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Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1955]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
fREPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:   - #-■--Ifajp^^^^- •-■'- ^p|P!-C>1^:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
o; •, : • :**■• "; R- w- BONNER,     '   'f~
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1954.
 Office of the Game Commission,
Jjgjl;- Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1954.
Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report for the year ended December 31st, 1953. „     ^ f
ff       If I have the honour to be,
•SS1'    "■-'■"'i; v^f Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W-        FRANK R. BUTLER,
Game Commissioner.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Reports— * Paoe
Game Commission  7
Officer Commanding "A" Division     9
Officer Commanding " B " Division  13
Summary of Reports of Game Wardens in " C " Division  16
Officer Commanding " D " Division  21
Summary of Reports of Game Wardens in " E " Division  25
Report of Fisheries Management Division—Chief Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A.
Larkin |  27
Report of Game Management Division—Chief Game Biologist Dr. J. Hatter.-__ 37
Report of Predator-control Branch—Supervisor of Predator-control G. A. West 44
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-53, Inclusive  48
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1953  49
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences  50
Revenue—Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, Goat, and Pheasant (Game) Tags  51
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  52
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters' Licences  53
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences  54
Revenue—Sale  of  Fur-traders',   Taxidermists',   and  Tanners'  Licences  and
Royalty on Fur I  55
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-53, Inclusive  56
Comparative  Statement  Showing Pelts  of Fur-bearing Animals  on Which
Royalty Has Been Collected, 1921-53, Inclusive  57
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty Was
Collected during Year 1953  58
List of Confiscated Fur, 1953, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur  59
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1953, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated
Firearms  60
Bounties Paid, 1953  61
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1953, Inclusive  62
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1953  63
Prosecutions, 1953  64
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1953  66
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1953   67
Statement—Game-bird Liberations, 1953  78
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1953  79
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  79
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1953  80
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1953  91
  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1953
It is gratifying to be able to report that revenue under the " Game Act" in this
calendar year reached the highest peak in history. The total revenue, as will be noted on
perusal of the statistical section of this Report, was $1,112,716, representing an increase
of $171,276.30 over the year 1952. |§
It is even more gratifying to receive this high revenue because it is common
knowledge that sustained game management can only be attained by carefully planned
expenditures, and the greater revenue received gives the authorities in charge of management a much greater opportunity to more fully cover the requirements of important
wildlife conservation.
As hunting and fishing pressure increases, as large industrial projects are brought
into being, and as various problems affecting wildlife appear, such as pollution, increased
water-use, and destruction of wildlife habitat, it is only natural to expect that increased
supervision over our wildlife resources must be apparent. History teaches us in no uncertain terms that constant vigilance is necessary at all times if wildlife is to be conserved
and properly managed.
It is again necessary to advise that continued scientific surveys have been carried out
in connection with our moose populations and, in many sections of the Province, on our
deer populations as well. These carefully planned surveys have greatly assisted your
Commission in instituting a definite and carefully thought-out programme of management.
In our last Report, mention was made of objections from some sources against the
shooting of females of the deer family, and it is now very pleasing to be able to report
that as a result of our scientific surveys and a constant educational effort these objections
have greatly din&lshed, and there would appear to be no reason therefore to continue
to refrain from permitrmg the taking of females of the deer family when investigations
clearly indicate that such action is necessary in older to satisfactorily crop our wildlife
resources and to preserve the food of these animals. In this connection your attention
is respectfully drawn to a report later on submitted by the Chief Game Biologist.
Your attention is also drawn to the reports submitted by personnel of the Fisheries
Management Division because it is felt that perusal of these reports will clearly indicate
the many problems of management which are being encountered in respect to the sport-
fishery resource of the Province. Here again it is very necessary to state that as fishing
pressure increases so should planned management and control measures be increased.
During the past few years an enlarged and carefully planned effort has been made
in controlling predatory animals, and in this connection you are respectfully referred to
the report of the Chief Supervisor of Predator-control, which is contained herein.
The game-checking station at Cache Creek was again in operation during the period
of approximately September 15th to December 5th. Valuable scientific and management
data were secured as a result of the operation of this station, and it is most apparent that
the station should be continued annually. It is also apparent that a permanent building
should be erected in order to satisfactorily house the personnel carrying out these checking
operations. In this connection lit is proposed to recommend in our estimates for the
fiscal year 1954-55 that money be supplied for the construction of this building.
f§' The following is a summary of the results of the station referred to:— J-   :
 F 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game and Fish Taken by Resident and Non-resident Hunters and Anglers and
Recorded through the Cache Creek Checking-station, 1953
Species of Game, etc.
Resident
Hunters
(7,457)
Non-resident
Hunters
(1,713)
Big-game
Trophy
Fees, etc.
Prosecutions
Cases
Fines
Big Game
Black bear, etc.-
Grizzly bear	
Caribou	
Deer .
Moose	
Mountain-goat—
Mountain-sheep.
Wapiti	
Totals.
47
4
1,192
787
14
1
1
2,046
55
18
13
211
917
52
18
1,284
$52,900
161
$1,945
Summary
Big game    3,330
Game birds—
Ducks     -    6,725
Geese    -          81
Grouse     10,297
  17,103
Trout .    6,568
In the operation at Cache Creek every step was taken to assist the cattle and sheep
interests in endeavouring to trace any stolen or otherwise illegally secured domestic
animals.
The Seventh Annual Game Convention was convened in the City of Chilliwack, with
considerable success. Many important and far-reaching problems respecting wildlife were
discussed fully and satisfactorily dealt with at this Convention. The Chilliwack Fish and
Game Protective Association and Rifle Club did its utmost in assuring a successful convention, and the arrangements made by this organization for the comfort and pleasure
of the Convention delegates, visitors, and guests were, to say the least, outstanding. There
would seem to be no question that these annual conventions have provided a means of
cementing co-operation and friendship among all those interested and who come in
contact with the wildlife resources of British Columbia.
UPLAND GAME BIRDS
Pheasant-hunting was as good, if not better, in 1953 than for some years past.
It is, however, still too early to make a statement as to the results of our changed policy
pertaining to the purchase and liberation of pheasants which was started in 1952.
Probably in a few years' time definite findings will be forthcoming on the effects on our
pheasant populations in purchasing and liberating young pheasants in September and
adult hen pheasants in March. J|r
The fourth of the fifth year period of release of chukar partridges was carried out,
and it might be mentioned that fairly favourable reports are being received that released
birds are establishing themselves quite satisfactorily.        Sir  i|     le
I MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS
Fair hunting of waterfowl in most areas was obtained during the open season.
It should probably be mentioned at this time that the annual crop of waterfowl taken by
our sportsmen does not to any great extent make any appreciable change in the whole
migratory game-bird picture. In other words, there has never been any serious drain
placed on waterfowl through hunting activities in this Province.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 9
BIG GAME
Conditions respecting big game appear favourable, with the possible exception that
in some areas moose and deer populations are still presenting a problem in that these
animals have increased to the extent that wintering areas are being depleted of natural
food, and something must of necessity be done to offset this unfavourable condition.
Consequently, it is anticipated that next year the game regulations will provide for the
taking of females in some, if not all, of the affected districts.
Great and understandable precaution has been taken to see that no drastic game-
cropping measures are brought into being until all the scientific and management facts
have been assembled and carefully studied. There is every reason to proceed with
caution before embarking on any severe means of curtailing the growth or expansion
of any game species.
GAME-LAWS ENFORCEMENT
So long as we have wildlife we must have regulations for controlling hunting and
fishing and to see that these regulations are adequately enforced and adhered to. During
the year the usual methods of enforcement have been employed, which have resulted in
a fairly large number of warranted prosecutions. In this connection, attention is drawn
to the statement pertaining to prosecutions, which is to be found in another portion of
this Report. The work of Game Wardens is frequently of an arduous nature, and your
Commission wishes to take this opportunity of extending to all these officers sincere thanks
for their constant efforts in enforcement work.
GAME-FISH CULTURE
As in the previous year, enlarged programmes of fisheries management in its many
phases have been effected, and in this regard it is respectfully suggested that the report
submitted by the Fisheries Management Division contained herein be very carefully
perused.
HUNTING ACCIDENTS
There would appear to be no further need to comment on hunting accidents, other
than to refer you to the statement appearing later on in this Report. It would, however,
seem necessary to advise that every possible step has been taken by educational methods
and otherwise to curtail these regrettable and unfortunate hunting accidents.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
As in previous years, every opportunity has been taken to attend meetings of cattlemen, Fanners' Institutes, game and zone associations, guides' and trappers' associations,
service clubs, and schools, where educational films have been frequently displayed and
full advice given in connection with all the work of this Commission in its wildlife-
conservation programme. Your Commission is most appreciative of the excellent
co-operation received, not only from the organizations mentioned, but from Federal
and Provincial Government departments as well.
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE
MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION,
INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
*   By G. C. Stevenson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit my annual report covering game and fish conditions
in "A" Division for the year ended December 31st, 1953.       Jfc
 I 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Big Game
Wapiti (Elk).—There is no appreciable change in the number or condition of these
animals, and reports would indicate there is little or no spread from their present habitat.
A census of elk on Vancouver fcland will take several years owing to their scattered
locations. The Shaw Creek Game Reserve reports suggest an increase in numbers, but
these reports are only based on opinion and not on factual information. It may develop
that as these elk are restricted to limited habitat for browse, the winter die-off is unduly
high, thereby causing the population to remain static. r
Beer.—The past season has shown a very satisfactory hunter success ratio on
Vancouver Island and some of the Gulf Islands. There appears to be a wide margin of
difference in regard to the physical development of deer in various parts of tlfe Division,
and though biological reports would indicate overcrowding in certain areas, which no
doubt exists, I lean somewhat to the theory that nutriment value of browse has deteriorated
in certain parts of Vancouver Island to the extent that deer suffer from undernourishment
even though the volume of food may be there. Logged-off lands and burned-over areas
reach a peak in their nutriment values and then gradually decline as new coniferous
growth smothers the deciduous shrubs.
Game-management techniques of various types for taking deer inventories, though
not infallible, are proving very beneficial in arriving at some understanding of our deer
population, but owing to the diversity of conditions existing on Vancouver Island, only
comparatively small areas lend themselves to census-taking. This, together with certain
research inventories carried out from time to time, should give us a composite picture of
the problems to be encountered in maintaining a balance between hunter pressure and
available game.
At times it appears difficult to impress upon the public the importance of scientific
research in game management, but, provided the information is imparted in a factual
manner, we all change some of our deepest convictions under the influence of time.
Fur-b earing Animals
Beaver.—This animal is definitely on the increase throughout Vancouver Island.
The tagging system, together with an adverse market during the past two years, has caused
this animal to increase to the extent where they have become a nuisance in several districts.
Marten.—These animals are in good supply, as trappers find it difficult to take them
in the hills after the end of December owing to heavy snow conditions.
Other Fur-bearers.—Mink and otter are numerous, and muskrats are fairly widespread over the Island.   Squirrels are fair in numbers and racoon very numerous.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds continue to be one of the outstanding game birds on
Vancouver Island and some of the Gulf Islands. During the past season the hunter
success in obtaining blue grouse was exceptionally good, even though hunting pressure
at the commencement of the open season was high. Though this bird continues to be
abundant and only slight variations in numbers are noted from season to season, much
is still to be learned about them and their movements. This especially applies to the
age-groups. Checking-stations reveal that the majority of birds shot are from the age-
group 1 year and under, and the problem presents itself as to what happens to the
remainder. We know they take to higher elevations sometime during the season and
return for breeding purposes, but there is much that is obscure.
Willow Grouse.—Much improvement noticed in the number of these birds, though
they cannot be called numerous. igg|
California Quail.—In the south-eastern portion of Vancouver Island these birds have
shown a healthy increase, especially in those areas where broom is plentiful for winter
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 11
cover and stubble-fields are available. Mild winters during the past two years have had
a beneficial effect on quail. These birds are not subject to much hunting pressure during
the open season. II
Pheasants.—Much discussion continues to evolve around this bird on Vancouver
Island, especially in the southern portion. The sportsmen clamour for the release of
more pheasants by the Department, and the farmer objects to his land being used as
a hunting-ground by the public. Pheasants are not plentiful, but in certain areas a considerable density of population exists—needless to say, in protected districts and private
property.
The pheasant problem is one that the sportsmen themselves must solve in so far as
farmer-sportsmen relationship is concerned, and unless this problem is overcome, the
scope for pheasant-shooting on Vancouver Island will become more and more restricted
every year. The question of type and age of pheasant to be released matters little if there
is no place to liberate or hunt them.
Predator-control
Approximately 294 cougars and 3 wolves were accounted for during the past year
in this Division. Of these, 26 were taken by Departmental hunters. The majority of
cougars killed by our own hunters came from remote areas where predator-control for
game-management purposes did not apply.
I think it is now being realized that the outcry for higher bounties and a bonus
system has not proved the panacea as far as the deer population is concerned. In all
probability the kill of cougar would be as great if the bbunty were considerably reduced.
If, as Game Management personnel point out, it is necessary to harvest more of our
deer-crop, then I see no reason for high bounties to eliminate the cougar. A certain
anomaly exists. Safety of the public and safeguarding of live stock can adequately be
attended to by Departmental hunters.
Game Protection
Out of 184 informations laid for infractions under the "Game Act" and Fisheries
Regulations, 180 convictions were obtained.
The carrying of loaded firearms in cars is being more severely dealt with by
Magistrates owing to the number of accidents and to the prevalence of game and sheep
being shot at from cars.
Game Propagation    -
Restocking with pheasants took place in the Alberni, Nanaimo, Duncan, and
Courtenay areas (exact numbers will be found elsewhere in this Report). Owing to
shooting in the Saanich Peninsula being restricted to small areas in North and Central
Saanich, it was not considered advisable to liberate any birds as the existing stock was
adequate and there was a possibility, and there still is, of the municipal authorities
concerned closing the whole area to hunters.
Game Reserves
The principal game reserves in this Division are Strathcona Park, Shaw Creek,
China Creek, and Elk Falls, with lesser ones such as Elk Lake, Miracle Beach, Royal
Roads, and St. Mary Lake.   Good stands of game may be found at Shaw Creek and Bald
Mountain Reserves. i
Fur Trade
J Practically all wild fur taken in this Division is shipped directly to Vancouver, where
royalties are collected. A considerable number of fur-farmed pelts pass through this
Division, and it is noted the chinchilla are now being pelted after the build-up of breeding
stock.
 F 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
/ . r  !■■-■;■-..••■;--' Trap-lines/
The registration of trap-lines continues to show more and more every year the
efficiency of this conservation measure. The number of registered trap-lines in the
Province would give the impression that the fur potential would decline, but the reverse
is the case, and many fur-bearers have reached the stage where they have become
a nuisance. Trap-line registration with all its implications should be better understood
by the general public.
Registration of Guides
Guides in this Division concentrate mostly on fishing parties, but there are several
guides in the Campbell River area who arrange to take hunters on big-game hunts,
especially after grizzly bear.
Special Patrols
No special patrols were carried out in this Division during the past year, but all
Detachments were well covered by routine patrols. A launch for patrolling the west
coast would be desirable as many of the logging camps and settlements require supervision, which cannot be given at present.
Hunting Accidents
There were four hunting accidents caused by firearms and one by drowning in this
Division during the past year. For detailed information covering the accidents, see report
" Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1953." |§
,.   Game-fish Culture
Selective plantings of cut-throat and Kamloops trout were made in lakes and streams,
particulars of which will be found later on in this Report.
Iff Summary and General Remarks *
The past year has been a successful one for angler and hunter. Fishing in lakes
and streams has been good, and though fishing pressure is increasing every year, the
skilful angler can still meet with a large measure of success. The hunter has also had
a very successful year in this Division both on game birds and deer. There has been
some criticism of an open season on doe deer, but these critics are mostly uninformed
persons who do not know all the facts relative to the reason. It is difficult to keep the
public informed of what the Department is undertaking in so far as game management
is concerned unless some media are arranged. Most of the States to the south issue a
periodical setting forth the aims and undertakings of their departments in order that the
public is kept informed of game potential and how it is being managed.* This information should be lucid and free from pedagogics. In my opinion this is essential so that
a well-informed public opinion can be maintained. Game and fish management has
reached a stage in this Province where a high level of publicity is very necessary.
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my thanks to the personnel of this
Division for their excellent work and co-operation in maintaining a high degree of
efficiency to the Department.
The relationship between this Department and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
has been most cordial, and any assistance that has been requested has been promptly
given, and I take this opportunity of recording my thanks and appreciation. I also
express my appreciation and thanks for the many kindnesses shown to this unit by other
Government departments which we have had to contact in the course of our duties.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 13
"B" DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
Big Game
Moose.—The southern trek of these animals seems to continue. They have been
reported in the Princeton district and in the South Okanagan, Boundary, Arrow Lakes,
and, somewhat more numerous, around Kootenay Lake. They are in good numbers in
the whole of the East Kootenay area, where they roughly parallel the elk distribution.
