton -_
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert _.
Quesnel ...
Revelstoke	
Rossland _.
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Trail ___
Vancouver.. ...
Vernon	
Victoria	
Westview. _.
34
11
19
10
76
23
5
47
26
28
41
34
21
15
120
111
35
23
7
16
27
128
73
253
11
218
7
83
63
31
16
63
94
33
31
24
11
22
66
4,296
135
760
22
Hospital
Deaths
23
8
9
7
62
15
3
38
17
17
27
24
19
9
72
87
27
19
4
7
16
97
47
186
9
148
2
64
43
19
13
42
58
26
25
20
10
19
55
2,690
71
509
18
Inf .ant
Deaths
2
2
6
1
7
3
5
4
1
3
1
9
8
9
10
4
10
2
12
Ti
7
5
1
12
14
7
7
1
1
3
2
187
8
28
3
Neonatal
Deaths
2
2
3
1
5
2
2
3
1
2
1
8
4
8
6
3
8
9
5
4
1
7
9
7
4
1
1
1
2
129
7
18
2
■Maternal
Deaths
5
2
 S 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 18.-DEATHS AND DEATHS IN HOSPITAL BY OCCURRENCE AND RESIDENT
FOR CENSUS DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953 b
Census Division
Total Deaths
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
Total by
Occurrence
British Columbia	
Division No. la	
Division No. lb	
Division No. Ic	
Division No. 2a	
Division No. 2b	
Division No. 2c	
Division No. 3a	
Division No. 3b	
Division No. 3c	
Division No. 4a	
Division No. 4b	
Division No. 5a	
Division No. 5b	
Division No. 5c	
Division No. 5d	
Division No. 5e	
Division No. 5f	
Division No. 6a	
Division No. 6b	
Division No. 6c	
Division No. 6d	
Division No. 6e	
Division No. 6f	
Division No. 7a__	
Division No. 7b	
Division No. 7c	
Division No. 8a__	
Division No. 8b	
Division No. 8c	
Division No. 8d	
Division No. 8e	
Division No. 8f	
Division No. 8g	
Division No. 9a	
Division No. 9b	
Division No. 9c	
Division No. 9d	
Division No. 9e	
Division No. 9f	
Division No. 10a	
Division No. 10b	
Division No. 10c	
Division No. lOd	
12,181
12,218
38
44
8
114
121
13
68
69
6
37
44
6
183
191
20
251
258
24
450
483
22
176
186
19
54
60
7
1,789
1,599
433
5,529
5,514
491
1,918
1,875
126
26
50
11
117
186
14
112
146
12
20
22
5
64 1
56
18
8
24
74
106
"~6
291
257
77
5
6
2
17
28
3
40
57
1
36
30
8
15
30
4
56
59
8
84
86
. 12
16
26
15
20
"i
84
89
13
65
85
2
67
59
15
11
17
2
2
7
3
7
12
18
i
177
154
49
35
22
20
16
19
5
8
7
4
1
2
30
34
H
67
65
ii
144
181
14
20
7
13
28
31
55
29
13
243
476
83
35
83
46
7
10
16
38
43
3
14
18
2
19
11
14
10
6
18
22
7
8
5
4
7
26
7
8
3
1
11
9
7,596
17
87
40
24
130
133
282
115
33
1,149
3,532
1,297
16
57
61
3
29
36
174
_____
8
13
Up
49
5
_____
34
27
3
103
1
2
13
42
Deaths in Hospitals
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
7,616
75
30
1
93
11
45
2
33
3
141
15
142
17
311
16
126
16
35
7
968
378
3,452
420
1,258
98
35
10
124
6
81
7
10
31
1
15
68
~2
134
64
2
13
~1
22
1
14
1
13
40
5
49
8
14
BmmJ.
5
__-.____
47
9
51
_*-_.
25
8
8
—
4
4
__.
8
___
91
31
3
1
8
—
3
1
—-
21
2
38 1
9
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
95
14
17
7
12
26
26
45
27
9
197
340
59
29
73
27
7
8
15
34
24
2
12
15
2
13
7
8
9
5
15
17
6
8
4
4
5
19
3
6
3
1
10
5
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 81
TABLE 19.-DEATHS AND DEATHS IN HOSPITAL BY OCCURRENCE AND RESIDENCF
FOR URBAN PLACES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
City or Village
Total Deaths
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
Deaths in Hospitals
Total by
Occurrence
Total by
Residence
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Campbell River	
Castlegar	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranberry Lake	
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Dawson Creek	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Hope	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kiihberley	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan	
Merritt j	
Mission City	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster—.
North Kamloops.___
North Vancouver	
Oliver ,	
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George.	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Trail 	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Westview	
9
18
20
2
8
5
2
7
36
49
77
40
35
1
182
166
31
28
3
16
47
182
112
700
1
261
19
97
73
16
3
68
116
32
29
42
39
29
92
,681
150
,107
3
34
11
19
10
76
23
5
47
26
28
41
34
21
15
120
111
35
23
7
16
27
128
73
253
11
218
7
83
63
31
16
63
94
33
31
24
11
22
66
4,296
135
760
22
2
9
9
___
1
n
16
25
44
13
18
78
66
3
13
1
5
28
69
49
494
94
13
30
26
6
1
17
39
11
9
20
29
12
36
816
29
449
27
2
8
8
69
19
3
42
6
4
8
7
4
14
16
11
7
8
5
5
8
15
10
47
10
51
1
16
16
21
14
12
17
12
11
2
1
5
10
431
14
102
19
16
14
26
39
66
32
33
138
144
24
24
_____
36
146
85
616
~~193
13
79
57
4
"~49
79
28
24
37
36
25
82
3,130
87
851
23
8
9
7
62
15
3
38
17
17
27
24
19
9
72
87
27
19
4
7
16
97
47
186
9
148
2
64
43
19
13
42
58
26
25
20
10
19
55
2,690
71
509
18
By Occurrence,
Residence
Elsewhere
By Residence,
Occurrence
Elsewhere
9
8
13
24
43
12
18
75
64
3
10
~5
27
62
46
468
84
12
28
25
4
14
33
9
8
19
27
11
35
729
28
416
23
1
3
7
62
15
3
38
4
2
4
4
4
9
9
7
6
5
4
1
7
13
8
38
9
39
1
13
11
19
13
7
12
7
9
2
1
5
8
289
12
74
18
 s 82                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 20.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR
!	
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12,218
44 121
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1
2581483
186
60
1599
5514
1
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7,678
4,540
28
16
11
44
45
24
26
18
128
63
166 306
92 177
124
62
36
24
1011
588
3430
2084
1084
791
35
15
146
95
51
i
 F.
I   Infective and parasitic diseases —_T.
266
2
2
4
4
2
13
2
3
25
110
29
M.
169
97
—
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
6
7
2
2
1
18
7
77
33
20
9
4
1
1
...    -    F.
Al
Tuberculosis of respiratory system__M.
84
—__
,-._„__
	
