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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT For the Years Ended December 31st 1953 and 1954 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1955]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
/Tl
REPORT
For the Years Ended December 31st
1953 and 1954
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the combined Annual Report of the
Department of Municipal Affairs for the years ended December 31st, 1953, and
December 31st, 1954. H
ISPI -f W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C., January 17th, 1955.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the combined Annual Report of this
Department for the years ended December 31st, 1953, and December 31st, 1954. This
is the third Departmental Report published separately from Municipal Statistics.
The consideration influencing the publishing of the Report separately from the
Statistics was that of economy and flexibility of issue. Thus we are now able to jnake
the contents of this Report current, and we propose to cover the two preceding years
in this issue in order to attain this object. § The separate branches of the Department are
represented by their individual reports.
Total assessed valuations continue to show increases over the previous years, in
total, as well as in values taxable and in values actually taxed. Figures are shown in
the following tables:— ...      J§L „
Total Assessed Value of Land and Improvements
1952
1953
1954
Increase. 1953
Over 1952
Increase, 1954
Over 1953
Cities 2	
Districts	
Villages —
Totals	
Vancouver	
Grand totals
Cities	
DistrictSL ||
Villages _.
Totals	
Vancouver	
Grand totals.
$348,992,827
371,943,030
53,126,953
$371,305,379
398,984,094
64,065,527
$391,863,512
455,853,772
71,847,732
$774,062,810
608,304,366
$834,355,000
666,309,030
$919,565,016
706,403,564
$1,382,367,176  $1,500,664,030 j $1,625,968,580
1
$22,312,552
27,041,064
10,938,574
$20,558,133
56,869,678
7,782,205
$60,292,190
58,004,664 |
$85,210,016
40,094,534
$118,296,854  $125,304,550
Values Taxable
$265,576,391
303,605,583
43,818,551
$284,077,897
324,493,182
53,595,297
$303,202,479
377,106,007
58,124,451
$613,000,525
503,004,011
$662,166,376
548,963,240
$738,432,937
583,378,389
$1,116,004,536
$1,211,129,616  $1,321,811,326
I
$18,501,506
20,887,599
9,776,746
$19,124,582
52,612,825
4,529,154
$49,165,851
45,959,229
$76,266,561
34,415,149
$95,125,080  $110,681,710
Values Actually Taxed
Cities I 	
Districts-- -
Villages .——
Totals I
Vancouver	
Grand totals
$160,283,727
200,294,606
28,319,093
$170,622,584
215,060,931
34,875,571
$182,543,676
250,507,086
37,697,039
$388,897,426
324,030,086
$420,559,086
350,570,537
$470,747,801
371,345,529
$712,927,512
$771,129,623
$842,093,330
$10,338,857
14,766,325
6,556,478
$11,921,092
35,446,155
2,821,438
$31,661,660
26,540,451
$50,188,715
20,77^,992
$58,202,111   $70,963,707
 X 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The amount and purpose for which new debentures were approved are set
below (Vancouver does not require approval^— j|K- , JL i_ ^^M
Amount and Purpose for which New Debentures Were Approved
•1 ^Aff:^X" ^W'^ 1953 I   .,..       "fc   r.
out
Purpose
Civic projects	
Drainage and dyking.
Electric light	
Hospitals.——_	
Local improvements-
Parks	
Protection to persons and property-
Roads and streets	
Schools 1	
Sewers —	
Telephone ——
Waterworks— ——	
Miscellaneous ■	
Totals If
Bridge	
Civic projects	
'Drainage and dyking—'.:.~7.:. :.
Electric light —\ ,—
Hospitals	
Local improvements ,—
Protection to persons and property-
Roads and streets	
Sewers	
Waterworks I	
Totals I	
Cities
$113,000.00
175,000.00
68,000.00
433,024.40
125,000.00
496,000.00
40,000.00
675,000.00
379,000.00
125,000.00
171,384.53
81,000.00
81,000.00
310,000.00
150,000.00
487,000.00
230,000.00
$115,000.00
465,000.00
1954
$65,000.00
100,000.00
162,335.29
610,300.00
41,300.00
808,000.00
$1,012,000.00
15,000.00
78,000.00
298,021.91
74,000.00
696,000.00
1,096,200.00
3,306,000.00
$260,000.00
326,259.75
$1,786,935.29.
$6,575,221.91! , I    $586,259/75.
$113,000.00
59,000.00
175,000.00
68,000.00
604,408.93
81,000.00
81,000.00
435,000.00
646,000.00
642,000.00
675,000.00
1,074,000.00
125,000.00
$2,629,024.40 $1,569,384.53 $580,000.00 $4,778,408.93
$1,012,000.00
65,000.00
- •15,00Wtt-
100,000.00
78,000.00
460,357.20
74,000.00
1,306,300.00
1,397,500.00'
4,440,259.75
$8,948,416.95
1 Of this figure, debentures of the newly incorporated District of Kitimat amounted to $3,175,200, consisting of
eight issues and a total of 3,177 debentures. —
The latest figures available for total debenture debt as at December 31st, 1953, are
summarized as follows:—
Total Debenture Debt
Issued, Sold, and
Outstanding
Unissued and
Unsold
Total
Cities. ,
Districts :.......
