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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1955

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1953
is herewith respectfully submitted.
$ LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1954.
 The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister oj Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-sixth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1953.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,     §
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister oj Labour.
Department oj Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1954.
 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria B C
Mrs. P. Woods, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B C
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B C
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C
R. M. Purdie, Chief Factory Inspector, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.'
E. L. Allen, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
f BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
P.O. Box 90, Prince George, B.C.
Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
Capital News Building, Kelowna, B.C.
Court-house, Smithers, B.C.
P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
1   BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters:  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters:  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
N. deW. Lyons, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
James Walker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
John Tucker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Fraudena Eaton. Hamilton Crisford.
George LeBreton, Government Representative, Board of Examiners in Barbering.
PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
Professor E. H. Morrow, LL.D., 4709 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Member, Alert Bay, B.C.
Ernest Brewer, Member, Vernon, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
T. R. Kelly, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
RENTALS CONTROL OFFICE
(Headquarters:   570 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.) f:
Stuart DeVitt, Rentals Officer.
  SUMMARY OF CONTENTS
List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front J^
Report of Deputy Minister  o
Statistics of Trades and Industries  21
Employers' Returns       _ 21
Payroll	
Previous Provincial Payrolls  j i
Comparison of Payrolls  22
Industrial Divisions  23
Census Divisions  24
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  15
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  16
Industrial Wage  17
Firms with Large Payrolls  20
Employment  20
Statistical Tables  26
Summary of All Tables  39
" Hours of Work Act "     40
Average Weekly Hours    41
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers     43
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour     45
Board of Industrial Relations  48
Meetings and Delegations  48
Orders and Regulations Made during 1953  49
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  54
Summary of All Occupations  59
Comparison of 1953 Earnings to Legal Minimum  60
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female) _  61
Statistics for Male Employees  62
Inspections and Wage Adjustments  64
Court Cases  65
Special Licences  69
Conclusion  69
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)     70
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1951-53 [     71
Table IL—Conciliation, 1953     72
Table III.—Boards of Conciliation, 1953 1     85
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause— 117
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes  1 - 8
Table V.—Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1935-53  119
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Industrial Disputes, 1939-53  ! 20
Table VL—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1953  121
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board (British Columbia)  121
194.
Summary of Prosecutions for 1953  lz_h
Employers' and Employees' (Labour) Organizations  124
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc  125
 G 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Page
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)—Continued
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1953  126
Organizations of Employees  126
% Organizations of Employers  141
Control of Employment of Children  142
Inspection of Factories j  143
... 3 Factories jj  143
Industrial Homework  143
Inspection of Elevators  143
Inspections—Elevator and Factory  144
New Elevator Installations  144
Elevator Operators' Licences  144
Conclusion j  144
Apprenticeship Branch I  145
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  148
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs  151
Outline of Operations of Rentals Control Branch  156
 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
^    I LABOUR FOR 1953
This Annual Report for the year 1953, the thirty-sixth since the formation of the
Department, continues with the record of a further period of expansion and prosperity in
the history of industrial development within our Province.
Successive years of rapid growth and impressive changes in our Provincial economy,
followed by a gradual shortening of some elements of strength in this upward trend during
the latter part of 1953, may well mark this year as a period for retrenchment and consolidation of gains, a time for pause, and a gathering of industrial weight in preparation
for further achievements in the year ahead.
While in recent years the preparedness programme had placed a strong hold on
materials and strategic commodities consistent with the defence effort, the gradual lessening of this flow in favour of a rising production of goods and equipment for our domestic
markets was apparent in 1953, this movement being further emphasized by a generally
widespread demand for British Columbia products. |p
An unprecedented degree of expansion in the northern and central areas, coupled
with progressive development in hydro-power for industrial uses, continued to spark the
industrial machine during the year.
With increased earnings resulting from the upward movement in average rates of
pay, and continuing high employment, the Provincial over-all payroll rose to an estimated total of $1,000,000,000 for 1953, as compared with a final revised estimate of
$979,364,603 recorded for 1952.    f
Continued importance of our secondary industries was again emphasized by the
expanding use of forest products in the manufacturing of commodities for domestic
markets, prompted by an increasing demand for pulp, veneers and plywoods, and other
articles of wood manufacture in addition to the regular flow of building materials.
Labour difficulties continued to beset some sections of the lumber industry during
the latter portion of the year, and strike action in many wood-working plants resulted in
considerable loss in working-time and payroll totals in the affected areas. For the mining
industry lower price structures became the deterrent factor generally responsible for a
serious curtailment in productive activity and subsequent loss of payroll noted for the
year under review.
Earnings were again substantially higher in most major industrial classifications
included in this Report.
The average weekly industrial wage figure computed for all male wage-earners
included in the coverage of the 1953 survey was recorded at $65.61, an increase of $3.83
from the previous high of $61.78 reported in 1952.
Payroll totals were higher in eighteen of the twenty-five tables relating to the various
industrial classifications for 1953.
The construction industry was again first with the greatest payroll increase during
the year, up over $8,000,000 from the 1952 total. Metal-trades industries gained by
over $5 800 000 to take second place in order of increase, followed by the pulp and
paper industry up over $5,200,000. Wood-products manufacturing increased by over
$4,100,000, while public utilities was ahead by over $2,200,000. For others in order of
increase, see "Comparison of Payrolls " in Report data.
Constituting the largest single decrease, the metal-mming industry suffered a serious
set-back in 1953, as declining metal prices resulted in closure of many operations and a
loss in payroll of over $5,700,000 from the record high mark established in this industry
during the previous year.   Payroll total for the lumber industries continued lower, with
9
 G 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
labour difficulties largely responsible for a further drop of over $1,200,000 in the annual
payroll here, while coal-mining payrolls dropped by over $1,100,000 due to a shut-down
of some Vancouver Island properties. Minor recessions in payroll totals were also noted
in smelting and concentrating, ship-building and boat-building, paint-manufacturing, and
jewellery manufacturing and repair.
Employment continued at a generally high level, although summary totals failed to
exceed the 1952 records due to curtailment, principally in metal-mining, ship-building
and boat-building, and coal-mining. Completion of some of the larger projects in heavy
construction and the effects of strike action in some phases of the lumber industry were
also factors in the lower over-all summary totals recorded for the year. Highest monthly
employment recorded was a total of 194,892 in August of 1953, the peak period appearing a month earlier, and just below the 1952 record of 197,514 reported in September
of the previous year.
The trend toward shorter working-hours in industry continued during 1953, with the
yearly average for industry as a whole declining to a record low during the year. For
some years past the tendency to lower average weekly hours had become pronounced,
although during 1951 and 1952 it was apparent that longer hours in heavy construction,
metal-mining, and such industries had strengthened the declining figures appreciably,
resulting in little change being recorded for those years. Following completion of many
basic projects in 1953, and a lessening of activity in some industries previously reporting
a considerable amount of overtime hours, the average continued downward, with shorter
working-hours noted in a majority of the industrial classifications included in this Report.
The average working-hours for all wage-earners was recorded at 41.60 during 1953,
down from 42.00 hours reported for 1952, to set a new low mark for the average industrial work-week in this Province.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 11
| STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Statistical summaries for 1953 again serve to place on record another year bustling
with pronounced activity m most lines of endeavour. Encouraging progress in the
development of many basic undertakings and the healthy and prosperous state of our
Provincial economy as a whole marked 1953 a good year for the working people of this
Province.
J EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 9,008 1
The extent of total coverage in the 1953 survey was somewhat below that of the
previous year, although the annual variation in number of returns is compensated, to some
degree, by the inclusion of late returns in summary totals set aside for this purpose and
entered below with other sections of the over-all estimated Provincial payroll.
With many firms filing reports in more than one industrial classification, attention is
again directed to the fact that, where mentioned, the I number of firms reporting " should
properly be considered as referring to the actual number of returns tabulated.
Prompt return of information requested remains a vital factor in the success of the
annual Departmental surveys, and some difficulty is encountered from year to year in
obtaining adequate representation of all industries reporting in time for inclusion in the
tables. In the furtherance of this effort, due recognition may here be given to the continued close co-operation of employers in industry and business, and we are indeed
grateful for a full measure of their assistance in this respect during the past year.
t| PAYROLL
The total amount of salaries and wages reported by the 9,008 firms filing completed
returns in time for tabulation in the tables was $673,114,364, this figure representing the
industrial payroll for 1953. In addition to the industrial summary, however, many items
of supplementary labour disbursement must be listed as necessary components in the
approach to an over-all figure to be considered as the entire Provincial estimated payroll.
The inclusion of the 1953 amounts representing these additional items, as listed below, together with the industrial total previously mentioned, provides an accumulative estimated
Provincial payroll of $1,000,000,000 for 1953, an apparent increase of $20,635,397
over final estimates for 1952:—
Payrolls of 9,008 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $673,114,364
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  1,235,447
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)  46,207,633
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables;  namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll) 279,442,556
Total  $1,000,000,000
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAYROLLS |j
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928 - $183,097,781      1941  $239,525,459
1929"' '" '_  5   192,092,249      1942-..  321,981,489
1930  _ 4    167,133,813      1943   394,953,031
1931   1 - 131,941,008      1944  388,100,000
1932 102,957,074 1945  383,700,000
Ot                           99,126,653 1946  432,919,727
§§p           113 567,953 1947_  557,075,508
1V34  125 812,140 1948  639,995,979
£2- 142,349,591 1949  671,980,815
fpfi          ; 162 654234 1950 1  718,202,028
938"            158026 375 1951  815,173,090
939            1 165 683,460 1952  ^ *1H^'603
1940.
188,325,766 1953 I  1,000,000,0002
11952 total revised since 1952 Report.
2 1953 preliminary total subject to revision.
 G 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
In arriving at an annual figure representing the over-all estimated Provincial payroll
preliminary totals are first adjusted in accordance with the actual increase or decrease in
labour costs recorded by industrial employers reporting in the survey, and provision is
then made for the inclusion of additional totals, covering various sections of the labour
force in business, trade, and services not included in the direct inquiry.
Early estimates appearing in the Annual Report are subject to revision in later
issues, with final figures based on additional information not previously available at the
date of publication.
The following table lists the three main employee classifications resulting from a
segregation of workers included in the industrial survey, and indicates the percentage of
the total payroll expended annually in each department during the comparative years
1949 to 1953:—
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen	
Wage-earners	
Totals i	
Per Cent
9.29
11.85
78.86
Per Cent
9.25
12.01
78.74
Per Cent
9.67
11.58
78.75
Per Cent
9.71
11.98
78.31
Per Cent
9.90
12.92
77.18
100.00 100.00 100.00    I    100.00        100 00
1 1 I
■ COMPARISON OF PAYROLLS
Living costs for the industrial worker and retail prices in general remained relatively
stable during 1953, and were apparently not immediately affected by the continuing high
level of production at increased wage rates, which pushed payrolls to record high figures
in most major groups. Eighteen of the twenty-five industrial classifications included in
the survey for 1953 recorded payroll totals substantially increased from the previous year.
The construction industry continued in the lead, with the greatest increase reported
during the year, payrolls in this section reaching an all-time high mark, some $8,048,833
in excess of the total for the previous year. Second in order of greatest increase, the metal
trades increased by $5,865,317 above the 1952 figure. Pulp and paper manufacturing
followed closely in third place, with an increase of $5,271,927, while wood-manufacturing
(N.E.S.) gained by $4,139,565;. public utilities recorded an increase of $2,229,501
above the total for the previous year; miscellaneous trades and industries was up
$1,970,316, followed by the cartage, trucking, and warehousing group, increased by
$1,536,179, and food-products manufacturing, up $1,213,607; builders' materials was
ahead $1,156,247; printing and publishing showed an increase of $1,149,780; coast
shipping payrolls increased by $1,117,603; oil refining and distributing was up
$1,020,615; garment-manufacturing increased by $843,046; house furnishings was up
$258,279; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, a gain of $234,487; leather- and fur-goods
manufacturing, up $159,413; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, up
$81,801; and explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, an increase of $29,033.
Most serious decrease noted in the survey of industrial payrolls was in metal-mining,
the closing-down of many operations in this industry due to lower base-metal prices,
resulting in a drop of some $5,721,420 in the annual payroll for 1953. Payroll totals in
the lumber industries were down a further $1,265,330 from the previous year, with
labour disputes and loss of working-time during the latter part of the year a contributing
factor in this instance. Decreases were also apparent in the coal-mining industry, the
1953 total showing a drop of $1,131,931 from the payroll figure previously reported.
Further minor decreases were noted in smelting and concentrating, down $865,830;
paint-manufacturing, off $387,276; and jewellery manufacturing and repair, decreased
by $60,279.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 13
Industry
1951
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders'materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction-
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals.	
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing...
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining.
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing....	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
phones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
tele-
No. of
Firms
Reporting
39
125
491
23
132
2,004
36
617
112
132
35
197
99
2,396
1,695
160
668
83
16
179
12
80
5
116
183
9,635
Total
Payroll
$5,083,041.00
8,218,129.00
9,536,452.00
5,918,822.00
23,248,950.00
84,207,280.00
7,076,870.00
41,348,369.00
3,746,181.00
4,734,645.00
926,310.00
5,957,237.00
1,845,355.00
148,350,435.00
54,538,945.00
24,985,914.00
26,072,257.00
9,851,866.00
1,355,231.00
12,461,393.00
21,474,339.00
12,827,000.00
17,193,220.00
34,100,478.00
16,685,916.00
No. of
Firms
Reporting
$581,744,635.00
39
145
474
20
131
1,825
37
605
99
132
34
182
97
2,267
1,647
152
651
73
18
178
12
82
6
116
178
9,200
1952
Total
Payroll
$5,715,611.00
9,142,882.00
10,571,864.00
6,216,897.00
27,230,354jQa
118,731,310.00
7,760,134.00
43,790,357.00
3,533,042.00
5,216,966.00
961,426.00
6,571,954.00
1,896,749.00
135,656,405.00
60,951,413.00
32,651,232.00
30,280,233.00
10,114,512.00
1,518,363.00
13,748,812.00
24,312,238.00
14,677,150.00
19,820,824.00
38,411,133.00
17,549,013.00
1953
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
$647,030,874.00
40
149
470
18
122
1,794
38
614
102
130
35
178
104
2,098
1,732
118
610
76
18
179
13
70
5
119
176
9,008
$5,797,412.00
10,299,129.00
12,108,043.00
5,084,966.00
28,347,957.00
126,780,143.00
7,789,167.00
45,003,964.00
4,376,088.00
5,475,245.00
901,147.00
6,806,441.00
2,056,162.00
134,391,075.00
66,816,730.00
26,929,812.00
32,250,549.00
11,135,127.00
1,131,087.00
14,898,592.00
29,584,165.00
13,867,157.00
18,954,994.00
40,640,634.00
21,688,578.00
$673,114,364.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS
Classification of industrial payroll totals within the Province has been continued
under three main divisional headings, the areas representing Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of Province. The divisional summaries, when expressed as
percentages of the whole, may be used to measure the variation in the amount of industrial payroll expended annually in each area, while further application of these percentages to the over-all Provincial estimated payroll shows the proportion of this entire
amount which may be considered as originating in each area.   #
Due principally to the continued concentration of heavy construction in development areas outside the metropolitan districts, the proportion of the total payroll attributed
to the divisional area known as Rest of Province again increased slightly from the previous year, rising to 42.43 per cent of total, from 41.93 per cent recorded in 1952.
A relative decrease in the Greater Vancouver percentage brought the proportion represented in the metropolitan area to 40.92 per cent, as compared with 41.25 per cent previously reported, while the Vancouver Island percentage declined fractionally to 16.65
from 16.82 per cent noted for the previous year. M
Divisional totals obtained by the application of these percentages to the Provincial
over-all estimated payroll for 1953 are shown in the following table, together with comparative information for previous years:— 	
1949
1950
1951
19521
1953!
Greater Vancouver.
Rest of Province	
Vancouver Island-
Totals	
$294,461,993.00
261,467,735.00
116,051,087.00
$671,980,815.00
$308,324,130.00
277,872,365.00
132,005,533.00
$718,202,028.00
$337,074,073.00
328,270,203.00
149,828,814.00
$815,173,090.00
$403,987,899.00
410,647,578.00
164,729,126.00
$979,364,603.00
$409,200,000.00
424,300,000.00
166,500,000.00
$1,000,000,000.00
11952 total revised since publication of 1952 Report.
21953 preliminary total subject to revision.
 G 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
:'  ''  "   '^''illfS~~   -W lllft CENSUS DIVISIONS |g| rv ■■■:f:"^'""t::    ':||r '
if- Concentration of the industrial labour force in varying degrees throughout the ten
Provincial regional areas or census divisions may be observed in the summary totals
appearing in this section, the numbered areas noted in the table being further indicated
on the accompanying map. §
jf While the survey used as a basis for the regional totals shown is restricted to a
coverage of industrial payrolls, and therefore does not include labour income from all
types of business, trade, and services in each area, it is considered, however, that the
industrial summary totals continue to provide a reliable measure of the rate and extent
of progress and development in the various sectors.
A distribution of 1953 industrial earnings as reported in the ten census areas is
shown in the following table, together with comparative data for previous years.     If
m      British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1950 to 1953
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1950
1951
1952
1953
No. 1    	
No. 2  . 	
No. 3 ;  	
' $14,730,880
28,152,569
17,986,918
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
9,749,718
1,352,763
2,139,119
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
19,560,533
2,140,056
2,291,684
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
358,233,779
109,412,278
11,015,136
20,160,757
20,771,777
32,163,701
2,266,598
4,703,401
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4,501,909
No. 4.  	
No. 5  	
No. 6   	
No. 7.   	
