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Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1954 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1955]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1954
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1954.
II RALPH CHETWYND,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia.
 The Honourable Ralph Chetwynd,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1954.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
 Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1954
The past year in British Columbia has seen the initial production of many large and
newly completed industrial projects. One of the most outstanding examples in this
direction has been the first shipments of processed aluminium from the new industrial city
of Kitimat. The development of this huge undertaking—from harnessing of the water,
construction of the plant, and preliminary work on the townsite to the actual production
of aluminium ingots—has fired the imagination of the people of this Province.
The expansion in our forest industries in recent years is now showing up in increased
lumber, plywood and veneer, and pulp and paper output. For instance, we now have
twelve pulp and paper plants with an annual production in 1954 of 1,140,000 tons of
pulp, compared to an output of 521,000 tons in 1945. Associated with the increased
output in our pulp-mills was the opening of a quarter-million-dollar research laboratory
at Harmac late this year. This laboratory, which contains a great deal of valuable technical equipment, will be staffed with research scientists who will endeavour to provide
new and better wood products from the trees of this Province.
In the light of the increased productive facilities in our wood industries, it is encouraging to note the continued strong world demand for these products.
The heavy capital investments in oil-refineries at the Coast and also at Kamloops,
which went on at a rapid pace during and subsequent to the completion of the trans-
mountain pipe-line, has been another facet of industrial growth in British Columbia.
Investment in new plant facilities has been approximately $40,000,000. The capacity of
the new plants now in operation has much more than doubled that available for refining
three years ago.
One of the highlights of this year was the successful completion of negotiations to
market Peace River natural gas in the Pacific Northwest area of the United States and in
the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. Construction is expected to begin early in
1955 with a 700-mile, $100,000,000 pipe-line from Dawson Creek to the International
Border near Vancouver.
With our industrial capacities geared to a higher level than in former years and new
prospects for further utilization of our power, mineral, and forest resources under way,
this Province is in a very strong position to supply our markets throughout the world.
Foreign trade has always been one of the key measures of the economic prosperity
of this Pacific Coast Province. Somewhat in contrast to the rest of Canada, our exports this year have been strong, with shipments through our customs ports valued at
$692,000,000, compared to $675,000,000 in 1953. The United Kingdom and the United
States have both purchased larger quantities of lumber this year than in 1953. Various
attempts to erect a tariff barrier in the United States, in so far as our lead and zinc exports
are concerned, have been unsuccessful.
Internally, the economy has experienced certain difficulties this year. The slight
recession in the United States has had some effect on the Canadian economy, and this
Province has not been entirely unaffected. Employment, especially in manufacturing,
lagged behind 1953 for the early months of the year but showed signs of a quickening
pace in the late summer months.
Total retail sales have held up remarkably well throughout the year in most lines,
with sales of $1,230,000,000 for the year. Other indicators of business activity, such as
We insurance sales, gasoline and electrical-power consumption, payrolls, bank clearings,
all compare very favourably with the preceding year, although not showing the sharp
upward trend which we have experienced in recent years.
 BB 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Construction activity in 1954 was marked by a heavier volume of home construction
and possibly lesser activity in major industrial projects. The total value of building
permits issued in incorporated centres of the Province was $165,000,000 in 1954. The
continued growth of population coupled with easier financing conditions of the " National
Housing Act | has caused a strong demand for homes. Connected with this trend has
been the construction of many large retail and commercial developments, as well as
schools and public buildings and other services related to urban growth.
The tourist industry of this Province, which is discussed in detail in a following
section of this Report, was bolstered by the influx of foreign and Canadian visitors to the
British Empire Games held in Vancouver during August. Other factors, such as wet
weather, exchange rates, and the temporary slow-down in economic activity in the United
States and this country, reduced visitor-spending. A very active programme of tourist as
well as industrial promotion has been carried on by this Department in the past year.
Advertising in leading national publications, as well as advertising through the medium
of film and, for the first time, television, has also been a successful means of publicizing
this Province.
A detailed account of the various divisions of the Department is outlined in the
following pages of this Report.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT
Regional Development
During the year the field representatives located at Nelson, Prince George, and Victoria assisted the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in obtaining data for the 1954
edition of the Regional Industrial Index. This publication was released for distribution
in December. It provides a factual background for sound industrial planning on a
regional basis. Information contained in the Index is presented under ten main regional
areas and also under eighty-one smaller subdivisions.
In gathering this material, the field representatives worked closely with Boards of
Trade and municipal officials throughout their respective areas. The regions covered by
the fieldmen from their regional offices are as follows: Region 1 and 2 (East and West
Kootenays), Region 3 (Okanagan), and Region 6 (Kamloops and South Central British
Columbia) covered by the Nelson office; Region 8 (Central British Columbia), Region
9 (North-western British Columbia), and Region 10 (Peace River and North-eastern
Interior) covered by the Prince George office; Region 4 (Lower Mainland), Region 5
(Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands), and Region 7 (Central Mainland Coast) covered
by the Victoria office.
Committees of several Boards of Trade were also assisted in preparing special industrial and tourist brochures for their respective communities during the year under review.
Numerous business and industrial inquiries were handled by the three regional offices
during the year, and close contact was maintained with the British Columbia Research
Council by channelling many technical inquiries to that organization.
In Region 4, work was commenced on the revision of our 1951 composite industrial
map of the metropolitan area of the Lower Mainland. The new map will indicate areas
zoned for heavy and light industry, areas of occupied heavy and light industry, together
with potential industrial areas not at present zoned. The revised edition will be available
for distribution early in 1955.f|f if
British Columbia Research Council
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry, the Research Council
held monthly meetings, at which were considered many scientific problems of vital
interest to the Province.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 7
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is very gratifying to the directors of the Council that industry is taking advantage of the services which
the Council provides.
The Council was organized to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia:
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province:
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in the
I Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and industrial research:
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards, and pecuniary and other aids, to facilitate and encourage original scientific and
industrial research.
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
During the year the Council expanded its programme of visits to firms all over the
Province, both to obtain first-hand knowledge of the industries' individual problems and
to make the Council's services better known. A notable trend is shown by the fact that
individual industries are requesting larger, more comprehensive research studies than in
previous years. While short-term trouble-shooting problems are still important, industry
is devoting more attention to larger-scale improvements in processes and products. To
meet the demand for increased research work, the total floor space in the Council's new
fire-resistant laboratory building now exceeds 18,000 square feet. The value of the
equipment is close to $175,000. With the new buildings and equipment and the ever-
increasing background of experience, the Council is a growing asset to the Province and
one in which industry can well place its confidence.
The board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Honourable Ralph Chetwynd, Minister of Railways, Trade and
Industry, and Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
Wm. MacGillivray, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
Federal Government—
R. E. Foerster, Principal Biologist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C. Jp'
K. G. Fensom, Superintendent, Forest Products Laboratory, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
University of British Columbia—
Ian McTaggart-Cowan, Department of Zoology.
A. H. Finlay, Department of Civil Engineering.
D. G. Laird, Department of Agronomy.
Industry— .%
J. K. Clarke, assistant to the manager, Buckerfield's Limited, foot of
Rogers Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
P. E. Cooper, a director, Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited, P.O. Box
879, Vancouver 4, B.C.
James S. Eckman, chairman, Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial
Development Commission,  1123  Marine Building, Vancouver  1,
B.C.
 BB 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Aird Flavelle, president, Flavelle Cedar Limited, Port Moody, B.C.
S. J. Hammitt, president, Morrison Steel and Wire Company (1950)
Limited, Granville Island, Vancouver 1, B.C.
M. M. O'Brien, vice-president and general manager, Bralorne Mines
Limited, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
R. V. Robinson, manager, British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Paul Walrod, general manager, B.C. Fruit Processors Limited, 1165 Ethel
Street, Kelowna, B.C.
C. E. Webb, consulting engineer, 6162 Churchill Street, Vancouver 13
B.C.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IN THE UNITED
KINGDOM, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
The year 1954 has been one of unprecedented prosperity for the United Kingdom.
Income has been at an all-time high level, exports are increasing, with gold reserves
rising steadily.
On August 31st, 1954, the Treasury relaxed some sections of the Exchange Control
Regulations, especially in regard to the transfer of personal funds by emigrants. This
now means that a family (head of family and four dependents) may make an immediate
transfer to Canada of £2,000. Further, those funds an emigrant leaves in England as
" blocked sterling " he may now sell to a Canadian buyer without the four-year residential
qualification in Canada, which was formerly required. This relaxation of the regulations
has meant that a good number of small business-men and sales agents can now finance
themselves from their own funds. Since this change there has been a decided up-spring
of business and professional emigrants, and it is expected this number may tend to
increase.
In many cases individual emigrants with sales or managerial experience have been
put in touch with British firms who require representation in our Province. This has
resulted in several new businesses, based on the distribution of British products, being
established in the Province.
Movement of Sterling to British Columbia
During 1953 the Bank of England had amended, in part, regulations which hitherto
had prevented many firms and individuals investing in Canada. This partial relaxation
of currency controls has stimulated interest in Western Canada by finance houses, private
investors, professional consultants, and other types of enterprise.
As an example, in May, 1954, after representations to the Treasury by this office,
permission was granted to a firm of Yorkshire engineers to convert their sterling funds
into dollars, so that unimproved land could be purchased. This is the first time that
permission has been given for such a purpose, and it is gratifying to note that, as a result,
the new town of Delsom is now being built in the Municipality of Delta, immediately
across the river from another British project, the Annacis Island Industrial Estate.
To sum up, British Columbia can confidently expect an increased investment of
British capital and the advent of British enterprise on a broader basis. Whereas before,
British interest in the West Coast of Canada was largely confined to sales, it now included
such varied fields as construction, professional engineering services, transportation, etc.
United Kingdom-British Columbia Trade
During 1954 the Ministry of Food was abolished. This means that there are now
no food-controls in the British Isles (although some commodities are still subsidized and
under licence).   In March it was announced that the United Kingdom would buy from
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 9
Canada $5,200,000 worth of tinned salmon and, in October, $2,430,000 worth of apples.
Open licences are now granted to distributers and dealers throughout the British Isles to
purchase either of these commodities which have been in such short supply during and
since the war. ~2|
The sale of British Columbia lumber in the British Isles during the year has been
most gratifying, approximating an amount of $50,000,000. There has been a decided
up-swing in British purchases of railway-ties, $2,250,000 having been imported from the
Province.
In August the controls on the purchase of plywood were abolished, and dealers
were able to buy under open licence. This has stepped up British buying of British
Columbia plywood from $80,000 in 1953 to $900,000 in 1954.
Mr. E. M. Gunderson's Visit
Mr. E. M. Gunderson, Special Trade Representative for the Government of British
Columbia, spent from August 31st to November 11th in the British Isles and visited
Western European countries. His visit created much interest amongst British manufacturers and suppliers, and will, no doubt, result in increased buying of British goods
balanced by a reciprocal flow of British Columbia commodities to the United Kingdom.
