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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December 31st 1954 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1955]

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31st
1954
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1954. ||
W. R. T. CHETWYND,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., January 24th, 1955.
 Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1954.
The Honourable W. R.T.Chetwynd,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-seventh Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1954, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
J. S. BROADBENT,
Deputy Minister.
 Report of the Railway Department
FOREWORD
The industrial expansion in British Columbia over the past few years has been
phenomenal. Most of us are apt to think this great expansion is due alone to our vast
and unlimited natural resources and the development of our natural water power. One
should remember, however, that improved methods of transportation have been and will
continue to be the deciding factor in our future development. Therefore, transportation
and improvements in transportation facilities become increasingly important to our
economic structure.
The huge Alcan project has been possible due to modern transportation—aerial
tramways, helicopters, aeroplanes, trucks, and railways—and modern material-moving
equipment has been the key which unlocked this vast storehouse of power and pointed
the way to greater accomplishments, the threshold of which we are about to enter.
It is to be remembered that private enterprise provided most of the transportation
of which we speak. Privately owned roads have been hacked out of a wilderness. Privately owned aeroplanes, helicopters, and aerial tramways have transported the workmen
to otherwise inaccessible places. Privately owned trucks have transported the raw
materials where public roads could never have been economically possible.
We have therefore continued to assist private enterprise in its change-over to new
methods of transportation. In this respect our inspection and safety-engineering service
has been extended to industry wherever requested. The companies making the requests
for our services furnished transportation for our personnel at no appreciable cost to the
Department. 1§
The safety of workmen and prevention of accidents has therefore been taken care of,
and it is felt that, apart from the safety aspect, private enterprise is being encouraged to
expand and to provide and govern its own systems of privately owned transportation
facilities necessary for industrial expansion.
The inspection services and field work as outlined in the following report have been
accomplished by a staff of only four Inspectors, who have also been appointed as
Inspecting Engineers pursuant to the provision of the j Railway Act," namely: R. E.
Swanson, Chief Inspector; W. E. Tyler, Inspector; J. H. Carmichael, Inspector; and
W. F. Thomas, Inspector.
 AA 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
V.L. & M. at Devil's Elbow, Copper Canyon.   Engine No. 1044.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA -
AA   /
A HISTORY OF RAILROAD LOGGING
By Robert E. Swanson
The fabulous escapades of the legendary Paul Bunyan have no place in a factual
report such as this, though it cannot be denied that many of the ingenious feats of those
boisterous outdoor men upon whom we have bestowed the title of " logger " must have
been inspired by the folk-lore of the Paul Bunyan tales.
Actually the first logging done on the Pacific Coast was accomplished by the Haida
Indians on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Those hardy tribesmen, nurtured in the cruel
climate of those northern isles known as the Queen Charlottes, atavistically inherited
a cruelty which surpassed the rigours of the climate which, according to their own legends,
spawned them.
Great war canoes were fashioned from huge cedar logs so they could conquer and
plunder native tribes as far south as the Columbia River sand-bars. The best logs,
naturally, grew 2 or more miles from the tide-water, and skid-roads were built so the
canoes could be dragged out and floated to native villages such as Skedans, where they
were fashioned and steamed into shape. I have walked over those ancient skid-roads
and have seen abandoned canoes 40 feet long upon which 200-year-old hemlocks were
growing, and was told by the old chiefs that slaves had been used to drag out the partly
finished canoe logs by the use of ropes fashioned from hemlock-root fibres.
The first logging actually done by the white man was on the west coast of Vancouver
Island when Captain Vancouver outfitted his ships with new Douglas-fir masts, the old
ones having been broken by the wild sweeping storms of the then unexplored Pacific
Ocean.
Of course, a certain amount of primitive logging was done by the Hudson's Bay
Company in building Fort Camosun, now Victoria, but aside from this the first commercial
logging for sawmills started in about 1850, when coal-mining began at Fort Rupert and
Nanaimo. In those days the motive power was supplied by plodding oxen dragging the
logs over corduroy roads. About 1898, oxen were to some extent replaced by horses,
until some Paul Bunyan-inspired logger rigged up the first steam-donkey which, with the
use of mile-long cables, dragged the logs along skid-roads to the sawmills with horses
dragging the cables back for the next trip.
The advent of steam in the woods opened up a new era in the annals of logging
transportation, for now by burning wood the intricate and locked-up power of steam could
be used to advantage in the place of the muscular power formerly supplied by horses
and oxen.
There is some controversy as to where the first steam-locomotive was used in the
woods. Some authorities claim it was used by the Hastings Mill in logging around
Thurlow Inlet and Quadra Island, while others swear the first actual logging-locomotive in
British Columbia was used in the neighbourhood of Chemainus. Despite the controversy
regarding the first use of locomotives, the fact remains that in 1900 Chemainus used
a little 45-ton Climax locomotive to drag logs down the skid-road from Miller Creek.
Formerly horses had been used, then road donkeys powered by steam, but finally the
timber got farther and farther back and roading donkeys were no longer practical. Again
a genius came to the rescue and decided, " Why not spike railway steel on the skid-road
and have a Climax locomotive drag the logs between the rails? | This was done, and
records prove this type of logging continued for a number of years. On some occasions,
especially on frosty mornings, the logs pushed the locomotive down the grades and it was
necessary to sand the skid-roads; on the other hand, in dry weather it was necessary to
grease the skids so the Climax could haul more logs,  f
When skidder logging was adopted from Louisiana and huge steam-machines were
orought into the woods, the old locomotive skid-road system fell into disuse and proper
 AA 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
When "Curly" was No. 3, pride of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1887.
Locomotive "Curly," first logging-locomotive, 1894, at Nikomekl River, British Columbia. Engine worked on Panama Canal and in 1887 worked on C.P.R. construction.
