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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-third Annual Report 1953-54 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1955]

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-third Annual Report
1953-54
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most ExceUent Majesty
1955
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-third Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
f| RAY GILLIS WILLISTON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1955.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1954
Minister
of Education:
The Honourable Ray Gillis Williston, B.A.
Deputy Minister and
Assistant Deputy
Superintendent of Education:
Minister of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
F. P. Levirs,
M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Municipal Inspectors, Assistant Municipal Inspectors, and
Superintendents of Schools:
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., B.Paed., D.Paed., Superin
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
tendent, Vancouver.
j. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
R. C. Grant, B.A., Assistant, Burnaby.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent,
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
Vancouver.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant, North
O. J. Thomas, B.A., Deputy Superintendent, Van
Vancouver.
couver.
D. B. Mackenzie, B.A., M.A., Assistant Super
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Greater Victoria.
intendent, Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Telkwa.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
A. D. W. Jones, B.A., Prince Rupert.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
J. G. Kirk, B.A., M.A., Trail.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Nelson.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission City.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
E. J. Dunn, B.A., M.A., Cranbrook.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Williams Lake.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Alberni.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Prince George.
S. J. Graham, B.A. Chilliwack.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., New Westminster.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
D. C. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., D.Ed., Nelson.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Nelson.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., New Westminster.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Penticton.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Dawson Creek.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Kimberley.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Duncan.
H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D., Victoria.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
Vancouver:
F. C. Boyes, M.A., Acting Principal.
F. C. Hardwick, M.A.
E. B. Broome, B.Ed., M.A., Acting Vice-Prin
Miss A. J. Kilgour, M.A.
cipal.
J. McGechaen, M.A.
W. H. Auld, B.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
Mrs. G. Birkett, B.Ed., M.A.
Miss K. L. Meredith.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
N. H. Brown, B.A.
Miss S. Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
D. C. Gibbard, B.A., M.A.(Music).
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed.
Model School:
Miss Z. M. Manning.
Mrs. Jean Webber.
Victoria:
H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Acting Principal.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
Miss K. M. Baker, B.A.
A. W. Johns, B.A.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
A. E. Loft, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland.
N. A. Swainson, M.A., B.Ed.
Miss D. M. Daniels, B.A.
W. H. Gaddes, M.A., Special Lecturer.
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
Miss G. Tuckey, B.A., B.S.W., Librarian.
5
 O 6
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Services: W. A. Plenderletth, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Coordinator of Teacher Education: F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.P_ed.
Comptroller: S. E. Espi__y.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Director of Administration: G. W. Graham, B.A.
^Supervisor of Planning and Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Adult and Vocational Education: H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., BJPaed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.
Inspectors of HomeJLConomics: Miss M. C. Orr^ B_A_, B_S., and Miss D. De Jong, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Director of Educationalrand Vocational Guidance: HL P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
B^recWr of Community Programmes: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Director^ Visual Education: J. R. Poixack, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: ¥. J. Kitley, M.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc., M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Emth E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary SchbblXZorresjhndence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-kook Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf andHhe BMnd: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S.inEd., LL.D>
Assistant Dirmtor of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education  29
Report of the Division of Teacher Education  32
Provincial Normal Schools—
Vancouver  32
Victoria  34
Summer School of Education  36
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  43
Report of the Director of Home Economics  48
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  50
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  56
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  58
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  59
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  60
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  62
Reports of District Inspectors  63
Report of the Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind  98
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  100
Elementary School Correspondence  104
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  106
Report on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  110
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  111
Elementary School  112
Community Programmes Branch  112
School and Community Drama  115
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  118
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  119
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  121
Report of the Director of Visual Education  123
Report of the Commission on | Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"_ 124
y
 O 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type Of School  j.
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  \ ^
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates j  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  j3
Cost per Pupil, on Various Bases, for the School-year 1953-54  j4
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District... 15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District    16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District....   17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District    17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District    18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District    18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in E<|ch District...   19
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers    20
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils    20
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School    22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  22
Classifications of Teachers' Salaries _r— 23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1953-54 by Provincial Government  24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1953-54 by School District  25
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  127
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades —~ 160
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover
I
  O 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
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Normal Schools,
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Summer School,
In-service Training.
Recruitment of Teachers
and Teacher-Trainees.
Teacher Qualifications
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2
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1953-54
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1955.
To the Honourable Ray Gillis Williston,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-third Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1954.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 195,290
to 210,174, and the average daily attendance increased from 176,138 to 191,061. The
percentage of the regular attendance was 90.91.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools.
Elementary schools	
Totals	
7,359
10,370
6,325
7,848
15,628
7,528
598
3,615
435
63,788
74
5,502
100
420
1,453
1,450
8,645
343
16,070
657
3,151
48,815
76,677
99,440
32,084
1,973
I
I
15,281
31,500
13,853
2,148
13,337
3,929
130,126
210,174
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 3,416 officially registered in
high, superior, or elementary schools)	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students 	
Under section 13 (g) of the 1 Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction	
1,448
1,520C|I/*
49
3,017
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  2,458
Night-schools   19,969
Vancouver School of Art  97
Vancouver Vocational Institute  1,907
High School Correspondence (adults only)  3,548
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  285
Carried forward  31,281
11
 O 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Brought forward  31,281
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  95,9751
Summer School of Education (1953 session)  ij\\
Normal School, Vancouver  340
Normal School, Victoria  no
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  131
Victoria College |  2902
University of British Columbia  5,5003
135,398
1 This figure is a total course enrolment, rather than a total oi the adults in this category.
2 This figure does not include an enrolment of 743 in the special evening classes.
I This figure does not include the following enrolments:  1953 summer session, 1,040; 1953-54 extra sessional classes,
266; correspondence courses, 378.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1953-54:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
Kindergarten
Grade I	
Grade H	
Grade III .....
Grade IV	
Grade V	
Grade VI	
Grade VII	
Grade VIIL_
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI	
Grade XII	
Grade XIII—
Totals
834
14,672
12,393
10,880
10,672
10,368
9,906
9,420
8,277
6,992
5,619
4,107
3,089
476
107,705
753
13,363
11,562
9,859
9,846
9,871
9,353
8,782
7,869
7,169
6,080
4,443
3,225
294
102,469
1,587
28,035
23,955
20,739
20,518
20,239
19,259
18,202
16,146
14,161
11,699
8,550
6,314
770
210,174
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Unclassified	
Totals	
540
1,072
440
89
475
120
4,035
12
164
291
122
40
11
119
44
704
1,363
562
89
515
131
4,154
56
6,783
791
7,574
15,281
31,500
13,853
2,148
13,337
3,929
130,126
210,174
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Senior high schools	
junior-senior high schools	
junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Unclassified-.-	
Totals	
568
1,046
415
14
206
51
364
27
2,691
Without
Degrees
136
317
147
75
309
80
3,790
29
4,883
Total
704
1,363
562
89
515
131
4,154
56
7,574
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78.
1882-83.
1887-88-
1892-93.
1897-98..
1902-03..
1907-08-
1912-13.
1913-14..
1917-18..
1922-23..
1927-28..
1928-29.
1929-30..
1930-31..
1931-32..
1932-33..
1933-34
1934-35..
1935-36-
1936-37..
1937-38..
1938-39..
1939-40
1940-41..
1941-42..
1942-43..
1943-44
1944-45.
1945-46.
1946-47
1947-48..
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
$48,411.141
60,758.7s1
113,679.36!
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.283
3,532,518.958
3,765,920.693
3,743,317.083
3,834,727.193
4,015,074.37s
2,849,972.02s
2,611,937.80s
2,835,040.74s
2,972,385.04s
3,277,660.23s
3,524,962.69s
3,630,670.78s
3,585,769.00s
3,963,848.24s
4,028,397.88s
3,924,243.53s
4,244,898.82s
5,022,534.59s
5,765,205.50s
9,398,473.46s
12,468,653.18s
17,363,430.94s
22,809,631.23s
25,830,076.88s
26,885,980.438
26,555,080.24s
24,060,233.15 3
$215,056.222
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54s
9,261,094.98s
11,149,996.27s
10,008,255.66s
10,061,387.99s
9,719,333.81s
8,941,497.343
8,213,369.04s
8,458,156.00s
8,775,353.78s
9,593,562.64s
10,193,367.08s
10,640,740.47s
10,521,684.92s
10,982,364.49s
11,120,801.94s
11,502,291.35s
12,231,029.35s
13,683,538.18s
14,818,625.81s
20,176,930.53s
25,768,392.09s
35,538,079.88s
47,726,750.37s
54,195,133.95s
57,881,559.48s
58,401,121.15s
70,791,844.253
o J_e total exPenditure for public schools was borne by the Government. j
*This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
 O 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1953-54
Grand total cost of education	
Deduct—
Capital expenditures  $15,705,633.19
Debt charges on school district debt       3,886,317.89
$70,791,844.25
19,591,951.08
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure
$51,199,893.17
502,871.46
Net total operating costs	
Less—
illf Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College
Special grant to Victoria College J	
Grant to University of British Columbia	
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Night-schools 	
Correspondence schools—
High school	
Elementary	
Adult education	
Special grants under section 13 (g) of Act	
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure
$50,697,021.71
$19,118.68
30,000.00
2,665,509.98
142,320.96
124,750.41
37,172.42
217,207.71
68,438.42
558,584.27
2,270.00
$3,865,372.85
351,680.19
3,513,692.66
Net operating cost for total enrolment of 210,174 pupils  $47,183,329.05
Net operating cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  224.50
Net operating cost per cshool-day (189 days) on total enrolment  1.19
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
191,061  246.95
Net operating cost per school-day (189 days) on average daily attendance   1.31
Grand total cost to Provincial Government  $24,060,233.15
Less—
Capital — debenture debt retire-
|        ment     $391,143.27
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure  :      502,871.46
Non-public school expenditure  3,513,692.66
       4,407,707.39
Net operating cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of
210,174 pupils for year	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total
enrolment	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day
(189 days) on total enrolment  	
19,652,525.76
93.50
.49
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1953-54—Continued
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year onf
average daily attendance of 191,061	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day
(189 days) on average daily attendance	
Net operating cost per capita for year on population of l,266,0Qp
(1954 estimate)	
Net operating cost per capita per school-day (189 days) on population
of 1,266,000 1	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on
population of 1,266,000	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day
(189 days) on population of 1,266,000	
i Computed on the net operating cost of $47,183,329.05.
2 Computed on the net operating cost to the Provincial Government of $19,652,525.76.
O 15
$102.86
.54
37.271
.201
15.522
.082
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1953-54:—
Municipal school districts  8
Large municipal school districts  36
Large rural school districts  36
Rural school districts (unattached)   24
Total number of districts  104
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 15,281; of this
number, 7,504 were boys and 7,777 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson
10. Arrow Lakes
6
2
2
1
1
5
1
1
11
3
22
6
5
15
16
30
18
9
147
27
48
26
11
71
21
12
15
3
33
10
8
22
21
40
23
12
212
36
64
30
14
114
30
17
360
74
11. TraiL
19. Revelstoke
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen
22. Vernon
628
158
165
495
23. Kelowna
33. Chilliwack—
445
951
34. Abbotsford
36. Surrey
477
281
39. Vancouver
40. New Westminster
4,642
840
4i. Burnaby
4j. North Vancouver
4. West Vancouver
1.488
744
389
«. Greater Victoria-.
w. Nanaimo                                             "               ""
*t Courtenay                                         """              """ """
2,242
579
323
Totals
29
1
498
704
15,281
-—	
 O 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
of
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 31,500*
this number, 15,710 were boys and 15,790 were girls.   The number of schools,'numbel
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
5. Creston	
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan	
9. Castlegar 	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
14. Southern Okanagan
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
20. Salmon Arm	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
28. Quesnel	
32. Fraser Canyon	
3 5. Langley- 	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South...
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
Totals 	
54
19
20
21
9
12
18
18
14
19
34
8
16
20
36
16
9
30
58
14
24
235
28
37
10
23
19
9
5
4
27
21
14
21
28
14
14
36
7
24
6
12
1,009
25
30
28
10
12
22
25
17
25
43
11
22
29
46
21
12
43
76
19
31
329
31
52
12
35
28
9
10
4
37
33
20
28
36
20
20
46
10
34
10
15
1,363
Number of
Pupils
594
665
581
223
280
473
488
376
547
1,018
247
466
589
1,175
498
266
998
1,876
386
771
8,215
949
1,104
251
700
625
246
137
119
802
615
426
595
815
396
391
1,064
204
785
194
350
31,500
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O  17
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 13,853; of this
number, 7,092 were boys and 6,761 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:— #
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
7. Nelson	
11. Trail- —	
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster
41. Burnaby	
44. North Vancouver.
61. Greater Victoria..
68. Nanaimo	
Totals	
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
18
14
24
23
20
24
26
19
79
36
43
26
51
25
410
Number of
Teachers
22
33
30
26
30
34
27
110
46
56
32
81
35
562
Number of
Pupils
465
728
695
669
742
802
643
2,764
1,295
1,623
850
1,772
805
13,853
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,148; of this
number, 1,118 were boys and 1,030 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils-
4. Windermere	
5. Creston    	
6. Kootenay Lake	
3
4
5
3
8
2
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
2
3
11
2
7
3
3
4
2
3
3
4
5
3
8
2
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
2
3
11
2
7
3
3
4
2
3
75
107
116
7. Nelson	
85
13. Kettle Valley 	
203
18. Golden          	
19. Revelstoke  	
49
56
20. Salmon Arm                 	
22. Vernon  .                                                                  	
76
62
27. Williams Lake                                                       	
28. Quesnel 	
66
82
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
166
54
48. Howe Sound	
51. Portland Canal	
27
64
54. Smithers.	
55. Burns Lake	
342
34
56. Vanderhoof	
62. Sooke.
189
35
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay
63
97
79. Ucluelet-Tofino...
— Unattached districts...                                              	
39
61
Totals	
27
89
89
2,148
 O 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 13 337.
of this number, 6,742 were boys and 6,595 were girls. The number of schools, numbe'
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
1. Fernie	
4. Windermere	
6. Kootenay Lake	
10. Arrow Lakes	
13. Kettle Valley	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
20. Salmon Arm	
22. Vernon	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon	
39. Vancouver	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte	
53. Terrace	
56. Vanderhoof	
58. McBride	
60. Peace River North...
64. Saltspring	
69. Qualicum	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino—	
78. Enderby	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
80. Kitimat	
— Unattached districts
Totals	
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
50
38
12
8
6
6
18
11
10
13
6
5
6
21
8
20
24
11
4
16
21
19
4
7
13
9
18
13
15
11
25
10
10
12
7
5
13
45
12
8
6
6
22
11
10
16
6
5
6
25
8
24
27
12
4
20
25
22
4
7
13
10
23
13
20
12
30
10
10
15
8
5
15
Number of
Pupils
1,188
335
224
143
162
636
318
304
425
157
140
177
629
165
539
668
397
111
531
495
687
100
195
360
262
542
339
379
347
800
208
230
411
187
126
420
455
515
13,337
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 3,929;
of this number, 1,984 were boys and 1,945 girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
41. Burnaby	
45. West Vancouver
67. Ladysmith	
69. Qualicum	
Totals	
3
1
1
1
67
22
12
11
112
79
27
13
12
131
Number of
Pupils
2,442
709
435
J43_
3,929
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O 19
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 130,126; of this
number, 67,555 were boys and 62,571 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
i
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Creston	
Kootenay Lake	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
B arriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Ladysmith.	
5
5
6
6
6
4
11
11
12
4
13
2
5
3
5
5
5
3
5
9
1
6
17
28
6
7
20
18
6
6
4
7
13
22
18
33
8
9
49
6
20
12
12
8
29
33
7
28
4
46
21
29
11
104
17
6
29
38
14
10
3
21
29
15
44
76
72
6
9
26
36
7
6
5
21
80
71
60
165
30
84
967
72
161
44
69
11
126
6
52
12
23
10
45
7
11
6
8
3
6
1
1
. 8
36
9
23
5
13
11
22
4
6
36
81
10
13
29
61
18
21
28
279
10
32
12
37
4
5
17
43
6
26
5
17
Number of
Pupils
8
146
30
1,033
34
1,108
7
148
30
838
4
59
49
1,561
21
490
29
902
11
352
112
3,125
18
560
6
110
30
1,057
41
1,399
14
372
10
245
3
53
21
721
30
917
15
548
46
1,557
77
2,558
73
2,127
6
112
9
128
26
501
36
1,068
7
131
6
97
5
67
21
629
81
2,899
73
2,432
60
2,019
167
6,075
30
1,020
86
2,985
1,087
31,950
75
2,893
163
6,077
44
1,631
70
2,551
134
4,909
55
1,871
23
609
46
1,375
11
217
8
188
6
133
1
11
36
1,237
23
708
13
370
22
592
6
131
83
2,256
13
212
62
1,597
21
349
288
10,328
32
969
37
1,162
5
80
44
1,310
27
803
17
521
 O 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni :	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby	
  Unattached districts-
Totals 	
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
No. and Name of District Number of Teachers
39. Vancouver |  24
41. Burnaby     8
43. Coquitlam     2
59. Peace River South    2
61. Greater Victoria  20
Totals  56
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay Lake	
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
20. Salmon Arm	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
8
6
7
9
8
6
15
14
13
7
16
3
9
4
6
6
6
6
7
13
2
10
21
30
7
8
23
21
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
46
48
53
22
53
17
83
33
47
20
168
31
20
48
72
22
28
16
30
58
20
98
132
114
11
15
50
63
53
55
64
22
62
17
99
33
51
20
203
35
20
55
84
25
32
16
34
65
23
117
153
125
11
15
54
68
Number of
Pupils
1,334
1,627
1,773
558
1,526
399
2,694
770
1,375
569
4,969
936
475
1,604
2,417
619
881
420
935
1,763
713
3,234
4,261
3,459
252
305
1,196
1,813
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O 21
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster—
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver.....
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte	
51. Portland Canal	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George	
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South...
60. Peace River North...
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
80. Kitimat	
 Unattached districts
Totals	
8
9
5
9
15
25
19
38
9
11
62
9
27
13
14
13
8
14
12
10
8
4
2
9
11
8
13
7
37
11
30
19
36
13
15
5
18
7
7
20
8
9
17
18
11
7
16
4
2
7
2
1
24
1,027
27
30
16
34
134
115
90
232
44
127
1,444
135
319
72
106
178
85
39
71
34
27
10
4
55
39
29
28
26
108
22
82
39
401
49
58
18
71
40
43
119
36
94
84
58
23
15
61
16
25
21
9
5
68
31
33
17
37
151
130
103
255
49
144
1,782
157
370
75
124
196
96
41
84
38
30
10
4
64
39
31
28
26
120
23
97
44
503
55
65
18
80
47
50
141
42
108
93
63
23
15
72
20
28
24
10
5
72
6,533
7,574
670
765
464
1,006
4,592
3,711
3,017
8,232
1,406
4,399
48,102
5,028
11,630
2,580
3,655
6,503
2,969
1,026
2,129
739
875
233
75
1,862
1,149
849
745
680
3,058
474
2,212
891
14,342
1,430
1,757
419
2,125
1,199
1,347
3,712
990
3,071
2,618
1,550
435
307
2,024
550
868
610
226
126
1,865
210,174
 O 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in
each type of school for the school-year 1953-54:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Total
Boys
Girls
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Unclassified	
Totals	
29
54
18
27
50
6
843
704
1,363
562
89
515
131
4,154
56
1,027
7,574
15,281
31,500
13,853
2,148
13,337
3,929
130,126
7,504
15,710
7,092
1,118
6,742
1,984
67,555
7,777
15,790
6,761
1,030
6,595
1,945
62,571
210,174       107,705
102,469
Average
Daily
Attendance
13,528.95
28,326.08
12,802.18
1,905.49
11,857.98
3,594.81
119,045.93
191,06142"
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
Gross
Salary
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
512
1,030
423
89
457
114
3,957
$24,484.34
42,127.61
16,832.15
2,659.76
16,035.46
3,789.31
124,893.24
$6,680
7,000
6,740
5,180
6,562
6,415
6,860
Supervising Principals
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
28
42
17
18
6
78
$1,891.62
2,739.96
1,149.53
1,138.38
384.85
4,781.45
$7,830
8,095
7,377
7,380
7,305
7,190
Special Instructors
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Unclassified	
$7,399.67
11,766.61
4,728.66
1,511.33
384.84
4,080.96
2,871.51
$2,130
1,460
1,530
1,425
1,481
2,040
1,200
$5,665
5,595
6,035
4,650
5,350
2,800
$4,782
4,090
3,979
2,988
3,509
3,323
3,156
$6,755
6,524
6,762
6,330
6,414
6,028
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT § O 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers
earning less than $1,100 per annum:— |
Number of Number of
Salary Range                          Teachers Salary Range                          Teachers
$1,100-$1,199   8     $3,800-$3,899  302
1,200- 1,299   8      3,900- 3,999  243
1,300- 1,399  12      4,000- 4,099  387
1,400- 1,499  22      4,100- 4,199  135
1,500- 1,599  24      4,200- 4,299  212
1,600- 1,699  10      4,300- 4,399  106
1,700- 1,799  18      4,400- 4,499  93
1,800- 1,899  16      4,500- 4,599  84
1,900- 1,999  70      4,600- 4,699  57
2,000- 2,099  145      4,700- 4,799  160
2,100- 2,199  204      4,800- 4,899  142
2,200- 2,299  228      4,900- 4,999  111
2,300- 2,399  259      5,000- 5,099  159     §
2,400- 2,499  306      5,100- 5,199  117
2,500- 2,599  210      5,200- 5,299  67
12,600- 2,699  227      5,300- 5,399  86
2,700- 2,799 j  231      5,400- 5,499  62
2,800- 2,899  238      5,500- 5,599  96
2,900- 2,999  214      5,600- 5,699  91
3,000- 3,099  280      5,700- 5,799  62
3,100- 3,199  225      5,800- 5,899  116
3,200- 3,299  206      5,900- 5,999  85
3,300- 3,399  225      6,000- 6,099  27
3,400- 3,499  193      6,100- 6,199  24
3,500- 3,599  185      6,200- 6,299  10
3,600- 3,699  240      6,300- 6,399  22
3,700- 3,799  301      6,400 and over  128
 O 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1953__54
Minister's office	
General administration	
Curriculum Branch	
Adult Education Branch	
High Correspondence School	
Elementary Correspondence School	
Inspection of Schools and School Services	
School for the Deaf and the Blind __
Teacher-training and Summer Schools	
Teacher Registration and Examinations	
Vancouver Normal School	
Victoria Normal School 1
Accounting Branch	
Federal-Provincial Training Programmes—
Urban Occupational Training	
Rural Occupational Training	
Student Aid	
Vocational Training—Re-establishment	
Vocational Training—Apprentices	
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement	
Community programmes grants	
Basic and supplementary grants	
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act	
Special aid to rural areas	
Conveyance of pupils	
Teachers' Pensions Fund 6% 	
Night-school grants             	
Education of soldiers' dependent children	
Free text-books, maps, etc. (Text-book Branch)	
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $2,599,999.98
University Endowment Lands  65,510.00
$9,289.40
52,824.97
70,035.75
114,786.52
217,207.71
68,438.42
504,080.74
269,988.37
54,158.77
112,696.71
142,320.96
124,750.41
38,651.11
40,960.87
12,588.96
117,988.00
40,798.21
67,184.31
160,331.52
3,945.88
10,279,127.33
2,270.00
5,656,452.59
1,181,679.30
1,688,682.08
37,172.42
15,286.25
275,384.05
Special grant to Victoria College
Incidentals and contingencies	
2,665,509.98
30,000.00
5,641.56
Total expenditure by Government  $24,060,233.15
Amount expended by districts (including debt and capital charges)    46,731,611.10
Grand total expenditure  $70,791,844.25
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O 25
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1953-54
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure:
Government
Grants
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11
12.
13,
14.
15.
16,
17,
18.
19.
20.
21,
22.
23,
24.
25,
26,
27.
28.
29.
30.
31
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41
42.
43,
44,
45,
46.
47,
48,
49.
50,
51,
52.
53,
54,
55.
56.
57,
58,
59.
60.
61,
62,
63,
64.
65.
66.
67,
68,
69,
70.
71
72.
73.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Creston	
Kootenay Lake	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt    §	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River |
Alert Bay	
$1,075,487.
344,680.
537,695.
122,311.
456,169.
238,229.
1,715,829.
213,271
357,858.
137,331.
1,125,460.
215,429.
117,651.
374,334.
496,081.
157,672.
191,699.
264,851.
185,431.
372,725.
340,284.
706,083.
878,544.
858,389.
72,625.
128,937.
399,083.
766,024.
255,760.
212,330.
126,434.
241,048.
1,049,824.
806,402.
588,274.
1,239,218.
404,743.
930,644.
18,778,868.
1,184,423.
3,072,291.
507,333.
805,730.
1,321,900
744,404
290,290
540,384
249,444
325,816
111,695
22,079
544,444
265,692
206,633
218,593
216,637,
1,028,317
164,910
661,466
674,961
4,611,809
683,629
429,586
138,980
483,325.
445,839
343,920
932,723
323,178
654,344
880,678
857,312
279,210
65
64
91
30
23
39
82
86
35
95
61
59
74
13
41
51
61
96
07
42
33
48
70
49
29
06
36
96
74
47
36
42
38
68
84
97
88
78
99
51
41
98
74
.51
94
76
23
.50
.10
.47
.24
02
.38
.10
.68
.58
.93
.20
.50
.66
.25
.01
.58
.40
16
41
77
.37
.91
39
19
57
39
$198,708.10
166,926.46
153,144.72
96,057.54
317,149.95
62,323.82
333,154.86
131,943.09
189,576.00
100,273.38
315,883.25
121,420.01
76,496.24
269,827.90
156,094.80
114,934.94
129,353.18
82,592.04
90,116.72
204,427.76
53,126.70
332,500.36
367,170.67
366,623.64
49,684.82
75,780.15
258,137.55
342,978.15
67,041.33
125,495.18
48,975.49
154,357.07
334,816.75
331,721.38
218,075.04
424,749.06
65,808.58
240,770.64
1,940,217.88
216,532.05
610,046.81
167,373.71
297,504.48
288,392.36
108,881.57
161,738.29
267,888.39
125,781.11
76,877.64
49,387.56
16,757.43
60,927.70
190,690.38
151,707.66
159,013.19
136,613.34
337,470.54
119,860.23
461,520.10
221,449.70
728,569.70
198,599.37
170,980.03
90,909.13
240,126.77
136,854.84
141,017.77
368,885.59
229,004.48
268,541.60
370,627.64
244,480.75
94,121.51
District
Expenditure
$876,779.55
177,754.18
384,551.19
26,253.76
139,019.28
175,905.57
1,382,674.96
81,328.77
168,282.35
37,058.57
809,577.36
94,009.58
41,155.50
104,506.23
339,986.61
42,737.57
62,346.43
182,259.92
95,314.35
168,297.66
287,157.63
373,583.12
511,374.03
491,765.85
22,940.47
53,156.91
140,945.81
423,046.81
188,719.41
86,835.29
77,458.87
86,691.35
715,007.63
474,681.30
370,199.80
814,469.91
338,935.30
689,874.14
16,838,651.11
967,891.46
2,462,244.60
339,960.27
508,226.26
1,033,508.15
635,523.37
128,552.47
272,495.84
123,663.39
248,938.46
62,387.91
5,321.81
483,516.32
75,002.00
54,925.44
59,580.49
80,024.24
690,847.39
45,049.97
199,946.40
453,511.96
3,883,239.55
485,029.64
258,606.55
48,071.27
243,198.39
308,984.57
202,903.00
563,837.78
94,174.43
385,802.79
510,050.55
612,831.82
185,088.88
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
 O 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1953
—Continued ^
No. and Name of School District
74. Quatsino—	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland—
78. Enderby	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino.
80. Kitimat	
Unattached
Atlin	
Bamfleld	
Belmont Park	
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163	
Camp Mile 300	
Camp Mile 456	
Chezacut	
Comox Airport	
Esperanza	
Fort Nelson	
Fort Nelson Airport-
Kyuquot	
Lower Post	
McDame Creek	
Muchalat	
Sarita River	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis River	
Tatlayoko	
Telegraph Creek	
Tulsequah	
University Hill	
Zeballos	
Totals-
Total
Expenditure1
$610,549.54
494,185.67
194,250.97
173,715.49
243,985.91
193,759.93
60,553.46
4,908.62
20,507.24
65,737.46
4,599.38
4,035.59
17,506.22
4,085.75
3,339.74
17,991.52
3,603.30
5,679.19
6,500.00
6,149.15
7,566.03
7,102.27
10,281.97
3,544.99
3,081.16
20,627.86
4,177.21
22,103.46
7,467.64
115,719.80
13,828.11
$64,056,844.80
Government
Grants
$17,925.27
191,384.75
49,205.82
58,073.06
80,565.02
51,085.21
1,581.24
3,031.38
14,555.85
60,277.37
2,100.37
3,984.68
17,506.22
3,984.20
3,050.13
17,991.52
1,603.24
4,451.01
3,525.70
4,974.56
7,499.06
3,821.70
2,264.99
39.53
2,805.32
9,130.82
4,006.56
19,432.00
2,044.56
56,170.84
9,593.10
$17,325,233.70
_. District
Expenditure
$592,624.27
302,800.92
145,045.15
115,642.43
163,420.89
142,674.72
58,952.22
1,877.24
5,951.39
5,460.09
2,499.01
50.91
101.55
289.61
2,00a06
1,228.18
2,974.30
1,174.59
66.97
3,280.57
8,016.98
3,505.46
275.84
11,497.04
170.65
2,671.46
5,423.08
59,548.96
4,235.01
$46,731,611.10
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1954
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225, generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
1st in B.C.
2nd in B.C.
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3
Area 4
Area5
Area 6
Area 7
Area 8
Area 9
Area 10
Area 11
Area 12
Area 13
Tied.
Name
Timothy Angus Williams	
Jeremy Stephen Drummond Winter	
George James Sofko.	
Anne Isabel Richard	
Sidney Wayne Hubble	
J Joyce Chiyeko Gyoba1
I Stuart Michael Piddoche1.
Marion Nastich	
Thomas Raymond Meadowcroft-
Martin Michael Zlotnick	
Penelop Anne Godfrey	
Valerie Joy Elliott.
Geraldine Louise Saunders.
Margaret Helen Weick	
Gael Harling Stott ...
Gwyneth Mary McArrary.1
School
Oak Bay High School	
Oak Bay High School	
Michel-Natal High School —
Penticton High School	
Kelowna High School	
Spuzzum, B.C.