The present prospects for an ample moose population in this Division—that is, that
part of the Province lying along the United States border—does not seem very promising
as, with some few exceptions, suitable browse is not present in any quantity. The
absence of feed also precludes a very numerous population in the East Kootenay, where
the present stand is at, or near, maximum strength.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are well established throughout the Electoral Districts of Fernie, Cranbrook, and Columbia, and maintaining their numbers despite the
generous open season. Small pockets of elk at the head of Kootenay Lake, also in the
Penticton and Princeton areas, show a moderate increase in local numbers and a healthy
instinct for new pastures. Odd animals are now being reported all the way from Princeton to Cranbrook contiguous to the Trans-Provincial Highway.
The elk stand in the East Kootenay has been steadily increasing. These animals,
in some forty years or so, have come from a low ebb, and a local open season to the
present situation where an open season through the entire valley between the United
States border and Golden does not appear to materially affect their numbers. It is
altogether likely that we shall, in the not so distant future, consider an open season on
other than animals of the male sex. Yet it is difficult to feel optimistic about the small
stands of elk in the West Kootenay, Okanagan, and Princeton districts. These are in
direct competition with stockmen, orchardists, and farmers to a greater extent than the
local deer populations. Grazing elk have a thin time on ranges used by domestic stock,
whereas browsing deer get by somewhat better. In the light of our experience, we only
seem to be able to make a good deer section into a marginal elk habitat. Further introduction of elk, although warmly sponsored by most sportsmen's groups, should be
considered with some caution.
Caribou.—So far the caribou situation has not changed appreciably in the past
quarter of a century. The main concentration—a very scattered one at that—is along
the higher elevations of both sides of Kootenay and Arrow Lakes from the Big Bend of
the Columbia south to the United States border, with probably a few animals ranging
south of the border. || An open season on bulls of six weeks' duration does not produce
a large kill—a dozen to twenty animals in each year—and we are somewhat puzzled why
there is no noticeable increase. We blame predators, cougars, wolves, and grizzlies, and
it is to be hoped that our present predator programme may shortly be responsible for an
uptrend in the caribou population.   There is ample pasturage for more of these animals.
Mountain-sheep (Bighorn).—These animals are confined to the main Rocky Mountain range from Banff Park south to the Montana border. They are still increasing, and
it is hoped that they may soon approximate the good stand before they were decimated
by the epidemic in 1941. Surprisingly, they do not seem to have established themselves
in the Selkirks, although odd reports have been received of one or two bighorn sheep
being seen on the east side of Kootenay Lake and on the northern slopes adjacent to
Glacier National Park,    If these animals are not migrants, they are most elusive and in
sparse numbers. 1||
The small bands at Vaseaux Lake and the Ashnola District seem to do very nicely
in their restricted habitat, where they compete actively with domestic stock for a living.
 F 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
They are not numerous enough to be considered for an open season, although a few
selected trophy rams might be taken without harm.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are well distributed over the entire Division, but
more noticeably in the Rocky Mountains. The light population in the Similkameen and
Boundary Districts is apparently showing a slow but steady increase, although the suitable range for these animals is not extensive as compared to the vast areas of good goat
country in both the East and West Kootenay.
Mule Deer.—These animals are well distributed throughout the Division and showing an appreciable increase. The winter of 1952-53 was exceptionally mild, and the
present winter at this tjpie of writing, March 15th, has been average and deer have wintered well. The augury for a normal or better than normal increase during the present
spring is most promising.
White-tailed Deer.—The same beneficent conditions that have prevailed during the
past two winters have benefited these animals no less than the mule deer. || They are in
a very healthy state indeed. Due to their somewhat restricted valley dwelling habitats,
they are not as numerous or as widely distributed as the mule deer.
Grizzly Bear.—This is not a numerous species of animal and is more plentiful in
the East and West Kootenay sections than elsewhere. Being much sought after by nonresidents, it is unlikely that grizzlies will become more numerous than they are at present.
Black Bear.—These animals are quite plentiful and on occasion cause some damage
to crops, orchards, and live stock. As soon as complaints are received, they are promptly
attended to by the nearest Game Warden or predatory-animal hunter.
|p Fur-b earing Animals
Trapping is very much in the doldrums. Fur prices are at an all-time low, and
there is little or no incentive for a trapper to catch fur-bearing animals if he has any
gainful occupation. This condition has prevailed for some years and is apparently stabilized. At present the numerous beaver are becoming troublesome, requiring live trapping
by Game Wardens, while lynx and bobcats are much too numerous for the welfare of
small game and even deer. When several hundred trappers were actively operating in
this Division, they took a consistent toll of the predators—weasels, marten, mink, fisher,
lynx, and bobcats—that are no less destructive to small game than the coyote and cougar,
on which we are waging continual war with much success.
Upland Game Birds
Willow Grouse.—While satisfactory in suitable habitat, these birds are perhaps not
as numerous as a year or two ago, but there has been no noticeable cyclical die-off in
this section. We should expect an epidemic among them either this year or next year,
as per the normal ten-year cycle. Perhaps, and this is a pious hope, due to our more
generous open seasons, the cyclical decline might not be as drastic as in previous years,
or we might escape it, although it has occurred regularly five consecutive times since 1905.
Franklin's Grouse.—These birds are well distributed and numerous in the East
Kootenay, but not as plentiful elsewhere.   This is the grouse of the jack-pines.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are very plentiful in the East and West Kootenays, but
are reported down from their recent peak in the Similkameen.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—These birds are doing well and extending their range in the
Cranbrook-Windermere section of the East Kootenay.
Pheasants.—These birds are flourishing in the Similkameen, Grand Forks, and
Creston areas.
II    The same satisfactory situation applies to Hungarian partridge, while California
quail in the Similkameen are holding up well.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 15
It is pleasing to write this brief summary about the pheasants after the pessimism
and apprehension of a few years back. These birds are now in a fair way to furnish the
excellent hunting of previous years.
Migratory Game Birds
Spring and early summer conditions were good, and the season could be considered
a normal one for young broods. A resident population of perhaps 1,000 ducks, of which
mallards, lesser scaups, and redheads are in the majority, winter in the vicinity of Nelson
and are fed during the severe weather. Presumably a number of these birds have lost
their migrating urge. Creston, the Duncan Lake area, and the Columbia River sloughs
from Canal Flats as far as Golden are the chief nesting areas, although every small lake
in the Division seems to support at least one flock of waterfowl. The bag taken by
hunters in this part of the Province is only a tithe of the waterfowl that are raised here.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
During the year, 14 nuisance bears, 15 bobcats, 47 house-cats, 46 cougars, 47
coyotes, and 20 ownerless dogs were killed by Game Wardens during the course of their
regular duties. This does not include lesser predators such as crows, hawks, magpies,
horned owls, which are destroyed as the occasion offers. This list is exclusive of the
coyotes destroyed by the use of poison baits throughout the Division, wherein the Game
Wardens have co-operated with the predatory-animal hunters, whose activities will be
noted elsewhere in the Annual Report.
Game Protection
The 186 prosecutions under the "Game Act" and Special Fisheries Regulations
for British Columbia resulted in 184 convictions.
Game Propagation
Spring plantings of female pheasants appear to be a good move, and the pheasant
carry-over in the winter is quite extensive. Feeding during severe snow conditions was
done liberally and successfully for pheasants, partridge, and quail.
Game Reserves
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of the Elk and Bull Rivers,
and also the White River, is the most important one as it is situated in the heart of the
big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are also
beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and the Kettle River. These are located
on winter yarding-grounds and serve as a haven should unusual conditions occur during
the open season when deer might be too easily taken.
Fur Trade
Most of the fur of this Division is handled by local fur-traders or sent to Vancouver.
Very little fur is handled directly by the trappers.
Registration of Trap-lines
This is a good system, and there would seem to be no criticism of its proof as the
trappers are quite satisfied.
 F 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
?0 ■ %' '"■#"       Registration of Guides      ^  ^
We have a very good working arrangement in this Division, and the guides are
strongly in favour of the continuance of control. None of them has expressed any wish
to return to the old unsatisfactory catch-as-can system of taking out hunting parties.
There is no crowding under the present arrangement, and the non-resident hunters are
much in favour of our controlled guiding territory.
-■■jfc, . Special Patrols
The usual extensive patroling on snowshoes was done while hunting predatory
animals. Frequent horse trips were made during the summer and fall to the back areas
to check game ranges and to inspect hunting territory for licensed guides as well as trap-
lines. The Wardens in this Division maintain an enviable reputation with the shooting
and fishing public for their knowledgeable attitude toward all wildlife problems, particularly those in the more remote parts of their Detachment areas.
ft   •. ■ j|| -.■■■:   -|"'      Hunting Accidents
There were five hunting accidents in this Division during the year, one of which was
fatal. For detailed information covering the accidents, see report j Hunting and Fishing
Accidents, 1953." |/' Jj|;
■'.!■; Summary and General Remarks It
This past winter, 1953-54, gave us some cause for concern with a combination of
heavy snowfall and extreme cold during the latter part of January. We were apprehensive that, should a sudden thaw develop, followed by more cold weather and probably
snow, the deer animals would suffer. Fortunately this did not happen. The cold gradually declined, the snows were light, and by the middle of February the situation had
ameliorated to a reassuring condition. For a short time it was necessary to feed both
upland birds and waterfowl, but the situation at the time of writing, March 15th, is very
promising and with some luck the new crop of wildlife should get away to a good start.
As noted last year, the winter of 1952-53 was an exceptionally mild one, and this
winter in turn may be considered an average good one for game. Nevertheless, we can
expect to observe the usual toll of animals and birds through natural causes—age, disease,
wood-ticks, or predators—which seems to be a normal or inevitable situation. May we
hope for a day with extended predator-control—some winter ranges reserved exclusively
for the wild ruminants and possibly the tailoring of our wild herds in line with the
available pasturage that our winter and early-spring losses may consistently grow fewer.
Our thanks for much cordial co-operation are tendered to the organized sportsmen,
the Forest Service, the Department of Public Works, and the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police. Their willing and voluntary assistance has been greatly appreciated on many
occasions by all of us.
SUMMARY OF REPORTS SUBMITTED BY GAME WARDENS IN I C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, CHILCOTIN, AND
SQUAMISH DISTRICT). jg
Big Game
ll Moose.—Moose are reported to be increasing throughout the Division, with the
possible exception of the Clinton Detachment, in sections of which it is possible that the
food-supply has been so badly overbrowsed that moose can no longer be supported in
large numbers. The increase is most noticeable in the southern extremities of the moose
range; namely, Lillooet, Merritt, Salmon Arm, Vernon, and Kelowna Detachments.
Moose have been observed in increasing numbers in all these regions in recent years.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 17
The past two winters have been exceptionally favourable for moose. Winter snows
were not heavy and the bad weather did not close in until late in the year. Hunter
success was poor until the last few weeks of the open season, and there is little doubt
that in many parts of the Division there are too many moose for the available winter
range. This is especially found in sections of the Chilcotin District, notably the Taseko
Lake-Big Creek area. Very few moose are actually taken from this vast range, and
serious damage has been done to the food plants in many areas by overbrowsing. Records
show that guided hunters took 350 moose from some 20,000 square miles of the Chilcotin
District. It is not known how many moose were taken by resident hunters, but it would
appear that many of these animals could safely be taken without having anything but
a beneficial effect upon the herds. One problem is that hunters rarely venture more than
a mile or so from travelled highways when in search of moose, with the result that large
areas of the country are never hunted. [U
Deer.—Winter conditions have been favourable for deer, and there has been an
over-all increase in their numbers. They have increased in particular in the Central
Cariboo and Chilcotin Districts, where a detrimental effect upon food-supplies has been
noted. There appears to be an abundance of deer in all districts, and an increase in the
bag-limit has been suggested from various sources.
Caribou.—Because of the fact that these animals live in secluded ranges, it is difficult to obtain reliable information on them. They are found in sections of the Quesnel
Detachment, where their numbers remain more or less static. There is a slight increase
in each of the small herds found north of Canim and Mahood Lakes, while similar reports
come from the Barkerville-Bowron Lake areas. Caribou were present in much larger
numbers in these areas in earlier days, but they have increased slightly from the extreme
low that was recorded a few years ago.
. The caribou herds in the Itcha and Rainbow Mountains are not believed to contain
large numbers of animals and remain at a constant level, according to the best reports.
Mountain-sheep.—The California bighorn mountain-sheep at Churn Creek and
adjacent areas were the subject of a special study during the winter of 1952-53 by
Range-management Biologist Lawson Sugden. Much valuable information was collected
regarding the habits of these rare animals.
It is estimated that there are about 1,000 California bighorns in the Province, and
these, with the exception of an unknown but small number in the Western United States,
comprise the last living specimens. Because they are scattered in at least ten different
bands, mainly in the Chilcotin area, they are the subject of serious study at the present
time and plans are being made to ensure their propagation.
The California bighorns at Vaseaux Lake, Short's Creek, and the Ashnola appear
to be static, and owing to limited range it is doubtful if they will increase to any appreciable extent. %
Other mountain-sheep occurring in this Division are found in small bands at Squilax
and Adams Lake- Their range is extremely limited. What appears to be a reliable
report states that Rocky Mountain sheep have been observed at Spences Bridge. These
animals were experimentally planted near Spences Bridge some years ago, but were
thought to have either moved from the area or become extinct. J+
H Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are rarely hunted in this Division because of the
rugged nature of their habitat, and only a few specimens are taken each year. They
are plentiful in the Lillooet District, especially in the Shulaps Mountains area. Increases
have also been noted in the Chilcotin and the Barkerville-Bowron Lake regions. Bands
of between thirty and forty have not infrequently been sighted in the Chilcotin mountain
districts. $ -.
Grizzly Bear.—Grizzly bear appear to thrive in the mountainous areas of the
Okanagan.   The Revelstoke-Big Bend district carries a steady population.    They are
 F 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
numerous in the Bowron Lake district and are found in considerable numbers in the
Ahbau Lake and Baezeko Canyon districts of the Quesnel Detachment.
Grizzly bear are usually shy and retiring animals, and damage from them is infrequently reported. ||
§ Black or Brown Bear.—Unlike grizzlies, the smaller black and brown varieties of
bear are a continual and seemingly increasing nuisance, and it is unfortunate that hunters
do not find them a suitable sporting animal. Damage is reported constantly from all
parts of the Division from these animals. They prey upon domestic stock and are quite
at home near human habitation.
f&h' -M--    Jk.'      Fur-bearing Animals jg
A marked increase in all fur-bearers is reported throughout the Division. This seems
to be due to the extremely low prices that have prevailed for all types of fur. Trappers
find that it does not pay them to operate their trap-lines, and they carry out only enough
trapping to keep their lines in good standing.
Beaver are approaching the nuisance stage in some areas, while their food-supply
is being threatened in others. Careful protection measures have brought the beaver back
from a seriously low ebb some years ago to a condition of plenty to-day. The development of the beaver-tagging system has played an important part in this protection
programme.
The registered trap-line system continues to be an admirable method of controlling
trapping activities.
ff Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—The position of pheasants in the Kamloops, Vernon, Salmon Arm, and
Kelowna districts appears satisfactory, with increases noted in all areas. There seems to
have been a complete recovery from the extremely low population of three years ago.
After the first few days of the open season, it was again demonstrated that the use
of a dog in pheasant-hunting is almost a necessity. Hunting success was generally good
throughout the territory where pheasants are found.
A satisfactory breeding stock was noted in all districts, and the wet, cool weather
that prevailed in June did not seem to adversely affect the birds, while the mild weather
and light snowfall of the previous winter were very favourable for the pheasant population.
The number of bands being returned from the hatchery-raised pheasants is still
disappointing, and hunters should appreciate that the bands are most important and
should be returned to the local Game Warden whenever they are found on a dead bird.
Grouse (Ruffed or Blue and Willow).—Both these species of grouse were plentiful,
and there was no sign of any cyclic decline. Blue and willow grouse shot in some areas
carried a tapeworm, but as this is not unusual, especially in the ruffed grouse, no
significance was attached to the matter. Franklin's grouse were also plentiful in all areas.
fH Sharp-tailed Grouse.—A slight increase in the sharp-tailed grouse population was
reported, but they are not plentiful in the Division as a whole. f
Hungarian Partridge.—There appears to be no change in the population of the
Hungarian partridge, except for a slight increase in the numbers of these birds along the
slopes of the Fraser River near Clinton.   They are not numerous in this Division.
Chukar Partridge.—The experimental introduction of chukar partridge can now be
said to have been successful. They were first liberated east of Kamloops in 1950.