Now in Hastings Park, Vancouver.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA 9
railroad was laid. This took place between 1904 and 1910. However, proper logging-
cars had not yet been developed, nor were air-brakes used in the woods. During this era
Victoria Lumber Company at Chemainus imported a rod engine from the Pennsylvania
Railroad known as "No. 21," and Charlie Cathie ran this engine, fired with shingle
hay from the sawmill. Instead of " cars," trucks were used, which were merely sets of
railroad whsek^Mt bunks attached, and the logs were loaded and strung out along the
railway. Braktanen rode the logs and applied hand-brakes whenever the locomotive
engineer whistled for them. Many brakemen lost arms, feet, legs, and many never lived
to tell the tale. I
One is led to believe from a bronze plaque on a little locomotive called g Curly," now
standing as a relic in Hastings Park, Vancouver, B.C., that this was the first logging-
locomotive. The bronze tablet informs posterity that this locomotive was originally used
on the building of the Panama Canal and was brought to British Columbia to complete
the Canadian Pacific Railway construction, that it fell into disuse and was bought by the
Hastings Company, better known as B.C. Mills and Trading Company, where it was
employed as a logging-locomotive, and old-time loggers tell us that a camp foreman by
the name of Saul Reamy used the locomotive to haul logs on Thurlow Island and Quadra
Island in 1901, and later that the locomotive went to Rock Bay.
Speaking of Rock Bay, it might be mentioned that when Hastings Company finished
up there and the claim was abandoned, Merrill, Ring & Wilson moved in with a large
railroad show which employed two 90-ton Pacific Coast Shay locomotives and several
Climax locomotives. This claim finally wound up in 1941 as a railroad show, and the
No. 5 Pacific Coast Shay locomotive went to Cowichan Lake and the No. 4 went to
Kelsey Bay. No. 4 locomotive is now on the Queen Charlotte Islands and No. 5 is now
operating at Englewood. 2       ~E
Regarding the controversy as to the first locomotive, it should be remembered that
big things have small beginnings. In this respect, mechanically minded loggers obtained
steam traction-engines as used on farms and had them fitted with bell-shaped wheels.
A wagon-train was hooked on to the tractor, the cars also having bell wheels, and, instead
of a regular railroad, round poles were spiked end to end on existing skid-roads to the
exact gauge of the bell-shaped wheels on the steam traction-engines. These bell-wheeled
"locomotives " hauled logs on Vancouver Island as early as 1900 and as late as 1930.
One of these original traction-engines, known as a Waterloo, now stands in Jerry Well-
burn's museum at Deerholme, near Duncan, B.C. It is in quite good shape, and it is
hoped that one day Mr. Wellburn will steam it up for a demonstration.
From this it is evident that the heavy grades encountered during the early days of
railroad logging demanded a locomotive of a different breed than the conventional type.
Geared locomotives were ultimately developed, known as Shay, Climax, and Heisler
locomotives. The Heisler was a half-breed between a geared locomotive and a conventional rod engine, as it had both gears and side-rods. The rod engines were also
especially adapted for logging by using saddle tanks, placing nearly all weight on drivers
and incorporating very small wheels. j|
By 1918 so many accidents had occurred in the woods due to lack of brakes on
heavy grades that the Department of Railways was forced to take action. Rules were
passed requiring all logging-trains to be equipped with air-brakes. By 1925 this was
ultimately accomplished. ||
Another innovation developed in the logging railroad industry was called the
"speeder." This vehicle consisted of an enclosed car with a gasoline-engine driving the
wheels through a chain-drive. Speeders were used principally for the transportation of
crews and were ultimately required to be equipped with air-brakes.
At Jordan River, near Victoria, the Island Logging Company employed locomotives
to haul logs to the beach.   When the claim was taken x>ver from the Michigan Lumber
 AA 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Locomotive 'Nanaimo' came around the Horn from England in 1874, worked on
Pacific Great Eastern Railway in 1912, and scrapped in 1923.* Engineer Hickman in cab
in 1895, at Nanaimo. This engine was No. 1 on the P.G.E. when that railway was first
known as the Howe Sound and Northern.
•it
Bell-wheeled Climax, Shawnigan Lake, 1903.   Engine called " Betsy 1 and
wooden-pole road.
ran on a
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 ^ n
Company in 1912, a 50-ton Climax was inherited which was later sent to Rock Bav
This old locie was scrapped at Franklin River in 1947. y'
Skidder logging was the vogue in 1911 when the Comox Logging and Railway
Company came into existence, making use of both skidder logging and locomotives
Some of the original locomotives which operated near Courtenay are still operating. In
particular the No. 7, a little saddle-tank engine which came from the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, is still operating on the main line at Ladysmith. The geared Heisler locomotives
used until recently by the Comox Logging Company came from the Columbia River
Logging Company at Golden, B.C.
Most old-time loggers will remember Bloedel, Stewart & Welch's big logging camp
at Myrtle Point near Powell River. This camp started operations also in 1911 and the
superintendent's name was Reilly, who must have been Paul Bunyan-inspired, as he
invented the steam duplex system of loading and used railways to a larger extent than ever
before used in the woods. Bloedel's first locomotive was known as " No. 1." It was a
small 45-ton Shay which burned wood and had a balloon stack, and when the claim at
Myrtle Point wound up in 1928, the locomotive went over to Menzies Bay and from there
to Great Central Lake; when Central Lake shut down a few years ago the | One Spot"
was loaded and shipped to Vancouver to be sent on to the Philippine Islands, where it was
to continue its long and useful life. However, something went wrong with the export deal
and it was refused an import permit. It was then that Jerry Wellburn bought the locomotive, had it transported over the Canadian National Railway to his farm near Deer-
holme, B.C., where it can be seen to-day standing as a monument to the early loggers
with its balloon stack, its head-light and whistle painted yellow—all dolled up in his backyard museum.
Another logging-locomotive of interest was the I Six Spot " at Chemainus. This was
a 50-ton Shay carrying 180 pounds of steam, built by the Lima Locomotive Works in
1906. This engine was operated by Len Cary, who died a few years ago. After his death
the locomotive was scrapped.
Then there was the big rod engine known as the | One Spot" on Cathels & Soren-
son's railroad at Port Renfrew. It was whispered around the West Coast that this locomotive was too big to stay on the track, and so it remained in an old locomotive-shed for
many years until purchased by Victoria Lumber Company. It is now operating on the
railway between Ladysmith and the Nanaimo River and is known as the | Ten-O-Seven."
It was built by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1923.
Then there was the New Ladysmith Lumber Company Railway, which was first
built near Cassidy serving a small sawmill in Cedar District. The locomotive used was
a little pot known as | The Nanaimo." It weighed about 10 tons and was brought around
the Horn in a sailing-ship from England in 1874. It had only two drivers. It was
resurrected from the scrap heap in 1912, and its history continued when it was shipped to
Squamish to lay steel on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and it worked on the P.G.E.
until about 1915, operated by a hogger called Angus McRay. Then it disappeared and
a rumour floated around the country that the little engine was abandoned somewhere in
the woods, but no one knew where. It was wanted for a monument in Nanaimo. Harry
Nichols, road foreman of engines, who had run the locomotive on the P.G.E. when he
was a kid, loaded it out as scrap in 1923, thus ending its long and useful career. This
little pot had a copper fire-box and little side-tanks, and the engineer usually ran it with
one leg hanging out of the window.