2
2
1
8
51
11
F.
37
1
1
3
2
16
?
A2
Tuberculosis of meninges  and central
4
—
1
2
	
6
1
A3
Tuberculosis of intestines, peritoneum.
and mesenteric glands M.
3
—
	
—
—1—
1
1
_
A5
Tuberculosis, all other forms M.
F.
9
3
—
	
	
	
	
—
—
—
1
3
1
i
3
1
—
—
—
A8
A9
1
—
—
—
General paralysis of insane M.
3
—
 '
rt	
1
	
._.
	
	
	
1
—
A10
F.
17
—
	
1
1
1
1
—
3
8
5
—
1
A13
Paratyphoid fever and other Salmonella
■---—
	
__—
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
	
.,. ._	
	
	
A16
Dysentery, all forms  M.
1
 :	
	
—
—:	
	
	
	
	
.__-.
J-iLE.*..
——w
A17
1
—
	
—
—
	
	
	
	
A18
Streptococcal sore throat M.
1
	
—
—
	
—
	
—
—
—
—__
1
	
.__-__
	
A20
A21
Septicaemia and pyaemia _. M.
__ _F.
.P.
3
1
2
1
1
1
	
—
—
	
—
—
	
1
1
	
	
	
	
A22
Whooping-cough M.
5
1
	
1
F.
2
i
A23
Meningococcal infections                    M.
4
1
1
1
	
F.
4
	
	
1
2
1
A26
1
.,  .,.
_-_——
	
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... ,
	
1
______
......
__
A28
Acute poliomyelitis M.
__F.
15
1
1
1
3
j
?,
15
3
4
2
3
A29
Acute infectious encephalitis _.          F.
1
M	
1
	
A30
Late effects of acute poliomyelitis and
acute infectious encephalitis             M.
1
	
 .
	
	
	
	
__________
1
__..
_.,.,TT
 .
Ditto          -       ~    -                        F-
1
	
1
	
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A32
Measles . _         -   -     - -    -     '          M.
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
	
 _.
 .
A34
Infectious hepatitis _        •   _ _      _  M.
11
6
1
1
—
	
 —
"2
3
—
	
	
 F.
6
4
i
A36
Typhus and other rickettsial diseases M.
1
1
A43
All other diseases classified as infective
and parasitic               M.
2
	
	
1
1
	
____
	
	
Ditto          ~       -           - -    ~ ~     F.
3
	
—
—
	
—
	
■—
1
1
—1_:
—-
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1
II. Neoplasms       —.   T.
1,950
5
21
9
5
33
38
70
29
6
270
885
374
11
30
24
-                 - -M.
1,122
4
12
5
2
22
26
42
17
2
160
495
204
8
21
11
___.       ..    F.
828
1
9
4
3
11
12
28
12
4
110
390
170
3
9
13
A44
Malignant  neoplasm  of buccal  cavity
and pharynx                              M.
32
1
1
7
15
7
	
—
—
Ditto ... .    -            --          F.
9
i
2
2
-_.——<
1
A45
Malignant neoplasm of oesophagus—M.
30
1
2
2
16
7
.__—-
—
—
. . F.
9
1
3
4
	