The announcement made by Mr. Gunderson of the purchase of British steel rails
for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway aroused great interest and was most favourably
received by the officials of the Board of Trade. It is our considered opinion that this
practical evidence on behalf of the Provincial Government to foster Anglo-British
Columbia trade had a direct bearing on United Kingdom purchases of salmon and fruit
and carried considerable weight particularly in relationship to the re-establishment of
the United Kingdom market for British Columbia apples.
On Mr. Gunderson's arrival a reception was held at British Columbia House at
which senior officials of ministries and representatives of all branches of British industrial
and commercial life were invited. Press conferences were held, and meetings with senior
ministry officials organized.
j| So that he could meet and address a complete cross-section of British industrial and
commercial interests, it was arranged for him to be the guest of honour and address
meetings of the following: Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Great Britain, London;
Birmingham Chamber of Commerce, Birmingham; National Union of Manufacturers,
London; the Pottery Federation, Stoke; and the Dollar Exports Council, London.
Mr. Gunderson attended the Scottish Industries Exhibition in Glasgow, visited the
Team Valley Industrial Estate in Newcastle and other commercial centres. He pointed
out to British industry the necessity of entering the Western Canadian market in an
aggressive manner and on a permanent basis. He advocated that where sales offices
were now maintained or contemplated, warehouses, spare-parts depots, and servicing
facilities should be also set up.
H European Interest in British Columbia
H Prior to Mr. Gunderson's arrival, arrangements were made with the Canadian Commercial Counsellors of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, West Germany, Switzerland, France,
Belgium, and Holland for them to receive him and put him in contact with government
departments, bankers, and industrialists in their respective countries. The Industrial and
Trade Representative joined Mr. Gunderson in Germany and accompanied him to
Switzerland. .1
fl German interest in the Province of British Columbia is keen, and large industrial
groups are exploring the possibilities for investment. It is expected that there will be
Canadian companies established similar to the Western Canadian Pipe Mills Limited,
which is now being built by the Rheinsche Rohenwerke, of Mulheim. Representatives
of several firms will shortly make survey trips to the West Coast.
 BB 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Agencies for United Kingdom Goods
This office, during 1954, contacted 161 British manufacturers who wish to sell their
goods and services in Western Canada. Details were sent to Victoria and published in
the Trade and Industry Bulletin. From these inquiries many successful agencies were
secured for wholesalers, retailers, and agency houses in the Province.
Many business-men from the Province called at British Columbia House and in
some cases were introduced to government departments or to firms in the British Isles
This is a service which has been the means of saving much valuable time for visitors.
Attendance by British Columbia buyers at trade fairs in this country was down
considerably from the previous year. A list of various trade fairs may be secured from
this Department's office in Victoria or the office of the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner in Vancouver. It is recommended that visitors to England and the Continent time
their visits to coincide with these fairs, which are most valuable in establishing direct
business relations.
RETIREMENT OF MR. E. G. ROWEBOTTOM
On December 1st, 1954, Mr. E. G. Rowebottom retired as Deputy Minister of
Trade and Industry after serving in that capacity for twenty-one years. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas L. Sturgess, formerly Industrial and Trade Commissioner.
Many tributes to Mr. Rowebottom's long and outstanding service were paid by
associations and individuals prior to and after his retirement.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 11
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
The prime objectives of this office are the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses whenever required, and the promotion of domestic and export trade. §
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
The economy of British Columbia was stimulated during the year by the establishment of many new manufacturing industries. In many instances entirely new products
were manufactured in the Province for the first time. For example, the first shipment
of aluminium was made from the world-famous Kitimat plant, and a firm in Vancouver
commenced manufacturing aluminium shingles and at the present time is the only firm
in Canada making this product. A large and well-known canning company constructed
a new and almost completely automatic $1,500,000 food-canning plant in the Lower
Mainland area.
In the pulp and paper industry it is interesting to note that a new $15,000,000 kraft-
pulp mill on Vancouver Island is under construction. This plant will operate adjacent
to the $40,000,000 paper-mill that commenced operation last year at Duncan Bay near
Campbell River. Completion of the new mill is expected in 1956, and the production
of unbleached kraft pulp will amount to 400 tons daily. Construction of a $25,000,000
pulp-mill within two years has also been proposed for the southern end of Vancouver
Island.   Other planning indicates additional newsprint and pulp production.
During the year under review many other large and small industries were established
or planned, and the following is a partial listing of some of these enterprises that have
been responsible for broadening the industrial base of our Province:—
(a) A new plant almost completed in Port Moody will manufacture television
receivers and radio sets,
(b) Construction of a $1,000,000 wire-rope plant was started during the year
at Vancouver, with completion expected early in 1955. This is an addition to an existing industry and the new plant will replace the present
operation.
(c) Construction is under way in New Westminster of a $1,000,000 plant to
manufacture corrugated-paper boxes. Production is scheduled for early
1955, and the plant will have a capacity of 150,000,000 square feet per
year.
(d) Production of coal briquettes commenced during the year in a new
$650,000 plant at Michel.
(e) Nickel-cadmium batteries were manufactured for the first time in Canada
flat a new plant in Vancouver.
(/)  A new $6,000,000 oil-refinery plant was completed at Kamloops during
the year.
(g) A new $375,000 plant is under construction at Kitimat to manufacture
^ oxygen and acetylene.
The foregoing lists only a fraction of the new industries established during the year,
but the encouraging feature of this expansion is the fact that the development has not
been confined only to our large metropolitan areas, but has spread to communities
throughout the whole of British Columbia.
Reported last year as in the planning stage, construction is now well under way for
the large steel pipe and tube mill at Port Moody.    This mill will produce black and
 BB 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
galvanized pipe in sizes up to 4 inches in diameter and electrical conduit up to 2V2 inches
in diameter.
CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR COMMITTEE
ORGANIZATION f
The Deputy Minister is chairman of the committee composed of members of associations interested in British Columbia participation in the Canadian International Trade
Fair, held annually at Toronto under the direction of the Federal Government Department of Trade and Commerce. This committee co-operates with the Trade Fair representative for this Province in encouraging buyer and visitor attendance, and exhibits of
British Columbia products.
For the sixth consecutive year the Province of British Columbia will be represented
with an exhibit at the 1955 Trade Fair.   A report on the 1954 exhibit follows.
Department Exhibit m
i The Province of British Columbia exhibit, organized by the Department of Trade
and Industry, at the Canadian International Trade Fair, Toronto, May 31st to June 11th,
1954, occupied a space of 240 square feet (10 by 24 feet) and was basically similar to
last year's exhibit with some improvements. The exhibit is a pictorial and statistical
presentation of this Province's industries and progress.
Twenty-seven countries exhibited, and there were business visitors from sixty
countries. The total attendance was down from last year, as was the total space occupied,
but there was a general feeling that the quality of exhibits was higher and that there was
a greater number of genuine business visitors. Several firms indicated an interest in
establishing plants in British Columbia, and there was an exceptionally large number of
inquiries on source of supply of British Columbia products and for information and
assistance in locating agents or distributers. There was also interest in setting up warehouse assembly and distribution facilities, which is the first step to eventual full manufacture in the Province. All these leads have been followed up with all information at
our disposal.
Approximately 6,000 pieces of industrial and commercial literature were distributed,
in addition to approximately 1,500 pieces of Boards of Trade own pamphlets. Our
industrial folder, I Man of Industry," was well received.
During the Fair, a short broadcast was made by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later translated to German, inviting European industrialists to investigate British
Columbia. Our industrial film I Johnny's Heritage " and " Burnaby—the New Heart I
were shown at the Fair by the National Film Board. The exhibit was manned by two
members of the Department staff,   f
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation from
the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Education, University of British
Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver
School of Art, British Columbia Research Council, and the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce.
The Committee has co-operated with the National Industrial Design Committee in
local planning. It has assisted in publicity and public relations, to encourage appreciation of industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of
British Columbia products.
The Committee has assisted in building up reference libraries on industrial design.
It has assisted in local planning for National design competitions sponsored by industry.
Direct financial assistance was secured from the National Gallery, Ottawa, with
smaller contributions from British Columbia sources.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 13
HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION
A revised edition of the Directory of Handicraft Products and Producers was published in 1954. As in 1953, this Directory listed producers in British Columbia known
to be interested in finding a market and in a position to supply reasonable demands.
Distribution of the Directory was made to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other
outlets as a guide for any handicraft items they might wish to purchase. Additional
distribution was made in Eastern Canada and the United States. Letters received from
producers and from purchasers indicate that the Directory has served a useful purpose.
Contact was maintained with Eastern Canadian Provinces, some of which have
extensive educational programmes for handicraft development.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEYS
The work of the Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia House is
covered in the general section of this Annual Report.
The Department at Victoria has cleared the Representative's work under headings
of Branch-plant Establishment, Investment Surveys, Special Industrial Surveys, Agency
Inquiries, Itineraries, and Introductions.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
This Bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of
general commercial interest, has been published for the past five years. It has been the
means of establishing contact between foreign firms and British Columbia importers and
manufacturers. Many of the trade inquiries reach us through our Industrial and Trade
Representative at British Columbia House, London, while the majority of licence manufacture opportunities are supplied by the Industrial Development Division, Department
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. Foreign trade representatives in Canada also use the
Bulletin to clear their trade inquiries.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
The policy of contacting firms known to be interested in, or considered to be suitable
for, branch-plant establishment has been continued, and a great deal of information has
been supplied. In addition, many European and United States firms have sought advice
on procedure and possibilities of establishing in British Columbia.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMITTEE WORK CO-OPERATION
The Department has continued the effective basis of co-operation with foreign
consulates and with the Trade Commissioners of Commonwealth countries.
The office has been responsible for itinerary and other arrangements for business
visitors from Eastern Canada and overseas, and visiting trade missions and special
industrial-survey parties. It has worked in direct co-operation with the Foreign Trade
Service Office in Vancouver for the arrangements in British Columbia for visiting Trade
Commissioners and officials from Ottawa.
The office is represented on the Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Development Commission and on several standing committees of the Vancouver Board of Trade
and the Victoria Chamber of Commerce. The Department has continued financial
assistance to the Transportation Bureau of the Board of Trade to help it serve the smaller
Boards of Trade in other parts of the Province in a constructive programme of tariff and
freight rates and services information.
 BB 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING
Although it was not possible this year to arrange for the usual organized industrial
advertising campaign in selected media throughout the United States, United Kingdom
and Canada, every opportunity was taken to place appropriate advertisements in special
editions of newspapers and trade journals. This advertising stressed the natural resources
of the Province and their relation to secondary production.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
This organization is composed of representatives from the ten Provincial industrial
and trade promotion departments. Associated with the Provincial representatives in this
co-ordinated effort to develop industry and encourage trade are other agencies, including
the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the banks, transportation companies
and other interested industrial and trade promotion groups.