Philip Sheffield High SchooL	
Richmond Junior-Senior High SchooL
Gladstone Junior-Senior High School-
King Edward High School—.	
Crofton House (Private) SchooL-
Burnaby North High School
Squamish Elementary-Senior High School-
Charleson Elementary-Senior High School
Oak Bay High School	
Nanaimo Senior High School
PerCent
96.8
94.6
91.1
89.9
90.1
89.4
89.4
85.1
91.8
92.3
90.1
90.0
89.8
84.9
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT O 27
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Timothy Angus Williams. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance examinations
was won by Jeremy Stephen Drummond Winter.
GENERAL REVIEW
Considerable progress has been made in all branches of Departmental work during
the year.   Reports of the branches appear in the following pages. f
Change of Ministers
During the year the Department suffered a distinct loss in the untimely passing of
the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston, Minister of Education. Mrs. Rolston's insight as
a legislator and a woman into educational problems and her buoyant cheerful personality
have been greatly missed.
Mrs. Rolston was succeeded as Minister by the Honourable Robert W. Bonner,
Q.C., B.A., LL.B., who held the two portfolios of Attorney-General and Minister of
Education during his six months' incumbency. Mr. Bonner gave to the Department
a keen and penetrating leadership.
Just previous to the close of the school-year the Honourable Ray Williston, B.A.,
became Minister of Education. Mr. Williston, a former high-school principal and
Inspector of Schools, comes to his high position eminently qualified to discharge the
duties which will devolve upon him, the second time in the history of the Province that
a professional educator has been Minister of Education.
Reorganization of the Department
For many years the Department has been growing by an accretion of functions made
necessary by an expanding school population and a diversification of educational offerings.
During the school-year 1953-54 the reorganization of the Department, indicated
on the attached insert, was brought into effect. This involved promotions to the following
senior positions at Departmental headquarters: Deputy Minister and Superintendent,
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.; Assistant Deputy, J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed.; Chief
Inspector of Schools, F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.); Co-ordinator of Services, W. A.
Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed.; Co-ordinator of Teacher Education, F. H. Johnson, M.A.,
D.P_ed.; Director of Administration, G. W. Graham, B.A.; Departmental Registrar,
H. M. Evans, B.A.; and Departmental Comptroller, S. E. Espley.
Retirements
During or at the conclusion of the school-year the Department lost the services of
the following able officials, who contributed greatly to the success of the Department:
Mr. C. G. Brown, Municipal Inspector of Schools for Burnaby; Mr. D. K. Kennedy,
Chairman, Assessment Equalization Commission; Mr. R. D. Smith, Chief Clerk; Miss
Madge Wolfenden, Assistant Provincial Archivist, who had been with the Archives
thirty-nine years; and Miss M. C. Holmes, Assistant Provincial Librarian.
During the year, also, Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale, Superintendent of Schools for
Vancouver and this Department's representative in that city, came to retirement. During
his years as teacher, principal, and Superintendent, Dr. MacCorkindale, perhaps more
than any other one person, was responsible for the growth and development of Vancouver's fine school system.
All members of the Department were saddened by the sudden and unexpected
passing of Mr. H. O. English, principal of the Victoria Normal School. To Mr. English
the training of young teachers was a sacred trust, to which he devoted his very considerable
energy and enthusiasm.
 O 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Appointments and Promotions
In addition to those mentioned under | Reorganization of the Department"
following appointments and promotions were made during the year:— '
To Municipal Inspectorships:  Mr. John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria-
Mr. C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby. 'and
To Assistant Municipal Inspectorships:  Mr. A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M BA
Greater Victoria; Mr. R. C. Grant, B.A., Burnaby; and Mr' W E Ln
B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver. '   *      cas>
To Provincial Inspectors of Schools: Mr. H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.; Mr Eri
Dunn, B.A., M.A.; Mr. J. G. Kirk, B.A., M.A.; Mr. H. S. Hum BA°
Mr. W. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed.; and Mr. F. J. Orme, B.A., BJai'
To Vancouver supervisory staff: Mr. R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.P_ed., Superintendent; Mr. O. J. Thomas, B.A., Deputy Superintendent; Mr. H. B
Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent; and Mr. D. B. MacKenzie
B.A., M.A., Assistant Superintendent.
To Normal School staffs: Mr. H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Acting Principal, Victoria*
Mr. N. H. Brown, B.A., Vancouver; Mr. D. C. Gibbard, BA, M.A.
Vancouver; Mr. A. E. Loft, B.A., Victoria; Mr. N. A. Swainson, MA.
B.Ed., Victoria; and Mr. W. H. Gaddes, M.A.
A study of the following pages should make clear the continuing emphasis on all
of the permanent values of a sound education. In particular, I should like to mention
two of them. In the first place, there is a steady and pervading emphasis in all grades
on the fundamental skills and learnings necessary for life in this modern world. Secondly,
in these days of mass secondary education increasing provision is being made for individual pupil differences to the end that each child, both bright and slow-learning, shall
be developed and trained to the limit of his capacity.
 EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION O 29
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.Paed., ASSISTANT DEPUTY
MINISTER OF EDUCATION AND DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM
In this, my first report as Director of Curriculum, to which position I succeeded
Mr. H. L. Campbell, now Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, in October,
1953,1 should like to reaffirm that during the eight years he was associated with curriculum development many progressive changes occurred, particularly at the secondary-school
level, which have placed British Columbia in the forefront in this field. It is hoped that
the splendid work already well advanced will be continued by this Division, in co-operation with those of my colleagues who are chiefly concerned with the instructional phases
of education.
The curriculum for the schools of British Columbia is designed to secure the best
possible education for every child. In the process of achieving this aim, constant attention is given to trends elsewhere and to the wishes of the people of the Province in respect
of the kind of education they desire for their children. Furthermore, attention is also
given to improvements in the methods and content of education, as established by the
studies and research of reputable educational authorities. Curriculum development is
therefore a matter of careful planning and gradual change, in order that the values of
established courses and practices may be retained, and that improvements and new courses
may be incorporated where they are needed.
Throughout the process, care is taken to avoid undue influence from any group or
from particular educational theories, progressive or traditional. The resulting curriculum
is actually somewhat conservative in comparison with that in force in other places.
There is every reason to believe, however, that this curriculum is highly effective in providing a basically sound education for every child.
During the period under review, the work of curriculum development has been concerned with the following:—
1. An Appraisal of the Elementary-school Curriculum
During the year the work of appraising or evaluating the major subject fields in the
elementary-school curriculum was begun. A widely representative committee of principals and teachers was set up for this purpose. Several meetings were held in Vancouver,
and reports were submitted which resulted in a plan to revise progressively, on a priority
basis, certain subject fields which have not been touched in recent years.
2. An Experiment in Decentralization
An experiment is at present under way to decentralize the teacher-committee work
in respect to course revision and text-book selection. In the past, participating teachers
have come mainly from Vancouver and other points on the Lower Mainland. In June
of this year committees of teachers, in co-operation with the Provincial Inspectors of
Schools, were organized at four points to undertake course revisions, as follows: Trail,
Junior High School Mathematics; Nelson, Social Studies for the intermediate grades;
Penticton, General Science for the intermediate grades; and Langley, English 10. In
each case the local Inspector of Schools will act as the Departmental representative and
consultant. It is expected that these groups will function during the forthcoming school-
year.
 O 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
3. Revision of Present Courses and Selection of New Text-books
(a) Course revisions and the development of new courses were undertaken in th
following subjects:—
(1) English.—A revised course was prepared for Grade VIII as the «*m.H
in a series of revisions for Grades VII, VIII, and DC. a
(2) Social Studies.—A new course based on the geography of British Colum-
bia was prepared for Grades X, XI, and XII. An appraisal was made of
the organization and contents of the present courses in Social Studies
(3) Mathematics.—Two of the present courses in Mathematics were revised
A new course in practical mathematics was prepared at a senior level for
those who are not proceeding to a study of advanced mathematics.
(4) Sciences.—Two courses in Biology were revised, one for Grade XI or
XII, the other for Grade XIII (Senior Matriculation). The Grade XIII
course in Physics was also revised. J|§§-
(5) Languages.—Course revisions in Grade XIII French, German, and Latin
were completed.
(6) Industrial Arts.—All courses in the field of Industrial Arts were revised.
(7) Music.—Two new programmes in school music were developed, one for
Grades IV to VI, the other for Grades VII to IX.
(b) In connection with the foregoing, the following new text-books were adopted:—
English—
Life and Adventure, English 8.
Using Our Language, English 8.
Social Studies—
British Columbia Geography Manual, Social Studies 32.
Mathematics—
Plane Geometry, Mathematics 20. S:
First Course in Algebra, Mathematics 20.
Occupational Mathematics, Mathematics 21.
Sciences—
Modern Biology, Biology 91.
General Biology, Biology 100.
Laboratory Exercises, Biology 100.
College Physics, Physics 101.
Languages—
Contes Modernes, French 120.
Review of French Grammar, French 120.
Drie Nouvellen, German 120.
A Book of German Verse, German 120.
Complete German Course, German 120.
A Latin Reader, Latin 120.       f       if
Latin Fundamentals, Latin 120. §
The Book of the Ancient Romans, Latin 120.
Music—
We Like to Sing, Music Grades I to III.
World Music Horizons, Music Grade VII.
It might be noted that over half of the above-named books were written or edited
by Canadian and British authors. Five books represent work by British Columbia writers.
This is in keeping with the policy of giving preference to Canadian and British text-booKs
wherever possible. During the biennium 1952-54, sixty new texts replacing those ou
of date or out of print have been adopted as a result of numerous revisions, and in »
majority of cases the authors are Canadian or British in origin, while the texts are polished in Canada by Canadian firms.
 EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION O 31
All course, revisions and text-book changes were undertaken with the assistance of
committees of teachers, members of the University staff, and other interested groups.
Over one hundred persons during the year participated directly or indirectly in this phase
of curriculum development.   Their keen interest and assistance are greatly appreciated.
Both the free-issue and text-book rental plans in this Province continue to operate
most effectively for the betterment of education. The Text-book Branch, by the very
nature of its work, functions closely with this Division. It is a pleasure to mention the
splendid support and co-operation which is manifest at all times.
As the school-year 1953-54 draws to a close, two events are forecast as follows:
Firstly, a secondary-school principals' conference lasting nine days will be held in July;
and secondly, the former Central Curriculum Committee has been reorganized on a
broader basis to give representation to lay as well as to professional groups. The new
organization, known as the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board, is scheduled to hold
its first meeting on September 1st, 1954. These topics will be reported upon more fully
in the next Annual Report. H
May I take this opportunity to record my appreciation for assistance during the past
year to Mr. J. R. Meredith, now Assistant Director of Curriculum; to several committees
of teachers who worked on course revisions, and especially to Mr. Walter Terming and
his colleagues for their painstaking work in connection with the preparation of the supplementary library lists issued during the year.
 O 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF F. C. BOYES, M.A., PRINCIPAL
The fifty-third session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, commenced on
September 8th, 1953, and closed on June 18th, 1954. Enrolment and results are indicated in the following table:—
Men
Enrolment	
Awarded diplomas.
120
104
Women
220
205
Total
340
309
The enrolment this year was only 84 per cent of last year's total. This was regrettable, as the need for teachers was greater than ever. One explanation which has been
offered is that the Departmental and University examinations were more searching than
usual, and that many students who had planned to attend the Normal School found that
they did not have the necessary requirements for admission. Whatever the reason for the
decrease might have been, it is interesting to note that the loss was in the women's group.
We found that the number of men attending was exactly the same as for the previous
year. The number of women attending dropped by 23 per cent.
Fifteen students were granted distinction standing. The following is the list: Earl
Malcolm Graham Allen, Ethel Shirley Anderson, Diana Marguerite Bradley, Yvonne
Louise French, Evelyn May Grantham, Barbara Helen Hay, Patricia Jean Ledgerwood,
Vivian Isobel McClounie, Irene Marchese, Beverly Ann Nelson, Karl Norman, Elizabeth
Ruth Schirmer, Sylvia Phyllis Turton, Maureen Evelyn Wadden, and Mrs. Lillian Matilda
Wickson. The Maxwell Cameron Award, presented by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation to the outstanding student in each teacher-training institution, was won by
Yvonne French.
The range in academic standing was as wide as ever. Thirty-five students had
degrees and twenty-live had full second- or third-year standing. One hundred and eleven
students had full Senior Matriculation or First Year University standing. Five had
degrees in music. These groups made up practically 50 per cent of our student body,
which indicates a growing interest in higher academic qualifications. Only 27 per cent of
our students arrived with the bare University Entrance certificates. Most of these will
have secured credit in some Senior Matriculation subjects by August of this year.
I feel that I should, at this point, pay a sincere tribute to the administrators and
counsellors of the high schools of the Province. They have been directing more and more
students of the right type to teacher-training courses. I am sure that the results of this
will be reflected in our schools in the future. I feel sure that the improved academic
standing of our students is the direct result of the interest and enthusiasm of these advisors.
Practice-teaching and demonstrations lessons play a major role in any training programme. Dr. Lord and T. R. Hall laid a wonderful foundation for this as far as the
Vancouver Normal School is concerned, and I have been privileged to carry | along.
The Model School and Simon Fraser School make wonderful contributions in this field.
Mr. Franklin and Mr. Meadows realize the importance of this contribution, and spare no
pains to make it more effective each year. Members of both staffs, inspired by m
leadership, have been unsparing in their efforts to introduce our students to the best i
teaching. The demonstration lessons which they prepare and present leave nothing to
desired. We owe them much and are pleased to acknowledge that debt.
 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION O 33
We would also like to extend our warmest thanks to Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale,
Inspector O. J. Thomas, Superintendent R. S. Shields, Inspector C. G. Brown, and
Inspector William Gray for the splendid co-operation which we have always received
from them in this regard. They have always been prepared to open their schools to our
students, and to assist in every way to further the training programme. Principals and
staff members have responded freely to our requests for assistance, and their comments
on our students have been most worth while.
Inspectors, principals, and teachers in Richmond and the Fraser Valley have become
more and more interested in teacher-training, and are offering their schools as training-
grounds. We have taken advantage of these offers wherever possible, and are most
grateful for the assistance thus rendered. Some of our students have taught in areas on
the Island and in the Interior. In all cases they have met with genuine interest and have
been helped greatly in their practice-teaching. We would like these teachers to know that
we really appreciate the value of the work done by assisting teachers.
We were privileged to have a panel of Inspectors from the Fraser Valley discuss
school problems before the student-body. This discussion was a highlight to many of the
students. We plan to make it a permanent feature of our work. Mr. William Grant was
a very interesting chairman, and his colleagues supported him most ably.
Once more we must pay our debt to the Provincial Model School. Miss Manning
and Miss Grier carried on their inspiring work with our students. Mrs. Sinclair was
forced to take a year's leave of absence due to her health, and her place was taken by
Mrs. Webber, who carried a new and heavy load with real credit to herself. These three
ungraded classes are a boon to us in our work. As I watch them in action, I feel that
they might well be called " opportunity classes" for both the little people fortunate
enough to attend them and for our students who are privileged to observe and teach
in them.
The Metropolitan Health Committee has again looked after our needs most adequately. Our own nurse, Miss Parrett, not only checks on all health matters, but instructs
in first aid. During the year she makes frequent home visits and frequently secures information which enables us to be of greater assistance to various students. We are most
grateful to the committee for the various services rendered in such cheerful and efficient
fashion.
The only staff change during the year was the return of Dr. Grantham from Indonesia. He replaced Mr. Broome as vice-principal, and Mr. Norval Brown returned to his
position on the staff of the Vancouver Schools. As the year ended, we learned that Miss
McManus would retire. It is difficult to estimate the value of an individual's contribution
to any cause, but, if one can judge by the number of groups who arranged to honour her,
the contribution which Miss McManus has made to education was great indeed. She will
be missed, but the work which she has done will carry on.
We suffered another loss during the year when Mrs. Rhoda Stewart, our secretary,
was forced to resign on account of her health. Mrs. Stewart had rendered long and
faithful service to the school, and her decision came as a shock. We were fortunate to be
able to promote Miss Bette MacLaine to the position, and to secure Mrs. Joan Thomson
to replace her as stenographer. The work of these young ladies is most satisfactory.
May I, in closing, pay a sincere tribute to the officials and staff members of the
Department of Education and of the Department of Public Works for the way in which
they have assisted me during the year. I have met with considerate and kindly treatment
on every occasion, and this had added much to a pleasant year's work.
I
 O 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF HENRY C. GILLILAND, M.A., PRINCIPAL
In the ordinary course of affairs this report would have been written by Principal
Harry O. English, B.A., B.S.A. However, Mr. English died suddenly on August 4th
1954. He had just completed a decade of service at the head of this school. The happy
characteristic of his leadership was his faith in the ability of each student to succeed, By
the force of his personality, and by his constant emphasis on their strong points, he developed in his students that self-confidence so necessary to their best work as teachers
The fortieth session of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria began on September 8th, 1953, and closed on June 18th, 1954. Enrolment and results are shown in the
following table:—
Men
Women
Total
Enrolled	
Awarded diplomas
41
37
129
118
170
155
Honour Standing and Awards
The following students graduated with honour standing: Marilyn Beatrice Adcock,
Vernon; William Charles Bell, Cassidy; Linda Bjornson, Dawson Creek; George William Broadley, Victoria; Betty Helfrid Dow, Pouce Coupe; Ethel Maud Ends, Cobble
Hill; Ivy Dell Johnson, Alberni; Margaret Ursula McCormick, Kelowna; Marie Corinne
Maggiora, Victoria; and Lida Tina Zinovich, Fernie.
The Denton Memorial Award for all-round achievement and leadership was won by
Lida Tina Zinovich of Fernie. This award is the gift of the Normal School Class of
1943_44. H   ;j||g ||||
|M The Maxwell Cameron Memorial Award, given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation for high scholarship and teaching ability, was won by George William Broad-
ley, of Victoria.
Observation and Practice-teaching
Observation and practice-teaching were spread throughout the year—an essential
part of teacher education. Observation of children and of teaching procedures was carried on in the schools of Greater Victoria during September and October, and again in
January and early in February. During these periods, six students were assigned for
observation to each classroom for one half-day each week.
For teaching experience, students were assigned to classrooms at three periods during the year—two weeks near the end of November, two weeks at the end of February,
and four weeks following the Easter holidays. In November and in February two students shared the teaching in each room. In the final period of practice-teaching, one
student-teacher was assigned to a room. In most instances the student-teachers were
given complete charge of the classroom. These periods of practice-teaching used the
schools of Greater Victoria, of Saanich, of Sooke, and of many other parts of the Province. We extend sincere thanks to the many teachers, principals, and School Inspectors
who so ably co-operated with us in the placement and kindly guidance of our student-
teachers.
Health Services
Dr. J. L. Gayton, Medical Health Officer, carried on a thorough and highly effective
supervision of the health of our student-teachers.   He examined all of them early ffl
 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION O 35
first term. During the year he conducted many re-examinations, special examinations,
and consultations. Whenever the need was evident, students were referred to their private doctors for treatment. As usual, the immunity record of each student in relation
to smallpox, diphtheria, etc., was ascertained early in the year, and preventative inoculations were made available. Most of the students accepted this service; all were given
X-rays at the Chest Clinic. Dr. Gayton's supervision of the health of our student-teachers
has always been marked by a sincere interest in the welfare of each student, a factor that
has been of great importance to every one of them.
Another valuable aspect of Dr. Gayton's work has been his arrangement each year
of a series of lectures by doctors working in the field of public health. This year the
speakers and their topics were: Dr. A. N. Beattie, | School Medical, Nursing, and Sanitation Service "; Dr. J. L. Gayton, | Communicable Diseases and Prevention with Special
Reference to Poliomyelitis "; Dr. A. B. Sinclair, " Venereal Diseases "; and Dr. R. M.
Lane, " Tuberculosis."
During the year Mrs. E. B. Walker, P.H.N., and Mrs. M. J. Croft, P.H.N., of the
Saanich and South Vancouver Island Health Unit, assisted with examinations and immunizations, and came to the school regularly for health supervision and consultations.
Faculty and students alike appreciate the excellent services rendered to this school
by Dr. Gayton and by Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Croft. We extend to them and to the
Provincial Department of Health and Welfare our sincere thanks for this service.
First Aid
Evening classes in first aid were again provided by the St. John Ambulance Association, Victoria Centre. One hundred and thirty-nine student-teachers successfully
completed this course and obtained their certificates. We offer our grateful thanks for
the unselfish and skilful work of the St. John Ambulance Association instructors.
Special Lectures
During the closing months of the term a series of special lectures was given by
members of the Department of Education to acquaint the students with special services
available to them as teachers. We extend our thanks to Mr. J. F. K. English, Assistant
Deputy Minister of Education, for his talk on the activities of the Division of Curriculum;
to Mr. P. G. Barr, Officer in Charge, Text-book Branch, for his explanation of the work
of his branch; to Mr. C. K. Morrison, Superintendent, Public Library Commission, for
his survey of library facilities available throughout the Province; to Dr. C. B. Conway,
Director, Division of Tests, Standards, and Research, for a talk on testing; and to Mr.
Philip J. Kitley, Director of School Radio Broadcasts, for talks and demonstrations concerning school broadcasts.
CO-ORDINATOR OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Toward the close of the year a member of our faculty, F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed.,
was promoted to the position of Co-ordinator of Teacher Education. We extend to him
our sincere good wishes for his success and happiness in this important work.
 O 36
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Summer School of Education
REPORT OF F. HENRY JOHNSON, M.A., D.P_ed., CO-ORDINATOP
OF TEACHER EDUCATION
During the forty-first session of the Department's Summer School of Education th
enrolment showed a continued increase to a new high of 1,799 teachers. Of this
number, thirty-two were from other Provinces or countries who had not taught in British
Columbia.
A faculty of sixty-eight was employed, seven of whom were from other Canadian
Provinces, and three from the United States. Again it was necessary to accommodate the
Industrial Arts Section at Victoria in the F. T. Fairey Vocational Technical Building, as
the Vancouver Technical School was undergoing structural alterations. The main section
of the Summer School at Victoria offered seventy-four courses, the Industrial Arts Section
twenty-three courses, and the Commercial Education Section, on the University of British
Columbia campus, five courses.
Over half (54 per cent) of the teachers enrolled were studying toward the higher
certificates beyond that of the Elementary Basic. There was a gratifying increase in the
number of teachers working toward advanced certificates in Home Economics, Industrial
Arts, Physical Education, and Music—all fields in which there is an urgent need for
trained specialists.
It is evident from the large proportion of teachers seeking advanced certificates, and
from the fact that almost half of those attending Summer School (43 per cent) had at
least four years' teaching experience, that teachers must have an academic and professional education commensurate with their great responsibilities.
For the success of this summer session, grateful acknowledgment is made to the
faculty and teachers in attendance for their fine co-operation under difficulties of accommodation, and to the librarians of the Victoria and Vancouver Normal Schools, the Public
Library Commission, the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Teachers'
Library, and the Victoria City Library for the loan of hundreds of volumes without which
our own library would have been most inadequate.
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
Figures for the numbers of courses offered, numbers of instructors, and total enrolment for the past five years are shown in the table below:—
Victoria Section, 1954 (exclusive of Industrial Arts)
Industrial Arts Section-	
Vancouver Section (Commercial), 1954
Totals for 1954
Totals for 1953
Totals for 1952
Totals for 1951
Totals for 1950
 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION o 37
Courses Offered
Victoria Section
Philosophy, Psychology, Methods, and Administration of Education:
Enrolment
9a. Visual Education Workshop  31
11.    Principles of Visual Education  46
15.    Introduction to Educational Sociology  57
50. Technique of Classroom Management  157
51. Rural School Problems  76
52. Organization and Administration of the British Columbia
System  120
66. Organization  and  Administration  of  the  Elementary
School  71
67. Home, School, and Community Relations  133
104x. Workshop in Educational Leadership  77
110.    Educational Psychology  104
116.    Psychology of Learning  111
128.    Remedial Education  127
132.    Tests and Measurements  55
152.    Child Guidance  173
156.    Disciplinary Problems in the School  151
Kindergarten-Primary Education:
440a. School Music—Kindergarten-Primary  125
584.    Art Education for the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  60
588    Methods in Kindergarten Education  83
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  91
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory  85
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  138
593. Reading in the Primary Grades  145
594. Problems in Primary Methods  85
596. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  146
597. Arithmetic in the Primary Grades  139
Intermediate and Secondary Grades Education:
202.    Remedial Reading  173
212.    Creative Writing  33
215. Producing the One-act Play  38
216. Speech Arts  52
217. Puppetry   51
261.    Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades  63
277. Teaching of Elementary Science  107
277a. Teaching   of   Elementary   Science—Construction   of
Equipment  57
278. Natural History of British Columbia  38
346.    Modern Canada  52
357.    Creative Expression in Elementary School Art  55
425a. Canadian Literature, Part I—Survey of Canadian Poetry 33
425b. Canadian Literature, Part II—Contemporary Canadian
Prose  31
440b. School Music in the Intermediate Grades  88
457.    Instrumental Music I  36
 O 38
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Art: Enrolment
374.    Stage Design  32
381.    Introductory Drawing and Painting  56
386.    Introductory Lettering  57
391.    Advanced Drawing and Painting  20
394a. History of Art I  24
394b. History of Art II  30
401.    Art Education in Secondary Schools  28
Music:
443. Choral Music and Conducting  45
444. Introduction to Music Literature and History  20
445. Intermediate Harmony and Counterpoint  7
453.    Music Theory I  22
459.    Instrumental Music II  23
462.    Advanced Music Appreciation  n
469.    Summer School Chorus  142
Library Service:
410. School Library Organization and Administration  28
411. Functions of the School Library  18
413.    Cataloguing and Classification  23
Guidance and Counselling:
189. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services  44
190. Counselling Techniques  47
Physical Education:
P.E.   90. Physical Education in Kindergarten-Primary  60
P.E. 100. Gymnastic Activities for the Elementary School  43
P.E. 104. Tumbling and Apparatus  49
P.E. 107. Volleyball  63
P.E. 110. Basketball  46
P.E. 140. Social Dance  74
P.E. 143. Folk Dance for the Elementary School  51
P.E. 160. An Introduction to Physical Education  30
Home Economics:
650b. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  44
651.    Problems in Home Economics Education  12
653.    Foods and Nutrition  24
Typewriting:
604.    Practical Typewriting  53
Senior Matriculation:
213.    Grade XIII English  148
313.    Grade XIII World History  100
316.    Grade XIII Canadian History  122
Industrial Arts Education:
220.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School  20
223. Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  4
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to the Industrial Arts  24
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  8
227. Elementary Woodwork  ^
228. Elementary Wood-turning  *
229a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  9
229c. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  7
 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION O 39
Industrial A rts Education—Continued Enrolment
234. Art Metalwork       6
235. Elementary Sheet-metal work  4
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work       7
238.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School  14
241. Practical Geometry       7
242. Freehand Sketching ;  10
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork       7
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)       5
246. Advanced Wood-turning       9
247. Practice in the Use of Woodworking Machinery; Care
and Maintenance  18
248a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  15
248b. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)       8
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work j  29
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  21
251. Welding:  Arc and Oxy-acetylene  32
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
621.    Stenography (Practice and Speed)  18
624.    Typewriting Practice :  13
627. Applied Typewriting  16
628. General Business  18
628a. Business Law  17
Student Courses1
Total in 1954  5,456
Total in 1953  5,150
Total in 1952  5,776
Total in 1951  4,104
Total in 1950  4,443
1 These figures are totals of all course enrolments.
Registration
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  303                Less than 1 year      108
10 to 12 years  87                Unreported        58
7 to 9 years  130                                                  	
4 to 6 years  227                               Total  1,799
1 to 3 years  886
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1953-54
More than 10 rooms  762                2 rooms  101
7 to 10 rooms  232                1 room  112
4 to 6 rooms  255 Unreported, or did not
3 rooms  60                    teach this year  277
 O 40
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Table IIL—Grades Taught by the Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII     12
Grade XII  109
Grade XI  207
Grade X  223
Grade IX  267
Grade VIII  338
Grade VII  233
Grade VI  307
Grade V .
Grade IV
Grade III
Grade II \
  305
  348
  397
  440
Grade I  397
Kindergarten  ig
Special Classes  10
Unreported  222
Table IV.
Primary	
Intermediate	
Art	
Commercial	
Music	
Home Economics
Industrial Arts	
-Advanced Certificates Sought
272 Physical Education    61
Counsellor    43
156
94
31
77
73
91
S.A. (Instructor)     51
Handicapped      6
Not Specified    10
Total
965
Faculty
Abercrombie, Miss Mary E., Primary Teacher, Dawson Primary School, Vancouver.
Allen, Miss Audrianna, B.A., M.A., Elementary Curriculum Consultant, Seattle Public
Schools, Seattle, Wash. p
Alsbury, A. T., B.A., B.Ed., Commercial Specialist, Principal, Fairview High School of
Commerce, Vancouver.
Baig, Miss Daisy, A.N.S.C.A., Instructor, Art Department, St. John's High School, and
Supervisor, Children's Saturday Morning Classes, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg,
Man.
Barrett, Franklin L., B.A., B.Paed., Inspector of Schools, Kent County, Chatham, Ont.,
and Senior Editor, Copp Clark Co.
Baxter, Miss Edna L., B.A., A.M., Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Boone, Mrs. Kathleen, B.Sc.(H.Ec), S. J. Willis Junior High School, Victoria.
Brown, Denis W., B.A., Director of Audio-visual Department, Greater Victoria School
Board, Victoria.
De Bruyn, J., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver.
Carl, G. Clifford, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director, Provincial Museum, Victoria.
Carruthers, Miss Bertha Muriel, B.A.,  Librarian in Charge of Elementary School
Libraries, Vancouver.
Conner, Miss Florence, B.A., A.R.C.T., Music Specialist, John Oliver High School,
Vancouver. j§. f
Copeland, Miss Winnett A., Primary Specialist, Instructor, Provincial Normal School,
Victoria.
Davies, G.O.B., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of History and International
University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Doyle, Miss Gladys Annetta, B.H.Ec, Instructor, Trail Junior High School, Trail.
Dunlop, Miss Florence S., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist and Supervisor of
Classes, Ottawa Public Schools, Ottawa, Ont. v
Erwin, J. Howard, B.A., B.Ed., Science Instructor, Teachers' College, Saskatoon,»
Ferguson, Miss Nancy, B.A., Physical Education Instructor, Greater Victona Schools,
Victoria.
 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION O 41
Forgie, J. D., Welding Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gibson, W. S., Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gaddes, William H., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology, Victoria.