Villages j	
Totals: 1	
Vancouver	
Grand totals.
$39,532,257
23,751,431
2,276,741
$640,104
46,924
175,200
$40,172,361
23,798,355
2,451,941
$65,560,429
105,084,153
$862,228
$170,644,582
$862,228
$66,422,657
105,084,153
$171,506,810"
This Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the Federal
Government that all semi-annual payments have been made in respect of the project
for which loans were obtained under the provisions of the I Municipal Improvements
Assistance Act, 1938." The following table shows the outstanding amounts as at
January 1st, 1954, and January 1st, 1955 —
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X 7
Loans Made under the Provisions of the " Municipal Improvements Assistance Act, 1938," Guaranteed by the Province of British Columbia, as
at January 1st, 1954, and January 1st, 1955.
Municipality
Loan
No.
Amount
Advanced
Balance
Outstanding,
Jan. 1,1954
Balance
Outstanding,
Jan. 1,1955
Greater Vancouver Water District	
City of Vancouver	
District of Saanich j	
City of Nanaimo . —
City of Prince George .	
City of Grand Forks	
District of Summerland	
City of Trail	
City of Port Alberni	
City of Alberni	
City of Prince Rupert	
Westview Light, Power, and Waterworks District.
District of Coquitlam	
District of Penticton1	
District of Surrey	
Annable-Warfield Waterworks District2	
Connaught Heights Waterworks District	
District of West Vancouver	
Grandview Waterworks District	
City of Salmon Arm	
City of Armstrong	
Totals
1
2
21
22
31
32
33
54
56
57
59
60
67
68
69
81
84
85
89
94
95
$750,000.00
390,000.00
39,224.15
200,000.00
18,750.00
11,000.00
140,192.50
130,000.00
66,000.00
10,000.00
40,000.00
40,000.00
8,400.00
41,000.00
12,500.00
44,000.00
39,200.00
100,000.00
8,000.00
15,000.00
11,491.05
$376,192.47
144,120.72
14,494.91
46,882.01
3,526.15
73,164.20
44,561.42
24,389.66
24,904.60
4,558.31
1,886.33
14,054.00
1,889.93
17,425.54
24,406.51
56,187.09
2,956.30
9,339.21
2,161.02
$345,293.50
123,143.40
12,385.12
33,818.68
2,136.70
67,445.65
37,499.06
20,839.66
23,616.73
1,534.58
1,270.02
11,826.64
954.37
15,082.30
23,144.39
52,188.39
2,526.00
8,856.26
1,309.49
$2,114,757.70
$887,100.38
$784,870.94
1 Changed from district to city status, April 30th, 1948.
2 This liability now assumed by The Corporation of the Village of Warfield.
Amortized payments due December 31st, 1953, and January 1st, 1954, made by all municipalities.
vXAll money by-laws, before being approved for submission to the electors, were
carefully examined as to necessity, estimated cost of the work involved, financial ability
of the municipality to repay the loan, and the relation of the life of the project to the
maturity date of the debentures. Care was also taken to see that the debt burden
resulting from combining the existing and proposed debt charges was not unduly excessive for any particular year. When local improvement debentures were submitted for
certification, evidence was required that proper assessments had been levied and all
statutory requirements complied with. fl ;M;
At the end of 1953, reserve funds amounted to $5,071,570, being an increase over
the previous year of $780,480. IThese are funds which are available for general or
specific capital expenditures, such as construction, renewal or purchase of utilities and
public works projects, as well as the purchase of equipment. H
During the years 1953 and 1954, considerable progress was achieved under the
direction of the Board of Examiners appointed pursuant to the provisions of Part XXIV
of the " Municipal Act."
The original Board, appointed in 1948 and reappointed in 1951, was composed of
Mr. B. C. Bracewell, Department of Municipal Affairs; Mr. G. R. Leigh, Municipal
Officers' Association of British Columbia; and Mr. R. R. F. Sewell, Union of British
Columbia Municipalities. 1% ^ ^>
These members drew up the first regulations passed pursuant to Part XXIV and
were instrumental in the inauguration of a four-year correspondence course on municipal administration. ||t
fr The course in municipal administration, which was sponsored by the Minister of
Municipal Affairs, has been aided financially by the Government by the provision of a
grant of $2,500 toward the cost of preparation of the lessons. Tuition fees will make
up the remainder of the costs involved. The actual course lessons were prepared by
various members of the faculty of the University of British Columbia, in consultation
with the Department, and the course is offered under the direction and control of thl
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
X   Q
School of Commerce of the University. First enrolment was in 1953 and consisted of
^J^SZ first-year course. In 1954 the students numbered fifty-one for fc!