No. 8-   	
No. 9  I	
NO. 10-       y  	
Not specified  	
Totals  	
$474,434,052
$581.744.635       I     $647 030.874
$673,114,364
y.   W       .     .      ,   -~   _,W    .          .
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 15
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES
Significant factor in the higher level of labour income recorded for 1953 was the
increase in industrial wage rates generally apparent throughout the coverage of the annual
survey. Weekly earnings for male wage-earners increased without exception in all
twenty-five of the major industrial classifications included in the inquiry.
Increasing totals of industrial workers reported in the higher pay brackets during
recent years had necessitated a further upward adjustment in the range of wage classifications used in the 1953 questionnaire. The added distribution of higher-paid workers
in wage-groups beyond the $75 weekly limit previously recorded provides a clearer picture of current wage levels, and has had a strengthening effect on the over-all industrial
averages reported in the table below.
Based on one week of peak employment, the figures shown in the following table
represent comparative average individual earnings for male wage-earners in each industry
for the years 1946 to 1953. #
 g m
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Weekly Earnings in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders'materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing1.
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals...
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining.
Miscellaneous trades and industries.-	
Oil refining and distributing .	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
$37.09
37.02
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
34.72
43.20
37.83
42.31
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
43.43
40.28
38.70
39.45
37.88
$41.25
40.50
39.55
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
$42.67
44.99
.43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
51.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
$44.67
48.11
46.41
52.68
44.21
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
42.41
43.93
41.36
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
51.15
44.07
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
46.78
54.88
47.57
44.18
61.89
53.77
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
63.74
62.51
63.76
56.88
54.85
$57.75
60.19
58.20
62.97
54.05
65.16
61.92
56.23
52.69
51.71
54.37
50.75
47.63
64.70
57.82
67.29
51.05
64.00
50.36
61.94
65.79
66.03
64.95
60.72
59.29
$61.11
64.33
64.09
66.11
58.46
70.62
66.86
58.71
54.83
53.94
56.54
51.35
48.98
67.68
61.40
71.35
54.71
70.23
51.45
68.33
71.22
70.64
69.32
66.36
60.96
1 1946 and previous yearly figures for cartage, trucking, and warehousing included with miscellaneous trades and
industries.
Increases noted in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in the 1953
survey are as follows:—
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers 	
Builders' materials 	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping  .	
Construction 	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals...
Food-products manufacturing 	
Garment-manufacturing 	
House furnishings  ,
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing
$3.36
4.14
5.89
3.14
4.41
5.46
4.94
2.48
2.14
2.23
2.17
0.60
1.35
Lumber industries 	
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining 	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing  	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building 	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc. 	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
$2.98
3.58
4.06
3.66
6.23
1.09
6.39
5.43
4.61
4.37
5.64
1.67
j     I     CLERICAL WORKERS' AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS
The general rise in the level of industrial labour costs during 1953 was also reflected
in the relative increase in wages and salaries paid to clerical workers, and with few exceptions average earnings recorded for both male and female employees in this section were
well in advance of similar figures noted for the previous year.      Jj
Totals referring to clerical workers are inclusive of clerks, stenographers, and outside
sales personnel, and it is again noted that in those industries employing substantial
numbers of skilled sales-workers it is the greater earning power of this group that is
largely responsible for the higher averages recorded in the clerical section of the payroll.
For male clerical workers in all industries the average figure representing weekly
earnings rose to a new high of $67.87 in 1953, as compared with the previous figure of
$62.58 reported for 1952. Average weekly earnings for female employees in clerical
occupations increased to $42.33 in 1953, up from $40.33 established during the previous
year.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 17
Average weekly earnings for male and female clerical workers are shown by industry
in the following table, for the comparative years 1952 and 1953:	
Industry
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers-
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousmg \ |g
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction .	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals.
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries.
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc..
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
All industries.
Males
$63.92
61.87
55.63
57.98
58.64
63.17
68.19
58.15
46.96
62.20
47.50
59.53
51.34
67.37
58.19
71.13
54.88
66.35
56.40
59.60
69.20
67.00
72.91
64.20
62.42
$62.58
1952
Females
$40.99
37.21
33.95
32.31
40.06
39.97
40.04
38.55
39.85
38.75
33.95
34.64
35.51
43.28
38.65
46.91
38.98
47.30
39.47
38.17
47.20
36.68
50.85
42.91
41.30
$40.33
1953
Males
$68.20
69.05
60.97
60.26
62.42
67.33
76.66
64.26
60.58
63.10
53.30
62.63
55.20
72.70
64.04
78.68
59.75
70.95
60.23
64.10
76.21
70.37
81.19
68.22
71.46
$67.87
Females
$42.40
39.67
37.19
34.83
43.79
42.92
42.74
40.64
42.08
39.59
36.77
36.02
37.84
44.50
40.38
48.11
41.83
49.35
43.10
39.54
46.71
40.17
50.76
44.22
47.81
$42.33
INDUSTRIAL WAGE
With no appreciable upward movement in the index level of retail prices and living
costs during 1953, increases generally apparent in take-home pay represented an important
advance in real earnings for most industrial workers during the year.
Marking the highest point yet recorded, the average figure representing weekly
earnings for male wage-earners in all industrial occupations included in the annual survey
climbed to $65.61 in 1953, up $3.83 from the previous high of $61.78 reported for 1952.
**£ Comparative average industrial weekly earnings for the years 1918 to 1953 are as
follows:—
1918  $27.97
1919  29.11
1920 .  31.51
1921  27.62
1922  27.29
1923  28.05
1924 ...  28.39
1925  27.82
1926  27.99
1927- _   ..    28.29
1928 .  28.96
1929  29.20
1930.  28.64
1936.
  $26.36
1937  26.64
1938  26.70
1939  26.80
1940  28.11
1941  30.67
1942  35.24
1943 ,  37.19
1944  38.70
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
26.17
23.62
22.30
23.57
24.09
1945.
1946-
1947.
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.
38.50
39.87
43.49
47.30
49.21
51.88
58.67
61.78
65.61
 G 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Based on the computed average figures for each year, the chart shows the trend of
average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners during the period 1918 to 1953:—
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS OF MALE WAGE-
1918 — 1953
Earners
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
YEAR
1918
1919
mo
1921
1922
1923
1924
J925
1926
.1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
;I932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
J942 1943
1944 1945
1946
1947
1948
:I94S
(950
1951
1952
I9S3
65.00
64.00
63.00
62.00
61.00
60.00
59.00
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36.00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
•
t
/
7
—4-.
•
/
/
—r
•
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1
•
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i
1
1
•
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/
1
7
/
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1
/
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/
i
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i
i
/
•
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V
/
/
/
/
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(1953 figure—$65.61.)
 Weekly
Wages
Under $15	
$15 to 20 1.03
20 to 25 1.69
Percentage
of
Employees
    1.59
25 to 30.
30 to 35.
35 to 40.
40 to 45.
45 to 50.
 j    2.58
    4.43
    7.68
—. 16.24
_ 19.48
50 to 55 r_ 13.25
55 to 60 ... 10.04
60 to 65    9.03
65 to 70    4.78
70 and over    8.18
Under $15  1.64
$15 to 20  0.92
20 to 25-  1.65
25 to 30  2.00
30 to 35  3.96
35 to 40  5.85
40 to 4*5  10.57
45 to 50  14.36
50 to 55  17.98
55 to 60.  11.87
60 to 65  8.88
65 to 70  7.43
70 and over  12.89
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$15    1.36
20    0.67
25 0.88
30.     1.25
35    2.22
40.    3.56
45    5.60
50     8.69
55  11.18
60--_ 14.55
60 to 65 12.74
65 to 70     8.86
70 to 75    7.54
75 and over. 20.90
Under
$15 to
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
Under
$15 to
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75 and over 27.59
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$15.
20...
25...
30...
35...
40...
45...
50...
55_.
1.37
0.65
0.97
1.07
1.44
2.35
4.00
4.69
7.62
60  12.20
65  15.41
70  11.06
75  9.58
Under
$25 to
30
35
40
45
to
to
to
to
50 to
55 to
60 to
65 to
$25  2.68
30  1.30
35  1.29
40  2.18
45 _ 3.02
50  4.03
55  6.44
60 .  10.45
70
75
80
85
to
to
to
65.
70.
75.
80.
85.
15.27
11.29
9.18
7.71
6.95
and over 18.21
?>                    7-                    *-                    P>»                    fc»
9         y         °         oi         o
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1951
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Hie above bar diagrams indicate the varying percentages of male wage-earners in a series of fixed wage classifications
through the years 1949 to 1953. waee-groups during recent years, it has been found necessary to
Due to the growing concentration in theJ^lv^^SsTwSLr8 in the section allotted to highest earnings,
extend the upper end of the scale m order to properly classity tnose workers m ««.
19
 G 20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAYROLLS 1
A segregation of firms reporting in the higher payroll brackets continues to serve
as a useful indication of the relative growth and importance of various industries in
respect to the over-all distribution of employment throughout the Province.        |
As the survey here is restricted to industrial returns, the totals mentioned are
inclusive only of the larger payrolls within the scope of the inquiry, Not included are
payrolls of public authorities (Federal, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale or retail
firms, transcontinental railways, or deep-sea shipping.
Continued increase was again apparent in the number of industrial firms reporting
payrolls in excess of $100,000, the 1953 total rising to 957 from a previous high of 938
recorded for 1952.
The lumber industry remained in leading position, with the greatest number of larger
payrolls for 1953, a total of 221 firms in this section showing payrolls of $100,000 or
over, this figure, however, representing a decrease of 11 from the previous year's total
for this classification. Continuing in second place, the construction industry reported
a total of 151 firms in the higher payroll bracket, an increase of 15 above the previous
year, followed by the metal trades with 129, an increase of 5, and food-products manufacturing with 93, unchanged from the 1952 total; miscellaneous trades and industries
reported 59, a decrease of 2 from the previous year; coast shipping with 35 was 2 above
the 1952 total; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) reported 30, increased by 6; metal-mining,
28, a decrease of 5; builders' materials, 24, an increase of 3; printing and publishing,
22, a decrease of 2; public utilities, 21, increased by 2; laundries, cleaning and dyeing,
19, up 1; cartage, trucking, and warehousing, 18, up 1; oil refining and distribution, 15,
an increase of 3; ship-building and boat-building, 15, decreased by 1; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 13, unchanged from the previous year; house
furnishings, 13, unchanged from the previous year; pulp and paper manufacturing, 12,
an increase of 1; garment-manufacturing, 11, unchanged; explosives, fertilizers, and
chemicals, 8, increased by 1; coal-mining, 7, down 1; leather and fur goods, 4, unchanged;
paint-manufacturing, 4, increased by 1; smelting and concentrating, 3, unchanged; and
jewellery manufacturing and repair, 2, also unchanged from the previous year.
Of the total 957 industrial firms reporting in the higher payroll group for 1953, there
were 94 recorded as reporting payrolls in excess of $1,000,000, 13 of this group
being reported as over $5,000,000, 5 between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, 8 between
$3,000,000 and $4,000,000, 19 between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and 49 between
$1,000,000 and $2,000,000. Iff   fl    m §
EMPLOYMENT
Employment remained at record levels in a majority of the industrial classifications
surveyed for 1953, although lower totals in some of the remaining larger employment
groups were effective in reducing the over-all industrial summaries to a general level below
that of the previous year.
Peak employment appeared during the month of August in 1953, a month earlier
than for the previous year, although the August high was slightly below the all-time
record figure noted for September in 1952.
Thirteen of the twenty-five industrial classifications showed totals increased above
previous records for the peak period, some of the larger increases being apparent in the
metal trades, pulp and paper manufacturing, food-products manufacturing, wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), and coast shipping. Decreased activity was evident in such industries
as metal-mining, ship-building and boat-building, coal-mining, and others, including some
sections of the heavy construction group, and the lumber industry, where strike action by
Interior lumber-workers was largely responsible for lower employment totals during the
latter portion of the year.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 21
The high and low monthly totals recorded for each of the various industries included
in the survey are noted in the following table, together with comparative information for
1952. Charts relating to the respective employee groups will also be found on pages
immediately following, indicating the annual trends of industrial employment in relation
to clerical workers, the wage-earner section, and total industrial employment for 1953
and previous years.
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years1
Industry
1952
2    *»
Sy O
a to cxe
o o eg
© >y
yOO
zm
2   1
a 2 as
£gsf
Breweries,  distilleries,   and  aerated-
water manufacturers	
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings .	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
All industries.
Oct.
Oct..
Sept.
Jan..
Aug.
Sept.
May.
Aug.
Sept.
Nov.
Nov.
Aug.
Oct-
Oct.
Mar.
July-
Sept.
Jan._
May.
Nov.
June
Apr..
Aug.
July-
May.
Sept.
1,852
2,707
3,497
2,014
8,606
33,027
2,136
20,142
1,571
2,000
445
3,227
796
42,244
17,298
8,398
10,595
3,011
466
3,779
5,636
4,600
5,198
12,958
5,866
197,514
Jan-
Jan...
Feb..
Oct-
Nov.
Jan...
Nov.
Dec.
May-
Mar.
Mar.
Jan..
Jan...
July-
Dec.
Dec.
Jan-
Dec.
Jan...
Feb..
Mar.
Sept.
Dec.
Feb..
Jan..
Jan._
u
o
B
Xi
o
yy,
o
rt
a
1953
at
O
i
o
&£ B-
•a
pB
Zyy
2  1
XyyyyE
1,601
2,414
2,874
1,743
8,146
22,409
1,984
11,413
1,356
1,616
370
2,944
640
27,619
16,528
6,987
8,422
2,283
417
3,647
5,386
3,546
4,804
12,160
4,886
165,446
July..
Oct..
Oct..
Jan...
July-
July..
Sept.
Aug.
Mar.
Nov.
Nov.
July..
May.
June.
Aug.
Jan...
Sept.
Nov.
Aug.
Nov.
July-
Apr..
Jan...
July..
Aug.
Aug..
1,765
2,949
3,717
1,803
9,076
31.181
2,099
20,839
1,844
1,935
421
3,193
784
38,727
18,275
6,923
10,850
3,062
335
3,971
6,631
3,715
4,901
13,011
7,119
194,892
Apr.
Jan..
Feb.
Aug.
Feb.
Jan..
Apr.
Jan..
July.
May
Mar.
Feb.
Dec
Dec
Dec
Dec
Jan..
Feb..
Jan..
Jan..
Jan..
July.
Dec
Jan..
Dec
Dec
*£
y>£y
B%
Zyy
1,590
2,485
3,106
1,424
7,564
23,906
1,913
11,454
1,635
1,713
326
2,950
694
29,761
16,809
5,758
8,488
2,230
269
3,753
6,121
3,097
4,339
12,161
5,918
163,547
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
 G 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1952 and 19531
fet§r"j^ - v^tt^tt
26,000
25,500
25,000
24,500
24,000
(1953)
(1952)
23,500
23,000
22,500
22,000
21,500
21,000
 _
■I
20,500
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
18,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
c
i         i
!   i
i  !
i   i
t
3    1
3   <5
3      C
i i
•
>   <
3     <
•
u
5
1 Employment as at the last day of each month,
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc, but not
January  24,891
February 25,004
March 25,218
April 25,374
Clerical Workers, 1953
(Male and Female)
May  25,702
June   26,048
July  .  26,255
August    26,229
September  25,969
October  - 25,807
November 25,719
December   25,471
 AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF WAGE-EARNERS (Male and Female)
1929-31-32-39-41-43-45-49-51 -5?-.-.
1929
shown thus
1931
it        <i
1932
it        ii
1939
ii        ii
1941
ii        ■•
1943
ii        ii
1945
ii        ■•
1949
ii        tt
1951
ti        if
1952
ii         ii
1953
it         H
	
	
+■
j    ..„                      s
January - 140,224
February 143,392
March 148,255
April  ;  151,340
1953
May  157,011
June 162,226
July 167,648
August 168,663
23
September
October |
November
December
166,817
157,834
148,947
138,076
 G 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Total Employment in Industry, 1952 and 19531
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
	
(1952)
(1953)
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
1 1   1 ■ ' ■*
ti
,0
o
i-t
u
ti
u
Pt
<
ti
o
yy
3
3
■y
3
Pi
o
CO
o
o
Z
o
o
staff.
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
Monthly Totals of Industrial Employment, 1953
(Male and Female)
January 165,115
February 168,396
March   173,473
April  ... 176,714
May  182,713
June   188,274
July   193,903
August   194,892
September  192,786
October   183,641
November  174,666
December  163,547
 REPORT OF^DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 25
Monthly Variation in the Number of Wage-earners, Clerical Workers,
and Total Employment in Industry, 1953 -
Number
Employed
260,
240,
220,
200,
190,
180,
170,
160,
150,
140,
130,
120,
110,
100,
90,
80,
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
70,000
60,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
Tot;
.1 'employ
ment
— "fl
rajje earr'
ers
Cleric
al Worke
rs
,.
15,000
10,000 -
a
ti
ii
Ui
u
(4
2
M
<
rt
2
c
■->
3
t->
DO
<
CU
o
>
o
2
o
a
Q
staff.
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
 CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in
or incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both
general and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not
include the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, ketchup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery, and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No.  16.  Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead
corroders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 40 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents and managers     $699,529
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      813,042
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    4,284,841
Total $5,797,412
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
1,115
1,100
1,109
1,076
1,108
1,148
1,197
1,168
1,135
1,169
1,188
1,196
346
285
275
277
272
300
313
235
258
325
333
313
168
170
170
173
177
174
185
182
177
174
177
187
64
62
61
64
63
67
70
66
67
67
64
68
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males   Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00.....
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99.
to 84.99.
and over.