Further introductions have taken place yearly near Ashcroft, Tranquille, Oliver, and
other Interior points. Very little was seen of these birds until 1953, but they were
observed frequently during 1953 in coveys from Monte Creek to Ashcroft. There is
a suggestion that an open season could well be placed on these birds very shortly.
Despite persistent local efforts in Kamloops to acquaint hunters with the appearance
of these birds, there is still a tendency to mistake them for Hungarian partridge.   As
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 19
chukars appear to be quite difficult to hunt, an open season might be in order, but
biologists would very likely wish to examine the present stand of these birds first.
California Quail.—Very few California quail are seen north of the Kelowna district
usually, although there is a static population of some hundred birds around Vernon.
Very few quail are taken annually in this Division, and the population remains static.
#      it Migratory Game Birds ^It
Ducks and Geese.—A slight increase in the numbers of ducks and Canada geese has
been reported throughout the Division. Excellent hunting was enjoyed throughout the
Cariboo and Chilcotin. In the Vernon, Kamloops, and Kelowna areas, upland lakes
were not ice-covered until late in the season. Because of this the migratory birds were
able to remain at the high-altitude lakes and were scattered throughout the high-level
waters until late. There is no doubt that the waterfowl population has recovered from
the extreme low of some years ago, and 1953 was a good year for ducks and geese in
"C" Division.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds ^
In later pages of this Report there will be found a detailed statement of predatory
animals and noxious birds destroyed by the staff of " C " Division during 1953. A statement of bounty payments will also be found elsewhere in these pages. It should be noted
that there has been a substantial reduction in the number of coyote-pelts submitted for
bounty, and this is probably due to the poisoning programme carried out by the staff of
the Predator-control Branch. Coyote and wolf complaints have decreased throughout
the Division.
There has been an increase in the number of bobcat complaints received, and these
predators have been increasingly active in attacking deer.
Complaints of black or brown bear molesting cattle have also increased notably.
This might be due to the tendency toward increased use of timbered ranges for summer
grazing of cattle.
Cougar are reportedly present in increasing numbers, but there would not seem to
be any cause for concern. With an increased deer population, it would seem to be quite
natural for cougars to increase.
^ Game Protection |F     ■#■■ ;*
A list of the prosecutions obtained during the year will be found in another section
of this Report.
The checking-station at Cache Creek, under the capable direction of Game Warden
H. P. Hughes, again proved itself of supreme importance. Much information of great
value was obtained at this station, while the importance of checking hunters both going
into and coming from the hunting areas is great. The number of people checked while
carrying loaded firearms in motor-vehicles continues to be surprising, and it would seem
that there is still a lot of room for more public understanding of the dangers of this
practice.
Game Wardens in the Division carried out patrols, many of them arduous, during
the year.   Closed areas and game reserves were patrolled constantly.
Game Propagation 'A
A list of the game birds liberated within the Division after being shipped from the
Lower Mainland will be found in another section of this Report. With considerable
aid from Robin Kendall, of the Department of Indian Affairs, nuisance beavers were
live-trapped and shipped to Indian trap-lines. #
 F 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game Reserves
Game reserves and protected areas were visited constantly by Game Wardens. The
reserves, adjacent to cities in the Interior attracted large flocks of migratory birds.
Observing these birds provided citizens with a great deal of enjoyment.
Of interest is the fact that a jeep-road was finished during the year into the south
end of Clearwater Lake in the Wells Gray Park. This will help materially in opening
up this area for the enjoyment of the public.
H Fur Trade
The low prices on fur caused trapping activity to be almost at a standstill. There
is a noticeable increase in the stand of fur-bearers, notably beavers and lynx. Statistics
pertaining to the fur trade will be found elsewhere in this Report.
Registration of Trap-lines   |
The excellent system of trap-line registration, which has been in effect in this
Province since 1926, continues to work with a minimum of friction.
Ill Registration of Guides
A further extension of the block system was quite successful. Under this arrangement an area is outlined and geographically described. Guides permitted to operate within
this area or block are then furnished with a description of the territory. The system has
worked extremely well, and it has been found that, in general, guides will respect each
other's rights within these blocks. Almost all of the Division has now been organized
under this system, and the former contentious matter of guiding rights seems to be a thing
of the past.
Game-fish Culture If ft
A list of the lakes and streams that were planted with eggs, fry, fingerlings, or adult
fish is to be found in another section of this Report, as are reports from the various sections of the fisheries branch.
Excellent work, often done under most unpleasant conditions, was carried out by
Fishery Officer F. H. Martin, Lloyd's Creek Hatchery. Game Warden E. M. Martin,
Penask Lake Hatchery, Hatchery Officer F. B. Lucas, and the helpers at these operations
and Game Wardens in the Division also assisted with fish-culture work where required.
A notable development was the increase in popularity of the Thompson River for steel-
head fishing. In past years few anglers visited this water, but this year large numbers of
sportsmen enjoyed winter and early-spring fishing along stretches of this river from
Savona to Spences Bridge.
. :'% :$(- ' Summary '' -W -"§--' ■• -   |> ■
The year 1953 was a good one for sportsmen, with an abundance of fish and game
being available. The condition of the browse plants on some of the deer and moose ranges
continues to give concern. There is little doubt that some districts are carrying an overabundance of these animals. Pheasants showed an encouraging increase, as did waterfowl. The predator-control programme was a pronounced success, especially as it concerned wolves and coyotes. Fur-bearing animals showed a marked increase. There was
a good population of upland game birds, with no decline in the grouse populations.
Trap-line and guiding complaints were at a minimum, jf    ^f?^
Co-operation with all other Government departments was excellent, and particular
thanks should be given to officials of the Forest Service, the Water Rights Branch, the
Lands Department, and officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, all of whom
showed the fullest desire to assist our Department whenever called upon. *
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 21
«D" DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division for the year ended December 31st, 1953. cjegj
Big Game
Moose.—A larger crop of moose was taken in the southern portion of this Division
during the 1953 season than has been taken in many years past. These game animals
were a lot healthier and in much better condition, and only a few cases of tapeworms
were reported.
Several moose were found dead or dying last spring. These animals were exceptionally heavily infested with moose-ticks. It is believed the ticks did far more damage to
the moose in the spring of 1953 than in previous years, due to mild spring weather starting
early and then colder weather setting in again later on, and thus preventing the moose
from getting into the water and mud to rid themselves of the ticks.
Deer.—These game animals are steadily increasing in the Prince George, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, and Smithers areas, and also in some of the northern portions of the
Province. I feel that our wolf-poisoning programme during the past five years has been
responsible for this steady increase as it is especially noticeable in those areas where we
have poisoned the heaviest.
Caribou.—These animals are reported to be increasing again in Tweedsmuir Park.
Large bands of caribou are still to be found in the Cold Fish Lake, Dease Lake, and Atlin
areas.   It is felt that timber wolves are destroying large numbers of these fine animals.
Black and Brown Bear.—Black and brown bear are not nearly as great a menace to
our game and live stock as in past years. However, because of the damage caused by these
predators to live stock and moose calves, I feel that the year-round open season should
be maintained.
Grizzly Bear.—Grizzlies are very plentiful in this Division and could stand heavier
hunting pressure.
Mountain-sheep.—White sheep (Ovis dahl) are still very scarce and should remain
protected. Stonei sheep are to be found in large numbers in the Dease Lake, Toad River,
Atlin, and Cold Fish Lake areas. I believe a more concentrated predator-control programme is necessary in these localities as heavy inroads into the sheep population is
being made by timber wolves.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are fairly plentiful in the area north of the 56th
parallel of north latitude. Very few are taken south of this parallel.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are very scarce in this Division. Although reports from the
Queen Charlotte Islands are still favourable, I feel that a game biologist should investigate
the area to secure authentic information regarding same.
Scattered bands of elk are still reported in the Tete Jaune, Wapiti River, and Moberly
Lake areas, but no noticeable increase has been noted.
Fur-bearing Animals
Marten.—Due to the low fur prices, very few marten are being trapped. Most trappers report a steady increase in marten throughout the Division.
Beaver.—Beaver are very plentiful on all trap-lines that have been properly protected and sufficient numbers left for breeding stock. I might say that the beaver
population is in a very satisfactory condition at present, and it is hoped that prices on
beaver-pelts will increase in order that sufficient numbers will be trapped to keep the
population down to a comparative level with available feed.
 F 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fox.—Fox are very plentiful, but trappers are not taking them because their pelts
have practically no value on the fur market.
Mink.—Owing to present prices, mink are being trapped very heavily but are still
fairly plentiful. 1
I Fisher.—Small female fisher are still in high demand and are being trapped in fair
numbers. They are steadily increasing in most sections.
Lynx.—These animals are very plentiful, although a great many are still being
trapped accidentally in sets made for other fur-bearers.
All other fur-bearers are fairly plentiful. Squirrels are by far the most heavily
trapped due to the satisfactory prices being paid for their pelts. I
1| Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—Forty-eight adult birds were released in the Smithers area last spring.
A few of these birds nested and hatched small broods. The Bulkley Rod and Gun Club
raised sixty-eight chicks and purchased an additional eighty-five chicks, all of which were
released in the Smithers district. From reports received, a fair number of these birds
survived.   A further forty-eight adult birds will be released in the spring of 1954.
No pheasants were released elsewhere in this Division during 1953 as it is felt that
climatic conditions do not warrant same.
Willow Grouse.—The 1953 willow-grouse season proved to be satisfactory. After
the season closed, birds were noticed to be quite numerous along the roadsides. Provided
we have a good hatching season in the spring of 1954, another good year of willow-grouse
hunting should be available in most of the Division. The exceptionally wet spring of 1952
held the grouse population in check during that year.
Blue Grouse.—Very few blue grouse are taken in this area.
Franklin's Grouse.—Franklin's grouse are still very scarce in most of this Division.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed Grouse).—These birds were not as plentiful in 1953
as they were in 1952, but good bags were obtained by those who used trained dogs.
I believe the extremely wet spring was responsible for a large percentage of the chicks
being destroyed. However, with a favourable spring next year, I feel certain that prairie-
chicken will be plentiful in those localities which are suited to them. |P
|| Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese.—Duck-hunting in this Division was very poor last year as there
was no stop-over on the southward migration.   Local ducks showed a slight increase.
Fair goose-hunting was found at Vanderhoof, Prince George, Prince Rupert, and in
the Peace River Block.   A fairly satisfactory increase was noted in local birds.
Destruction of Vermin
Timber-wolves and Coyotes.—An extensive wolf-poisoning programme was carried
out in the areas around Prince George, McBride, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, Smithers, and
along the Yukon-British Columbia border. No figures are available as to the exact
number of wolves poisoned, but it is believed that several hundred were destroyed. In
placing out poison-stations, greater attention was given to those areas inhabited by deer
and moose during the winter. I wish to thank all farmers and loggers who so kindly
donated horses to us for this work. More than forty-five horses were slaughtered by our
men in this Division.   All of the meat was used in our predator-control programme.
Cougars.—These animals are increasing steadily in the southern portion of this
Division. However, due to the severe winters, I do not think they will ever increase to
alarming numbers.
Magpies.—A slight increase was noted in the number of magpies, but I do not
believe these predators will ever become numerous enough to cause a great deal of harm.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 23
H Eagles.—Bald eagles are very plentiful, and reports are frequently received regarding their destruction of muskrats, ducks, and trumpeter swans.
Game Protection
As previously mentioned, provision for the hire of aircraft is greatly needed for
making patrols into isolated lakes along the coast as an increasing number of reports are
being received of foreign aeroplanes carrying non-resident anglers into these lakes. Too,
aircraft are essential in areas which are at present inaccessible by other means of transportation.
A considerable increase in the number of prosecutions took place in " D " Division.
This, no doubt, was caused by an increase in population, and many arriving here from
other Provinces of Canada seem to have very little respect for game laws or game
conservation.
It is felt that a new Game Detachment should be opened at Atlin. There has been
a considerable increase in the population of the Atlin district, and now that a first-class
road is completed from the Alaska Highway to Atlin, the number of non-resident sportsmen coming into the area has vastly increased. The amount of game work has increased
in Atlin to the point where it can no longer be handled satisfactorily by the local Royal
Canadian Mounted Police.
Game Propagation
Pheasants.—Forty-eight adult pheasants were released at Smithers, under the supervision of the Department, with the generous assistance of the members of the Bulkley
Valley Rod and Gun Club. This club has been outstanding in its efforts to introduce
pheasants successfully to the Smithers area. A good percentage of the birds released are
wintering in first-class condition.
Beaver.—A few beaver which were causing trouble in certain localities have been
transplanted to areas where no damage would be caused by flooding. A limited number
of beaver were also supplied by the Department to trappers for propagation purposes
during 1953. %
Game Reserves ,||
The Fort George, Lake Kathlyn, and Kaien Island Game Reserves are the only ones
in this Division. All three reserves cover small areas around cities or towns and are more
for the protection of the public than game.
The Nechako Bird Sanctuary at Vanderhoof is used extensively by migratory game
birds during their northern migration. In the fall a fairly large number of birds inhabit
the sanctuary, but the birds are molested a great deal more now than they were previously.
Dogs as well as the local residents can walk over the sanctuary without difficulty since the
water-level of the Nechako River was lowered by the Aluminum Company of Canada.
A protected area for migratory game birds was put into effect at Buckhorn Lake.
Approximately fifty geese used this sanctuary all fall and made regular flights to the
neighbouring grain-fields. Some of these were taken on flights to their feeding-grounds
by the local sportsmen.
Fur Trade
The fur trade in this Division has been very poor due to the low fur prices.
Registration of Trap-lines
Practically all the trap-lines in this Division are registered, and very little trouble is
being experienced over border disputes. f
\M Because of the inaccuracy of the trap-line maps in use, we have had considerable
trouble locating proper boundaries for many of the trap-lines. It is hoped that aerial
maps will soon be available for all of the northern portion of the Province.   As the mode
 F 24 ll BRITISH COLUMBIA
of travel in the north is chiefly by dog team, the progress made in covering trap-lines in
order to have errors in their boundaries corrected has been very slow.
Registration of Guides
I feel that our system of allotting guiding areas is working out satisfactorily on the
whole. I might say that there is only one area where overcrowding has taken place, and
that is in the Fort St. John Detachment. A meeting of the guides was held, and it is felt
that a satisfactory solution to this problem may be worked out.
Special Patrols
Only two special patrols were undertaken during 1953, and both were made by
Game Warden J. A. McCabe. Assisted by Game Warden B. Villeneuve, one trip was
made to Fort Liard in the Northwest Territories in order to check fur-buyers' books,
trappers, and to inoculate dogs for rabies. This trip took four days, and a distance of 400
miles was covered by boat.
The other patrol was made to Haines Cut-off and Atlin in company with Game
Warden J. Dowsett. This trip lasted seven days and was for the purpose of assisting the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police constable at Atlin in registering trap-lines and checking
hunters and tourists in the extreme north-west corner of the Province. The total distance
covered was 1,278 miles by car and 7 miles on foot.
Hunting Accidents
I regret to report that four persons were injured in hunting accidents during 1953,
three of which were fatal. For detailed information covering the accidents, see report
I Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1953."
Game-fish Culture
Coarse-fish traps in Beaverly and St. George's Creeks, the outlet and inlet of West
Lake, were in operation all spring. There was a noticeable drop in the number of coarse
fish taken this year as only 4 tons of fish were removed, as compared with an average of
approximately 8 tons taken in previous years.
All creeks running in and out of Cluculz Lake were poisoned or trapped. A considerable decrease in suckers was noticed, especially in Norman Creek. More trout are
now inhabiting these streams, and this, no doubt, is due to the reduction of coarse fish.
Dr. P. Parkin's report on fish-culture may be referred to for further details.        |§
During the year a total of more than 33^ tons of coarse fish was taken out of trout
streams and lakes in the vicinity of Prince George and Vanderhoof.
One hundred and fifty thousand eyed Kamloops-trout eggs were planted in the
Dawson Creek area by Game Warden Taylor, assisted by the local rod and gun club;
120,000 eyed Kamloops-trout eggs were planted in streams in the Vanderhoof area; and
115,000 eyed Kamloops-trout eggs were planted in the Prince George area with the
assistance of the members of the Prince George Rod and Gun Club. This club also
operated its hatchery, and from the 110,000 eyed eggs it received, over 90,000 fry were
released in the following lakes: Ness Lake, 10,000; Cluculz Lake, 50,000; Heart Lake,
5,000; and West Lake, 25,000. f
The Bulkley Valley, Dawson Creek, and Prince George Rod and Gun Clubs have
been of great assistance in our fish-culture programme.
Summary and General Remarks
I feel that the game and fish in this Division are in a very satisfactory state, but more
Wardens will be needed if we are to properly conserve and build up our game and fish
sufficiently to meet the greater demands of the vastly increased population in the North.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 25
I wish to thank all sportsmen who assisted us in our endeavours and also those
members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who are assisting in game work in those
areas where no Game Wardens are stationed.