—
A46
Malignant neoplasm of stomach    .  -M.
171
2
5
8
4
4
26
78
28
1
2
_   .    F.
93
2
1
5
3
2
6
50
19
1
—
2
A47
Malignant  neoplasm   of  intestine,   ex
2
4
cept rectum                                             M.
113
1
2
1
2
3
2
15
50
22
1
2
Ditto                            .                  F.
96
1
1
2
1
14
52
19
1
1
A48
Malignant neoplasm of rectum     .  _.M.
72
1
1
1
2
14
28
17
1
 F.
34
1
2
1
6
15
8
A49
Malignant neoplasm of larynx       •■ M.
-       -         -                  -F.
Malignant neoplasm of trachea, and of
12
2
—
—
	
—
—
1
2
7
2
2
A50
—
—
______
—
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—
	
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bronchus  and  lung not  specified  as
2
secondary                                                   M
172
4
4
4
8
1
21
77
37
4
Ditto .                                             F.
28
1
3
14
6
—
—
—
A51
Malignant neoplasm of breast           M.
2
2
 ._
—
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2
m
l
A52
_   F.
Malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri _. F.
177
51
—
3
1
1
	
~~1
4
5
4
2
27
8
79
22
37
8
A53
Malignant neoplasm of other and un
specified parts of uterus .                 F.
34
?
3
19
9
—
2
i
A54
Malignant neoplasm of prostate       M.
166
1
1
1
3
4
1
17
52
21
1
i
A55
Malignant neoplasm of skin               M
11
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
—
—-
I——
|            F.
6
2
2
2
	
—
—
A56
Malignant neoplasm of bone and connective tissue                                    M
13
3
1
4
4
1
Ditto       ....                             f
8
1
2
5
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 83
CENSUS DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953
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1
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A56
 S 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
o
Z
m
•Tt
TT
A57
A58
A59
A60
A61
A62
A63
A64
A65
A66
A67
A68
A69
A70
A71
A72
A73
A77
A78
Ae19
A80
A81
A82
A83
A84
TABLE 20.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR CENSUS
Cause of Death
Malignant neoplasm of all other and
unspecified sites  M.
Ditto  . -*'
Leukaemia and aleukaemia  M.
 I F.
Lymphosarcoma and other neoplasms
of lymphatic and haematopoietic system  M-
Ditto I ~ t-
Benign neoplasms and neoplasms ot
unspecified nature  M.
Ditto  F-
III, IV. Allergic disorders and endocrine, metabolic, and blood diseases T.
Ditto   __— ■ • M.
 1 F.
Non-toxic goitre  j  F.
Thyrotoxicosis with or without goitre M.
Diabetes mellitus M.
„         1 F.
Avitaminosis and other deficiency states
 L j M.
Ditto ] j F.
Anaemias _J I M.
„ _ _ F.
Allergic disorders;   all other endocrine,
metabolic, and blood diseases M-
Ditto _~ F.
V. Mental, phychoneurotic, and personality disorders  ! T.
Ditto | M.
 F.
Psychoses . M.
 F.
Psychoneuroses  and  disorders  of personality  i M.
Ditto ___. F.
Mental deficiency       M.
 _ F.
VI. Diseases of the nervous system and
sense organs 1          T.
Ditto :  ' P M.
  „F.
Vascular lesions affecting central nervous system         _   _  M
Ditto   __„ E F!
Non-meningococcal meningitis M.
Multiple sclerosis      M.
 1 " p;
Epilepsy    _M.
„            p.
Otitis media and mastoiditis  M
 ; i p.
AU other diseases of the nervous system
and sense organs              M
Ditto        - 7 __"_' p^
VII. Diseases   of  the   circulatory   system  x
Ditto 1 |^
 %m
Rheumatic fever
M.
F.
Chronic rheumatic heart disease M.
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart'
disease  j^
Other diseases of heart     "  "jyf _
TT    i      "      p
Hypertension with heart disease ____M.
Hypertension wifihout mention of heart
  M.
 F>
Ditto
a
t-»
o
H
244
204
54
30
66
26
14
21
315
179
136
2
4
7
59
69
10
5
15
15
91
38
30
19
11
4
5
14
4
1
2
1,445
728
717
647
651
9
4
11
8
5
6
16
12
40
36
4,822
3,138
1,684
11
6
94
76
2,490
1,223
109
63
208
178
53
29
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 85
DIVISIONS,
BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1953
1—Continued
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40
14
1
5
4
3
..._.
1
1
___
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
._._
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
5
2
3
1
3
1
13
10
3
6
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
4
2
___
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
24
19
5
17
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
5
1
-   '
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
A57
A58
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
~—
A59
1
3
1
2
2
3
2
1
3
i
3
1
2
1
1
1
18
11
7
~2
3
3
3
4
1
1
1
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1
1
1
6
5
1
3
jjl
1
2
14
9
5
9
4
1
36
29
7
25
7
1
~2
-_
A60
1
1
—
1
1
1
—
—
	
1
—
1
2
1
1
1
1
—
—
—
	
—
A61
A62
A63
1
A64
A65
	
1
1
—
1
1
2
2
2
14
10
4
9
4
1
1
1
—~_
	
5
3
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
A66
——
1
———
-*——.
	