Charlie Snowden, of Nanaimo fame, had operated the little "Nanaimo" when it
fct came to Nanaimo; but to continue with the New Ladysmith Lumber Company Railway, Charlie Snowden also operated the streak of rust from Nanaimo to East Wellington
"J 1908. The locomotive used on that railway was of real interest as it was originally
No. 168 of the New York Elevated Railways.   It had a vacuum bellows to apply the
 AA 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
^S&sS-^x;^
*«:*:;Ps^i?Swfft»
Charlie Snowden's locomotive, Nanaimo, 1925.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1954 AA 13
brakes on the wheels. In 1914 it fell into disuse when it was replaced by a 27-ton saddle-
tank engine built by the Canadian Locomotive Works in Kingston, Ont. This 27-toa
monster worked on the New Ladysmith Lumber Company line until the road was abandoned in 1933. This road not only served the mill at East Wellington, but hauled coal
from the Jingle Pot mine and bricks from the several brickyards located along the right-
of-way, and, as a matter of historical interest, was constructed on the old right-of-way of
the original railway that ran from Departure Bay to East Wellington. The locomotive
that ran on the original coal-road is now standing in Piper Park, Nanaimo, B.C., is narrow
gauge, and is known as the j Wellington." It was built in 1883 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works. jg.
Another railway of interest was the narrow-gauge railway of the Eastern Lumber
Company near Ladysmith, which was a reconstruction of the original narrow-gauge railway that ran from Crofton to Mount Sicker mines, near Duncan. The little Shay locomotive was brought up to Ladysmith and operated as a logging-locomotive until one day,
due to the narrow gauge, it turned over and killed the engineer, and the Department of
Railways thereafter condemned the use of narrow-gauge locomotives for logging and
specified that all logging-railroads should be standard gauge.
The Rat Portage Lumber Company purchased a large Climax locomotive from the
Climax Locomotive Company in 1918. Shining, brand new, it was put to work at the
head of Indian Arm near Vancouver, and the first day it ran away, with the train hitting
a stump and the locomotive diving into the salt water with only the stack sticking out.
It was resurrected and put back on the track, and it worked for many years around Vancouver, later went up to Vedder Crossing near Chilliwack, and from there to Englewood,
where it is still operating and hauling logs every day. The man running this locomotive
to-day is known as Curly Hutton, the last original locie puncher in the woods.
After fifty years of railroad logging, the timber finally got to be so far back in the
hills it was impractical any longer to build railroads to the tops of the mountains. Again
a Paul Bunyan-inspired genius came to the rescue and decided that logging-trucks could
do the job. Well, logging-trucks did the job as they were better on steep grades to feed
main-line railroads transporting logs to the salt water. Some operations are now 60 miles
back from the salt water. And while to-day several operations, such as Englewood, consider it cheaper to operate a railroad show, most of the loggers consider logging-trucks
are the answer to the actual logging operation, with railroad best adapted for long transportation of logs.
Thus to-day some of the camps are part truck and part railroad, while others are all
truck. At Franklin River a large articulated Mallet steam locomotive is used to wheel
the logs from the back end of the claim to the beach, and the railroad is fed by logging-
trucks. Some of the logging-trucks weigh as much as 70 to 80 tons when fully loaded.
They are equipped with very complicated air-brake systems, and the drivers have to be
carefully trained to operate on the heavy grades encountered.
And so while progress goes ever forward, the spirit of the legendary Paul Bunyan
continues to inspire the logger to accomplish bigger and better things yet to come. Who
knows?  Some day logs might be hauled with helicopters!
 AA 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Bull teams in 1891 at Thurlow Island (twelve yoke or twenty-four oxen)
Horse teams on a skid-road in 1900 (ten horse-power).
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954
AA 15
Rigging crew, 1902, with line-horse.
,-, -    -, ^i^&^
First steam spool donkey, about 1900, Vancouver Island.
 AA 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A 45-ton Climax taking a 1 turn " from 10x12 road donkey in 1901 when logs were
dragged between the rails.
mm
ti
Three Spot," Chemainus, dumping at beach after dragging the 1 turn § between the
rails from Miller Creek.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954
AA 17
A 50-ton Shay—superheat wood-burner, a popular size from 1920 to 1930.
A 70-ton Shay (wet steam) at old "IT," Campbell River.   Engine ran up until 1953.
A 110-ton (Class 90) Shay, three trucks.   There were only five of these in British Columbia
between 1925 and 1950, with one left in 1955.
 AA 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The biggest Climax ever built was 115 tons and it had 44,000 pounds tractive effort.
Built in 1927, worked at Timberland, Ladysmith, and later at Youbou as No. 5. Taken
out of service in 1954.
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch's old "No. 1," wood-burning Shay, 45 tons, waiting to be
shipped to the Philippines. In Vancouver, with C.P.R. station in the background. Now
in Wellburn's museum, Deerholme, B.C.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA 19
REPORT OF THE RAILWAY DEPARTMENT
The continued industrial expansion within the Province intensified the activities of
the Department, with many new transportation installations pursuant to the " Railway
Act." %
The staff of the Department, as of December 31st, 1954, consisted of a Deputy
Minister, Chief Inspector, three Inspectors, one draughtsman, secretarial stenographer
(Grade 2), and a senior clerk-stenographer.
The railways supervised by the Department include common carriers, industrial
railways, and equipment used in conjunction with industrial operations of transportation.
The head office continued in charge of the records of the Department, and in conjunction with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics reports were prepared relating to
extensions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to develop the untouched natural
resources of North-east British Columbia. The Construction Department of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway Company in connection with the extensions of railroad from
Squamish to Vancouver and Prince George north has been established within the Department at Victoria under control of the Deputy Minister. The Inspecting Engineers continued the inspection of the road-bed, track facilities, shops, mechanical facilities, and
equipment of all the railways and other means of transportation.
With the increased use of the aerial tramway within the Province, further work was
done with regard to the safety and operating of this means of transportation. Our rules
and regulations regarding aerial tramways have received world-wide recognition and the
State of California in the United States and New Zealand in the Antipodes have drafted
their rules and regulations from ours.