SUMMARY OF REPORTS SUBMITTED BY GAME WARDENS IN " E " DIVISION (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND LOWER
MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND).
Big Game
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Deer are increasing throughout the Division and are
reported too numerous in the Matsqui and Sumas areas, where these animals have done
considerable damage to fruit-trees. The deer populations on Thormanby, Texada, and
other islands appear excessive, and a doe season might be beneficial. A large die-off is
noted each spring, particularly of yearlings, while the animals on Texada appear stunted.
Wapiti (Elk).—The herd of elk on McNab and Potlatch Creeks in Howe Sound now
appears to be at a maximum, with as many as 150 animals being reported present on this
small range. An open season of a week's duration might be considered owing to depleted
condition of browse.
Black or Brown Bear.—The continual open season on black and brown bear has
little effect upon their numbers, and they are reported increasing in some areas, notably
near Coquitlam and in the Powell River district, where they are becoming a nuisance.
Few are shot for sport, and they are usually only destroyed when they become pests.
Grizzly Bear.—These animals maintain a satisfactory population in the area at the
heads of Loughborough, Bute, and Toba Inlets, and Phillips, Fredericks, and Ramsay
Arms. A few are found at the head of Jervis Inlet, while they are fairly plentiful in other
coastal inlets and bays where access is extremely difficult, making hunting limited.
Grizzlies are also found in sections of the Mission district, but few are ever taken.
Mountain-goat.—Goats are quite numerous in mountainous areas near Mission and
Chilliwack, and are found in good numbers at the headwaters of Coquitlam, Alouette,
Stave, Harrison, and Chehalis Lakes, as well as in adjacent areas. They are in healthy
numbers behind Woodfibre and Jervis Inlet and in smaller numbers along bays and inlets
of the coast. A small band is reported near Porteau on Howe Sound, while three have
been seen in the north shore mountains adjacent to Vancouver.
Fur-bearing Animals
With fur prices at an extremely low ebb, there is little trapping activity. Decreases
in the muskrat population have been noted, but mink and beaver are increasing. Beavers
were numerous enough to cause flooding damage in some areas, while racoons have increased to such an extent as to have become pests almost everywhere.
Upland Game Birds
Grouse (Blue and Willow or Ruffed).—Blue grouse were plentiful in some areas,
but most of these regions were inaccessible and little hunting was done. Good populations
were found on some of the islands and in the Chehalis area. Blue grouse in this Division
are only found in scattered areas and cannot be considered plentiful over the whole Division. Fluctuations in the willow-grouse stands were noted, with definite increases found
in some places and decreases seen in others. They were not plentiful.
California Quail and Hungarian Partridge.—There are so few birds of these types
found in this Division that they can hardly be considered. Only a few families are found
in widely scattered areas.
Pheasants.—The hunting pressure on pheasants grows each year, with an increasing,
number of hunters from the heavily populated Lower Mainland taking the field in search
 F 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
of these popular game birds. On the other hand, more and more land is being posted
against hunters. This is a problem which is difficult but not insoluble, and it would seem
that the best approach yet found is for organized sportsmen to make satisfactory hunting
arrangements with land-owners. To supply enough pheasants for the large numbers of
licence-holders is a formidable task.
The season was not a good one. It was demonstrated again that hunters with dogs
are far more successful than men afield without these helpful animals. J
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Canada Geese.—Conditions for waterfowl-hunting were good, with many
flooded fields allowing some field hunting. This compared with the previous year when
the country was dry. The duck population appeared to be high, but despite the large
numbers of ducks, for some reason the birds did not come in to feed until after dark along
the coast. Canada geese were not as much in evidence as usual, although they appeared
in more encouraging numbers after the season had closed.
Cackling geese and snow geese were taken in good numbers at Porpoise Bay.
Black Brant.—These birds were plentiful and showed a good increase over recent
years.   Boundary Bay saw good flocks during the season.
Snow Geese.—Like the brant, these birds appeared in large numbers, but they left
from most areas quite early in the season.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds were seen in large numbers, but left before the
season opened in most places. There seem to be goodly numbers of these birds, which
are not hunted extensively.
Wilson's Snipe.—These birds are plentiful in all districts, but they are not in great
demand.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
Cougar complaints were at a minimum during the year, with only the Alert Bay
district receiving any number of reports of troublesome animals.
Fox and racoon caused some concern on the Lower Mainland, with the latter
animals fast becoming a nuisance in some areas. Good success was obtained in controlling them where required.
Domestic dogs and cats have been responsible for damage to game animals and
birds and have been hunted extensively.
Crows and certain types of hawks have been destroyed where necessary, and elsewhere in this Report will be found a list of predators destroyed, together with a detailed
report on the over-all predator situation.
Game Protection
Attention is drawn to the statement of prosecutions which will be found in another
portion of this Report.
Game Propagation
Pheasants were released at various points in the Division during the year, and a list
showing the numbers and locations of these releases is printed elsewhere in this Report.
Game Reserves
Closed areas and game reserves were patrolled regularly by Game Gardens. Migratory and other types of birds find welcome sanctuary in these areas. |
''•' '*""    Fur Trade       '  W
During 1953, fur prices were so low that very little trapping was done. The value
of the fur trade in this Division was negligible.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 27
Registration of Trap-lines
The system of registered trap-lines put into force in this Province in 1926 has worked
amazingly well, and there is little doubt that it is the best system yet devised for the regulation of trappers and their trapping areas. It has continued to regulate trapping with no
complaints and has been responsible for a controlled and systematized fur harvest.
Registration of Guides
With the exception of the inlets found on the west coast of the Mainland, there are
few areas where guides are needed to locate the available game. A few trips after grizzlies
were made during the year by guides and their parties near Knight Inlet.
Special Patrols
|l A patrol was made by Game Warden B. E. Wilson, in charge of launch " P.G.D.
No. 1," to Long Beach, Texada Island, to investigate the fatal shooting of Wilfred Klein.
A further special patrol was made to Cortes Island on October 8th, 1953, to investigate
the shooting of a heifer owned by K. Hansen. A third patrol was made while assisting
Game Warden R. Hayes in an inspection of his northern trap-lines. Corporal L. R. Lane,
assisted by J. McLellan, both of Vancouver, patrolled to Rock Creek near Grand Forks,
to look into a complaint of illegal sale of deer. A prosecution was obtained in this case.
A special patrol by aeroplane which covered 440 miles was undertaken, commencing
October 4th, by Corporal W. J. Mason, Alert Bay, with the Qbject of finding a lost foss
barge.
Hunting Accidents
There were five hunting accidents in the Division during 1953, two of them fatal.
In addition, two hunters were accidentally drowned when their boat overturned. It might
be mentioned that in one of the non-fatal accidents, the late Commissioner J. G. Cunningham and Dr. Casimer Lindsey, a fisheries biologist with the Game Department, were
both slightly wounded in the course of their duty. Fuller details of the hunting accidents
mentioned above will be found in another section of this Report.
Game-fish Culture
The largest development that has affected game-fish culture this year is that of the
Cleveland Dam. This structure is on the Capilano River, and a full report on the effects
of this dam and the work the fisheries biologists of the Game Department have done there
is set out in another section of this Report.
Steelhead and trout fishing has been good, as has the angling for cut-throat, kokanee,
and eastern brook trout in some waters.
The Smiths Falls Hatchery at Cultus Lake is becoming of increasing importance in
game-fish culture work. A detailed report on this phase of work in set out elsewhere in
this Report.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION
By Dr. P. A. Larkin, Chief Fisheries Biologist
The year 1953 was a year of accomplishment in the Fisheries Management Division.
The reorganization of the Division into four subdivisions was completed, and the first full
year of operation under this new set-up was completed. A division between the four
branches of work—that is, Research, Protection, Hatcheries, and Management—has
proven to be a very satisfactory and workable one. There have been very few examples
in which the duties of any one division were in doubt, and the only discord in this respect
has arisen from the almost overwhelming responsibility of the management branch.
 F 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
However, this difficulty has been overcome by placing the Management Division more
closely under the direction of the Chief Fisheries Biologist and thereby consolidating
points of view and policies. ||
2 The Research Division has carried on the analyses of lake survey data collected from
1948 to 1952, and the summarization of this material in the form of publications on the
trout-fisheries in British Columbia and the regional limnology of British Columbia is well
on its way to completion. When this work is finished, it will mark the completion of the
objectives of the first five years of operation of the Fisheries Managament Division.
Already many of the conclusions of this summarization have been anticipated and have
been applied to existing problems. Major changes have been made in the Fishery Regulations in the past year, including the reorganization of all of the regulations into a simplified format, the deletion of several unnecessary regulations and the addition of such novel
features as a 6-inch size-limit, and extensive closures on Lower Mainland streams. All
of these changes were brought about from analyses of lake and stream survey data. The
lake survey has also been the starting-point for much of the work which was begun in
1953. The new research programme at Loon Lake, Clinton, was partly designed with
the lake survey findings in view. The extensive modifications in the hatchery organization,
involving the closing of some units and the improvement of others, were prompted by
appreciation of regional fisheries problems on the basis of lake survey data. The institution of resort operators' surveys was enhanced by the familiarity of the resort operators
with the work being done by the Department. Moreover, when complete, this information
on the catches of fish in lakes in the Province will combine with the lake survey data to
give an excellent picture of the economics of the resource and its future potential.
In short, the Fisheries Management Division has accomplished the objectives of its
first five-year programme of research survey and is beginning to apply the findings to the
perennial problem of management of the sport fishery. The following reports of the
various divisions testify to the activity of the staff and to the close need of co-ordination
between them.
This report is submitted with considerable optimism for the future management of
the sport fishery.
A certain number of research projects have been carried on during 1953 outside of
the activities of the Research Division under Dr. Lindsey. Most of these projects have
been under the direct supervision of the writer.
During 1953 the International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission decided to
launch a four-year programme of investigation into the factors determining the dominance
of certain year-classes of sockeye salmon, and the Shuswap area was chosen for study.
There are some theoretical reasons for supposing that predation by trout and perhaps
competition by trout may be related to the phenomenon of dominance in salmon
populations. The International Pacific Salmon Commission requested that the Game
Commission co-operate with respect to this aspect of the study and offered to finance an
investigation by our Department in this regard. The Salmon Commission is providing
moneys for the employment of D. P. Scott, who is conducting the investigation on trout
for the Game Commission. Mr. Scott has made extensive collections on Shuswap Lake,
and by the end of 1953 some interesting trends were suggested by his data.
The studies on Paul Lake, which have been carried on for the last six years, have
given most interesting results with respect to the effect of redside shiners (Richardsonius
balteatus) on the Kamloops-trout population of the lake. These findings were summarized
in a paper presented to the American Fisheries Society at its meetings in Milwaukee in
September, 1953. The paper was prepared by the writer and S. B. Smith, and was very
well received. These findings incidentally have prompted a number of experimental
liberations of Kamloops-trout fingerlings into Paul Lake in an attempt to rectify the major
deterioration of the sport fishery on the lake.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 29
D. P. Scott completed the field studies on Paul Lake by his investigation into
factors affecting the fecundity of Kamloops trout. The conclusions of this investigation
await confirmation from study of captive trout currently being held at the Smiths Falls
Hatchery, ft ,|
Also using Paul Lake data, S. B. Smith has prepared a study of factors involved in
scale growth of Kamloops trout, and this manuscript is in the process of being prepared
for publication in the journal of the Fisheries Research Board.
Studies of F. P. Maher on steelhead trout were finalized during 1953 and have
suggested some important points with regard to steelhead that will influence future policy
in the management of this valuable sport fish. There is no evidence to support the view
that the fishery for adult steelhead has any appreciable effect on the subsequent runs of
adult steelhead; it seems apparent that stream-flows during low-flow summer periods and
similar physical and chemical characteristics of the streams are the determining factors
in limiting the abundance of steelhead. These findings were implemented in the revision
of regulations pertaining to steelhead streams in the Lower Mainland. They also prompted
an intensification of the activity of the Protection Division in water-conservation measures
in highly populated areas. The time has come for many Lower Mainland streams when
critical water-levels could so seriously affect sport-fish populations as to render them
virtually non-existent. The outstanding work of the Protection Division in this regard
deserves merit.
The research activities both at headquarters and of the Research Division have been
co-ordinated during the past year by the newly formed Institute of Fisheries at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lindsey is giving lectures at the University in connection
with the Institute's activities, and plans are being made to splice the Research Division
more closely to the Institute in the future.
It is repeated that in all respects 1953 has been a very important year of activity in
the Fisheries Management Division, since the fruits of the early years of work are now
being harvested. It is a pleasure to summarize our activities for 1953 on such a cheerful
note of optimism for the future.
Research Division
Dr. C. C. Lindsey, Biologist in Charge
A detailed study of spawning migrations, food, growth, and survival of Kamloops
trout was commenced at Loon Lake in the Southern Cariboo region in March, 1953.
Seven traps were installed on streams in the area, and numbered metal tags were placed
on over 7,000 adult trout taken in these. A further 14,000 young trout were marked by
fin-clipping. Scale and stomach samples were collected from anglers' catches; weather
and water temperatures were recorded in conjunction with studies on movement of young
fish in the streams. Field experiments were also conducted to determine the part played
by light and temperature in guiding young trout toward the lake from either inlet or outlet
streams. Information is emerging which may be useful in successful planting of eggs or
fry in streams entering or leaving other lakes. Over fifty returns of tagged fish have
already been obtained through co-operation of anglers and resort-owners; these and
intensive trapping next year will indicate whether or not there may be two "races" of
inlet-spawning and outlet-spawning trout within one lake.
In order to evaluate the success of plantings of hatchery-reared trout, it is necessary
to distinguish in the angler's catch between wild fish and hatchery fish. Investigation was
continued as to the possibility of | marking " hatchery trout by the addition of a small
amount of strontium to their food. Chemical analysis of scales of fish fed this special diet
revealed that traces of strontium were retained at least six weeks after reversion to normal
diet. With this encouragement, a longer-term experiment will be started in the hope that
detectable amounts of strontium will be retained throughout life.
 F 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Analysis of surveys made on British Columbia lakes in the past five years was
brought nearer completion during the winter months. Complete sounding maps were
finished for 80 lakes, and outline maps were drawn from aerial photographs of 31 others.
Chemical analyses have been completed on water samples from 131 lakes; plankton
samples have been analysed qualitatively for 60 lakes and quantitatively for 160 others.
Samples of bottom organisms have been examined from 125 lakes. Stomach contents
from trout netted in 187 different lakes have been examined; ages of fish have been read
from scales of fish from 80 lakes. M   ■$
Specimens of fresh-water fishes coming to the fisheries group of the Game Department are now being identified, catalogued, and preserved in co-operation with the Institute of Fisheries at the University of British Columbia. Most fresh-water species are
represented in the collection; these are available for teaching purposes and research at
the University. From January to March, 1953, Dr. Lindsey was on loan to an expedition
which brought back fish specimens for research purposes from the Galapagos Islands.
During 1953 three papers were submitted for publication in scientific journals—one
by T. G. Northcote on sculpins in the Arrow Lakes, and two by C. C. Lindsey on variation
in the number of fin rays and vertebrae in fresh-water fish.
l| Protection Division
R. G. McMynn, Biologist in Charge
Ji In May the staff of the Protection Division was augmented by the hiring of N. G.
Perret, formerly of the Department of Fisheries, as an assistant fisheries biologist. His
services replaced those of E. H. Vernon, who, as of May, devoted most of his time to
research on the Capilano River fish-protection facilities. Mr. Vernon's report on that
project is appended.
Water Licences
The investigation of many water licences was carried out by Game Wardens and by
biologists of the Protection Division. In this respect the excellent services of the Department's first regional fishery biologist were most useful. The new system of handling water
licences, which was instigated at the beginning of the year, has resulted in greater efficiency
and dispatch.  The following table indicates the number of applications investigated in
each Of the game divisions:  Original Renewals or
Applications Extensions
If:            Division "A"  158 |            101 §
j§             Division "B"  185                155
Division "C"  241                204
||             Division "D"  30                    9
H      Division "E"  115                  49
Totals  729 518
Grand total, 1,247. M
H The total of 1,247 licences which were investigated during the year 1953 compares
to 906 during the preceding year.
if One of the most formidable problems presented by the above work is that of having
to investigate and submit recommendations within the thirty-day period allowed by the
Water Rights Branch. In many cases this is impossible because applicants supply
insufficient or incorrect information or the water in question may be located in an outlying, inaccessible area. It is suggested that the period allowed for registering official
objection to a water licence should be increased to at least sixty days in order that all
applications may be adequately investigated and reported upon. If    ||
During the year 1953 the following water licences were either officially objected to
or certain recommendations made: City of Alberni, Dog and Summit Lakes; The Corpo-
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 31
ration of Village of Comox, Anderton Spring; L. York, Oyster River; A. Young, French
Creek; J. Mcintosh, Toby Creek; P. Webber, Jolly Creek; J. N. Newberry & Sons, East
Barriere River; and R. Connet, Serpentine River. f|   # ft    llil
As a result of investigations carried out on the Salmon River and Tsolum River, it
was found that only in a few cases are irrigation and domestic water uses sufficient to
reduce stream-flow to such a point as to be harmful to sport-fish interests. However, the
Game Commission will apply for a minimum flow of water, for fish-cultural purposes, on
important streams where the water problem as far as fish are concerned is acute. p
Pollutions
The general subject of pollution, and more particularly how it affects sport-fish
interests, received a great deal of attention through 1953. The chief problem was
systematically put forward to a large group of technical personnel at the Sixth Annual
Resources Conference held in Victoria, B.C. The subject will be extended and concluded in this year's Conference, at which time a number of suggestions made by the
Pollution Panel will be recorded for possible legislative investigation.