46
12
33
33
50
54
41
164
507
228
68
52
63
71
6
9
6
26
172
128
12
20
1
3
1
4
16
6
18
11
19
23
22
32
23
40
4
6
3
21
22
14
5
3
1
1
2
26
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 27
Table No. 2
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
Returns Covering 149 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers i    $1,223,207
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      1,488,330
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers ).„.      7,587,592
Total $10,299,129
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January—
February-
March	
April	
May. _
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
2,025
8
276
2,026
8
279
2,138
9
282
2,166
9
283
2,271
11
284
2,338
10
287
2,392
10
285
2,452
9
289
2,464
9
288
2,464
8
290
2,389
7
291
2,268
6
276
176
179
183
182
181
187
182
187
183
187
192
186
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males J Females
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 74.99.
75.00 to 79.99.
80.00 to 84.99.
85.00 and over.
91
18
21
41
114
50
201
419
456
324
328
180
174
341
3
3
2
1
2
4
4
10
7
17
16
19
23
30
26
29
42
67
10
3
32
63
49
16
13
5
3
2
Table No. 3
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 47 OTirms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents,  and managers.
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).
Total.
$1,419,797
~M23,603
9,664,643
$12,108,043
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
2,686
18 |
217
2,666
15 1
218
2,753
12
221
2,790
15
226
2,877
15
232 |
2,971
20 |
236
3,053
22
236
3,095
23
240 |
3,157
24 |
246
3,191
21 |
252
3,115
19
261
2,960
18
261 |
206
207
209
213
217'
226
229
239
248
253
250
247
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males  i Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99
and over.
137
47
49
102
132
150
274
345
478
451
569
199
205
546
13
2
5
5
1
1
10
5
11
11
11
18
24
16
34
38
19
22
17
27
31
25
40
lW
37
24
11
4
3
1
1
1
4
 G 28
Table No. 4
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 18 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $560,401
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         91,525
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,433,040
Total  $5,084,966
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November
December.
1,770
2
19
1,748
2
19
1,582
2
19
1,462
2
19
1,406
2
19
1,428
2
19
1,425
2
19
1,391
2
19
1,410
3
19
1,464
3
19
1,515
3
19
1,459
3
19
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males  I Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
1
1
to $29.99	
1
to 34.99	
1
1
2
to 39.99	
4
1
to 44.99	
2
1
to 49.99	
13
to 54.99.	
21
1
2
to 59.99.	
10
3
to 64.99	
977
3
to 69.99	
532
3
to 74.99	
102
to 79.99	
56
1
to 84.99	
1
and over
126
3
1
2
2
3
4
Table No. 5
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 122 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $2,508,651
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      1,799,983
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    24,039,323
Total.
$28,347,957
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males | Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
7,239
116
368
6,901
118
368
7,116
110
368
7,463
146
374
7,491
169
373
7,862
192
386
8,290
193
401
7,923
212
387
7,700
167
387
7,208
122
372
7,349
112
374
7,349
102
374
176
177
179
176
180
188
192
199
194
181
180
176
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99
and over.
244
10
1  3
438
7
5
92
1  13
7
929
4
7
468
68
1  28
823
44
24
1,125
11
32
759
2
54
334
1
63
491
47
611
32
957
23
530
19
924
40
8
2
10
35
73
37
23
10
4
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 29
Table No. 6
CONSTRUCTION
Returns Covering 1,794 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers-      $9,919,836
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      14,678,259
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     102,182,048
Total 1 $126,780,143
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
20,627
168
2,116
20,929
163
2,155
22,570
173
2,214
24,014
165
2,247
25,719
243
2,303
26,897
278
2,325
27,493
310
2,332
27,449
274
2,307
26,606
204
2,211
25,706
192
2,177
23,562
170
2,107
20,930
151
2,021
995
999
986
1,015
1,021
1,039
1,046
1,050
1,067
1,050
1,040
1,021
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males    Females
Under $25.00._.
641
277
253
389
872
930
1,524
3,183
4,591
2,439
2,276
2,000
3,790
11,610
98
56
26
79
13
12
12
13
8
6
2
1
41
17
47
59
95
108
176
214
267
208
142
190
194
626
97
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to  39.99
40.00 to  44.99
45.00 to   49.99
50.00 to   54.99
55.00 to   59.99
60.00 to   64.99
65.00 to  69.99
70.00 to  74.99
75.00 to  79.99
80.00 to   84.99
85.00 and over
54
118
149
211
202
128
59
58
31
5
9
2
4
Table No. 7
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 38 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $595,045
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc . 2,118,682
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,075,440
Total $7,789,167
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males {Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
1,370
37
407
1,369
38
412
1,362
42
417
1,341
44
418
1,346
42
418
1,338
39
422
1,410
42
428
1,419
46
433
1,496
44
441
1,440
39
441
1,408
38
439
1,402
36
435
112
109
111
110
115
121
121
121
118
116
119
115
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males    Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99
and over.
28
11
2
25
9
1
14
9
5
32
6
3
39
11
4
62
11
16
62
13
106
13
203
19
269
25
300
18
221
39
118
37
149
240
3
13
25
47
18
9
5
1
1
1
 G 30
Table. No. 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOOD PRODUCTS-^MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 614 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $5,356,702
Clerks, stenographers,, salesmen, etc      6,204,218
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    33,443,044
Total  $45,003,964
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May..	
June	
July..	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
7,117
2,191
1,296    |
7,061
2,307
1,278    |
7,242
2,295
1,292    |
7,910
2,582
1,286
8,995
2,998
1>305!|
10,118
4,482
1,321    |
11,124
6,802
1,329    |
11,375
7,219
1,322    |
10,718
7,689
1,328
9,646
6,091
1,317    |
8,264
3,785
1,329    |
7,297
2,225
1,311    |
850
835
841
847
882
906
927
923
915
891
888
881
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females   Males
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99...
to 34.99...
to 39.99...
to 44.99-
to 49.99...
to 54.99_.
to 59.99...
to 64.99..
to 69.99...
to 74.99...
to 79.99...
to 84.99_.
and over	
779
221
240
338
561
1,126
2,007
1,841
1,724
1,346
1,008
709
542
1,215
2,060
905
1,069
1,581
1,695
1,197
707
354
238
128
66
32
16
67
8
13
26
27
71
109
166
155
130
173
105
70
98
235
Females
33
58
179
223
182
134
80
34
15
10
4
3
1
2
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 102 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $632,855
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      771,986
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).    2,971,247
Total ..... .- $4,376,088
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
387
387
391
390
377
384
386
388
388
379
375
367
1,144
1,175
1,259
1,222
1,114
1,086
1,060
1,126
1,211
1,195
1,117
1,115
100
100
106
108
109
110
110
109
106
106
106
104
Females
80
85
88
88
87
86
79
81
80
81
80
80
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
26
11
28
18
28
42
54
44
41
31
19
14
15
38
261
295
250
209
191
106
55
30
21
12
2
1
2
2
1      1
3
2
4
1     n
1     n
12
6
1     14
13
1      8
1      5
1      4
15
i 6
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to   34.99
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99
45.00 to   49.99       .
50.00 to   54.99
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   64.99
65.00 to   69.99
70.00 to   74.99
75.00 to   79.99
80.00 to   84.99
85.00 and over
i 7
6
20
S    15
1      7
1      3
i -
2
2
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 31
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 130 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $782,841
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       629,975
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    4,062,429
Total  $5,475,245
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
1,201
1,197
1,152
1,124
1,106
1,125
1,167
1,231
1,275
1,278
1,271
1,210
424
434
421
411
406
S 389
406
436
|j 443
451
452
429
69
70
74
75
75
78
85
86
81
79
80
82
123
February	
March     	
April. -	
May  	
126
128
126
126
June   	
130
July 	
August  .
September..    _
131
126
125
October	
126
November..	
December	
132
125
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00—
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 74.99
75.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 84.99.
85.00 and over.
50
59
60
61
131
131
289
189
141
101
78
37
34
64
48
32
110
76
97
72
26
11
2
4
1
2
3
7
6
7
6
5
4
4
8
2
17
8
10
24
23
21
21
9
2
5
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 35 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers $130,280
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc    148,363
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    622,504
Total   $901,147
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
140
121
11    |
144
118
10    |
141
113
10    |
143
113
10    |
147
121
10    |
143
B i25
9
144
129
9    |
141
S   126
9    |
155
126
9    |
156
128
9    |
162
167
9    |
159
159
9    |
65
65
62
63
61
66
65
66
65
74
83
78
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
11
4
20
8
12
8
9
11
20
27
14
12
8
13
16
21
1   129
I     13
1       6
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
6
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99.	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99 —
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99.—
60.00 to   64.99	
65.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   74.99	
75.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   84.99	
85.00 and over	
13
24
19
12
8
2
1
1
1
|          1
 G 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 178 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $593,560
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       884,473
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,328,408
Total  $6,806,441
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males    Females
January	
February-
March I
April	
May. I
June	
July	
August	
September
October—u.
November.
December.
750
1,915
102
754
1,881
108
764
1,924
113
757
1,954
114
773
2,033
117
769
2,063
123
779
2,099
109
786
2,082
108
788
2,014
I   H3
769
1,965
110
773
1,939
105
755
1,879
109
206
207
197
210
207
205
206
202
202
201
197
210
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99.
and over.
60
18
29
47
100
88
139
136
71
47
31
35
9
18
284
289
598
485
327
89
38
17
5
6
2
1
2
4
7
9
14
16
10
17
10
14
9
10
26
38
53
74
50
24
8
4
3
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 104 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $400,907
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       299,985
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,355,270
Total ... $2,056,162
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May.	
June	
July	
August-	
September
October	
November
December.
344
264
51
344
266
52
362
269
56
361
269
56
370
304
58
330
301
57
339
296
57
321
306
56
338
307
57
363
301
56
353
313
55   1
316
274
52
48
48
49
50
52
50
49
50
53
56
57
52
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
1
Males 1 Females
1
Under $25.00	
31
13
25
16
65
53
57
62
58
23
8
5
1
3
59
73
72
84
47
17
10
2
13
1
1
4
2
5
6
8
6
4
4
5
4
1
1
4
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to   34.99
35.00 to   39.99     .
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99.
50.00 to   54.99
55.00 to   59.99.
60.00 to   64.99
65.00 to   69.99
70.00 to   74.99
75.00 to   79.99
80.00 to   84.99
85.00 and over
§      3
10
15
1      9
N      4
3
1      1
1
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 33
Table No. 14
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 2,098 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $10,374,763
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        5,963,192
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 118,053,120
Total.  $134,391,075
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
29,569
260
1,115
32,681
285
1,129
34,604
328
1,143
34,673
336
1,147
36,247
346
1,150
36,488
383
1,159
36,004
381
1,162
35,937
363
1,158
35,697
317
1,149
32,983
381
1,135
30,885
310
1,124
27,742
233
1,125
661
667
679
680
694
697
706
698
690
684
681
661
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
Males    Females
Under $25.00.	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to  34.99	
35.00 to  39.99	
40.00 to  44.99—.
45.00 to  49.99	
50.00 to  54.99.	
55.00 to  59.99	
60.00 to  64.99 '.
65.00 to  69.99	
70.00 to  74.99	
75.00 to  79.99	
80.00 to  84.99	
85.00 and over	
624
43
20
228
23
3
275
41
14
358
50
15
654
129
17
918
48
22
1,672
39
35
5,469
58
55
9,366
72
84
6,559
20
91
4,269
24 .
81
3,206
14
114
2,826
14
103
7,740
9
388
52
23
61
109
139
104
79
49
27
15
15
6
3
13
Table No. 15
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,732 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $11,357,262
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc    13,125,877
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    42,333,591
Total—  $66,816,730
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males  | Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
12,352
461
2,378
12,419
436
2,400
12,667
456
2,423
12,824
496
2,439
12,955
489
2,478
13,163
508
2;517
13,469
519
2,530
13,529
543
2,520
13,547
525
2,507
13,214
519
2,481
12,930
483
2,466
12,275
410
2,447
1,645
1,634
1,655
1,655
1,670
1,668
1,687
1,683
1,684
1,708
1,707
1,677
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00-..
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99.
to 84.99.
and over.
508
314
489
527
878
991
1,479
1,484
1,746
1,680
1,819
1,845
718
1,388
Females
Males  I Females
86
50
116
80
110
40
69
34
14
4
12
"-71
10
2
46
29
56
71
125
201
215
281
259
247
134
152
130
536
127
71
284
383
400
293
125
62
33
19
6
8
1
3
 G 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 16
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 118 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $1,561,644
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      3,717,590
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    21,650,578
Total 1 $26,929,812
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males    Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June_	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
6,054
91
667
5,929
88
673
5,856
83
671
5,568
71
669
5,322
76
660
5,330
75
661
5,384
74
655
5,409
75
651
5,294
71
639
5,153
54
633
5,060
54
629
4,983
55
623
111
111
108
108
108
104
104
103
98
97
99
97
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males  I Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99	
to   34.99	
to   39.99	
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99	
to   64.99	
to   69.99	
to   74.99.	
to   79.99	
to   84.99	
and over	
91
30
26
64
82
110
338
461
688
716
1,212
783
988
1,386
8
7
4
7
5
14
28
17
8
5
2
3
1
5
2
3
1
11
25
54
71
105
81
342
9
12
19
17
16
19
10
4
3
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 610 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $5,173 495
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     6,538 651
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    20,538 403
Total .  $32,250,549
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
5,252
1,047
1,104
5,345
1,084
1,115
5,429
1,072
1,139
5,455
1,091
1,147
5,620
1,206
1,175
5,805
1,236
1,186
6,407
1,304
1,188
6,850
1,372
1,212
6,459
2,091
1,188
5,660
1,197
1,191
5,553
1,175
1,186
5,404
1,121
1,178
1,085
1,094
1,099
1,099
1,106
1,110
1,133
1,114
1,112
1,090
1,091
1,092
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
580    |
to $29.99.	
321    |
to   34.99	
259    |
to   39.99	
456    |
to   44.99	
572    |
to   49.99	
760    |
to   54.99	
838    |
to   59.99	
857
to   64.99	
963    |
to   69.99	
711    |
to   74.99	
551    |
to   79.99	
431    |
to   84.99	
262
and over	
446    |
1
192
177
1,120
320
204
209
123
79
20
43
15
13
4
5
51
15
34
43
78
99
133
136
102
114
67
88
61
138
79
68
150
210
207
206
128
53
23
27
11
10
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 35
Table No. 18
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 76 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $1,418,815
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      3,943,989
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)      5,772,323
Total $11,135,127
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
1,200
6
717
1,177
5
723
1,238
9
726
1,306
9
742
1,348
1     14
1   757
1,383
23
768
1,415
21
792
1,499
17
802
1,508
17
803
1,652
15
799
1,898
17
796
1,777
12
791
325
325
321
324
330
347
340
352
357
353
351
345
Classified Weekly Earnings
Clerks
For Week of
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Employment of
Number
.,,.
vji cdiesi
i   Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
55
1       3
7
$25.00 to $29.99	
9
2
3
3
30.00 to
34.99	
8
1       3
4
15
35.00 to
39.99	
14
3
23
40
40.00 to
44.99...
28
22
63
45.00 to
49.99 —
59
9
47
90
50.00 to
54.99.....
78
6
43
51
55.00 to
59.99	
229
2
50
53
60.00 to
64.99	
244
56
13
65.00 to
69.99	
197
70
12
70.00 to
74.99	
381
68
16
75.00 to
79.99	
300
1
106
5
80.00 to
84.99	
148
48
3
85.00 and over
550
257
1
Table No. 19
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 18 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $279,182
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       273,774
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)       578,131
Total  $i,i3i ,087
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May.	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
154
28
50    |
174
33
53    |
185
36
53    |
188
37
53    |
194
37
52
193
42
52    |
196
1     36
54    |
199
1     40
53    |
186
36
53    |
189
31
53    |
184
32
53    |
181
32
52    |
37
38
39
41
43
43
42
43
43
42
41
42
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99
and over.
1
2
16
18
29
20
34
37
30
12
5
1
2
3
11
19
7
1
1
2
1
3
4
7
6
11
9
1
4
4
1
2
6
6
12
10
2
2
1
1
 G 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 20
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 179 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.
$1,865,189
4,480,598
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)      8,552,805
Total - $14,898,592
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
2,018
2,024
2,045
2,042
2,062
2,048
2,063
2,055
2,053
2,081
2,112
2,082
358
377
383
375
396
385
388
394
393
388
404
397
761
767
772
771
771
779
779
785
787
807
799
806
Females
616
618
625
618
645
649
648
667
648
656
656
643
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   I Females
Males    Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00....
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99
and over.
130
111
37
65
48
21
63
59
25
63
48
35
67
39
35
63
45
47
70
98
67
105
23
54
110
8
43
108
46
104
4
54
137
2
51
338
1
139
796
1
152
55
85
101
134
97
64
36
22
4
9
6
6
3
17
Table No. 21
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 13 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $3,821 253
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.       2,473 638
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    23,289 274
Total 1 _ $29,584,165
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males  I Females
Males
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November-
December.
5,265
5,267
5,378
5,433
5,668
5,640
5,687
5,661
5,627
5,636
5,590
5,446
144
152
154
164
189
187
202
200
197
170
183
168
471
475
471
472
477
489
488
492
477
479
483
488
Females
241
244
243
243
249
253
254
259
253
259
257
259
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males | Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99	
to   34.99	
to   39.99	
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99	
to   64.99	
to   69.99	
to   74.99	
to   79.99	
to   84.99	
and over	
126
9
3
31
4
1
43
5
3
33
27
3
50
34
4
93
1 --
1  2 1
160
20
8
364
15
17
792
7
29
773
7
1  31
705
5
43
560
63
471
43
1,661
188
1
29
43
63
44
32
26
22
1
3
4
1
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 37
Table No. 22
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 70 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc..