In the field of diesel locomotives, studies and recommendations made with regard
to axle loadings on light rail have been adopted by many of the railways in the Province.
INSPECTION OF PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY TRACK,
STRUCTURES, AND MECHANICAL FACILITIES
On October 12th, 13th, and 14th an inspection was made of the railway from
Squamish to Prince George by the Department of Inspecting Engineers. This inspection
was carried out by V-8 track motor and conditions found are as follows:—
Generally, the track, road-bed, and right-of-way, together with bridges and structures, are in a very much improved condition over former years. The work and replacements which had been recommended on previous inspections have been put into effect by
the company, and all officials concerned are co-operating most fully. Traffic is much
increased and trains are running on better schedules and hauling much heavier tonnages
than heretofore was possible.
In previous Annual Reports recommendations had been made that the new diesel
power, as procured, should have 4-wheel trucks rather than the 6-wheel trucks which
were currently being ordered. In making this recommendation, full consideration had
been given to the light rail existing on the Pacific Great Eastern, and it was reasoned that
it would be better in the long run to order locomotives with heavier power-axle-loading
and work toward heavier rail as the existing rail was getting worn out and was very old.
During 1953 this recommendation was put into effect by the company, and one locomotive was ordered with the standard 4-wheel truck arrangement. This locomotive was
capable of hauling 25 to 30 per cent greater tonnage with the same horse-power. A work
study showed it was no harder on track than the existing 6-wheel locomotives, and the
company consequently ordered additional locomotives to the new specification. The new
locomotives work out so well the company is now converting all its existing 1,600-horse-
power locomotives to the 4-wheel truck arrangement, and consequently the increased
traffic is being handled with longer trains and increased operating efficiency.   The inspec-
 AA 2Q BRITISH COLUMBIA
tion reveals from observation, corroborated by the company's chief engineer, that the new
locomotives are not hard on track.
When recommendations of the foregoing paragraph were made, recommendations
were also put forward that, due to the age and worn condition of the rails on the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway, a programme should be instituted so that 50 miles per year of
85-pound rail would be laid to replace the worn 60-pound rail. This would not only
increase safety, but would enable schedules to be speeded up to take care of increased
traffic; consequently, the following rail replacements have been put into effect:—
85-pound rail (new)— Miles             Year
Mile   12.9 to Mile   29.4  16.0 1951
Mile   29.4 to Mile   35.6  6.2 1952
Mile   35.6 to Mile   40.3  4.7 1954
Mile   40.3 to Mile   53.0  9.7 1954
Mile 122.8 to Mile 154.3  31.5 1954
Mile 349.0 to Mile 429.0  80.0 19521
70-pound relay—
Mile     8.5 to Mile   12.9  4.4 1953
1 Prince George Extension.
The rail programme should be continued in effect and at least 50 miles should be
laid during 1955 as rail in many locations is badly worn at curves. It is imperative that
the rail be changed in the vicinity of Anderson and Seaton Lakes. In these locations,
rail is badly worn and bad derailments at these points have usually meant fatalities to
operating personnel; therefore, new rail in these particular locations cannot be too
strongly recommended.
An excellent job of ballasting has been done by contract during 1954, and in
particular the following ballasting has been completed which meets with railroad engineering standards:—
Complete ballasting— Miles Year
Mile 201 to Mile 206     5 1953
Mile 182 to Mile 201  19 1954
Mile 349 to Mile 369  20 1954
The importance of ballasting should not be underestimated, and it is recommended
that ballasting continue under a programme for several years until the track is brought
up to proper standards. It must also be pointed out that, after construction in 1921 and
years previous to that, the track had never been given a proper ballast lift as it was considered in those days traffic did not warrant the expenditure; however, traffic conditions
are such to-day that ballasting should be given the same priority as rail replacement.
Bridges were inspected. Decking and ties as required have been renewed by the
company and in some places bridges have been replaced by fills. The following bridges
have been renewed:—
Work Done Mileage Year
Renewed  148.0 1     1954
Renewed   148.4 1954
Refilled, replaced by fill  321.4 1954
Replaced by fill  38.0 1954
To replace by fill  170.2 1954
At Deep Creek Bridge, Mile 292.6, where concrete pedestals were spalling, four
pedestals are being reconstructed. This work was under construction at the time of
inspection. On the Quesnel River Bridge, Mile 346.5, eight bents on the north approach
were renewed.   New 85-pound rail has been laid on the Fraser River Bridge, Mile 123.0.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA 2]
The Cottonwood Bridge was examined. There is no evidence of any settlement of
the piers. The gravel laid for the run-off is not sloughing, and it was found that approximately 3 to 5 gallons of water per hour was running out of the drainage-tunnel.
Kale Creek Bridge on the Prince George extension has given considerable trouble
due to the fill sloughing out. It was therefore necessary to redrive six bents with piling on
the north embankment, which work was completed by the end of 1954. The approach
on the north embankment appears to have stabilized after several thousand yards of
gravel had been dumped in the fill.
Approximately 15 miles of ditching has been completed during 1954. In several
locations, close cuts have been widened by the use of the company equipment, and considerable rock scaling has been completed between Mile 15 and Mile 30.
The following sidings and spurs have been installed or completed during 1954:
Industrial sidings, six; industrial spurs, two to complete (under construction); 50-car
siding completed at Mile 182; 50-car extension on siding under construction at Mile
307.4; Garibaldi siding, Mile 22.2; Canim siding, Mile 215.3 (to be extended during
1954); and on the Moran and Pavilion sidings, rail has been changed from 60-pound to
70-pound. j|
A new apron was constructed and installed on the barge-slip at Squamish during the
fall of 1953. During 1954 forty piles were required in the dolphins at the Squamish
barge-slip.
Three new 1,600-horsepower diesel-electric locomotives were on order for delivery
by the end of 1954, and one locomotive has been delivered. The two remaining locomotives are expected by February 1st, 1955. These diesels will have the standard 4-wheel
truck arrangement. When the new diesels are in operation, it is expected that all steam
power can be abandoned. With this in mind, a programme of not maintaining water-
tanks is being inaugurated.   The water-tank at Quesnel has therefore been dismantled.
Shop facilities have been improved at various points on the line; however, with
increased traffic and additional motive power and rolling-stock, a new diesel repair-shop
is badly needed at Squamish. The 1953 report recommended a drop-pit, wheel-lathe, and
wheel-press. These items are also badly needed and should be included in the new shop
appropriations.