The following pollutions were investigated in 1953, the results of which are briefly
summarized:—
Mineral King Mill.—Operators advised of their responsibility in preventing silting
of Toby Creek.   Operation pending.
New Arlington Mine.—Operators advised to build an impoundment area to prevent
silting of South Fork of Salmon River.
Marysville Fertilizer Plant.—Gypsum-retaining pond installed and now operating
satisfactorily.
Canadian Exploration Company.—Polluting Salmon River at the present time, but
is negotiating for land purchase for impoundment facilities.
Big Bend Lumber Company.—Sawdust pollution of Arrow Lakes, successfully
abated by repair of retaining-wall.   Burner to be installed in the near future.
Carnegie Mine.—Impoundment area constructed for mill tailings.    Mine now
inoperative.
|§     Cawston Slough.—Construction of additional settling-pond completed.    Pollution
of Cawston Slough this year greatly reduced.
Swan Lake.—Fish killed as a result of water stagnation, resulting in oxygen depletion; that is, summer kill.   No practical solution. p
Vernon Creek.—Mud-slide cleared from creek.
Sil Van Consolidated Mine.—Mill wastes from the mine formerly escaped into
Aldridge Lake near Smithers.   Impoundment area now operating, apparently successfully.
Boden and Easter Creeks.—Natural obstructions investigated in order to determine
advisability of building fish 1 stops " on the two creeks in order to prevent coarse fish
from Ootsa Lake entering Boden and Eastern Lakes chains.    "Stops" found to be
unnecessary.
Chicken Creek.—Recommendations to Department of Health that the Village of
Smithers not be allowed to dump domestic sewage into the creek.
Deer Lake.—Suspected sewage pollution found to be non-existent. Recommendation for possible stocking. # % 1 p
Lane Creek.—Large numbers of fish killed. Investigation indicated weed-killer was
the toxicant.   Company concerned advised and cautioned re spraying. i
Schlage Lock Company.—Construction of a gravel-pit and settling-pond to prevent
chemical pollution of McKay Creek. if
For the past three years we have been unsuccessfully attempting to reduce pollution
in Atchelitz and Luckakuck Creeks on the Lower Mainland. Unfortunately, there are
many factors which make enforcement of the Fisheries Act difficult or impractical.
Among these factors the following might be cited:— f"    |;
 F 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
|§r (1) Both creeks are small and considered by themselves relatively unim
portant.
(2) On both the above creeks a long-established industry contributes all or
the majority of the pollutants. The cost of proper pollution-abatement
facilities is not great if included in the original plans and capital outlay,
but these same facilities can be very expensive to install once a plant
operation is established without them.
(3) The seriousness of these pollutions has only recently been brought forcibly
to the plant operator's attention, and it is perhaps placing an undue
hardship on these firms to force them to install expensive treatment
facilities now.
During the past year it has become increasingly apparent to this Division that we are
lacking a great deal of background information on the whole problem of water pollution,
especially with respect to standards. Therefore, standard procedures for determining
water quality were set up, and a portable water-analysis kit was designed for carrying out
the various tests. In addition to this, water-pollution forms were made up so that an
accumulative file could be kept for all pollution studies. Water from a number of streams,
both polluted and unpolluted, will be analysed to provide us with much of the background
material we need to evaluate accurately each new stream pollution.
Our pollution reference library has been expanded during the past year by the
acquisition of text-books and publications dealing with all phases of water pollution.
Many United States organizations are now sending us their regular publications.   J|
Obstructions
A number of fish obstructions were investigated during 1953. The following list
briefly summarizes the more important of these:—
Fourth Nanaimo Lake.—Reservoir cleared and preliminary engineering survey made
assessing the necessity of constructing a fish-ladder on Sadie Creek to by-pass a 9-foot
natural falls.
Capilano River.—Trapping facilities, tank-truck, and road almost completed and
ready to operate; problem of down-stream migrants under study; co-operative project
with Federal Fisheries Department.
Seton Lake Power Development.—Fish facilities primarily designed for salmon
protection being constructed into dam by the British Columbia Electric Company—
watching brief by Game Commission. §
Puntledge River Power Development.—Under investigation.
Buttle Lake.—Pending; information as to construction schedule not yet available.
Whatshan Lake.—Clearing schedules and plans arranged with British Columbia
Power Commission.
Okanagan Flood-control Prefect.—Final decisions made with respect to protection
of game fish in area to be affected by the project. Fishway plans approved for Okanagan
and Skaha control-dams.
One Mile Creek.—Installation of fish-ladder and subsequent modification to vertical-
slot type for adjustment of baffles.
Lardeau River.—Placer operation pending results of preliminary mineral surveys.
Recommendations of Game Commission agreed to by operators in order to safeguard
sport-fish interests.
Mission Creek.—Preliminary engineering survey undertaken in order to estimate
the type and cost of building a fish-ladder over an irrigation-dam and of installing
a self-cleaning screen in the diversion-ditch.
Beaver Lake, Kelowna.—Permanent metal screen to be installed at outlet of Beaver
Lake this spring.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 33
Vedder Canal—Proposed dredging of lower' reaches for British Empire Games
rowing events.   Recommendations regarding fish protection submitted.
As the scope of our activities increases each year, so does the need for the services
of a Departmental engineer. It is hoped that the acquisition of one will soon become
a reality, as money spent on consulting fees has become large. We have been fortunate
in obtaining the services, to date, of trained fisheries civil engineers who have, on their
own time, done a certain amount of consulting and engineering service for us. At the
present time we could well use a full-time engineer.
Papers
In addition to numerous interim reports, the Protection Division was responsible
for the following publications during 1953:—
(1) | Toxicity of Heavy Metals to Fish, with Special Reference to Lead, Zinc
and Copper," by E. H. Vernon (in Press No. 15, Canadian Fish Culturist).
(2) "The Effects of Fisheries of Present and Future Water Utilization in the
jff         Campbell River Drainage Area," by R. G. McMynn and P. A. Larkin
(Management publications of the British Columbia Game Commission).
(3) "Effects of Salinity on the Development of Pacific Herring," by R. G.
McMynn (Canadian Journal of Zoology).
Protection of Sport Fish in Capilano River
By E. H. Vernon
Construction of a dam and creation of a large water reservoir on Capilano River has
presented a serious threat to important commercial and sport fisheries. Located 3Vi
miles from the sea, Cleveland Dam is over 300 feet high and will form a complete
obstruction to cohoe salmon and to steelhead migrating up-stream to their spawning-
grounds in the upper reaches of the river. Since 1950, when plans of the structure were
made available by the Greater Vancouver Water District, technical staffs of the Federal
Fisheries Department and the Game Department have been co-operating in an attempt
to protect the salmon and steelhead.
Construction of a fishway to pass fish over the obstruction is impractical because of
the great height of the dam. Instead, all up-stream migrants will be trapped below the
dam and transported by tank-truck to a point above the reservoir. Fish-protection
facilities, consisting of a fence, traps, ladder, hoist, tank-truck, and road, are almost ready
to operate. On the recommendation of the Federal Fisheries Department and the Game
Department, this equipment was installed by the Greater Vancouver Water District.
The water district will also operate the equipment on completion of the project.
||||l The survival of cohoe and steelhead on their seaward migration is also of considerable concern, and it is possible that many will perish in passing over the spillway of the
dam. Every dam poses special problems, and it is impossible to draw on experience
elsewhere to predict accurately the magnitude of mortalities to be expected here. To
assess the effects of Cleveland Dam on down-stream migrants, the Federal Fisheries
Department and the Game Department have embarked on a long-term co-operative investigation. To obtain comparative data on conditions before the obstruction becomes
effective, the programme was started in March, 1952. By trapping, marking, and recapturing down-stream migrants, considerable information was gained on:—
(1) The number of cohoe and steelhead involved in the down-stream migration.
(2) The time at which the migrations occur and their relation to stream-
discharge.
(3) The time necessary for migrants to descend through that section of the
stream which will be inundated by the reservoir above Cleveland Dam.
 F 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
This phase of the programme will be continued and concluded in 1954.
The second phase of the programme will begin in 1955, when the dam
becomes operational, and a direct study of mortalities at the spillway will
be initiated.
In addition to planning for the main protective facilities, constant and close inspection of the project has been maintained since construction of the dam started in 1951.
Temporary conditions detrimental to fish have occurred during the construction period,
and temporary protective devices have been recommended and instituted from time to
time.
Hatchery Division
I. Barrett, Biologist in Charge
The past year, 1953-54, has seen the initiation of many new projects and policies
in the trout-hatchery programme of the British Columbia Game Department. Many of
these changes are still in progress and are still being evaluated. Some alterations and
directions in policy are being programmed for the coming years. The following report
is an account of many of the specific activities of the Hatchery Division during the past
year and a general outline of the hatchery development programme.
All of the permanent and seasonal hatcheries have undergone some new construction, improvements, and the addition of new equipment. Among the major expenditures
was the construction of a specially designed trout-liberating tank to be operated from the
Nelson Trout Hatchery for liberations in the Kootenay District. The Smiths Falls Trout
Hatchery was completely repainted during the past year, and improvements were made
to the rearing-ponds and grounds. Certain changes in the electrical system were necessitated by the arrival of a British Columbia Electric Company power-line, which replaced
the electricity generated locally by a Pelton wheel. Improvements at the Summerland
Trout Hatchery included the painting of the hatchery interior and exterior, the construction of a sea-wall and other grounds improvements, the enlargement of the laboratory
facilities, certain structural alterations within the hatchery, and the redecoration of the
living-quarters. The exterior of the Puntledge Park Trout Hatchery was repainted, and
improvements were made to the grounds. An auxiliary pumping system was also set up
at the Puntledge Park Hatchery.
Of the seasonal hatcheries, perhaps the greatest changes were made at the Loon
Creek Trout Hatchery. Here, a self-contained feeding-room was constructed, into which
was fitted a gasoline-driven 35-cubic-foot freezing unit and a gasoline-driven food-
grinder. In addition, three plywood rearing-ponds were constructed at the hatchery,
trout-traps were built and relocated in Loon Creek, and the living-quarters were improved.
At the Cranbrook Trout Hatchery, two plywood rearing-ponds were built, the hatchery
exterior was repainted, and a new retaining-wall was built. At the Penask Trout Hatchery, the once-open hatchery building was completely screened and improvements were
made to the water-supply system. The kitchen at the Lloyd's Creek Trout Hatchery
was remodelled, a fence was built around the hatchery, the construction of a telephone
connection to the Kamloops line was continued, and the Paul Creek spawning-trap was
partially rebuilt. Routine maintenance and improvements were executed at the Beaver
Lake Trout Hatchery-
Personnel and personnel shifts, due to the increased demand for men during the
heavy summer season, continued to be a major problem. There are presently twelve
permanent fisheries men on staff, including two men who alternate as Game Wardens
during the winter season. The additional summer staff consisted of eleven men and two
cooks. There was a considerable relocation of men during the summer in order to
handle the continually changing requirements of the various hatcheries during the summer
season. Changes in personnel included two new appointments—one superannuation and
one resignation.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 35
Changes in methods, foods and feeding, techniques, and reports were initiated during
the past year. A Manual of Hatchery Practice, outlining many proposed refinements,
was prepared and distributed to the hatchery staff. A start was made on the standardization of egg- and fish-enumeration methods at all of the hatcheries. To this end, new
scales were purchased and distributed to the nine hatcheries. New weekly and bi-monthly
report forms were developed, which require the listing of information which will enable
the cost per pound of trout and the pounds of fish raised, among other things, to be
calculated. Both the diets and the feeding methods have been standardized for all
hatcheries where trout are fed, in order that comparisons may be made between the
various hatcheries. The use of malachite green for the prevention of the development
of fungus on incubating trout-eggs has been initiated with success. A stock of prophylactic and remedial drugs for a wide variety of trout diseases has been established at the
Vancouver headquarters.
Another new departure during the past year was the designation of the Summerland
Trout Hatchery as a training institution for new personnel, in addition to its present
function as a major hatchery. This establishment is being set up as a model hatchery
where new methods and techniques may be developed and evaluated, where certain types
of equipment may be tested, and where at least one man a year will receive a year's
training in as many branches of hatchery practice as possible based on the Manual.
Certain major changes in policy became evident during the past year. Kamloops-
trout liberations in the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island districts are being replaced
by steelhead and cut-throat liberations. This involved the discontinuance of the Kamloops-trout brood stock at the Smiths Falls Trout Hatchery and the enlargement of the
cut-throat brood stock. The Loon Creek Trout Hatchery has been expanded into
a feeding and rearing station from its former status as a hatching-station in order to
provide advanced fry for liberation into the waters of the Cariboo region. Similarly,
more trout are being fed for a longer period prior to liberation at the Cranbrook Trout
Hatchery. The trend of eliminating marginal operations and collections has been continued, with the non-operation this year of the Peterhope egg-taking station and the
Revelstoke Hatchery. The policy of supplying food for trout being raised in local Game
Association rearing-ponds has been discontinued, and the operating of these ponds is
being discouraged as an inefficient and expensive procedure. The concentration of
hatchery activities into major distribution centres was emphasized by the use of the
trout-liberating tanks to make liberations from the Smiths Falls Trout Hatchery into
waters of the Bridge Lake area. Year-round supplies of food have been practically
assured by the practice of ordering all of the estimated yearly food requirements at one
time, thus allowing the suppliers to gauge production requirements.
The above has necessarily been a brief list of the projects and policies initiated, in
progress, or completed during the past year. What follows are some features and the
contemplated direction of the hatchery-development programme during the coming year
or years.
Primarily, there will be an increasing trend toward the consolidation of hatchery
operations into fewer, larger, more efficient units. This trend will be enhanced by the
modernization of equipment, the improvement and expansion of present facilities, and
the use of such improved methods of distribution as trout-liberating tanks. Hatchery
operations being conducted at. the present time will be evaluated to determine the extent
to which they are serving a needful purpose. The extension of present facilities by the
construction of new hatcheries will only be undertaken when it can be shown that new
requirements cannot be handled by existing hatcheries and personnel. ||
A critical study will be made during the coming year into the results of hatchery
plantings in many lakes. Survival and growth-rate analyses will be made for the various
waters stocked, and, on the basis of these, stocking-lists will be revised.   Studies will be
 F 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
initiated to determine at what age and at what season of the year trout may best be
liberated into certain waters for maximum survival. A study of the physiology of the
trout species presently handled by the hatcheries will be continued and expanded in
conjunction with the survival studies. To this end, a laboratory will be equipped at
the University of British Columbia.
Hatchery operations per se will continue to come under critical surveillance. A sharp
account of costs, foods, feeding methods, use of equipment, and the development of new
techniques will be maintained. The training of personnel at the Summerland Trout
Hatchery will be continued. Revisions of the Manual of Hatchery Practice will be made
as required.
As to personnel, several innovations are contemplated. The first will be the employment of a greater number of permanent personnel, so that qualified men may be available
to manage the seasonal hatcheries during the summer, and so that there may be a backlog
of trained men to step into the shoes of the retiring officers. Secondly, attempts will be
made to give new appointees as wide a range of experience as possible by (a) moving
them from hatchery to hatchery during the first years of their employment, and (b) giving
them one year's training at the Summerland Trout Hatchery.
A statistical summarization of liberations made during 1953 is appended to this
Report.
Management Division
S. B. Smith, Biologist in Charge
Statistical Records and Field Investigations
During 1953, record-books were supplied to about 230 fishing-camp operators in
many sections of the Province. Catch data were recorded and books were returned to
the Game Department in the autumn. Although analyses are not yet complete, it is
indicated that about 25,000 anglers' catches will have been recorded when the project
has been brought to its conclusion. It is evident that contact by circular letter will not
suffice to ensure continued response to the degree which is necessary. During the 1954
fishing season, all operators who kept records in 1953 will be contacted by the Game
Department personnel in an effort to secure continued maximum response and to increase
accuracy of records.