—
—
—
	
—
—
A67
A68
4
3
1
1
1
9
7
2
6
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
m
6
4
2
4
2
25
19
6
13
5
1
1
5
4
1
3
1
1
31
23
8
_____
1
16
6
4
_____
2
2
2
7
6
1
6
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
8
5
3
4
3
1
14
11
3
9
3
____
12
5
7
4
6
1
1
1
—
2
—
A69
1
2
1
1
i
2
A70
1
—
1
—
—
2
A71
..._.
1
—
23	
1
1
~1
30
21
9
1
11
6
4
~~5
2
A72
A73
All
— ■"—
13
11
2
~2
1
7
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
—
3
3
2
A78
7
5
52
42
10
38
9
___
1
5
4
1
_____
4
4
4
1
, „ i. ,
9
8
1
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7
2
1
1
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A79
A80
3
2
3
A81
—-
~~1
2
—
—
—
	
—
___
—
	
—
A82
A83
—-
1
1
1
A84
 S 86
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 20.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR
CENSUS
o
fc
Vi
TT
a
Cause of Death
A85
A86
A87
A88
A89
A90
A91
A92
A93
A94
A95
A96
A97
Diseases of arteries
Other diseases of circulatory system_M.
 F.
VIII. Diseases of the respiratory system  —  *■•
Ditto 0.
Acute upper respiratory infections—M
______ F
Influenza M
A98
A99
A100
A101
A102
A103
A104
A105
A106
A107
A108
A109
A110
Alll
A112
A114
A115
Lobar pneumonia
Bronchopneumonia
Primary atypical, other, and unspecified
pneumonia  — :■ M.
Ditto  I 1 r~--F.
Acute bronchitis ——__ M^
 F.
Bronchitis, chronic and unqualified—M.
F.
Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids M.
n     l : F.
Empyema and abscess of lung M.
 _ _F.
Pleurisy 	
All other respiratory diseases
IX. Diseases of the digestive system . T.
„        M.
 . F.
Acute nephritis
Ditto
Diseases of teeth and supporting structures  M
Ulcer of stomach j M
 ___. F
Ulcer of duodenum I _M
F
Gastritis and duodenitis M
 F
Appendicitis  . M
 . -_ F
Intestinal obstruction and hernia M
  _F
Gastro-enteritis and colitis, except diarrhoea of the new-born i Ml
Ditto  F
Cirrhosis of liver _M
Cholelithiasis and cholecystitis M
Other diseases of digestive system M
X. Diseases of the genito-urinary system  i X
Ditto | M
Chronic, other, and unspecified nephri
tis ____ m
Ditto 1 I j f
Infections of kidney __: M
 F
Calculi of urinary system M
 F
Hyperplasia of prostate | M
Other diseases of genito-urinary system
XI. Deliveries and complications of
pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium j _t
Sepsis of pregnancy, childbirth, and the
puerperium         p
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1953—Continued
S 87
0
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A85
.—
6
2
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1
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1
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1
3
2
1
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A86
3
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!
1
4
3
1
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1
2
2
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A87
A88
1
1
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—1
—
A89
A90
A91
A92
A93
A94
A95
—
1
4
4
2
1
1
A96
1
1
1
	
2
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
jj|t
1
1
1
	
1
I
A97
;
A98
~T
1
~1
i
il
i
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1
A99
A100
A101
"
A102
—
:	
1
—
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2
2
1
i
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V
I
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Eg
A103
A104
t
	
~i
l
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1—
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A105
—
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k *
r j
A106
	
'
	
	
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1
■ A107
	
1
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1
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A108
—-
ZZ
E
—
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A109
[ ■
A110
i
r ■
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1
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A112
A114
—
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R
!
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1
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f—
f
1
1
f—
A115
 S 88                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 20.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR
CENSUS
6
fc
*■>
oa
3
_a
1
Cause of Death
*o3
o
H
cd
Tt
o
fc
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>
Q
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fc
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24
19
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v.
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I
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A116 [Toxaemias of pregnancy and the puer-
■nprii-TT-                                       ■--                   **-
1
!
41—
1
51
1
11
[
i
I
 I
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
1
2
1
2
6
2
4
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
20
16
4
2
1
1
1
4
~~4
I
~~2
1
1
1
1
9
5
4
2
I
1
2
3
7
5
2
~5
2
33
25
8
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
___
1
14
8
6
1
3
3
3
4
19
10
9
2
5
1
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
40
30
10
5
5
3
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
18
12
6
4
3
3
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
18
16
2
3
1
~~1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
5
1
1
~~2
1
1
1
5
1
4
1
2
2
19
11
8
3
3
2
5
6
48
29
19
7
4
7
3
3
j
3
2
1
9
8
17
9
8
4
6
5
2
165
124
41
38
13
6
2
5
1      1
i )
PCIIUIII                                                         ■                              i_MJ
A117 1 Haemorrhage of pregnancy and cnfld-
feirth                                                   F.
1
	