This Council meets once each year, and in 1954 Saskatchewan was the host
Province.   All Provinces and associated agencies were represented.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 15
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1954, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province. Wm'
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic Research, Trade and Transportation, Market Research, Statistical,
and Mechanical Tabulation. To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured
to follow the policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who
could be relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been
the policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all
other departments of the Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial
Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1954 the essential statistical services
performed for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade
and Industry, were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services
performed by the various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity
in British Columbia is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Preliminary statistical returns for 1954 indicate that business activity continued its
upward trend and reached an all-time high. The primary industries recovered after
showing a decrease in 1953 and showed a moderate increase. The manufacturing and
construction industries continued at the high levels established during 1953. Retail
prices showed an increase in 1954, after 1953 recorded a decrease from the previous
year. Retail sales showed a slight increase over 1953; however, when allowances are
made for price increases and an increase in population, the per capita sales showed
a decline.
Incomplete returns indicate the net value of production of primary and secondary
industries amounted to some $1,345,000,000 in 1953, compared with $1,239,598,000
in 1952 and $1,240,225,000 in 1951.
 BB 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BANK DEBITS
160
140
120
co
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a ioo
80
D
Z
X
W     60
Q
Z
1      40
20
0
EMPLOYMENT
13
12
11
1949
100
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YEARS
1948
1950
1952
19
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1940
1942
1944       1946       1948
YEARS
1950       1952     1954
RETAIL TRADE
1300
12.0
1200
10.5
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CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL POWER
o. u
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1940   1942   1944   1946   1948
YEARS
1950      1952     1954
1940       1942       1944       1946       1948       1950      1952     1954
YEARS
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180
160
cn
SALES OF LIFE INSURANCE
§
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1954 Figures Subject to Revision
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
BB 17
CONSUMER PRICES
PRICES
(INDEX NOS.)
WHOLESALE PRICES
140
120
194
9 =
100
100
80
60
40
20
0
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
1935-
1939
* 100
1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950 1952       1954 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950        1952        1954
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES
BUILDING PERMITS
2
«$'
Q
Q
uu
80
6n
40
1
?,0
0
200
180
160
1940   1942   1944   1946   1948   1950   1952   1954
YEARS
1940   1942   1944   1946   1948   1950   1952   1954
YEARS
1954 Figures Subject to Revision
 BB 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1. Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1952 and 1953,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1954
Mining—
Total value of production	
Gold production	
Silver production	
Copper production	
Lead production jj	
Zinc production	
Coal production	
Forestry—
Total value of production	
Timber scaled	
Lumber production	
Paper production	
Fisheries—
Total value of production	
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—
Total value of production	
Apples—
Total shipments	
Domestic shipments	
Export shipments	
External trade—
Export of canned salmon	
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir	
Export of red-cedar shingles	
Internal trade—
Total retail sales	
Department stores	
Motor-vehicle dealers	
Gasoline consumed .	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia	
Consumption of electric power	
Sales of life insurance 	
Construction—
New residential units completed	
Building permits issued	
Finance—B ank debits	
Tourist trade—Automobile entries on sixty-day permit	
Employment—
All employment	
Manufacturing .	
Iron and steel products	
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper	
Mining	
Logging	
Construction	
Communication	
Transportation _	
Services	
Trade	
Salaries and wages	
Unit or
Base
Period
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
MB.M.
MB.M.
Tons
$ i||
Cases
$
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
Mft.
Sq.
000$
000$
000$
Gallons
Tons
000 kwh.
000$
Units
000$
000$
Number
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$
1954
Preliminary
Estimates
149,500,000
9,000,000
8,800,000
14,900,000
45,550,000
31,200,000
9,200,000
528,022,783
5,567,423
4,233,106
647,117
69,400,000
1,745,000
135,000,000
1,923,539
702,261
1,537,160
2,285,907
1,230,337
181,015
220,393,855
12,359,945
5,209,683
198,311
8,547
164,840
11,956,325
278,376
106.5
109.2
107.2
112.5
129.5
92.5
91.3
106.9
145.7
110.6
102.4
103.0
1,200,000,000
1953
152,731,181
9,130,524
7,017,709
14,869,544
39,338,655
40,388,346
9,630,777
512,288,656
5,291,587
4,045,724
597,936
66,259,600
1,821,269
137,388,000
4,395,772
2,630,492
1,765,280
499,473
1,272,106
2,052,877
1,228,231
156,391
252,245
210,072,483
11,845,595
4, 897,335
176,899
7,503
149,231
11,786,823
283,837
108.4
107.9
113.1
108.3
123.1
104.3
92.5
127.4
139.2
112.3
98.6
102.7
1,066,979,019
1952
171,298,142
9,109,994
7,315,088
13,054,893
45,936,692
59,189,656
9,718,452
496,506,550
4,937,965
3,696,629
521,609
58,089,200
1,293,435
141,402,677
4,740,716
2,758,950
1,981,766
292,185
1,151,485
2,093,767
1,194,900
156,300
240,300
191,531,678
11,888,688
4,457,298
159,826
7,028
94,264
11,111,011
262,550
106.7
105.4
114.1
98.8
116.4
121.9
95.8
114.2
114.8
104.6
95.7
102.9
979,364,603
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
One of the major functions of this Division is to provide economic counsel to the
Government. On a general basis this is done through the medium of a weekly report
sent to the Premier's Office and to the Minister of each Department. The report contains
a review of economic events which are considered to be of particular significance to the
Province. The report also contains charts chosen to illustrate trends in our economy.
A section of statistical information is also included, which provides an up-to-date summary
of business indicators.
In addition to providing general economic data as described above, the Economic
Research Division has also been requested to prepare reports on special subjects by many
branches of the Government.   Technical assistance of this nature has been given in the
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 19
past year to the following branches: Department of Municipal Affairs, Department of
Labour, Department of Finance, the Hospital Insurance Commission, and the Civil
Service Commission.
This Division attempts to assist government and industry by keeping them well
informed on current business activities within the Province. This is accomplished in
part through the preparation of a widely distributed publication entitled "Monthly
Bulletin." It contains a short outline of changes in the economy as shown by the various
statistical series which are collected or received by the Bureau. Also included from time
to time are articles of general interest. Statistical tables supplement the text of each
issue. As well as the monthly publication described above, an annual review of the
Provincial economy showing the changes in the basic industries over the year, as well as
the prospects for the coming year, is prepared for general circulation.
A great number of requests for information dealing with the Provincial economy
have been received during the past year from private individuals, corporations, trade-
unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. In some cases such
inquiries call for the provision of statistical information readily available from our files
and library. In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and a considerable amount
of research. The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial Library and other
departments of the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
Special Surveys
Wage-rate Surveys
At the request of the Civil Service Commission, a study of wage rates in the
metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria was prepared. A questionnaire was sent
to all large firms in these areas asking for the wage rates in selected occupations.
As a result of the survey, the Civil Service Commission was provided with comparative
wage rates paid by private firms and by the Provincial Government. Considerable
demand for the information collected was also shown by other Government branches.
A mimeographed summary of the survey was prepared for distribution to the co-operating
establishments and to other interested organizations.
Many reports showing occupational wages were prepared for the Department of
Labour during the past year. The information was compiled from sources such as the
wage-rate study referred to above, collective-bargaining agreements, and statistical returns
from industrial firms which are filed with this Bureau.
The clerical-salary survey of the Vancouver Board of Trade was again tabulated
and analysed by this Division. The results of the survey were published in a comprehensive report showing salary ranges and average salaries for thirty-three office occupations within the Vancouver area. The publication also includes a section outlining
the policies of the participating firms with respect to working conditions. Assistance was
also given to the Vancouver Board of Trade in preparing a study of the wage rates and
working conditions of warehouse and shipping-room employees in the Vancouver area.
Trade-union Statistics
Each year a survey of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is conducted
for the Labour Relations Board. Data collected from each local include the following:
Names and addresses of officers, affiliation, membership, and jurisdiction of the local
organization. A directory of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is compiled
from the returns and is published in the Department of Labour's Annual Report.
Reported labour-organization membership in British Columbia (including non-
trade-union membership of less than 1,000 members) totalled 178,533 members at
December 31st, 1953, compared to 174,894 members at December 31st, 1952, an
increase of 2.08 per cent.
 BB 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Expressed as a percentage of paid workers, organized-labour membership this year
reached 50.24 per cent. This is the first time in the history of the Province that over
half of the paid workers have been members of labour organizations.
A comparison of the 1953 industrial distribution of trade-union membership with
the corresponding distribution for 1952 is as follows:—
1952 1953
(Per Cent) (Per Cent)
Wood and wood products     20.90 20.44
Public service     17.97 17.65
Construction      11.38 12.58
Foods        8.08 7.14
Mining and quarrying       7.11 5.64
Other transportation       7.04 9.20
Railway transportation       6.45 6.80
Metals  - j       6.15 7.16
Personal service       5.48 4.15
Light, heat, and power       2.97 2.94
Communication       2.41 2.36
Printing and publishing       1.42 1.56
Clothing and footwear    §0.55 0.58
All others       2.11 1.80
100.00
100.00
As indicated last year, the survey of organized labour in British Columbia is now
carried out jointly with the Federal Department of Labour. Advantages of combining
surveys of this type are elimination of duplication and increased coverage, owing to the
combining of mailing-lists.
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE DIVISION
Transportation Section
The principles of equalization of freight rates as recommended by the Royal Commission on Transportation are gradually becoming a reality. By March of 1955 there
will be a single class-rate mileage scale for all of Canada. Certain exceptions will still
exist, however. These include the preservation of certain privileges for the Maritime
Provinces, a provision whereby 2 water miles equal 1 land mile for Vancouver Island
traffic, and the retention of the Montreal-To'ronto-Windsor group for east-west shipments.
Although the savings will run into millions of dollars for British Columbia shippers
or receivers whose goods move on class rates (or on rates reflecting class rates), there
are still several discriminatory elements in our rate structure. Perhaps the most glaring
example of such is the $7,000,000 I bridge subsidy," by which the Federal Government,
on shipments to the Prairies, for example, pays between 23 and 31 cents per hundredweight at first class to eastern shippers to help them over the | barren " territory north
of Lake Superior. Thus, for equal distances into the Prairie market, British Columbia
firms have an average disadvantage over their eastern competitors of over 25 cents per
100 pounds. This inequality becomes even greater due to a grouping arrangement in
the East whereby Montreal gets the benefit of Toronto's shorter mileage. Moreover,
most of British Columbia's shipments which pass over the § barren " territory are precluded from the subsidy because they move on rates which are classified as competitive.
Another contentious element in the rate structure is the 1 one and one-third rule," which
partially destroys British Columbia's geographic advantage of being located on the sea-
coast. The Bureau, in conjunction with legal counsel retained by the Attorney-General's
Department, has presented this latter grievance before the Royal Commission on Agreed
Charges.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 21
Special research has been done to assist the Victoria Chamber of Commerce in its
fight for parity, or near parity, in rates with Vancouver. Considerable assistance has also
been given to the various lumbermen's associations in their efforts to obtain a more
equitable lumber-rate scale. ||
Considerable interdepartmental co-operation in the fields of transportation economics
and financing has been necessary in the past year between the Department of Railways,
Agriculture, and Finance and the Bureau's Transportation Division.