$927,391
1,026,591
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    11,913,175
Total  $13,867,157
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June „.
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
3,371
13
3,317
14
3,318
17
3,386
14
3,274
13
2,919
17
2,758
20
2,770
17
2,783
13
3,092
11
3,365
11
2,892
10
202
206
203
210
213
212
213
213
214
216
214
212
106
104
106
105
108
106
106
102
100
103
106
103
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Under $25.00.	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to  34.99	
35.00 to  39.99	
40.00 to  44.99	
45.00 to  49.99	
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to  64.99	
65.00 to  69.99	
70.00 to  74.99	
75.00 to  79.99	
80.00 to  84.99	
85.00 and over	
162
66
85
61
87
76
108
147
257
387
288
822
335
1,274
Females
Males
Females
12
4
1
4
2
7
8
13
13
12
16
26
35
22
46
4
3
24
28
31
7
9
2
2
3
Table No. 23
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 5 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $974,293
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      4,012,432
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     13,968,269
Total  $ 18,954,994
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males  I Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May.	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
3,881
53
780
3,866
62
769
3,834
58
773
3,817
60
765
3,729
56
771
3,811
62
766
3,883
64
763
3,872
61
765
3,621
58
747
3,410
57
743
3,424
57
732
3,383
58
726
187
186
188
184
181
182
180
177
178
178
179
172
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
1
Males    Females
1
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99-   ..
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to  44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
50.00 to   54.99..   ~
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   64.99
65.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to  74.99 	
75.00 to  79.99.     .
80.00 to   84.99-   1
85.00 and over	
57
26
26
29
27
44
69
191
495
940
726
573
380
270
37
5
2
1
6
8
3
2
21
14
40
30
76
85
509
1
13
18
19
57
23
22
14
11
10
1
2
 G 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 24
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 119 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,412,695
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      9,063,062
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    29,164,877
Total  $40,640,634
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males    Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June _.
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
5,712
3,542
1,422
5,737
3,627
1,424
5,888
3,651
1,418
5,952
3,666
1,416
5,967
3,756
1,454
6,088
3,721
1,474
6,103
3,780
1,489
6,090
3,771
1,493
5,956
3,738
1,478
5,918
3,797
1,460
5,807
3,635
1,466
5,713
3,821
1,471
1,485
1,485
1,501
1,528
1,514
1,589
1,639
1,603
1,558
1,529
1,543
1,555
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
to 79.99
to 84.99.
and over.
88
109
15
45
211
10
83
1,178
5
99
863
12
147
507
40
196
528
82
356
250
106
1,105
18
139
1,082
44
119
677
14
123
531
4
153
339
8
506
232
2
42
1,420
4
146
21
48
169
321
341
306
162
118
40
25
12
11
4
1
Table No. 25
WOOD-MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 176 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $1,630,863
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      1,378,434
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    18,679 281
Total  $21,688,578
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
Males
Females
January.	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September
October	
November.
December.
5,083
785
255
5,069
788
256
5,162
818
254
5,335
836
253
5,460
871
255
5,701
880
251
5,744
863
252
5,832
872
250
5,665
836
249
5,363
789
254
4,936
663
255
4,853
650
254
157
158
160
160
157
156
157
165
165
160
159
161
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males I Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
$25.00	
to $29.99	
to   34.99....
to   39.99	
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99	
to   64.99	
to   69.99	
to   74.99	
to   79.99	
to   84.99	
and over	
191
29
47
145
182
315
450
864
1,789
1,010
325
243
170
333
38
25
37
28
101
86
145
245
175
30
1
1
3
1
2
4
7
8
12
17
19
23
15
23
17
89
6
4
12
20
32
25
23
25
5
9
3
2
1
2
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,008 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments During Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers  */-, ,^A „,.-
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc   86 950 252
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   519^43'656
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  $1 235 447
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)   46207 633
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables;  namely, Governmental work
ers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)
Total
279,442,556
G 39
$673,114,364
326,885,636
$1,000,000,000
Employment
Month
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June.	
July	
August.	
September-
October	
November-
December..
Wage-earners
Males
126,682
129,631
134,286
136,976
141,832
145,420
148,312
148,842
146,026
139,584
133,468
124,399
Females
13,542
13,761
13,969
14,364
15,179
16,806
19,336
19,821
20,791
18,250
15,479
13,677
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
15,122
15,229
15,388
15,473
15,693
15,861
15,950
15,941
15,754
15,653
15,555
15,413
Females
9,769
9,775
9,830
9,901
10,009
10,187
10,305
10,288
10,215
10,154
10,164
10,058
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00                                           	
4,758
2,310
2,285
3,885
5,377
7,175
11,455
18,582
27,163
20,079
16,328
13,717
12,360
32,382
3,520
j       2,252
4,860
4,007
3,779
2,725
1,652
928
664
281
136
81
50
93
I          254
138
270
344
604
856
1,131
1,319
1,364
1,452
1,134
1,761
1,221
4,113
593
531
30.00 to  34 99                                   	
1,387
35.00 to   39.99                                    	
2,062
40.00 to   44 99                                           	
2,160
50.00 to  54.99                                         -	
1,740
984
580
292
180
102
80.00 to  84.99                                            -            	
70
26
52
Totals
177,856        1       25,028
15,961               10,759
1
1
 G 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
1 HOURS OF WORK ACT
99
Indicating the general trend in working-hours for industrial wage-earners from year
to year, the Board has continued to show a computed annual figure representing the
average hours worked during one week under survey for all employees reported in this
group.
, A reduction in the hours of work legally permissible under the " Hours of Work
Act I became effective during 1946, by amendment to the Act, and was followed by
a sharp decline in the yearly average figures, terminating in a record low of 41.89 hours
reported for all wage-earners in 1950. While this downward movement steadied somewhat in 1951 and 1952, with 42.01 and 42.00 hours computed for those years, the 1953
figure declined further to set a new low mark of 41.60, representing the lowest average
weekly hours for all industrial wage-earners yet recorded in this Report.
Th& annual figures which follow will serve to indicate the gradual decline in the
average industrial working-hours reported for all employees in the wage-earner classification through the years 1930 to 1953:—
1930  48.62
1931  47.37
1932 |  47.69
1933  47.35
1934  47.32
1935 I  47.17
1936  47.63
1937  47.25
1938  46.84
1939  47.80
1940  46.91
1941  46.90
1942  48.12
1943  47.19
1944  46.02
1945  45.59
1946  43.63
1947  42.24
1948  42.21
1949  42.24
1950  41.89
1951  42.01
1952  42.00
1953  41.60
A percentage segregation has been maintained in the following table, to show for
the years 1947 to 1953 the varying proportion of the total number of wage-earners
reported working at the legal maximum weekly hours or less and the percentage of total
remaining at hours in excess of the legal limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1953 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947        	
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9,635
9,200
9,008
159,300
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
180,107
172,174
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
83.20
85.56
Per Cent
19.37
1948      	
18.41
1949 .
18.14
1950 	
16.94
1951 	
17.76
1952 	
16.80
1953	
14.44
Reports from the 9,008 industrial firms replying to the Department of Labour
inquiry for 1953 included hours-of-work information covering some 172,174 wage-
earners, male and female.
Shorter hours were apparent in many industries during the year, the average weekly
hours for wage-earners declining in fourteen of the twenty-nine classifications listed in
the following tables. Included with those reporting shorter hours were some industries
in the larger employment category whose returns had also indicated declines in employment during the year.
Lower levels of activity in metal-mining and a noticeable lessening of the longer
hours and overtime apparent in many of the heavy construction projects during the last
two years contributed in some measure to the reduction in the remaining percentage of
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 41
employees still working the longer week. The percentage of the total wage-earners working within the limits of the 44-hour week increased to a new high mark of 85.56 per cent
in 1953, while the section remaining at hours in excess of 44 per week was reduced to
14.44 per cent, as compared with 16.80 per cent recorded in 1952.
Some 25,894 clerical workers were reported in the returns under the question
dealing with weekly working-hours, this group including clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc., but excluding officials and executive staff. Weekly averages with reference
to the working-hours of clerical employees in the various industries are also shown in
a table following this section.
 G 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES
Comparative yearly figures for wage-earners and clerical workers follow in separate
tables, the figures representing the average weekly hours recorded for 1953 and previous
years in the various industrial classifications included in the survey.
Average Weekly Hours of Work It
Wage-earners
Industry
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers.
B uilders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing	
Lumber industries—
Logging	
Lumber-dealers	
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
1949
1950
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
41.21
43.11
43.91
40.09
48.61
41.90
41.92
44.47
38.96
40.21
38.53
41.42
40.71
41.66
43.54
41.24
41.02
39.71
41.96
43.50
42.61
43.94
41.71
38.75
44.51
39.55
42.43
42.52
39.20
41.32
42.65
44.14
39.17
46.83
41.49
42.25
43.70
38.96
40.29
38.85
41.31
40.12
41.57
42.99
41.17
41.15
39.83
41.83
43.95
42.07
43.94
41.57
37.98
43.36
40.21
43.13
40.59
40.16
1951
40.60
42.03
45.19
39.90
46.74
43.02
41.78
43.04
38.51
40.34
38.28
40.94
39.70
42.36
42.61
41.68
41.03
39.88
41.77
44.32
41.54
43.86
40.58
37.72
42.89
41.63
42.17
38.60
39.93
1952
40.39
42.98
44.42
40.08
44.26
43.91
40.29
43.47
39.16
39.95
38.17
41.26
40.28
41.77
42.61
42.18
41.07
39.62
41.39
45.04
40.84
43.40
40.25
37.98
40.82
41.48
40.07
38.49
40.22
1953
40.50
42.26
44.78
39.97
42.84
41.86
41.56
43.05
39.44
40.03
37.57
40.72
40.76
42.11
42.59
42.29
41.05
39.68
42.10
43.88
40.39
43.88
40.73
37.36
41.75
41.08
40.89
39.98
40.04
Clerical Workers
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers-
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing §
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing '_	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing	
Lumber industries—
Logging—:—|	
Lumber-dealers	
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
40.32
38.20
41.73
39.89
40.27
38.81
39.40
41.82
38.79
39.77
38.65
42.74
39.91
42.02
38.31
40.85
40.69
40.72
40.89
42.91
40.98
37.43
37.52
37.18
40.58
38.93
41.25
38.19
38.38
38.81
38.05
39.93
39.50
39.78
37.69
41.27
41.79
38.48
38.97
38.20
42.65
37.59
41.12
41.84
39.82
39.43
39.61
40.47
42.85
41.54
37.64
37.68
36.58
39.35
39.80
42.54
35.19
38.03
38.51
38.05
39.78
39.18
39.93
38.37
39.79
40.52
38.99
39.17
37.62
42.16
38.30
41.50
38.21
40.37
39.33
39.02
39.95
43.80
39.38
37.17
38.74
37.24
37.86
38.63
41.60
35.59
37.30
37.74
37.22
39.42
38.90
38.39
40.11
38.99
40.07
39.83
39.43
37.38
41.69
37.51
39.16
38.57
40.33
39.36
38.44
39.68
42.50
38.87
36.63
38.53
37.08
38.10
38.33
41.08
35.74
38.10
37.80
36.80
40.07
39.68
38.37
39.08
39.09
40.45
39.71
39.04
37.09
41.22
36.46
41.04
39.89
40.46
38.51
37.24
39.39
42.17
38.73
36.81
36.26
36.42
38.50
37.47
40.41
35.93
37.69
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
G 43
The section following is devoted each year to statistics with particular reference to
civic and municipal workers.
Returns from cities and municipalities throughout the Province are regularly included
in the industrial survey in respect to a coverage of workers engaged in public works,
utilities, etc., and, as a portion of the total industrial payroll, relevant data obtained
from this source have already been incorporated in summary totals reported elsewhere
in this Report. In this section, however, civic and municipal returns are regrouped and
reported as a separate survey, in order that factual information concerning the payroll,
employment, wages, and working-hours for employees in this classification may be
recorded on a comparative annual basis and observed in relation to other sections of
the industrial payroll.
Totals reported in this section are inclusive of workers employed in public works,
the construction and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light
and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the cities or municipalities
completing the reports.
Payroll for the year 1953, representing the total labour costs reported by the 147
civic and municipal administrations completing returns, was $18,908,581, an increase
of $2,174,836 above the total recorded for the previous year.
Comparative payroll totals in each of the three main employee classifications surveyed are shown in the following table, for the comparative years 1951, 1952, and
1953:—
1951
1952
1953
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, eta.
$1,320,966
1,510,146
11,591,035
$1,950,326
1,901,408
12,882,011
$2,180,728
2,142,661
Wage-earners..       .
14,585,192
Totals   .   	
$14,422,147
$16,733,745
$18,908,581
Employment increased in civic and municipal occupations during 1953, with principal gains noted for male workers in the wage-earner section and for female employees
in the clerical group. Corresponding monthly totals for reported over-all employment
were generally higher than the figures for similar periods in 1952.
Peak employment on civic and municipal payrolls appeared during the month of
July in 1953, when a total of 6,388 employees in all categories were reported, this being
a month earlier and well in advance of the previous year's high of 6,239 recorded for
August of that year.
Comparative monthly totals of male and female civic and municipal employees are
shown in the following table, with separate figures recorded for wage-earners and clerical
workers:—
 G 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
EMPLOYMENT TOTALS1 OF ClVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS, 1952 AND 1953
Month
1952
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
1953
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November-
December..
3,978
4,083
4,243
4,451
4,837
5,059
5,272
5,287
4,994
4,853
4,678
4,451
1     41
516
239
45
516
237
1        59
525
240
1        51
523
243
122
542
247
(      151
540
247
160
546
258
|      148
545
259
1        54
546
260
1        42
557
263
1        54
561
265
51
1
562
267
4,395
4,385
4,510
4,661
4,956
5,174
5,382
5,328
5,048
4,920
4,699
4,632
|       60
511
58
509
63
517
62
516
134
534
162
526
185
545
161
541
74
542
65
536
62
547
54
543
Females
259
264
265
269
271
285
276
276
275
276
273
275
1 Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
The distribution of male civic and municipal wage-earners in relation to their
weekly earnings is indicated in the following table, showing comparative employment
percentages in each wage-group for the years 1951, 1952, and 1953:—
Weekly Earnings
Percentage of Employees
1951
1952
1953
Under $25.00.     - i	
2.41
1.16
2.29
3.58
12.55
28.31
20.87
12.55
7.40
3.15
1.98
1
1-    3.751
J
2.44
0.37
1.08
1.77
6.05
8.20
17.19
31.48
1   13'44
7.76
4.88
5.341
3.02
$25.00 to $29.99...              	
1.01
30.00 to   34.99    .      .    	
0.90
35.00 to   39.QQ                                                          B         ._           1              _.___..      	
1.10
40.00 to   44.QQ                                                -         -           -           -                          	
5.36
45.00 to   49,99
7.43
50.00 to   54.99       .
8.83
55.00 to   59.99      	
27.94
60.00 to   64.99  	
18.38
65.00 to   69.99   	
10.14
70.00 to   74.99 	
5.13
75.00 to  79.99	
f    3.97
80.00 to   84.99--  	
i    2.28
85.00 and over  	
4.51
^.
1 Percentage distribution over $75 weekly not recorded prior to 1953.
In line with generally higher wage levels in industry and business, 1953 earnings
continued higher for workers in civic and municipal employment, with increases noted
in the weekly averages for both the wage-earner and clerical classifications.!
As compared with the 1952 figure of $56.21, average weekly earnings for male
wage-earners in civic and municipal occupations increased to $58.81 during 1953, the
highest yet recorded for this group.
Increases were also apparent for both male and female employees in the clerical
section, the average weekly amount earned by male clerical workers in 1953 rising to
$61.60 from $57.23 previously recorded, while for female employees in clerical occupations weekly earnings averaged $42.31, compared with $40.75 noted for this category
in 1952.
Working-hours for most civic and municipal workers varied only slightly from the
previous year. For the wage-earner group, weekly average time was computed at 40.51
hours, down from 40.94 hours noted for this section in 1952, while the average weekly
hours for clerical employees continued a slight upward trend, showing at 38.11 in 1953,
up from 37.07 noted for the previous year and a low of 36.47 hours recorded for this
group in 1951.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 45
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1954)
"COAL-MINES REGULATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1954"
This Act was amended in 1951 to prevent more than one shot being fired when
millisecond delay detonators are used. The amendment permits the necessary quantity
of powder to be taken into a mine under proper safety measures imposed by the Inspector.
I LABOUR RELATIONS ACT I
This Act, on Proclamation,* will take the place of the § Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act."
The sections of the Act follow a logical sequence from the definitions in section 2
through employees' and employers' rights, certifications, collective bargaining and agreements, and conciliation to offences, the Labour Relations Board, and miscellaneous
provisions.
The Act provides for increased freedom in collective bargaining. It recognizes
collective agreements entered into by trade-unions that are not certified, provided the
agreement has been ratified by a majority of the employees affected (section 23 (4)).
For simplification the word 1 trade-union " is used throughout, and no reference is
made to labour organizations, bargaining agents, bargaining authorities, or other similar
terms that confuse the reader.
Section 3 clearly establishes an employee's right to join a trade-union of his own
choice.
The provisions of sections 3 to 9, inclusive, dealing with the rights of employees and
employers and unfair labour practices have been strengthened to discourage such practices. Section 4 (4) makes it mandatory for the Magistrate to direct the employer to pay
to the employee the wages lost as a result of an illegal dismissal.
Sections 10 to 15, dealing with certification of trade-unions, give craft and industrial
unions equal rights in this respect. It is clearly stated in section 12 (3) than the date of
application is to be used for determining when the majority of members of a trade-union
were in good standing for the purpose of certification. The responsibilities of parties
where an application for certification is pending are established in section 12 (9). The
Board's duties in the case of representation votes are set out in section 14.