In conjunction with truck and facility inspections, a study was made of level
crossings. The level crossing at Quesnel presents a dangerous condition to the public.
The highway has priority over the railway due to its existence prior to the railway, but
it should be pointed out that several junction roads adjacent to the crossing have come
into existence in recent years. In view of this, it would appear that a joint effort should
be made by the Department of Public Works and the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to
install a regulation automatic flasher at this crossing, the circuit of which, due to switching
operations, can be formulated for satisfactory protection.
Yards and facilities at Prince George have continued to improve during 1954. The
construction of the south link, Squamish to Vancouver, is progressing, several inspections
having been made by Department Inspecting Engineers, with a study inaugurated regarding the elimination of a number of level crossings in West Vancouver.
Conclusion
It can be reported the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is in a very much improved
condition over previous years. Appropriations for improvements and replacements have
been used to good advantage, so that the railway is now in safer condition than it has
ever been; however, the programme of rail replacements, ballasting, and betterments must
be continued under definite replacement programmes already instituted by the Mainten-
ance-of-way Department. Mechanical shop facilities at Squamish, Lillooet, Williams
Lake, and Prince George are much improved over previous years.   Washrooms, boiler-
 AA 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
plant improvements, and sanding facilities and shop storage-track space are required at
Lillooet and Williams Lake, and a new diesel maintenance-shop is required at Squamish
The rail wear is quite serious on curves of 12 degrees and over. New rail will soon
require to be turned in several locations. Locomotive-wheel flanges are cutting badly
and while track-oilers are to be installed at some points, flange-oilers on all 1,600-horse'
power locomotives are required. Flange-oilers on the locomotives will not only cut down
on rail wear, but it is expected the life of the wheels could be quite easily doubled.
The foregoing matters should be taken into consideration when making the 1955
appropriations.
GENERAL INSPECTION OF RAILWAYS AND OTHER TRANSPORT
General Trends.—Transportation facilities in British Columbia during 1954 kept
pace with the current industrial development. This condition applies to public and
common-carrier transportation as well as industrial and privately owned transportation
systems. In spite of current press statements that rail haulage has decreased on a national
basis, rail haulage within the Province has increased. §
Passenger traffic as well as freight movement increased 27 per cent over 1953 on the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and on the British Columbia Electric Railway freight
movements from Huntingdon to New Westminster increased to the point where the company has ordered additional diesel-electric motive power. In the industrial field of
railroading the trend continues from railway to truck haulage. Several of the larger
companies have abandoned railway and reconstructed the existing right-of-ways into
truck-roads. This condition also applies in a lesser degree to the mining industry; specifically Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, upon abandoning its No. 8 mine at
Cumberland, also abandoned its main-line railway, retaining only the marshaling yards
at Union Bay. It now feeds the remainder of the railway operation by trucks operating
over privately owned roads from the Tsable River mine near Fanny Bay, a distance of
8 miles.
On the other hand, the railways, in conjunction with mining at Fernie, Kimberly, and
Trail in Eastern British Columbia, have in no way diminished in proportion or function.
Notwithstanding this, however, the trend is away from the time-honoured methods of
logging to other more advantageous methods, except where long-haul transportation is
involved. This is due to the impracticability of short railways in the higher, rougher
country now being exploited. In other industries large and complicated aerial tramways
are under construction, as covered later in this report.
Logging-trucks vs. Railways.—As already stated, several of the logging companies
have changed from logging-railways to motor-trucks operating on privately owned roads.
In most cases when rails were removed, the right-of-way was reconstructed into a truck-
road. This trend is due not to the failure of railways or increased cost of railway operation, but is due to all accessible timber now being on high ground where railway is impracticable. Notwithstanding the modern trend to trucks, it is reported that at Franklin
River 21 miles of logging-railway was constructed in 1953, and several operations report
they will keep existing railways where they supply a means of cheap log transportation.
Logging-railways.—All logging-railways were inspected in 1954. In some cases,
bridges required renewal and repairs. Log-dumps required our new safety device to be
installed. All boilers were inspected and certificates issued. At Englewood, where a
50-mile railway is in operation, both logging-trucks and railway operation were inspected.
Crews were examined and certificates issued on both rail and truck operation. Where rail
operations have been replaced by logging-trucks, the best of the rolling-stock has been
transferred to other companies operating railway. In many cases, locomotives, cranes,
and heavy equipment have been transferred. Department Inspectors have inspected the
equipment and in most cases advised the companies as to the general history and life
expectancy of the materials concerned.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 ^ 23
Diesel-Electric Study.—The use of diesel motive power on logging-railways is now
well established, as proved by tests in 1951 when General Motors loaned a diesel locomotive to various logging-roads to prove they were superior to steam. The 1951 tests
were under the direction of Department Inspectors and reports were compiled. Continuing since the tests through 1954, the companies have relied on the Department's advice
regarding the use of diesel power, so that at least two of the remaining logging-railways
are at present negotiating for the procurement of diesel locomotives. In this regard it is
of interest to note that Pacific Great Eastern Railway now hauls several log-trains per day
by diesel locomotives, and this condition also applies to the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway on Vancouver Island. In both cases, Department Inspectors checked the condition of the log-cars used, as the safety of workmen during loading operations was
involved.
Mining-railways.—On the mining-railways regular inspections were made of all
equipment and track. The Morrissey, Fernie and Michel Railway, at Fernie, where a
large diesel-electric locomotive is used, has continued to operate to full capacity. The
narrow-gauge steam-locomotives at Elk River Colliery and at Michel were inspected,
and operators, where necessary, examined and certified. At Kimberly the rail-haulage
system has been inspected. A fatal accident occurred at this operation when a workman
got involved in the dumper. Safety precautions were recommended. At Trail, accidents
occurred which were investigated, and subsequent safety meetings were held to point out
safer practices to the company and recommend closer screening of operating personnel
prior to certification by the Department.
Mines Department.—All air-locomotives of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company
were hydrostatically tested and certified. Copies of Inspectors' reports and certificates
were forwarded to the Chief Inspector, Department of Mines. Through an interdepartmental arrangement of many years' standing, the Railway Department inspects surface
trackage and equipment which is on the border line of jurisdiction between Mines and
Railways. The haulage systems at the Sullivan mine and Britannia Beach come under
the foregoing arrangement, and reports were submitted.