External Trade Section
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the Fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the Federal
trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province. While
these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British Columbia
nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other goods passing
through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very comprehensive
annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published.
For reasons of economy, this publication has been combined in an abbreviated form with
the Bureau's Monthly Bulletin.
The discontinuance of fairly detailed monthly published external-trade figures has
resulted in increased requests for import and export information, which has been supplied
to all inquirers.
Tables 2 and 3 give a brief insight into British Columbia's foreign trade for the
eleven-year period 1943 to 1953. The value of exports was higher in 1953 than in any
previous year. Imports increased in value in 1953 by over 5 per cent from 1952 values.
Preliminary figures for the first six months of 1954 show a small decrease in the value
of imports and exports compared to the same period in 1953.
 BB 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 23
Table 4.—Twelve Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1953
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir.  96.9
2. Planks and boards, spruce  54#1
3. Newsprint  52.8
4. Planks and boards, hemlock  43.9
5. Planks and boards, cedar  27.4
6. Zinc spelter  25.7
7. Lead in pigs, refined lead  23.0
8. Shingles, red cedar  21.0
9. Copper, fine in ore  14.4
10. Pulp sulphite, dissolving  11.7
11. Zinc in ore  11.5
12. Nitrogen fertilizer  11.2
The above table indicates the importance of lumber, pulp and paper, and mine and
smelter products exported from British Columbia in 1953. Lumber and paper products
accounted for seven of the ten leading exports.
Over 100 countries purchased British Columbia products in 1953, with the United
States and the United Kingdom buying over 85 per cent of these products. Exports to
the United States rose from 58.7 per cent in 1952 to 71.8 per cent in 1953. Exports
to the United Kingdom dropped from 27 per cent in 1952 to 13.5 per cent in 1953.
This latter decrease was due largely to smaller purchases by the United Kingdom of
wood, wood products and paper, and non-ferrous metals and products. Ten countries
took over 96 per cent of all our exports. These leading customers are set out as follows:—
Table 5.—The Ten Leading Countries to Which British Columbia
Products Were Exported in 1953
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $398,708,201 71.8
2. United Kingdom  74,772,108 13.5
3. Japan   28,577,579 5.1
4. Australia   9,266,393 1.7
5. Union of South Africa  8,401,629 1.5
6. Hawaii  4,919,127 0.9
7. Belgium  4,521,934 0.8
8. Netherlands  1,718,187 0.3
9. France  1,563,980 0.3
10. Pakistan   1,345,329 0.2
All other countries .      21,496,578 3.9
Total, all countries  $555,291,045 100.0
A continental breakdown of British Columbia's 1953 exports shows North and
Central America and the West Indies bought 72.6 per cent, Europe 15.4 per cent,
Oceania 2.9 per cent, Asia 6.4 per cent, Africa 2.2 per cent, and South America less
than 1 per cent.
 fiB 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6. The Eleven Leading Imports from Foreign Countries
for Consumption in British Columbia, 1953
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Crude petroleum for refining j  17,3
2. Tourist purchases, duty free  15.9
3. Coffee, green  15.4
4. Gasoline, under .8236 specific gravity  12.4
5. Pipe, wrought, over lO1/^ inches  10.1
6. Sugar, raw, imported direct I 1     7.3
7. All machinery, n.o.p., and parts    7.2
8. Automobiles, passenger (under $1,200)__    7.1
9. Tractors, internal combustion     6.0
10. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6     5.7
11. Manufactures of iron, steel, n.o.p     4.2
Petroleum products again ranked among the top eleven imports of British Columbia
in 1953. The oil pipe-line from Alberta was not completed until October, 1953, and the
value of petroleum products imported in 1953 did not drop appreciably from the 1952
value.
Although British Columbia imported from ninety-six countries in 1953, over 80
per cent of all imports originated in the United Kingdom and the United States. Imports
from the United Kingdom rose from $32,000,000 in 1952 to $41,000,000 in 1953, while
imports from the United States rose from $220,000,000 in 1952 to $246,000,000 in
1953.   The top ten countries listed below provided over 90 per cent of all imports.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Which British Columbia
Imported Products in 1953, for British Columbia Consumption
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States j  $246,127,360 71.2
2. United Kingdom   41,232,427 11.9
3. Brazil   6,703,544 1.9
4. Fiji   5,554,072 1.6
5. Colombia   5,348,370 1.5
6. Japan  4,769,554 1.4
7. India  3,176,772 0.9
8. Belgium  2,459,289 0.7
9. Philippines   2,325,111 0.7
10. Costa Rica  2,297,559 0.7
All other countries       25,879,164 7.5
Total, all countries  $345,873,222 100.0
A breakdown of our imports by continents reveals that in 1953 North America
supplied us with 73.4 per cent, Europe 14.6 per cent, South America 5.1 per cent, Asia
4.2 per cent, Oceania 2.5 per cent, and Africa less than 1 per cent.
The gap between our total imports and exports increased slightly in 1953 compared
with 1952, in that imports were 62.3 per cent of exports but in 1952 were 61.9 per cent.
The balance is still closer than in 1939, when the ratio was around 50 per cent.
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also, it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to establish uniform
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 25
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other statistical
bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating to statistical data.
Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1953. The fields of co-operation and the dates
of the original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External
Trade Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost-of-food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government
Payroll Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction Statistics—Building Permits, 1951. In addition, copies of Dominion Bureau
of Statistics annual Census of Industry forms and monthly reports on Production, Shipments, and Stocks on Hand in British Columbia Sawmills have been received since 1948.
Commencing in 1953 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics agreed to supply this office with
duplicates of their Operations in the Woods forms. In return, the Bureau assists the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics by checking mailing-lists, estimating production of delinquent firms, and other services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held
annually. As a consequence, it is expected that within the next few years there will be
considerable progress toward the elimination of duplication in this field.
Similar progress can be reported in the field of labour-organization statistics,
whereby the Federal Department of Labour will co-operate with the Bureau in issuing
joint forms. This should result in savings to both the governments involved and to the
union secretaries.
Prices Section
Prices during 1954 were relatively stable. The consumer price index generally
averaged higher in 1954 than in 1953. Price indices declined somewhat in the first half
of the year, then increased in the latter half. The August consumer price index reached
117.0, the highest since February of 1952.
Wholesale prices showed little change in 1954. A slight decrease in wholesale price
indices was noticeable throughout 1954.
Consumer Price Index—Description
In October, 1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics began publication of the
Consumer Price Index, which is the successor to the old Cost-of-living Index.
The new index remains, in character and general purposes, the same as the old
Cost-of-living Index. However, the goods and services selected for purposes of computing the new index conform with post-war expenditure patterns and should reflect
more realistically current changes in living costs due to prices.
In order to determine the items and proportions to be used in the new base budget,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics conducted a survey of family expenditure covering
some 3,600 urban Canadian families. The survey covered the year ended August 31st,
1948. It was decided that the central core of family types whose expenditure patterns
were similar enough for their changes in living costs resulting from price change to be adequately represented by one index could be defined as those families (a) living in twenty-
seven Canadian cities with over 30,000 population, (b) ranging in size from two adults
to two adults with four children, and (c) with annual incomes during the survey-year
ranging from $1,650 to $4,050.
Detailed information on expenditures was submitted by 1,517 families with these
attributes.
 BB 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The year 1949 is the base period of the new Consumer Price Index. This index will
measure the percentage change in prices between 1949 and, for example, January, 1952
rather than between January, 1952, and 1935-39, as in the case of the old Cost-of-living
Index. Calculations of the percentage change between any two points in time will yield
exactly the same result regardless of the base period used.
Publication of the old Cost-of-living Index ceased after September 1st, 1953. Each
month the Bureau of Economics and Statistics releases the latest Consumer Price Index
figures to a mailing-list of some 180 individuals and organizations.
British Columbia Cost of Food
During the year this Bureau continued to calculate its quarterly Cost-of-food Index
covering British Columbia centres. Information regarding comparative food costs in the
various centres is available upon request. ||
Table 8.—Canadian Consumer Price Index, 1913-54
(Base: 1949=100.1)^
Year
1913.
1914.
1915.
1916_
1917-
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926-
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Index
Year
49.2
1934
49.6
1935
50.3
1936
54.2
1937
63.7
1938
72.0
1939
78.8
1940
90.5
1941
80.9
1942
74.9
1943.
75.2
1944
74.0
1945
74.6
1946
75.9
1947
74.6
1948
75.0
1949
75.8
1950
75.3
1951
67.9
1952
61.7
1953
58.8
1954
Index
59.6
59.9
61.1
63.0
63.7
63.2
65.7
69.6
72.9
74.2
74.6
75.0
77.5
84.8
97.0
100.0
102.9
113.7
116.5
115.5
116.2
1 The Consumer Price Index prior to January, 1949, is the Cost-of-living Index, inclusive of all tobacco taxes, linked
to the Consumer Price Index, 1949=100.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
BB 27
Table 9.—Total and Main Components of the Canadian Consumer Price Index,
by Years, 1939-54, and by Months, 1953-54
(1949=100.)
Other
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Commodities and
Services
1Q1Q
63.2
50.2
84 6
54.9
59.9
66.5
70.3
77.2
77.9
17J7                                	
65.7
52.6
86.6
1941	
69.6
57.9
89.2
63.6
73.8
80.0
1942
72.9
63.4
90 7
65 8
76.0
76.1
82.0
84.8
1943.             -	
74.2
65.2
90.9
66.1
1944
74.6
65.6
91.2
66 6
75 7
86.1
86.4
1945 -   _ —-             	
75.0
66.3
91.4
66.9
74.9
1946     —       	
77.5
70.0
91.8
69.2
77.2
88.7
1947    \   ._      ..,.„.	
84.8
97.0
79.5
97.5
95.1
98.3
78.9
95.6
86.2
96.8
91 6
1948 _                         —           -
96.5
1949        .
100.0
102.9
100.0
102.6
100.0
106.2
100.0
99.7
100.0
102.4
100 0
1950.        |        	
103.1
1°51
113.7
117.0
114.4
109.8
113.1
111 5
1952 	
116.5
116.8
120.2
111.8
116.2
116.0
1953 (average)  	
115.5
112.6
123.6
110.1
117.0
115 8
January—	
115.7
113.5
122.3
109.7
116.5
116.7
February               - -   -	
115.5
112.7
122.5
109.6
116.6
116.7
March..,	
114.8
111.6
122.5
109.7
116.7
115.2
April       	
114.6
110.9
122.7
109.7
116.9
115.0
May -	
114.4
110.1
122.9
110.1
116.6
115.1
June   - -     -■■ -  -- 	
114.9
115.4
111.4
112.7
123.6
123.9
110.1
110.3
116.6
117.0
115.1
July     	
115.2
August	
115.7
112.8
124.1
110.4
117.2
115.8
September
116.2
114.0
124.2
110.4
117.4
115.9
October            . \
116.7
116.2
115.5
113.4
124.5
125.0
110.3
110.3
117.5
117.4
116.0
November                       	
116.3
December   \   j| .... "   ...- ....... jp
115.8
116.2
112.1
111.4
125.2
126.5
110.2
109.4
117.4
117.4
116.3
1954 (average)                 ...