vear and forty-eight for second year. Some relaxation of the entrance requirements was
made in 1954 by opening the course to persons other than those employed by munfe
palities in this Province. 1 ■H       c +u   *   * * I
In June 1954 for four days prior to the holding of the first final examinations, an
instituteW^eld at the University, at which the students enrolled in the course could
meet with their instructors to discuss various aspects of the work they had studied
during the year. hS     §1 g§i
In 1954, at the expiration of the three-year terms of the Board of Examiners, the
following were appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council: Mr. J. E. Brown,
Department of Municipal Affairs; Mr. T. R. B. Adams, Union of British Columbia
Municipalities;   and Mr. R. A. Harrison, Municipal Officers' Association of British
Columbia.
Both Mr. Leigh and Mr. Sewell were unable to continue due to ill health. The
Department acknowledges with gratitude their valuable contribution toward the betterment of administration in local government.
The present Board of Examiners, in the light of the new course, have under study
the requirements for certification and the possible revision of the regulations.
The fourteenth and fifteenth conferences of the Municipal Officers' Association
were held in June in the years 1953 and 1954. These conferences, sponsored by the
Minister of Municipal Affairs, provide an excellent opportunity for the discussion of
administrative problems and also for municipal officials to take up local matters with
the various departments. Meeting each year with the various officials has proven of
great value to the Department and much is accomplished in the field of public relations,
The Corporation of the District of Kitimat was formed on the 31st day of March,
1953, and is the first municipality in British Columbia which has started with a complete town plan before a single improvement was created in the area. Because of its
unique beginning, at least as far as this Province is concerned, the development is being
watched with great interest, and it is anticipated that the results will clearly demonstrate
the advantages of orderly growth.
In 1953, extensions of boundaries were granted to the Cities of Kamloops and
Prince George and to the Villages of Quesnel, Vanderhoof, and Williams Lake. In the
case of Prince George and Vanderhoof their areas were approximately doubled.
In 1954, extensions of boundaries were granted to the City of Cranbrook, the
Township of Langley, and to the Villages of Dawson Creek, Comox, and Sidney.
H     The most significant changes or additions to legislation affecting municipalities are
referred to in the paragraphs which follow.
1953 LEGISLATION
The " Municipal Improvements Assistance Enabling Act " was amended to allow
for the assumption by one municipality of the obligation of another where they have
exchanged ownership of a project financed by a loan issued under the provisions of the
* Municipal Improvements Assistance Act" (Federal). The "Vancouver Charter"
was passed, superseding the " Vancouver Incorporation Act, 1921," and amendments
thereto.
" Public Schools Construction Act, 1953," provides for the issuance of debentures
for school capital costs by the school districts with the loan guaranteed by the Province,
The municipal electors, however, still must approve by referendum the purpose and
amount of the issue.
The "Assessment Equalization Act, 1953," provides for the equalization of assessment values of real property throughout the Province for the purposes of taxation for
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 9
school purposes and, in addition, makes it obligatory for municipalities to assess and
tax industrial and commercial machinery, equipment, and fixtures which, as if so erected,
affixed, or placed by a tenant, would, between landlord and tenant, be removable by the
tenant for the same purpose. The Courts of Revision in municipalities will, in future,
be appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, not by the municipality, and
appeals from such Courts will be heard by the Board of Appeal set up by this Act.
Courts of Revision for special assessments and rates will continue to be appointed by
Municipal Councils. J§
The "Water Act" was amended so that an improvement district under that Act
cannot be set up within a municipality or a village for waterworks or sewerage purposes.
The "Local Improvement Act" now outlaws a petition to undertake a local
improvement after two years have elapsed from the date on which the petition has been
certified. Councils may now levy up to 5 mills (replacing the former 2 mills) annually
in order to create a revolving fund to be used to finance local improvement projects.
|J§ The "Municipal Act" now provides for the appointment of a Recreation Commission and permits the paying of a grant toward its maintenance. The maximum
allowable mill rate for general municipal purposes was raised to 50 mills from 35 mills.
The trade-licence section of the Act was amended and maximum fees increased. A portion of the remuneration paid to a member of Council may be paid as an allowance for
expenses, thus qualifying for a partial exemption under the Federal Income Tax Regulations.   There were also certain minor changes of a technical nature.
The I Village Municipalities Act" increased the powers granted by adding authority to install parking meters, tax and collect a special rate for the establishment and
maintenance of a fire department, operate and borrow for the installation of a gasworks,
and borrow for the purchase of fire equipment and for the construction of a fire-hall.
Two important sections of the "Municipal Act" were made applicable to villages.