Collective bargaining and collective agreements are dealt with in sections 16 to 25.
Although collective agreements entered into by a trade-union are recognized if they meet
the requirements of section 23 (4), an employer, unless he is bound by a collective agreement, is not required to bargain with a trade-union that is not certified. Parties to a collective agreement are required by section 17 to give ample notice of intention to negotiate,
thus eliminating uncertainty in this connection until the agreement is due to expire.
Section 29 of the Act embodies an entirely new concept. It provides, at the discretion of the Minister, for the recommendations of a Conciliation Officer to substitute
for the report of a Conciliation Board if the Conciliation Officer recommends that a
Conciliation Board should not be appointed.
The appointment, constitution, and duties of Conciliation Boards are set out m
sections 30 to 42 Section 32 (1) establishes that qualifications which previously applied
only to the Chairman now apply to all members. A new section 40 requires parties to
advise the Minister of their acceptance or rejection of the recommendations of a Conciliation Officer or the report of a Conciliation Board within eighteen days.
The division of the Act dealing with illegal strikes and lockouts, sections 45 to 55,
provides in sections 50 (2) and 51 (2) for a limit of ninety days on strike or lockout
action following a vote, and further requires forty-eight hours notice to be given to the
* It was proclaimed in force on June 16th, 1954.
 G 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
other party of intention to strike or lock out. Section 52 requires the Minister to appoint
a person to conduct a pre-strike or pre-lockout vote if requested by either party. This
division of the Act also embodies provisions that affect only irresponsible persons and
organizations. Section 54 provides for the Minister to refer the matter of the legality or
illegality of a strike or lockout to a Judge of the Supreme Court for an adjudication. If
the Judge certifies that a strike is illegal, he can declare certain things null and void under
section 55.
Provision is made in the division of the Act dealing with the Labour Relations
Board (sections 62 to 66) for the appointment of a Vice-Chairman, and the Chairman
or, in his absence, the Vice-Chairman is included for the purpose of establishing a quorum.
The addition of a new subsection requires the Board to publish all of its decisions. Section
65 sets out clearly the Board's authority to determine certain specific questions.
" PUBLIC WORKS FAIR WAGES AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT
ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1954"
This amendment gives the Minister of Labour the authority to determine fair wages
and conditions of labour and employment in any district notwithstanding that there may
be current wages and conditions of labour and employment in a particular district.
• Amendments to other sections of the Act vest in the Minister of Labour authority
which was previously vested in a member of the Executive Council whose Department
let the contract for a Public Works project.
a
RENT-CONTROL ACT "
This Act repeals the "Leasehold Regulations Act" as of March 31st, 1955, and
provides the machinery for a municipality to take over rent-control if it so desires.
I SHOPS REGULATION AND WEEKLY HOLIDAY ACT
■M    AMENDMENT ACT, 1954 "        ^^»|
This amendment gives the City of Vancouver, following a favourable plebiscite, the
right to make a by-law which would permit any class of shops within the city or part
thereof to remain open for business six days a week, provided that no employee shall work
on more than five days in any one week.
a
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1954
??
The important changes made to the " Workmen's Compensation Act" by this
amendment may be summarized as follows:—
1. Extended Coverage.—(1) Provisions of the Act will in future include domestic
servants on an optional basis.
(2) Self-employed persons to be included—elective.
(3) Independent operators and their dependents to be included—elective.
(4) Workmen exposed to dust conditions which to-day are not included in the
presently protected " silicotic " clauses will in future come under the Act.
(5) The restrictive measures which previously prevented coverage for hernia now
removed. "^m~       Si'
2. New and More Equitable Formula jor Calculating Compensation and Pension
Awards.—Increased emphasis on physical impairment. This includes present method of
computing awards, which is based on loss of earning. In addition, loss of physical function will in future be taken into consideration. I To a degree the Board is presently doing
this.   The change will broaden and formally approve this method of calculating awards.
3. Basis oj Assessment May Be Broadened.—To-day it is based on payroll only; in
future the levy or assessment may be based upon a " unit of production " if deemed neces-
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 47
sary. This is in keeping with one of the amendments proposed by the fishermen. In no
way can this be used as an additional levy.
4. Extension oj Benefits. — (1) Maximum allowable income to be raised from
$3,600 to $4,000, together with a percentage increase on average earnings from 70 to
75 per cent.
(2) Permanent total and partial disability pensions awarded prior to March 18th,
1943, are to be increased as of January 1st, 1955.     ft
5. Extension oj Medical Aid and Treatment.—Chiropodists, chiropractors, naturopaths, and dentists permitted to treat under the Act as " qualified practitioners."
(1) The amendments will clarify the position and potential of "other persons
authorized to treat human ailments " by defining " qualified practitioners " and permit
the injured workman to select the type of medical aid or treatment to be administered to
him within the amended provisions of the Act.
H| (2) To provide immediate necessary and emergent medical aid to persons coming
under the " Canada Shipping Act" by supplementing the medical aid provided by the
Sick Mariners' Fund.
6. Administrative Changes.—To assist the Board in improving workmen's compensation service.   Practically every amendment proposed by the Board has been adopted.
(1) The amendments provide for better administration of the Act.
(2) Clarify certain ambiguous clauses and thus remove any doubt that may exist
with regard to the position and authority of the Board.
(3) Extend the scope of the Act without making any drastic change in the intent
or framework.
(4) Will remove certain restrictive measures.
7. Penalties jor Violations Increased.—(1) The authority and power of the Board
is extended by increasing the maximum penalty for a violation of the provisions of the
Act, or of the safety and other regulations issued by the Board from time to time under the
provisions of the Act.
(2) Permits the Board to estimate and fix a fair wage for assessment purposes of
shareholders and directors of an incorporated company who were not previously included
in the payroll for assessment purposes but who enjoyed full coverage.
8. Appeal Formula.—The claimant who feels that he has a grievance against the
decision of the Board is provided with a method of appeal by—
(1) A reference to two specialists, selected from a panel to be established.
. (2) One to be selected by the claimant and the other by the Board.
t(3) Written decisions to be given.
(4) Costs to be borne by the Board.
 G 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Members of the Board
1. W. H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria. ; ,
2. Fraudena Eaton 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
3. H. Douglas 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
4. G. A. Little 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
5. H. J. Young 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Secretary
C. R. Margison Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head office Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch office 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices 17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
|, Capital News Building, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
560 Baker Street, Nelson.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Smithers.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twentieth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board, which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt with
minimum wages, hours of labour, and conditions of employment for women and girls,
so this report, in so far as it relates to women workers, is the thirty-sixth annual record
of labour laws and their results in that sphere.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS
During the year under review, public hearings were held in connection with the following matters: A proposed Minimum Wage Order to apply to watchmen; a proposed
regulation to exempt boom-men in the sawmill industry from the limits of hours of work
provided in section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act "; a proposed Minimum Wage Order
to apply to employees in the geophysical and seismographic survey industry; a proposed
Minimum Wage Order to apply to employees in the mining industry; a revision of Order
No. 4 (1946) with respect to cook- and bunk-house employees in unorganized territory;
and the revision of the Minimum Wage Orders and regulation applying to employees in
the fresh fruit and vegetable industry.
In view of the representations made to the Board at the hearings held in connection
with the proposed order to apply to watchmen and to the proposed regulation to apply
to boom-men, the Board decided that it was unnecessary to proceed further with the
proposed order and regulation. Representatives of employers and employees in the
logging industry were satisfied with the present requirements of the Department with
respect to the hours of work of watchmen, and representatives of the employees in the
sawmill industry opposed any relaxation in the hours of work of boom-men. In connection with this occupation it was suggested that the working conditions of the boom-
men in the sawmill industry were not comparable to those of boom-men in the logging
industry, and accordingly these employees should not require a similar exemption to that
granted boom-men in the logging industry. Representatives of the employees likewise
stated that the hours of work of boom-men in the sawmill industry did not present a
problem, and any difficulty in that connection could be overcome by the issuance of an
overtime permit. A summary of the orders and regulations made by the Board as a
result of the public hearings is given in another section of the Report.
The public hearing in connection with the revision of the orders and regulation
applying to employees in the fresh fruit and vegetable industry was held in Kelowna,
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 49
and at that time an opportunity was also given to anyone who wished to speak to the
Board with respect to other matters coming within its jurisdiction. As the Board had not
met m the Interior of the Province for several years, the meetings proved of interest and
benefit to the members of the Board as well as to the general public. The revision of the
orders and regulation has not been completed, but as all interested parties have now been
given ample opportunity to make representations, it is expected that this matter will be
completed in the near future.
ill As in the previous year, due to the increased expansion of industry in the Province,
much of the Board's time was taken up in connection with the consideration of applications for overtime permits. As the Board's authority in this connection is restricted to
the granting of permits only in connection with emergent conditions, numerous delegations appeared before the Board to present argument to prove to the satisfaction of the
Board that conditions were such that overtime permits could be issued consistent with
the requirements of the Act. Many of the applications were opposed by representatives
of employees, and in this connection delegations from the Building Trades Council,
Vancouver, and the Greater Vancouver and Lower Mainland Labour Council, Vancouver, appeared before the Board in connection with the granting of overtime permits. As
there appeared to be an increase in the supply of available tradesmen during the latter
part of the year, the Board resisted any application for overtime permits where it was
apparent that the emergent condition could be overcome by the employment of additional help.
During the year the Board held fifty-eight sessions, four of which'were held in
Victoria, six in Kelowna, and the remainder in Vancouver.
ORDERS AND REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1953
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Construction Industry—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 12 (1953). — In
November, 1952, the Board held a public hearing in connection with the revision of
Order No. 12 (1940). Representatives of the employees who were present at the
hearing asked the Board to establish a minimum wage of $1.25 per hour. This rate
was opposed by representatives of the employers, who pointed out that occupational
orders of the Board established a minimum wage of $1.25 per hour for skilled tradesmen—for example, machinists and sheet-metal mechanics—and accordingly a rate of
75 cents per hour for unskilled labour in the construction industry would be fair and
reasonable. After hearing the representations, the Board, having regard to the minimum
rates established in other orders, set a minimum of 85 cents per hour for employees in
the construction industry not covered by another order of the Board. This rate is
applicable to employees throughout the Province, regardless of the area in which they
may be employed. Order No. 12 (1940), which the new order supersedes, provided
different minimum rates, depending upon the locality in which the work was performed
and the age of the employee.   Under this previous order the highest minimum rate was
54 cents per hour.
2. Cook- and Bunk-house (in Unorganized Territory)—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1954).—Following representations, verbal and written, which
commenced in 1951, the Board of Industrial Relations held a public hearing on October
28th, 1953, in Vancouver, for the purpose of revising Male and Female Minimum Wage
Order No. 4 (1946). The hearing was attended by many employer and employee representatives, who covered the problems of the mining, fishing, logging, construction, and
lumbering industries with respect to hours of work of cook- and bunk-house employees.
The representatives of the employees urged the Board to establish overtime rates of pay
which would apply after an eight-hour day and a forty-four-hour week. Havmg regard
to the nature of the occupation, however, the Board did not believe it was fair or reason-
 G 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
able to establish this condition, but it has embodied in the new order a requirement that
employees shall be given a weekly rest period of thirty-two consecutive hours. If, however, conditions are such that it is not possible for the employer to meet that requirement,
the employee may accumulate the weekly rest periods on the basis of one day for every
six days worked. It is further provided that the accumulated rest periods must be taken
at least once every three consecutive calendar months. As it is quite possible that due
to the remote or isolated location of a camp it would be neither desirable nor convenient
for the employee to take the accumulated rest periods, another alternative is provided,
and in lieu of this provision the employee is required to be paid time and one-half for all
hours worked in excess of 572 hours in the three calendar months. The 572 hours is
determined on the basis of a forty-four-hour week for a thirteen-week period.
1 In spite of these three alternatives there will be quite a few cases where some other
arrangement will be desired by both employer and employee, and accordingly section
4 (c) of the order gives the Board of Industrial Relations authority to approve some
other arrangement, provided, however, that the arrangement approved is not inferior to
the provisions of the order itself.
If an employee's service is terminated at a time when he has accumulated rest
periods but has not worked in excess of 572 hours in the three consecutive calendar
months, the employer is required to pay him time and one-half for all hours worked in
excess of an average forty-four-hour week.
Order No. 4 (1946) of the Board, which the new order supersedes, established a
minimum wage of 50 cents per hour, without any direct or indirect limitation on the
employee's hours of work. The revised order establishes a minimum wage of 80 cents
per hour and endeavours, with a considerable degree of flexibility, to control the employee's hours of work by the requirement to give him time off or to pay the employee
overtime in lieu thereof.
3. Geophysical-exploration Industry—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 23 (1953).
—This order was made following a public hearing in July, 1953. The order originally
was intended to apply to employees doing exploratory work in the mining industry in
addition to those who might be exploring for oil or natural gas, but after hearing representations made by the Mining Association of British Columbia, it was decided to apply
this order only to those employees who were exploring for oil or gas. Further consideration was to be given to the matter of establishing a minimum wage for employees
doing exploratory work in the mining industry when the Board dealt with the application
requesting that a minimum wage be established for all employees covered by the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act."
The order establishes a minimum wage of $1 per hour for all employees to whom
it applies, and requires that they be paid time and one-half their regular rates of pay for
all hours worked in excess of 191 hours in a calendar month.
4. Machinist Trade—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 21 (1953).—In July, 1949,
the International Association of Machinists, Vancouver Lodge 692, sent an application
to the Board requesting it to make a Minimum Wage Order to apply to journeymen
machinists and engineer fitters, specialists, and helpers. A public hearing was held in
December, 1949, at which representatives of employers strongly opposed the making of
a separate order to apply to these tradesmen. It was the contention of the employers
that the " Minimum Wage Act " was intended to provide for a floor on wages for common and unskilled labour and that the pay for skilled trades should be left to normal
collective-bargaining procedures. It was also suggested by the employers that the establishment of a minimum wage for skilled trades placed British Columbia industry at a
disadvantage when the wages paid to employees in competing areas—for example, other
parts of Canada, Great Britain, Japan, and Germany—were considerably less than the
rates paid to employees in this Province. It was suggested that the imposition of a minimum wage would accentuate what was already considered an unfavourable competitive
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 51
position. There was a further difference of opinion between industry and labour as to
how to properly define a machinist, and following the hearing it was decided that the
parties should try to get together in an endeavour to agree upon a definition
Numerous meetings were held in an endeavour to obtain complete agreement among
all concerned with respect to the proposed order. However, representatives of industry
were still opposed to the principle, and accordingly, in July, 1953, the Board, realizing
that there was nothing to be gained by further discussions, made Order No. 21 (1953),
which establishes a minimum wage of $1.25 per hour for employees in the machinist
trade. The order does not apply to (a) employees who are permanently employed on
maintenance work in industrial and (or) manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings; and (b) employees employed in the production-line or assembly-line
manufacture of metal products for resale. Employees referred to in (b) are covered by
the provisions of Order No. 25 (1948), which establishes a minimum wage in the manufacturing industry at a rate of 40 cents per hour. lj||
5. Rejrigeration Trade—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 22 (1953).—This order
resulted from representations which were made to the Board in September, 1950, by the
Refrigeration Workers' Union, Local 516. Depending upon the type of work they were
doing, refrigeration mechanics had been covered by industrial orders of the Board, and
the applicant felt that a higher minimum wage could be obtained for the skilled tradesmen
if the employees were covered by an occupational order, § Numerous discussions were
held with the Refrigeration Contractors' Association of British Columbia and the Refrigeration Workers' Union, Local 516, and, as a result, Order No. 22 (1953) was made,
which establishes a minimum wage of $1.25 per hour for employees in the refrigeration
trade.
6. Truck-drivers and Motor-cycle Operators and Their Swampers or Helpers, and
Warehousemen Not Covered by Another Order oj the Board—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1953).—From the time when the " Hours of Work Act" was
made applicable to employees in the transportation industry in June, 1935, officials of
the Department had difficulty administering this legislation for the following reasons:
(1) The lengthy and cumbersome 129-word definition of the industry was difficult to
interpret because of its wording; and (2) because of conditions peculiar to the industry,
it is, with a few exceptions, not practical to arbitrarily confine the working-hours of the
employees within certain specific limits.
From 1935 to 1948 an attempt was made to directly control the hours of work of
the majority of the employees in the transportation industry by establishing daily and
weekly limits of working-hours. However, as the hours of work of employees in the
industry are governed by factors over which the employee and his employer have no
control, such as meeting the requirements of industries to be served; distances to be
travelled; arrivals and departures of boats, trains, and aeroplanes; and generally catering
to the needs of the public, it was found impractical to limit the working-hours to a maximum in the day and week. Some of those factors are further affected by seasonal rushes
of commodities—for example, fresh fruits and vegetables—and by weather conditions,
particularly during the winter.
After eleven years of attempting to control the hours of work of employees m the
industry by arbitrarily restricting these hours to a daily and weekly maximum, representations were made to the Board by the Automotive Transport Association of British Columbia, representing the majority of employers in the industry, and the General Truck Drivers'
and Helpers' Union No. 31, representing the employees, to have the Board completely
revise the applicable orders and regulations because it was impossible to apply those
which were in effect. Accordingly the Board held a public hearing in Victoria on June
13th, 1946, and at this hearing representations were made by the Automotive Transport
Association of British Columbia and the General Truck Drivers' and Helpers Union that
the transportation industry should be deleted from the Schedule to the    Hours of Work
 G 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Act." The Board did not favour this recommendation, but in 1948 it exempted the
majority of truck-drivers and swampers from the limitation of hours of work and imposed
an indirect control by requiring the payment of progressive overtime rates. Provision
was also made for the Board to vary the overtime rates set out in the order if these rates
were found to be unreasonable because of the distance travelled or for other reasons, in
which case other overtime conditions were imposed. These alternative overtime conditions could not be legally applied except by publishing an order in The British Columbia
Gazette with respect to every variation that might be made by the Board. This was a
costly and inefficient method of solving the difficulty. Further public hearings were held
in Victoria on November 23rd, 1950, and in Kelowna on February 9th, 1951, in addition
to numerous discussions with representatives of the Automotive Transport Association
of British Columbia and the General Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union No. 31.