117.4
January      -          	
115.7
115.7
115.5
111.6
111.7
110.7
125.4
125.4
125.6
110.1
110.0
109.8
117.5
117.5
117.6
116.4
February.	
116.5
March         	
116.6
April-   „                 	
115.6
110.4
125.6
109.9
118.1
117.2
May	
115.5
110.2
125.8
109.9
117.3
117.5
June  	
116.1
116.2
112.0
112.1
126.4
126.6
109.7
109.6
117.1
117.2
117.5
July      ...   ,
117.6
AugUSt. -   __   _       :        	
117.0
116.8
114.4
113.8
127.0
127.2
109.6
109.5
117.2
117.2
117.7
September   	
117.6
October..	
116.8
113.8
127.4
108.4
117.3
117.9
November
116.8
113.4
127.9
108.2
117.2
118.2
December.	
116.6
112.6
128.2
108.1
117.1
118.2
 BB 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Consumer Price Indexes, Vancouver, B.C.
(1949=100.)
Date
1949 i
1950	
1951	
1952 —
1953	
1954 (average).
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June ,	
July g	
August	
September—
October	
November—.
December	
Total
100.0
103.6
114.3
117.4
116.1
117.4
116.2
116.4
116.3
116.9
116.9
117.1
117.0
118.1
118.1
118.6
118.6
118.3
Food
Shelter
100.0
104.5
117.8
117.3
112.1
111.7
110.8
111.6
110.7
110.4
109.8
111.6
111.2
113.6
113.7
113.5
112.3
111.6
100.0
107.7
113.2
118.2
122.1
124.9
123.7
123.7
124.1
124.1
124.6
124.7
125.0
125.5
125.5
125.8
126.0
126.1
Clothing
100.0
99.1
110.6
115.1
122.5
112.9
112.6
112.3
111.8
113.4
113.4
113.4
113.3
113.3
113.1
112.7
112.7
112.6
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
100.0
100.0
101.4
103.3
115.3
109.4
122.2
115.1
122.7
117.0
125.2
119.2
123.7
117.5
124.3
117.4
124.7
117.4
126.7
118.0
126.4
118.9
124.3
118.9
124.5
118.8
125.4
118.8
125.5
118.8
125.5
121.3
125.4
122.6
125.4
122.4
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes."
Table 11.—Principal Wholesale Price Indexes, Canada
(Base:  1935-39=100.) M
Date
General
Wholesale
Price
Index
Raw and
Partly
Manufactured
Fully and
Chiefly
Manufactured
Industrial
Materials
Canadian Farm Products
Field
Animal
Total
1913	
1920	
1926 .	
1929	
1933	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954 (average)
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
83.4
203.2
130.3
124.6
87.4
102.0
99.2
108.0
116.4
123.0
127.9
130.6
132.1
138.9
163.3
193.4
198.3
211.2
240.2
226.0
220.7
217.0
219.8
219.0
218.6
217.9
218.2
217.8
217.4
215.8
215.3
214.3
214.8
215.3
85.1
194.7
129.1
126.1
79.3
99.4
94.9
103.1
114.4
123.0
131.1
134.4
136.2
140.1
164.3
196.3
197.1
212.8
237.9
218.7
207.0
204.8
206.5
205.1
204.3
205.7
207.5
206.7
207.4
204.9
202.9
201.4
202.1
203.4
86.2
208.2
133.0
123.7
93.3
103.5
101.9
109.9
118.8
123.7
126.9
129.1
129.8
138.0
162.4
192.4
199.2
211.0
242.4
230.7
228.8
224.2
227.8
227.3
226.9
225.1
224.5
224.5
223.6
222.3
222.6
221.8
222.2
222.3
144.3
132.8
78.3
95.8
99.0
113.3
125.2
135.1
140.0
143.1
143.2
148.6
187.0
222.7
218.0
244.6
296.1
252.6
232.3
223.5
224.1
223.6
222.8
223.9
224.2
223.9
224.2
222.1
221.7
223.3
224.1
224.0
158.5
137.2
69.3
100.9
83.7
85.4
88.9
109.7
129.0
144.5
162.5
177.9
184.1
200.6
191.9
191.9
200.4
223.0
175.1
162.1
159.4
160.0
158.3
157.6
158.2
158.9
173.6
167.6
162.6
161.8
164.0
163.5
130.2
144.4
69.2
104.8
101.5
106.7
124.4
144.6
161.8
166.1
170.2
181.2
200.2
263.7
265.4
281.4
336.9
277.5
263.8
256.2
266.3
264.7
262.0
260.4
268.0
267.3
262.1
248.2
245.5
240.5
243.6
245.9
144.4
140.8
69.3
102.9
92.6
96.1
106.6
127.1
145.4
155.3
166.4
179.5
192.2
232.1
228.7
236.7
268.6
250.2
219.5
209.2
212.9
212.3
210.2
209.0
213.1
213.1
217.8
207.9
204.1
201.1
203.8
204.7
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.'
 DEPARTMENT OF TlEADE AND INDUSTRY BB 29
Tourist Trade Section
The volume of tourist travel to British Columbia from the United States increased
somewhat in 1953 over 1952. In the same period the number of Canadian tourists
returning from the United States through British Columbia ports increased slightly.
Tables 12 and 13 give a breakdown of tourist travel between British Columbia and
the United States. Jj   £
Chart 1 gives a breakdown of automobiles visiting Canada from the United States
by State of origin, with the number visiting British Columbia and the Yukon shown in
red. In 1953, automobiles originating in California, Oregon, and Washington comprised
85 per cent of the total number of cars visiting British Columbia from the United States.
The average length of stay of cars from the above States was five days, and expenditures
averaged $14.19 per car per day. || 1
Expenditures of United States travellers in Canada during 1953 reached a record
high of $282,000,000. There was a slight decrease in British Columbia's share of the
total expenditure—14.6 per cent, as compared with 15.5 per cent in 1952, 15.3 per cent
in 1951, and 13.5 per cent in 1950. However, United States tourist expenditures were
larger in 1953 than in 1952.
Interprovincial tourist-travel figures are not compiled by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, but it is undoubtedly important and adds considerably to the total of tourist
expenditures in British Columbia.
United States United States
Travel Expenditures Travel Expenditures
Year in Canada Year in Canada
1942  $79,000,000 1948  $267,400,000
1943  87,000,000 1949  267,100,000
1944  116,600,000 1950  259,700,000
. 1945  163,300,000 1951  258,000,000
: 1946  216,100,000 1952  257,000,000 '
1947  241,100,000 1953  282,200,000
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Forest Section
The primary and secondary forest industries of British Columbia comprise the most
important industrial group in the Province. In recent years this industrial group has
accounted for 40 per cent of the net value of production, provided employment to some
60,000 people, and paid out $200,000,000 in salaries and wages.
During 1953 the primary forest industry of logging cut an all-time high of 5,291,587
M board-feet, valued at $240,275,000. Operations in the Coast region accounted for
3,702,098 M board-feet, with Douglas' fir as the leading species at 1,497,004 M board-
feet and hemlock next with 1,022,414 M board-feet. At the same time, Interior operations cut 1,589,489 M board-feet, with Douglas fir again the leading species at 579,490
M board-feet and spruce next at 532,903 M board-feet. |
|| The traditional conversion enterprise for British Columbia timber has been saw-
milling. The sawmilling industry in the Province has grown tremendously since its
inception a hundred years ago, so that to-day it is the most important single industry in
British Columbia and produces over half the total Canadian production of sawn lumber.
During 1953 sawmills in the Province produced 4,045,724 M board-feet of lumber,
valued at $276,564,562. In addition, these mills produced other products, such as
shingles, ties, laths, box-shooks, etc., as well as selling slabs and edgings, sawdust and
hog fuel. Mills in the Coast region produced 2,571,631 M board-feet of lumber, valued
at $193,655,945, while those in the Interior produced 1,474,093 M board-feet, valued
at $82,908,617. M
The pulp and paper mills of the Province during 1953 used 863,113 cords of pulp-
wood, valued at $24,304,558, as well as 314,144 cords of waste wood (for example,
sawmill and veneer-mill chips, slabs, and edgings, etc.), valued at $7,080,391. From
this material these mills produced 1,070,863 tons of pulp, valued at $84,658,292. Over
half of the pulp produced was used in the Province to make 632,556 tons of paper, valued
at $74,131,677.
During 1954 this Section assisted the Railway Department with its studies on extensions for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. This assistance consisted of economic studies
dealing with resources adjacent to the present railroad, as well as those resources along
the proposed extensions. Statistical information was prepared for the various lumber
associations and was used in their brief to the Board of Transport Commissioners dealing
with revisions in lumber freight rates.
During the year this Section prepared a second publication dealing with the forest
industries of the Province entitled " Statistical Record of the Logging Industry and Summary of the Forest Industries in British Columbia." The first publication in this series,
"Statistical Record of the Lumber Industry in British Columbia," was released in 1953.
In addition a report prepared by this Section appeared in the July, 1954, issue of the Pulp
and Paper Magazine of Canada under the title of | British Columbia's Timber Policy and
Its Relationship to the Pulp and Paper Industry."
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mining Division
The value of the mineral output of British Columbia in the calendar year 1953 was
$152,731,181, compared with $171,298,142 in 1952. Metals contributed 82.7 per cent
of the 1953 production value, industrial minerals contributed 2.1 per cent, structural
material contributed 8.9 per cent, and coal 6.3 per cent. The value of the metals was
$126,333,618, compared with $147,799,867 in 1952. Greater quantities of copper
lead, zinc, iron, and tungsten were produced in 1953 than in 1952. Copper was valued
at $14,869,544, iron at $6,763,105, and tungsten at $5,950,323. The combined value
of the three metals was $4,300,000 greater in 1953 than in 1952; however, because of
lower prices the combined value of lead and zinc was almost $25,400,000 less than in
1952. The prices (yearly averages in Canadian funds) for gold and silver were fractionally higher, but the prices for copper, lead, and zinc were lower than in 1952.
The value of industrial minerals increased, mainly because of the production of
asbestos by the Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Limited. The value of structural material
increased, mainly because of the increased production of cement made possible by the
expansion in the plant of the British Columbia Cement Company Limited.
Most of the copper produced was in the form of concentrates and, together with
precipitates from Britannia Mine water and dross from the Trail lead-smelter, was all
shipped to the Tacoma smelter for treatment.
British Columbia lead and zinc, including the contents of concentrates exported and
refined metal produced, were sold mainly in Canada, the United States, and Great
Britain.   Over half the silver produced was sold in the United States.