5
1
4
1
1
2
1
12
9
3
1
1
3
1
1
4
1
16
9
7
3
2
1
j
5
3
2
2
1
2
2
2
3
2
1
1
l
10
9
1
!___
1
i
ii
i
2
1
1
28
14
10
A
——
A118 I Abortion without mention of sepsis or
toxaemia                     ,           .                -    F.
1
A119 | Abortion with sepsis F.
A120 | Other complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium F.
|XII, Xm   Diseases of the  skin  and
musculoskeletal system T.
i r___+_-                                                             M.
2
4
62
26
36
5
3
4
22
1
1
2
1
14
9
184
111
73
15
13
45
29
51
31
440
260
180
51
34
59
40
15
13
3
11
15
12
117
70
108
62
46
21
23
41
23
1,204
905
299
167
65
92
9
65
28
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
_____
1
6
5
1
1
F_
14|     6
1
1
4!	
21
21     1
8|     4
1
11	
1
1
8|     3
3|     2
!
73!   24
45!   15
281     9
1
4!    2
41	
1
221     6
161     1
—
A121 1 Infections   of   skin   and   subcutaneous
1     tissue                                                      "M-
I Ditto - JP-
A17? I Arthritic nnd *_DOndvlitis                     . ■    M.
„       : __        __F.
A123 j Muscular rheumatism and rheumatism,
unspecified —_____ M.
! Ditto                                                        —-
—
A124 ! Osteomyelitis and periostitis          —M.
F.
A126 j All other diseases of skin and musculo-
cV<-1<_ta.   evctPtn                                                            \f-
1
1
1
Ditto    "ZZ F.
XTV. Congenital malformations  T.
M.
3
3
j
,,         _                                              r
Fr
1
A127I
Spina bifida and meningocele __M.
F
—
A128
I
Congenital   malformations   of   circulatory system                                       M.
ritttr*                                                      F
—
A129 I All other congenital malformations M.
1                                                                                  V
19
8
145
85
60
14
6
22
18
5
8
1
5
3
3
40
20
23
11
1
8
44
27
17
7
1
7
5
2
2
_
11
8
13
6
3
!
1
|
XV. Certain diseases of early infancy
T.
Ditto M.
__F
7
3
4
A130
Hirth  ininrifts   1                                              M
I          „             F.
A131 1 Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis M.
1         ,_                                                      F.
A132 1 Tnfp_r.tior._j of thp. n^w-horn                       \f.
1
2
F
1
3
32
29
3
3
A133 I Haemolytic disease of new-bom M.
I         ..                                                      F.
A134 I All other defined diseases of early infancy                                                 M.
! Ditto _F_
A135 | Dl-defined diseases peculiar to early infancy and immaturity unqualified—M.
1 Ditto                                                            P
1
!
i
XVI.  Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined
conditions                                            T
Ditto                                                               M
1
%7
121     7
1
1
81    2
101    2
3!    4
21     5
1
1
477! 114
3331   85
1441   29
531   17
251     7
251    7
21—-
511    2
1
A136 I Senility without mention  of psychosis
| Ditto                                                          p*
A137 | Ill-defined and unknown causes         M.
r
E  XVII.    Accidents,  poisonings,   and
violence   (classification  according to
external cause)                                     T
1 Ditto                                                        JM,
 F.
AE138 j Motor-vehicle accidents  M
F.
AE139 1 Other transport accidents                     M,
AE140   Accidental ooisonine                            M*
1—
1    1
	
 F.
j
22
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
DIVISIONS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953—Continued
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
~1
4
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
.__.
8
4
4
2
1
1
—
1
1
1
—
—
—
11
1
1
1
1
2
1
17
14
3
2
21
21
21
3!
21
1|
1|
2
1
1
__.
1
11
10
1
6
6
1
1
—-1
—
—
	