Concurrent with the recording of fishing success at resorts, record-books were also
supplied to the Game Wardens. Although of a similar nature to resort operators' record-
books, Game Wardens' books were provided with additional space in which was listed
the town or city wherein the angler resided. Data were obtained from these records of
the distribution of anglers in addition to catch-success information. Approximately
7,500 anglers' catches were recorded.
A questionnaire was prepared for circulation to 6,000 anglers (both resident and
non-resident) requesting information on the amount of money spent in 1953 while
angling. The questionnaire will be sent out before February 15th, 1954, and when the
returns are analysed, they will be combined with resort operators' and Game Wardens'
record-books in a report outlining the economics and distribution of the British Columbia
sport fishery.
Investigation of the winter steelhead fishery of the Thompson River was begun in
October, 1953. Fishery Officer F. H. Martin has carried out the field investigations to
date. Field records of catch success and distribution of anglers, as well as approximately
300 steelhead-scale samples, have been accumulated. These data will enable close
watch to be kept on the extensive, important, and rapidly expanding winter sport fishery
of the Thompson River.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 37
Lake Survey, Lake and Stream Improvement
Over thirty lakes were surveyed during 1953. Most of these were in response to
applications for stocking with trout. Several streams were poisoned where spawning
runs of coarse fish (suckers, squawfish, chub) had been observed. Large kills of several
species of coarse fish resulted from these operations. In addition to stream-poisoning
in several localities, a preliminary reconnaissance was carried out at Bridge Lake, where
poisoning will be confined to the streams entering Bridge Lake, or possibly some of the
shallow bays. Briefly, the programme of coarse-fish removal at Bridge Lake is designed
as an attempt to improve sport-fishing by eradication of undesirable species. The
programme will continue for several years.
One lake-poisoning was carried out in 1953. Mill Lake, a 42-acre body of water
near Abbotsford, was treated with " fish-tox," a rotenone-base toxicant, in order to
eradicate a population of catfish. A complete kill of all fish resulted, and tests indicated
a high degree of toxicity still persisted one month after the poison was applied. Mill
Lake will be restocked with cut-throat trout in April, 1954, and fishing will be allowed
immediately after stocking has been completed.
Research and Experimental Programmes
Research by G. E. Stringer on the behaviour of trout is continuing at the University
of British Columbia. This work may be of great importance in determining the role of
territory defence and general behaviour patterns in production of salmonoid fishes in
streams.
Experimental plantings of equal numbers of hatchery- and pond-reared trout in
Corbett Lake, near Merritt, have been encouraging enough to warrant duplication of the
plantings in 1954. Results of comparative survival and growth to date indicate that, by
methods presently employed, fish reared at Summerland Hatchery exhibit growth and
survival rates equal to or better than fish reared naturally at British Columbia Game
Department outdoor 1 natural" ponds at Kelowna.
A paper has been prepared dealing with relative growth of scales of trout, together
with a new method of calculating size of fish from scales at periods previous to time of
capture. The paper is in final stage of preparation, and will be submitted for publication
in the journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada.
Experimental introduction of large-mouthed black bass was made into Smelter Lake,
near Princeton, in July, 1953. Bass were obtained by angling at Shannon Lake, near
Westbank, and were transported to Smelter Lake by tank-truck. Fishing will be allowed
in 1954, and if bass have been established successfully, further introductions will be made
to other waters.
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES OF THE GAME MANAGEMENT DIVISION
By Dr. J. Hatter, Chief Game Biologist
Introduction
Numerically, the Game Management Division is the smallest in the Game Branch,
and will probably continue as such due to the evolution that has led to the present organization of the Game Branch. Initially, the warden staff composed the only field organization which not only enforced the " Game Act," but also made recommendations for
management of the varied game resources. This dual responsibility of the enforcement
division has, for the present at least, made it impractical or undesirable to have in addition a large technical game staff engaged in management and research.
« What the future holds is difficult to predict, but it appears likely that there will
continue to be a shift of responsibility for management policy from the warden staff to
 F 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the Management Division. At present the technical staff is not large enough to shoulder
the full responsibility of management, and if it were, it is questionable if a sharp division
of effort should be made between the warden personnel and the biologists in matters
pertaining to game seasons and other problems of a management nature. If significant
progress is to be made in the future, however, it seems evident that the Management
Division should at least assume added responsibility in setting the policy for game seasons.
The true measure of success in such matters will, however, rest largely with the willing
co-operation of all field personnel. Through mutual understanding of our problems it
is hoped that all personnel will work as a team, not for the benefit of any one division,
but for the name of the Game Branch as a whole.
The technical staff of the Game Management Division at present consists of one
Chief Game Biologist, three game-management biologists, and one range specialist whose
activities emphasize habitat and game range conditions. L. G. Sugden holds the last
position, being appointed to the permanent staff in 1953 after taking postgraduate training
in wildlife and range management at Utah State College- Up until his permanent appointment, he was employed in various temporary positions with the Management Division.
The technical staff is summarized as follows:—
J. Hatter, Chief Game Biologist, Vancouver; appointed, 1948.
E. W. Taylor, game-management biologist, Vancouver; appointed, 1949.
P. W. Martin, game-management biologist, Kamloops; appointed, 1951.
D. J. Robinson, game-management biologist, Nanaimo; appointed, 1951.
L. G. Sugden, range-management biologist, Williams Lake; appointed, 1953.
It is hoped that in 1954 the position of game-management biologist for the Koote-
nays will be filled. This important game area has, of necessity, received little or no
attention by the Management Division-
Under the limited space available it is difficult to present a comprehensive summary
of the year's activity of the Game Management Division. An attempt has been made
therefore only to mention the highlights of our work, illustrating these with a few tables
and a minimum amount of comment. It should thus be understood that the text and
numerical data presented are by no means a full summarization of the work of the
Division, but rather illustrative of some of its major activities.
Big Game
Moose.—A large portion of the work of the two Interior biologists has been devoted
to the moose problem, as this is considered first in importance in the Central Interior.
Range survey, aerial census, and public relations have formed the major lines of effort
in an attempt to place our moose management on a more factual basis. So far we have
largely failed to harvest an adequate either-sex crop of moose and thereby ameliorate
periodic die-offs and decimation of winter range, which are slowly reducing the moose
populations.
Spring assessments of winter range in the Cariboo were made prior to June 1st in
the following districts: Deadmans Creek, Little Fort, Lac des Roches, Green Lake, Roe
Lake, Big Creek, Big Bar Lake, Timothy Lake, Chilco Ranch, Bidwell Lake, Taylor
Lake, Alexis Creek, Loon Lake, Lone Butte, Sheridan Lake, Horse Lake, and 105 Mile.
In the above areas browsing was categorized as " excessive," " heavy," 1 moderate,"
" light," and " trace." The trend in the amount of usable feed for each palatable species
was estimated under the general heading of " increase," I static," and " decrease."
Utilization and trend ratings were obtained for all species of browse utilized, but for the
purpose of this summary upland willow, red osier, dogwood, and paper birch are considered key indicator species. Sixty per cent of the observations on these species revealed
excessive utilization—11 per cent heavy and 30 per cent moderate usage during the
winter of 1952-53.   Trend estimates showed a 70-per-cent decline in production.   In
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 39t
25 per cent of the observations on the above three species, production was rated static,
and in only 5 per cent was an increase recorded.
Summary of Range Conditions Affecting Moose on the Bonaparte Plateau
and Surrounding Areas, April, 1953
Number of
Sample Areas
by Browse
Species
Species of Browse
Degree of Use
E.
H.
M.
14
4
4
6
3
1
1
1
2
Production Trend
D.
Upland willow	
Red osier dogwood.
Swamp wiUow	
Aspen	
Bog birch	
Paper birch	
Twin berry	
False box	
Lodgepole pine	
7
4
1
1
2
2
2
1
4
12
4
1
,:tl
3
1
3
3
2
2
E.=Excessive use.
H.-=Heavy use.
M.=Moderate use.
L. flight use.
T.z=Trace.
D.rzDecreased production.
I.=Increased production.
S.=Stationary or static.
The annual census of moose for trend purposes was carried out in the Bridge Lake
and Horsefly districts on January 26th and 29th and on March 9th and 10th. These
flights revealed a moose density of at least 2.5 and possibly as many as 5.6 per square
mile in the area bounded by the main Cariboo Highway on the west, the foothills of the
mountains on the east, and the latitude of Loon Lake on the south. This region has an
area of approximately 2,000 square miles, and thus, according to the above figures,
contains at least 5,000 moose and a possible population of 11,200.
Aerial Counts of Moose on January 26th and 29th, 1953,
in Bridge Lake-Green Lake Area
Flight 2a
Flight 2b
Flight 6
Totals
 No.
 miles
 sq. miles
 No.
42
63
5.9
7.1
57
102
9.6
5.9
29
82
7.9
3.7
128
247
23.4
5.6
In July, P- W. Martin and L. G. Sugden undertook an extensive survey of moose
ranges in the Big Creek region. Their observations reveal that the ranges of the middle
and lower levels are chronically overbrowsed. The present population of moose is in
excess of the desirable number if rehabilitation of the ranges is to be realized. A total
of 211 moose were observed and classified as 136 bulls, 41 cows, 28 unsexed adults, and
6 calves. Seventeen carcasses were found, nine of which were from the previous winter
(1952-53) and eight previously. Of the nine winter kills of recent origin, one was
a senile cow, five were adult cows, and three were calves. The carcasses were located
in the meadow lands of the lodgepole-pine area about Groundhog and Porcupine Creeks.
The losses were attributed largely to the poor range conditions. i
In August, P. W. Martin was engaged in a moose survey south of the Thompson
River. His observations led to the conclusion that a flourishing moose population has
become established on the Ashcroft-Nicola plateau area. Moreover, it is evident that the
moose of this area have reached a density desirable and consistent with food-supplies and
 F 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
that an open season is justified. In the area east of the Kamloops-Merritt Road the
moose have failed to develop a large population. This is most likely due to the discontinuity of suitable habitat. Nevertheless, a short open season was recommended, and
although the whole proposal to open moose south of the Thompson River met with some
criticism, a one-month season in the Nicola area and a two-week season east of the
Kamloops-Merritt Road was finally agreed upon. Thus the survey and recommendations
were of value and the open season allowed some recreation and a small harvest of moose,
probably not more than 20 head. ||
II A brief reconnaissance of an area near Dawson Creek was undertaken in June. It
was proposed by the Dawson Creek Rod and Gun Club to have the area set up as a moose
sanctuary. Study showed, however, that a moose sanctuary would be of questionable
need in this vast region. Moreover, the nature of the district suggests that factors other
than hunting pressure are limiting the density of moose.
In July a two-week reconnaissance of alpine and lowland moose ranges in the
western portion of the Province was undertaken. Portions of the Rainbow, Ilgachuz,
and Itcha Mountains north of Anchim Lake were covered. The area was found to be
low in carrying capacity for moose, as compared to areas closer to the Fraser River.
Winter forage consists primarily of the less palatable lowland willow and arctic birch.
Upland willow is extremely low in abundance and has been critically overbrowsed.
Moreover, spring, summer, and early-winter ranges in the mountains have been severely
overbrowsed and recovery is slow. Moose have declined in the Anahim area probably
since 1935, but in recent years little or no change is reported. Overpopulation and
depletion of the choice ranges and forage are believed primarily responsible for the
initial decline. Currently, hunting pressure and illegal kill may have assumed importance
as limiting factors, and in view of the high illegal kill of cow moose reported, although
not verified, no cow season was recommended.
Bighorn Sheep.—Counts of California bighorn north of the Chilcotin River and west
of the Fraser River were made on October 20th and 21st. The results are presented in
the following table.   Chances of duplicate counts were virtually non-existent.
Moon Ranches
Gang Ranch
Totals
Rams    	
17
24
7
38
52
27
55
Ewes  	
76
Lambs -__^
34
Totals   	
48
117
165
An estimated 200 sheep are believed present in the above area. The lamb-crop at
the time of the count appeared good and may probably be attributed to a favourable
winter and more intensive coyote-control.
Elk.—Observations and study of elk have, of necessity, been limited to the Princeton
herd. In the East Kootenay, where the majority of our elk occur, the services of a game
biologist are lacking.
An aerial survey of the Princeton area was carried out on February 10th, at which
time sixty-seven elk were counted. Great difficulty was experienced in ageing and sexing
the animals, as most were scattered throughout the bushy wooded slopes and draws and
were difficult to discern.   At least six bulls were observed.
Snow conditions were not suitable for taking a census of the elk at the time, and the
numbers observed were not believed to represent the total herd.
Mule Deer.—Princeton herd. Generally speaking, the winter of 1952-53 was
extremely favourable, and the expansion of carrying capacity undoubtedly allowed for
above-average survival of fawns.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 41
Fawn-Adult Ratio, Princeton Herd
Date
Adult
Young
Young
Percentage
March, 1953.
May, 1953—
57
51
43
41
43
44
Thirty %0o-acre forage plots established in the Princeton area in 1952 revealed the
following with respect to winter use of key species of browse (1952-53):—
Ceanothus sp.: Heavy use. Sixty-six per cent of twigs browsed to the extent
of 32 per cent of the pre-winter growth.
Service-berry (Amelanchier sp.): Forty-two per cent of the shrubs were in
poor condition in the fall of 1952. After the winter 48 per cent of the
twigs produced in 1952 had been cropped 35 per cent of their average
length.   Thirty-seven per cent of the shrubs had sustained heavy browsing.
Upland Willow (Salix sp.):JfFifty per cent of twigs on sample plots were
browsed during the winter but only to the extent of 7.2 per cent of their
length.   This species is apparently less palatable.
On Gambier Island a cursory survey of deer range was undertaken on April 27th
and 28th. It is becoming apparent that the harvesting of doe deer on the coastal islands
would be beneficial both to the deer and as a source of additional recreational opportunities
to sportsmen.
Sayward Forest, Vancouver Island, a key management area for black-tailed deer,
received intensive study by the regional game-management biologist. Studies have centred
about population composition, survival rates, and range conditions. Details of the year's
work are contained in D. J. Robinson's "Interim Report re Status of Sayward Forest
Deer Herds." Copies of this report were prepared and distributed on Vancouver Island
in July, 1953. Following recommendations from the Management Division, a three-day
season on doe deer over 1 year of age was declared from November 28th to 30th. An
intensive road check was maintained during this period, and much useful management
data were accumulated.
Results of the Three-day Doe Season in Sayward Forest
Total number of hunters   1,442
Deer checked—
Male  131
Female  273
Successful hunters (per cent)  28.0
Age-class Distribution of the Deer Checked at Campbell River, November 28th to 30th
Age
Males
Females
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Wi years	
50
22
21
9
12
43.2
19.3
18.4
7.9
11.2
33
37
34
19
73
16.8
Vh    ..                       -
19.4
m   ..
17.3
4Vi    ..
9.6
5VS-J- years	
36.9
 F 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Weights of Deer Checked at Campbell River, November 28th to 30th
Age-class (Years)
-
Wi
21/2
||
4i/2
5V2+
Male—
 lb.
62.6
54-80
60.9
46-72
75.5
59-91
67.2
48-79
89.0
73-114
69.4
52-83
107.9
84-135
73.5
58-81
128.6
  lb.
119-151
Female—
    1 .lb.
79.0
  ..lb.
66-96
Close co-operation between our biologist on Vancouver Island and C. E. Estlin,
Game Warden, Courtenay district, has led to considerable information on the deer
populations in this area. A report by the above individuals was prepared and distributed
on Vancouver Island. Findings indicate that a hunter's choice season is required in the
Courtenay region as the range is stocked to capacity and the annual mortality is therefore
high* 1       ll-'
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—Pheasant releases were largely confined to adult hens in March and
cock birds in September. A small number of post-breeding adults were liberated, but
these did not figure largely in the totals. The regional distribution of pheasants is listed
elsewhere in the present Annual Report.
At present it is not possible to determine whether or not the modified release system
described above has resulted in measurable gains to the pheasant-hunter.|| Efforts will be
made to determine the success of the spring release of hens, a problem that is most difficult
as the birds have their freedom and are difficult to trace during the subsequent breeding
and nesting season.
Chukar Partridges.—The year 1953 was the fourth in the five-year period of releases
planned for the establishment of chukar partridges in British Columbia. The release
schedule is fisted elsewhere in the present Report.
Waterfowl ' : ft
Little or no comprehensive study of waterfowl was undertaken. The quarterly
presentation of the Pacific Flyway Report was continued as previously. It is to be
regretted that a greater contribution cannot be made by the Game Management Division
to the important task of waterfowl management. At present it is virtually impossible to
integrate waterfowl work with the important seasonal studies on resident species.