These were Part XV (audit provisions) and Part XXIV (Board of Examiners). Certain minor technical changes were also made.
1954 LEGISLATION
I Gas Act."—In anticipation of the use of natural gas in the Province, provision
was made in this Act for the appointment of local inspectors in municipalities.
"Rent-control Act."—Rent-controls were repealed, with effect from March 31st,
1955, but provision was made so that any municipality, if it so desired, could retain
rent-control. The definition of municipality in this Act, however, does not include
villages.
| Water Act."—The amendment provided that an improvement district may not be
incorporated for irrigation purposes within a municipality or village. ||
"Municipal Elections Act."—The most important addition was the provision to
permit the spouse, of an owner of land, who is resident in the municipality a vote in
municipal elections. This extension to the franchise was also included in the "Village
Municipalities Act." fa. m
I Village Municipalities Act."—The status of a joint owner of land was defined
for the purpose of qualification for municipal office. A portion of the remuneration
paid to a Commissioner may be paid as an allowance for expenses, thus qualifying for
a partial exemption under the Federal Income Tax Regulations. Power was given to
grant aid to an art centre or centre for cultural activities either within or without the
municipality. Provision was made for the appointment of a Recreation Commission
with authority for grants-in-aid therefor. SThe section relating to trade licences was
amended for clarification, and some increases in the maximum fees chargeable were
added. J|
| Municipal Act."—For the purpose of qualifying for municipal office, the interest
of a joint owner was defined.   Power was given to make a grant-in-aid to an art centre
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
or
centre for cultural activities within or without the municipality. A Municipal Council
that has established a forest reserve may enter into an agreement to manage lands within
the municipality belonging to the Province under a forest management licence. Water
companies were brought under the same taxation provisions as other utility companies
" Workmen's Compensation Act."—A member of a municipal fire brigade working
with or without remuneration has been defined as a J workman."
The foregoing references to legislation include the more important items of general
interest but are not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all the changes. I
Regulations pursuant to section 9 (c) of the " Village Municipalities Act" were
passed in 1954, making the "Workmen's Compensation Act" and section 314 of the
" Municipal Act " applicable to village municipalities. The latter section gives authority
for a municipality to enter into agreements with other taxing authorities for the handling
of tax arrears on real property.   Multiple tax-sale proceedings can thus be avoided.
During 1953 and 1954 other regulations had to be passed pursuant to section 9 (/)
of the "Village Municipalities Act," making certain portions of the "Municipal Act"
applicable to specified villages and in some cases to all villages. This points out the
need for the revision of municipal Statutes, as has been authorized by the Minister of
Municipal Affairs.
The continued growth of and increase of urban centres in district municipalities
which were or are predominantly rural continues to create difficult problems for all
concerned. I feel that if Councils are unable or unwilling to cope with this problem,
some statutory remedy should be considered. This and related problems are receiving
the study and consideration of the Department toward finding an acceptable solution.
The last two years have seen a number of staff changes, particularly among the
senior members. In 1953 Mr. L. W. Wheeldon, the Assistant Supervisor of Municipalities, left the Department to assume the duties of treasurer for the District of Kitimat,
His position was filled by the promotion of Mr. J. D. Baird. The position left vacant
by Mr. Baird was in turn filled by Mr. W. K. Smith, who transferred from the Estates
Branch of the Department.
On August 31st, 1954, Mr. B. C. Bracewell retired on superannuation from the
post of Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities. In 1938 he came to the
Department, leaving the position of Municipal Clerk of the District of Penticton to
assume the position of Assistant Supervisor of Municipalities. After serving briefly as
Supervisor of Municipalities, he succeeded the late Mr. E. H. Bridgeman as Deputy
Minister in 1945. At the present time he is engaged by the Department to co-ordinate
the work entailed in the revision of municipal legislation for the Province. It is a pleasure
to report that both the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and the Municipal
Officers' Association of British Columbia conferred a life membership on Mr. Bracewell
in recognition of his long and outstanding service to the municipalities. |
On September 1st, 1954, Mr. J. D. Baird took over the post of Supervisor of
Municipalities and Deputy Inspector of Municipalities on the elevation of the undersigned to the position of Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
The Departmental secretary, Miss M. McPhail, retired on November 30th, 1954,
after thirty-three years of service. I «
Staff changes, combined with a period of great activity and many administrative
and organizational changes affecting municipalities, both actual and pending, created
a heavy load, but the staff responded splendidly and have performed efficiently and
well so that the past two years have shown progress and achievement.        §
The active and friendly co-operation of the various elected and appointed officials
of the municipalities has, during the past two years, proved of material assistance to the
Department.