In 1953 the last company-operated coal mine at Nanaimo was closed, and production
of coal on Vancouver Island is now mainly from the Tsable River collieries of Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited. Coke production by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company has been entirely in by-product ovens since October, 1952. At the end of 1953
a plant to produce briquetted coal for use in steam-locomotives was nearing completion
at Michel. ||
The average number employed throughout 1953 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
mineral, and structural-materials mining was 15,658. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $55,543,490; fuel and electricity,
$8,668,099; process supplies, $20,979,411; Federal taxes, $11,811,177; Provincial
taxes, $1,172,276; municipal and other taxes, $1,210,966; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis) and for unemployment insurance, $1,769,232. Dividends
amounted to $22,323,089, and the lode-mining industry spent $27,815,152 in freight
and treatment charges on ores and concentrates.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
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 BB 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 16.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1952 and 1953
Description
Principal Metals
Gold-
Placer, crude  oz-
Lode, fine  I
Silver   "
Copper 1D'
Lead |
Zinc   "
Totals.
Miscellaneous Metals
Antimony  — \ ">•
Bismuth  |
Cadmium   —. 1 »»
Indium oz-
Iron ore  tons
Platinum  oz*
Tin   1°-
Tungsten (WO3)  »
Totals	
Industrial Minerals
Asbestos	
Barite   tons
Diatomite   »»
Flux (quartz, limestone)   |
Granules (slate and rock)   |
Gypsum and products  |
Mica :—jj lb.
Perlite  tons
Sulphur   ,,
Totals	
Structural Materials
Brick—
Common  No.
Face, paving, sewer  „
Firebrick, blocks	
Clays  tons
Structural tile, hollow blocks 	
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe, flue-linings	
Pottery—glazed or unglazed	
Other clay products	
Cement	
Lime and limestone tons
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock   „
Sand and gravel	
Stone  tons
Totals~„. .	
Fuel
Coal
tons
Total value.
1952
Quantity
Value
17,554
251,393
8,796,720
42,005,512
284,949,396
372,871,717
$494,756
8,615,238
7,315,088
13,054,893
45,936,692
59,189,656
$134,606,323
2,333,239
142,246
726,172
404
900,481
2
212,113
1,434,640
848
12
55,588
1,610
91,112
314,000
182,627
830,815
2,566,540
11,483
321,710
739,504
122,308
$1,028,025
312,941
1,561,270
889
5,474,924
176
250,293
4,565,024
$13,193,542
$23,000
13,408
240
141,478
21,026
235,453
3,001
1,745,258
$2,182,864
$28,248
121,254
435,681
51,797
60,273
468,110
6,536
11,296
3,603,273
1,552,772
982,792
3,839,965
434,964
$11,596,961
1,402,347
$9,718,452
$171,298,142
1953
Quantity
14,245
253,553
8,376,953
49,021,013
296,559,781
378,345,159
1,551,043
71,298
787,158
6,752
991,248
1,092,228
2,168,977
3,560
37,358
4,620
172,665
604,000
1,112
151,954
1,382,883
4,307,894
5,226
338,005
770,415
2,611
1,384,138
Value
$403,230
8,727,294
7,017,709
14,869,544
39,338,655
40,388,346
$110,744,778
$570,474
157,569
1,550,701
14,922
6,763,105
581,746
5,950,323
$15,588,840
$988,716
52,845
110,698
59,321
387,655
11,338
11,120
1,590,055
$3,211,748
$51,381
226,459
426,783
31,990
123,469
627,097
30,012
19,267
5,071,260
1,357,958
1,122,516
4,388,594
78,252
$13,555,038
$9,630,777_
$152,731,181
Labour Statistics Division
During the year reviewed the Labour Division again completed the regular annual
collection and compilation of labour information obtained from industry and business,
a summarization of which has been prepared and published under heading of " Statistics
of Trades and Industries g in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for 1953.
The co-operative arrangement in effect between the Department of Labour and the
Department of Trade and Industry in the matter of statistical collection has again proved
of valuable assistance, and the maintenance of this close interdepartmental relationship
continues to provide a good measure of co-operation, mutual aid, and assistance in the
joint effort.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
BB 37
Adequate coverage of industrial labour information on an annual basis necessitates
continuous revision of existing statistical forms used in each inquiry, and progressive
changes and amendment to the questionnaires continue to result in a marked improvement
of the factual information obtained through this medium.    If
Additional projects completed during the year include the preparation of regional
breakdowns of industrial employment and payroll information, an alphabetical index of
reporting firms arranged by industrial classifications and geographical location, the current
edition of a list of industrial firms in size groups, and routine statistical analyses of
Provincial labour data as required in response to inquiries from industry, business, and
other Governmental departments.
The industrial payroll totals which follow show in varying degree the growth and
development in the Provincial regional areas over the past four years, based on industrial
payrolls only, and the accompanying census map outlines the areas mentioned in the table.
While the totals shown are restricted to industry, and as such are not representative
of the entire payroll of each area, as an indicator of labour concentration in the various
census districts they do, however, provide a means of comparison from year to year.
Table 17.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for
the Comparative Years 1950 to 1953
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1950
1951
1952
1953
No. 1	
No. 2	
No. 3	
No. 4	
No. 5	
No. 6	
No. 7	
No. 8 |	
No. 9	
No. 10	
Not specified	
Totals
$14,730,880
28,152,569
17,986,918
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
9,749,718
1,352,763
2,139,119
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
19,560,533
2,140,056
2,291,684
$474,434,052       $581,744,635
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
358,233,779
109,412,278
11,015,136
20,160,757
20,771,777
32,163,701
2,266,598
4,703,401
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4,501,909
$647,030,874    | $673,114,364
 BB 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart 2.—Census Divisions
Thken fhom tfri&sh Co/umbio Depor~£rrt*rrt of Lands, Geogrophtcof Of
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
This Division is responsible for market research studies, industrial and location
surveys, the collection of market statistics and statistics relating to new industries, new
plants, and additions to existing plants.
The 1954 edition of the Regional Industrial Index was published and most favourably
received.
A new edition of the Trade Index is planned for 1955 as the supply of the earlier
edition has been exhausted for some time.
Several regional statistical publications were released showing bench-mark data for
specific regions of the Province. fl    I
In addition, many miscellaneous requests covering population, area studies, industrial
and area development, and marketing problems were answered.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
This Division was established to handle mechanical tabulation work for the Bureau
and act as service centre for departments of the Government requiring the facilities of
punched-card equipment. No charge is normally made to the departments for this
service; however, accurate job costs are maintained and are listed below to show the
value of work done for each department and branch for the twelve-month period ended
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 39
October 31st, 1954.   Similar figures for the previous period are included for comparative
purposes.
Department of Agriculture—Herd Improve- 1953-54 1952-53
ment Branch  $685.20 $1,056.65
Department of the Attorney-General—
Motor-vehicle Branch  $5,423.86 $6,049.88
Liquor Control Board  33,784.56 27,111.60
         39,208.42             33,161.48
Department of Education— J
Annual Statistical Report  $1,626.06
Division of Research, Tests,
and Standards     1,358.68
  2,984.74 1,124.98
Department of Finance—Furniture inventory     628.94
Department of Health and Welfare—
Accounting Division  $1,890.94 $1,678.92
Medical Services Division  14,493.50 14,025.22
Hospital Insurance Service _.    6,986.86 1,236.76
  23,371.30            16,940.90
Department of Labour — Annual Statistical
Report  2,627.24 3,493.04
Department of Lands and Forests—
Geographic Division      $288.88 $468.40
Water Rights Branch     5,064.96 746.18
Forest Surveys Division  12,880.46 4,196.98
Forest Management Division      971.02 2,140.98 Mm
I   19,205.32     7,552.54
Department of the Provincial Secretary—
Civil Service Commission _.._ $4,929.00 $4,735.54
Queen's Printer  11,741.00 12,822.20
  16,670.00            17,557.74
Department of Public Works—Traffic Division   647.77 	
Department of Trade and Industry—
Bureau  of  Economics  and    f
Statistics    $6,747.36 $5,846.94
Mechanical Tabulation Division      5,673,94 8,221.12
§          12,421.30            14,068.06
$117,821.29 $95,584.33
To meet the diversified demands of the various departments, a complete set of
punched-card equipment is rented, which includes alphabetic printers, sorters, reproducing gang summary punches, end printing document punches, an alphabetic interpreter,
collator, and multiplying punch, as well as alphabetic punches and verifiers. Here again
the job cost records are used to ensure that maximum utilization is obtained from the
equipment. 1(1
To operate the equipment efficiently, a well-trained staff has to be maintained, and
at present it consists of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, four senior machine
operators, seven machine operators, a senior key-punch operator, eleven key-punch
 BB 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
operators, a senior clerk-stenographer, and three clerks. In addition, three members of
the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liaison and
perform necessary clerical functions.
In the opening half of this period we were greatly handicapped by the loss of
experienced machine operators to industry, and it was feared it would seriously affect
our production; however, the closing of the tabulating section of the Hospital Insurance
Service in May enabled us to secure experienced operators and bring our staff up to
complement.
As in previous years, a considerable amount of development was undertaken covering both the revision of current jobs and the drafting of proposals for new applications.
The major developments are described briefly in the following section of this report.
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service
During the month of May the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service closed
its tabulating section, and certain basic operations were turned over to this Division for
processing. A revised admission-discharge card was designed so that the accounting and
statistical information could be obtained from a single card. From this card we agreed
to prepare weekly hospital remittance statements and municipal billing statements. Commencing October 1st, limited monthly statistical tabulations were to be prepared. The
first of these monthly tabulations has recently been completed and is currently being
reviewed to determine the most practical form of presentation.
The Division also undertook the responsibility of tabulating its 1953 annual statistical
tables. Each major tabulation covers some 300,000 cards which have to be sorted on
approximately ten columns, summary punched, put through the multiplying punch some
five times to establish various averages and percentages, so that a three-month period is
required for each tabulation.
It will be appreciated that we were somewhat handicapped in producing early results
by the fact that we did not start this work until June 1st. However, we expect to complete
its major tabulations by the end of the year.
To do this work, the Bureau accepted the responsibility of obtaining an additional
alphabetic printer, summary punch, and two sorters, while a Federal health grant covered
the salaries of two machine operators for the balance of the year.
At the request of the Hospital Insurance Service, card forms are being drafted to
cover the recording of multiple admissions as required by the Federal Government. This
will require the use of two punched cards for each admission, the second card being used
for accounting purposes only.
Liquor Control Board
We have been officially advised that the punched-card system will be discontinued
in the Esquimalt and Pender Street stores and that a cash-register system will be used
instead. This comes as a disappointment, as considerable effort was put into the development of the punched-card system, which, it is felt, had many valuable advantages. However, the work being done for these two stores is only minor compared to the various
other jobs being done for the Board, and the new licensee records will more than utilize
the equipment freed by the cancellation of the counter-check procedures.