The results of all of the hearings and discussions in connection with the hours-of-
work problems in the transportation industry were embodied in the amendment to clause 9
of the Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act," amending the definition of the transportation industry and putting it into its simplest terms, and the making of Minimum Wage
Order No. 26 (1953). The change in the definition required complementary changes in
certain regulations, but only such as were necessary to meet the revised definition. It
provides a simple and efficient method of establishing different overtime conditions to
meet the different problems of employers in the industry by the issuance of permits by the
Board which are not required to be gazetted. In addition to this, the change in the definition brought within the application of the " Hours of Work Act" the classification of
warehousemen, a large number of whom are employed in the transportation industry but
who had not up to this time been covered by the " Hours of Work Act" or a minimum
wage.
The hours of work of employees covered by the order are indirectly controlled by
the payment of progressive overtime rates. The order establishes a minimum wage of
80 cents per hour for employees to whom it applies, except motor-cycle operators, who
are required to be paid not less than 55 cents per hour.
No overtime conditions have been set for drivers of vehicles engaged in the retail
delivery of milk or the delivery of bread as the hours of work of these employees are
restricted by special regulations.
7. After holding an inquiry pursuant to the provisions of section 9 of the " Male
Minimum Wage Act," the Board made an order prohibiting an employer in the logging
industry from carrying out the terms of an agreement that had been made with certain
employees, which agreement, in the opinion of the Board, was intended to have the effect
of defeating the true intent and object of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
8. Mercantile Industry—Order No. 24 Supplementary (1953). — This order took
care of the payment of overtime for hours worked pursuant to the temporary Christmas
regulation during the Christmas season. It also set aside the daily guarantee provisions
of Order No. 24 (1949) during that period.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act "
Regulation No. 22k—Truck-drivers, Motor-cycle Operators, and Their Swampers
or Helpers, and Warehousemen.—This regulation of the Board amended clause 9 of the
Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act" and redefined the transportation industry. The
industry is now defined as follows: " The transportation industry, by which expression
is meant the occupations of truck-driver and motor-cycle operator, and their swampers
or helpers, and warehousemen." The previous definition required 129 words and was
extremely cumbersome. The new definition is specific and leaves no doubt regarding
which employees in the industry are covered by the provisions of the Act. (See comments
in the previous section dealing with Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26
(1953).)
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 53
Regulation No. 13k—Truck-drivers, Motor-cycle Operators, and Their Swampers
or Helpers and Warehousemen. - As pointed out in the comments in connection with
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1953), it is not possible for the truck-
drivers to maintain a fixed schedule of hours of work, and accordingly this regulation
exempted employers from the requirement to post notices showing the hours at which the
work of employees covered by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1953)
begins and ends.
Regulation No. 23b—Retail Milk Delivery.—This regulation continued in effect the
same hours of work with respect to the drivers of vehicles in the retail delivery of milk
as were established by the previous Regulation No. 23.
Regulation No. 23k—Employees Covered by Order No. 26 (1953). With the
exception of drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk whose hours of
work are restricted by Regulation No. 23b, and delivery-men employed in the baking
industry whose hours of work are restricted by Regulation No. 17c, this regulation permitted employees covered by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1953)
to work such hours as might be necessary to meet the requirements of the transportation
industry.
Regulation No. 39—Commercial Travellers.—This regulation exempted from the
operation of the " Hours of Work Act" commercial travellers who solicit orders for or
purchase merchandise, wholesale only, from samples, catalogue card, price-list, or description from dealers or manufacturers for goods which shall subsequently be delivered from
factory or warehouse. This was done because travelling salesmen, due to the nature of
their work, are not under the supervision of the employers, and accordingly it is impossible
for the employer to keep a true and correct record of the hours worked each day by these
employees.   (See pages 44 and 46 of the Annual Report, Department of Labour, 1952.)
Regulation—Mercantile Industry (Christmas, 1953, Temporary). — This annual
Christmas regulation permitted employees in the mercantile industry to work certain
overtime during the Christmas season.
Regulation No. 40—Geophysical-exploration Industry.—This regulation exempted
from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" employees in the geophysical-exploration
industry. The search for oil and natural gas makes it necessary for prospecting parties
engaged in this industry to work in such isolated and remote areas of the Province that it
is unreasonable to attempt to restrict the hours of work of these employees, and it is also
desirable that they be given the opportunity to make use of as many daylight hours as
possible during the good weather. There is an indirect control over the hours of work of
these employees by the requirement to pay overtime as outlined in the comments in connection with Male Minimum Wage Order No. 23 (1953) in a preceding section of this
report.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts
Regulation No. 1—Commercial Travellers.—As it is also a requirement of the Male
and Female Minimum Wage Acts that the employer shall keep a record of the hours
worked each day by the employees, it was necessary to exempt commercial travellers from
the operation of the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts for the reason given in the
comment with respect to Regulation No. 39 made pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act."
This is the first regulation made by the Board pursuant to the amendments made to
the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts at the Spring Session of the Legislature, 1953.
(See page 44 of the Annual Report, Department of Labour, 1952.)
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may be
obtained free of charge from the Department on request.)
 G 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
STATISTICS COVERING   WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES
The annual summarization of statistical data with reference to female workers
employed in business and industry is presented in the section to follow, the accompanying
tables being arranged to show for the past five years a comparative record of the employment, earnings, and hours of work of female workers in various occupations and industries
for which Minimum Wage Orders have been set by the Board.
Although the number of firms reporting in time for inclusion in the 1953 totals was
slightly below the record coverage of the previous year, a summary of the over-all employment totals reported in the returns continues to show a marked increase in the number
of women workers, and again reflects with further emphasis the growing importance of
this segment of the total labour force in this Province.
Representing the greatest number of women workers yet recorded in the annual
surveys, a total of 66,250 females were reported by the 8,331 firms filing returns for
1953, a substantial increase from the total of 65,567 recorded in 1952 for some 8,449
firms replying to the iriquiry for that year. f|
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1,813
12,206
$384,169.00
$31.47
36.31
1,889
12,534
$364,716.00
$29.10
35.56
1,830
12,570
$351,563.00
$27.97
37.24
1,733
11,946
$334,995.00
$28.04
41.60
1,814
12,044
$293,381.00
$24.36
38.65
Employment of female workers in the mercantile industry continued at a high level
during 1953, a total of 12,206 women workers being reported by the 1,813 firms filing
returns in this section. With fewer firms reporting in time for tabulation, however,
totals referring to employment and coverage of the survey in this instance were slightly
below the figures noted for the previous year.
With many of the larger mercantile establishments using the Christmas week as
the period of greatest employment for purposes of completing the filed report, some fluctuation in the averages representing hours worked and resultant earnings may occur in
this section due to the position of the holiday within the working-week.
Earnings increased for mercantile workers in 1953, the average per capita weekly
earnings for female employees being computed at $31.47, up from $29.10 recorded in
1952, and establishing a new high for earnings in this classification. The average
working-week for the period of greatest employment under review in the mercantile
industry was 36.31 hours in 1953, up slightly from the low of 35.56 reported for the
previous year.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
235
2,739
$90,398.00
$33.00
38.07
258
2,743
$87,558.00
$31.92
39.41
241
2,744
$80,075.00
$29.18
39.28
248
2,539
$69,432.00
$27.35
39.95
266
2,552
$64,001.00
$25.08
39.33
Firms reporting in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industries showed a total of
2,739 female workers employed during a representative week in 1953, this total showing
little change fom the 2,743 previously reported, although fewer firms filed returns than
during the previous year.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 55
• 1 in°TLPfy of $90,398 was reported for the week of the survey, as compared
with $87,558 for a similar period m 1952, to show an average individual weekly salary
of $33 for females engaged m laundry occupations during 1953, as compared with a
weekly average ot $31.92 earned by women workers in this industry during 1952
Together with increased earnings noted for workers in this section, some shortening
of the workmg-hours was also apparent for employees in laundry, cleaning and dyeing
occupations, the average working-week (which had remained in excess of 39 hours for
some years) recording a sharp decline, to show an average figure of 38.07 hours for the
week under review in 1953.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1,296
10,807
$313,723.00
$29.03
37.22
1,351
10,620
$288,432.00
$27.16
37.63
1,335
10,458
$270,068.00
$25.82
38.49
1,297
10,541
$252,163.00
$23.92
38.01
1,295
10,450
$239,239.00
$22.89
38.24
The hotel and catering industry reported a total of 10,807 female employees during
the week of greatest employment in 1953, increased from some 10,620 shown for the
previous year, although the number of firms reporting was slightly less than the 1952 total.
Increased earnings and shorter hours were generally apparent for occupations in this
classification during 1953, and no doubt proved important factors in the increase in
employment noted in this section. The average figure representing weekly earnings for
all female employees in hotel and catering occupations climbed from $27.16 previously
reported to a new high of $29.03 for this group in 1953.
The average working-week further declined fom 37.63 hours recorded in 1952 to
37.22 hours for a similar period under survey in 1953.
Office Occupation (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting       	
3,588
19,143
$781,343.00
$40.82
37.65
3,555
18,851
$732,206.00
$38.84
38.38
3,501
18,511
$678,776.00
$36.67
38.41
3,333
17,059
$551,373.00
$32.32
38.43
3,468
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings    	
17,137
$525,692.00
$30.68
Average hours worked per week	
38.65
The office occupation continues to offer increasing opportunities for the female
worker in industry and business. A steady rise in employment totals over the past few
years, together with the higher earnings and shorter hours which have become apparent
in the above table, points up the office occupation as one of the most attractive vocations
for a great majority of women workers.
Firms reporting female workers in office occupations increased to 3,588 in 1953,
from 3,555 shown for 1952, while a total of 19,143 employees were included in this
section for the year under review, as compared with some 18,851 noted for the previous
year.
Total amount of salaries and wages paid to the 19,143 female office-workers for
the week reported was $781,343, representing an average per capita weekly salary of
$40.82 for this group, up from $38.84 reported in 1952 to establish a new all-time high
mark for average earnings in the office occupation.
Average weekly hours for office-workers, which during the past few years had shown
a decided downward trend, declined further during 1953, to record a low of 37.65for
the week of greatest employment during that year, as compared with an average of 38.38
hours worked during a similar week in 1952. y|
 G 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Hairdressing Occupation (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting j
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
97
283
$10,447.00
$36.92
38.83
113
308
$11,116.00
$36.09
38.85
112
292
$9,710.00
$33.25
40.24
133
400
$11,857.00
$29.64
38.40
1949
151
402
$10,637.00
$26.46
38.81
Included in the above classification are females engaged as beauty-parlour operators
and hairdressers, and while this group remains somewhat smaller than others, it is recognized that many firms in this business are owner-operated and do not employ outside help.
Firms reporting in the above table, however, have been restricted to only those establishments employing staff.
|§ With fewer firms reporting in this group than during the previous year, employment
noted in this occupation was slightly below the 1952 figure. The total of 97 firms
reporting showed some 283 female workers in hairdressing and beauty-parlour occupations, this number comparing with 308 reported in 1952 by the 113 firms completing
returns for that year.
Average weekly earnings for those in this classification, however, further exceeded
the higher level established during the previous year, to set a new high of $36.92 in this
section, as compared with an average weekly amount of $36.09 recorded in 1952.
Little change was noted in the working-hours for employees in this occupation, the
1953 average being computed at 38.83 hours, as against a figure of 38.85 representing
the average weekly hours worked by this group in 1952.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
30
2,424
$99,940.00
$41.23
38.72
26
2,058
$92,234.00
$44.82
39.67
31
2,108
$81,425.00
$38.63
38.43
25
1,709
$59,554.00
$34.85
39.04
28
1,610
$52,832.00
$32.81
40.56
Varying periods of activity occur in the fishing industry, where seasonal employment
of large numbers of workers is necessary at certain times of the year due to the urgency of
processing huge quantities of incoming fish as rapidly as possible.
During the seasonal peak of 1953 a total of 2,424 female workers were reported by
the firms completing returns in the fish canning and processing group, this figure being
well above the total of 2,058 reported during a similar period of greatest employment in
1952.
The size and nature of the pack and the combination of piece-work earnings in
addition to regular-time wages in this industry are generally important factors affecting
the average weekly earnings recorded for the group as a whole.
With the increase in employment indicated during the seasonal period of 1953,
individual weekly earnings for women workers in this classification continued in strength,
but did not exceed the high level of the previous year. Average weekly earnings were
computed at $41.23 for the week under review, as compared with a high of $44.82
recorded in this section for 1952. lj|||
H The effect of easing the seasonal load through added employment during the peak
period was also noted in the shorter working-hours reported for female employees in
1953, the average work-week being recorded as 38.72 hours, down from 39.67 hours
reported as average in this industry for 1952.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
G 57
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
253
4,523
$184,752.00
$40.85
38.06
1950
1949
227
3,952
$143,582.00
$36.33
37.89
220
3,712
$130,116.00
$35.05
36.27
231
3,391
$91,226.00
$26.90
38.92
203
2,999
$89,043.00
$29.69
40.07
In addition to firms in the actual business of communications, the above table is
inclusive also of females engaged in switchboard work and similar occupations in industry
and business relating to the telephone and telegraph section.
Increases were general throughout the 1953 summary of female workers in this
classification. As compared with some 227 firms reporting in 1952, a total of 253 firms
reported women in these occupations during the year under review, employment in this
group increasing to 4,523, as against 3,952 shown for the previous year.
Substantial increase was apparent in the earnings of female workers employed in
telephone and telegraph occupations, the average weekly salary rising to $40.85 in this
table for 1953, increased from $36.33 noted in 1952, and establishing a new high for
average earnings under this heading.
A fractional increase was noted in the average working-hours for telephone and
telegraph workers, the 1953 average for female employees showing at 38.06 hours, as
compared with 37.89 hours reported for a similar weekly period in 1952.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
750
7,758
$306,103.00
$39.46
38.72
781
8,044
$306,820.00
$38.14
38.62
796
8,462
$286,483.00
$33.86
38.28
769
8,308
$256,282.00
$30.85
38.32
778
7,938
$230,328.00
$29.02
38.50
Manufacturing industries continued to account for the fourth largest group of
females covered in the survey, although the number of firms reporting and employment
reported in this section have generally followed a downward trend from higher totals
recorded in previous years. The 750 firms filing returns in time for classification listed
a total of 7,758 female workers in all manufacturing occupations, as compared with
a total of 8,044 reported by 781 manufacturing establishments in 1952.
During the representative week under survey, the 7,758 female workers reported
were paid a total of $306,103 in wages and salaries, amounting to a per capita average
weekly figure of $39.46 in this classification, a further increase from the previous high
of $38.14 represented as individual earnings during a similar period in the previous year.
A fractional increase was again apparent in the average working-hours for employees
in this section, the 1953 average weekly figure rising to 38.72 hours from 38.62 hours
reported in 1952.      p
#Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
87
5,533
$198,886.00
$35.95
41.99
84
5,688
$202,265.00
$35.56
43.94
80
5,485
$181,235.00
$33.04
41.32
72
5,791
$167,653.00
$28.95
41.89
82
6,120
$203,615.00
$33.27
45.79
 G 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Due to the seasonal nature of the fruit and vegetable industry, it is not uncommon
for fluctuations to occur in the working-hours of employees during the peak employment
periods, with labour activity in the processing plants often affected to some degree by
various crop and weather factors not to be encountered in other industries.
Employment requirements reported by the firms filing returns for the 1953 season
showed a total of 5,533 females engaged during the seasonal peak week, this number
being slightly less than the total employed during a similar period in 1952, when some
5,688 female workers were reported.
Although the average work-week recorded for the 1953 season was shorter than in
1952, earnings continued to move up from the 1952 level, increasing from $35.56 to
an average figure of $35.95 for the week under review in 1953.
Average weekly working-time for female employees in fruit and vegetable canning
and processing plants during the 1953 season was 41.99 hours, considerably below the
average of 43.94 recorded during the period of greatest seasonal activity in 1952..
Transportation Industry (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
48
122
$3,970.00
$32.54
38.11
58
157
$4,789.00
$30.50
39.38
53
139
$3,685,00
$26.51
42.84
40
103
$2,523.00
$24.50
42.27
41
101
$2,571.00
$25.46
42.50
A small group of 48 firms reporting in the transportation industry continued to
employ females in delivery, trucking, and messenger work, some 122 women workers
being listed in occupations of this nature for 1953.
Although the number of firms reporting was somewhat below the 1952 high, with
a resultant drop in the total coverage of female workers in this section, for the 122
employees in occupations relating to this industry weekly earnings continued to improve,
the 1953 average increasing to $32.54, as compared with average weekly earnings of
$30.50 in 1952 and $26.51 in 1951. f f
Considerably shorter hours were apparent in this classification, the average workweek in 1953 for female employees in this industry declining to 38.11 hours, as against
39.38 hours shown for 1952 and 42.84 hours recorded in 1951.