-.-■■■■":•'    .      -|pc.:-'if   J.E.BROWN,
"' •      • ■ M:     :   ■*■ 111-     Deputy Minister.,':
l
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 11
fjl REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 14th, 1955.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—This is the third Report published separately from Municipal Statistics. The
only major change in the latter has been the inclusion for 1953 of a new schedule,
"Analysis of General Fixed Assets," and the redesigning of two other schedules to
conform as closely as possible to the standard report as approved by the Dominion-
Provincial Conferences on Municipal Statistics.
Further work has been done toward the setting-up of standardized accounting
records for small municipalities. However, due to the introduction of the provisions of
the "Assessment Equalization Act, 1953," it has been thought better to delay adoption
of any accounting forms dealing with assessment and tax collection until the administrative details in connection with this Act have been worked out. Printers' proofs are
expected momentarily on the accounting forms which have been finalized.
The staff continued to be fully employed dealing with the regular flow of business.
A comparison of the following with the corresponding summaries of previous years
should prove of interest.
During 1953:—
(1) One hundred and six visits were made to municipalities.   The number of
ill                municipalities actually visited was eighty-nine, since a few received more
than one visit.
(2) One hundred and sixty-three Orders in Council were prepared and
approved. || ^
(3) Forty-two certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued.
(4) Forty-three debenture issues were certified by the Inspector of Municipalities, while 4,979 debentures with coupons attached were examined,
|ljp checked, sealed, and certified. i|\ jifr     #''v -
(5) Three hundred and sixty-three village by-laws were examined and filed.
-.   During 1954:— |>     . ^       $^%:    ^:^^\
(1) One hundred and seven visits were made to municipalities. The number
of municipalities actually visited was 103.     || 'cljli ■ '> "llii*
(2) One hundred and eighty-seven Orders in Council were prepared and
approved.  - :-Jg;-- .      "• ilftk .       H 1§ft'
(3) Sixty-five certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued.
(4) Fifty debenture issues were certified by the Inspector of Municipalities,
while 9,378 debentures with coupons attached were examined, checked,
sealed, and certified. j| Ac       \fl ."      |ji
(5) Four hundred and two village by-laws were examined and filed.   r    ||f
Previous reports included brief analytical studies on municipal debt and municipal
revenues. It is proposed to continue these series, focusing our attention in this Report
on municipal expenditures.
f§j|§ Municipal governments provide many services for their citizens, and in doing so
they give employment to about 10,000 in British Columbia alone. The comparative
payrolls of other public bodies in British Columbia are: General hospitals, approximately 10,000; Public School Boards, about 8,500 teachers and 3,500 janitors,
maintenance-men, and others; Provincial Government, about 8,500, including part-time
workers. The nature of these municipal services is revealed by an examination of their
expenditures. In recent years a more or less common classification of municipal
expenditures has been adopted throughout Canada- for reporting purposes,  and H
 __ U BRITISH COLUMBIA
A     l,Jkt
shown in Table No. 1. As this is a gross classification, a few details must be fiUedin
to make it intelligible. The item " general government includes the remuneration of
the elected representatives, the salaries of administrative staff, and the costs of conduct.
ine municipal elections, maintaining the office buildings, office supply, and the like.
In private business this would correspond closely to general overhead expenses. The
second item, "protection to persons and property," covers fire protection, police
protection law enforcement, various forms of inspection services such as building and
plumbing 'inspection, street-lighting, destruction of pests, animal pounds, and similar
services. The item 1 sanitation and waste-removal" covers such things as sewerage
systems and garbage disposal; " recreation and community services " include community
centres, libraries, museums, parks, and related services. |
Table No. 1 shows the amounts and percentages distribution expended by municipalities in British Columbia and in Canada. The surprising result is the marked similarity
in the percentage distributions. It is evident that there is a common experience throughout Canada in the role and scope of municipal government. It must not be overlooked,
however, that in spite of a very clear and definite common pattern there is a wide
variation within this pattern both as between Provinces and as between municipalities
within a Province. There is likewise a marked range in per capita expenditures for
municipal government among the Provinces. In 1952, for example, it ranged from a
low of $24 in Newfoundland to a high of $93 in Alberta. I
Table No. 2 shows the distribution of per capita expenditures by cities and also by
districts for the years 1921 and 1951. In the case of cities there has been an increase
from a median of $37.5 to $69.0, an increase of 85 per cent, while for districts the
increase has been from a median of $33.0 to $56.0, an increase of 70 per cent. When
one makes allowances for changes in the price level, the effective increase in expenditure
is roughly 50 per cent. In the same thirty-year span, however, per capita income has
nearly tripled, and, therefore, while the citizens have in general increased the services
purchased by them on a community basis, it is obvious that they are devoting a smaller
fraction of their income to this purpose.        '■%'■'' I
The significant changes in per capita expenditures between 1921 and 1951 are set
out in Table No. 3. In 1921, accounts were not classified in the same detail as now,
and, therefore, the comparison is subject to a margin of error. Nevertheless, some
interesting deductions can be made. First, the data reveals the development of the
programme of public assistance to needy persons. While no doubt some assistance
was given in 1921, it was so small that such items were usually treated as miscellaneous,
The second point of interest is the expenditure for the administration of justice, which
means, largely, the police force. Here the increase is not as great as one might anticipate,
except in the case of Vancouver, and this is possibly accounted for by the fact that the
senior governments now provide policing for most of the municipalities on a contract
basis at figures considerably less than cost. The other points of interest have to do
with expenditures for schools and for debt. In 1921, expenditures for schools included
annual debt charges, whereas in 1951 such debt charges were not included. Hence,
compared with 1951, expenditures in 1921 were overstated for schools and understated
for debt, by the amount of the debt charges attributable to schools. |
It is a point of some satisfaction to observe that debt charges in 1951 were less
than in 1921 dollarwise, and, therefore, except in the case of districts in terms of
per capita income or expenditure, the change represents a real reduction in the debt
burden.