Department of Health and Welfare—Cost of Drugs
Plans are still being progressed in an endeavour to establish a combined physician's
quarterly statement covering the value of drugs prescribed and medical services rendered
for social assistance cases. This work is being done for the Medical Services Division
of the Department of Health and Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 41
Department of Public Works
Tabulations were completed on the traffic records of the Department of Public
Works. These covered some 37,000 trips and presented a very comprehensive study of
the movement of traffic through certain control points by time of day and purpose of trip.
Department of Agriculture
The milk production records of the Herd Improvement Branch were extended during
the year to cover the Jersey and Holstein breeds. While this is not a large-scale job, the
calculation of averages for sires, daughters, and daughter-dam pairs makes it a worthwhile tabulating operation. i
Department of Lands and Forests—Water Rights Rental Billing
The initial preparation of 15,000 water rights rental bills was done on our equipment during the month of December and proved to be a very satisfactory operation.
The recording of payments during the year has been maintained, and statements by
batch have been prepared for control purposes. A large volume of status-change notices
covering changes in rental, ownership, and address were also processed. Considerable
effort was put into the designing of a suitable form for the recording of status-change
notices.
British Columbia Forest Service—Forest Surveys
and Inventory Division
By far the most complex jobs undertaken during the year were those for the Forest
Surveys Division. Four actual jobs were undertaken, all of which dovetail together to
produce an estimate of the timber resources in the various survey units.
The four jobs may be described as (a) Volume of Trees—Part I, Gross Volume;
(b) Volume of Trees—Part II, Decay Analysis; (c) Volume of Trees—Part III, Standing
Tally; (d) Working Plan and Special Survey.
Some 250,000 cards were punched and verified to cover Part I which, after several
passes through the machines involving the use of logarithm masters, produced Gross
Volume tables. Calculations were then made on 250,000 Part II cards which were
punched to cover cull factors. These cull factors were then applied to the Gross Volume
tables to automatically arrive at the Net Volume tables which give the cubic content of
trees by species, age, d.b.h., and height by merchantability standards.
The Net Volume tables were then applied to the cards punched for Part III which
was a standing tally for unit areas, the result being a volume in cubic content per acre
for a unit area which could be used as an average value of volumes in various forest
classes.
The above-average volumes were applied to the 250,000 cards punched for the
Working Plan and Special Survey to establish timber estimates of the survey units, these
results being tabulated directly on to multilith masters to facilitate the rapid distribution
of many copies.
Department of Education
In addition to the annual statistical report for the Department of Education, a special
study of intelligence survey records was made for the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research. The purpose of this study was to establish differential standards for the
subjects tested at the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation levels. This proved
to be a rather unique application as some 13,500 cards were punched showing subjects
taken, programme, and S.A. score for the student. These were then tabulated to establish
the differential standards.   The code numbers for the course taken were interpreted over
 BB 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
mark sense fields in the cards, and actual grades attained are now being marked into these
fields. The marks are subsequently automatically punched into the cards, which will
enable a comparative analysis of grades by intelligence quotient and subject or such other
combinations as may be required.
P PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin.—This publication has been continued and expanded. Special
articles have been included at various times throughout the year covering topics of current
interest. Included are statistical summaries of business indicators relating to British
Columbia's economy.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a companion
of the Monthly Bulletin and provides a compact source of annual statistics relative to the
economy of the Province.
External Trade.—Monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the
Monthly Bulletin. A statement of external trade through British Columbia customs
ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published
annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—It is planned to release a revised issue of this
publication in 1955.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—This publication was released in 1954
and contains statistics on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The eighth edition of this publication will
be released in 1955. This publication provides general and historical facts and statistics
relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population, Education,
Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication, Retail
Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Manufacturing, Water Power, Tourists, and
Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—This brochure, published by the
Bureau, gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a
business in British Columbia, such as government regulations, facilities and services, etc.
List of Industrial Firms in British Columbia by Number of Employees.—An alphabetic listing of firms segregated by size groups according to employment.
Statistical Record of the Logging Industry and Summary of the Forest Industries in
British Columbia.—An historical summary of statistics relating to the logging and forest
industries of British Columbia.
Regional Statistics of British Columbia.—Summary of census statistics by regional
areas. At the end of 1954 three area studies were completed, namely, West Kootenay,
East Kootenay, and the Okanagan.
Current Publications.—A directory of publications released by the Department of
Trade and Industry. # J||t
In addition to Departmental publications, other studies were completed but not
released for general consumption.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 43
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
The tourist trade in 1954 did not eclipse the record-breaking figures of the year
before, but at the year's end, entries on travellers' vehicle permits were only slightly
behind 1953, and in spite of adverse weather conditions which affected the whole
continent in the early summer, the over-all volume was fairly well maintained. Inter-
provincial and domestic holiday traffic appeared to take up a great deal of the slack, so
that in spite of a 2-per-cent (approximately) drop in United States entries, an estimate
of $70,000,000 on the Tourist Industry Account is on the conservative side.
In 1954 there was a very noticeable appreciation in the number of inquiries
respecting camp-sites and all camping areas were well patronized, but the increased use
of these facilities does not appear to adversely affect the resort establishments; rather,
it reflects the greater use of public amenities by those who prefer this type of recreation
and by many who would otherwise be denied outdoor holidays. Camping facilities were
appreciated by the people of British Columbia and foreign visitors alike.
Mail volume of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau totalled 31,626
in 1954, compared with 23,517 in 1953. With few exceptions, inquiries were given
response within twenty-four hours of receipt.
During the year the travel counsellors were afforded opportunities of gaining
first-hand information on various sections of the Province. Queen Charlotte Airlines
co-operated by giving the Chief Counsellor a familiarization tour of west coast points,
and during the season a tour of the Province and mountain regions was organized for
two of the Bureau staff and members of the staff of the Alberta Government Travel
Bureau. This exchange of visits between counselling personnel proved extremely worth
while and was followed by a joint conference in Cranbrook in October, attended by the
Directors of the Alberta and British Columbia Travel Bureaux, their assistants and
counsellors.
Out of this conference, recommendations were made to the respective Governments
resulting in several co-operative measures which have been approved for 1955, including
joint field representation in Pacific Coast States, joint folders, and other promotional
media.
ADVERTISING
Advertising in 1954 followed the same pattern as in previous years, with space in
international magazines (Holiday, National Geographic, Time, Sunset, etc.) being supported by newspaper space through the eleven western States, with special emphasis in
California, Oregon, and Washington. Television was also used by the agency responsible
for the placing of advertising.
Five bulletin-boards, with a traffic count of over 11,000,000, were repainted with
an invitation to visit British Columbia. These have been maintained for several years
in the vicinity of Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Grant's Pass, and Spokane.
Radio was again used with a view to encouraging British Columbians to spend their
own vacations in the Province, and it was also used in conjunction with Canadian national
magazines and newspapers to encourage more interprovincial tourist traffic. This campaign has also had the effect of stimulating a large number of settlement inquiries.
While the tourist advertising campaign was handled by an advertising agency, the
Bureau staff prepared 189 general advertisements, issued orders covering 1,648 advertisements for other departments, and checked all advertising invoices for every branch
of the Government service.
 BB 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FIELD WORK
The travel promotional programme, through personal contact with travel information
offices, followed a pattern quite similar to that of former years. This type of publicity
has proven itself as being very suited to the Bureau's needs, although the time allotted
to such work has been less than would be desirable. In the United States the Assistant
Commissioner, during a nine-week period in the spring of the year, checked with the
main offices in principal cities throughout the ten western States. Travel literature and
general discussions on British Columbia vacations with travel counsellors were enthusiastically received, giving reason to believe that greater time in these offices or more
frequent calls would be welcomed. With the heavy pressure of the many promotional
activities being staged for the encouragement of travel to other countries, it is gratifying
to note the steady interest maintained in this Province by these travel personnel.
Offices contacted consisted mainly of travel bureaux, automobile clubs, Chambers
of Commerce, transportation companies, and oil companies where directional bureaux
are maintained. Films were shown and talks given to a number of organizations.
Television stations continue to show interest in our films, and excellent publicity was
obtained through this medium; radio has not been able to use our available material
to the same advantage. Magazine and newspaper travel editors were most co-operative
in supplying picture and story space.
While the Alberta and British Columbia field work took on somewhat the same
style as that in the United States, the local or community tourist information centres are
among the most important contacts. These bureaux continue to play a most vital role
in furthering travel in British Columbia.
PUBLICITY
The reader-columns of newspapers, magazines, trade papers, and house organs are
regarded as excellent channels for the distribution of Provincial publicity supplementary
to the scheduled advertising campaigns.
Accordingly, every opportunity was taken to make use of free space in a wide
variety of publications by responding readily to editorial requests for material and by
voluntarily submitting stories, articles, and photographs to periodicals circulating in
British Columbia's travel market.
The Travel Bureau's staff writer was also employed in producing a considerable
amount of industrial publicity for the Province. In addition to speech material for
officials of the Department of Trade and Industry and other departments, the travel writer
produced articles and statements for an important list of publications.
LITERATURE
More than 700,000 pieces of promotional literature were distributed last year.
These included road reports, special-event folders, maps, listings of tourist accommodation, regional folders, and general and factual booklets. Designed to support a definite
sales objective, meet a particular need or requirement, or support a definite objective
in a specific market, all this material was distributed on personal request, except at entry
ports where limited amounts of folders were kept available in racks accessible to visitors
as they crossed the border.
The Bureau added to its poster series and gained a very wide distribution, one
avenue of which were large chain department stores in the United States. At the
International Holiday Poster Exhibition in Durban these " posters created considerable
interest, and contributed much towards the success of this Exhibition."
New productions included a regional folder on the Howe Sound-Powell River
recreational area and a booklet, "Alluring British Columbia," which, illustrated with
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
BB 45
full colour, has been widely appreciated as an outstanding piece of promotional literature
from point of view of design, copy, illustration, and printing.
Another new mailing piece draws attention to the attractions and advantages of
Central British Columbia.
"TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT"
In 1945, when the Regulations Governing Tourist Accommodation and Trailers
were promulgated, housing conditions in the tourist industry were such that the failure
of some operators to meet standards of sanitation and provide basic amenities demanded
by changing trends in a growing industry dictated some measure of control. The regulations brought down were largely concerned with health measures, but more recently
competition in the industry, new standards of public acceptance, star rating under the
Regulations Governing Classification, and the establishment of health units throughout
the Province have contributed to the development of over-all standards requiring no
further control on the part of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau.
Health requirements are now checked by local and regional health units, and on
December 4th the Regulations Governing Tourist Accommodation and Trailers were
rescinded. This means that tourist accommodation is no longer licensed or registered
by the Bureau, but the classification of tourist accommodation (star rating) will be
continued.
British Columbia's classification system has been investigated by other Provinces,
and early in the new year a conference of representatives from each of the four western
Provinces will meet with a view to devising a system which could apply to each one
of the Provinces.