Hunter Sample      "fltl"'
Selection and distribution of the "Hunter Sample" covering the 1953 season was
modified in some respects over the method used in previous years. Instead of taking
a 10-per-cent random sample of general-firearms-licensed hunters throughout the Province
generally (as in 1952), the following refinement was made:— I
The 1953 sample was selected on an Agency basis in an attempt to obtain kill
estimates of game taken within the areas served by the different returning Government
Agencies. The reason for so doing was to try to break down the broad regional harvest
estimates made in the past into estimates for component areas.
To effect these more refined calculations, the " Hunter Sample" was distributed
on a graduated basis over the different Agency areas. Agencies handling large numbers
of licences were sampled in proportionately smaller numbers of contacts than those having
smaller numbers of licence sales. The initial sample ranged in size from 9 per cent to
100 per cent, depending on the hunter population as indicated by individual Agency
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 43
licence sales. In all cases an attempt was made to obtain a returned sample of at least
5 per cent (or a minimum of thirty returns) of the number of ordinary firearms, general
firearms, and special firearms licences sold at any Agency.
To obtain the coverage necessary to achieve the ultimate working sample, the number
of initial contacts had to be increased to 12,000 instead of the 10,000 made for the 1952
sample. ■        ■   • • Jj. -
If the return from the various Agencies is not of sufficient size to permit statistically
valid harvest calculations for the smaller areas, it will still be possible to make broader
regional estimates on the same basis and comparable with those of preceding sample years.
Summary of the 1953 Harvest of Major Game Species
District
Ducks
Grouse
Pheasants
Deer
Moose
South of Quesnel	
North of Quesnel	
Vancouver Island	
Mainland Coast	
Interior	
Kootenays	
Peace River	
Wells Gray Park	
South of Thompson River
Totals	
88,500
178,100
127,500
26,100
9,000
429,200
87,100
12,800
206,100
43,700
9,000
358,700
6,115
23,887
19,531
1,747
51,280
11,300
2,900
8,700
5,000
27,900
2,223
1,976
423
418
125
25
5,190
Economic Survey
A request for an itemized account of expenditures made by resident hunters in 1953
was incorporated into the hunter sample form. It is hoped that this will provide an
accurate account of moneys annually expended in hunting.
Similar information was requested from non-resident hunters returning to the United
States by way of Cache Creek Checking-station.
Public Relations
Organized sportsmen, wherever they may be, generally take an active interest in
hunting and fishing matters. The rod and gun clubs annually submit their recommendations for game seasons, bag-limits, and the like. At times these recommendations are
most conservative and may not be in the best interest of hunters and the game populations
in question. It is therefore necessary for members of our management staff to devote
considerable time in appearing before sportsmen groups, endeavouring to explain the
principles of good management and the reasons why our recommendations may be at
variance with those of various hunters. We feel handicapped by the lack of a Departmental bulletin with a sufficiently wide coverage to reach a majority of sportsmen. In
modern game management such a tool is a necessity, and our programme will suffer until
this end is realized.
The regional game-management biologists are instructed to avail themselves of every
opportunity to address rod and gun clubs and other organizations interested in the Game
Commission's work. We feel that this activity is paving the ground for the acceptance
and understanding of principles and management practices which are generally new to
the average sportsman and others interested in wildlife management.
Although almost all the larger rod and gun clubs in the Province were attended at
least once by a game biologist during 1953, there is great need for wider coverage in the
form of a monthly bulletin issued by the Game Department. This probably constitutes
the greatest hiatus at present in our over-all fish and game progress.
 F 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Appreciation is expressed to those within and without the Game Branch for assistance
rendered the personnel of the Game Management Division. The future appears bright
particularly if adequate support and understanding from all quarters continues to be
PREDATOR-CONTROL BRANCH
G. A. West, Supervisor of Predator-control
The destruction of predatory mammals and birds was kept at a high level during
1953, and the results were highly satisfactory.   The following table supplies the details:	
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 45
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 F 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
This report will deal mainly with the larger, more important predators, which were
treated as follows:—
Bears.—As during 1952, bears were responsible for the majority of the complaints
received throughout the Interior portions of the Province, They damaged or destroyed
in a wide field of produce but were mainly concerned with domestic stock and oat-fields,
where the damage was retained at a minimum. The effects gained by the use of cyanide-
guns and 1080 were very satisfactory, and it is anticipated that these control methods
will continue to be our main weapons against the depredations caused by bears. A total
of 254 bears were definitely destroyed by Departmental personnel, and probably many
more were killed but their carcasses were never located.
Cougars.—The number of cougars bountied during 1953 represented a slight increase
over 1952, although the kills effected by Departmental personnel were reduced in number.
Possibly the weather conditions in the Interior of the Province were responsible for the
reduction.
I The registered bonus cougar-hunters on Vancouver Island accounted for 178 of
a total of 296 cougars presented for bounty from that area. The bonuses represented
a sum of $3,560 paid in addition to the regular bounty payments, but the system
apparently resulted in an increase of 53 cougars destroyed and also made our own hunters
available for the difficult complaints. This latter point was of particular importance
during the last quarter of 1953, as Predatory-animal Hunter James Dewar was inactive
as a result of injuries and his work was taken over by Predatory-animal Hunter A. M.
Hames, who completed an excellent performance.
The worst area on the whole of Vancouver Island for cougar complaints was the
Ucluelet-Tofino area. Here the Department expended a great deal of time and expense
in an effort to reduce the number of cougars. The success of these efforts is not easy to
measure as the area appears to be one into which the cougars migrate from adjacent lands.
Consequently, when cougars are removed, it is only a short time later when more of these
animals have moved in.
Coyotes.—Departmental personnel effected a large kill of coyotes during 1953, and
this is partially reflected in the lowered bounty payments. However, we are forced to
compete with dishonesty. There are numerous facts and suspicions on hand that indicate
the presentation of the scalps of coyotes that have been poisoned by our own personnel
is common. There is little chance of effecting a suitable type of control when these
dishonest practices are being continued. The only answer is, of course, the abolition of
the coyote bounty payments, and this step is strongly recommended by the writer. It is
absolutely necessary that the Game Department have a more adequate control of these
animals, as the bounty system has accomplished nothing in this field.
Coyotes are fairly numerous in the eastern half of the Fraser Valley, where twenty-
four were destroyed during 1953. However, this area is quite well suited for intensive
control measures, although the use of poison is very restricted.
Foxes.—Foxes are still numerous in the whole of the Lower Mainland area, but the
damage caused by these predators is being steadily reduced as control is intensified.
Unfortunately, much of this area is unsuited for poison, which is the most practical method
of control. A total of 215 foxes were destroyed in the Lower Mainland. This destruction will be increased as control measures are perfected and increased.
Wolves.—It is in this group that we have had the largest measure of success. The
bounty payments dropped from 728 during 1952 to 544 in 1953, or a decrease of 25.3
per cent. Bounty payments for wolves have not been as low as at the present time since
1935, when 561 wolves were bountied. It is anticipated that a further significant reduction will result from the poisoning operations being conducted at the present time.
Although the picture appears to be bright in the wolf situation, we have dishonesty here,
too. It is known that at least 10 wolves were presented for bounty during 1953, and
these wolves were destroyed by our bait-stations.    Here again our control is being
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 47
handicapped by persons who wish the protection and then " cash in " on that protection
service.
Other Predators.—Racoons were the major source of complaint in this group,
although bobcats were important, too. Racoons were troublesome in the Fraser Valley
and on Vancouver Island, and bobcats were fairly numerous on the Mainland. The
numbers of these animals that were destroyed were quite high, and the men in the field
feel as though the damage has been small.
Our poisoning campaign during 1953 was very successful, and 768 poison-stations
were established. This represents an increase in excess of 100 per cent over the 1952
figures. We have very little information concerning the predators destroyed by the baits,
but the areas poisoned were noticeably reduced in terms of predators. Baits were placed
in the following areas:— S      ^
(1) Pine Pass-Dawson Creek-Sikanni Chief River.
(2) Terrace east to the McGregor River.
(3) Prince George north to Fort Ware and Tatla Lake.
(4) Blackwater River-Quesnel-Bowron Lake.
(5) Anahim Lake-Williams Lake-Horsefly Lake.
(6) Empire Valley-Clinton-100 Mile House.
(7) Cache Creek-Kamloops-Salmon Arm.
(8) Okanagan-Princeton.
(9) North Thompson River.
(10)  Grand Forks. jf | ' ||jfo-'
fl    (11) Arrow Lakes-Nelson-Lardeau. J|J
(12) Cranbrook-Fernie-CanalFlats-Invermere.
I wish to extend my thanks to all members of the Department for their help and
co-operation.   Without the aid of the Game Wardens, the above would not have been
possible.
I My special thanks are extended to the Indian Affairs Branch of the Federal Government for the assistance given in our wolf-control campaign in the northern sections of
the Province.
 F 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
Comparative Statistics, 1913 to 1953, Inclusive
Calendar Year
1913.
1914
1915.
1916
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944
1945-
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.
Prosecutions
Informations
Laid
Convictions
Cases
Dismissed
Firearms
Confiscated
Fines
Imposed
Totalsr.
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
819
895
1,142
1,115
1,359
1,489
1,504
1,519
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
798
878
1,117
1,099
1,337
1,468
1,476
1,500
23,446
22,420
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
21
17
25
16
22
21
28
19
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
39
56
74
86
69
83
87
67
I
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
10,921.00
11,837.50
17,537.00
18,148.50
22,923.00
24,087.50
25,755.00
23,663.50
Revenue
Derived from
Sale of Game
Licences
and Fees
1,006 1,388      | $343,339.07
!
I
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
502,555.25
597,529.30
610,383.56
656,997.38
706,591.06
830,178.59
856,971.22
1,032,264.31
Revenue
Derived from
Fur Trade
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,250.95
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,335.44
76,454.56
58,713.48
56,788.19
$10,681,887.65    I $2,004,959.62
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 49
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences,
jp       Collections, etc, January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Revenue derived from—
Sale of resident firearms licences  $403,421.50
Sale of deer, moose-elk, goat, and pheasant tags  93,981.50
Sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors'
j|    firearms licences  .189,202.00
Sale of non-resident firearms licences and outfitters'
licences |_     79,543.00
Sale of non-resident anglers' licences  167,760.00
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur  56,788.19
Sale of confiscated firearms  230.01
Sale of confiscated fur  313.05
Sale of big-game trophy fees from non-residents  96,805.00
Prosecutions—fines imposed under the " Game Act" 23,663.50
Miscellaneous revenue  1,008.25
Total  $1,112,716.00
 F 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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H
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 51
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Moose-Elk, Deer, Goat, and Pheasant Tags,
January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Government Agency
Deer Tags
No.
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin	
Barkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Denver	
New Westminster	
Oliver	
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers j	
Terrace	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof	
Vernon I	
Victoria	
Williams Lake	
Totals^..—. ._.
Less refunds
Total	
2,533
404
166
410
1,076
5,628
2,529
828
2,000
1,070
1,053
768
3,261
158
1,699
551
364
3,981
1,372
335
8,209
917
1,983
2,146
805
2,371
2,035
958
1,421
283
1,895
838
365
192
8,924
296
1,972
5,864
1,244
Amount
Moose-Elk Tags
No.
$1,266.50
60
202.00
124
36
83.00
82
205.00
464
538.00
769
2,814.00
1,264.50
1,549
414.00
231
1,000.00
43
535.00
779
526.50
685
384.00
33
1,630.50
1,149
79.00
22
849.50
317
275.50
107
182.00
47
1,990.50
88
686.00
228
167.50
17
4,104.50
3,354
458.50
303
991.50
223
1,073.00
1,684
402.50
19
1,185.50
1,951
1,017.50
432
479.00
105
710.50
726
141.50
108
947.50
314
419.00
233
182.50
370
96.00
255
4,462.00
2,410
148.00
277
986.00
376
2,932.00
158
622.00
574
Amount
$120.00
248.00
72.00
164.00
928.00
1,538.00
3,098.00
462,-Ofr
86.00
1,558.00
1,370.00
66.00
2,298.00
44.00
634.00
214.00
94.00
176.00
456.00
34.00
6,708.00
606.00
446.00
3,368.00
38.00
3,902,00
864.00
210.00
1,452.00
216.00
628.00
466.00
740.00
510.00
4,820.00
554.00
752.00
316.00
1,148.00
72,904
$36,452.00
20,702
$41,404.00
Goat Tags
No.
14
23
23
3
452
49
245
297
7
42
29
92
7
4
99
28
90
16
5
208
11
125
123
4
36
53
4
51
125
119
1
19
10
52
Amount
$4.00
28.00
46.00
46.00
6.00
904.00
98.00
490.00
594.00
14.00
84.00
58.00
184.00
14.00
8.00
198.00
56.00
180.00
32.00
10.00
416.00
22.00
250.00
246.00
8.00
72.00
106.00
8.00
102.00
250.00
238.00
2.00
38.00
20.00
104.00
Pheasant Tags
No.
120
157
382
446
379
192
1,277
1,169
116
348
35
7,629
240
624
9
134
83
104
433
6,652
1,724
594
6
Amount
Total
$60.00
78.50
191.00
223.00
189.50
96.00
638.50
584.50
58.00
174.00
17.50
3,814.50
120.00
312.00
2.00
4.50
67.00
41.50
52.00
216.50
3,326.00
862.00
297.00
3.00
$1,450.50
528.50
100.00
247.00
1,179.00
2,122.00
3,011.00
5,266.50
1,197.00
1,275.50
2,583.00
2,490.50
560.00
4,651.00
181.00
2,068.00
673.50
348.00
2,348.50
1,357.50
257.50
14,807.00
1,216.50
1,759.50
4,857.00
464.50
5,337.50
2,132.00
764.00
2,162.50
471.00
1,733.50
1,109.50
1,024.50
856.00
12,846.00
704.00
2,638.00
3,565.00
1,877.00
2,468     $4,936.00
22,857 |$11,428.50
|$94,220.50
239.00
$93,981.50
 F 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Government Agency
Anglers
No.
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin	
Barkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Denver	
New Westminster-
Oliver |	
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
Less refunds
Total	
1,670
575
38
209
994
762
3,642
2,886
983
1,160
1,434
878
830
3,872
382
2,877
792
650
2,792
3,304
624
15,089
685
2,553
1,489
1,121
2,542
2,319
1,518
950
689
2,845
1,612
775
720
15,488
368
2,525
4,104
931
89,677
Amount
Guides
No.
Amount
Free
Farmers
No.
$3,340.00
1,150.00
76.00
418.00
1,988.00
1,524.00
7,284.00
5,772.00
1,966.00
2,320.00
2,868.00
1,756.00
1,660.00
7,744.00
764.00
5,754.00
1,584.00
1,300.00
5,584.00
6,608.00
1,248.00
30,178.00
1,370.00
5,106.00
2,978.00
2,242.00
5,084.00
4,638.00
3,036.00
1,900.00
1,378.00
5,690.00
3,224.00
1,550.00
1,440.00
30,976.00
736.00
5,050.00
8,208.00
1,862.00
$179,354.00
1
6
5
28
164
13
20
5
4
54
63
10
92
15
3
1
11
1,039
2
120
59
34
5
35
13
12
6
1
1
36
2
2
215
$5.00
75.00
60.00
280.00
1,770.00
100.00
175.00
45.00
40.00
500.00
675.00
95.00
850.00
140.00
30.00
10.00
100.00
15.00
25.00
1,005.00
545.00
310.00
60.00
370.00
105.00
115.00
55.00
10.00
10.00
335.00
20.00
20.00
1,930.00
$9,880.00
9
9
21
3
20
20
20
68
6
29
23
67
11
45
1
82
14
3
102
13
69
11
61
3
7
44
8
5
69
52
3
14
17
177
82
25
1,213
Prospectors
No.
2
12
9
27
18
1
5
29
12
2
8
17
21
24
9
38
1
4
22
2
56
6
8
54
54
51
17
49
14
7
5
41
14
62
2
24
17
55
799
Amount
$4.00
1.00
4.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
5.00
$19.00
Total
$3,345.00
1,150.00
151.00
478.00
2,268.00
3,294.00
7,388.00
5,947.00
2,011.00
2,360.00
3,368.00
2,431.00
1,755.00
8,595.00
764.00
5,758.00
1,724.00
1,330.00
5,594.00
6,708.00
1,248.00
30,194.00
1,370.00
5,131.00
3,983.00
2,242.00
5,630.00
4,948.00
3,096.00
2,270.00
1,483.00
5,690.00
3,339.00
1,605.00
1,450.00
30,988.00
1,071.00
5,070.00
8,229.00
3,797.00
$189,253.00
51.00
$189,202.00
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 53
Revenue Derived from Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters'
Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Government
Agency
General Firearms
Licences
No.