Pulp-mills and Industrial Plants.—Trackages and yards serving the pulp-mills and
industrial sites were inspected, as were all motive power, cranes, and equipment serving
industry. Operators, where necessary, were examined and certified. At Columbia
Cellulose Company, close clearances were inspected and recommendations made. At
Port Mellon the steam-locomotive was inspected, as well as barge-slip and trackage.
Close clearances were also corrected at the Port Mellon plant. At Elk Falls Paper Company the barge-slip and steam-locomotive were inspected.
Shipyards.—At Yarrows Limited, Esquimalt, the Department was consulted as to
lifting loads on a large hammer-head crane installed on its dock. Calculations were made
and submitted, after which lifting and tipping tests were conducted and the crane certified
for operation. Trackage and cranes at other shipyards were inspected and equipment
certified.   .
Kitimat.—During 1954 the Canadian National Railways has been constructing a
42-mile railway from Terrace to Kitimat to serve the new aluminium industry. This
railway is to be operated by the Canadian National Railways, but the railway and yards
at Kitimat are to be owned and operated by the Aluminum Company of Canada under
the jurisdiction of the Department. In this regard the Department has advised the
Aluminum Company regarding operational procedure and the hiring and certification of
personnel to operate the railroad. At this writing two diesel-electric locomotives have
arrived at Kitimat to supply motive power for the 3-mile interchange railway (with the
Canadian National Railway) and to switch the extensive yards at the Kitimat mill-site.
| Kemano Power-house.—The Alcan Power-house at Kemano was placed in operation during 1954 when it was officially opened by His Royal Highness the Duke of
 AA 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Edinburgh. The Chief Inspector was on hand at the request of Alcan to officially inspect
the aerial tramway over which His Royal Highness was to ride. The opening of the
power-house finished the first phase of the construction at Kemano, where the Department
had inspected all underground hoisting, railways, and aerial tramways, and advised the
company on safety engineering regarding this work during construction. With construction completed, the tramway was turned over to Alcan to operate in conjunction with its
power project. It was therefore necessary to formulate new operating rules and have
them approved by Order in Council. i
Federal Board of Transport.—All Department Inspectors are appointed by the
Board of Transport Commissioners as locomotive inspectors to examine fire-protective
appliances on all locomotives operating under the Board's jurisdiction within the Province.
Railway passes are supplied by the Board through the Department of Lands and Forests^
to whom copies of reports are submitted with originals of all reports sent direct to the
Board of Transport Commissioners in Ottawa. Thus a liaison exists between the Federal
Board of Transport Commissioners, the British Columbia Railway Department, and the
Department of Lands and Forests.
M With reference to the foregoing paragraph, 367 inspections were made of fire-
protective appliances on the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National Railway, and
Great Northern Railway, and reports submitted, while 20 such inspections were made on
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and other industrial railways which were not reported
to the Federal authority. i A
B.C. Electric.—On the B.C. Electric Railway, inspections and certifications were
made of all diesel-electric and electric locomotives; tracks were inspected as well as shop
facilities. In Vancouver, remaining street-cars and street-railways were inspected. Streetcars are being rapidly replaced by trolley-buses.
Trolley-buses.—Trolley-buses were not inspected, as there exists some doubt as to
the Department's jurisdiction over these vehicles. It might be pointed out with regard to
trolley-buses that, while they steer like a conventional bus and operate on rubber tires,
they are not licensed as a motor-vehicle under the 1 Motor-vehicle Act," nor do they
carry any type of licence-plate under the 1 Motor Carrier Act." It should also be pointed
out that they have replaced street-cars and run on defined routes from overhead trolley-
wires and the operators belong to the Street Railwaymen's -Union. There is a school of
thought that the inspection for public safety for these vehicles falls automatically under
this Department's jurisdiction, but the matter has never been clarified.
Aerial Tramways.—All existing aerial tramways, with certain exceptions, operated
to full capacity during 1954. The aerial tramways adjacent to Vancouver reported no
serious accidents. All tramways were rigidly inspected several times during the year.
Hollyburn Aerial Tramway was at a disadvantage in that only single chairs were used.
The Department designed a double chair and through Order in Council approved new
tower clearances on all tramways where approved chairs are used.
The Red Mountain Aerial Tramway near Rossland has given considerable difficulty.
This tramway was in existence prior to the Department's jurisdiction over such matters
and consequently design was not up to standard. Due to an accident in 1953 the Department suspended summer transportation of passengers on this tramway as all landings and
stations were designed for snow conditions. It can be reported that the tramway is now
in satisfactory condition and is being brought up to a higher standard. During an electrical
storm the rope was damaged, which necessitated a special inspection by the Department's
tramway engineer.
A new aerial tramway has been approved and has been under construction during
1954. This tramway is property of National Defence and, for security reasons, details
are not given here; however, it can be reported that a substantial job has been completed
in both design and construction, and the project will be operating in early 1955 subject
to the Department's jurisdiction.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA 25
A very large and extensive areial tramway is being constructed at the Cassiar
Asbestos Company near the northern boundary of the Province.   Several hundred drawings have been approved by the Department and the project is well under construction
scheduled for completion in 1955, when final inspection will be made.   This tramway is
over 3 miles in length.
Truck Transportation.—As previously stated, there has been a definite trend or
change-over, on short rapid transit from rail to motor-truck. This has come about'for
three reasons: (1) Improvement in trucks operating on rubber tires, together with the
perfection of high-speed automotive-type diesel engines; (2) improvement in road-
building methods resulting from better trucks, engines, bulldozers, carry-alls, and other
dirt-moving equipment; and (3) such roads with improved trucks are now feasible in
heretofore inaccessible places. This being the case, industry, and more particularly the
logging industry, has lost no time in adopting the newer methods, which in turn has
boosted productivity and heavy industry in the Province.
The change-over has presented many safety problems to the operators, and companies formerly operating railways, to whom our services had been available, applied to
have our same services extended to their trucks and truck-roads. It should be pointed out
in most cases such companies have constructed their own private roads, over which public
highway rules of the road do not in any way have jurisdiction.
The Department met the challenge by recommending improvements in air-brake
systems and systematized inspection of vehicles by the company, but with no Act in force
to back up the Inspectors, only as much could be done as the companies were willing to
use to their own advantage. The greatest contributory cause to accidents, it was found, was
that the operators of the new-type logging-trucks were in most cases displaced railroaders
who knew nothing about handling air-brakes as used on trucks. The companies recognized
this weakness on their part and requested the Department to train and certify all truck-
drivers operating on their own logging-roads. This was a concerted request by all the
larger companies to which the Department directed its efforts.