Goodfellow, Mary, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Gower, Fred E., Sheet-metal Work Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Grant, George, B.A., M.Sc.(P.E.), Supervisor of Physical Education, Greater Victoria
Schools, Victoria.
Green, Mrs. Irene V., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Vancouver.
Griffith, Harry E., B.E., M.A., Ed.D., Co-ordinator of Elementary Education, Humboldt
State College, Areata, Calif.
Hambrook, Gordon, Industrial Arts Instructor, South Park School, Victoria.
Hansen, E., Industrial Arts Instructor, S. J. Willis Junior High School, Victoria.
Hardie, William Leslie, B.A., M.A., Head of English Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria. §
Harpley, Miss Morag K. L., Primary Supervisor, Winnipeg Public Schools, Winnipeg,
Man.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Cambie Junior High
School, Vancouver.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Hunt, Edward G., B.A., Instructor, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Hutchinson, H. F., Industrial Arts Instructor, Trail High School, Trail.
Jarvis, Donald A., Dip., V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Johns, Harold P., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance, Department of Education, Victoria.
Kelly, Eric, M.A., Instructor in Social Studies, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Kerkham, Mrs. Elizabeth, B.S., Victoria.
Kurth, Burton, Head Supervisor of Music, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Levirs, Franklin, P., M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Inspector of Schools, Cranbrook.
Love, Miss E. M. Yvonne, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Gladstone Junior-
Senior High School, Vancouver.
Mahaffy, Dr. C. E., M.D., L.M.C.C, Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Mahood, D. E., M.Ed., Ed.D., Instructor, Macdonald College, McGill University, Que.
Merrick, C. J., Instructor in Draughting, Gladstone Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
Miller, Edward F., B.A., Principal, Sutherland Junior High School, North Vancouver.
McLagan, R. Moir, B.A., B.Paed., Head of Department of Health and Personal Development, Victoria High School, Victoria.
McManus, Miss Mildred, Mus.Bac, M.A., Instructor in Music, Provincial Normal School,
Vancouver.
Nicholl, Mrs. E., B.H.E., Instructor in Home Economics, Lloyd Crowe High School,
Trail. M
O'Connell, Miss M. Sheila, B.A., Primary Specialist, Model School, Vancouver.
Ozard, Elmore G., B.A., Art Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Penn, Richard, B.P.E., Instructor in Physical Education, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver.
Pritchard, Vaughan G., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Quayle, Thomas A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Vancouver. || Jp-
Reid, William D., B.A., M.Ed., Vice-Principal, Esquimalt High School, Victoria.
Rickard, Victor E., Vocational Instructor, Como Lake High School, New Westminster.
Robson, C. W. Sherwood, Music Specialist, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
 0 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Slind, Lloyd H., L.R.S.M., B.Sc, B.Mus.Ed., Instructor in Music Education Finn
State University, Tallahassee, Fla. '  m*
Smith, H. L., M.A., Principal, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Stark, Russell T., Electricity Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Steinson, S. W., B.A., M.A., D.Ed., Instructor in Psychology, Teachers' College, Saskatoon, Sask.
Stevenson, Miss Janie S., L.R.A.M., L.G.S.M., A.L.A.M., Teacher of Speech and Drama
Nelson. '
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Vancouver
Sutton, Miss Beatrice M., B.A., Commercial Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria
Swainson, Neil A., M.A., B.Ed., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Wells, Mrs. June-Diane E., B.P.E., Instructor in Physical Education, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver.
West, William D., Dip., V.S.A., Art Instructor, Central Junior High School, Victoria
Woods, Leonard A., A.O.C.A., Instructor in Sculpture and Art History, Vancouver
School of Art, Vancouver.
Student Activity Society
Auditing dates do not permit the inclusion here of the 1954 accounts. The following
statement is of the accounts of the preceding or 1953 session, as audited by Ismay, Bois-
ton, Dunn & Co., chartered accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $4,896.00
Additional income (receipts from dances and concerts)—      954.45
Total  $5,850.45
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $2,205.07
Social affairs, dances, picnics, entertainment       772.41
Service charges and incidentals       591.80
Total  $3,569.28
Excess of receipts over disbursements  $2,281.17
Funds on hand, December 31st, 1953  $3,387.49
Fall and Winter In-service Courses
I During the fall-to-spring session a number of courses, similar in content to those
given at the Summer School of Education, are offered in various urban centres throughout
the Province. In 1954 thirty-one such courses were offered, with a total enrolment of
583. Centres in which such classes were formed were Vancouver, Victoria, Mission,
Abbotsford, Nelson, Trail, Kamloops, Campbell River, Vernon, Nanaimo, Dawson
Creek, Cranbrook, and Kimberley.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION q 43
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL, VOCATIONAL,
AND ADULT EDUCATION
This report covers the work of the following for the school year 1953-54:	
(a) Industrial Arts (Junior and Senior High Schools, and Industrial Arts
option for University Entrance).
(b) Vancouver Technical School.
(c) Vancouver School of Art.
(d) Night-schools.
(e) Teacher-training.    §
(/) Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(g) Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by C. J. Strong, M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes.)
Junior High Schools
The expanding enrolment in the secondary schools is reflected in the additional
number of Industrial Arts teachers required each year. This need for more teachers
has outgrown our facilities for Industrial Arts teacher-training.
During the next school-year careful consideration should be given to the problem
of providing trained teachers for our growing school enrolment. The standard of work
done in Industrial Arts shops is, on the whole, satisfactory. Many of our teachers are
taking advantage of courses offered at Summer School for Secondary Advanced credits
to improve their knowledge and skill in specialized areas of Industrial Arts. There are
sixty-two school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, these being Abbotsford,
Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Ashcroft, Belmont Park, Campbell River, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Castlegar, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie,
Fraser Canyon, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Keremeos, Kimberley, Ladysmith,
Lake Cowichan, Langley, Lillooet, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Peace River North, Penticton, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Sechelt, Smithers, Sooke, Southern
Okanagan, Surrey, Summerland, Trail, Ucluelet-Tofino, University Hill, Vancouver,
Vernon, Greater Victoria, West Vancouver, and Williams Lake.
Senior High Schools
Industrial Arts courses in Senior High Schools continue to show an increased enrolment. During this past year all Industrial Arts courses have been again revised. The
pattern for all courses has been standardized, and weaknesses found by experience have
been corrected. It was decided to offer Farm Mechanics again as one of the optional
courses in Industrial Arts for Senior High Schools.
Industrial Arts Option for University Entrance
It was gratifying to note the increasing number of boys in different school districts
applying for examinations for scholarships this year. The practical applications of
science and mathematics found in Industrial Arts courses are beneficial to boys who plan
to continue their education at the University.
The total number of individual Junior and Senior High School shops in the Province
is 256.
 0 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
The total number of pupils participating is as follows:—
Junior High Schools  13,379
Senior High Schools    5,983
Total   19,362
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle, Inspector of Technical Classes.)
It is my pleasure to visit the Industrial Arts Departments in the districts of Burnaby
Coquitlam, North and West Vancouver, coastal points, the North, the Cariboo, South
Okanagan, and Northern Vancouver Island. Steady progress is being made in the
development of the established Industrial Arts centres, with future expansion being
planned in many districts.
During the past year a new centre was established in Ucluelet; others were added
in Burnaby, Campbell River, Dawson Creek, Nanaimo, and Prince George. It is also
interesting to note that new centres are being prepared in Alert Bay, Kitimat, and Terrace
for opening in September, 1954. M
The Vancouver Technical School
The following report has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal of
the Vancouver Technical School:—
11 indicated in my last report that extensions and alterations were planned to the
present building, which was built in 1928. These are almost completed, and comprise a
modern junior high school wing to the East, a new double gymnasium with cafeteria and
kitchen underneath, and alterations to our girls' building so as to give three foods
laboratories and three sewing laboratories. The Motor Mechanics shop was extended,
leaving room for a junior woodwork shop, metal shop, electrical shop, and a draughting-
room. Various other alterations have been made, the whole of which will make a very
efficient school plant.
1 We have co-operated with the Department of Labour in training a number of
apprentices from outside points in the Province. They usually come in for from four
to five weeks during the slack season of the year, and, under the instruction of Mr. A. E.
Russell, have returned home with a feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment.
2 This year we will have a very up-to-date kitchen in connection with our cafeteria.
Mr. Taylor, an experienced and well qualified chef, has been appointed. We anticipate
an expansion of our instruction to include fancy baking and candy-making.
11 am pleased to note that certain technical books have been placed on the rental
system."
The following is an analysis of the enrolment for the school-year 1953—54:
Boys Girls
University Programme      88 17
Commercial      68 387
Technical  397 27
Specials  §23
Totals  576 431
Grand total, 1,007.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION O 45
The Vancouver School of Art
The following report was prepared by Mr. Fred Amess, principal of the Vancouver
School of Art:—
" The Vancouver School of Art continues to enjoy its excellent facilities, although
these are taxed to the limit in some departments of the day and the night school and in
the Saturday morning classes, which are operating a split shift.
" The school programme was highlighted by a sale of work which, accompanied by
skits, was a tremendous success. The day-school joined with the evening-school in a
highly successful Christmas Black and White Party. i
" There was no Beaux Arts Ball this year, but organization for this event is under
way, and it is expected to hold the Beaux Arts Ball in February, 1955. il
" Mr. Lionel Thomas, who is leaving us this year, was successful in winning a mural
competition for the Mercantile Bank. Mr. Shadbolt was invited to Calgary, to Winnipeg,
and to Duncan, where he adjudicated and gave a graduation address. Mr. Bobak was the
winner of the water-colour award in the Montreal Spring Exhibition, and Mr. and Mrs.
Bobak were honoured by a travelling show of their work throughout the Province. Mr.
Amess spoke at the Victoria Community Centres Convention and also at Powell River.
" The staff were active with the Community Arts Council, Industrial Committee,
the B.C. Federation of Canadian Artists, the B.C. Society of Artists, and the Vancouver
Art Gallery, both as exhibitors and as officers.
" We were very fortunate to have as guest speakers this year Mr. Eric Newton, dean
of art critics, and Mrs. Newton, both of whom spoke to our students. Lectures by these
foremost authorities are greatly appreciated additions to the curriculum. The students
also had the pleasure of listening to Dr. A. Y. Jackson, one of the foundation members
of the Group of Seven.
I It is, however, in the success of the students that a school's quality shows. We
are pleased to note that once again a student of the Vancouver School of Art placed in
the prize list of the Toronto Exhibition Booth Competition. Mr. Gordon Shrum placed
second and Mr. William Mayrs received the prize for the best presentation, while Mr.
Sclater, the third entrant, received honourable mention.
"A letter from a Toronto firm inquiring as to the possibility of employing Vancouver
School of Art students further underlines the high standard accredited to this school
throughout Canada.
11n community efforts, such as the British Empire Games, the contribution of the
school can also be noted. Supervising the stadium construction for the architects, Sharp
and Thompson, Berwick, Pratt, is Mr. Ron Thorn, who had a great deal to do with the
designing of the stadium. § Mr. Thorn is a graduate of the school. Another graduate,
Mr. Bob Boal, an instructor with the school, is at present associated with Mr. Thorn in
this architectural firm. A model used for publicity purposes was largely constructed
by Mr. R. Kovach, working for the firm Tisdale Associates.
" The British Empire Games booklet, j The B.E.G. Story,' was designed by Mr.
Bob Johnson, a former student of the school, and several of the drawings in it were done
by Mr. Glenn Startup, last year's graduate.
" The illumination presented to His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh was
by Mrs. Ian Mcintosh, formerly Sylvia Golman, of the Art School.
"At the two Hastings Street entrances to the stadium are statues of a runner, by
Mr. Gordon Dixon, and a football player, by Mr. Don Mcintosh.
I We should like to mention the close co-operation the school has enjoyed with
the Vancouver Vocational Institute, without whose help the statues could not have been
completed.
 0 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
| Drawings by Mr. Johnson were used in the magazine section of the Vane
Daily Province, and Mr. Al Beaton's cartoons added to the humour of the games ^
j In the British Columbia Building at the Exhibition, Mr. Kovach, Mr. Startup M
Wing Jones, Miss Joyce Noble, and Mr. Herbert Gilbert are working on large cartoo
relative to the educational exhibit. ns
I Miss Joyce Noble has just received word that she has been granted the Emil
Carr Scholarship for 1955.   Mr. Lawren Harris, in notifying us, has stated that she is
one of the most outstanding prospects he has seen in many years.
1 Nineteen graduates and a full attendance of students and friends listened to a very
fine address by Mr. Warnett Kennedy, M.R.A.I.C., A.R.I.B.A., A.M.T.P.L, M.S.I.A
at the graduation banquet.
I The problem of training students to maintain a quality of art in an industrial age
is an extremely difficult one, and the school fully appreciates the guidance of the Department of Education."
The enrolment at the school for the past year was as follows:—
Day-school (full time)       97
Day-school (part time)        63
Evening-school     777
Saturday morning classes     383
Total  1,320
NiGHT-SCHOOLS
Classes in night-schools operated by the local School Boards continue to increase
because of public demand.   The enrolment during the year 1953-54 was as follows:—
Students
Vocational     6,119
Non-vocational  13,850
Apprenticeship classes     1,532
Total  21,501
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
The Shop Teacher-training unit at the Vancouver Vocational Institute is operated
jointly by the Department of Education and the Department of Labour, Ottawa, under
the terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. Teachers are trained for
a one-year period, after which they are appointed to schools and complete their training
by attending Summer Schools. jf    ljl
Enrolment
Part-time courses §24
Full-time courses    12
Summer School    95
Total    131
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
Vocational courses are offered in the Secondary Schools of this Province in three
areas of training—(a) Industrial, (b) Commercial, and (c) Agriculture-in day J
night schools, for which extra grants are paid to local School Boards.   The cost is snare
equally between the Department of Education and the Department of Labour, Ottawa.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
O 47
For the year 1953-54 the enrolment was as follows:—
Number of
PupUs
Number of Teachers
Part Time
Day-schools	
Night-schools—
Teacher-training
Totals..
5,525
6,119
36
11,680
220
2
222
FuU Time
109
235
1
344
Vancouver Vocational Institute
This Institute is operated by the Vancouver School Board, but accommodates pupils
from all parts of the Province. Special grants are paid under the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
During the past year the enrolment was 1,907 students, and a total of 24 subjects
were taught.
 O 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools    2,428
Junior high schools  14,747
  17,175
In Grade VII     7,088
In Grade VIII     6,995
In Grade IX     3,092
17,175
School for the Deaf and the Blind        16
Senior high schools    8,132
High-school boys  235
Technical students     19
Private schools       322
Indian schools         58
       380
In elementary grades  (Grades VII and   |
VIII)  170
In high school (senior grades)  210
380
Correspondence Courses taken under supervision of teacher
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics Jf
Courses        171
Total number of students taking Home Economics
Courses  25,874
There are 123 Home Economics centres in public schools throughout the Province,
5 in private schools, and 2 in Indian schools.                        centres Rooms
One-room centres    65 65
Two-room centres    43 86
Three-room centres     13 .39
Four-room centres      4 16
Five-room centres      3 15
Six-room centres      2 12
Totals  130 233
Home Economics classes at Haney and Grand Forks were not conducted this year.
The school at Haney was destroyed by fire during the late spring of 1953. Grand
Forks was forced to temporarily discontinue Home Economics instruction for this year,
due to the fact that they were unable to procure a qualified teacher.
During the 1953-54 session new school buildings, with Home Economics centres,
were opened at:—
 HOME ECONOMICS O 49
Courtenay: Courtenay Senior High School. ft
Ladner: Delta Junior-Senior High school, with an additional Home Economics
room.
Quesnel: Quesnel Junior-Senior High School, increasing accommodation from
one- to two-room centre.
Burnaby:   Burnaby South Senior High School, Edmonds Elementary-Junior
High School, and Alpha Junior High School. ''$
An additional Home Economics room has been added at Campbell River to the
Campbell River Elementary-Senior High School. Renovations to the Home Economics
rooms at Mount View High School, Victoria, were completed in the early part of 1954.
In the Province there are 228 teachers of Home Economics on the staffs of schools,
showing an increase of 3 over the total for last year. Of these, 70 are graduates in Home
Economics from the University of British Columbia. J
During the 1954 session, 83 teachers attended Summer School for the purpose of
attaining Home Economics certification.   Of these, 46 are working toward Secondary
Certification.   Courses offered at Summer School were as follows:—
Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics.
Problems in Home Economics Education.
Foods and Nutrition. §
The instructors were Mrs. Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc.(H.Ec); Mrs. Kathleen Boone,
B.Sc.(H.Ec); Mrs. Irene V. Green, B.Sc.(H.Ec); and Miss Gladys Annetta Doyle,
B.H.E. Miss E. M. Yvonne Love, B.Sc.(H.Ec), with Mrs. Elizabeth Nicholl, B.H.E.,
as her assistant, directed the work of the cafeteria.
 O 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER, B.C.)
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., LL.D
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
To provide for sufficient classroom accommodation and to take care of rapidly
increasing enrolment, and to plan for a shifting population within the school district
itself, constitute very real problems in school administration, particularly in the older
and larger centres. f|
Since 1946, the City of Vancouver, School District No. 39, has had a long-term plan
of school construction endorsed by the taxpayers of the district. This long-term policy
has made it possible for the Vancouver Board of School Trustees to plan economically
over the years, and, at the same time, provide for any emergency that might arise from
general city growth. I am pleased to report that most of the classes on double shift have
been ehminated.
According to the present figures available, from the birth-rate tables and reports on
the influx of population, such a long-term plan will have to continue for many years,
During the next six years in this district the average annual growth of the school enrolment
(elementary and secondary) will be nearly 3,500. This means that the average number
of new classrooms required to meet the increase will be at least 100 rooms per annum,
School Buildings
The following buildings were completed during the school-year 1953-54:—
Lord Nelson No. 2 Elementary School:  Seven classrooms.
Maple Grove Elementary School Addition:   Four classrooms, gymnasium-
auditorium, lunchroom.
Portables (Elementary):   Eight classrooms.
Nightingale Elementary Addition:   Gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Renfrew Elementary Addition:  Seven classrooms.
Templeton Junior High School Addition:  One Home Economics room, extension to gymnasium.
Extra accommodation in existing schools:  Fifteen classrooms.
The following buildings were under construction during the school-year 1953—54:—
John Oliver High School Addition:   Twenty-two classrooms, four shops, five
Home Economics rooms, cafeteria, auditorium.
Osier Elementary Addition:   Eight classrooms, lunchroom.
McBride Elementary Addition:   Gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Additions to Technical School:  Twenty-seven classrooms, double gymnasium,
cafeteria.
Britannia High School Addition:   Five classrooms, shop, double gymnasium,
cafeteria.
Douglas No. 2 Elementary Addition:   Ten classrooms.
David Lloyd  George Elementary  Addition:   Six classrooms, gymnasium-
auditorium.
Lord Roberts Elementary Addition: Gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Queen Mary Elementary Addition:  Three classrooms, gymnasium-auditonuni,
lunchroom.
Portables:  Twenty-six classrooms.
Trafalgar Elementary Addition:  Ten classrooms.
Fleming Elementary School Addition:  Ten classrooms.
 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER, B.C.) O 51
Plans are being prepared for the following:—
Sir Winston Churchill High School: Thirty-five classrooms, five shops, four
Home Economics rooms, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith Elementary School: Sixteen classrooms, lunchroom, gymnasium-auditorium.
Brock Elementary Addition:  Six classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium.
Quilchena Elementary Addition: Four classrooms, lunchroom, gymnasium-
auditorium.
Norquay No. 2 Elementary Addition:  Eight classrooms, lunchroom, gymnasium-auditorium.
Livingstone Elementary Addition:   Six classrooms, lunchroom, gymnasium-
auditorium.
Carleton No.  2 Elementary Addition:    Eight classrooms,  gymnasium-
auditorium.
Laurier Elementary Addition:  Four classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium.
Sexsmith Elementary Addition:  Six classrooms.
Southlands Elementary Addition:   Six classrooms.    \
Special tribute is due to the Director of Building Construction and Maintenance,
Mr. E. D. King, and his staff, for the splendid work which has been done in order to keep
pace with the rapidly expanding needs of the system.
Testing
The following tests were given during the school-year 1953-54:—
(a) Number of individual intelligence tests given, 1,474.
(b) Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 11,982.
(c) During September the Detroit Beginning First-grade Intelligence Test
(Revised) was administered to all Grade I pupils (6,285).
(d) For June, 1954, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given
to approximately 4,650 pupils of Grades VI, VII, and VIII—Grades VI
and VII in junior high-school areas for promotion to junior high school;
Grade VIII in senior high-school areas for promotion to senior high
school. The type of standardized tests used aids principals and Inspectors
in maintaining levels of achievement. Tests were administered by the
classroom teacher under the direction of the prinicipal, and promotion
lists were submitted to the Department of Research and Special Services.
(e) Vancouver General Hospital probationary classes in nursing were tested—
one class each in September and February.
(/) Testing of Pupils under Age for Grades II, III, and IV.—From September
to December seventy-three children entering the Vancouver school system
from private schools who were under age for Grades II, III, or IV were
tested to determine their ability to do the work of the grade concerned.
Pupils in this category were those entering Grade II who were under
7 years of age as at December 31st, those entering Grade III who were
under 8 years of age, and those entering Grade IV who were under 9 years
of age as at November 30th. The Supervisor of Primary Work, Miss
E. Roy, administered a standardized reading examination and tests in
arithmetic, printing, oral reading, and phonics. The psychologists of this
Department gave each child an individual intelligence test. Resulting
placements: In Grade IV, one pupil to remain; In Grade III, twenty-
three pupils to remain, three pupils demoted to Grade II, and five pupils
to remain on trial for six weeks or longer; and in Grade H, twenty-one
pupils to remain, sixteen pupils demoted to Grade I, and four pupils to
remain on trial for six weeks or longer.
 O 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
(_?) Bryant Reading Tests, Grades II to VI, Inclusive.—In November
March sets of tests prepared and standardized by Mr. S. J. Bryant, priT
pal retired of Lord Nelson School, were administered to all pupiis°l"
Grades II to VI, inclusive. Test results were incorporated in Department
of Research and Special Services Bulletins 154 (A-E) and 158 (A-E)
Other tests are in preparation, so that ultimately there will be on hand
one test per grade for each month of the school-year.
(h) Survey of Achievement in Arithmetic, Grades VI and VIII.—As an outcome of recent discussions concerning standards of achievement in arithmetic, it was decided to conduct an examination in this subject of all
Grade VI students and of all Grade VIII students in Vancouver schools
Accordingly, in the week of June 7th, pupils of these grades were given
the following tests: Vancouver Tests—Reasoning in Arithmetic, Form A*
and the All-Canada Test in Fundamentals in Arithmetic, Form 1. Since
each test (or an equivalent form of each) has been administered in our
schools from time to time since 1930, comparisons will be available, and
it will be possible to gauge trends in achievement.
(i) Provincial Testing Programme.—(1) Test in English Usage, Spelling and
Vocabulary to Students of English 20 and 21.—The fall testing programme
of the Department of Education's Division of Tests, Standards, and Research consisted of the administration during the last week of November
of a test in English Usage, Spelling, and Vocabulary to all students of
English 20 and English 21. It was thought that this test would provide
teachers with a test by which weaknesses may be discovered and, in the
future, may assist counsellors, teachers, and principals in directing pupils
into the English 21 course. Provincial norms for the test have been
established.
(2) Scholastic Aptitude Testing, March. — Because changes are
taking place in the requirements for High School Graduation and in the
minimum standards that were established for various subjects in 1953,
the Department of Education requested that the Dominion Tests—Group
Test of Learning Capacity, British Columbia Edition, Advanced Form B,
be administered to all University Programme and General Programme
students enrolled in English 30, 31, 32, 40, and 41, and all students
enrolled in Senior Matriculation courses. It is the Department's intention
to check scores made on the same test which was given to the English 30,
31, and 32 pupils last year, to obtain information regarding new students,
to reclassify last year's data, and obtain new data from this year's survey.
Arrangements for the project were made by the Department of Research
and Special Services. M
(3) Terminal Survey Course Tests in French 20, German 20, Spanish 20, and Latin 20.—For the past few years the Department of Education has carried out a Provincial survey of one of the high-school terminal
courses. In June all Vancouver pupils enrolled in French 20, German 20,
Spanish 20, and Latin 20 were given tests in this subject " to establish
Provincial standards and to enable principals and teachers to make comparisons with results for the Province as a whole." The Department of
Education will mark the test papers and prepare a report on the results,
Reports and Statistics
(a) Analysis of the results of the achievement and intelligence tests given in
June, 1953, to junior high-school entrance pupils and to senior high-schooi
entrance pupils.
 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER, B.C.) O 53
(b) Compilation of statistics on the geographical origin of new pupils enrolling
in Vancouver schools, September 8th, 1953, to November 30th, 1953,
inclusive.
(c) Compilation of statistics on age-grade census for September, 1953, and
promotion summary for elementary schools for June, 1953.
(d) Five hundred and eighty-five applications for transfers of pupils across
school boundaries dealt with.
(e) Number of home visits made by members of this Department, exclusive
of those made by the Supervisor of Special Classes, was 186.
(/) One hundred transcripts of school records were forwarded to the High
School Correspondence Branch, Victoria, at the request of the Director,
Dr. Edith E. Lucas.
(g) Preparation of outlines of courses to be offered in the secondary schools
of Vancouver in the school-year 1954-55.
(h) Sorting and forwarding to principals of secondary schools the applications
of students for choice of course—approximately 5,050.
(/) Questionnaire on Industrial Arts and Commercial Courses: Each year the
information requested in this questionnaire by the Director of Technical
Education for the Province of British Columbia is compiled in the Department of Research and Special Services. Bulletin 159 shows the number
of Vancouver pupils taking Industrial Arts and Commercial Courses as
of April, 1954. I
(/) Racial origin of pupils in classes for new Canadians: A tabulation was
made showing the number of pupils of each nationality in our thirteen
elementary school classes for new Canadians.
(k) Kindergarten survey questionnaire: A summary was prepared of the
kindergarten survey questionnaire which was submitted in November to
the Superintendents of Schools of the fourteen largest cities in Canada.
(/) Costs—Vancouver schools, 1939-1953, inclusive: With the co-operation
of the Secretary-Treasurer's Department, a table indicating school costs
in Vancouver schools over the period 1939-1953 was prepared.
(m) Course-enrolment summary of pupils enrolled in Grades IX to XII: From
the Form K reports a summary was made showing the number of pupils
taking each course in Grades IX to XII, inclusive, in Vancouver schools—
reported in Bulletin 156.
(n) Summary of programme-selection survey, Grades IX to XII: By means
of a questionnaire, a summary was prepared showing the number of pupils
taking University Programme and General Programme in Grades DC to
XII, inclusive, in Vancouver (Bulletin 157).
(o) Questionnaires: Numerous questionnaires from the Canadian Education
Association Information Service, school systems in Canada and in the
United States, etc., have been answered.
(p) Record and medical cards and requests for same handled: Number of
cards coming into office (record card and medical cards for the same pupil
counted as one card), 23,254; number of requests for cards made by
schools, 16,970; requests for cards which the Department of Research
and Special Services made to schools or to Health Units, 4,858.
In concluding this section of my report I wish to pay tribute to Dr. S. A. Miller and
his capable staff for the splendid summaries which have been prepared on various topics
for the Superintendent and the Board during the past year.
 O 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Evening Classes
The table which follows gives the classification of more than one hundred s h'
offered in approximately thirty different centres, according to the nature and puroo   f
the courses.   It should be noted that in the shop and technical-vocational divisiof
breakdown is shown in the subjects offered to apprenticeship and non-apprentice'iT
groups.   This will occur in another section of the Department's report on vocati  i
education.
Table Showing Classification of Evening-school Subjects for the 1953-54 School
the Number of Classes, the Number of Subject Registrations, and the Number oi
Teachers in Each Division.
-year,
Subjects
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Classes
Enrolments
Male
Female
Total
Number of Teachers
Total
Full
Time
Part
Time
Academic—I	
Shop and technical-vocational	
Business-vocational	
Teacher-training   (including  kindergarten-
teacher training)	
Homemaking	
Music, arts, and crafts	
English and citizenship for the foreign-born
Youth leadership	
Recreation 	
Totals	
32
53
15
20
20
24
2
5
9
180
78
156
45
20
70
58
36
10
32
505
1,840
3,577
511
153
96
625
634
204
314
7,954
1,620
112
956
407
1,977
848
395
215
902
7,432
3,460
3,689
1,467
560
2,073
1,473
1,029
419
1,216
15,386
46
111
32
12
31
36
29
4
26
327
7
5
2
10
10
10
44
53
116
34
22
41
46
29
4
26
371
I should like to make special mention of the excellent organization and
trative work conducted by the Director of Evening Classes and Adult Education, Mr.
Graham Bruce, and his capable staff of assistants.
Instruction
A high standard of classroom instruction has been maintained. The special supervisors of physical education, music, art, home economics, industrial arts, handwork, and
primary grades have co-operated excellently with the senior officials in promoting the
growth and development of our teaching staff. Many in-service courses in methods of
instruction have been conducted throughout the year.
All teachers appointed to the staff during the year have been visited at different
times by the Assistant Superintendents in charge of their respective fields. In co-operation
with the school principals, a splendid programme of instructional supervision has been
developed. We are proud of the work being done by our teachers and pleased with the
progress being made by our pupils.
 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER, B.C.)
O 55
Superannuation
The following members of the staff have retired on superannuation.   These persons
are to be commended for their many years of efficient and loyal service.
Teacher
School
Date of
Appointment
Breadon, L. H. M._.
Campbell, W. S	
Crowe, C. B.	
Griminett, J. A.	
Henderson, J	
Kitchen, C. H	
Lambert, W. H	
McLeish, W. Y	
Morgan, W	
RiddeU, Miss R. B...
Sanford, J	
Bower, Miss M	
O'Hara, Mrs. V. C.Pearson, H. L. O.—
Steele, J. P	
Wate, G. S	
Wilby, W. J	
John Oliver	
Technical	
Kitsttano	
Templeton	
Point Grey	
King George	
King Edward (wireless).
King Edward	
Technical	
Technical	
Kitsttano	
Mount Pleasant	
Dawson and Roberts.-	
Tennyson	
Strathcona	
Carleton (principal)	
Relieving staff.	
September, 1921.
March, 1930.
August, 1913.
September, 1927.
September, 1925.
October, 1921.
September, 1926.
September, 1920.
September, 1922.
September, 1930.
March, 1926.
August, 1914.
September, 1927.
September, 1930.
February, 1932.
January, 1913.
February, 1934.