It has not been possible to relate expenditures to the value of the service or the
efficiency with which it has been provided. It seems only reasonable to suppose that
uiere must be some variation in the effectiveness with which various municipal^
serve their citizens.   By the use of rank-correlation techniques it can be shown in *
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X 13
case of cities that there is a definite tendency for the per capita expenditure to increase
with the size of the city. This same tendency, however, is matched by an increase in
per capita assessments with increasing size, with the result that there is a very high
degree of correlation between per capita expenditures and per capita assessments.
Whether there is any causal connection, it is not possible to say. It may be that
Councils tend to work to a customary mill rate, and, if so, this would explain some of
the phenomena so observed. |jt Jjjlf       E   "Ifr|R
The district municipalities are much more heterogeneous both in size and in
physical characteristics. Some are urban in everything but name. Some have very
large areas and are made up of numerous urban centres interspersed with rural tracts
of land. It is i*ot surprising, therefore, that any consistent pattern of expenditures is
lacking. However, they have one common feature with the cities in so far as their expenditures are concerned: there is a high degree of correlation between the size of the
per capita expenditure and the size of the per capita assessment. This same condition
holds true for villages also, though the relationship is not so marked.
Per capita expenditures for general government are fairly consistent among the
cities regardless of size, but, since budgets tend to increase with size, the percentage of
expenditures devoted to general government tends to decrease with size. If one considers
general government as the overhead, it can be seen from Chart 1 that, percentagewise,
overhead declines with increase in size. If
It remains an intriguing question why municipal expenditures are what they are.
In the case of urban municipalities, one factor appears to be size and another wealth,
but this still leaves unanswered many questions, particularly in regard to individual
services. At least two kinds of questions come to mind: Why are the level of expenditures what they are, and how efficiently is a particular service being provided?
This lack of conclusive results points up the desirability of further research along
these lines, and it is my feeling that knowledge gained by such studies would amply repay
the efforts required. . ||- H    S^^W'          jj       .Ijtllll    H  :j|fe^|    ^
%  : :- -j|iSilii-;- '    ■■!■        J. D. Baird,   I    ,.|. .:^i
Supervisor of Municipalities.
Table No. 1.—Expenditures by Functions for All Municipalities in
British Columbia and Canada for the Year 1952
(In thousands of dollars.)
Items
General ^overnment-.-^™™,™,—
Protection to persons and property.
PubUc works	
Sanitation and waste-removal.
Health	
Social welfare ,	
Education	
Recreation and community services	
Debt charges—
Debenture	
Other	
Utilities and other municipal enterprises (deficits and levies).
Provision for reserves	
Capital expenditure out of revenue j	
Joint or special expenditures	
Miscellaneous expenditures	
Total expenditures.	
British Columbia
Amount
$
11,269
8,744
2,712
2,418
5,417
23,310
3,142
13,029
217
390
382
2,761
160
884
Percentage
6.1
14.1
11.0
3.4
3.0
6.8
29.3
3.9
16.3
0.3
0.5
0.5
3.5
0.2
1.1
Canada
Amount
79,751
100.0
62,110
102,861
121,087
34,154
39,825
35,802
233,986
24,866
130,456
3,912
5,009
8,598
28,279
5,932
7,069
Percentage
7.4
12.2
14.4
4.0
4.7
4.2
27.8
2.9
15.5
0.5
0.6
1.0
3.3
0.7
0.8
843,946
100.0
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics Financial Statistics of Municipal Governments, 1952.
 X 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table No. 2.—Distribution of per Capita Expenditures for Cities and
Districts for the Years 1921 and 1951
Dollars
Number of Cities
1921
1951
Number of Districts
1921
0-   9.9	
10- 19.9	
20- 29.9	
30- 39.9	
40- 49.9	
50- 59.9	
60- 69.9	
70- 79.9	
80- 89.9	
90- 99.9	
100-109.9	
110-119.9	
120-129.9	
130-139.9	
140-149.9	
1951
Totals	
Median in dollars.