Truck-driver Certification.—It was necessary to procure films and necessary literature and have the Inspectors in the course of their normal travels put on lectures and
training courses in the various camps and logging centres. During 1954 forty such
lectures were conducted at various points in the Coast Region, and, as a result, 95 logging-
truck operators were examined and certified during 1954, with 117 during 1953 and 65 in
1952, making a total of 277 logging-truck drivers who operate on private roads trained
and certified to date.
The industry as a whole has found that the safety of operations has been increased,
so that all of the larger companies have applied to the Department to have the industrial
transportation (not on public highways) brought under the control of an Act similar to
the j Railway Act."
Highway-driver Training.—Training courses made available to the logging industry
were quickly recognized by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as being beneficial to
drivers of equipment on public highways, and application was made by personnel of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police to the Department to have our training and a form of
certification extended to the public highways on Vancouver Island.   As a result, a concerted effort was made by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Public Works Department, the Motor-vehicle Branch, and the Railway Department so that highway drivers
could attend the forty special lectures conducted for drivers on private roads.   R.C.M.P.
officers sponsored the meetings, provided the halls, and registered the drivers.    Over
1000 drivers took the courses, and ultimately 539 highway drivers were examined and
certified under the auspices of Royal Canadian Mounted Police in addition to the 277
pnyate-road drivers certified, making a total of 816 drivers who have been certified and
registered with the Department.   There is no doubt this has increased safety, courtesy,
and efficiency on both private and public roads alike.
 AA 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Traffic and Safety Councils.—-To perpetuate the safety work instituted in the interests
of public safety, the Department, under the sponsorship of the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, inaugurated five Traffic and Safety Associations at various centres on Vancouver
Island, namely: Colwood, Duncan, Nanaimo, Port Alberni, and Courtenay. These
associations are operated in the interest of highway safety entirely by public-spirited
citizens. Their function is to further traffic safety and co-operate with law-enforcement
bodies. They also bring dangerous conditions to the attention of City Councils so that
conditions can be improved through amendments to by-laws.
A central council was needed through which all various local organizations could
funnel requirements to Government departments. A Vancouver Island Traffic and
Safety Council was therefore formed, consisting of two members of each group. This
organization is now functioning to the best public interest. It is recommended this council
receive all possible help from Government departments and officials concerned.
Railway Safety.—Railway safety being the cardinal tenet of this Department, safety
programmes were sponsored and encouraged in various parts of the Province. This was
carried out in three principal ways: (1) Obtaining films and literature for company meetings, (2) by our Inspectors giving lectures and film showings, and (3) encouraging
company safety drives and offering trophies. The last method is considered superior as
it is a proven principle in human behaviour that anything good for a group of people must
be fought for and won by the people themselves. It follows, then, that a good thing
cannot be forced upon people as they will not accept it. This principle has been applied
wherever possible so that employees will demand of the employer safer conditions under
which to work.
Three trophies are put up by the Department: (1) A safety shield for the logging-
railways, (2) a cup for the mining-railways, and (3) a trophy for the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway which is competitive between divisions. In 1952 the Canadian Forest
Products (Englewood Division) held the logging trophy but lost it in 1953 to the Comox
Logging and Railway Company Ladysmith operation. This trophy has not yet been
awarded for 1954. The mining-railway trophy has been held since 1952 by the Morris-
sey, Fernie and Michel Railway at Fernie, and the P.G.E. trophy instituted in 1953 has
not yet been awarded for 1954.        M
It can be reported the industrial railways show a keen sense of competition in safety
matters; however, on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway the company should set up its
own safety department. A railway safety car would be an advantage. This car could also
be used for air-brake instruction, first-aid instruction, and rule-book instruction. The
company could then hold regular safety meetings, and Department Inspectors, whenever
available, could lecture and assist. Most companies employ a safety director, which procedure is recommended wherever possible.
Accidents.—An unfortunate accident occurred December 17th, 1954, on the Franklin
River Railway of MacMillan & Bloedel Limited when, due to inclement weather, a bridge
washed out and two men were drowned. Our investigation revealed that the bridge had
been inspected an hour prior to the train's arrival, flood conditions prevailing at the time
had undersecured a tower bent, and the bridge collapsed when the locomotive was on the
span, drowning the engineer and head-end brakeman.    mBm
A fatal accident was investigated at Sullivan mine, Kimberley, where a workman
was fatally injured between a railway-car and the dumper. It appeared that the deceased
was endeavouring to retrieve a tail-light and placed himself where workmen were
forbidden to enter. Recommendations were made and the special rules for this railway
are being revised. I
Several logging-truck accidents were investigated, and in most cases were found to be
caused by lack of knowledge and training on the part of the drivers in the use of airbrakes.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 ^ 2?
In summarizing all accidents investigated, it is the consensus of opinion that the best
safety device is a safe workman; consequently, our safety educational and certification
programme should be carried forward in perpetuity for the future.!
Following is a report of equipment inspections during 1954:	
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  107
Internal and external inspections of boilers  7
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified  39
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified.. 9
Air locomotives hydrostatically tested  9
Power rail-cars inspected and certified  32
Air-receivers tested and inspected  10
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified  34
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways 14
Electric locomotives inspected on Alcan project  6
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests  31
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  500
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways  115
Miles of underground trackage inspected at Alcan project  18
Miles of track inspected  750
Aerial tramways inspected in British Columbia  5
Aerial tramway inspections conducted 1  14
Locomotive engineers examined and certified  7
Conductors examined and certified  7
Power-car operators examined and certified  8
Train-dispatchers examined and certified  1
Air-brake inspectors examined and certified  1
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified  1
Engineers examined and certificates issued, Pacific Great Eastern Railway  4
Electric-locomotive operators examined and certified, Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd  20
Motormen and underground hoistmen examined and certified,
Morrison-Knudsen Co. of Canada Ltd  54
Logging-truck operators examined and certified  95
Truck-drivers on highways examined under auspices of Royal
Canadian Mounted Police  539
B.C. Electric Railway street-cars inspected  8
B.C. Electric Railway diesel and electric locomotives inspected
and certified   16
Accidents on B.C. Electric Railway  2
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways  3
Fatal accidents on logging and industrial railways  2
Accidents on logging-truck roads investigated  1
Accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway 1  12
New diesel-electric locomotives -  2
Reservoirs constructed under Department supervision  5
Safety lectures conducted by the Department  7
Truck air-brake lectures conducted by the Department  40
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on Pacific Great
I Eastern Railway and industrial railways I— 20
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives
of C.P.R., C.N.R., and G.N.R. for Board of Transport
Commissioners 1  367
 AA 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST OF APPENDICES
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways are shown in Appendix B.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is shown
in Appendix D. ||
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E.