15
7
8
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
33
27
6
11
3
5
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a
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>
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11	
61
51
11
2
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10
8
2
1
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d
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Q
u
OS
d
fc
0
Os
d
fc
>
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16
14
2
1
1
2
11
5
6
1
1
1
3
o
Os
d
fc
1
1	
2
1
24
19
5
11
11
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d
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o
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1
1
15
9
6
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1
1
1
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27
20
7
5f_
II-
II-
S 89
o
Z
*-
3
A116
A117
A118
A119
A120
A121
A122
A123
A124
A126
A127
A128
A129
A130
A131
A132
A133
A134
A135
A136
A137
AE138
AE139
AE140
 S 90
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 20.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR CENSUS
o
fc
co
'Ti
Cause of Death
03
•♦-»
O
H
a
Tt
6
fc
'• >
•—t
Q
o
fc
>
•»s
fl
o
Trt
d
fc
>
rtrt
fl
■St
CS
d
fc
•irt
Q
JD
CS
d
fc
«
>
•—<
Q
o
cs
d
fc
>
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Q
C3
d
fc
>
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Q
JD
cn
6
fc
>
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o
CO
d
fc
>
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AE141 f Accidental falls __. —I M.
„    —tem&rW^m §#
AE142 1 Accidentas caused by machinery M.
 F.
| Accident caused by lire and explosion
of combustible material M.
Ditto  F.
AE144 | Accident caused by hot substance, corrosive liquid, steam, and radiation.-M.
Ditto  . F.
AE145 1 Accident caused by firearrri f M.
„         F.
AE146 I Accidental drowning and submersion M.
I :—1— F.
AE147 I All other accidental causes—I M.
I i 1 F.
AE148 I Suicide and self-inflicted injury M.
 : f.
AE149 ! Homicide and injury purposely inflicted
by other persons (not in war)—__M.
Ditto  i  F.
N XVII. Accidents, poisonings, and
violence (classification according to
nature of injury)  _T.
Ditto  . -_.M.
 F.
AN138 ! Fracture of skull 1 M.
— —_ . f.
AN 139 I Fracture of spine and trunk M.
 _ F.
AN 140 I Fracture of limbs j - M.
 ___ _F.
AN143 ! Head injury (excluding fracture) M.
 -.—: __F.
AN 144 I Internal injury of chest, abdomen, and
pelvis M.
. Ditto F.
AN 145 I Laceration and open wounds M.
  C F.
AN 146 I Superficial injury, contusion, and crushing with intact skin surface M.
AN147 I Effects of foreign body entering through
orifice   M.
Ditto        :_   F.
AN148 ! Burns __ M.
 F.
AN 149 I Effects of poisons . M.
 F.
AN15C ! All other and unspecified effects of external causes M.
Ditto F.
108
83
32
1
34
19
2
2
22
3
95
18
124
20
155
43
9
8
1,204
905
299
158
43
45
15
59
60
76
20
138
33
17
3
1
17
8
19
10
149
60
226
47
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1
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 91
DIVISIONS,
BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1952
»—Continued
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—
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1
6
2
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AN149
2
4
1
AN150
1
 S 92
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 21.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR URBAN PLACES OF 5,000 POPULATTHm
AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953 W
_■ m
O
fc
■*->
G
i—t
Cause of Death
T-I
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 M.
6,511
4,047
2,464
127
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35
57
17
2
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4
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1
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616
476
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94
59
61
60
39
21
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103
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98
27
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64
6
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6
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115
25
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76
37
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90
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35
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128
80
48
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1
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1
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28
16
12
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4
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3
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73
45
28
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253
150
103
3
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218
116
102
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63
40
23
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94
66
28
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66
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4,296
2,722
1,574
91
68
23
46
13
2
;;    ~         :::_._.      _f.
421
Al
»»    * ■■—^
I. Infective and parasitic diseases          T.
M.
;; f.
Tuberculosis of respiratory system M.
339
7
6
1
6
A2
A3
Tuberculosis of meninges and central nervous system .                              M.
Tuberculosis of intestines, peritoneum, and
mesenteric glands                                 M.
Tuberculosis, all other forms M.
Tabes dorsalis             %                    —M.
General paralysis of insane                    M.
All other syphilis _                                  M.
Dysentery, all forms                              M.
-Streptococcal sore throat                       M.
Septicaemia and pyaemia                         M.
M                                                     F-
—.
A5
A8
..__.
18
5
13
___.
___
1
	
3
1
1
7
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
700
403
297
14
2
12
3
64
36
42
39
23
11
5
64
10
59
16
13
38
2
2
4
5
84
74
16
10
29
10
23
19
4
""2
2
1
1
1
4
1
2
6
1
1
—
A9
AlO
A16
A18
A20
~1
___
1
—
—
A21
Diphtheria                                        M.
Meningococcal infections                        M.
Acute poliomyelitis M.
F-
Late  effects  of  acute  poHomyelitis  and
acute infectious encephalitis                M.
Ditto         F.
Measles _.            —   -   -M.
Infectious hepatitis                                . M.
F.
All other diseases classified as infective
and parasitic        —           M.
Ditto             ____ -           -  _     F.
II. Neoplasms . -           ~_                   -   T.
M.
- F.
Malignant neoplasm of buccal cavity and
pharynx , M.
Ditto                           -                  F.
Malignant neoplasm of oesophagus        -M.
F.
Malignant neoplasm of stomach         _M.
F.
Malignant neoplasm  of  intestine,  except
rectum _M.
Ditto      -_         .— .___                 F.
Malignant neoplasm of rectum                  M.
—F.
Malignant neoplasm of larynx               M.
- F.
Malignant neoplasm  of  trachea,   and  of
bronchus   and   lung   not   specified   as
secondary                                                      M,
Ditto                                                                F.
Malignant neoplasm of breast                  F.
Malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri         F.
Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of uterus                              F.
Malignant neoplasm of prostate .   -      M.
Malignant neoplasm of skin                   M.
               F.
Malignant neoplasm of bone and connective tissue                                              M.
Ditto                                                             f
Malignant neoplasm of all other and unspecified sites       _                              M.
Ditto --              _                                       F
Leukaemia and aleukaemia .                .  M.
.   F.
Lymphosarcoma and other neoplasms of
lymphatic and haematopoietic system M.
Ditto                                                           F
A23
10
9
1
_____
~~2
1
1
1
1
47
27
20
1
~~7
2
2
3
3
2
1
3
4
1
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1
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A28
18
10
8
n
_-_
16
6
10
8
4
4
1
A30
A32
A34
A43
	
	
—
A44
38
17
21
15
6
9
10
7
3
8
6
2
12
7
5
141
74
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A45
	