I regret to report the death of the following teachers who have served this system
so well:—
Teacher
School
Deceased
Date of
Appointment
Gamey, H. T.
Kagnoff, M.._.
Selkirk (principal).
Technical	
September 13th, 1953
May 24th, 1954	
April, 1918.
September, 1925.
In concluding this report, I wish you to know of the excellent help I have received
from the Mayor, City Council, Police Department, Board of Park Commissioners,
Library Board, Fire Department, City Engineer's Department, and the civic officials
concerned.  More and better assistance could not have been given.
To the press of this city I wish to state that I am particularly indebted to them for
the fair interpretation they have given concerning school policy as enacted by a splendid
group of School Trustees.
Since this is the last report I shall submit to you as Superintendent of Schools for
the City of Vancouver (School District No. 39), I wish to express my gratitude for your
help and sympathetic assistance at all times. To my successor, Dr. R. F. Sharp, I know
you will give every possible assistance to see that he receives similar co-operation. I hope
that you and your associates in your Department will endeavour to see that autonomy
within each of the school districts of this Province will be extended and not curtailed.
To assure that British Columbia will continue to lead in the field of education in Canada
it is essential that democracy be allowed to function in the school districts themselves.
 O 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF JOHN GOUGH, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOIS
AND ALEX. TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A., ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL IN
SPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Historically, it is of much interest that the year 1953 represents the centennial of
the founding of the Common School in Greater Victoria, and, for that matter, in all
British Columbia. In view of this, some significance can be attached to the fact that this
year also saw the erection of the new Central Junior High School, a building symbolic
of school expansion in this area and throughout the Province, within a few yards of the
little school which James Barr, master, and his pupils occupied as early as October 21st
1853.
A change came in the administrative personnel in November, when Alex. Turnbull,
Provincial Inspector of Schools at Penticton, transferred to the Greater Victoria School
District in the capacity of Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools, to be associated
with John Gough, who had become Municipal Inspector of the district.
Today the Greater Victoria school system is comprised as follows:—
Number of
Schools
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Senior high	
Junior high	
Elementary	
Kindergartens-
Totals
Increase	
5
3
29
114
82
302
5
2,242
1,772
10,047
281
37
503
14,342
41
1,327
1 Three kindergarten centres less than in the previous year were conducted, with a decrease of 151 pupils.
Accommodation continued to be taxed to the limit, resulting in the conversion of
auditoria and basement space into classrooms and in the formation of large classes,
sixty-three of which contained forty or more pupils each. Fortunately, there was no
need to introduce the shift system. m
The School Board endeavoured to embark on a second school-building programme,
but found its efforts thwarted in December with the defeat of a $3,390,000 referendum.
Some relief to the problem of overcrowding did come about with the completion of
three building projects approved by a previous school by-law; these included the addition
of classrooms and a gymnasium to both Mount Douglas and Mount View High Schools
and the erection of the James Bay Elementary School. This seven-room unit replaced
Kingston Street Elementary School, which dates back to 1883. In the fall, work commenced on the Lansdowne Junior High School, the third unit of this type to be established under the first school-building by-law.
Effectiveness of instruction within the classrooms has been stimulated, maintained,
and improved, where necessary, by the Inspectors, supervisors, and principals. Increased
responsibility for the supervisory and administrative programme has been assumed by
the principals. Jf
Standardized tests in reading, vocabulary, spelling, language, and arithmetic were
administered in the intermediate and junior high-school grades and scored by the Depart-
«.«xxx__uioicicu iu me uiienueuiaie ana junior nign-scnooi grades ana scuicu vy ^ —*
ment of Tests and Measurements of this school system. Surveys of scholastic aptrtiwe
were carried out in Grades IV, VIII, XI, and XIII. Five tests were administered on
behalf of the Department of Education. Other tests were given to serve as teaching aio
in diagnosing weakness and in improving instruction.    The whole testing program^
 REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 57
revealed that pupil achievement in the basic subjects was generally satisfactory, and
where remedial teaching was necessary, teachers were ready to undertake it.
The trustees are to be commended for operating six special classes for very slow
learners drawn from various schools. In addition to these, three other classes were
organized in their respective schools for remedial cases. Two classes were constituted
at North Ward School to teach the basic subjects to new Canadians of school age, the
majority of these being of Chinese origin.
The motivation of learning through the effective use of audio-visual aids continued
to receive attention, the emphasis of the in-service training programme being shifted
from the techniques of operating film and film-strip projectors to the techniques of classroom instruction. It was encouraging to note a greater use of film-strips, models, and
free teaching aids that were made accessible through the Audio-visual Aids Department.
The local system is grateful to the Provincial directors of the Division of Visual Education
and the Division of School Broadcasts—to the former for loaning films to supplement
the local library, and to the latter for assistance to teachers utilizing radio programmes
in their classrooms.
Evidence of the expansion in the music programme was seen in the fact that five
bands and four orchestras provided instruction and enjoyment for over 500 students.
The high quality of the choral work at the schools was reflected through the local musical
festival, in which many school groups participated. More so than ever before, the
senior high schools undertook to present light operettas that provided a joint effort for
students interested in singing, orchestra work, drama, and art.
In Physical Education, at the elementary level, emphasis was given to the teaching
of folk-dancing and rhythms. The success of this was demonstrated by a marked improvement in the posture and precision of the pupils and in the performances of 800
children in the music festival. ft
Winner of the Strathcona Trust Shield for Physical Education was the S. J. Willis
Junior High School. Both Monterey and Cloverdale Elementary Schools deserve honourable mention for their work in this field.
The School Board continued its policy of providing a series of eight swimming
lessons to all pupils in Grade V, and, in consequence, 1,340 children from twenty-four
schools attended the classes in the Crystal Garden.
General supervision of the physical well-being of pupils in the system was carried
out by the medical officers and nurses. The two dental officers made approximately
20,000 examinations, and endeavoured to educate the children and their parents in dental
health. The Speech Therapy Department gave attention to 275 children with speech
difficulties, some of whom showed marked improvement as a result. Children whose
emotional problems hindered their general progress were aided by the Mental Health
Co-ordinator.
In the junior high schools, namely, Central, Oak Bay, and S. J. Willis, an effort was
made to meet the needs of the slower learners as well as promote high standards of
scholastic achievement for the others.
The five senior high schools—Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Mount Douglas, Mount View,
and Victoria—experienced a very successful year academically as well as in athletics,
music, and drama. In both junior and senior high schools the extra-curricular activities,
including the inter-house sports, provided challenging opportunities for participation by
practically the whole student-body.
High scholastic honours in the University Entrance examinations, held in June,
came to Oak Bay High School when students from that school attained the three top
results in the Province. Timothy Williams received the Governor-General's Silver Medal
for first place, Jeremy Winter the Bronze Medal for second, and Gael Stott the third
position.   All were awarded valuable scholarships.   This evidence of academic progress
 O 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
is a matter of great satisfaction, and sincere congratulations are extended to thP i _.
students.
Seven centres throughout School District No. 61 provided instruction in Indu '
Arts and Vocational-technical Education for the following numbers:  Industrial a!
(Grades VII to XII), 1,832; Vocational-technical (Grades X to XII), 204.
The number of students taking Home Economics was 1,815, an increase of 300
over one year ago.
Night-school classes were attended by the largest enrolment ever recorded in th
district. This can be attributed to the new Leisure Time Enjoyment Courses, given in
co-operation with the Communities Programme Branch of the Department of Education
and addition of Matriculation courses in English, Mathematics, and Physics. Grants
from the Provincial and Federal Governments made possible the operation of classes
for training welders.
In the fall, Victoria College commenced another successful year with 81 students
registered in the second year and 209 in the first. The latter, representing a slight decrease
compared with the year previous, reflected the lower enrolment in Grade XII students
in this school district. J|
At the annual assembly in October, scholarships to the value of $4,000 were distributed, indicative of the practical interest taken by various local individuals and organizations in Victoria College. The Evening Division continued to aid the community by
offering a wide variety of courses, which were taken by 41 students for credit and 702
for non-credit.
Graduation ceremonies, marked by grace and dignity, terminated the school-year.
Many students were honoured for service and ability throughout the system. It was a
year of progress, to which the splendid co-operation of staff, School Board officials, and
trustees contributed effectively. We express our appreciation to all those with whom we
were associated.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
I        OF SCHOOLS      1
This report for the year 1953-54 shows an enrolment of 4,859 pupils, with a staff
of 158 teachers. This enrolment was distributed as follows: Grades I to VI, 285;
Grades VII to IX, 1,249; Grades X to XIII, 759; an increase of 354 over June, 1953.
Our pupil growth is fairly constant and because of boundary limitations is expected to
remain so. The building programme has been excellent, and proper pupil accommodation has been one of the foremost concerns of the Board of School Trustees.
Four years ago the junior high school was built at a cost of approximately
$1,300,000, accommodating 1,400 pupils.   Tenders were awarded in May of this year
for a new Composite Vocational Senior High School, to accommodate 1,000 pupils, to
Manton Brothers of Burnaby, for $1,100,000.    These schools are on the school-site
of thirty-five acres arranged for by the Board from the City Council.   Two classrooms
were added to Tweedsmuir Elementary School at a cost of $19,708.   Plans are also
under way for the reconstruction of two new classrooms at Spencer Elementary, an
provision is being made for an expected increase at McBride.   The maintenance at a
schools is very satisfactory.    During the year all phases of school activity received
attention. |
Under the auspices of the School and Community Drama Branch of the DePartmel
of Education the Ninth Annual Drama Festival was held in the junior high school
 REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 59
torium three nights in March. Twenty teachers and over 200 pupils from all schools of
the city took part. Chairman was Mr. E. H. Locke and adjudicator was Mrs. Lily
Harper.   Parent interest was manifest in the presence of over 5,000 spectators.
The night-school classes, principal Mr. G. Morris, were the most successful to date,
classes being held in twenty-three subjects with an enrolment of 513. It is interesting
to note that four shop instructors are Technical graduates and are leaders in their field
of work.
All other departments functioned just as smoothly and effectively—the Simon Fraser
Health Unit, the dental clinic, the junior high-school cafeteria, and the pool library. The
work of the pool library is of interest, combining as it does the services of the basic school
libraries and the elementary schools' library pool. The six basic school library collections
provide reference material and books necessary to the teaching of the school curriculum.
It supplements these collections twice a year with loans varying from 300 to 400 books,
directed toward meeting the needs of each school in recreational and free-reading material.
The size of each loan is based on the school enrolment and needs.
The 'present pool collection consists of approximately 2,500 titles, covering fiction,
non-fiction, and primary fields. Book repairs and rebinding are done at the British
Columbia Penitentiary.
The total circulation from the pool library to the six elementary schools is 3,900
books a year. Book losses are very low; this year, 1953-54, the total loss of a circulation of 3,900 books has been 11 books.
This past year the Principals' Association, Mr. Hugh Campbell, president, welcomed
Mr. J. G. Kirk, newly appointed principal, and Mr. George Ford, newly appointed vice-
principal, of Duke of Connaught High School.
May Day again was an outstanding feature of our school activities, under the chairmanship of Mr. A. Sweet, principal of Queen Elizabeth Elementary School, and with
the motif " the British Empire Games." The standard and keen popular interest of
other May Days were ably maintained.
Again it is a pleasure to refer to the hearty co-operation and able assistance given
at all times by the Department of Education, to the interest and support of the Parent-
Teacher Associations, to the unstinted loyalty of highly trained principals and teachers,
and to the careful attention given to all school affairs by the Board of School Trustees—
keen and successful business men and women giving of their time and ability without
remuneration to the interests of education.
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The main activity of the present year was the launching of a $4,500,000 building
programme in Burnaby. This programme involved the reconstruction of fourteen of
the older schools, the extension of ten existing schools, and the construction of ten new
schools, some of which will replace old school units which are to be abandoned, and
some which will provide accommodation for new housing areas. These new schools are:
Sussex Avenue Elementary, Charles Street Elementary, Morley Avenue Elementary,
Armstrong Elementary, Inman Avenue Elementary, Edmonds Elementary, Marine Drive
Elementary, Sperling Avenue Elementary, Moscrop Junior High School, and Kensington
Junior High School. The building programme is being spread over three years to facilitate the financing of the projects.
 O 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
During the past year a comprehensive in-service teacher-training programm
conducted under the direction of Dr. C. C. Watson, Miss K. Collins, and Miss J B T
members of the supervisory staff. § Considerable experimental work was done in evl'
ating certain subject fields, and opportunities were given for inter-class visitation bv th
teachers. Plans are being developed for a more intensive survey and evaluation of th
educational system of Burnaby. The lead in this important work is being taken by ft
Principals' Association. e
Two special classes, one at Windsor Street School and one at Rosser Avenue School
were organized for pupils who were having difficulty in adjusting themselves profitably in
the regular class instruction. The success of these two classes will determine whether this
phase of our work will be extended or curtailed. Some attention is being given to the
development of a plan to do more effective remedial work as and where the need arises
Under the direction of Inspector C. J. Frederickson, a fairly extensive testing programme
was conducted. In this work he was assisted by Mr. Hugh McPherson, who plotted
the results and prepared interpretative data for the guidance of the principals and teachers.
Progressively, the Board is undertaking to reconstruct and modernize the older
schools, and to improve the grounds of all the schools so that they are playable and
suitably landscaped to harmonize with the environment of the community surrounding
the schools.   The Board is to be complimented upon its efforts in this direction.
A splendid example of co-operative work was exemplified this year during teacher
salary negotiations. The Board and the teachers' committee agreed upon basing salary
increments upon professional growth. A joint committee worked out the details of this
plan, and set up an evaluating committee to appraise the professional courses taken by
teachers and to determine their placement for salary purposes. A very amicable relationship between the School Board and the teaching staff has resulted.
The Metropolitan Health Board, under the direction of Dr. Sunderland, continues
to give excellent school health services. New and larger quarters are urgently needed to
permit the health staff to function effectively.
It is a pleasure to record again the line services given by the principals and teaching
staff, and to record the full measure of co-operation and assistance given by the Department of Education in the management of the educational affairs within the municipality.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS        j
In this inspectorate during the year 1953-54 the number of full-time teachers
employed was increased over the preceding year by 33, making a total of 288. Of these,
195 ivere employed in North Vancouver and 93 in West Vancouver. This increase in
staff resulted from the increased enrolment, which was 14 per cent greater than in the
preceding year. In School District No. 44 the enrolment rose to 6,340, an increase of
13 per cent, and in School District No. 45 the number of pupils increased to 2,894, an
increase of more than 16 per cent. In spite of this unusual growth in school population,
both districts were able to provide classroom accommodation without the need ot
double shifts.
JI North Vancouver
In anticipation of about 700 more pupils seeking admission to school, additional
classrooms had been constructed—six at Highlands, two at North Star, and four a
Ridgeway.
 REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 61
As even more children would be seeking entry to school in September, 1954, the
School Board, during this year, proceed with plans for additional rooms. The first
school by-law presented to the ratepayers for more than twenty years was passed by
a large majority, giving the Board permission to sell bonds for an amount of $1,199,000.
This sum will provide for additions to the following schools: Burrard View (two rooms);
Highlands (six rooms); North Star (six rooms); and Keith Lynn (two rooms). In
addition, it provides for four portable classrooms to be placed where needed. All of
these projects are expected to be completed by September, 1954. The larger portion of
the by-law money will be used in constructing a new junior high school, expected to be
completed by September, 1955. This junior high school will be constructed at the
Hamilton Street site, and will take care of the pupils in the quickly growing western
section of the district.
With the opening of new subdivisions in various parts of the district, the Board
followed its policy of making sure that school-sites would be available in or near these
areas when needed.
With the opening of school in September, Mrs. Mary Allgrett began her work as
helping teacher. She gave valuable assistance to the teachers of the primary classes,
especially to those who were teaching for the first time.
Miss Mary Craig continued with her work as Mental Health Co-ordinator, and
did much to prove the value of this type of work in the schools.
An attendance officer was employed on a part-time basis, and gave assistance to
the teachers in their efforts to eliminate unnecessary absences of pupils.
Mr. John McLean retired on superannuation after teaching in North Vancouver for
the long period of thirty years.
Mr. E. R. Chamberlain, after teaching as an assistant in the high school, and later
as principal of Ridgeway Elementary-Junior High School, was forced to retire owing to
ill-health.   His loss to the teaching staff will be keenly felt.
West Vancouver
The increase in school population on the opening of schools in September was taken
care of by the four-roomed addition to West Bay School and the new Cedardale School
in the eastern section of the district. Anticipating an equally large increase by September,
1954, a by-law for $339,000 was prepared and successfully presented to the ratepayers.
The main projects included in this by-law are: Four rooms to be added to Cedardale
School, four rooms to Ridgeview (thus completing the original plan for this school), and
completion of four unfinished rooms in the senior high school. Activity-rooms are also
to be added to Hollyburn, Cedardale, and West Bay Schools.
During the year considerable thought was given by the Board to the improvement of
grounds, and plans are under way to develop suitable play areas at Pauline Johnson,
Ridgeview, and West Bay Schools. The excellent playground used by the junior and
senior high schools also received attention. The Board developed a keen interest in the
curriculum and in the methods being employed by the teachers in their classwork.
A number of meetings with principals and vice-principals was held, and various excellent
suggestions were acted on with considerable success.
The fine arts programme was continued in the secondary schools of West Vancouver,
and its success has been such that steps are being taken in other quarters to make available
to other high schools similar programmes.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for assistance in my work received
from the teaching staffs, the Boards of School Trustees, and the Department of Education.
 O 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Paed., MUNICIPAL
I       INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS |
The enrolment in School District No. 36 (Surrey) continued to grow during th
school-year 1953-54 and reached a new high of 8,102 pupils, an increase of ll p^
cent over the preceding year.   That the enrolment may be expected to continue to grow
may be assumed from the fact that Grade I accounted for 1,128, or almost one-seventh
of the total number of pupils. |
There were in operation thirty-three elementary schools, four junior-senior high
schools, and one senior high. Two of the junior-senior high schools registered Grade
XIII. The only building done during the year was an addition of two rooms to Simon
Cunningham, which, for the first time in several years, reduced the number of shifts in
that school to two. The year ended with eleven classes housed in basements, and
sixty-four classes on shift.
The teaching staff of 259 included two teachers to relieve principals for supervisory
duties and one helping teacher for the primary grades. In a district such as this, where
because of the great turnover of teachers so many beginners are in charge of the primary
grades, a helping teacher is most necessary. During the year Miss Stephenson, in this
capacity, rendered very valuable service, and several beginners who would otherwise
have failed, made good.
It was found impossible, with the buses available, to transport the Grade VII
classes to the high schools for Industrial Arts and Home Economics, and if it had been,
the necessary shops and laboratories were not available; but the three Grade VIII classes
enrolled in the elementary schools were given instruction in these subjects.
Teacher turnover was again a major problem, aggravated by an influx of pupils
during the school-year.   Teachers of music were especially hard to find.
In the month of December a by-law designed to relieve the overcrowding was
defeated by a narrow margin. The situation continued to grow worse, so an amended
by-law in the form of a referendum was put in June and passed. This referendum
provides over a period of three years for nine new elementary schools, totalling forty-
eight classrooms, and thirteen additions comprising twenty-eight rooms, together with
the renovation of some existing buildings. It is also proposed to build a new high school
to replace Lord Tweedsmuir, which will then be used for the elementary grades. This
new accommodation provides for a normal rate of increase only.
In closing, I would like to thank the officers of the Department of Education, the
members and officials of the Surrey School Board, and the principals and teachers of
Surrey for the co-operation and help which they have extended to me during the past year.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS o 63
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers),
and No. 55 (Burns Lake)
REPORT OF H. D. ABBOTT, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
I School District No. 53 (Terrace)
The outstanding achievement in this district was the completion of the building
programme, highlighted with the official opening of the new Skeena Junior-Senior High
School in Terrace, by the Honourable Minister of Education. In addition to reconstructing an entire block of classrooms in the Terrace Elementary School, a total of nineteen
new classrooms was built in the district. In area, this is a very large school district.
However, the bulk of the pupils live in Terrace and Hazelton. As a result, the eight
remaining schools have only one or two rooms. A survey was conducted among these
to determine whether a dormitory would be feasible, in order to assist students from
smaller schools to attend the district high school at Terrace. Although numbers did
not, at that time, justify operating a dormitory, they will likely reach the required
minimum soon.
mL School District No. 54 (Smithers)
The school-building by-law was approved, and every effort is being made to have
the new accommodation ready for next term. At Smithers an eight-room elementary-
school building will replace one of the existing buildings which had become obsolete.
The Smithers Junior-Senior High School will have additional facilities, including gymnasium, enlarged industrial arts shop, and enlarged home economics laboratory. The
Telkwa Superior School will have a library, staff-room, and three new classrooms. The
Houston Elementary-Senior High School will gain a staff-room, storage-room, and
three classrooms.
This is a relatively compact school district with eight schools, three of which offer
secondary-school education.
School District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
A school-building referendum has been prepared for presentation in August, 1954.
It provides for a new elementary-school building in Burns Lake, a gymnasium and
additional classrooms at the Burns Lake Junior-Senior High School, and additions or
replacements at Perow, Grassy Plains, and Cheslatta.
This school district occupies a large, thinly populated area. In consequence, there
are many difficulties in providing for the education of the children, particularly at the
secondary-school level. Students living south of Francois Lake will have to be provided
with secondary-school instruction nearer home in one or two years, when the numbers
will likely justify it. A survey of the eleven schools outside the Village of Burns Lake
revealed that there are not yet enough pupils to warrant dormitory provision.
General
Principals and teachers continue to give good service. They have been most conscientious and co-operative in our joint efforts to improve the level of instruction. Some
of the projects for the year have included emphasis upon higher achievement in written
English, Arithmetic, and Reading. Both formal and informal testing have assisted the
programme. Art, Music, Dramatics, and Athletics have also added to the pupils' educational growth.   Worthy of mention is the Smithers Elementary School Band, under the
 O 64
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
direction of principal James Mugford, which not only performed in various comm^
functions but also presented an evening musical recital of its own. y
It is a pleasure to have this opportunity to thank the Department of Edncatio
officials and the secretary-treasurers for their unfailing assistance.
Indian Day-schools
During the year visits were made to the nine Indian day-schools in this inspectorate
for consultation and inspection. It has been most interesting to visit these schools
The language problem offers the chief difficulty for the students. The buildings are
modern and include very comfortable teacherages. The schools are well staffed and
receive good support from the agency superintendents.
School Districts No. 38 (Richmond), No. 73 (Alert Bay), and
Unattached School District (University Hill)
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Jr.
High
Elem.-
High
Elem.
Graded
Elem.
Ungraded
High
and Jr.
High
Elem.
and
Sup.
Special
No. 38 (Richmond)
—
1
1
4
1
8
1
7
57          845
7 16
8 7
1
KTo 7* (Alert Bay)
Unattached (University Hfll)	
—
Totals
1       1
1
5
8       1        8
72     I   109    1     1
1
Totals: Schools, 23; teachers, 182.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
Accommodation problems continued to occupy the attention of the Board throughout the year. Two classes at Hamilton Elementary School were on double shift until
December, when the new classroom was put into operation; four classes at R. M.
Grauer Elementary School until January, when the two-room Thompson subdivision
annex was completed; four classes at the Mitchell Elementary School until January,
when the two-room Siddaway Elementary School was opened; and four classes at the
Garden City Elementary School until Easter, when the two-room addition to the Curne
Elementary School was brought into service.
During the year the Board again conducted a population survey, and worked closely
i\. ■_,  _r *     . .     __— ,'_,_ .   _ _ t 1   _•_.__   ttnnO
.i_-_-_._xx& ___m^ jwu nit, uuaiu again tunuuwicu a pupuiauuu suivcj, auu n^i_vw ,
with the Municipal Town Planning Committee. As a result, many school-sites have
been plotted throughout the district and steps taken to secure them. The siting of
schools, however, is being made increasingly difficult because of the number of new sub
divisions now being developed or being planned for future development.
In May a referendum by-law, covering a five-year school-building plan for an
amount of $1,500,000, was passed by a vote of 88 per cent of the voters. This excellent
result was achieved only by close co-operation with the public organizations in the
districts and efficient work over a period of time on the part of the public-relaW
committee established by the Board. The proposed building programme is scheduled
to begin this coming summer (1954).
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 65
The school dental clinic continued to render popular and efficient service to our
Richmond pupils. During the year all students in Grades I and II and some in Grade
HI were inspected. In all, 1,207 inspections were made. Children accepting treatment
numbered 702 from all grades, and these accounted for 2,421 dental appointments.
Dr. Deverall deserves great credit for this very fine accomplishment. |
Through the initiative of the School Board, the Richmond Recreation Commission
was organized in April. Under the leadership of the director, Miss P. Buckley, the
recreational activities of the district are being co-ordinated and expanded, and close
liaison is being maintained with our school principals as to the needs of the various
areas. In all this, the patient and efficient organizational work of Mrs. Hilda Keatley,
the district consultant of the Department of Education Community Programmes Branch,
must be given full recognition and commendation. I
M School District No. 73 (Alert Bay)
The new Alert Bay Elementary-High School at last entered the construction stage
early in the spring. This school will provide excellent educational facilities for the
children at Alert Bay, including, by agreement, at least one hundred Indian pupils in
the junior-senior high grades. In addition, two duplex teacherages are being provided
for the staff, and these should prove a factor in the retention of teachers.
Surveys made during the year indicate a need in 1955 for further classroom accommodation in the Malcolm Island Elementary-High School at Sointula. Plans are now
being made for an addition of two classrooms plus a teachers' room at this school.
In this connection it is anticipated that the two portable classrooms now surplus at Alert
Bay will be transported to Sointula and utilized. A duplex teacherage is also planned.
for this area.
University Hill School District
This elementary-high school continued to operate under very crowded conditions.
The plans for the new Junior-Senior High School were finalized in early spring, and it
is expected that the structure will be in service at the school opening in September.
Plans are now under way for the construction of a three-room primary school adjacent
to the present structure to accommodate the anticipated increased enrolment next year.
w General
The year has been one of great activity, and the co-operation of teachers, principals,
School Boards, and Department officials has made it one of gratifying educational
progress. Appreciation of the assistance and sympathetic consideration of all concerned
is herewith acknowledged.
School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte) and No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, which includes a large municipal and a large rural school district,
employs the services of 151 teachers.   .
School District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
With the opening of the new school at Port Clements, every attendance area in the
Queen Charlottes has a new, modern, well-equipped school.
The inclusion of the native children of Grades VII and above at Masset and Skide-
gate has made possible a reasonably adequate high-school programme at those centres.
 O 66
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
In the case of Skidegate, however, this has meant the reopening of one room in ft
school, and, unless some arrangement is made with the Department of Indian Affair f
an addition to the new school at Queen Charlotte City, both rooms in the old school* 11
have to be utilized next year. § i m
The merging of the two groups in the same schools has presented very few probl
and is working out to the distinct advantage of both. F   ems
School District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
This district has continued its steady rate of growth, and many new schools are
already overcrowded. The successful presentation of the latest building by-law should
take care of this, but in the meantime a shift system for several classes appears inevitable
in the coming year.
An opportunity class for children who have been falling behind in their grades was
instituted this year and has been very successful. About eighteen pupils from a number
of schools were enrolled and in some cases made astonishing progress.
Test results indicate that standards in this district are being well maintained and
the Departmental examination results were very satisfactory.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 47 (Powell River),
and No. 74 (Quatsino)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Delta
In the North Delta area, four classrooms were added to the Richardson School, and
plans were laid for the construction of a two-room elementary school on the Newton
Road. As the population of this section of the municipality continues its rapid growth,
the need for a local high school becomes increasingly urgent.
The opening of the new Delta High School annex in September relieved the congested secondary situation at Ladner, but the elementary-school facilities here still
provide but minimum essentials.
Powell River
A referendum was passed in May for the building of a new junior-senior high school
in Westview, new elementary schools at Grief Point, Edgehill, and in Powell River, and
additions at Cranberry Lake and Wildwood. Of necessity, the programme has been
extended over a period of three years, and it is anticipated that during this time accommodation needs at some points will be acute. jf
Quatsino
Modern and very attractive schools at Port Alice and Port Hardy were complete
and occupied, and new schools were planned for Coal Harbour and Mahatta Kiv
In May the San Josef School was opened at the R.C.A.F. station near Holberg.
Through the dauntless energy of the members of the School Board and the supp
of the ratepayers generally, Quatsino is nearing its goal to provide adequate sc
facilities and comfortable teacher living accommodation throughout the district.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 67
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with headquarters at Mission City, includes the two large municipal
districts of Maple Ridge and Mission. Total enrolment this year has been approximately
4,500. On all sides, sub-division of property is under way, particularly in Maple Ridge;
within two years the enrolment should pass the 5,000 mark.
In School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge) the disastrous lire in June, 1953, which
destroyed the junior-senior high school, created problems. Classrooms had to be found
for nearly 1,000 pupils, and basement rooms and other temporary rooms were opened
in the emergency; by using this space on two shifts, a minimum basic programme was
offered. Very few mentioned the inconvenience, most sensed the emergency, all gave
excellent co-operation. By September, 1954, a partial solution will be at hand—the new
senior high school will be ready. The referendum passed in May, 1954, provides for
a junior high school, which should be ready for September, 1955. These two units will
provide for immediate needs only, already the Board is planning for future expansion of
this district. Mention should be made of the co-operation of the Parent-Teacher Associations. While these groups are naturally interested in schools, their efforts in arranging
meetings where people might hear and discuss the referendum were very helpful.
A new five-room elementary school was officially opened on September 11th, 1953,
in Pitt Meadows. Due to the Legislature being in fall session at this time, the Department
was represented by the local Inspector of Schools.
In School District No. 75 (Mission) the growth is steady. The School Board is
wisely building up a capital reserve fund through the provision for a 1-mill levy. Through
this fund, one room is being added to Hatzic school this year.
The work in the schools has been satisfactory. Night-school classes have continued
to expand, and in-service classes for teachers have been well attended. In the year
neither School District No. 42 nor School District No. 75 had enough pupils to warrant
a Senior Matriculation class on its own. Interested students from the whole inspectorate
met at Mission and made one class possible. I am of the opinion we should do more
consolidating for Senior Matriculation, for not only is it hard to justify a small class on
the basis of expenditure, but a larger group makes possible a wider course offering and
at the same time gives these maturing young people a wider horizon than the local school.
In June, 1954, the teachers of the Mission Junior-Senior High School and the
trustees of the district joined to honour Miss M. Casselman, retired after more than
thirty years' service in the secondary schools of this district. Miss Casselman has been
untiring in her efforts to advance mathematics as a secondary-school subject.