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 AA 29
APPENDICES
9 APPENDIX A
Certificates Issued under the Provisions of the 1 Railway Act 1
Certificate No.
Approving application of Howe Sound Pulp Co. Ltd., Port Mellon, B.C., for
exemption from standard clearances    830
Approving notice served by Chief Inspector of Railways upon Canadian
National Railways condemning trestle of L & K Lumber (North Shore)
Ltd.    831
Granting request of Pacific Great Eastern Railway for approval of uniform
code of operating rules  832
Approving application of MacMillan & Bloedel (Alberni) Ltd. to construct
bridge over Nitinat River, Barclay District  833
Granting application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway for an extension of five
years for the completion of the railroad  834
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. permission to construct a spur track
across Wilson Avenue and John Street, Municipality of Burnaby  835
Approving issue by B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. of 4%-per-cent general
mortgage bonds,  1954 series  836
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. permission to relocate whistle-boards
on District III, New Westminster to Chilliwack lines  837
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. permission to construct spur track
across Ewen Avenue and Stanley Street, City of New Westminster  838
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. permission to construct and carry a
team track across Hazel Street, Village of Abbotsford  839
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part XI, Governing the Location, Construction, and Operation of Aerial Tramways, by amending Rule 41  840
Granting application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway for approval of Form
1 94b   841
Approving application of Department of Public Works for leave to construct
a highway crossing over tracks of Pacific Great Eastern Railway spur at
Squamish   842
Approving application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to increase share
capital of company from $25,000,000 to $90,672,900  843
Approving special rules and regulations of the Aluminum Co. of Canada Ltd.
for operation of aerial tramway at Kemano  844
Approving B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. application to construct a spur track
across Twentieth, Fourteenth, and Eighteenth Streets, Municipality of
Burnaby  845
 AA 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX B
Accidents Reported, 1954
On Railway
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.—
Passengers 	
Employees 	
Other persons 	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.-
Passengers 	
Employees 	
Other persons 	
Industrial railways—
Employees 	
Other persons 	
Locomotive cranes—Employees ...
Aerial tramways (industrial)	
Killed
Injured
14
1
19
7
3
Totals  -      3
Level Crossings
46
Unprotected Crossing
Protected Crossing
Killed
Injured
Number
of
Accidents
Killed
Injured
Number
of
Accidents
Under jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
After sunrise	
After sunset               	
....
....
7
5
1
....
—.
Totals _    	
—
7
5
—
—
w.
Under jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—
After sunrise 	
After sunset   	
3
5
16
7
9
1
1
....       |         7
....        |         4
3
1
Totals 	
3
21
16
—
11
4
Total number of accidents in British Columbia.  	
3
28
21
—
11
4
 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954
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 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1954 If AA 33
APPENDIX D
List of Cranes and Other Auxiliary Motive Power in Industrial Plants
Inspected by Railway Department
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Ltd Crane No. D.R. 304.
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd .Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd J Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
Associated Foundry Ltd Crane No. D.R. 305.
Baxter, J. H., & Co. Ltd Gas Crane No. 1.
B.C. Cement Co. Ltd .Crane No. 21439 B.C.
b!c. Forest Products Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. D.R. 320.
Bridge & Tank Co Crane No. 12669 B.C.
Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
Canadian Bridge Co 1 Crane No. D.R. 346.
Crane No. 12330 B.C.
Capital Iron & Metals Ltd j j Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd Diesel-Electric Locomotive No. 1.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd.—
Kimberley 1 Electric Locomotives Nos. 1, 2, 3.
Trail 12 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
Dobson Bros Crane No. D.R. 289.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 347.
Crane No. 44013 B.C.
Gas Locomotive No. 1.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co. Ltd Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. 1.
Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 6.
Esquimalt Dry Dock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Portable Boiler D.R. No. 314.
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Crane No. 41298 B.C.
King, M. B., Lumber Co. Ltd .Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Leber Pole & Piling Co . Gas Crane No. 1.
Lions Gate Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Lumby Timber Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 321.
MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. 44666 B.C. §
Gas Internal-combustion Locomotive No. 50.
Diesel-Electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co. Ltd Crane No. 43505 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard __      . Crane No. D.R. 290.
Sigalet & Co. Ltd ,  Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co. Ltd... „   Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers Ltd Crane No. 43807 B.C.
T. I Crane No. D.R. 288.
nmberland Lumber Co. Ltd. Crane No. 12368 B.C.
Vancouver Steel Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 316.
v.     . Crane No. D.R. 342.
victona Machinery Depot Ltd   Crane No. D.R. 291.
western Bridge & Steel Fabricators Ltd.  Crane No. D.R. 355.
w I Crane No. D.R. 309.
western Plywoods Ltd.  Diesel Crane No. 142.
arrows Ltd  ..Electric dock crane.
 AA 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX E
Mileage of All Railways Operating in the Province
Mainland
Main
Line
Sidings
Island
Main
Line
Sidings
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Com
missioners for Canada—
Canadian Pacific Railway 1	
Canadian National Railways ...
Great Northern Railway—.	
B.C. Electric Railway (leased) . ...
Totals	
Under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
B.C. Electric Railway .	
Industrial railways—
Standard gauge 	
Standard gauge, Queen Charlotte Islands	
Narrow gauge .	
Totals j	
Grand totals	
1,858.31
1,302.34
140.77
26.06
527.06
366.40
42.00
23.73
3,327.48
959.19
430.80
91.88
30.39
7.00
38.17
66.12
18.40
28.06
15.00
34.49
598.24
162.07
3,925.72     1,121.26
Total
Main
Line
197.81
90.17
Sidings
46.51
24.28
287.98
70.79
225.60
8.25
43.87
1.75
233.85
45.62
521.83
116.41
2,056.12
1,392.51
140.77
26.06
3,615.46
430.80
91.88
255.99
7.00
46.42
832.09
573.57
390.68
42.00
_23J73_
1,029.98
66.12
18.40
71.93
15.00
207.69
4,447.55 I 1,237.67
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia, 5,685.22.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
160-255-4513
  

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