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
108
646
$14,336.00
$22.19
28.41
107
612
$11,362.00
$18.57
26.20
107
588
$10,950.00
$18.62
27.89
97
519
$8,753.00
$16.87
27.60
94
521
$8,108.00
$15.56
26.50
Employment opportunities for females in occupations relating to this classification
continued to increase, a total of 108 firms in this business submitting reports for 1953,
indicating a total employment of some 646 women employees, this total comparing with
612 females reported by the 107 firms filing returns for the previous year.
Included in this group are those employed as theatre-ushers, checkroom attendants,
and similar occupations in connection with swimming-pools, bowling-alleys, sports
centres, and other such public places of amusement.
Due to the part-time nature of the work performed in the occupations here included,
weekly hours are shorter and the earnings relatively lower than for other occupations
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 59
with full-time employment. With increased activity generally apparent in this classification during 1953, however, the working-week for female employees in this section
increased from the previous year to show an average of 28.41 hours for the period under
review, as compared with 26.20 hours computed as the average time worked during a
similar week in 1952.
With somewhat longer hours worked in occupations relating to the various establishments reporting under this heading, the average weekly earnings for female workers
increased to $22.19 in 1953, up from an average of $18.57 noted for the shorter working-
week reported in 1952. As mentioned previously, average earnings in this classification
do not refer to full-time employment.
Personal-service Occupations (Female)
1953
Number of firms reporting  26
Total number of employees . •  55
Total weekly earnings   $2 793.00
Average weekly earnings _._       $42.32
Average hours worked per week         36.98
Questionnaires issued in the 1953 survey were amended to include a separate section
dealing with female employees in occupations relating to personal service. Under this
heading an attempt was made to segregate where possible, with the co-operation of the
.employer completing the report, females engaged in the work of massage, physiotherapy,
chiropody, chiropractic, osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
As it is probable that many female workers reported as office employees may be
partially employed in work of the above nature, the totals segregated here should not be
considered as representing total employment in these occupations, but rather as a sample
providing a fair indication of earnings and hours of work for occupations in this category.
A total of 26 firms reported females under heading of this section, the reported
employment from these returns totalling some 66 employees in various occupations
relating to the inquiry.
The average weekly salary earned by the 66 employees reported was $42.32, this
amount being slightly higher than the individual average weekly earnings of all other
female office-workers, which is quoted previously in the Report as $40.82 for 1953.
Average work-week for females reported in personal-service occupations was 36.98
hours.
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ")
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
8,331
66,250
$2,390,860.00
$36.09
37.82
8,449
65,567
$2,245,080.00
$34.24
38.18
8,306
65,069
$2,084,086.00
$32.03
38.26
7,978
62,306
$1,805,811.00
$28.98
39.30
8,220
61,874
$1,719,447.00
$27.79
39.32
The annual survey for 1953 is based on returns from 8,331 firms reporting payroll
information concerning some 66,250 female workers during one week of greatest employment for that year. J§
While the number of firms reporting in time for classification in the tables did not
exceed the greater coverage of the previous year, employment and earnings continued
to rise, establishing further new high marks for all female workers within the scope of
the 1 Female Minimum Wage Act."
Aggregate salaries and wages paid to the 66,250 female workers included in the
1953 survey for one representative week during that year was $2,390,860, as compared
 G 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
to a payroll of $2,245,080 for a like period during the previous year, when 65,567 female
employees were reported.
The average figure representing weekly individual earnings for female workers in
all occupations included in the coverage of the tables increased to $36.09, up $1.85 above
the 1952 figure, to set a record high mark for average earnings recorded each year for
the survey as a whole.
Under the provisions of Minimum Wage Orders in effect for female workers during
1953, the minimum legal amounts below which an employee could not be paid when
working on a weekly basis ranged from $17.60 in some industries to a high of $25 in
one other, with some exceptions providing for higher earnings on a straight-time basis in
certain seasonal occupations exempt from the regulations of the | Hours of Work Act."
In comparing the legal minimum weekly amounts mentioned above with the figure
of $36.09 shown in the summary table as representing the average weekly earnings for
all female occupations included in the survey, it is clear that average earnings for female
workers in this Province continue at a level well above the minimum requirements laid
down by the Board. |
The average working-week for all female employees included in the summary totals
for 1953 showed a further fractional decline from the average recorded for the previous
year. Compared with 38.18 hours noted as the average work-week for all workers
included in the 1952 survey, the average further decreased to 37.82 hours for the weekly
period under review in 1953.
The 66,250 female workers mentioned in the summary are inclusive only of those
employees in industries and occupations for which Minimum Wage Orders have been set
by the Board. Not included in the totals are domestic workers, farm-labourers, or fruit-
pickers, these occupations being excluded from the coverage of the provisions of the
I Female Minimum Wage Act." Bank employees and Federal workers are also excluded
from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1953 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Actual
Weekly
Average
Wage for
Weekly
Full-time
Earnings
Employees
Percentage
by Which
1953 Average
Earnings Exceed Legal
Minimum
Mercantile	
Laundry	
Hotel and catering	
Office	
Hairdressing	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph	
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Transportation	
Public places of amusement
Personal service	
AU occupations	
1,813
235
1,296
3,588
97
30
253
750
87
48
108
26
12,206
2,739
10,807
19,143
283
2,424
4,523
7,758
5,533
122
646
66
$384,169
90,398
313,723
781,343
10,447
99,940
184,752
306,103
198,886
3,970
14,336
2,793
8,331
66,250
$2,390,860
$18.00!
17.602
22.003
18.00*
25.001
19.201
20.161
17.602
17.602
(5)
18.003
20.003
$31.47
33.00
29.03
40.82
36.92
41.23
40.85
39.46
35.95
32.54
22.196
42.32
$36.09
74.8
87.5
32.0
126.8
47.7
114.7
102.6
124.2
104.3
(6)
23.3«
111.6
105.1
1 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
2 Forty-four hours per week.
8 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
- Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
5 In the transportation industry, it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum wages in
the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycle, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-vehicles.
6 Earnings represent partial week only.
The above table contains a summarization of all occupational classifications included
in the 1953 survey, data shown including employment and payroll information for each
group, together with the average weekly earnings for individual employees in each occu-
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953 G 61
pation, shown in relation to the established legal minimum wage set for each classification
by the Orders of the Board. An additional column attached to the table further shows
the averages expressed in each instance as percentages in excess of the fixed rate With
reference to the figure of $36.09 representing the average weekly earnings for all female
employees m the classifications, it is noteworthy that this average amount was 105.1
per cent in excess of the lowest legal minimum shown in the table.
STATISTICAL SUMMARY COVERING HOSPITAL-WORKERS (FEMALE)
The annual survey of women workers in industry and business was again extended
to include a coverage of female employees in hospitals, nursing homes, and similar
institutions; although the inquiry does not request details of nursing staffs, payroll
information concerning all other female employees of these establishments was obtained
for 1953 and is summarized in the following section.
The accompanying table sets out the main occupational classifications, together with
a sampling (where possible from the returns) of additional occupations peculiar to
hospitals and similar institutions. Based on a weekly period of greatest employment
during 1953, the table shows the employment and payroll totals for each group, together
with average weekly earnings and hours worked.
With exception of the selected occupations peculiar to the hospital group, the totals
appearing in the following table have already been incorporated in the 1953 summary of
female workers mentioned earlier in this Report. The totals in this section should therefore not be considered as in addition to previous summary figures, but rather as segregated here for separate study in proper association with all other hospital employment.
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Laundry ,	
Housekeeping and catering.
Office	
Hairdressing	
Telephone and telegraph...-_
Manufacturing	
Personal service	
Technicians, X-ray	
Technicians, laboratory	
Pharmacists	
Dietitians	
Physiotherapists	
Therapists, occupational-
Nurses' aides	
All occupations.
604
$19,526
$32.33  |
2,034
64,822
31.87  |
706
28,170
39.90
1
57
57.00
77
3,011
39.10
40
1,448
36.20
45
1,971
43.80
76
4,029
53.01
88
4,531
51.49
1
63
63.00
2
115
57.50
10
513
51.30
3
146
48.67
822
27,675
33.67
4,509
$156,077
i
$34.61
37.9
39.6
38.4
44.0
38.8
41.3
36.3
39.6
40.0
40.0
44.0
38.4
42.7
40.4
39.3
Returns were received from 112 establishments, reporting a total of 4,509 female
employees for the period under review. Included in the survey were public and private
hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like
institutions, but in all inquiries female employees engaged in the nursing profession were
omitted.
Increased earnings and shorter hours were generally apparent throughout the occupational classifications mentioned in the table, in comparison with similar data for the
previous year.
2§ Female hospital employees engaged in laundry occupations totalled some 604
according to the reports, the average weekly individual earnings in this section being
computed at $32.33. Housekeeping and catering occupations continued to claim the
greatest number of female workers shown on the payroll records, a total of 2,034 being
reported in this department for 1953, the average per capita weekly earnings in this
group being recorded at $31.87.    Office-workers employed in the hospitals numbered
 G 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
some 706 for the period under review, the average weekly salary for office occupations
amounting to $39.90. One institution reported a female employee engaged in the hairdressing occupation at a salary of $57 per week. Switchboard operators, numbering 77,
comprised the section under heading of telephone and telegraph occupations, the average
weekly individual earnings for this group being recorded at $39.10. Workshop or
manufacturing employees on hospital payrolls earned an average individual salary of
$36.20 per week, a total of 40 females being reported in such occupations. A group of
45 women engaged in various personal-service occupations were paid at salary rates
averaging $43.80 per week. Technicians were generally reported as being employed in
X-ray or laboratory work, and where segregation was possible from the returns, separate
compilations were completed for each department. Female technicians in X-ray work
were shown at slightly higher salaries than laboratory workers, a group of 76 X-ray
technicians averaging $53.01 per week, while average individual salaries for some 88
laboratory technicians was computed at $51.49 for a similar period. Where mentioned
separately on the reports, sampling information concerning selected occupations such as
pharmacist, dietitian, etc., was obtainable, although complete employment totals of such
individuals were not possible from the returns. One female employed as a pharmacist
was reported at a salary of $63 per week, while a representative average weekly amount
paid for dietitians was computed at $57.50 for the employees mentioned in this instance.
A small group of 10 females listed as physiotherapists were shown at salaries averaging
$51.30 for the week under review, while occupational therapists earned an average weekly
amount of $48.67. Constituting the second largest group of hospital employees included
in the survey, a total of 822 females were listed as nurses' aides, this occupation earning
an average weekly salary of $33.67.
Average individual weekly earnings for all hospital occupations, based on the total
of 4,509 females employed in all classifications exclusive of nursing staff, was $34.61,
the 1953 figures representing a substantial increase in both employment and earnings
as compared with the totals for 1952, when a total of 3,935 female employees were
reported at average earnings of $32.71 for the week under review during that year.   f|
A slight decrease in working-hours was generally apparent throughout the various
occupational classifications in this section, the 1953 average working-week for all female
workers included in the survey being recorded at 39.3 hours, as compared with 40.6
hours computed for the previous year. ft
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES
From industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this Report a segregation has
been made to isolate some of the more important occupations within the coverage of the
| Male Minimum Wage Act." 8
The following tables provide a comparative study of the general trend of employment and earnings in these selected groups of male workers during the past four years,
the totals being restricted to male wage-earners only, as reported on the payrolls during
the week of employment of the greatest number.
Baking Industry (Male)
1953
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
169
1,408
$88,549.00
$62.89
39.86
1952
172
1,371
$78,097.50
$56.96
40.67
1951
178
1,481
$80,170.50
$54.13
40.89
1950
181
1,333
$61,022.00
$45.78
40.46
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 63
Construction (Male)
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
1,794
34,775
$2,455,735.50
$70.62
41.86
1,825
37,919
$2,470,629.50
$65.16
43.91
2,004
33 891
$2,086,591.00
$61.57
43.02
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
96
3,362
$176,687.50
$52.55
45.93
91
3,537
$185,689.50
$52.50
46.09
93
2,820
$137,851.50
$48.88
45.41
House Furnishings (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
130
1,425
$76,862.50
$53.94
40.03
132
1,439
$74,414.50
$51.71
39.95
132
1,446
$67,648.50
$46.78
40.34
2,220
30,651
$1,641,903.00
$53.57
41.49
93
3,088
$131,456.50
$42.57
46.33
136
1,502
$62,982.50
$41.93
40.29
Logging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
1,057
16,606
$1,214,803.50
$73.15
42.11
1,197
19,500
$1,338,218.00
$68.63
41.77
1,253
22,879
$1,526,249.50
$66.71
42.36
1,091
19,981
$1,197,147.50
$59.91
41.57
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
169
965
$68,383.00
$70.86
40.41
181
1,081
$69,213.50
$64.03
40.36
207
1,264
$75,623.00
$59.83
39.94
191
1,048
$56,942.50
$54.33
40.11
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male waee-earners         	
225
1,576
$108,067.50
$68.57
40.86
231
1,518
$95,900.50
$63.18
40.77
257
1,635
$96,184.00
$58,83
40.48
266
1,888
Total weeklv earninss                      	
$101,114.50
Average weekly earnings             . —     	
$53.56
Average hours worked per week	
40.67
Sheet-metal Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
77
904
$59,906.50
$66.27
39.45
70
850
$52,096.00
$61.29
40.39
75
945
$54,839.00
$58.03
39.76
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week—
781
21,471
$1,382,433.50
$64.39
41.05
827
23,425
$1,454,063.50
$62.07
41.07
892
24,013
$1,392,725.00
$58.00
41.03
81
1,016
$52,193.50
$51.37
40.14
749
22,496
$1,171,475.50
$52.07
41.15
 G 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Shingle-mills (Male)
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week—
45
2,504
$173,718.00
$69.38
39.68
56
2,555
$168,307.00
$65.87
39.62
58
3,059
$193,040.00
$63.11
39.88
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings 1	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week—
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)   (MALE)
1950
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
176
6,093
$371,438.00
$60.96
40.04
178
5,182
$307,246.50
$59.29
40.22
183
5,001
$274,286.50
$54.85
39.93
59
3,330
$187,175.50
$56.21
39.83
1
70
82
1
80
76
4,155    [
4,527
4,247
2,980
$293,503.50
$298,934.50
$265,477.00   |
$156,996.00
$70.64
$66.03
$62.51
$52.68
41.08    |
1
41.48
41.63
1
40.21
217
5,067
$247,366.00
$48.82
40.16
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS
During the year 1953 the Inspectors of the Department made 16,542 investigations,
and, through the efforts of the Department and co-operation of the employers, collections
made during 1953 amounted to $76,569.42. Department and private cars travelled
136,340 miles in connection with the legislation administered by this office.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, it may be presumed
that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by this
Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following table:—
Comparison of Inspections and Wage Adjustments
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Number of investigations	
Number of Inspectors1	
"Male Minimum Wage Act"—
Firms involved	
Employees affected .	
Arrears paid	
"Female Minimum Wage Act'
Firms involved	
Employees affected .	
Arrears paid	
" Annual HoUdays Act "—
Firms involved	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid	
Total collected.	
$45
$7
$56
18,699
20
354
871
,658.00
175
491
,579.01
1,293
7,162
,152.54
$109,389.55
17,437
20
586
1,642
$92,745.40
198
344
$6,995.38
865
3,295
$32,377.45
$132,118.23
18,421
18
268
547
$25,544.49
132
208
$5,150.03
807
2,288
$22,865.09
$53,559.61
15,676
20
139
208
$8,981.31
93
127
$3,575.67
874
2,891
$27,049.21
$39,606.19
17,413
20
71
148
$10,194.54
123
208
$4,332.57
694
1,911
$17,540.88
$32,067.99
16,542
20
36
76
$2,074.92
52
68
$1,246.08
500
1,470
$14,817.02
$18.138.062
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holiday Acts, 414 firms paid 934 employees
$58,431.36 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total collections for 1953 were therefore $76,569.42.   Total adjustments for 1952 were $97,597 19
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
COURT CASES
G 65
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to
resort to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be
obtained.   A summary of Court cases during the year 1953 follows:	
a
Annual Holidays with Pay Act
J5
Name of Employer
Charge
Armstrong Motor Transport Ltd., Armstrong
Bouffard, Raymond, Hammond J	
Burnham,  Gen.   F.   W.   E.,   Halcyon  Hot
Springs
Cameron, J. J., 917 Hornby St., Vancouver
Cameron, J. J., 917 Hornby St., Vancouver
Cutillo, Leo and Joseph, Bear Creek	
Davis, W., 2685 West Sixteenth Ave., Vancouver
Davis, W., 2685 West Sixteenth Ave., Vancouver
Garland, Fred M., 441 Alexander St., Penticton
Hellens, A., Moyie	
Jordan, Lloyd, Arrow Park	
McKay, D., Nelson
McKay, D., Nelson.
McKay, D., Nelson
McKay, D., Nelson
McKay, D., Nelson.
Pappas, T., Furs Ltd., 850 Granville St.,
Vancouver
Port-O-Van Auto Transport Ltd., 907 Vancouver Block, Vancouver
Port-O-Van Auto Transport Ltd., 907 Vancouver Block, Vancouver
The Sea Food Shop (Fred Lim), 118 Yale
Road East, Chilliwack
Weir, A. J., Castlegar	
Wiebe, Cornie, Hope.
Failure to pay annual holiday to
employee
Failure to pay annual holiday to
employee
Failure to pay annual holiday to
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
Failure to pay
employee
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual holiday to
annual
annual
annual
annual
annual
annual
annual
annual
annual
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
holiday to
Failure to pay annual holiday to
employee
Sentence and Remarks
Fined $25 and arrears of $19.67
ordered paid.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $2.56
ordered paid.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $2
paid prior to hearing; case held
ex parte as General Burnham failed
to appear.
Fined $25; ordered to make restitution in the amount of 90 cents.
Fined $25; ordered to make restitution in the amount of $14.48.
Suspended sentence; arrears paid
prior to hearing.