I wish to record my appreciation of courtesies shown me by the District Health Unit.
In our work we see the same pupils in the same situations, and it is helpful to share
opinions. I express my thanks to the School Boards and their secretary-treasurers for
interest and co-operation in this challenge of providing pupils with an education.
 O 68
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13 (Kettle Valley),
and No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There were 109 teachers in the sixteen schools in this inspectorate during
the
year.
past
One school, Anarchist Mountain, was closed in September, and the pupils transported to Bridesville Superior School. §
1 Owing to lack of teachers, the Home Economics Course in the Grand Forks Junior-
Senior High School had to be eliminated and the subject taken by correspondence.
In the Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High School, the Vocational Agriculture
Course was dropped, partly because a suitable teacher was not obtainable and partly
because the results were not considered satisfactory.
In School District No. 12 (Grand Forks), one untrained teacher was appointed.
while two were appointed in School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley). All teachers in
School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan) were trained.
Through the co-operation of the School Boards and teachers, there was a continued
improvement in the standard of work being done throughout the inspectorate.
In the late fal a workshop for all primary teachers was held at Oliver, under the
direction of Miss Marian James, primary supervisor of Victoria. This was most successful, with all primary teachers from School Districts Nos. 12, 13, and 14 being present
and it was gratifying to see the principals and vice-principals in attendance.
In the early spring the Dominion Arithmetic Fundamental Test was given throughout
Are area to all pupils from Grades IV to XIII, inclusive, and the results are being used
to improve the Arithmetic fundamentals of those pupils who were not performing at the
proper levels Grades XII and XIII results were somewhat disappointing, and it
appear that there is insufficient practice and drill in fundamentals at the higher
In School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan), conferences were held with the
counsellors, public health nurse, and welfare workers to deal with problem cases who
ware attending the schools there. Through the co-operation of the various workers, many
problems were solved and many avoided, by pooling the information each had and by
foreseeing the difficulties that were about to arise.
It was unfortunate that School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) was without the
services of a public health nurse from February until the end of the term, and it is
fstncerely hoped that a nurse will be found to serve this area in the coming year. Owing to
tie scattered nature erf this district and the lack of medical services, it is most important
that it should have a resident nurse. The nurse stationed at Grand Forks attempted to
serve the area from February on, but it was too great a task to expect anyone to handle
both districts.
It was my good fortune to attend the C.E.A. convention in Halifax in September
This was a most enjoyable and profitable experience.
Once again I wish to express my sincere appreciation to School Board members
School Board secretary-treasurers, welfare workers, public health nurses, principals, and
members of the teaching staff for their co-operation during the past year.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 69
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum), No. 70 (Alberni), No. 79 (Ucluelet-
Tofino), and Unattached School Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kyuquot,
Muchalat, R.C.A.F. Station (Tofino), Sarita River, Tahsis River, and
Zeballos.
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The thirty-one schools in this inspectorate opened in September with a complete
staff of 173 teachers. Increased enrolments necessitated additional staff at Tahsis River
and in the three large school districts. A new school was opened for the first time at
Muchalat. The school at Kildonan was closed during the year. Additions and replacements to staff brought the total teacher strength to 184.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
The survey of accommodation made by the Board in the spring of 1953 resulted in
a referendum being placed successfully before the ratepayers in December. This new
building programme will see the completion of projects commenced under the district's
first by-law. The Qualicum Beach Junior-Senior High School will have the administrative section and Industrial Arts shops completed and a gymnasium-auditorium added.
The Parksville Junior High will have the administrative section completed and an auditorium-gymnasium, together with Industrial Arts and Home Economics shops, added.
Additional classrooms are to be provided at Nanoose and French Creek. A new school
on an enlarged site is to be built at Bowser. The heating plant at Errington is to be
reconstructed. A new one-room school is to be built at Home Lake. With this additional accommodation it should be possible to provide elementary education to most
pupils in their own communities, thus reducing the amount of transportation now used.
Work on a number of these projects has already commenced, and it is expected that
some units will be ready shortly after the opening of the new term.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
Three thousand and sixty-five pupils sought admission to the district's schools in
September. This was a marked increase over former enrolment records. Although all
pupils were satisfactorily accommodated, the need for more classrooms became very
evident. The Board devoted its energies during the fall term to the making of a population survey of the district. This survey, together with information available from other
sources, was used in the drafting of a new by-law which has yet to go before the ratepayers. The proposed projects include a four-room primary school for the South End,
a ten-room elementary school for the Calgary area, a sixteen-room junior high school
for the rural and Alberni area, and the acquisition of two new school-sites. The first
of these is to provide for future construction of an elementary school on Milltown Road.
The second is for a junior high school in Port Alberni. In draughting the new by-law,
the Board is not only providing for present needs but also planning for future expansion.
It envisages the day when community schools will offer elementary education within
easy access of pupils' homes. These schools, in turn, will provide the enrolment for two
district junior high schools. It is expected that the present junior-senior high school will
eventually enroll only senior high-school pupils. Sketch plans and estimates are now in
the process of preparation. In all probability the decision of the ratepayers will be
sought at the time of municipal elections in December.
School District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
The building programme authorized by this district's first by-law was completed
shortly after Christmas.   A new three-room elementary school was built at Ucluelet.
 O 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Pending completion of this building, classes were accommodated in temporary qUarte
A new classroom was added to the recent addition at Tofino and the old classroo^
demolished.    Considerable maintenance work has been done to existing schools and
teacher ages.   A planned programme of playground improvement is well under way
In November a permanent Board of School Trustees was elected to replace th
temporary Board which had functioned so effectively since the creation of this new
district. The educational programme was reorganized in September. All pupils in
Grades VII to XII were taught by a staff of fully qualified teachers in the Ucluelet
Elementary-Senior High School. Grades I to VI were taught in their home communities
Transportation was provided for those high-school and elementary pupils residing at a
considerable distance from school. Children from the R.C.A.F. station (Tofino) were
transported to and taught in the Ucluelet schools. The school at Port Albion continued
to operate as an ungraded (I to VI) school. Enrolment at this point was marginal. The
ungraded school at Kildonan was closed at Christmas because of lack of pupils. Much
credit is due both the teaching staff and the temporary and permanent Boards of this
district for the very noticeable improvement in educational standards and facilities.
Unattached School Districts
The Eric Godson Memorial Superior School at Bamfield continues to meet adequately the educational needs of the community. Enrolment remains fairly static. The
small community at Esperanza is effectively served by its well equipped and maintained
ungraded school. A marked increase in enrolment is noted at Kyuquot. A school was
opened for the first time at Muchalat. The school building at R.C.A.F. station (Tofino),
although ready, was not equipped. Pupils were transported to Ucluelet. Increased
enrolment at Sarita River is seriously overtaxing existing accommodation. Steps are
being taken to increase facilities for next term. The seven pupils at Sydney Inlet are
comfortably housed and ably taught. Enrolment at Tahsis River continues to increase.
An additional classroom was put into use at this point. The three-room building has
been much improved since reconstruction work was undertaken following the fire-damage
of last year. Curtailment in logging operations has reduced the attendance at Zeballos.
Anticipated mining activity may offset this temporary set-back. At all points the residents take a pride and interest in their school. This, together with their friendliness and
co-operation, greatly assists the educational programme.
General
This has been a busy and rewarding year for Boards, teachers, pupils, and myself.
In all districts, Boards gave unstintingly of their time and energy to provide the best
possible facilities for the job of teaching. Teachers, most of whom were fully qualified
and experienced, gave unselfishly of their best to maintain and improve standards in
basic skills, without neglecting those other aspects of education so necessary for a M
development of the growing personality. Pupils applied themselves earnestly to their
studies and in many cases did outstandingly good work. The University of British
Columbia Alumni Association Regional Scholarship was won by Henry E. McCand-
less, a student at Alberni District High School.
Throughout the year schools were visited as frequently as time would perau •
Monthly bulletins were sent to all teachers and Boards. Principals' meetings were held
at regular intervals. A district testing programme was carried out. Tests sent out y
the Division of Tests, Standards ,and Research were administered. A successful reading
institute, with sixty primary teachers in attendance, was held in May. An experimen
course in forestry, to be implemented this fall, was drafted with the assistance a
co-operation of the leaders of the lumbering industry. Classification ^issh0^J
placement and disposition of all pupils were completed in June.    During the spring te »
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 71
reports were prepared on a good percentage of learning situations. This work was
terminated with official visits to the Indian schools at Ucluelet, Ahousat, Nootka, and
Kyuquot. §     |
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of the helpfulness and co-operation
of Boards of School Trustees, their secretaries, principals and teachers, and officials in
the Department of Education at Victoria.
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 51 (Portland Canal), No. 52 (Prince
Rupert), No. 80 (Kitimat), and Unattached School Districts of Butedale
and Tulsequah.
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 49 (Ocean Falls) employed a staff of twenty-nine teachers in
eight schools enrolling 981 pupils. This enrolment shows a sharp increase over previous
years; this is partly due to the policy of enrolling the native children of Bella Coola in
the Provincial school there. In October, at Bella Coola, a three-room elementary school
was officially opened by Dr. H. P. Johns, Director of Guidance, Department of Education,
and by Mr. F. Anfield, Superintendent of Skeena Indian Agency.
The school district has passed a referendum for the amount of $920,000 to provide
added school accommodation and teacherages throughout this district. A good school-
maintenance programme has been maintained. Night-school continues to operate
successfully at Ocean Falls.
School District No. 51 (Portland Canal) operates a three-Kiom superior school
at Stewart, and an ungraded school at Torbrit Mines, on Alice Arm. The school population of this area has remained constant.
School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) continues to show an increase of about
5 per cent in the pupil enrolment of 1,862. The school staff in this district numbers
sixty-four. All school accommodation has been taxed to capacity. The spring term saw
the completion of a new six-room school with activity-room at Port Edward, and a two-
room addition to Conrad Street School. Night-school classes were conducted at the
high school throughout the winter season.
The school district suffered a grave loss with the death of Mr. A. M. Hurst, a capable
educator and a popular principal of Booth Memorial High School.
School District No. 80 (Kitimat) was created in July, 1953. A six-room elementary-
high school operated at the smelter-site. Night-school classes showed a heavy enrolment,
and this school played an important part in community activity throughout the year.
A building referendum has been passed for $730,000, and construction of a new
elementary school on the townsite has commenced.
Ungraded schools were in session at Butedale and Tulsequah. At Kemano a five-
room school, operated by the Morrison-Knudsen Company, provided educational facilities for 110 pupils. I
The twelve Indian schools in this inspectorial area had an enrolment of approximately 500 children. Very satisfactory teacher and pupil accommodation has been
provided and is being well maintained. Indian Affairs officials and teachers are doing
a conscientious work.
In all the school districts the schools are receiving fine public support.
 O 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
School Districts No. 33 (Chilliwack) and No. 76 (Agassiz)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment in the schools of School District No. 33 for the school-year 1953_54 wa
2,374 students, with a staff of 151 teachers. In District No. 76 (Agassiz), 539 students
were enrolled, and the staff numbered 21.
In its first year of operation, the new Agassiz Elementary-High School under Principal W. S. Duncan had a very satisfactory year. There was a marked improvement in
the standard of academic achievement, and it was very gratifying to observe a considerable
increase in attendance in the senior grades of high school.
The Chilliwack School District is fortunate in having a group of competent and
conscientious teachers in its schools, with the result that the educational development of
the area continues at a very satisfactory standard.
An important project carried out in the Chilliwack School District during the year
was a detailed investigation of school-population facts and trends. The information
secured indicates that the district may anticipate a continued growth in school attendance
of about 5 per cent per year. The School Board is developing a building programme
to handle this rate of increase and at the same time reduce transportation requirements
as much as is possible.
The presence of a large army camp in this inspectorate presents many interesting
problems, one of which is the supervision of a school enrolling some ninety apprentice
soldiers.
School Districts No. 32 (Fraser Canyon) and No. 34 (Abbotsford)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A, B.Ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In line with the policy of the previous year, the Department assigned Mr. A. D.
Jones, Inspector of Schools, for part time to this inspectorate, so that consultant duties k
Vocational Agriculture could continue to be carried on from this office. Mr. Jones made
his headquarters here with the exception of two months spent in the Peace River
inspectorate and two months in the Prince Rupert inspectorate. During his time lias
Mr. Jones carried out the inspection of the elementary schools.
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
School enrolments increased from 906 in June, 1953, to 957 in June, 1954, or by
5.6 per cent. The increase was most noticeable in Hope, with some also at Yale which
was balanced by a corresponding decrease at Spuzzum. To meet the increased enrolment
it was necessary'to add only one teacher to the staff. |
The growth in school population has been met by providing a temporary room in
the basement of the Hope school and by renting the Canadian Legion Hall and two
basement rooms in the Roman Catholic Church hall. This accommodation has proven
fairly satisfactory. To take care of future requirements, the ratepayers of Fraser Canyon
gave a 71-per-cent approval to a referendum for this purpose on June 28th.
The Board of School Trustees had the misfortune to have the St. Bino elem^
two-room school completely destroyed by fire during the year.    Pupil accommoda u
for the balance of the year was provided by renting the Presbyterian Church at Laidia ,
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 73
and by utilizing the old Concord School at Floods.    It is anticipated that the St. Elmo
school will be replaced by a new building in time for the new school-year.
The certificate classification of teachers engaged during the year was as follows:
E.-C, 11; E.-B., 14; S.-T., 2; S.-B., 7; S.-A., 2; total, 36. While it would appear
that the schools were adequately staffed, more and more this is being done by drawing
on local resources of married women teachers and, in several instances, accepting those
with less than the basic certification. Securing Physical Education, Commercial, and
Home Economics teachers proved a difficult task during the year. Illness and other
causes necessitated several changes of staff of the Hope Junior-Senior High School in
mid-term, and the Board was fortunate in securing suitable replacements.
||ln addition to the bus routes that have been operating for some years, routes were
opened from Chaumox to North Bend and along the Trans-Canada Highway to Boston
Bar and North Bend. The Board entered into an arrangement, also, in assisting with
the transportation of children from 14-Mile Ranch on the Hope-Princeton Highway to
Hope. This increase in transportation provides for practically all children in the district
for whom it was difficult to attend school on account of distances.
H School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Enrolment increased from 3,437 in June, 1953, to 3,563 in June, 1954, with a
peak enrolment of 3,609 in November. This is an increase of 126 pupils or almost
4 per cent. Increase in enrolment in one private school and the establishment of an
additional private school of three divisions operated in reducing the increased enrolment
from previous estimates. The increase in teaching staff amounted to SV2 per cent. This
was made necessary by the increased enrolment and by the inadequacy of temporary
accommodation at the senior high school.
During the year a new one-room unit was opened at Barrowtown for primary pupils,
and one-room additions made to Simpson and South Poplar Elementary Schools. A portable unit was built at the senior high school to house some of the increased enrolment
there. A referendum submitted to the ratepayers in May received an affirmative vote
of 69 per cent. This will provide for a new senior high-school building and a number
of elementary-school classrooms.
No particular difficulty was experienced in staffing schools for the year with fully
qualified teachers, excepting for teachers of special subjects—Physical Education and
Home Economics in particular. The following indicates the numbers of teachers in the
various classifications: E.-C, 12; E.-B., 65; E.-A., 3; S.-T., 1; S.-C, 6; S.-B., 38;
S.-A., 5; total, 130.
In both districts, results of the Departmental testing programme and of those from
this office would indicate that a good standard of instruction has been maintained. For
the most part, schools offer good physical conditions, and are adequately supplied with
teaching materials and suitably equipped with classroom furniture.
This department enjoyed the full co-operation of the Public Health Branch, the
Social Welfare Branch, Boards of School Trustees, and secretary-treasurers during the
year, for which thanks are gratefully extended.
School Districts No. 15 (Penticton), No. 16 (Keremeos), and No. 17 (Princeton)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P^d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
These three school districts are compact and serviced with excellent highways.
All told there are seventeen schools with 139 teachers.   In each district there is one
 O 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
centrally organized junior-senior high school, to which the secondary pupils are t
ported. In School District No. 15 (Penticton), the large elementary school is o^"
crowded, and since there is an average annual increase of 120 pupils, a new build'61
must be planned for the near future. Such a new building would also decentralize t?
elementary classes. Two classrooms are being added to the Carmi Elementary Scho 1
for the fall term. School District No. 17 (Princeton) has had to plan two additionl
rooms in the high school for the fall and two more rooms on the Princeton Elementary
School for the following year. A second classroom at Allenby is to be opened for the
intermediate grades. With a few exceptions, the conditions of the classrooms in use are
commendable.   The equipment and supplies are generally adequate.
The quality of instruction, particularly in School District No. 15 (Penticton) is
good. The advantage of continuity in the teaching staff of this larger centre has a marked
effect on the achievement of the pupils and on the tone of the schools. Monthly Arithmetic
drill tests were sent from this office to all Grade VIII and IX pupils in the area. As a
result of daily teacher drills, a considerable and steady improvement was measured over
the year. The Schorling-Clark-Potter Arithmetic test was given to all Grade VII pupils.
Metropolitan Achievement tests were given to Grade VI and VIII in the one- and two-
division schools. The district organization of elementary principals has planned a minimum standardized testing programme that will be followed in all schools. During
classroom visits, all Grade IV pupils were tested in Arithmetic, and many classes were
asked to prepare short written compositions. A special emphasis on written English
was requested in all elementary and secondary schools. The full co-operation of principals
and teachers on all suggestions made has been most gratifying.
Miss Ann Isabel Richards brought distinction to herself and the Penticton Junior-
Senior High School by winning the University of British Columbia Scholarship for Area 2.
It is interesting to note that pupils of this school have won the area scholarship seven
times in the last nine years. Miss Virginia Sykes, of the same school, won the CKOK
scholarship. Kenneth McKenzie, of the Princeton Junior-Senior High School, won
the competition for public speaking and was awarded a trip to the United Nations.
Representatives from the teachers, from the Public Health Branch, and from the
Social Welfare Branch meet regularly in this centre to discuss mutual problems. This
has been an effective means of bringing a co-operative approach in the treatment of
children with problems and handicaps.
I appreciate greatly the kindness and co-operation that have been given to me by the
School Boards, the secretary-treasurers, and the teachers since my transfer to this inspectorate late in October. I am also indebted to my predecessor, Inspector Turnbull, who
is largely responsible for the good relationships that exist in this area.
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South), No. 60 (Peace River Northland
Unattached School Districts at Atlin, Telegraph Creek, Fort Nelson Airport,
Cassiar, Lower Post, Camp Mile 456, Camp Mile 300, Fort Nelson River,
and Camp Mile 163.
REPORT OF FLOYD L. IRWIN, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, covering the extreme north and north-east corner of the Pro*
includes two large rural areas and nine unattached school districts. The fifty*111
elementary and two secondary schools are staffed by 159 teachers.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
O 75
The school-year 1953-54 showed a continuance of the steady growth of the area,
as indicated in the following table showing the net enrolment in School Districts Nos. 59
and 60 from 1950-51 to 1953-54:— f
School Year
<_» 8
,H  C.
oo
tf
o
c.
l-l
Oi
_>
OK
2,
O!
c.
oS
o
0>
<_»
OS
0>
oSh-t
f-t i—(
0>
0)
OSh-l
WlHH
0>
4>
OS
d8
a)
OS
ox
OS
OX
4)
•o
C-l
OX
1)
C- h-i
»-l>—I
ox
OS
o
H
f_
a.
c_
v
+_ **
_!_g
►ar. G
School District
No. 59
1950-51	
1951-52	
1952-53	
1953-54	
School District
No. 60
1950-51	
1951-52	
1952-53	
1953-54	
254
217
180
188
160
141
170
144
117
94
63
35
12
1,252
90
261
222
219
182
189
153
131
143
121
104
76
48
1,939
111
257
234
236
191
184
173
146
120
148
111
84
62
7
2,054
113
298
243
225
217
199
191
185
132
110
127
82
54
15
2,191
1
94
101
71
84
84
-77
81
53
48
37
10
8
749
1
111
93
101
68
80
86
77
77
42
34
30
6
806
128
93
89
98
66
80
83
67
52
33
23
23
835
137
122
117
87
91
66
89
77
48
46
25
18
923
587
115
137
157
29
88
The supervision of such a large number of schools was shared by Inspector A. D.
Jones, who spent two months in the district and whose able assistance was much appreciated.
The continuing shortage of qualified teachers was felt again this year in this inspectorate. While all classrooms were eventually opened, some few were not before the
end of October. The following table, showing the distribution of teachers by certification for grant purposes, reflects our situation in this respect:—
E.T.
E.C.
E.B.
E.A.
s.c.
S.B.
S.A.
Total
School District No. 59—
Elementary	
Secondary	
Totals for School District No. 59
School District No. 60—
Elementary	
Secondary	
Totals for School District No. 60
Unattached	
Total for inspectorate	
9
1
12
39
3
10     12
42     2
1
10  |   6
1  |   2
15
3
1
11      8     18      1
4     5     6
25
25
66
3
22
63
33
4     25     1     96
....  |  ....
1  |   7
1
32
15
1     7
1
47
1
16
32
159
The crowded condition of the schools at Dawson Creek and Fort St. John will be
relieved by the completion of the new junior-senior high school at Fort St. John, which
will be occupied in September, and by the passing of the school-building referendum in
School District No. 59, by a majority of 78.5 per cent, which provides for a new elementary school and a junior high school at Dawson Creek. Two one-room schools were
built at Erinlea and Moose Creek. Other small rural areas north of the river are growing
and presenting new problems of accommodation or transportation for the early future.
This area of the Province is coming into prominence as its vast potential natural
wealth is being more widely realized and acknowledged. The development in natural
gas and oil, the huge potential in hydro-electric, the vast as yet unopened agricultural
areas, promise great expansion in this section of the Province. In the two larger centres,
the educational programme is on a sound basis and is capable of expansion to meet the
needs of the future. §
In conclusion, I wish to extend my thanks to the Department of Education, the
School Trustees, area representatives, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers for
their splendid co-operation and assistance during the year.  |jj-
 O 76
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden^
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The inspectorate comprises the two large rural School Districts of No. 4 (Winde
mere)  and No.  18   (Golden), with the large municipal School District of No. 3
(Kimberley).
In each of the three school districts there has been a gradual increase of school
population that has necessitated organized building-programme study.
In Golden School District it is anticipated that a new four-room elementary-senior
high school at Parson, to replace four scattered one-room buildings, and a six-room
elementary-senior high school replacement, with activity-room, at Golden, will be ready
for occupancy by next September. Moseson Camp Elementary School was destroyed
by fire in February. Moseson Lumber Company immediately and very co-operatively
replaced its supplied school building by improvised quarters.
| In Windermere School District the present use of improvised classrooms and the
detailed study of population trends have accounted for much planning for a construction
referendum next year. A one-room elementary school was opened in company-provided
quarters at Mineral King Mines in October. The small Galena one-room elementary
school went on swing-shift in October, with two divisions. Special Department Representatives Dr. W. A. Plenderleith and Mr. D. Kennedy were in School Districts Nos.
3 and 4 in June to confirm building requirements.
In May, Mr. H. L. Campbell, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education,
officially opened Kimberley School District's four-room Lindsay Park Elementary School
and three-room Chapman Camp Elementary School. The actual spring openings had
terminated swing-shifts for six divisions at A. A. Watkins Elementary School. The
Board hope to obtain referendum sanction next fall for the construction of a new
Kimberley Senior High School and additions to Blarchmont and Marysville Elementary
Schools.
Pupil-transportation problems continue to cause consternation to School Boards,
but firm, consistent local policy adherence in co-operation with the Department results
in general respect by affected persons.
During the past year the three Boards were able to fill all teaching vacancies. The
year closed with five elementary-temporary certificated teachers, one of whom was
without teacher-training. The one fairly large junior-senior high school has had difficulty
in staffing with fully qualified specialist teachers.
In Kimberley School District the transition of teacher leadership at Marysville,
Blarchmont, and Chapman Camp Elementary Schools from senior teacher to principal
was effected at the beginning of the school-year. They and the principal of A. A.
Watkins Elementary School have co-operated with the Inspector of Schools in vital
administration policy-setting and in the study of the improvement of instruction and
leadership.
Dr. Conway's Department testing was supplemented with the Inspector's minimum
standardized programme in Grades I to VIII. Secondary-school principals co-operated
with the Inspectors in East Kootenay January University Entrance examination production, with succeeding diagnosis and treatment
The East Kootenay Administrators' Council convened four times this year at Cranbrook.   Principals, vice-principals, and Inspectors participated in valuable deliberations.
Adult education continues to advance.   Kimberley night-school classes, which are
in their second year of revised organization under a director, have maintained satisfaction
and interest.   Golden made a rather noteworthy attempt last winter in the support oi a
English class for new Canadians.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 77
Special mention here is deserved by the sixty-piece Kimberley High School Rotary
Band for its proficient participation in May at the New Westminster secondary-school
band conference. j
In conclusion, I wish to express my gratitude to the Department of Education,
trustees, representatives, secretary-treasurers, principals, teachers, and other school
personnel for their splendid associations during the year. ?&
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 63 (Saanich), No. 64 (Saltspring),
and Unattached School District at Belmont Park
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P.ED., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
AND HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS
No major changes in the personnel of the teaching staff occurred in the areas within
this inspectorate during the school-year 1953-54. A steady growth in school population
continued, however, with the result that numerous additions to the staff were necessary.
Specific developments in two of the school districts are referred to below.
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
In January, 1953, this district gave approval to a money by-law for $576,000 for
the construction of new schools. During the current year construction was in part completed in connection with the elementary-school programme. Construction of high
schools located in the Belmont and Milnes Landing areas was commenced. It is hoped
these buildings will be ready for occupancy in September.
School District No. 63 (Saanich)
The continued growth of the school population in School District No. 63 has presented a serious problem of accommodation in certain sections of this area. This is
particularly noticeable in the Royal Oak, Prospect Lake, and Deep Cove Schools, and
in the North Saanich Junior-Senior High School. The problem will become increasingly
acute during the next school term, but it is one of which the School Board is fully aware
and to which it has given much attention.
During the past year the School Board introduced two innovations of considerable
importance in the educational programme offered by the district. An opportunity class
was established at Sidney Elementary School to serve the district, and relieving teachers
were employed in the elementary schools in order to provide supervision time for
principals.
This has been an active year for the teachers of School District No. 63. Their
interest and enthusiastic participation in matters of a professional nature are to be commended. During the year committees of teachers were set up to study various aspects
of the educational programme in the district. Their work has formed a valuable avenue
of in-service training, as well as being of assistance in planning educational developments.
A reading clinic was held for elementary-school teachers, and a special workshop on
problems of remedial reading instruction was attended by secondary-school teachers.
Regular professional meetings were held by school principals and by teachers of the
primary grades.
 O 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
School Districts No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 57 (Prince Georff^
and No. 58 (McBride) 8 ;'
REPORT OF G. E. JOHNSON, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof) employed 26 teachers to instruct 640 pU fj
in seven schools.
In School District No. 57 (Prince George), there were 37 schools in operation
Total student enrolment was 2,940, with 121 teachers employed.
School District No. 58 (McBride) had a teaching staff of 23 in eleven schools
enrolling 460 pupils.
I The staffing of the schools in this inspectorate was difficult, and it was not possible
to secure qualified teachers for all positions. There is evidence that this problem will
become still more acute with an expanding school population and the need for schools
in new areas. Spear-headed by the Prince George Board, an attempt was made during
the year to interest teachers from the United Kingdom to accept teaching positions in
the Northern Interior of the Province. This will bring some relief for school opening
in September, 1954, but the need for qualified teaching personnel is still very great. The
matter of adequate staffing still remains the greatest single problem in this northern area,
In School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof), a building programme was approved by
the ratepayers early in the school-year. Among other things, this programme provides
for a modern secondary school at Vanderhoof to serve the needs of this school district.
It is expected that this school will be ready for occupancy by September, 1955.
Building programmes submitted in School District No. 57 (Prince George) and in
School District No. 58 (McBride) during the year did not get the necessary majority
from the ratepayers.   Some double-shifting will be necessary for the 1954-55 school-year.
A highlight of the school-year in Prince George was the official opening of the new
Connaught Elementary School by the Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education
and former Inspector of Schools for this area.
I would like to express my sincere thanks to the teachers, trustees, and secretary-
treasurers for helping to make my first year in this inspectorate both interesting and
enjoyable.
School Districts No. 1 (Fernie) and No. 2 (Cranbrook)
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1953-54 saw further additions to the school facilities of both
districts. In School District No. 1, new one-room schools at Gold Creek and Newgate
were placed in operation, while the junior-senior high school at Sparwood should be
ready for use in September. The addition to the elementary-senior high school at Fernie
is under construction and should be completed some time in 1954. A new building at
Elko burned down a matter of days before its completion; a replacement should be ready
for the fall term. In School District No. 2 an additional room was opened in the Tentfl
Avenue School at Cranbrook, and this school was placed under the administration oi
a separate principal. The modernization of the Wardner and Moyie Schools was continued. The phenomenal growth of the school population in and around CranbrooK n
necessitated planning for further accommodation for both elementary and seconda y
pupils.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 79
The number of children conveyed by school bus steadily increased. Although there
was no increase in the number of routes, some buses were forced into double-trip schedules and some bus routes were extended. T|
' As well as the normal testing programmes in the larger schools, testing was done
through the Inspector's office in Arithmetic from Grades III to VIII, in Spelling from
Grades II to X, and in English Language in Grade VII. The results in these fields show
steady improvement throughout the last five years. At all grade-levels there was some
increase in emphasis on the teaching of English Composition.
The value of the East Kootenay School Administrators' Council, an organization of
principals, vice-principals, and Inspectors, has been very great. Meeting four times
a year, this group has done much to assure common administrative policies in the schools
of the area. Last year, in addition to its usual activities, it sponsored a successful
co-operative testing programme at the Grades XI and XII level in English 40, Mathematics 30, Mathematics 91, Social Studies 30, and Chemistry 91, as well as in Arithmetic
at the elementary-school level.
IThe experimental work in homogeneous grouping of pupils at the elementary-school
level has, through the devotion of the teachers concerned, been so successful that consideration should now be given to an extension of the principle to junior high-school
grades. In the senior high-school grades the same underlying ideas should permeate
the grouping of pupils in special courses.
An in-training course for teachers was conducted during the winter. The response
was slight in numbers, but great in the quality of work done by participants.
It is also gratifying to be able to report that the general attitude of senior high-
school pupils throughout the area shows an increasing seriousness of purpose, resulting
in conscientious and effective work habits. I personally feel that the average high-school
graduate of to-day compares very favourably with his more highly-selected counterpart
of a generation ago.