1
7
12
3
7
3
1
1
1
2
6
9
4
5
6
34
37.5
35
69
2
3
6
7
3
1
1
1
1
6
10
3
3
2
25
33
1
1
28"
56
Table No. 3.—Comparison of per Capita Expenditure by Services for All
Cities Except Vancouver, for Vancouver, and for All Districts for the
Years 1921 and 1951
Item
General government™.	
Fire	
Administration of justice.
Street-lighting	
Public works	
Sewers ,	
Public health	
Hospitals	
Schools.-...	
Debt-        	
Public utilities	
Miscellaneous.	
Parks and donations___
Social welfare	
Capital out of revenue	
Reserve	
Totals	
All Cities Except
Vancouver
1921
1951
$2.72
2.71
2.42
1.10
4.21
.57
.38
.79
11.45
16.46
.51
6.14
1.14
$50.60
$7.23
5.20
3.91
1.83
10.60
3.94
.99
1.50
17.40
14.55
.73
1.08
3.87
6.73
5.86
.50
$85.92
Vancouver
1921
1951
$1.85
3.09
3.86
.75
6.12
1.77
.48
1.73
12.02
15.65
1.26
4.79
1.37
$4.01
7.20
9.32
1.79
6.77
3.13
1.37
2.31
18.50
15.60
.05
.99
3.75
7.73
2.00
1.71
$54.74
$86.23
All Districts
1921 1951
$2.70
.17
1.13
.31
8.40
.22
.11
.96
8.32
5.54
1.99
4.90
.26
$35.01
$4.10
2.14
1.60
.64
11.05
1.30
,48
1.12
16.18
6.17
.92
.83
1.13
4.73
2.74
.97
$56.10
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X 15
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SaNVSnOHl     Nl      NOIXVindOd
 X 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF DIRECTOR, REGIONAL PLANNING DIVISION
 Victoria, B.C., January 14th, 1955
J. E.Brown, Esq., # .
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir—During the two-year period ended December 31st, 1954, the number of
regulated areas in unorganized territory which were put under land use and building
control were increased from ten to thirteen. At the same time, two existing regulated
areas were increased in size, one addition being practically the equivalent of a new area
On the other hand, a very large part of the Prince George District Regulated Area was
absorbed into the City of Prince George. I
The amount of building construction authorized by building permits in regulated |
areas in 1953 and 1954 is shown in the table hereunder:— |
Regulated Area
Year
Established
1953
1954*
Kelowna	
Vernon	
Cormaught Heights	
View Royal	
North Saanich	
Prince George District
Nanaimo District	
Kamloops District	
Golden District	
Quesnel District	
Woodhaven District	
Dawson Creek District
Totals	
1947
1947
1948
1948
1948
1949
1949
1950
1952
1952
1954
1954
$2781,317
200,943
37,707
182,485
301,27a
430,050
1,475,740
507,300
196,985"
238,400
$332,324
175,797
61,731
241,340
178,65&
190,750
1,096,240
595,100
55,455
264,570
5,400
98,700
$3,849,197
$3,296,057
Total value of permits issued to end of 1954* $22,521,222.
In these figures are included the costs of the houses for which permits were issued
during the two years as shown below. It is interesting to note that the houses buflt in
the regulated areas since their establishment would house the residents of a city about
the size of Kamloops.
New Housing Accommodation Built in Regulated Areas
Regulated Area
Kelowna !
Vernon	
Connaught Heights..
View Royal	
North Saanich
1947
1948       1949
1950
1951   1   1952
1953
1954     Total
Prince George District—
Nanaimo District	
Kamloops District	
Golden District	
Quesnel District—.	
Woodhaven District—
Dawson Creek District—
Totals.
129
15
167
51
18
7
17
116
29
6
20
58
8
170;
144
260
407
43
28
3
25
39
46
152
24
15
4
20
26
75
120
24
11
9
5
16
25
189
81
3-5
8
20
336
308
399
29
22
6
19
33
93
83
63
9
33
35
554
18
187
8
50
26
m
18
216
44
455
91
697
78
200
5
22
27
80
1
1
13
tt
In order to keep abreast of current legislative requirements, close relations were
maintained with administrative bodies operating under the various parts of the "To*
Planning Act
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 17
Community planning advice, in most cases involving the preparation of draft by-laws,
was given to ten municipalities and particular planning problems were dealt with in
five more. In addition, zoning, building, and subdivision by-laws were submitted by
various municipalities for checking and comment. It should be mentioned that interest
in planning in British Columbia is continually growing, and requests for planning
assistance tripled in 1954.
In preparing draft by-laws related to the physical planning of a municipality, a
balance has to be struck between what is desirable and what is practicable. Over 70 per
cent of the municipalities have less than 5,000 population. Most of them are growing.