	
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3
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6
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1
1
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8
9
A47
10
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A48
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1
3
7
A49
1
3
1
A50
1
7
2
2
1
2
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1
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1
4
1
1
1
3
2
14
1
A51
A52
A53
1
1
1
1
11
2
5
A54
A55
1
2
8
1
A56
1
2
4
1
3
1
2
2
2
1
3
6
1
1
1
6
2
1
1
1
1
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A57
A58
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
17
18
3
2
3
4
A59
-
1
1
1
1
1
 !
;—1—|
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 93
TABLE 21.
-CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR URBAN PLACES OF 5 000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953—Continued E^^
0
fc
I
Cause of Death
cc)
4-*
O
u
JB
u
A60
A61
A62
A63
A64
A65
A66
Benign neoplasms and neoplasms of unspecified nature M.
Ditto   F.
III, IV. Allergic disorders and endocrine,
metabolic, and blood diseases _T.
Ditto 1 M.
I        „.„_ F.
Non-toxic goitre F.
Thyrotoxicosis with or without goitre—M.
I        I _F.
Diabetes mellitus M.
I F.
Avitaminosis ancj other deficiency states_M.
„         F.
Anaemias  M.
„        _ ___„F.
Allergic disorders;   all  other  endocrine,
metabolic, and blood diseases M.
Ditto  F.
V.   Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders T.
Ditto  M.
 F.
Psychoses . M.
 F.
Psychoneuroses and disorders of personality  __.M.
(Ditto  F.
A69 | Mental deficiency F.
VI.  Diseases of the nervous system and
sense organs T.
Ditto  M.
--. . F.
A67
A68
A70
A71
A72
A73
A77
A78
A79
A80
A81
A82
A83,
A84
A85
A86
Vascular lesions affecting central nervous
system  . M.
Ditto F.
Non-meningococcal meningitis M.
Multiple sclerosis  M.
 : f.
Epilepsy M.
Otitis media and mastoiditis . M.
 F.
All other diseases of the nervous system
and sense organs _„.M.
Ditto  r F.
VII. Diseases of the circulatory system-T.
 M.
   F.
Rheumatic fever 3 M.
1   |         F.
Chronic rheumatic heart disease M.
a     I _._F.
Arteriosclerotic   and   degenerative   heart
disease     M.
Ditto  1 F.
Other diseases of heart I M.
Hypertension with heart disease M.
u    u        —F.
Hypertension without mention of heart-M.
i „ f.
Diseases of arteries _ _   1 M.
__ .   » I F.
Oth^r diseases of circulatory system M.
 F.
VIII. Diseases of the respiratory system-T.
1 M.
1 ! . m. f.
9
14
153
94
59
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29
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398
381
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19
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2,685
1,709
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116
24
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51
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264
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12
 s 94                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 21.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR URBAN PLACES OF 5,000 POPUl at.™.,
AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953—Continued                        0N
•
O
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A87
A88
A89
A90
A91
A92
A93
A95
A96
A97
A98
A99
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A102
A103
A104
A105
A106
A107
A108
A109
A110
Alll
A112
A114
A115
A116
A117
A118
A119
A120
Acute upper respiratory infections M.
— F.
3
1
5
2
31
12
116
47
15
6
6
3
31
5
9
1
2
1
46
15
251
166
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1
24
23
15
8
45
20
11
10
16
14
146
115
31
2
1
36
14
21
9
7
1
36
13
6
10
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
7
1
1
1
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1
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1
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
2
1
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1
1
1
3
2
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2
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1
3
1
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1
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1
1
•. . F.
Primary  atypical,  other,  and unspecified
	
	
1
1
	
___
2
1
1
       F.
1 Bronchitis, chronic and unqualified      .M.
.   .  F.
Empyema and abscess of lung M.
      £
All other respiratory diseases            —M.
F.
IX. Diseases of the digestive system.  -T.
M-
._ |     F.
Diseases  of  teeth  and  supporting  structures __                      —            -       M.
Ulcer of stomach                    .    .     .   .M.
Ulcer of duodenum .                             _M.
- - I -                    - 1 F.
Gastritis and duodenitis            -    _      M.
Appendicitis .                   .                . _   M.
....                  F.
Intestinal obstruction and hernia      _   M.
...      F.
Gastro-enteritis   and  colitis,   except  diarrhoea of the newborn        „„     ,..,. .. M.
Ditto                       .             . F.
Cirrhosis of liver                              -M.
-               -   F.
Cholelithiasis and cholecystitis               M.
. .       „- F.
Other diseases of digestive system    _   M.
__       ...           F.
X. Diseases of the genito-urinary system -T.
I                            -                  M.
- -  F.
Acute nephritis           .       .                M.
--    _                    ...              -F.
Chronic, other and unspecified nephritis M.
-F.
Infections of kidney       ...    M.
 ___    _.F.
Calculi of urinary system   ..                  M.
.F.
Hyperplasia of prostate               .   .  . _M.
Other diseases of genito-urinary system_M.
- .          F.
XI. Deliveries and complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium.. T.
Sepsis of pregnancy, childbirth, and the
puerperium                    F.
Toxaemias   of   pregnancy   and   the   puerperium ....                                  F.
Haemorrhage of pregnancy and childbirth
-    -                    _                                 F.
	