In severing my direct connection with the schools of this area, I wish to express
my sincere thanks to both the teachers and the trustees with whom I have had the
pleasure of serving. In addition, I should like to pay tribute also to the boys and girls
of the East Kootenay, who to-day, even as twenty-seven years ago, are proving themselves
worthy of serving their district and their Province.
School District No. 11 (Trail)
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., Pjed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises School District No. 11 (Trail), which has one senior
high school, one junior-senior high school, one junior high school, one elementary-junior
high school, and twelve elementary schools. The total enrolment in June, 1954, was
4,834 pupils, with a staff of 204 teachers. In June, 1953, the totals were 4,767 pupils
and 193 teachers. jjjl
All schools operated efficiently, with principals and teachers co-operating to put
into practice the objectives of the programme of studies. Professional meetings of school
principals were held regularly during the year.
All elementary schools in this inspectorate were staffed with fully qualified teachers.
Such was not the case in the secondary schools. It is becoming increasingly difficult to
find fully qualified teachers in Home Economics, Physical Education, and Commerce.
There is also a shortage of qualified teachers of general subjects in the secondary schools.
 O 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Consequently, it was found necessary to transfer a number of experienced teachers f
the elementary schools to the junior high schools and, in a few cases, to the senior n
schools. lg
The class for mentally and physically handicapped children in attendance at T I
elementary schools was opened in the Trail Central School. A similar class continud
in operation in the Cook Avenue Elementary School in Rossland. Both classes are me t
ing with success and are greatly appreciated by both pupils and parents. e j
In both the Trail Junior High School and the Rossland Junior-Senior High School
special classes were set up for the very slow learners. It is felt that good progress has
resulted for these students.   Standardized tests indicate a good growth in achievement.
Arrangements have been completed in both the J. Lloyd Crowe Senior High School
and the Rossland Junior-Senior High to keep the superior students together as a class
throughout Grades X, XI, and XII. It is planned to give these students an enriched
and challenging programme in English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, and Foreign
Languages.
Mrs. Hazel M. Davidson, of the Rossland MacLean Elementary School, retired on
superannuation in June. Her charming personality, genial disposition, and efficiency
marked her as one of the great teachers of this district. |
During the school-year a commendable effort was made by all schools to better
acquaint the public with our public-school system. Successful weekly panels were broadcast over radio station CJAT. Among the topics discussed were: (1) The Philosophy
of Education, (2) The Organization of the Elementary School, (3) The Place of the
Junior High School in Education, (4) Reading in the Elementary School, (5) Education
for Living, (6) Reporting Pupil Progress to Parents, and (7) The School Lunch.
In addition to the radio broadcasts, good public relations were sought through
regular news-letters from the schools to all parents, through educational programmes at
Parent-Teacher Association meetings, and through addresses to service clubs and Chambers of Commerce in both Trail and Rossland.
In December, 1953, a school by-law referendum was presented to and approved by
the ratepayers of School District No. 11. The Board of School Trustees was thereby
empowered to borrow money to the extent of $675,000 for the following projects: (1)
Three-room school for the Glenmerry sub-division, (2) six-room addition plus a gymnasium-auditorium to the Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High School, (3) two-room additional plus activity-room to the Montrose Elementary School, (4) four-room addition
plus activity-room to the Sunningdale Elementary School, (5) alterations to and addition
of an activity-room to the Trail Central School, and (6) improvements to the lighting
facilities in both the Rossland MacLean School and the Trail Junior High School. By
the end of June, construction had commenced on the Fruitvale, Sunningdale, and Montrose projects.
In concluding this report, I want to express my thanks to the Department of Education, the Trail School Board, Secretary-Treasurer Robert C. Smith, the principals, and
teachers for the splendid co-operation they have extended to me throughout the year.
The trustees in particular have given most generously of their time and effort to bring
about satisfactory solutions of their many problems.
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), and No. 8 (Slocan)
report of j. j. Mckenzie, b.a., inspector of schools
During the past year this inspectorate has had much activity in the field of schoo
construction.   This activity will continue throughout the next few years before the
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS 0 81
ing programme previously planned is completed. School enrolment has increased considerably in School District No. 7 (Nelson), and has remained reasonably stable in
School Districts Nos. 6 and 8.
Two in-service training courses for teachers were given at Nelson. These were in
the field of dramatics.   They were well attended by the teachers of the district.
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
The school population in this district has remained relatively stable. A new one-
room school at Ainsworth was completed by Christmas, and the additions to the Riondel
Superior were ready for school opening. During the coming year the Board plans to
replace the inadequate facilities at Argenta with a new one-room portable school unit.
The largest construction job was the addition to Kaslo Elementary-High SchooL Two
classrooms and a gymnasium were added. Occupancy took place in January. The closing
of most of the base-metal mines in the area did not greatly affect the school enrolment as
calculated to June 30th. It is not known, however, what effect the mine closures will
have on enrolment in the new term.
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
During the past year the enrolment has increased considerably in the elementary
school and greatly in the senior high school. All available space in the high school has
been put to use. With the Board facing delays in the construction of the new senior high
school, due to drainage problems on the site, it will be necessary to acquire more accommodation before the fall term begins, in order to accommodate the increased enrolment.
Working conditions for staff and students have been difficult during the past year, due to
lack of space.
The new Salmo Junior-Senior High, which has been under construction during the
year, will be ready for occupancy in September. This building will provide facilities in
Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Science laboratories, which are needed to round
out the programme of the school. The new Salmo Elementary was completed during
the year.
Additions to the Nelson Junior High and Hume Elementary in Nelson will be
completed for the September term.
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
The school population has remained approximately the same as in the previous year.
One-room additions were made to the W. E. Graham and Mount Sentinel Junior-Senior
High Schools. Partitions were placed in four high-school classrooms throughout the
district to give better facilities for typing and study. The grounds at the Lucerne High
School were graded and surfaced. The schools at Winlaw, Appledale, and Perrys received
concrete foundations. A workshop for the maintenance department was constructed at
Slocan City. All construction and maintenance of buildings was carried out by the
Board's maintenance staff at a great saving to the school district. During the summer
two classrooms will be constructed at New Denver Elementary School, replacing two old
one-room units. f
During the past year a special school of Sons of Freedom Doukhobor children, who
have become wards of the Government, was established at New Denver. The many
obstacles which were encountered at first were overcome, and during the latter part of
the school-year the school was flourishing. It is hoped that many of the children, who
are attending school on a half-time basis during the summer, will be ready to fit into the
regular school programme at the commencement of the new term.
An active interest has been shown by all of the larger schools in drama and music.
Some of the schools have done exceedingly well in these fields.
 O 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
A full-scale testing programme was carried out in the inspectorate, and
whole, results showed a reasonably good standard of achievement. '     'oa ^
In conclusion, I should like to thank my three Boards of Trustees, their local
resentatives, the principals of the schools, and their staff members for their heloi
co-operation during the past year.   It has been a pleasure to serve as the DepartmeT
representative in this area. n s
School Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 29 (Lill00et\
and No. 30 (South Cariboo) ;'
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.Pm,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS   J
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
The past year has been one of normal progress in this district.
The old log school-house at Squam Bay was replaced by a modern building. An
additional classroom to the three-room Barriere High School, which was built in 1951,
is under construction.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
The school-year 1953-54 was marked by continuation of the steady growth and
development that has characterized this district for the past number of years. Blue River
Superior School was completed, with the addition of a third classroom, full plumbing,
heating, and insulation of the old school. This marked the completion of the programme
undertaken with the passing of School By-law No. 1, in February, 1951.
The preliminary work was completed during the year in preparation for a further
expansion of school facilities at Clearwater and Birch Island, as well as the bringing oi
the other schools and teacherages of the district to acceptable present-day standards,
This district was fortunate in establishing, in co-operation with the Department of
Health and Welfare and a dentist from Kamloops, dental services for the district. Over
three hundred children received attention during the first six months of the operation of
the programme, at no cost to the taxpayers of the Province except the loan of the necessary chair and dental cabinet. Numbers of adults also have availed themselves of the
service in the evening hours.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
This year saw the completion of the much-needed activity-room with stage addition
to the Lillooet Elementary-Senior High School, and also a new two-room school a
Shalalth.
Night-school classes for wood and metal work were successfully carried on
Lillooet, and English for new Canadians in Bralorne.      I
A successful building by-law was passed in May to provide a six-room eleven J
school at Lillooet and an additional classroom at Shalalth, plus two additional c assr
at Bralorne and a new school at Devine.   Also included were teacherages at
and Bralorne, to overcome lack of teacher accommodation. ^
It is hoped that construction will commence early in the fall and so take care o
needs of the rapidly increasing enrollment for the next few years.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
O 83
School District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
The school population has continued to increase during the past year, due mainly
to the development in the northern part of the district. Plans are now being made for
the addition of three extra classrooms and new Home Economics and Industrial Arts
rooms at the Clinton School. Plans will also be made for future additions of two extra
classrooms at the Ashcroft and Lytton Schools.
As approximately 50 per cent of the pupils at the Walhachin School requested
transportation to the Ashcroft High School, it has been decided to temporarily close the
Walhachin School and transport all of these pupils to the Ashcroft School, opening an
extra division at Ashcroft. The present school bus will be stationed at Walhachin, and
an extra bus put on the Ashcroft-Basque run.
Last term the schools at Tin Cup and Loon Lake were closed, bus routes being
extended to transport the pupils from these two schools to the Clinton School. This plan
proved to be very satisfactory, and will be continued for the coming term.
In concluding this report, I should like to express my gratitude and appreciation for
the splendid co-operation shown, and work performed, by the very conscientious and
able trustees of my inspectorate. This applies also to school representatives, secretary-
treasurers, and teachers.
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops) and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 24 (Kamloops)
The net enrolment for the school-year 1953-54 was 3,456, an increase of 405 pupils
over the previous year. The number of teachers increased from 114 for the previous
year to 124.
The following schools were in operation:—
Number
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Enrolment
One-room elementary..
Two-room elementary.
Graded elementary	
Elementary-high	
Junior-senior high	
Totals	
20
20
20
4
8
8
4
42
44
1
6
6
1
36
46
30
112
1   124   |
297
223
1,604
157
1,175
3,456
Rural one-room schools were opened at Frolek's Mill, Pritchard, Red Lake, and
Rose Hill, while the schools at Martin Prairie, Pemberton Range, and Willow Ranch
were closed. It
Transportation was provided to the Allan Matthews Elementary School at Kamloops
for the pupils of Grades V and VI from Brocklehurst, Heffley Creek, Savona, and Valley-
view, and to the North Kamloops Elementary School for Grades IV to VI from Westsyde.
This was a temporary measure pending completion of construction of more adequate
accommodation for these rural centres. I
The increasing enrolment of this district necessitated the presentation of a referendum to the ratepayers in December, 1953. The favourable response of the ratepayers has
permitted the School Board to proceed with plans for twenty-three additional elementary
classrooms, and to replace several outmoded rural schools.   It will also permit the con-
 0 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
struction of a new junior-senior high school, to accommodate 600 students, | the
of North Kamloops. Jt '        ^
The Kamloops Junior-Senior High School auditorium was completed, and offici n
opened in June, 1954, by the Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education. Ith
seating capacity for 925 students. j     as
During the year regular meetings of the administrative council, consisting of th
principals, vice-principals, and head teachers of school districts Nos. 24 and 31 were held
to discuss and formulate educational policies for the area.
A child-guidance council for Kamloops School District was formed under the chairmanship of Miss E. M. Foord, Mental Health Co-ordinator, with representation from the
Department of Health and Welfare, the South Central Health Unit, the Kamloops City
judiciary, Board of School Trustees, Kamloops schools, and the office of the Inspector
of Schools. This council met monthly to discuss problems concerning students whose
behaviour showed indications of abnormality.
It is also gratifying to report that two in-service courses for teachers were well
attended.
Circulating libraries of reference, professional books, and phonograph records were
established to serve the schools in the rural areas.
The reorganization of the School Board office staff, with A. V. McLeod as secretary-
treasurer, and the establishment of a Maintenance Department under a Maintenance
Superintendent, have greatly improved administration in the district.
School District No. 31 (Merritt)
The limited educational programme for the secondary level, due to inadequate
facilities in this district, was formally recognized by the Board of School Trustees in the
presentation of a referendum to the ratepayers in late June, 1954. The referendum made
provision for a modern junior-senior high school for Merritt and a new two-room elementary school for Brookmere. The referendum was not approved by the ratepayers on
its first presentation, but is to be presented a second time early in the fall.
General
There has been a marked improvement in the physical condition of the schools
throughout the area. A programme of reconstruction of the classrooms in the older
schools has noticeably improved working conditions for the teachers and pupils. This,
together with the purchase of new furniture and classroom equipment, has brought many
of the classrooms up to a good standard.
Much credit is due to the principals and teachers for their continued conscientious
efforts to provide a worth-while educational programme for this area.
Hie secretary-treasurers and their staffs have shown friendly and considerate cooperation. The members of the School Boards, as in past years, continued to display a
devotion for public service by giving so freely of their time in the interest of education.
School Districts No. 23 (Kelowna) and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
While individual notions of the primary purposes for which our public scj0* **
maintained are legion, widely varied, and often antithetical, according to the^ideals ^
experiences of the holder, most students of child development agree that the educat1^
children should be both training in present living and a preparation for adult lite.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 85
recently published " Teaching and Learning," Dr. S. R. Laycock points out that the two
most pronounced characteristics of our time are rapid, often unpredictable, change, and
an atmosphere of tension and anxiety.   He then says:—
"In the light of the above, our citizens are likely to have to place increasing
emphasis on the kind of person our schools develop rather than merely on academic
skills and knowledge which the pupil is able to acquire in his school years. Not that the
latter are unimportant, but they can function in a rapidly changing and tense world only
in certain types of persons — persons who have integrity of personality, integrity of
thought, and integrity of character. 4
| If the children of our schools are to stand up to the stresses and strains of both
to-day's and to-morrow's world, they will need to be emotionally stable and emotionally
mature individuals." g
In attempting to give educational leadership to the teachers, the parent-teacher
groups, and the public generally throughout this inspectorate, we have consistently
emphasized the above as fundamental in our British Columbia philosophy of education.
In both school districts in the inspectorate, the school-year 1953-54 has been,
I believe, one of earnest and generally enlightened effort on the part of all those charged
with responsibility for public-school education. We have experienced some severely
vexing problems, but have nevertheless achieved good success in our primary function
of promoting the wholesome and multilateral development of our children and youth.
Our school enrolments have continued to increase at a moderate rate, and, after a period
of four years with little new classroom construction, both districts find it necessary to
expand some of their facilities. In this respect careful planning has been in progress for
several months.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
In this district there are seventeen elementary schools, one junior high, two junior-
senior high schools, and one senior high school. The net enrolment for the year was
4,261—2,554 in the elementary-school grades, and 1,707 in the secondary-school grades;
the percentage division is 60 per cent and 40 per cent for the respective sections. The
increase in enrolment over last year was 171, amounting to about 4 per cent. The
teaching staff numbered 151, an increase of 3 over the preceding year. Only 2 of these
teachers, a University of British Columbia graduate with special training in Physical
Education and an assistant in Home Economics, lacked the required teacher-training.
Of the 75 teachers engaged in secondary-school work, 8 had less than the full academic
and professional requirements. Difficulty in staffing was acute in girls' Physical Education and Home Economics. There was no underqualified teacher on the staffs of the
elementary schools.
Student achievement at the top level was pleasing. Norman Gri, of Kelowna Senior
High School, led the Province in the Senior Matriculation examinations, and not only won
the Royal Institution Scholarship for that achievement but was also chosen for the Union
Carbide Scholarship of $2,000 for study in chemical engineering. Miss Beth Spall, of
the same class and school, was also awarded a $400 scholarship, while John Mepham,
also of the same class, was awarded a local scholarship of $1,000 provided for in the will
of the late Emerson Dow Roberts. In the University Entrance division, Wayne Hubble,
of Kelowna Senior High School, won the University Scholarship for Area 3 (School
Districts Nos. 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and 23). This same student won the $250 Meyerhoff
Scholarship for School District No. 23.
A year ago I reported the appointment of Mr. Joseph BiUyeald as Mental Health
Co-ordinator, and expressed approval of the beginning he had made in his new work.
During this school-year his services have been continued and expanded. He co-operates
effectively with the teachers in all cases involving maladjustments and symptoms of maladjustment.   His work takes him into the schools and the homes and community environ-
 0 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
ments of the children referred to him.    His services are being generally recoi.ii'
a valuable contribution to the improvement of child nurture.
In the matter of building, two important projects have been carried through
cost
now
other project was the erection of an adequate School Board administration buildin
first was the reconstruction of the four-classroom Peachland Elementary School at
of about $21,000.   The building was antiquated and in very poor condition- it s*C08t
a good functional school building, and will give many years of satisfactory service^
.•« •_   -a.      _-1_ -_     i_-_i_J_£_;>k)-4     y-.-P    rt«_     nrXtmitn+A     0^.1.^.^.1     "D ^-- 3     _  J        •      •     .
Kelowna.   Besides the necessary offices, it includes a well-equipped workshop for\u
 -■  B j.      if--    " -'_.-V___vjfx
maintenance crew, and storage-space for school furniture and supplies.   The \
about $33,000. | Was
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
This school district is fully consolidated, and one elementary and one junior-senior
high school accommodate all its pupils. The net enrolment for the year was 855-518
in the elementary grades, and 337 in the secondary grades. The increase of 47 pupils
amounts to almost 6 per cent. The teaching staff numbered 29, an increase of 1 over
the preceding year. The full-time staff of the elementary school was 13, while that of
the high-school was 15; in addition, 1 relieving teacher assisted half time in each school
to permit the principal to give time to administration and supervision. No teacher in
this district lacks teacher-training, but 3 who teach in the junior-high grades have first-
class certificates only. As in School District No. 23 efforts to get a fully-qualified instructor for girls' Physical Education were unsuccessful.
Present classroom accommodation is taxed to its limit. For the past two years the
elementary school has used one basement room as a regular classroom, and another has
been fitted up to accommodate an additional division in September next. These rooms
should be regarded as temporary expedients, and the provision of new classrooms should
be planned for. The desirability of the necessary new construction taking the form of
a two- or three-classroom building in one of the outlying orchard areas should be given
consideration. In the high school, plans for the expansion of the Industrial Arts accommodation are being carried out, and similar provision for the Home Economics is also
necessary.
Before concluding, I should say a word about the experiment in the primary grades
of both districts which I outlined in my report of a year ago. The plan has been pursued;
of the 552 beginners of September, 1952, 53 seem to be ready for intermediate-grade
work. Careful evaluation indicates that only in Arithmetic have these pupils achieved
less mastery than the regular three-year groups. It would appear that^ with reasonable
review at the beginning of next term, they will be quite capable of succeeding in the
Arithmetic work of Grade IV. j 1
To members of the School Boards, principals, teachers, secretary-treasurers, the
public health nurses and doctors, and all others who have whole-heartedly co-operated m
our great task, I wish to express my sincere appreciation.
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake), No. 28 (Quesnel), Unattached School
Districts at Chezacut, Tatlayoko, and Anahim, and Indian Day-schools
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
The Board of Williams Lake School District has had to deal with P*8^
from the general population increase.   The fact that the school population has g
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 87
from 770 in June, 1951, to 1,155 in June, 1954, and that it will very likely be over 1,300
in September of this year, will give a good idea of the increased accommodation the
Board found it necessary to provide each year. There is every indication that this general increase in population is continuing, and at present the Board is having requests for
rural schools in areas where there has been none in the past, as well as facing the necessity of providing increased high-school and elementary-school accommodation. The
representatives, the Board, and its staff have met this problem with good judgment and
decision, and provided for this very scattered district a smoothly operating and efficient
educational system.
In the school-year 1952-53, the district opened a high-school dormitory. This
dormitory has now completed two very successful years of operation and is proving to
be a great boon to the rural students of this community, for whom it provides excellent
supervised boarding accommodation at an extremely reasonable rate. During the last
year it has provided accommodation for some pupils from four other districts as well as
from School District No. 27.
The Board operates a well-equipped composite high school in Williams Lake. The
provision of this high school has resulted in increased secondary enrolment in the district
during the last several years.
The following statistics will give some idea of the growth of this district:—
Enrolment
Grades I-VI
Grades
vn-xn
Total
April, 1951	
April, 1954	
September, 1954 (anticipated)
553
783
825
217
372
475
770
1,155
1,300
High-school dormitory enrolment:   1953-54, 61;   1954-55 (estimated), 70.
Pupils transported to school by bus, 1953-54:   Grades I to VI, 250; Grades VII
to VIII, 85; total, 326.
Teachers:   1953-54, 54;  1954-55 (estimated), 59.
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
This has been an extremely busy year for the representatives and Board members
in the Quesnel School District. Assisted by a capable staff, they have met and mastered
many problems of providing schools, temporary accommodation, equipment, maintenance, school transportation, etc. During the year the Board lost the services of the
conscientious and capable secretary-treasurer, Mr. Warren B. Woodhurst. His place
was taken temporarily by his very conscientious assistant, Mrs. Anne Rowlandson, and
finally by the appointment of Mr. G. J. North.
This school district completed and opened the following buildings during the school
year:— 1
(1) A ten-room addition to the Quesnel High School.
(2) A modern eight-room elementary school, with large activity-room, in
West Quesnel.
(3) A three-room school at Narcosli.
(4) A two-room school at Kersley.
(5) A one-room addition to Macalister School.
(6) One-room schools at Moose Heights and Milburne Lake, § #
At the present it is building a combined maintenance shop-School Board building, a one-
room addition to the Alexandria School, and a three-room primary school.
The Board anticipates that September, 1954, will see all its buildings crowded and
several classes in temporary quarters. It plans to prepare soon the draft of a new by-law
to take care of future educational needs.
 O 88
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
The following statistics give some indication of the recent development of the
district and the effectiveness of the Board's policy of developing a modern coml
high school accessible to the large majority of students by bus:— posite
Enrolment
Grades I-VI
Grades
vn-xn
June, 1950	
June, 1952	
June, 1954	
September, 1954 (anticipated).
623
897
1,172
1,320
239
398
544
680
Total
862
1,295
1,716
2,000
Pupils transported to school by bus, 1953-54: Grades I to VI, 340; Grades VII
to VIII, 205; total, 545. f
Teachers:   1953-54, 68;  1954-55 (estimated), 73.
Unattached School Districts at Chezacut, Tatlayoko, and Anahim Lake
Chezacut School District has a local Board which continues to give good service to
the community by maintaining a good rural elementary school.
The Inspector of Schools is Official Trustee for Tatlayoko. A good rural school is
operated here. It is anticipated that the building will be replaced by a more modern
one for the new term.
A school meeting was held at Anahim Lake, with the result that a school district
is being organized, and a school will be opened in a new building for the new school term
Indian Day-schools
The one-room day-school at Upper Dean River (Anahim Lake) and the two-room
school at Anahim Village near Alexis Creek were included in this inspectorate this year.
It is expected that new day-schools will be erected at Sugar Cane, near Williams Lake,
and Nazko, some 70 miles west of Quesnel, for the new term.
School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF C. T. RENDLE, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
I School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
The following table shows the growth in the school population during the past
seven years:—
June, 1946
September,
1953
Grades I-VI .„_.
Grades VII-IX.
Grades X-XII...
1,236
458
187
2,276
753
406
Increase
PerCent
83
90
117
The average increase, Grades I to XII, is approximately 96 per cent. During
same period the number of teachers employed has increased from 60 to 125.
A careful survey of anticipated future enrolments indicates that comparable incica
may be expected over the next six years. The Board of School Trustees has maoe
careful study of the situation and has initiated a building programme to meet the requ
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
O 89
ments of the district in progressive stages. In June of this year a referendum authorizing
the expenditure of $1,217,000 was passed for sites, buildings, and equipment. This sum
will provide accommodation for the initial stage of the programme. Close co-operation
between the Board of School Trustees and municipal councils has resulted in reservation
of future sites likely to be required for school purposes. In this programme, decentralization of elementary schools is being stressed.
The programme outlined under By-law No. 2 was completed last fall with the construction and opening of a two-room annex at Glen, in the Municipality of Coquitlam.
A modest night-school programme was commenced in 1953 and met with a reasonable degree of success. Courses of instruction in Commerce, Woodwork, Dressmaking,
and English for new Canadians were given. There is felt need for a night-school programme, and considerable growth in night-school enrolments is expected.
Vocational programmes in Como Lake and Moody Junior-Senior High Schools
continue to receive a good response from the pupils. Considerable favourable publicity
has been given the Vocational Carpentry course during the past year.
School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
The following table shows the growth in the school population:—
June, 1946
September,
1953
Increase
Grades I-VI	
Grades VH-IX.
Grades X-XH-
449
110
15
663
206
78
Per Cent
47.0
87.0
400.2
The number of teachers employed is 40, as compared with 21 in 1946.
While there has been a large increase in the school population over the past seven
years, the present trend is not indicative of rapid growth. The increase in the number of
secondary pupils is significant and may be attributed largely to the establishment of a
well-equipped junior-senior high school at Gibsons. Here it is possible to offer a
reasonably broad and varied programme of instruction at the secondary level.
A class was established for a small group of pupils at North West Bay, Gambier
Island, under section 13 (g) of the | Public Schools Act." Jl
Departmental approval was received to enrol pupils in Grades XI and XII at
Madeira Park Superior School, and a second teacher was employed for the high-school
programme. The status of this school has been changed to that of an elementary-senior
high school, and the I holding power " of this small school has increased significantly.
Transportation has been extended to Port Mellon, and the secondary pupils are now
able to attend the Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School.
The small school at Deserted Bay was closed in June, 1954. Logging operations
have ceased in this area, and it is not anticipated that the school will be reopened.
General
Improvement of old buildings, maintenance of the new schools, and steady improvement of grounds are worthy of mention.
The health programme is being capably administered by the staffs of the Health
Units, in co-operation with the Boards of School Trustees, principals, and teachers.
Dental programmes were satisfactory, in spite of difficulties experienced in School District
No. 46 (Sechelt).
No major difficulties were experienced in obtaining qualified teachers.
A modest standardized testing programme was carried out in each district with the
co-operation of principals and teachers.
 0 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Regular meetings of principals and teachers continue tp improve superviv
instruction and administrative practices.  The work and contributions of the pri? f
primary consultant, and teachers are acknowledged. v mciP*,
Impressive graduation ceremonies are held in the high schools of both dist'
A number of valuable local scholarships have been established and are awarded amui'
to deserving students of good scholastic standing. m1
Mr. G. Matheson, Community Programmes Branch, has been active in both distr'
He has established good relations and has laid the foundations for the development of
future programmes. f|
The Boards of School Trustees, area representatives, secretary-treasurers, principals
and teachers must be commended for their loyalty, co-operation, and assistance. Good
results are being achieved by those responsible for the educational welfare of the pupils
School Districts No. 5 (Creston), No. 9 (Castlegar), and No. 10 (ArrowLakes)
REPORT OF DENIS C. SMITH, B.A., B.Ed., D.Ed.,
I    I INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
During the past school year 136 teachers were employed in this inspectorate for an
enrolment of some 3,600 pupils. A continual increase in enrolment is indicated, and
already 8 additional teachers have been hired for the next term. School District No. 9
(Castlegar) continues to be the area of greatest increase in school population, while an
increase of some 50 pupils occurred at the elementary level in School District No. 5
(Creston), and a slight but steady increase was noted in School District No. 10 (Arrow
Lakes) for the past school-year.
School District No. 5 (Creston)
This district employed 62 teachers for an enrolment of some 1,550 pupils. In
October a kindergarten was opened at Creston, credit for which belongs mainly to Mr.
J. J. McKenzie, former Inspector of this area, who gave much in time and energy to
accomplish this objective. An excellent remedial programme has been developed and
carried out at the elementary school.
Disposition of old school buildings took place as follows: Tenders were called for
the sale of a teacherage at Alice Siding and old schools at West Creston, Arrow Creek,
Sanca, Boswell, and Huscroft. Reconstruction of four rooms which constituted the old
wing of the Creston Elementary School has been undertaken to take care of increased
enrolments at the elementary level.
Maintenance of plant and equipment in Creston schools is of a high order, credit
being due to both the Board of Trustees and to Mr. Roland Roebuck, Supervisor of
Maintenance, a person of competence in all matters of plant and equipment.
The Board lost a valued member with the death of Trustee L. V. Rehmann, a man
noted for championing the cause of education. His warmth and humanity contributed
steadily to the good work of this Board.
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)
The School Board of this district employed 52 teachers for an enrolment of'some
1,500 pupils.   The loss of a teacher at Renata in January forced the closing of JOT
I at that time.   The pupils were accommodated in the junior room.   A XG^mL
gramme at both elementary and high-school level has been developed to assist those pf
in need of extra assistance.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 91
To date, the rapid and continuing increase in school population has outstripped the
building programme. A referendum for $616,000 was passed in December towards a
$727,000 building programme. New schools are being built as follows: Dumont, two
rooms; Robson, one room; and Tarrys, two rooms. Additions include a $450,000
extension of Stanley Humphries High School, two rooms plus an activity-room at Kinnaird
Elementary, and one room plus an activity-room at Castlegar Elementary No. 2. An
additional room has been built behind Castlegar Elementary School to take care of a very
recent increase in elementary-school population in that area.
A tribute should be paid here to the members of the School Board, who have
laboured without stint to keep the building programme abreast of the educational needs
of this ever-expanding area.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
The School Board employed 20 teachers for a pupil enrolment of over 500 pupils.
The slow but steady industrial expansion in this area indicates that further school construction must soon be planned.
W A Teacher Institute was held in September by Inspector J. J. McKenzie to familiarize
new appointees with various phases of their work and to serve in general as in-service
training. ;1
A delivery truck was purchased by the Board to distribute more quickly educational
supplies and other materials throughout the scattered schools. An electric calculator was
also purchased for the School Board office. A programme of double-glazing has been
undertaken to better insulate the various schools, all of which are of recent construction
and in good repair.
In the three districts during the past year the programme of standardized testing was
continued, supplemented by tests from the Bureau of Tests, Standards and Measurements.
In addition, administrators in both East and West Kootenay co-operated in the construction and distribution of tests in Arithmetic for Grades II to VI. With the help of certain
principals and staff-members, Inspector McKenzie and the writer prepared a Self-Inspection Rating Scale for the use of those teachers who wished to appraise certain aspects of
their teaching.
In conclusion, I would like to voice my appreciation of the general harmony prevailing in my inspectorate, due largely to the intelligent endeavour of both teachers and
members of the School Boards to introduce and maintain objectivity and friendly cooperation in their relationships with each other and the community in general.