It is obvious from these two facts that a municipality needs to control its developing
physical layout, but plans to that end have to be so arranged that a small staff can carry
them out.
Also, there is the fact that planning provisions are not static things. As a municipality grows and planning implementation becomes more complex, changes in zoning
and associated by-laws become necessary. This is realized, but at the same time care
has to be exercised and all proposed amendments should be scrutinized with a view to
ascertaining if they are really the result of changed physical conditions and do not arise
laerely out of particular whims or interests.
The Division is very cognizant that a much amended zoning by-law creates the
very condition which it was originaEy aimed at preventing; that is, instability rather than
stability. |L JjL
As a service to municipalities, two brochures dealing with the elementary requirements of zoning and general planning were prepared and distributed.
The Division co-operated with the Department of Public Works on such matters as
limited access plans and subdivision plans, and help was given the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway and the Lands Service of the Department of Lands and Forests in the design
of subdivisions.
At the request of municipalities in the Lower Columbia region, preliminary steps
were taken looking to the eventual establishment of a regional planning area there.
Information on what such action would mean was prepared for distribution. This work
is continuing. Jgj
Two planning areas—the Lower Mainland Regional Planning Area and the Capital
Regional Planning Area—are in operation and were assisted by special grants. The
efforts of the residents to take advantage of the facilities made possible by the " Town
Planning Act" to maintain orderly development of their areas is viewed sympathetically
and help and guidance made available as far as possible.
Population growth in municipalities is being made the subject of research.
J. H. Doughty-Davies^
Director, Regiowd Planning Division*
 x lg BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR, ESTATES BRANCH
* Victoria, B.C., January 14th, 1955,
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir—By and with your title of Inspector of Municipalities, acting for the Attorney.
General as statutory committee under the "Lunacy Act," the administration of the
estates of patients at the Provincial Mental Hospitals has continued during the two-
year period ended December 31st, 1954. The number of estates coming under our
control has continued to increase. During the past calendar year this Branch recorded
2,633 admissions to the hospitals, of which 1,541 were subsequently discharged or died.
This Branch of the Department has continued to enjoy co-operation and assistance
from many sources. The information and assistance so provided has afforded a most
valuable means of protection and guidance in the exercise of our duty. Special mention
must be made of the ready direction and advice given by the Attorney-General's
Department.
As is generally realized, the handling of the individual estates is a matter of some
delicacy. The personal preferences and prejudices of a patient's family cannot be
entirely disregarded and a happy balance must be achieved, with efficiency and legality
and a good understanding. It has been the endeavour, as in the past, to assure interested
persons that the Government has not taken or seized the property of a patient, but that
it is the duty of the appointed official to administer the patient's affairs, as a trust, in the
best interests of the patient. Steps have been taken to inform the next of kin of patients
of the Attorney-General's position in relation to the patient's affairs. This emphasis
appears to be giving the public a fuller appreciation of the work of the Estates Branch.
As at the end of 1954, cash, securities, and other assets belonging to patients
totalled $2,219,424, compared with $2,192,594 at the end of 1953.
SP For the period under review the total moneys received to the credit of the patients
amounted to some $950,800 during 1953 and $1,005,600 during 1954. These moneys
were derived from revenue earned on the assets, including bank and bond interest, rents,
and from pensions, disability payments, legacies, sale of real and personal property, and
other sources.
During the same period similar amounts were paid out on behalf of patients. This
money was used in part in payment of the patients' maintenance at the institutions and
to provide for extra comforts while at the institutions. Certain sums were expended on
behalf of dependents of patients. Other expenditures were chiefly for estate maintenance,
represented by property taxes, repairs, insurance premiums, mortgage payments, and for
the closing-out of balances to patients upon their discharge from hospital or to executors
or administrators where patients have died. The sum of $112,550 was invested in
Canada savings bonds, ninth series, during the past year. In addition to this investment,
patients' holdings in Government of Canada bonds in the amount of $82,900 were
exchanged for Canada savings bonds, ninth series.
While the Attorney-General may, under the governing Act, retain up to 5 per cent
out of all moneys of an estate in his possession as committee of a patient as an administration charge, in practice the rates are varied according to the circumstances. All sums
so retained are paid into the Provincial Treasury. The sums of $14,677 and $14,859
were retained for the fiscal years ended March 31st, 1953, and March 31st, 1954,
respectively.
It will again appear fairly evident from the foregoing brief description of the work
earned out by this Branch that a very heavy volume of correspondence is involved.
la addition, it was necessary to have many interviews. There is also often urgency *
these matters.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 19
Expressions of appreciation have continued to be received from patients and relatives
of patients after they have left the hospital for the manner in which their affairs were
handled. H
E. C. Wilderspin,
Supervisor, Estates Branch.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
1,010455-4233
 

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