In the enforcement of regulations under the Act and in the settlement of problems
arising out of them, acknowledgment should be given here to the co-operation of the
public health engineers, the doctors and sanitarians attached to the various health units,
and to the officers of the Auto Courts and Resorts Association.
The following tabulation shows the relative standards of tourist accommodation
through the Province as of December 31st, 1954, and as reflected by the auto courts
and resorts:—
Number of Auto Courts Star-rated and Ungraded
1954
1950
1948
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
PerCent
Four stars	
Three stars      _	
Two stars	
One star	
395
255
175
123
166
35
23
16
11
15
216
220
155
147
172
24
24
17
16
19
70
158
112
141
151
11
25
17
23
No star	
24
Total graded  	
Ungraded	
1,114               100
226                 _
910              100
260                _
632               100
1
Totals	
1,340
40
—
1,170
—
___
Permits .. ..
——
Grand total	
1,380
—
1        -
	
mammm
■f
The following grades were raised in 1954:—
Twenty-three grades raised from three to four stars.
Five grades raised from two to four stars.
One grade raised from one to four stars.
One grade raised from no star to four stars.
Nineteen grades raised from two to three stars.
Eleven grades raised from one to three stars.
 gg 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
One grade raised from no star to three stars.
Fifteen grades raised from one to two stars.
Five grades raised from no star to two stars.
Ten grades raised from no star to one star.
The following grades were lowered in 1954:—
Fourteen grades lowered from four to three stars.
One grade lowered from four to two stars.
Twenty-one grades lowered from three to two stars.
Five grades lowered from three to one star.
Nine grades lowered from two to one star.
One grade lowered from three to no star.
Three grades lowered from two to no star.
Thirteen grades lowered from one to no star.
Auto courts initially graded in 1954 were as follows:—
Four stars    48
Three stars     13
Two stars     11
One star     15
No star     19
Total  106
Auto courts that ceased operating in 1953 numbered 40, and in 1954 numbered 50.
New licences issued in 1954, 88, and cancelled (Health Department), 3.
The following is a brief tabulation of tourist accommodation available in the
Province:—
Number of Rental Units Available to Tourists
Auto courts and resorts  11,795
Hotels  14,073
Total  25,868
Number of Beds Available Each Night to Tourists
Auto courts and resorts  47,180
Hotels  21,146
I    Total  68,326
Construction Value (Estimate)
Auto courts and resorts  $31,123,000
Hotels (not including licensed premises or restaurants,
etc.)     49,255,000
Total  $80,378,000
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
Mention has been made elsewhere of the co-operation between the British Columbia
Government Travel Bureau and the Alberta Government Travel Bureau, and while
mutual interest dictated this, the British Columbia Bureau appreciatively acknowledges
an interest on the part of the Deputy Minister of Economic Affairs for Alberta and the
Director and staff of the Alberta Travel Bureau far beyond the ordinary measures called
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 47
for. The Province has also been served most generously by the Automobile Club of
Southern California, the National Automobile Club, and the State Automobile Associations of California, Oregon, and Washington.
Without exception the oil company travel bureaux have co-operated very closely,
particularly in respect of dissemination of road reports. The regional and community
travel bureaux at Kamloops, Nanaimo, Hope, Vernon, New Westminster, Chilliwack,
Trail, Kimberley, Kelowna, Revelstoke, Nelson, Cranbrook, Courtenay, and a score of
other centres, in co-operating with the Bureau, enabled it to round out a comprehensive
programme of promotion and service. The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and
the Vancouver Tourist Association gave a tourist service extending beyond their immediate interests and were in turn furnished folders and promotional material for distribution.
A special credit should be given the British Columbia Automobile Association for a fine
spirit of co-operation.
The co-operation at all times of the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers
at border points is greatly appreciated by the Bureau as it is by the visitors. Without
exception, visitors to the Province have been courteously received, a fact which has been
very frequently commented on.
Particularly friendly liaison has been maintained between the Bureau and the
Canadian Government Travel Bureau in Ottawa, its offices in New York and Chicago,
and the Canadian Consulates in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle. At all times
the resources and facilities of these offices have been placed at the disposal of the Bureau
and frequently taken advantage of. It is further acknowledged that without the ready
co-operation of the foregoing agencies, the press and radio services, and other interests
which recognize the value of the tourist industry, the promotional task of the Bureau
would be much more difficult.
Hi settlement
Settlement inquiries were received in considerable volume throughout the year, a
large number having been inspired by the press coverage of Kitimat and other developments, actual and proposed. A large number of people who had failed to establish themselves in Ontario and other Provinces to which they had originally migrated hoped to find
a home in British Columbia; there were also a large number of retired Canadians seeking
a happy place in which to spend declining years. A heavy mail was also received from
prospective agricultural settlers. In disposing of these inquiries, the Bureau acknowledges
the assistance of the Department of Agriculture, Department of Citizenship and Immigration, and other authoritative sources of factual information and advice. The National
Employment Service in Vancouver and Victoria helped the Bureau on innumerable
occasions, and the Agent-General for British Columbia and the Dominion Department
of Labour in London, England, were important references.
In no way does the Bureau solicit immigration, but the expanding economy of the
Province naturally invites inquiry. Such inquiries as are funnelled to the Travel Bureau
are given the information and references most suitable and helpful, but any finalizing is
left to the Canadian or Provincial department most directly concerned.
Appreciative acknowledgment has been received from many countries throughout
the world.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The fifteenth annual meeting of the Tourist Council was held in Vancouver on May
21st, with the Deputy Minister in the chair. Operations of the Government Travel
Bureau over the past year were reported upon by the Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner and reviewed by the Council. The 1954 advertising campaign was outlined by
the agency, leading to a discussion on media and a general endorsation of the programme.
 BB 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
HISTORIC SITES
The marking of historic sites was confined to the issuance of two bronze plaques—
one at Grand Forks symbolizing the spirit of friendship existing between Canada and the
United States, and the other at Fort Langley in memory of Ovid Allard and William H.
Newton, of the Hudson's Bay Company, and the many pioneers of the Fort Langley
district. However, the Bureau's interest in the historic background of the Province
extended beyond this one practical expression. Whenever opportunity offered at regional
meetings and gatherings, the Commissioner emphasized the value of local historic references and took time as it offered to forward a list of historic sites for possible publication. Public interest in such sites has been evidenced by a large number of inquiries,
which warrant issuance of a brief catalogue at least in mimeographed form. Meanwhile
the proposed text is in the hands of the Provincial Archivist for review.
RECEPTION CENTRE
Keys for British Columbia's first tourist reception centre were handed over to the
Minister early in December, and it is planned to staff the building early in the new year.
The centre is designed to render assistance to tourists, help them with itineraries, and
encourage them to spend as much time as possible in British Columbia by advising of
alternate routes, scenic and sports facilities and attractions, and by giving factual information with respect to roads and accommodations.
REPRESENTATION
During the year the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau was represented
at the conventions of the Canadian Tourist Association, Windsor; Auto Courts and
Resorts Association meetings and conventions at Prince George, Williams Lake, Cranbrook, Campbell River, Vancouver, and Victoria; at the meetings of the Okanagan-
Cariboo Trail Association in Kamloops and Bend, Ore.; at the Dominion-Provincial
Tourist Conference in Ottawa; and at the general meetings of the Vancouver and the
Victoria Tourist Associations. Advantage was taken of every opportunity to stress the
fact that British Columbia's tourist industry makes a major contribution to the general
economy of the Province and that the bureaux operating on a Provincial level could and
should be supplemented to advantage on regional and local levels.
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
The activity of the Photographic Branch is reflected in the following report:—
Motion-picture Shows. — To various organizations in Victoria and environs, 60;
preview shows in the Branch theatre, 26.
Motion-picture Circulation.—Total audiences: British Columbia, 222,667; other
Provinces, 806,808; United States, 559,540;  grand total, 1,589,015.
Still Prints.—During 1954, prints suitable for reproduction were sent to writers,
publishers, advertising agents, as follows: British Columbia, 2,452; other Provinces, 656;
United States, 450; foreign, 266; total, 3,824.
Darkroom Production.—Total number of negatives processed, 9,712; total number
of prints, 15,742. it
Still Photography.—During the year the Photographic Branch accepted and completed still assignments for the following departments: Agriculture, British Columbia
Hospital Insurance Service, British Columbia Power Commission, British Columbia
Resources Conference, Economics Bureau, Health and Welfare, Lands and Forests,
Mines, Premier's Office, Provincial Archives, Provincial Museum, Public Works, and
Queen's Printer.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY BB 49
Still Assignments.—Photographers were in the field and covered Highway No. 16
from Prince George to Prince Rupert, and also the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from
Prince George to Squamish.
A series of black-and-white and colour photographs, suitable for covers, was taken
on Vancouver Island, Vancouver, and the Lower Fraser Valley.
A tour of Vancouver Island and Vancouver by a press group from Australia was
covered by one of our photographers, and the resulting photographs were given wide
coverage in Australia.
A series of ski-ing photographs was taken during the spring at Grouse Mountain,
giving much-needed coverage.
Many photographs were taken and enlarged for use in the displays at the new British
Columbia Building at the Pacific National Exhibition, Vancouver.        if
An interesting assignment covered the whole process of the making of the new
British Columbia mace. This group of photographs was suitably bound and deposited in
the Provincial Archives.
Another unusual assignment was photographing the British Columbia Legislature in
session. This has never been done before.
Motion Pictures.—Approximately 75 per cent of the footage for a new industrial
motion picture was taken during the year, concentrating on secondary industries.
The Branch provided assistance in producing television travelogues on Vancouver
Island and on the Lower Mainland. These were shown in the Los Angeles area with
much success.
Assistance was given to the British Columbia Power Commission in editing a short
film of its production.
Completed Films.—Three colour-sound motion pictures were released during the
year. They were "Northward Bound" (Alaska Highway), "Lady of the Lake" (the
Kelowna Regatta), and "Quality Plus" (certified seed-potato production).
Television.—Films were supplied to and televised by various stations, as follows:—
KING, Seattle, Wash.—8 films, approximately 30,000 viewers (each show).
CBUT, Vancouver, B.C.—3 films, approximately 30,000 viewers (each show).
CKSO, Sudbury, Ont.—1 film, approximately 21,000 viewers.
CKCK, Regina, Sask.—1 film, approximately 25,000 viewers.
CFPL, London, Ont.—1 film, approximately 10,000 viewers.
Rediffusion, Inc., Montreal (closed circuit)—16 films, approximately 30,000
viewers (each show).
In addition, a special showing of the film 1 Vancouver Island " was presented over
KING-TV, Seattle, to an estimated audience of 200,000.
British Columbia Films in the United Kingdom
British Columbia House, London, has available a number of our films and has
rendered a valuable service in showings to commercial firms, tourist bureaux, clubs,
public and secondary schools, and private audiences. A total of 852 showings were
made to a total audience of 107,203 persons.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most ExceUent Majesty
1955
860-255-4500
   

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