School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound)
REPORT OF H. D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 35 (Langley)
The growth in population in the Langley School District since the institution of the
eight-grade elementary-school system in this Province is indicated in the table below.
One of the interesting facts to be noted from the figures is the tremendous increase in
the number of students receiving secondary education. The figures also indicate the
| holding power " of the schools, imply changes in curriculum, as well as indicate growth
of the municipality. I     I
 O 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
June, 1954
(Actual
Attendance)
1943-44
(Net
Enrolment)
1933-34
*,   (Net
Enrolment)
Grade I	
Grade II	
Grade III	
Grade IV	
Grade V	
Grade VI	
Grade VII	
Grade VIII	
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI	
Grade XII	
Grade XIII	
Totals
320
292
272
320
298
294
288
224
200
178
118
104
20
2,928
1923-24
t> (Net
Enrolment)
During the year there has been a marked emphasis upon the critical evaluation of
pupil progress. Considerable attention has been given to pupil attainment in academic
subjects as related to apparent scholastic ability. I
Administration of standardized achievement tests in both the elementary and secondary schools has been followed by a careful tabulation and analysis of scores. This
in turn, has resulted in teachers and principals reorganizing classes so as to try out more
effective techniques.
The attention given by teachers in the development of music, art, sports, and other
co-curricular activities was greatly appreciated.
The Board of School Trustees has spent a busy year attending to many exacting
duties connected with the management of the schools, negotiation for payment of salaries,
and presentation of a referendum covering construction of needed school facilities. This
referendum was rejected by the voters.
School District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
The number of schools in operation in this district during 1953-54 was the same
as that during the previous year, namely, ten. A superior school was in operation at
Pemberton, where instruction was offered in some subjects to the end of Grade XI. At
Woodfibre, the three teachers at the high school offered instruction in academic subjects
to the end of Grade XII. The secondary school at Squamish, which also served the
communities of Britannia Beach and Mount Sheer, offered a full secondary school programme up to and including Grade XIII.
It was with considerable satisfaction that school authorities learned that Miss Ger-
aldine Louise Saunders was the winner of the District University Entrance Scholarship
for 1953-54. She was a pupil in attendance at the Squamish Elementary-Senior High
School.
While there has been no great increase in the number of pupils enrolled at the larger
centres, nevertheless, due to changed economic conditions, thought must be given to
planning for additional school accommodation. It can be anticipated there will be an
increased population at Squamish, brought about through the completion of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway to Vancouver and by the construction of a highway joining the
Squamish Valley with the Provincial highway system. ,    ,
For the first time since the formation of the large rural school district, designated
School District No. 48 (Howe Sound), all the teachers and the Board of School Trustees
met together during May, 1954. It is to be hoped that it will be possible for similar
educational meetings to be held in the future. I
 reports of district inspectors O 93
School Districts No. 20 (Salmon Arm) and No. 19 (Revelstoke)
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This report presents a summary of important matters regarding the educational and
administrative problems of the Revelstoke-Salmon Arm inspectorate for 1953-54.
The year was marked by a steady, though not heavy, increase in school population,
which resulted in a shortage of classrooms. Because of this, the shift system had to be
organized for the urban areas of both districts. Building projects were planned, and
by-laws presented to the ratepayers. In Revelstoke, a substantial majority gave approval
to the School Board's proposal, but in the Salmon Arm district the majority of the ratepayers did not favour the proposed ten-room school.
The Revelstoke School Board is presently proceeding with plans to build an eight-
room school on a splendid site adjacent to the City Park. The Salmon Arm district, with
a foreseeable increased enrolment in September, 1954, will have to plan for more shift
classes as well as providing additional quarters in basements or rented premises.
During the year a number of educational conferences were held. A reading clinic,
sponsored by W. J. Gage & Co., was well attended by the majority of primary teachers
in the inspectorate. In the Revelstoke district, through the co-operation of the Department and the School Board, it was made possible for all rural teachers to visit the classrooms of their choice in the city schools on a definite day. The teachers in these schools
kindly agreed to carry on with their regular work for the benefit of the others. Later in
the day the teachers discussed their common problems. This proved to be a very successful gathering for all concerned. Administrative conferences attended by principals, vice-
principals, and counsellors were held on several occasions. Many important matters were
discussed at these Saturday meetings. At an early meeting, an important testing programme was planned, and later it was put into operation throughout the inspectorate.
Teacher-made tests in the fields of Mathematics and Language were given to Grades II,
IV, VI, VIII, and XI; also to the same grades were administered the California Tests
of Mental Maturity and Achievement. The results of these tests were used carefully and
did much to improve the mastery of important fundamental skills in the fields tested.
I was particularly pleased with the active interest taken by the principals at these meetings.
In both school districts, School Boards are doing a very fine job. The enthusiasm
and active interest taken by all members is a credit to them, and I wish to express my
appreciation for their co-operation and help during the past year.
Generally speaking, there is a good type of principal and teacher in this inspectorate,
and it is pleasing to observe the earnest and sincere effort these people are making to
improve the educational growth of the young people who come under their charge.
 O 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay), No. 72 (Campbell River) and
Comox Airport Rural School District '
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment, Staff, and Schools, 1952-54
District
School-year
Number
of
Pupils
Number
of
Schools
No. 71
No. 72
Airport
Inspectorate totals
1952-53
1953-54
1952-53
1953-54
1952-53
1953-54
1952-53
1953-54
2,489
2,606
1,463
1,520
56
174
4,008
4,300
18
17
21
18
1
1
39
36
Types of Schools, 1953-54
Number
rr of
Teachers
91
95
60
64
2
5
153
164
District
Senior
High
Junior-
Senior
High
Elementary-
Senior
High
Superior
Elementary
One-and
Two-room
Rural
No. 71    	
No. 72	
Airport  	
1
1
1
1
1
12
3
1
2
13
School District No. 71 (Courtenay)
The school-building programme, as provided in By-law No. 2, was completed during
the year with the construction of Tsolum addition, Comox activity-room, and Union Bay,
A separate two-room unit was built in Comox. Minto two-room school was closed, and
the pupils enrolled in the new Royston Elementary.
ITie pupils in junior- and senior-high grades of R.C.A.F. personnel living in Department of National Defence housing continued to attend School District No. 71 schools,
but the elementary pupils were transferred to the newly formed Airport School District.
Maintenance and reconditioning of schools and grounds continued, with many
improvements made during the year.   The maintenance staff gives excellent service.
The local McPhee Scholarship was awarded to Miss Fay McNish, of Tsolum, as
second-place student in School Districts Nos. 71 and 72.
The excellent work of the 165 teachers of these districts deserves praise. The
janitorial, maintenance, and office staffs have given splendid service, and the Board
members continue to donate much time and effort to the arduous work of the districts.
Transportation routes had to be extended, due to larger number of pupils attending
Courtenay High School. Board-owned buses are operated on five routes, and five routes
are contracted.
School District No. 72 (Campbell River)
Campbellton Elementary School was opened in September.  This eliminated the
shift. Willow Point Elementary was completed at Easter and will be occupied in & P
tember.   A fourth classroom and activity-room are being added to Sayward. A
one-room school was opened at Stuart Island.   Hayden Bay, Owen Bay, and Camp >
Salmon River, schools were closed.   Attendance had dropped in the first two sen
Salmon River pupils were accommodated at Sayward.
 -and much
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 95
Grounds of most schools received attention—some for the first time-
improvement was made.
Comox Airport Rural School District
As no school was ready for September, pupils from the married quarters of the
Department of National Defence were housed in a converted barracks block. This building, although inconvenient and inadequate, was made usable by the station maintenance
crew and served well for the year. Enrolment increased from 56 to 174. Five teachers
were employed.   A kindergarten operated for the first time. j[
The new six-room school should be ready for September opening, but it is doubtful
if it will accommodate the increasing population.
General
A fine-arts council was formed to co-ordinate various festivals. It is now established
that the music festival be held in the spring, the art display after Easter, and the drama
festival in November.
Miss Trudeau Mounce, from Cumberland Junior-Senior High School, won the
Governor-General's Medal for second place in the University Entrance examinations for
the Province.   She was also awarded the Chris Spencer Foundation Scholarship.
School Districts No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan),
and No. 67 (Ladysmith)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS        j|
This inspectorate, with offices located in Duncan, embraces the following school
districts: No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan), and No. 67 (Ladysmith).
The enrolment and staffs in these school districts, as of June, 1954, are as follows:—
pupns
Schools
Teachers
District
Elementary
Secondary
No. 65 (Cowichan)              	
1,290
796
827
771
403
480
18
7
8
80
No. 66 (Lake Cowichan).    	
No. 67 (Ladysmith).        .           .   .
47
51
Totals ...	
2,913
1,654
33
1
178
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
In common with other areas in British Columbia, the Cowichan School District is
in need of additional school accommodation. The central high school, which to date
has housed all the secondary pupils in the whole area, will next year be taxed to its limit.
Some parts of the district are also in need of additional classrooms for elementary pupils,
and the Board of School Trustees has been devoting its attention to the solution of this
problem.
Winter night-school classes were again organized in the high school and served a
much felt need. The teaching staff has worked co-operatively and diligently. This is
reflected in the results of tests administered throughout the year.   An effort was made to
 O 96
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
measure in each school the average achievement of the pupils for the year k M
subject matter areas.   The results, on the average, showed scholastic growth above
year.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
The customary good standard of performance that had been achieved i
in this
area
was maintained throughout the year.   On the elementary level, continued emphasis \»
placed upon specific instruction among the slower learners.   Results of these efiol
were good.
By the end of the year, four more classrooms will have been added to the U
school. This addition will also include teacher aax>mmodation. shower-room for ml
and office-space. It will not likely be long before additional elementary accommodation
will be needed in the district.
Commendation is due the members of the Board of School Trustees, who at aE
times bend their every effort at improving the opportunities for the pupils in'the schools
and who consistently maintain a policy of encouraging the higjiest possible educational
performance.
School District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
School affairs in this district have operated very smoothly during the past year.
After careful consideration by the Board of School Trustees, a building programme was
prepared to meet the needs of the area. This plan received the approval of the ratepayers, and, as a result, the following additions will be made as requirements dictate:—
(1) New ten-room elementary school at Ladysmith.
(2) Four additional classrooms at Mount Brenton.
(3) Teacherage and electric-lighting system at Thetis Island.
(4) Three additional rooms at the junior-senior high school at Ladysmith.
(5) Playground development  at the Chemainus Junior High, Ladysmith
Junior-Senior High, and Ladysmith Elementary.
Scholastic achievement in this area was well maintained throughout the year. The
night-school classes, which had been organized in the fall of 1952, were operated again
during the past winter.
Both teachers and trustees have worked most co-operatively through the year for
the general welfare of the pupils. Special commendation is due the trustees, who have
shown themselves to be most generous with their time and earnest in their purpose to
achieve the best in education.
School Districts No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen), No. 22 (Vernon).
and No. 78 (Enderby)
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
| Increase of school population in this inspectorate, while less spectacular than in
some other districts, continued through the year 1953-54. It may be of interest to note
that in 1945-46, the year when the Cameron Report was put into effect, the enrotaent
was 3,331 pupils, with 105 teachers. Since then the enrolment has passed the 4,5W
mark, while the teaching staff has risen to 164. Adding seven teachers of Indian another schools, this makes 171 teachers to be visited if time permits. .
There are three special classes. One is a pre-primary class for slow-learning beginners, another is an ungraded opportunity class for slow-learners and remedial cases from
Grades II to VI, and the third is an opportunity class for Grade VII pupils.
 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 97
During the year a citizens' committee investigated the possibility of starting a special
school for children who are too retarded mentally to be admissible to the public schools,
but who do not require confinement in an institution. To date, however, it has not proved
possible to solve the problem of financing such a school.
It now seems that the building problems in School Districts Nos. 21 and 78, after
several frustrating years, are close to solution. At this writing, a new junior-senior high
school at Armstrong and a new elementary school at Enderby are almost ready for
occupancy, and in the latter district three new one-room schools are also being built.
In School District No. 22 (Vernon), a large building programme was started in
1948, and this satisfied the needs for some years. Now, enrolment has once more
exceeded accommodation, and in June, 1954, a referendum by-law was passed which will
permit the erection, as required, of nineteen additional classrooms at Vernon, Lumby,
Coldstream, and Cherryville.
A feature of these districts that perhaps warrants comment is the stability of teaching
staff. Several causes probably combine to account for the relatively low rate of turnover,
but in any case a good many problems are greatly eased by the fewness of the staff
changes that have to be coped with.
Once again I acknowledge, with real pleasure and with sincere thanks, the kindness,
co-operation, and support I have received through the year from trustees, teachers, and
all who have to do with the schools.
 O 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Attendance
In 1920 the. Provincial Government took over the operation of four deaf 1
and one blind class in Vancouver.   Two years later these classes were moved infoT
main building of our present school. Jf e
The graph below indicates the growth in the enrolment since 1920:	
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
\
/               N
\            )
hi-                  i
-jj*_
On
vo
7
on
en
I
O
ON
vo
m
I
0\
©
vo
i
>n
On
1-H
c*
ro
^t
»r>
m
Vi
>o
£
1
1
1
«n
V)
m
m
On
ON
ON
ON
The enrolment for the past term is as follows:
Day Pupils
Resident
Pupils
Total
Deaf and hard of hearing
Blind and partial-sighted
Totals	
32
12
94
18
44
112
126
30
156"
In addition, the following services were also provided by the school: Eleven parents
of pre-school deaf children were supplied with home-training instructions and guidance;
fifty-nine pre-school blind children and their parents received assistance through the joint
efforts of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind and the school; ten city preschool deaf children received part-time training in our nursery class; twenty-nine partial-
sighted students in all parts of the Province were supplied with magna-type text-books
on a loan basis; and five partial-sighted out-of-town students were boarded at the schoo
and attended Kitsilano High School.
Health
The general health of our resident students was well above average,
considerably to make it a good school-year.
This, of course,
 SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND O 99
General Remarks
I am pleased to describe some of the more important accomplishments of the past
year:—
(a) Instructional periods for city pre-school deaf children was increased from
one to two each week. The beginning-age was lowered to include a few
who were a little over 2 years of age.
(b) A three-day institute for out-of-town and in-town parents of pre-school
deaf children was held during Easter. Lectures by medical specialists
and demonstrations by staff members were presented during the conference.
(c) Three hard-of-hearing students were reassessed and placed in regular city
classes for exploration and observation, after having been fitted with suitable hearing-aids. This undertaking was entirely successful, and all will
return next term to schools in their own communities, with a follow-up
programme to insure continual success.
(d) Two intermediate deaf classes were conducted in city schools, Lord Dawson and Sir Cecil Rhodes, with gratifying results.
(e) Five out-of-town partial-sighted resident students were enrolled in the
sight-saving class at Kitsilano High School.
(/) Our programme of studies for the deaf intermediate department was
revised.
(g) Our senior deaf class reached a new level of academic achievement for this
school by advancing into a number of Grade X subjects.
While the foregoing enumerates some of the major advances achieved in the academic programme, numerous other desirable objectives have been reached in the extracurricular and vocational areas of our work.   The sum total represents a very satisfactory year.
A new salary schedule for teachers, submitted by the Management Committee and
approved by the Government, went into effect on April 1st. The new schedule more
nearly approximates that currently in effect within the Province.
In the early spring, the Management Committee was replaced by an Advisory Committee, which now includes the presidents of both the deaf and blind Parent-Teacher
Association groups, with the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education, Mr. J. F. K. English, as chairman.
I wish to express my personal thanks to the members of the Advisory Committee,
the members of the school staff, and all co-operating agencies for their support in achieving the objectives which it has been my pleasure to report for the year 1953-54.
 O 100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1953-54 was 8,409.   This figure shows an increase of 1,199 over 1952-53.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school— PerCent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior schools. (Throughout this report the term
"school-age" refers to students under 18 years
of age.)   2,542
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools       170
Total number of school-age students 2,712
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools     701
4. Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools —        3
Total number of students registered in
their local schools taking one or
more correspondence courses  3,416       40.6
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school be- J;
cause of physical disability      120
2. School-age students gainfully employed      152
3. School-age students studying courses at home
J|      because of the distance factor     240
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary       58
5. School-age  students  not registered in  schools
for other reasons        10
. 6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools      868
Total number of students under 21 years
not registered in their local schools
and obtaining their education by correspondence   1,448       17-2
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  3,545       42.2
Total number of students  8,409     100.0
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS O 101
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:	
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age 3,292 39.1
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years  1,569 18.7
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  3,548 42.2
Totals  8,409 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses.   Others
registered for only one or two courses.   The number of students who enrolled in each of
the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:— ^g§
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  988
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  1,251
English 91 j  32
Social Studies 10, 20, 30  947
History 91  69
Science 10, 20  441
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91  2,322
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  285
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  150
French 10, 20, 91, 92  436
Effective Living 10, 20, 30  492
Agriculture 10, 38, 39  215
Geography 91   66
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91  617
Art 10, 20  322
Record-keeping 11  469
Business Fundamentals 24  157
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  453
Mathematics 12  88
Shorthand 21, 31 j  243
Typewriting 10, 20  829
Secretarial Practice 92, 93  9
English 93 (Business English)  133
English 32 (Journalism)  25
Biology 91  97
Chemistry 91   92
Physics 91  60
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  33
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  298
Sheet-metal Work 20 |  3
Metal-mining   3
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  243
Diesel Engineering 91  57
Electricity 20  178
Radio and Wireless 30  114
Elementary Geology 29   53
Forestry 3 0  102
Art 3 9  45
Frame-house Construction 20  75
Home Furnishing 23  33
Extra-mural Music 11, 21  9
Total 12,514
 0 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
1 This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of stud
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation course
as follows:—
English Literature 100     179
English Composition 101     163
Mathematisc 101     126
Mathematics 100        24
French 120       60
French 110       21
Latin 120       18
Latin 110       10
Spanish 110        2
Agriculture 100 ...        8
History 101 |       99
Chemistry 101        30
Physics 101        39
German 90     154
Total     938
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering, 4th, 3rd, 2nd Class  447
House Painting and Decorating 1  15
Aviation I   12
Industrial Mathematics  73
Practical Design  36
Glove-making  3
Air Navigation I, II  12
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, 2nd Class !  46
Accountancy for Credit Unions  14
Spherical Trigonometry   5
English 19   447
Dressmaking   23
Total  1,133
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students
living outside this Province. t, ■%
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 639 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS O 103
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1 Hospital cases  208
I British Columbia Penitentiary  90
3. Oakalla Prison  109
i Girls' Industrial Home  13
5* Boys' Industrial Home  18
6. New Haven  58
7. On relief or equivalent  3
8. Disabled students at home  20
9. Students needed at home  16
Total :  535
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:— j
Professional—
Teachers :  732
Nurses  509
Medicine   145
Science ,  60
Law  44
Art   62
Theology   33
Pharmacy  42
Miscellaneous  72
Commercial  839
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 360
Police  39
Aviation  46
Her Majesty's Forces  71
Civil Service        18
Agriculture and farming  91
Forestry   82
Mining   6
Journalism  61
Diesel and steam engineering  715
Radio  51
Miscellaneous  65
Not given |  4,266
Total  8,409
Completion of Courses
A total of 110,171 papers was marked during the year, which is an increase of
>000 over the number of papers marked in the preceding year.   We have five-, ten-,
tote-, eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.                  |
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-four instructors
^employed during the year.
 O 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 5,938 students with material from our co
in English I for New Canadians, 654 students were supplied with material boJT
English II for New Canadians, and 548 students took the course in English II (eJj !!
19) by correspondence. Classes in English were held in forty-one night-school centos
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 110 small isolated place'
throughout the Province. I
g New Courses
English 20, French 110, Latin 110, Spanish 110, Agriculture 39, Frame House
Construction, Geography 91, Chemistry 91, and Physics 91 were the new courses offered
during the year.
Elementary School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1953-54 there were 1,520 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
School Correspondence Branch courses. Of these, 1,371 were enrolled at Victoria and
the remaining 149 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe, in the Peace River District. The
tabulation below shows the enrolment by month and grade for each locality.
Enrolled at Victoria
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Grade
vm
Total
September
October	
November
December.
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
September	
October	
November	
December	
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
146
123
112
92
96
60
82
51
190
140
127
112
127
84
103
70
199
141
139
124
132
96
113
83
210
150
153
129
134
98
118
91
223
172
155
141
138
106
123
99
234
172
165
147
139
113
130
101
230
189
172
156
148
120
131
113
236
194
180
159
153
129
137
118
240
198
186
168
156
131
141
131
236
204
193
169
155
135
141
138
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)
15
19
22
22
23
28
33
34
36
35
7
9
13
14
16
19
22
22
23
24
15
18
18
19
19
24
26
27
28
29
5
9
9
10
11
10
10
11
13
12
4
4
4
4
4
10
11
11
13
13
2
4
5
5
6
5
6
7
11
11
5
6
8
8
8
9
10
10
13
14
762
953
1,027
1,083
1,157
1,201
1,259
1,306
1,351
1,371
2
55
2
71
7
86
7
89
8
95
9
114
9
127
9
131
11
148
11
149
The number of papers marked in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 145,0
papers; Pouce Coupe, 18,768 papers—a total of 163,797 papers.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, twelve full-time instructors, one
part-time instructor, and an office staff of five members; in Pouce Coupe, one full-tune
instructor and one part-time instructor. ..
The services of seven qualified outside markers were used during the year, mariong
excess papers on a piece-work basis in their own homes.
 ^CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS - 0 105
During the year new courses were produced in Art for Grade VI; in Reading,
language, Writing, and Arithmetic for Grade I; and, partially, in Arithmetic for Grade
III Temporary courses in Grade VII Literature and Language were also produced. All
toe courses were devised, written, and illustrated by staff instructors.
In addition to the numbers shown above, adult students enrolled for the courses
from Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September     82 February   213
October  133 March   244
November   156 April   258
December  185 May  275
January  202 June   285
There were 6,684 papers marked in the adult section during the year.
 0 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
In presenting my twenty-third annual report, I am pleased that we have an addi
tional 1,000 square feet of shipping-room space, which will permit of more efficient
operation. It is still my hope that some day we may occupy a building specially designed
for the purpose.
The year under review is another of continued challenges successfully overcome
With the Province-wide advancement in every field, which includes a large annual
increase in school enrolment, the work performed by this Branch, of necessity, increases
yearly. The Text-book Rental Plan is now an established success from every point of
view and receives much favourable comment throughout Canada and from other lands
The supplying of free text-books to the junior grades, while increasing in cost, is under
reasonable control.
The Text-book Branch supplied the required free text-books and the various forms
etc., to schools and School Boards as and when required. Curriculum and other bulletins were distributed to schools, and orders for books from the various dealers throughout the Province were processed and completed in a satisfactory manner.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies during the school-year 1953-54 to
public and private schools and to correspondence students required an expenditure of
$275,384.05; 4,353 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 17,202. From these
orders, the sum of $538,489.79 was collected and deposited in the Treasury to the credit
of Text-book Branch Operating Account.
A total of 2,262 Rental Plan requisitions was received, checked, and completed,
and $309,873.29 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected
and deposited in the Treasury. During the school-year $4,229.66 was refunded to pupils
who left the school system prior to March 31st.
To properly execute all of the detail involved in the above necessitates a loyal and
hard-working staff, as well as excellent co-operation from all school officials, particularly
secretary-treasurers. This assistance and co-operation has been extended in full, and it
is with much pleasure I officially record to one and all my thanks.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st, 1954
The accompanying financial statements, presented in the form required by the Audit
Branch, include the fifth covering the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $341,687.78, is valued at publisher's price
plus incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $380,125.03, is valued
on the same basis, less depreciation. No allowance is made for the costs involved in
moving the stock from the text-book warehouse to the several schools.
Sales
The sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $649,147.21, less discount of $125,953.14,
and a profit, or excess of revenue over expenditure, of $26,885.82, is shown, fotfe
previous year, this part of our business showed a loss of $4,943.74 because a necessary
increase in mark-up was not allowed when asked for. It is of note that at no other-tone
has the Text-book Branch failed to show a profit on sales since the reorganization in W •
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH O 107
Rentals
W received $304,634.32 in rental fees, etc., from the various schools, an increase
117 oer ^t over the previous year.   It will be noted that the deficit for the year is
1039 34   No subsidy was voted> but in sPite of increasinS costs in book-manufacture,
rtation, etc., the excess of expenditure over revenue is less than was estimated.
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1954
Sales
«T£" -  $649,147.21
Lmdiscount     125,953.14
Net sales  $523,194.07
f! Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1953  $370,589.71
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and §
duty)     421,547.54
 $792,137.25
Inventory, March 31st, 1954     341,687.78
Cost of sales     450,449.47
Gross profit     $72,744.60
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages      $33,459.97
Packing and general expenses         3,668.88
fl Freight and delivery \         8,082.61
Sundry expenses i  647.32
 45,858.78
Excess of revenue over expenditure     $26,885.82
 O 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1954—continued
Rentals
Rental fees collected .$<C4 6V ^
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1953  $339,743.81
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     398,989.93
I I $738,733.74
Depreciation1
Inventory, March 31st, 1952 $334,441.00 Sj|
Less three years' depreciation at 33VS per cent
per annum     334,441.00 $ 111,480.34
Inventory, March 31st, 1953  $342,395.20
Less two years' depreciation
at 33VS per cent per $&
annum     228,263.46    114,131.73
Inventory, March 31st, 1954  $398,989.93
Less one year's depreciation
at 33VS per cent per
annum     132,996.64    132,996.64
$265,993.29
Closing rental inventory at March 31st, 1954 380,125.03
Total depreciation for year 1953-54  $358,608,71  $358,608.?!
A dd expenses—
Salaries and wages  $28,502.94
Packing and general expenses  3,125.34
Freight and delivery  6,885.24
Sundry expenses  551.43
      39.064:95
97,673.66
Excess of expenditure over revenue -   S93.03934
See foot-note to balance-sheet.
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH O 109
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1954
Assets
^tZLi          «00.00
Cashinbank  750.00
  $850.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand  _541 ,oo /. / 8
Consigned text-books  $738,733.74
less depreciation1     358,608.71
  380,125.03
Accounts receivable  19,981.27
$742,644.08
xTWrTyear depreciation on 1951-52 inventory ... $111,480.34
Second year depreciation on 1952-53 inventory    114,131.73
First year depreciation on 1953-54 inventory    132,996.64
$358,608.71
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $793.96
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  850.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund     741,000.12
$742,644.08
At the request of the Audit Branch, the accounts " subsidies provided for Text-book
Rental Plan, $62,799.52," and "Rental Plan profit, 1949-50, $1,697.68," which have
appeared on the balance-sheet since 1951, have been written off, and the Operating
Account balance reduced accordingly to agree with the Provincial Ledger.
 0 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL, VOCATIONAL
AND ADULT EDUCATION
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes have be*
administered by the Department of Education. These groups are: (1) Those that are
conducted in co-operation with the Federal Government—that is, classes operated under
tite Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement—and classes operated under
the Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement, and (2) those that are the
direct responsibility of the Province, which are the classes conducted at the night-
schools.    (These are reported under Industrial Education.)
CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME
During the fiscal year 1953-54 the following schedules of the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training Agreement were in operation:— f
Schedule O—
Sub-schedule C—Urban Occupational Training.
Sub-schedule E—Rural Occupational Training.
Sub-schedule H—Student Aid.
Schedule M—Training of Unemployed Workers and Handicapped Persons.
Schedule K-l—Training of Personnel for Armed Forces.
Schedule K-2—Training of Workers for Defence Industries.
Schedule O
Sub-schedule C—Urban Occupational Training
Classes under this schedule were offered as follows: At the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training School at Nanaimo, forty-seven young men were trained in Automotive Mechanics and Diesel Mechanics; at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, thirty
young women were taught Power-machine Sewing.
Sub-schedule E—Rural Occupational Training
The Dominion-Provincial Youth Training School is held at the University of British
Columbia and is administered by the Extension Department of the University. Young
men and women from all parts of British Columbia attend this school. The enrolment
for the past year was 52; of this number, 25 were boys and 17 were girls.
Sub-schedule H—Student Aid
Students with proven academic ability who are in need of financial aid are given
bursaries to enable them to proceed with their education beyond the level of the secondary
schools. The awards are granted on the basis of 60 per cent bursary and 40 per cent
loan, which is repayable after the recipient is employed.
During the year 1953-54, assistance was granted enabling students to attend the
following:—
University of British Columbia  416
Victoria College    17
High schools       3
Medical schools    15
Dental schools    13
Other courses (Occupational Therapy, etc.)      8
Nursing schools |    35
Normal Schools "___  1°9
Technical, vocational, and art schools J^_
Total  I I       637
 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 111
Schedule M—Training of Unemployed Workers and
Handicapped Persons
Unemployed persons are trained,  to prepare them for re-employment,  at the
on-Provincial Vocational Training School at Nanaimo, in Automotive and Diesel
D°Tnics and at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, in Power-sewing.
MeC Handicapped persons have also been trained and placed in employment through
. us c0urses at the Vancouver Vocational Institute.   A new Schedule R is expected
Operate next year to train these very deserving citizens.
Schedule K-2—Training for Defence Industries
Under an agreement with the Federal Government, welding classes in new techniques
were offered to experienced shipyard welders in Victoria who work on naval craft. The
full cost was shared by the Federal and Provincial Governments.
APPRENTICE TRAINING
Apprentice Training was given at night-schools in the larger cities, and outside
students were given courses by correspondence. A total of 1,532 apprentices were given
training at the night-schools, and 130 took full-time training.
High School Correspondence Adult Education
EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. i_s L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1953-54 was 8,409. Of this number, 18.7 per cent or 1,569 were between the
ages of 18 and 20, and 42.2 per cent or 3,548 were 21 years or over. Thus 60.9
per cent of our students can be classified as adults. This is an increase of 5.8 per cent
over the figures of 1952-53. There was an increase of 34 students in the number of
students over 21 years and an increase of 1,109 in the number of students between the
ages of 18 and 20 years.  flK        f ¥       SK|£
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age
and over who gave information as to their employment:— %
Apprentices      104
Army, Navy, Air Force        41
Civil Servants        30
Police        14
Domestic workers       113
Farming and ranching        48
Firemen, engineers      361
Forestry ___.   ■       3 6
Housewives  |  40
Lumbering   69
Merchants [_  25
Mining   24
Office-workers      396
Carried forward   1 >301
 0 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1953-54
Brought forward _  l33Ql
Professional—
Teachers   235
Nurses     92
Miscellaneous    23
I   350
Railroad       10
Skilled labour  426
Unskilled labour  177
Miscellaneous       31
Total  2,295
Elementary Correspondence School Adult Class
ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
In the school-year 1953-54 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 285 students. The enrolment figures for the year are as
follows:—
September     82 February  213
October  133 March  244
November  156 April 258
December  185 May  275
January   202 June 285
During the year, 6,684 papers of adult students were corrected.