Fined $25 and $7.50 costs; two weeks
to pay or ten days in gaol; arrears
paid.
Suspended sentence;   arrears paid.
Suspended   sentence;     $2.50   costs;
entered into recognizance for two
months.
Fined $25;   arrears of $6.24 ordered
paid.
Suspended  sentence;    arrears of $4
ordered paid or in default ten days
in gaol.
Fined $25;   arrears of $28 ordered
paid within ninety days or ten days
in gaol.
Arrears of $18 ordered paid within
ninety days or ten days in gaol.
Arrears of $28 ordered paid within
ninety days or ten days in gaol.
Arrears of $18 ordered paid within
ninety days or ten days in gaol.
Ordered to pay arrears of $28 within
ninety days or ten days in gaol.
Fined $25 or three days in gaol;   in
default—distress.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   arrears
of $3 ordered paid.
Arrears of $3 ordered paid.
Fined $25 and $4 costs; ordered to
pay arrears of $2.40.
Ordered to pay arrears of $10.92
within thirty days or thirty days in
gaol in concurrence with sentence
under " Semi-monthly Payment of
Wages Act."
Suspended sentence; Court costs of
$3 or in default five days in gaol;
order to pay deferred to declaration of bankruptcy, September 29,
1953.
a
Control of Employment of Children Act
Cameo Cafe, 828 Yates St., Victoria-
Employed a child under 15 years
of age without a permit	
Fined $15.
 ■^^ft G 66    ^^wH^^P)            DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR   ^
-|^^^|^^B^^:            -■ J               1 Employment Agencies Act '
>
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Victoria Personal Service Ltd., 635 Fort St.,
Unlawfully did collect a fee from
Fined $15;   in default—distress.
Victoria
a  worker   seeking   employment
for furnishing the worker information  regarding   an  employer
seeking a worker
i|j|-                                               1 Female Minimum Wage Act !
>5
Burnham,   Gen.   F.   W.   E.,   Halcyon  Hot
Failure to pay wages as often as
Suspended sentence; wages had been
Springs
semi-monthly as per Order No.
paid prior to Court hearing; case
52
held ex parte as General Burnham
failed to appear.
Williams, T. C, 408, 470 Granville St., Van
Failure to pay wages as often as
Suspended sentence; tendered cheque
couver
semi-monthly as per Order No.
34
in full amount of $161.13.
fjj§:                                                    " Hours of Work Act "
Coast  Sportswear,  309 West Cordova St.,
Failure to keep true and correct
Each partner fined $10 ($30 in all);
Vancouver
records
distress   in   default — three   days
each in gaol.
The Old Mill (J. Nelson), 1429 Trans-Canada
Highway, New Westminster
Failure to post notice        	
Fined   $25   and   $2.50  costs  or in
default ten days in gaol.
Rapanos, Thomas (Cameo Cafe), 828 Yates
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10.
St., Victoria
records
Waldbauer, Hebert, Benta Lake	
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10 and $3 costs; in default-
records
distress order to be issued.
||;.                                                  " Male Minimum Wage Act "                                      J
Bouffard, Raymond, Hammond— 	
Failure to keep records 	
Fined $10.
Burns, " Chick," 241 West Sixty-fourth Ave.,
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs.
Vancouver
semi-monthly as per Order No.
9
Failure to keep correct records as
Burns, g Chick," 241 West Sixty-fourth Ave.,
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs.
Vancouver
per Order No. 9
HeUens, A., Moyie	
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly as per Order No.
26
Failure to pay minimum wages to
Fined $10.
The Sea Food Shop, 118 Yale Road East,
Fined $25 and $4 costs;   arrears of
Chilliwack
employee
$40   paid   April   20   into   Court;
$80.25 to be paid by Wednesday,
May 27, 1953.
P^H::                        '             " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages
Act "                          , Jfj
Bouffard, Raymond, Hammond-   ..
Failure to pay wages to employee
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs;   arrears
of $128 ordered paid or in default
sixty days in gaol.
Bridgeport  SawmiU   (M.  L.  David),  Lulu
Failure to pay wages to employee	
Fined $25 and $3 costs;   arrears of
Island
$253.31 ordered paid.
Cameron, J. J., 917 Hornby St., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages to employee
Fined $25;   ordered to make restitution in amount of $19.25.
Casorso, B. P., Golden 	
Failure to pay wages to employee
Fined $25 or in default ten days in
gaol;   $83 in arrears paid prior to
appearance in Court.
Craft Cleaners (H. S. Levinson), 621 East
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs or in de
Fifteenth Ave., Vancouver
fault twenty days in gaol; ordered
to pay arrears of $110.82 on or
before July 2, 1953.
Craft Cleaners (H. S. Levinson), 621 East
Failure to pay wages to employee	
Ordered to pay costs of $3.75 or in
Fifteenth Ave., Vancouver
default ten days in gaol;  ordered
to pay arrears of $46.05 in wages
on or before July 16, 1953.
Craft Cleaners  (H. S. Levinson), 621 East
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Ordered to pay arrears of $105.82
Fifteenth Ave., Vancouver
on or before July 9, 1953, or in
default twenty-five days in gaol.
Craft Cleaners  (H. S. Levinson), 621 East
Failure to pay wages to employee	
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs or in de
Fifteenth Ave., Vancouver
fault fifteen days in gaol; ordered
to  pay  arrears  of  $35.41 within
ten days.                            i
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 67
a
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued
Name of Employer
Craft Cleaners (H. S. Levinson), 621 East
Fifteenth Ave., Vancouver
Cutillo, Joseph, Bear Creek	
Cutillo, Leo and Joseph, Bear Creek.
Cutillo, Leo and Joseph, Bear Creek.
D.D.M.   Logging   Co.   (Don   D.   Mackie),
Hope
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford	
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford	
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford	
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford	
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford	
Davis, W., 2685 West Sixteenth Ave., Vancouver
Economy Construction Co. Ltd. (Thos. Kir-
wan), 801 Helmcken St., Vancouver
Economy Construction Co. Ltd. (Thos. Kir-
wan), 801 Helmcken St., Vancouver
Gach, William, Lumby	
Gach, William, Lumby.
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek.
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek.
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek-
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek.
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek.
Gadsby, Cecil, Ta Ta Creek-
Jordan, Lloyd, Arrow Park-
Kirk, T., 1130 Lockley Road, Victoria-
Kirk, T., 1130 Lockley Road, Victoria-
McLean,   Sid   G.,   1225   Brantwood   Road,
Vancouver
Murray, H. B., Yahk.
Perpet, Henry, Surrey.
Reid, Harvey, Prince George.
Rick & Bergey (Raymond Bergey), Houston
Rick & Bergey (Raymond Bergey), Houston
Ri<& & Bergey (Raymond Bergey) j Houston
Charge
Failure to pay wages'fo
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Fatture to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Failure to pay wages to
Sentence and Remarks
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee
employee,
employee,
employee,
employee.
employee,
employee.
employee.
employee.
employee.
employee.
employee.
employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Fined $25 or in default twenty days
in gaol; ordered to pay arrears of
$27.68 by May 4, 1953.
Fined $25; arrears of $65 paid previous to Court hearing.
Fined $25; arrears paid prior to
Court hearing.
Suspended sentence; arrears paid
prior to Court appearance.
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs; arrears
of $245.29 ordered paid or in default two months in gaol.
Fined $25; arrears of $116.84 ordered paid.
Arrears of $110.08 ordered paid.
Arrears of $39.44 ordered paid.
Arrears of $123.46 ordered paid.
Arrears of $302.90 ordered paid.
Fined $25; .arrears paid.
Fined $25 and $10.50 costs; arrears
of $81 ordered paid before or by
December 24, 1953.
Suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $82.50 and $4 costs by
December 24, 1953.
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs or in
default ten days in gaol; arrears
of $61.21 ordered paid.
Fined $25 and $3 costs or in default
ten days in gaol; arrears of
$143.80 ordered paid.
Fined $25; arrears Of $148.84 ordered
paid.
Fined $25; suspended sentence fd£
one year.
Fined $25;
one year.
Fined $25;
one year.
Fined $25;
one year.
Fined $25;
one year.
Fined $25; arrears of $200 ordered
paid on or before May 15, 1953,
or in default ten days in gaol.
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs; arrears
of $40 ordered paid.
Fined $25; arrears of $30 ordered
paid.
Signed a form of recognizance; suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $328.95 on or before
September 11, 1953.
Suspended sentence; placed on own
recognizance in the sum of $50
until December 31, 1953; arrears
paid before appearance in Court.
Fined $25; arrears of $25 ordered
paid; given until April 20 to pay
fine and order or in default thirty
days in gaol.
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs; arrears
of $97 ordered paid or in default
fifteen days in gaol; defendant
defaulted and was according ordered to serve the gaol sentence.
Suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $95.90 within ninety days
or in default thirty days in gaol.
Suspended sentence; ordered tcfpay
arrears of $34.54 within ninety days
or in default thirty days in gaol.
Suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $102 within ninety days
or in default thirty days in gaol.
suspended sentence for
suspended sentence for
suspended sentence for
suspended sentence for
 G 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
I Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Rick & Bergey (Raymond Bergey), Houston
Osoyoos.
Roberts.
Wayne,
Roberts
Wayne,
Roberts
; Wayne,
Roberts.
Wayne,
Roberts.
Wayne,
Roberts.
Wayne,
Roberts
Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts.
Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts
1 Wayne,
Roberts
, Wayne,
Roberts.
Wayne,
Osoyoos.
Osoyoos.
Osoyoos.
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos—
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Osoyoos	
Topper's Snack Bar (Ed Lauk), 2217 Granville St., Vancouver
Weir, A. J., Castlegar.
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake.
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake.
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake .
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake.
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake.
Wheeler, W. G., Burns Lake.
Wiebe, Cornie, Hope..
Sentence and Remarks
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee .
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee	
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Fined $25 and $5 costs; ordered to
pay arrears of $141.41 within ninety
days or in default thirty days in
gaol.
Suspended sentence^
$236.50 ordered paid.
Suspended sentence;
$411.50 ordered paid.
Suspended sentence;
$64.69 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$247.50 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$43.75 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$50.67 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$25.50 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$65 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$18.70 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$32.30 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$44 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$36.44 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$12 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$43.50 ordered paid.
Suspended sentence;
$16.78 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$37.50 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$112.70 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$91 ordered paid.
Suspended sentence;
$101.83 ordered paid.
Suspended  sentence;
$41.50 ordered paid.
Suspended sentence;
$77.95 ordered paid.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs; arrears
of $17.87 ordered paid or in default seven days in gaol; wages
paid into Court.
Fined $25; arrears of $200 ordered
paid within thirty days or in default sixty days in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $20.75
ordered paid within ninety days or
in default one month in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $35.40
ordered paid within ninety days or
in default one month in gaol.
Fined $25; arrears of $28.16 ordered
paid within ninety days or in default one month in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $18.34
ordered paid within ninety days or
in default one month in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $24.35
ordered paid within ninety days or
j in default one month in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears of $71.W
ordered paid within ninety days or
in default one month in gaol.
Suspended sentence; Court costs &>
or in default five days in gaol,
ordered to pay deferred to declaration of bankruptcy filed September
29,1953.
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
arrears of
 ii
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued
G 69
Name of Employer
Charge
Woodgate, William, Smithers
Woodgate, William, Smithers
Woodgate, William, Smithers
Woodgate, William, Smithers
Wookey, Gary, Hazelton	
Sentence and Remarks
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Charges withdrawn.
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs; arrears
of $283.52 ordered paid or in default twenty days in gaol.
Fined $25; arrears of $327.10 ordered
paid within ninety days or in default twenty days in gaol.
Fined $25; arrears of $138.92 ordered
paid within ninety days or in default twenty days in gaol.
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs or in default twenty days in gaol; ordered
to pay arrears of $420.49 within
thirty days or in default thirty
days in gaol.
jiSPECIAL LICENCES §■   /%
Provision is made in the majority of the orders of the Board for a graduated scale
of wages to inexperienced employees whose employment permits in writing have been
obtained from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six months' learning period
for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive periodic increases until
at the expiration of the learning period they are qualified for the minimum wage payable
to experienced employees. The following table shows the number of licences issued in
the various lines of work in 1953, 1952, 1951, 1950, 1949, and 1948:—
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
Telephone and telegraph..    .	
Personal service                                         	
17
3
71
4
1
1
1       51
8
49
25
4
6
1
65
8
21
44
32
3
7
8
105
27
27
60
66
2
6
7
3
6
47
22
41
40
136
2
Hairdressing   „__. ,.__	
10
Laundry.. .... .....  - - \	
Mercantile                                           .....
17
81
Office         	
66
Hotel and catering- -      	
Practical nurse (students).          	
Manufacturing-	
Household furniture..            	
61
190
2
Automotive repair and gasoline service-station	
Hospitals                                       	
Totals                 ---	
97
143
181
308
297
427
———————
During the year 1953, twenty-eight part-time employment permits were issued.
v S CONCLUSION • ,
Before concluding this report, the Board would like to acknowledge its appreciation
of the co-operation extended during the year 1953 to its officials in the administration
of the various labour laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
% '% sir> |"
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.^
Fraudena Eaton.
'.-   w      ' .H H.Douglas.
: G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
 G 70 IlBi?'     '^^S^^ DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REPORT OF LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD  (BRITISH COLUMBIA)
Offices... Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members of the Board
D'Arcy J. Baldwin, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
James R. Barton Vancouver.
George C. Home  Vancouver.
Maj.-Gen. C. A. P. Murison, C.B., C.B.E., M.C Duncan.
F. W. Smelts, M.B.E Vancouver.
Registrar
N. deW. Lyons Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Chief Executive Officer
B. H. E. Goult Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Chief Conciliation Officer
W. Fraser 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Sixth Annual Report of the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
On January 16th, 1953, you announced the reappointment to the Labour Relations
Board of Mr. F. W. Smelts, M.B.E., Vancouver, and the appointment of Mr. James R.
Barton, Vancouver; Mr. George C. Home, Vancouver; and Maj.-Gen. C. A. P. Murison,
C.B., C.B.E., M.C, Duncan, as new members, as authorized by section 55 of the Act.
The newly constituted Board held its initial meeting in Victoria on January 19th, 1953,
and by December 31st, 1953, had convened seventy-eight times. Prior to January 19th,
members of the former Board held two meetings and fifteen committee meetings.
In accordance with terms of the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act,"
during the year 1953 the Board named Chairmen for 129 Conciliation Boards,* the
disputing parties selecting their own Chairman in twenty-one cases, and it is interesting
to note that in ten of these cases Chairmen chosen were persons who from time to time
are placed on Boards by the Labour Relations Board. The Board authorized issuance of
467 certificates of bargaining authority and rejected 119 applications for certification. On
its behalf, forty-eight representation ballots and 221 strike votes were conducted.
As required by section 55 (8) of the Act, 269 interested parties were heard at
hearings of the Board in 117 cases. Fifty-four applications for decertification were
entertained, of which, following a representation ballot of employees, or the requisite
investigation, fifteen were rejected and twenty-nine authorized. Eight applications were
tabled, and two were still before the Board at the year's end.
Court cases implicating the Bioard or concerning the Act itself are briefly reviewed
at the conclusion of this report.
On the joint application of the parties where grievance procedure had been invoked,
the Board named Chairmen to twenty-five Arbitration Boards.
* There were 343 references to Conciliation Officers, which resulted in the settlement of 154 disputes. Fifty-three of
these references were unterminated at the year's end, 124 were referred to Conciliation Boards, in seven cases instructions to the Conciliation Officer were cancelled, and in five cases negotiations were discontinued.
r. I f Tfei24 dlsputes referfe<* to Conciliation Boards by Conciliation Officers, and twenty-three other referrals.
°*e h^fred . utwenty-nine Boards were appointed; eight Boards were appointed without prior reference to a Conciliation Officer; eighteen Boards were appointed as a result of reference in the preceding year; 103 Boards were appointed
on the recommendation of the Conciliation Officer in 1953. Ten disputes were settled before Boards were appointed. In
eight cases the Conciliation Officer had recommended Conciliation Boards, but these Boards had not been appointed at
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1953
G 71
Requests for permission to prosecute for alleged violations of the Act totalled
seventy-five, of which thirty-six were approved. This is a sharp increase over previous
years.
For ease of reference, a summary of matters which are reported annually is appended for the years 1948 to 1953, inclusive. M
Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1948-53
1948
Number of applications for certification dealt with.
Certifications granted	
Applications—
Rejected	
Withdrawn	
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
Representation votes conducted—
Conciliation Officers appointed-
Conciliation Boards established—
Grievance procedure provided	
Permissions to prosecute granted.
Strike votes supervised	
864
757
765
961
816
670
594
540
727
640
126
95
117
142
93
68
68
108
92
83
33
80
45
78
53
212
246
241
357
414
90
97
110
120
176
4
12
3
1
1  3
14
7
5
4
14
34
119
322
173
229
664
467
119
78
48
343
129
6
36
221
Summaries of (I) Cases Dealt with in 1953, (II) Conciliation, (III) Boards of
Conciliation, (IV) Industrial Disputes, (V) Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British
Columbia, 1939-53 (with graph), and (VI) Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British
Columbia, 1953, follow:—
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with in 1953, Showing Comparison for 1952
Number of applications dealt with
1952
816
1953
664
1952
Certifications granted  640
Applications—
Rejected    93
Withdrawn      83
Representation votes conducted	
Conciliation Officers appointed	
Conciliation Boards established	
Grievance procedures provided	
Permissions to prosecute granted	
Strike vote supervised	
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed
1953
467
119
78
53
414
176
3
14
229
48
343
129
6
36
221
2
Totals - 1J05
1,449
 G 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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