	
	
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2
1
1
1
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1
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1
1
8
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
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5
4
1
~1
1
1
1
1
5
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
l
l
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
l
5
2
3
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4
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
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1
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1
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1
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1
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6
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1
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1
1
3
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—
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—
1
—
—
—
2
—
1
1
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Abortion   without  mention  of   sepsis   or
toxaemia               „                                F.
Abortion with sepsis                                 F.
Other complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium                     F-
—
l
—
 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1953
S 95
TABLE 21.-CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR URBAN PLACES OF 5,000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953-Continued rUFULATI0N
6
%
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Cause of Death
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XII, XIII.  Diseases of the skin and musculoskeletal system T.
31
14
17
4
2
1
11
1
1
8
3
83
48
35
8
6
18
17
22
12
185
108
77
21
11
24
18
5
9
6
...... 5
1
53
32
35
21
14
9
10
12
4
561
393
168
57
32
28
2
55
24
70
52
11
12
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
6
3
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
22
11
11
4
2
1
7
3
 _ F.
Infections of skin and subcutaneous tissue
      .  M.
1
2
A121
A122
Arthritis and spondylitis  M.
                                   F.
Muscular   rheumatism   and   rheumatism,
Osteomyelitis and periostitis M.
All other diseases of skin and musculoskeletal system  . M.
F.
XIV. Congenital malformations T.
„                         -M.
F.
Spina bifida and meningocele —_  M.
 F.
Congenital  malformations   of  circulatory
system     M.
Ditto       F.
All other congenital malformations —  M.
  F.
XV. Certain diseases of early infancy T.
    M.
 F.
Birth injuries  __: M.
 F.
Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis M.
 F.
Infections of the newborn  M.
 F.
Hemolytic disease of newborn F.
All other defined diseases of early infancy
-----  -._._-_-_ ...^ .___„„_ ._M.
Ditto         F.
Ill-defined diseases  peculiar to  early  infancy, and immaturity unqualified     M.
Ditto  F.
XVI. Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined
conditions      T.
Ditto M.
  „.F.
Senility without mention of psychosis M.
  F.
Ill-defined and unknown causes M.
 F.
EXVII. Accidents,  poisonings,   and  violence   (classification   according   to   external cause)    T.
Ditto                                     ..M.
 F.
Motor-vehicle  accidents   M.
     ..                              F.
1
A123
A124
3
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
2
1
1
1
___
1
7
4
3
1
1
1
6
4
2
3
1
1
___
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
_1
5
4
1
1
1
A126
6
1
54
30
24
3
3
12
14
15
7
104
61
43
10
5
16
11
3
7
4
3
29
16
20
11
9
8
8
3
1
1
I
385
265!
1201
1
351
24
2
2
1
1
5
2
3
2
2
1
7
6
1
1
1
1
1
A127
3
1
2
1
1
1
8
5
3
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
7
5
2
1
A128
A129
1
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3
1
2
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9
4
5
1
1
1
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A130
A131
4
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1
1
7
4
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
15
10
5
3
1
A132
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
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1
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1
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A133
A134
A135
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4
4
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1
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1
1
1
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4
2
2
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1
6
4
7
3
4
A136
A137
1
4
2
1
1
2
3
AE138
5
4
1
2
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1
11
11
3
2
1
8
4
4
1
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4
1
3
2
4
3
1
1
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2
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25
19
6
1
2
2
3
1
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1
2
21
15
6
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
7
7
2
1
2
10
8
2
2
1
1
15
9
6
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
6
6
1
2
51
35
16
6
2
AE139
Other transport accidents  M.
  F.
191	
1|.__
481	
18 _.
45!    2
371 —
7     1
61--
61. -
1
llll.
AE140
Accidental poisoning  M.
  F.
Accidental falls   .                      _ M.
   F.
Accidents caused by machinery  M.
Accident caused by fire and explosion of
combustible material  M.
Ditto ...                                                     F
Accident caused by hot substance, corrosive liquid, steam, and radiation         M.
Ditto                                                          F
2
AE141
AE142
AE143
AE144
—
1
4
12
5
~1
1
1
1
—
 S 96
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 21.—CAUSE OF DEATH BY SEX FOR URBAN PLACES OF 5,000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1953—Continued
o
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Cause of Death
ed
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AE148
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ANi44
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AN149
AN150
Accident caused by firearm _ M.
Accidental drowning and submersion M.
 F.
All other accidental causes M.
Suicide and self-inflicted injury M.
 F.
Homicide  and injury  purposely   inflicted
by other persons (not in war)—.—M.
Ditto j F.
N XVIIi Accidents, poisonings, and violence (classification according to nature
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Ditto i M.
tt
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Fracture of spine and trunk
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Head injury (excluding fracture)
'99
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 M.
 ._____> F.
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and
_M.
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with intact skin surface 1—M.
Effects of foreign body entering through
orifice l ^_ M.
Ditto F.
Burns  | I I M.
p . F.
Effects of poisons ! M.
Ditto  : F.
All other Mid unspecified effects of external causes M.
1 F.
9
26
5
34
10
86
30
4
3
561
393
168
60
20
19
8
36
37
27
11
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42
41
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S 97
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