Community Programmes Branch
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
The Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education has been
organized in British Columbia to give leadership and assistance in helping communities
establish recreation programmes in which the Province, the community, and the citizen
co-operate actively. During the past year the new Branch has been in the process of
organization.   The second half of this period has seen definite and vital growth.
The role of the Community Programmes Branch can be summarized briefly as
follows:—
(1) To stimulate local interest in recreation of all kinds.
(2) To assist communities to develop programmes suited to their own needs
and interests.
(3) To encourage local responsibility in the operation of such programmes,
and to ensure a maximum degree of local control over them.
(4) To provide a consultative and advisement service in recreation matters 0
communities and interested groups within them.
 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION q 113
is a
Physical Fitness Programme of the National Health and Welfare Department
The Community Programmes Branch offers six principal services in recreation:—
/jeered -m British Columbia by the Community Programmes Branch.
1
The Branch assists, in an advisory capacity, public bodies interested in recreation.
i staff of nine regional consultants whose services are available to the local
a
and headquarters:
It main ^ ^^    The f 0jiowjng ijsts the names 0f ^ consultants, as well as
communities^
regions
Consultant Region Headquarters
Mr. K. K. Mailman... Northern British Columbia Quesnel.
Mr. S. Hansen East Kootenay Cranbrook.
Mr. A. W. Thiessen—West Kootenay Nelson.
Mr. J. Panton Okanagan Kelowna.
Mr. L. Preston Central British Columbia Kamloops.
Mr. T. Ruben Fraser Valley Abbotsford.
Mr. J. Mathisen New Westminster and district... New Westminster.
Mrs. H. Keatley Greater Vancouver Vancouver.
Mr. A. C. Batcheler.__ Vancouver Island Victoria.
The Community Programmes Branch also has on its staff Mr. Joseph Lewis, who
does a most remarkable job in recreation for the blind throughout British Columbia.
3:2. The Branch is in a position to provide to the communities and to persons
interested in recreation a large amount of resource material. Fairly large and varied
libraries of films, film-strips, books, and pamphlets are available. This resource material
is proving to be most valuable in many communities.
3. A programme of leadership-training for recreation leaders has been provided
in order to assist local areas in obtaining instructors and organizers for their progammes.
During the past year the consultants met as a group for several days to discuss policy
and recreation philosophy, once during the month of July and once in October.
During the week of February 22nd to 26th, 1954, a most successful conference of
consultants, recreation directors, and representatives of Recreation Commissions was
held. Some fifty-two persons, representing thirty-eight British Columbia communities,
attended. There has already been evidence of the value of this conference.
A Provincial Recreation Leadership Training School was held at the Victoria
Normal School from July 19th to 29th, 1954. For ten days, fifty-one persons from
toty-five Recreation Commissions studied and practised various recreation subjects,
which included Recreation Objectives and Philosophy, Recreation Organization and
Operation, square and old-time dancing, puppetry, recreation problems, leathercraft,
block-printing, physical activities, and recreation games. The enthusiasm and accomplishment of these community leaders left little to be desired. J
Throughout the Province, several clinics and workshops have been held for the
purpose of training recreation leaders for the communities. During the past year twentymo such clinics were approved at which 411 leaders were in attendance. Regional
conferences are being convened in the various parts of British Columbia this fall.
4. As a means of encouraging and assisting School Boards in the operation of
recreation classes through regularly organized night-schools, grants-in-aid are paid on
e same basis as those which apply in the case of non-vocational night-school courses
j* nt^ Columbia. These grants are paid toward the salary of instructors. The fol-
J^g is a list of School Boards which offered recreation courses, with the number of
*s, the number of courses offered, and the total enrolment:—
—
 O  114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT.  1953-54
School District
Coaises      Enroth
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
3 (Kimberley)	
11 (Trail)	
14 (South Okanagan) —
15 (Pentiction)	
23 (Kelowna)	
32 (Fraser Canyon)	
33 (Chilliwack)	
34 (Abbotsford)	
35 (Langley)	
38 (Richmond)	
39 (Vancouver)	
40 (New Westminster).
41 (Burnaby)	
44 (North Vancouver)-
45 (West Vancouver)—
47 (Powell River)	
57 (Prince George)	
61 (Greater Victoria) —
68 (Nanaimo)	
Totals
In some cases, the above night-school recreation courses were designed for leadership-
training purposes as well as for general participation.
5. In order to assist in the organization and co-ordination of public recreation, other
than those phases which can best be conducted by means of night-schools, the Community Programmes Branch makes grants-in-aid on behalf of local Recreation Commissions. These are grants toward the salaries of those organizing and co-ordinating local
public recreation and, in communities of less than 10,000 population, toward recreation
expenses. As a prerequisite to the payment of such grants, the " Municipal Act" gives
the Council the right to appoint a local Recreation Commission as its governing body
in matters of public recreation. In unorganized areas, Recreation Commissions are
elected at public meetings duly called for this purpose, after notice of such intention
has been filed with the Regional Consultant in charge of the district.
The following sixty-one communities have appointed or elected Recreation Commissions since the organization of the Community Programmes Branch:—
*Alexandria.
*Bouchie Lake.
fBritannia Beach.
Burnaby.
fCampbell River.
*Cedar.
^Central Saanich.
*Chase.
tChemainus.
fCourtenay.
*Crawford Bay.
fCranbrook.
*Crescent Valley.
*Creston.
Dewdney.
Enderby.
Fruitvale.
*Glenmore.
Grand Forks.
*Great Central .
*Grindrod.
*Hazelton.
Houston,
t Kamloops.
* Kaslo.
Kelowna.
tKimberley.
Lister.
*Lumby.
* Marysville.
fMount Sheer.
Nanaimo.
t Nelson.
*North Bend,
tNorth Vancouver.
Okanagan Centre.
*Osoyoos.
Peachland.
Port Mellon.
Prince George.
fPrince Rupert.
Procter.
*Quadra.
fRichmond.
*Roe Lake.
*Sayward.
*Soda Creek.
* Sidney.
* Sooke.
Squamish.
Summerland.
*Terrace.
fTrail-Tadanac.
fVancouver—
fKitsilano.
tMarpole.
fSunset.
*Vernon.
Westbank.
*West Vancouver.
Winfield.
*Wynndel.
Youbou.
*Zeballos.
* Receiving a grant for recreation expenses.
t Receiving a grant for full-time director of recreation.
 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION q 115
The Community Programmes Branch during the past year has approved twenty-
rial recreation projects which have been recommended by Recreation Commis-
** ^School Boards in conjunction with School Inspectors and Regional Consultants.
T medal projects were mainly concerned with basketball, gymnastics, playgrounds,
dimming programmes.   Some 3,574 persons have benefitted through their partici-
n in such projects.
to the early part of June, the Community Programmes Branch co-operated with the
adian Red Cross Society in sponsoring Water Safety Week throughout the Province.
fchools and communities were supplied with information pertaining to this important
j necessary matter.
2,1 The manner in which a people uses its leisure should be one of the prime concerns
f every community.   It is imperative that rural areas, villages, municipalities, and cities
Le well-directed and well-organized recreational and educational activities to meet the
needs of all the people. g| jf
The services of the Community Programmes Branch are available at all times to
assist in this development and to meet these needs. P
School and Community Drama Branch
REPORT OF H. S. HURN, B.A., DIRECTOR
The main effort during the past year was directed to the strengthening of the zone
with respect to the organization of adult amateur theatre. In the absence of
paid officials, the Branch was dependent upon the kindness of volunteers throughout
(he Province, and it wishes at this time to express the thanks of the Department and
itself to the many who gave unstintingly of their time to this development.
The system is related to three general fields of endeavour—the festival pattern,
the starting of new groups, and the establishment of as high a degree of co-operation
among the groups as is possible in the various zones. But there is, too, a desire to
strengthen the Provincial body, known as the British Columbia Drama Association,
to make it more responsible and to give it more autonomy. There was sufficient
evidence in the work during the year to feel assured that this aim would have been
realized very soon. New groups were started, there was a sharing of experiences within
the zones, and the final festival was held in Penticton with participation from all zones
but one. Groups had accepted the responsibility of a per capita fee in order to place
the Association on a sound financial condition to enable it to carry on its work.
The field work of the Branch has rested almost entirely upon the shoulders of the
Director. Obviously, in so large an area, the impact of any direct help, however extensive
from his standpoint, was minor with respect to each zone and especially each club.
However, without such direct aid, it is pleasing to record that Miss Betty Mitchell,
jjc adjudicator at the final festival and a well-known person of the theatre throughout
Canada, characterized the standard of production as extraordinarily high and in some
cases professional in quality. This is a tribute to community drama groups in British
Columbia of which we can be proud, especially when it is realized that none of the
SWips participating came from the large centres, Vancouver and Victoria. This happy
Ration can be attributed, at least in part, to the festival movement, which gives groups
^ opportunity to produce with the benefit of adjudication. The adjudicators are often
nucized themselves, as all adjudicators are, but year by year, with changing personnel,
J sum total of their advice and the giving to groups of the benefit of their own
Penences makes a definite imprint on the minds of the criticized, obviously with good
 q il6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
results.   The Branch would like to thank in large measure those who have«dert
this difficult task year by year, a task motivated largely by a keen sense of*
responsibility. lc
H     School drama has progressed.   The standard of production has improved in ^
cases to one of excellence.   Festival work by pupils in the elementary section has T
been extremely delightful.   Wherever there were keen teachers, reasonably well-equij!!
to carry on the work, there was to be found good drama playing—a not iiiconriderabl
part in one aspect of the all-around development of the children.   More students in ft
high schools are taking the accredited course each succeeding year, and there is no doubt
that were the credits applied to drama changed as has been so often recommended, many
more would take drama.   It is hoped that these recommendations will be put into force
as soon as possible.
The services of this Branch to schools and groups have been considerable. There
has been much use made of the splendid and many books in the library. lhe curtains
have travelled many miles, as have the lights, etc. These concrete aids are much
appreciated, especially in the small places, and it is hoped that this service will not be
discontinued. Other services are so extensive and varied that to enumerate them all
would be tiresome, but we should like to mention one which has received commendation
irom all parts of the world—the magazine 'c British Columbia Drama." This publication, with its practical aids, its news, its lists of plays, etc., has been finding its way to
Australia, Africa, South America, Pakistan, and Malaya, as well as many parts of the
United States, Britain, and Canada. New requests come every year to be placed on the
mailing list, and it is evident that the magazine has had a pleasing share in the establishment of public relations between British Columbia and the rest of the world, at least
in the field of the arts.
The Dominion Drama Festival final was held in Hamilton, Ont., this year. The
Trail Little Theatre, under the direction of Miss Janie Stevenson, won the __)€___inion
Drama Award with its production of § For Love or Money." During the past year there
were fourteen one-act adult festivals held throughout the Province. Seven district festivals were held in Prince Rupert, Prince George, Fort St. John, Kelowna, Vernon,
Vancouver, and Nanaimo. In the early part of June the British Columbia final one-act
festival was held in Penticton, with the following little-theatre groups participating:
Naramata Players, Nakusp Players, White Rock Players, Vernon Little Theatre, Fort St.
John Drama Club, Kelowna Little Theatre, Prince George Players, Burnaby Little
Theatre, and Yellow Point Drama Club. The White Rock Little Theatre group, under
the direction of Mr. Franklin Johnson, won the top award in this festival with its fine
production of " Spreading the News." Mrs. Felicie Mitchell, of this group, won the
Best Actress Award. Several adult groups are producing plays for children, notably
the Holiday Theatre, a professional group under the direction of Miss Joy Coghill, of
the University of British Columbia.
Como Lake High School won the Times Shield for the best group of six essays
submitted. Second prize went to West Vancouver High School. Ray Griffin, Como
Lake High School, won the School Drama Essay Competition. Ian Young, of South
Burnaby High School, was awarded the annual prize for the drama scrap-book competition. During the last year there were fifteen non-competitive school drama festivals held
in the Province.
The following British Columbia players received scholarships this year: John
Sparks, Oak Bay High School; Carole MacLellan, Oak Bay High School; and Mrs.
Eileen Collins, Dawson Creek.    |
This office maintains a close connection with the Governing Committee, who eac
year present the Canadian Drama Award. In 1953, Mrs. Jessie Richardson, of Vancouver, was among the recipients. 1 &
 the development of vigorous community drama and satisfyingly improving school
cs
ibu
pai
rf/ctPffl      d_Lkv»    w--—7     -—   __. • ___ - —
' with a satisfying leisure-time activity whose end result serves to enrich life in the
„       I _-_ • T"* •      i1_   _ .*-■-. .       _ .
•aitin tne uvtw^*"''— —    ^ - *    <-» _* —_r- — *—*© _»-___-w_,
r atics from the primary to the high-school grades.   The small staff of three have
bued with the firm belief that drama in its p*™**»* *™-« ^ j i—
^"atpart in the development of the whole child on jJM_ _ __
1 ?- and can, from both the recreational and aesthetic aspects, provide our adult
ii"--.. .. .... -a . _
his or her way through the school
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 117
t view of the circumstances, this report should close with a brief review of the
rt of the Branch during the past seven years.   It has played a not inconsiderable
part in
drarnal
been ii
a great
system:
arious communities of the Province. During those years the Branch has carried on the
Secretarial work of the British Columbia Drama Association and the Canadian Drama
Award has brought the zone system to a finality in festival work, and has played a promi-
ent part in the hosting of the finals of the Dominion Drama Festival.
Since the inauguration of the Branch in 1935, there has always been inadequacy of
money and help needed to enable the staff to eliminate the feeling of frustration over
things not done, and it is our wish that, with the new organization, these defects will be
removed.
I would like to pay personal tribute to Miss Adamson, who has been of fine assistance throughout the past seven years. I should like to also direct the attention of the
Department to many citizens of British Columbia who have done much to build Provincial
drama to its enviable position among the Provinces of Canada and the thousands who
share as audiences in the work which they produce. To the many who have become
personal friends and who have been ever ready to help, I wish to express my sincere
thanks and best wishes for the future.   The Play is the Thing.
 O 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
The counselling services in British Columbia schools have continued to develoo i
a steady manner during the past school-year.    There is growing evidence that 12
usefulness in schools is becoming more generally understood and appreciated by administrators, teachers, and students.
One of the more encouraging aspects of this development is the evident eagerness
of those in the counselling service to obtain training, and to maintain their efficiency by
attending refresher courses once they have completed the formal requirements for
certification as counsellors. The training programme operated by the Department of
Education continues to recruit new teachers to the ranks of counsellors. This is of major
importance, not only because of the continued extension of the service in British Columbia
schools, but as well because of the number of counsellors each year who are promoted
to administrative positions as principals and vice-principals.
In the two courses offered this summer in connection with the Department's
counsellor-training programme, registration of teachers can be summarized as follows:—
Counsellors
Beginning
Training
Counsellors
Completing
Training
Counsellors
Attending
for
Refresher
Purposes
Total
Enrolment
Course  189—Organization and administration of the guidance
services  ___	
Course 190—Counselling techniques  _	
33
33
11
13
1
44
47
Totals     	
66
24
1
91
Again this year, the Division of Educational and Vocational Guidance has enjoyed
the support and active co-operation of many business and professional organizations in
connection with its occupational information programme. In particular, the assistance
of the British Columbia Products and Industrial Bureau, Vancouver Board of Trade,
and the Pacific National Exhibition should be mentioned. Their combined efforts in
making possible another Province-wide job-study competition is to be commended. Their
enterprise was rewarded by the submission of 15,376 job studies. This represents the
largest number of vocational-guidance job analyses yet produced by students of British
Columbia secondary schools in any one school-year.
Separate awards were made this year to students of junior and of senior high schools.
Winners of the competition were as follows:—
Senior High Schools
m First—John Sodja, Rossland High School, Rossland.   Subject:  "TheAuto-
H motive Mechanic."
Second—Sheila Farrington, North Vancouver High School, North Vancouver.
Subject:   "The High-rigger." i
Junior High Schools
First—Nannely Thurnwald, Inglewood Junior High School, West Vancouver.
Subject:   "British Columbia's Mining and Smelting Industry."
The Rossland High School was awarded the annual Challenge Shield as the schoo
attended by the student winning the first-place bursary award offered by the sponsors oi
the competition.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS O 119
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR
OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Programming
Planning for school radio broadcasts is the responsibility of the Director, but is done
• conjunction with advisory groups both in the radio and the educational fields. There
. ^ considerable inter-provincial consultation. Suggestions for programmes come
from such sources as parents, teachers, the pupils themselves, Inspectors, and Departmental officials, as well as from radio peisonnel. Planning is guided by the over-all aim
of enriching and supplementing the instructional programme. Specific criteria for plan-
nine are drawn from such aims as providing up-to-date information, making available
information not readily accessible to the teacher, presentation of material in a form
compatible with the highest teaching standards, stimulating pupil interest, and so on.
With due allowance for overlapping, approximately one-quarter of the year's
programmes were suitable for the primary level, about three-quarters for the intermediate
leveL one-third for the junior-high level, and one-sixth for the senior-high level. While
specific designation of programmes by subject matter is neither possible nor desirable,
the proportions of programmes by subject were: Music, 40 per cent; Social Studies,
25 per cent; English, 12 per cent; Science, 10 per cent; Health and Personal Development, 7 per cent; Art, 3 per cent;  and French, 3 per cent.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation allows half an hour a day for school
broadcasts. Since this generally demands too long an attention-span for a single programme, the time is therefore split up, as far as expenses will allow, to provide two
programmes a day. This year approximately 40 per cent of the programmes (mostly
senior) were half an hour in length, 40 per cent fifteen minutes in length, 10 per cent
twenty minutes in length, and 10 per cent ten minutes in length.
Over a thousand classrooms listened regularly to the most popular programme,
musk for the first two grades. The music programmes and the art broadcasts occupied
the top five positions in preference. Health, English, and Science broadcasts were also
high in popularity.
Coverage
By the end of the year, school broadcasts were being heard in British Columbia
over twenty-one low-power repeater stations, as well as over ten stations affiliated with
the C.B.C. networks. In spite of this, however, there are still considerable areas of the
Province where reception is impossible or difficult. A notable example is the south end
of Vancouver Island. I
School Districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 26, 31, 49, and 51 reported no schools listening.
In Districts Nos. 2, 3, 10, 13, 18, 25, 27, 30, 48, 50, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, and 74, Itm
than one-third reported listening. Two-thirds or better of the schools reported listening
in Districts Nos. 11, 12, 14, 17, 21, 22, 23, 32, 33, 34, 35, 37, 39, 40, 41, 43, 45, 47,
&61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 75, and 78. While the picture this gives is a fi&althy
°ne, a careful examination will show that there are still considerable schools that are
within the reach of school broadcasts but are not at present taking advantage of them.
Of the total number of pupils attending school during the year, 44 per cent listened to
school broadcasts. This represents 46 per cent of the classrooms in session, and more
!han53 per cent of the schools of the Province. Reports indicate over 1,200 radios at
Present in use in British Columbia schools. Unfortunately, the number is not evenly
aistnbuted, over 350, for example, being in Vancouver City schools. A steadily growing
number of schools are making use of tape-recorders to facilitate use of broadcasts.
 0 12o PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Evaluation
Approximately 200 teachers again undertook day-to-day reporting on the bro d
casts, enabling the School Broadcasts office to verify such production essentials
maturity-level, clarity of ideas, suitability of speed, value of related sound and mi/
and kindred matters. The practice is developing for groups of teachers from one school
to report simultaneously. This is a valuable trend, since it makes possible wide
discussion before judgments are made.
IPrinted Aids
Stress is laid on the importance of adequate preparation by teacher and class for
effective use of school broadcasts. As a guide, a number of printed aids are prepared
During the year these quantities were distributed:— f
Teachers' Bulletin (main programme details)    5,900
Pictures in the Air (art pamphlet)    4}000
Music supplement for lower grades    4,000
Pupils' music sheets, intermediate grades 26,500
Pupils' pamphlet for "Ecoutez" (French programmes) 5,800
" The Waif and the Wizard " (mimeographed play to accom-        f
pany drama series)    1,100
Young Canada Listens (booklet prepared by the C.B.C.)    3,600
Television       if
The Coronation ceremonies in June, 1953, were witnessed by a number of schools,
through the courtesy of dealers who provided them with receivers. The results of the
impromptu experiment seemed to show that television can be of practical service to
schools. In March, 1954, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation presented a series of
late-afternoon telecasts designed to supplement the school broadcast of the day. Schools
in New Westminster, Burnaby, Vancouver, and North Vancouver participated officially
in this experiment, by planning and encouraging the widest possible extent of home
viewing, and by sending in complete reports. Results from across Canada were encouraging enough to justify a further experiment for in-school viewing, which is to be
conducted in November, 1954.
School Visits
As many schools as possible were visited during this year. This is a project that
deserves more time than the Division is at present able to give. Areas of the widest use
of school broadcasts are logically those where the administrators are the most enthusiastic.
Personal contacts appear to be the best means of securing the kind of co-operation
necessary.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH O 121
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., DIRECTOR
Three Province-wide surveys involving six tests were carried out during the school-
2953-54. The British Columbia English Usage, Spelling, Vocabulary Test, Form P,
^standardized in Grade X in November. Norms based on 10,572 English 20 and 21
?dents are now available for the use of teachers in Grammar and Diction, Punctuation,
Capitalization, Sentence Structure, Spelling, and Vocabulary. An earlier form of the
test previously was standardized in Grade IX, and it should prove useful for instructional
and classification purposes. Terminal Course tests in foreign languages were administered
to all students taking French 20, German 20, Latin 20, and Spanish 20 on June 10th and
jH 1954. The results were forwarded to principals early in September. A revised
British Columbia edition of the Dominion Group Test of Learning Capacity, Advanced
Form B, was administered to the University Programme and General Programme students
in Grades XI and XII and all students enrolled for Grade XIII courses. This was an
extension of the study that was begun in 1953. A Social Studies 20 test was revised,
and two forms, A and B, were prepared for standardization. Unfortunately, budgetary
limitations made it necessary to hold this fourth portion of the programme over until
1955.
University Entrance Standards.—The investigation of learning capacity that has
been carried on during the past two years has provided confirmation of the differences
in ability that were believed to exist between groups of students enrolled in different
courses at both University Entrance and Senior Matriculation levels. It also has provided new bases upon which the scaling of examinations can be carried out, and it represents a change in the previous assumption that all subjects should have a constant
percentage of failure. Until 1952 the failure rate in general was approximately 15 per
cent for University Entrance subjects, and for Senior Matriculation subjects, 18.4 per
cent. The assumption since that time is that a lower percentage of failure should occur
in subjects that are selected by the " best f students, and higher percentages in those in
which negative selection occurs. While no student is ever failed on the basis of his
Intelligence Quotient, the percentage of failures has been raised in the case of the nonselective subjects, and lowered in subjects such as Physics 91 and 101 that are taken by
students who should have the greatest capability of success at university.
The 1953 results indicated that in no case could the General Programme students
approach the standards set by University Programme students. This happened even
tagh three majors were required from the latter and only one from the former, and
should give pause to those who have greater faith in aptitude in specific subjects than
in general ability. §    |j,
The results of the 1954 survey, and some of the data upon which the scales were
teed, are given in the accompanying tables. Additional data, including that obtained
by testing the G.P. students, indicates that the selectivity of different courses is remarkably
instant from year to year. It is felt that this study will influence the calibre of the
students who attend university later, and will lessen the probability that the success or
[*e of students at the U.E. level will depend upon their selection of courses. This,
it is believed, will increase the fairness of the University Entrance and Senior Matricula-
ton examinations. jf
Mm™6 Enrolment'—Bilt^ in British Columbia in 1953 reached a new high of
10 In ™S number may be compared with pre-war births, which were approximately
ofifi?.Peir year for several consecutive years.    Immigration of children under the age
was lower than in 1952 but still exceeded emigration.   The net gain for the calendar
"~ 1,937 school-age and pre-school children.   These figures indicate that recent
in which the enrolment for 1965 was placed at 300,000, were not excessive.
------a
 O 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT. 1953-54
Scholastic Aptitude of Public-school University Programme Students
Enrolled in University Entrance Courses
Course
Median U.P.
Learning Capacity
Score
Physics 91	
Spanish 92	
French 92	
Mathematics 91 i
Latin 92	
Law 93	
Commerce 91	
Economics 92	
English 91	
English 401	
History 91	
Commerce 92, 93
Chemistry 91	
Geography 91.....
English 93	
Social Studies 30
Biology 91	
Mathematics 30..
German 91,92 ___
Spanish 912	
Latin 912	
French 912	
English 301 2	
52.5
52.5
50.4
49.9
53.4
50.1
50,7
49.9
48.7
48.2
48.3
45.6
46.1
45.3
44.6
42.7
42.1
41.0
41.03
50.5
46.4
45.5
41.7
LQ.
118
111$
117
116
119
116
117
116
115
115
115
113
113
113
112
111
110
110
117
113
113
110
Learning-
Capacity
Scores
below 36.5
1 English 40 is the typical Grade XII group; English 30 is the typical Grade XI.
2 Non-examinable subjects inserted for comparison.
3 Possible language difficulty.
Public-
school
Candidates
Failing
Average
I.Q. at
Pass-mark
Scholastic Aptitude of Public-school Senior Matriculation Candidates
Enrolled in Various Courses
Course
Median S.M.
Learning Capacity
learning-
Capacity
Scores
below 41.5
Public-
school
Candidates
Failing
Average
I.Q. at
Score
I.Q.
Pass-mark
Physics 101
1
1
56.7 122
55.2                  121
46.8 114
55.1 121
43.2 119
53.0                  119
52.7 119
50.3 116
52.0                   118
49.9 116
56.5 122
53.8 120
49.6 116
48.8                  116
50.5                  117
AQ t\                           1 Ul
Per Cent
13.5
13.1
11.1
16.3
16.3
17.3
18.2
20.9
19.3
20.0
21.4
20.1
23.4
24.6
29.5
20.0
Per Cent
16.7
16.7
16.7
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
112
French 120 _
111
German 110 .
111
Chemistry 101
111
Mathematics 101
111
English 101
111
English 100
110
Latin 110
110
French 110
110
History 101
110
Latin 120
110
German 90
110
History 102
109
Biology 100   .
Mathematics 100
109
108
German 120
$
-r^.v
I
___——
1 Possible language difficulty.
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
O 123
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sa, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering
the period September 1st, 1953, to August 31st, 1954:—
Circulation Report
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
1. Fernie—•	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
j. Creston	
i Kootenay Lake—
7. Nelson— 	
8. Slocan	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley-	
14. South Okanagan....
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
Ii Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
20. Salmon Arm _..
21. Armstrong	
21 Vernon	
23. Kelowna 	
24, Kamloops	
2J. Barriere	
26. Birch Island.....	
21. Williams Lake	
21. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
I South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey       	
37. Delta ._...ir.r~j
31 Richmond	
8. Vancouver	
^ New Westminster".
41. Burnaby	
^ Maple Ridge	
^ Coquitlam 1
«• North Vancouver.!
4S- West Vancouver
46. Sechelt	
fl-Powell River 1 5
* Howe Sound ""'
49-Ocean Falls *
J-Queen Charlotte"
• Portland Canal _
«• Jrince Rupert _.
M- Terrace	
51 Smithers
*• Burns Lake      I
J Vanderhoof	
"Jrince George	
58-McBride _
59 an^. P^ fc~-
399
188
437
769
1
534
245
178
21
2,784
185
257
115
144
339
123
306
339
473
166
344
1,336
690
98
4
20
52
250
218
410
1,716
4,545
3,473
847
305
385
4,603
3,774
2,196
879
978
2,020
160
284
180
444
777
29
497
54
40
28
6
232
6
1,070
Number
Supplied
205
73
294
483
1
235
130
89
12
1,425
106
117
53
56
208
60
142
151
243
73
159
646
432
70
4
16
33
130
107
209
1,217
2,769
1,851
454
143
368
2,907
2,200
1,067
358
441
1,321
113
164
98
277
487
17
238
36
19
14
6
98
5
312
Film-strips
Number
Requested
183
59
56
250
120
1
37
1,019
5
120
77
14
49
46
307
98
71
109
100
382
17
13
47
170
81
389
2,044
2,156
432
409
147
532
865
96
1,047
600
1,256
192
271
162
69
235
21
34
31
332
168
13
446
Number
Supplied
145
39
56
159
107
1
29
736
4
83
58
10
36
36
221
66
46
74
79
211
14
13
33
139
66
287
1,739
1,433
297
266
123
295
708
96
652
344
786
189
197
104
59
162
20
20
13
185
105
12
237
 O 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1953-54
Circulation Report—Continued
District Number and Name
Motion Kctures
Number
Requested
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River.
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino._
80. ___it____at	
Unattached schools _
Miscellaneous	
Totals-
4,955
417
123
252
534
67
30
335
266
1,310
272
401
441
100
1,713
93
529
349
30
218
528
379
Number
Supplied
2,740
249
72
129
265
30
18
200
133
748
120
202
245
65
1,124
33
291
182
20
64
305
329
Film-strips
54,795
30,506
Number
Requested
3
228
297
202
932
52
20
53
93
189
100
68
49
72
1,092
3
84
133
11
52
19,111
Number
Supplied
3
159
226
114
666
34
18
45
59
161
79
60
39
56
80S
3
57
84
7
 47_
13,512
Eighteen districts operate a system of circuits of booking material by "block."
This results in an appreciable reduction in the number of orders processed and the
physical handling of visual aids in this office. I
This division supplied visual aids to 565 schools during this term.
On the shelves of the library were 2,099 motion pictures, 3,991 film-strips, 618
picture sets, and 52 dioramas.
This spring saw the introduction of a loan service of stereographs to one-room rural
schools.   Although operated but a few months, the response has been stimulating.
"EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF F. M. KINSMAN, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION
During the school year 1953-54 a total of 212 applications were considered by the
Commission. Of these, thirty were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the (__bmmission for grant purposes. One hundred
and eighty-two applications were approved for grants, seventy-eight receiving assistance
for the first time, forty-six for the second year, forty-two for the third year, and sixteen
for the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade K, 37;
Grade X, 49; Grade XI, 43; Grade XH, 50. During the year eighteen students dropped
out and grants were discontinued.
Students in fifty-two school districts received aid, and while the large majority
attended schools in the heavily populated south-west section of the Province, such distant
places as the Peace River and Port Hardy were also represented.
The grant per pupil was $86 for the year, payable as follows: September, $51);
December, $20; and March, $16.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
O 127
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