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin 	
Barkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook..—	
Creston	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster
Oliver	
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Powell River	
Prince George—
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Williams Lake—
Totals I	
Less refunds
Total	
2
10
10
4
5
80
10
154
36
1
110
57
22
84
18
4
6
6
1,720
281
33
134
37
23
1
8
4
183
3
20
6
39
Amount
3,112
$50.00
250.00
250.00
100.00
125.00
2,000.00
250.00
3,850.00
900.00
25.00
2,750.00
1,425.00
550.00
2,100.00
450.00
100.00
150.00
150.00
43,000.00
7,025.00
825.00
3,350.00
925.00
575.00
25.00
200.00
100.00
25.00
4,575.00
75.00
500.00
150.00
975.00
$77,800.00
General Firearms
Licences (Special)
No.
4
3
17
10
6
2
5
1
19
1
8
1
1
1
3
1
2
99
Amount
$135.00
60.00
45.00
255.00
150.00
90.00
30.00
15.00
75.00
15.00
285.00
15.00
120.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
30.00
$1,485.00
Ordinary Firearms
Licences
No.
15
1
4
4
1
1
2
29
66
Amount
$45.00
3.00
3.00
12.00
12.00
3.00
3.00
6.00
87.00
6.00
3.00
15.00
$198.00
Outfitters'
Licences
No.
Amount
2
1
$50.00
100.00
50.00
$200.00
Total
$50.00
250.00
430.00
100.00
125.00
2,060.00
250.00
3,898.00
900.00
25.00
3,058.00
1,587.00
550.00
2,202.00
483.00
100.00
15.00
150.00
153.00
43,081.00
7,040.00
825.00
3,822.00
15.00
1,095.00
596.00
25.00
245.00
100.00
18.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
4,635.00
90.00
530.00
150.00
975.00
$79,683.00
140.00
$79,543.00
 F 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Government Agency
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin	
B arkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Denver	
New Westminster-
Oliver	
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland I	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Terrace .-„
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof- __.-
Vernon	
Victoria	
Williams Lake	
Totals ...
Less refunds
Total	
Anglers' Licences
(Other than Canadian)
No.
146
97
38
12
63
222
652
560
568
38
184
114
383
721
139
1,043
25
49
159
753
11
9,969
1,964
421
306
127
108
53
75
34
71
247
620
10
12
766
14
262
231
122
21,389
Amount
$1,022.00
679.00
266.00
84.00
441.00
1,554.00
4,564.00
3,920.00
3,976.00
266.00
1,288.00
798.00
2,681.00
5,047.00
973.00
7,301.00
175.00
343.00
1,113.00
5,271.00
77.00
69,783.00
13,748.00
2,947.00
2,142.00
889.00
756.00
371.00
525.00
238.00
497.00
1,729.00
4,340.00
70.00
84.00
5,362.00
98.00
1,834.00
1,617.00
854.00
$149,723.00
Anglers' Licences
(Canadian)
No.
Amount
Anglers' Licences
(Minor)
No.
16
4
7
1
24
7
43
136
87
15
780
499
8
91
14
47
4
5
26
114
16
92
17
49
413
1
84
19
10
7
31
5
59
3
48
12
30
30
2
2,856
$80.00
20.00
35.00
5.00
120.00
35.00
215.00
680.00
435.00
75.00
3,900.00
2,495.00
40.00
455.00
70.00
235.00
20.00
25.00
130.00
570.00
80.00
460.00
85.00
245.00
2,065.00
5.00
420.00
95.00
50.00
35.00
155.00
25.00
295.00
15.66
240.00
60.00
150.00
150.00
10.00
$14,280.00
13
13
5
6
6
64
115
88
60
2
84
105
65
98
9
235
3
7
14
88
5
1,947
343
55
75
5
14
1
16
4
26
29
64
2
1
80
2
42
37
6
3,834
Amount
$13.00
13.00
5.00
6.00
6.00
64.00
115.00
88.00
60.00
2.00
84.00
105.00
65.00
98.00
9.00
235.00
3.00
7.00
14.00
88.00
5.00
1,947.00
343.00
55.00
75.00
5.00
14.00
1.00
16.00
4.00
26.00
29.00
64.00
2.00
1.00
80.00
2.00
42.00
37.00
6.00
$3,834,00
Total
$1,115.00
712.00
306.00
95.00
567.00
1,653.00
4,894.00
4,688.00
4,471.00
343.00
5,272.00
3,398.00
2,786.00
5,600.00
1,052.00
7,771.00
198.00
375.00
1,257.00
5,929.00
162.00
72,190.00
14,176.00
3,247.00
4,282.00
899.00
1,190.00
467.00
591.00
277.00
678.00
1,783.00
4,699.00
72.00
100.00
5,682.00
160.00
2,026.00
1,804.00
870.00
$167,837.00
77.00
$167,760.00
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 55
Revenue Derived from Sale of Fur-traders', Taxidermists', and Tanners'
Licences, and Royalty on Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1953
Government
Agency
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences
No.
Alberni--
Atlin	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson..	
New Westminster.__
Pouce Coupe	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel I
Revelstoke ! 1
Rossland I
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vancouver .	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Vanderhoof-	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
Less refunds-
Total	
2
3
1
1
16
5
6
3
37
6
16
Amount
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences
(Transient)
No.
Amount
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-traders'
Licences
No.
Amount
Royalty or
Tax on Fur
No.
Amount
Taxidermists'
or Tanners'
Licences
No.
Amount
100
$50.00
75.00
25.00
25.00
400.00
125.00
150.00
75.00
100.00
925.00
150.00
400.00
$2,500.00
1
2
15
$100.00
100.00
100.00
200.00
200.00
700.00
100.00
$1,500.00
$200.00
$200.00
3
4
18
6
1
1
12
1
4
12
3
212
52
37
5
2
2
23
4
107
1
10
17
1
538
$8.50
24.69
i     ,   „     I
765.83
37.10
4.50
.50
2 |
101.05
2.50
15.50
1 |
1 |
2 j
37.75
12.95
14,818.92
1 |
3,653.64
1,377.57
——
222.95
13.50
40.00
1,358.62
5.50
28,537.57
5 |
.25
22.00
2 I
1,503.30
.50
$52,565.19
14 |
 1
$7.00
2.00
2.00
4.00
2.00
10.00
4.66
Total
$31.00
$8.50
74.69
840.83
37.10
4.50
100.50
7.00
101.05
2.50
17.50
25.00
25.00
2.00
141.75
12.95
15,320.92
3,978.64
1,527.57
497.95
13.50
40.00
1,458.62
5.50
30,372.57
.25
26.00
1,653.30
500.50
$56,796.19
8.00
$56,788.19
 F 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1953, Inclusive
Year
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
Fur Royalty
or Tax
Totals.
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
98,766.72
92,637.14
66,939.08
56,563.26
65,205.44
70,799.56
54,256.48
52,565.19
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
8,591.00
6,707.00
6,453.00
4,980.00
6,255.00
5,655.00
4,457.00
4,223.00
Total
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
62,446.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
45,981.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,352.40
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,460.44
76,454.56
58,713.48
56,788.19
$1,823,247.68
$202,117.00
$2,025,364.68
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
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List of Fur Confiscated under | Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1953
F 59
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from—
Jan.  28.
Mar. 18.
1    1
1    18
|    18.
I     18
I    18
Apr. 14
1 14
1 22
1 22
I 22
I    29
June 9
1      9
July 8
I      8
Aug. 21
Sept. 21
Dominic Frederick..
J. J. Dore	
Edwin M. Chase	
L. Charlie	
Leo Houchen	
R. Voltz	
John A. Shearer	
A. Elving	
M. Stout	
Dan Dominic	
Garnet Jeff	
Eugene Billy	
G. R. Taylor	
Johnny Squihaham.
Prosper Rocky	
Charles H. Hughes.
Unknown	
Andrew Collins	
Ole Brekkas	
Totals-
Confiscated at-
Shelley	
Steveston	
Manning, Alta...
Topley	
Surrey.	
Surrey	
Prince George-
Anderson Lake.
Estevan Point—
Squirrel Cove	
Alexis Creek	
Alexis Creek	
Fort St. John	
Alkali Lake	
Williams Lake-
White Rock	
Anahim Lake	
Valhalla Centre-
Kind of Fur Confiscated
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250
32
19
2    580
Note.—The sum of $313.05 was received during 1953 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur.
 F 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Firearms Confiscated under "Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1953
Date of
Confiscation
Jan.
Feb.
Apr.
J J
J J
JJ
J J
JJ
J J
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
May
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June
July
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Nov.
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Dec.
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9.
9.
9.
9.
12.
12.
18.
18.
18-
18_
18-
18-
14.
14-
14.
14.
14-
21.
21.
21.
21.
23.
23-
23-
23.
23.
23.
29.
14.
14.
20.
20.
20.
20.
20_
20.
21.
27..
5.
15.
24.
24..
3.
3-.
16-.
16-
16..
16..
16..
3_.
3..
3..
3_.
3_.
3_.
3..
Confiscated from-
Tom Kadous	
R. F. Holmes	
R. C. Gothard	
D. Myers	
Fred Furgeson	
B. G. Anderson	
H. G. Kistner	
J. D. Wall	
Luther Ediger	
Wolfgang Ediger..
Calvin Neetz	
Peter Isaac	
Fred Wales	
Fred Oneski	
Walter Payment—
A. T. Johnston	
R. Connauton	
Ivan Green	
Herbert Vogel	
R. E. Daniels	
Donald Ross	
Rene Gagnon	
Bernard Ueland™.
Douglas Shannon-
Eli Brewer	
James A. Inrig—
Edgar Butler	
S. W. Evans	
William Gollner—
Mickey Allen	
John Sawon	
J. Jansen, Jr	
R. V. Brown	
George Conrad	
C. Martin	
R. S. McDonald....
A. J. Meyers	
P. W. Johnson	
D. Neufeld	
L. Welder	
S. Benson	
William Beasley....
E. Grashak	
William Leluk	
G. M. Maier	
J. C. Walter	
Ronald Bain	
John Jansen	
Jake Penner	
Wayne Douglas	
Garry Wilson	
Roy Norman	
H. G. Prentice	
W. F. Kryzanowski.
Fred Bircher	
Paul Yungen	
Robert Racho	
T. M. O'Toole	
Mike Rosa	
D. A. O'Connor	
Charles Geier	
A. E. Swanson	
Totals.
Confiscated at—
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
Tulelake, Calif	
Reno, Nev	
Bell Gardens, Calif.
Port Arthur, Ont.	
Loromie, Wyo	
South Gate, Calif ....
Vernon	
Smithers	
Yarrow	
Yarrow	
Sardis	
Yarrow	
Princeton	
Vancouver.	
Vancouver.	
Princeton	
Mission	
Hope .	
Albion	
South Burnaby	
Sooke	
Maillardville	
South Burnaby	
South Burnaby	
Kelsey Bay	
Campbell River	
Campbell River	
Port Alberni	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
McBride	
McBride	
Lamming Mills	
McBride	
Lamming Mills	
McBride	
Abbotsford	
Revelstoke	
Quesnel	
Kelowna	
Prince George	
Kelowna	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Sicamous	
Revelstoke	
Comox	
Vancouver	
Sardis	
Armstrong	
Armstrong	
Armstrong	
New Westminster-
Prince George	
McBride	
McBride	
Lulu Island	
Hope	
Cultus Lake	
Aldergrove	
Edmonton, Alta	
Delaware, U.S.A..
1
1
58
i Air pistol.
Note.—The sum of $230.01 was received during 1953 from the sale of confiscated firearms.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 61
Bounties Paid during the Year Ended December 31st, 1953
Government Agency
Wolves
$40
Alberni	
Atlin	
Barkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay-	
Cranbrook	
Duncan	
Femie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Smithers	
Salmon Arm	
Vanderhoof	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Vernon	
Williams Lake I	
Totals	
22
$25
7
133
2
84
142
114
1
5
10
1
Cougar
Bounty, $20
Bonus, $20
Coyote, $4
91
1
18
107
13
48
5
17
11
14
4
2
4
23
16
4
2
2
1
3
1
9
43
501
19
27
9
42
49
"58
36
20
15
500
185
7
6
252
356
1
132
44
85
26
480
10
92
49
357
98
9
50
341
376
27
48
228
28
23
28
64
82
25
203
898
Total
$2,800.00
203.00
24.00
4,353.00
2,064.00
3,354.00
788.00
1,680.00
276.00
680.00
424.00
2,400.00
145.00
408.00
356.00
1,428.00
885.00
712.00
36.00
280.00
3,504.00
40.00
5,074.00
3,018.00
212.00
1,412.00
137.00
92.00
237.00
396.00
578.00
505.00
840.00
992.00
5,312.00
4,425
$45,645.00
 F 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1953, Inclusive
Calendar Year
1922..
1923..
1924..
1925..
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929..
1930-
1931..
1932-
1933..
1934..
1935..
1936..
1937-
1938..
1939..
1940..
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944..
1945..
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
Totals-
Wolves
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
1,156
1,180
991
753
728
544
Cougars
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
725
524
395
488
524
685
Coyotes
Crows
Magpies
Eagles
Owls
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
2,720
2,976
3,911
6,847
9,822
5,202
4,769
4,425
53,443
~172
5J70
10,046
22,264
13,109
122,911
69,431
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
1,025
1,389
403
1
Amount
$60,494.80
14,840.00
20,398.40
24,397.00
41,077.00
65,377.95
50,709.25
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,036.15
80.00
6,285.00
6,825.00
12,374.00
20,350.00
19,540.00
21,018.00
26,399.00
23,131.00
16,868.00
17,397.00
16,587.00
20,243.00
46,627.00
22,392.00
36,386.00
58,344.00
70,501.00
73,688.00
51,133.00
48,551.00
45,645.00
8,230
7,204        20,615    I $1,057,906.80
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1953
Government Agency
••H
Ih
o
U
a
a
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Atlin	
Barkerville	
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston	
Fernie	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Lillooet	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Oliver  	
Pouce Coupe ..
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Smithers	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof	
Victoria	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
Less refunds
Total	
7
5
11
8
1
1
2
1
28
4
6
1
5
1
11
97
M
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1
3
49
22
12
6
4
22
10
7
3
1
2
10
1
3
166
Species
3
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U
ca
aj
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U
a
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1
65
10
4
85
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QyZ
201
9
1
6
21
3
1
9
1
4
33
303
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34
11
1
43
31
1
2
1
84
7
19
1
15
257
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116      1,140
rt
5
1
7
9
5
111
6
7
24
10
23
59
1
23
11
1
8
1
11
49
30
79
34
1
53
9
7
9
6
2
4
18
85
F 63
Amount
113
$445.00
425.00
555.00
52,875.00
15.00
2,640.00
50.00
6,665.00
4,665.00
75.00
800.00
60.00
715.00
160.00
1,020.00
3,860.00
7,640.00
4,165.00
1,095.00
565.00
450.00
5.00
120.00
585.00
1,125.00
52W
6,315.00
$97,095.00
290.00
$96,805.00
 F 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1953
Description of Offence
Divisions (See Foot-note)
« A »»
Game Animals
Allowing dogs to run or hunt deer —
Buying or selling game animals illegally	
Exceeding bag-limit on game animals	
Hunting or killing game animals with rim-fire shells or
metal-cased bullets	
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals under 1
year of age	
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals during
close season	
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals of female
sex	
Hunting or killing big-game animals with shotgun	
Keeping big-game animals in captivity without a permit.—
Pit-lamping or hunting game animals at night	
Possession of game animals in logging Camp, hotel, etc	
Possession of untagged moose, elk, goat, or deer	
Possession of game animals with sex removed	
Firearms
Carrying firearms on a game reserve  —-
Carrying  loaded  firearms   or   discharging   same   from
automobile	
Carrying or possession of unplugged shotgun	
Discharging firearms on or across highway	
Minors carrying firearms unaccompanied by an adult	
Non-residents in possession of unsealed firearms	
Licences
Non-residents carrying firearms without a licence	
Non-residents carrying fishing-tackle or angling without
a licence	
Residents carrying firearms without a licence	
Residents carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a
licence	
Fur Trade and Trapping
Allowing another person to use his trap-line without a
permit	
Exporting fur without a permit	
Failing to make returns on trapping licence	
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line	
Possession of untagged beaver-pelts 	
Trading in fur without a licence	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping during close season	
Trapping beyond the bounds of his registered trap-line	
Migratory Game and Non-game Birds
Exceeding bag-limit or possession-limit	
Hunting migratory game birds from power-boat	
Hunting migratory game birds during the night	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
Hunting or possession of migratory game birds during
the close season	
Using live decoys to attract migratory game birds	
Upland Game Birds
Allowing dogs to run during prohibited time	
Hunting pheasants during prohibited hours	
Hunting  or  possession  of upland  game birds  during
close season	
Possession of untagged pheasants	
Possession of upland game birds with plumage removed	
"B 1
1
1
6
1
1
2
10
1
23
11
1
4
4
36
42
1
1
3
2
2
1
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09
09
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2
1
3
4
1
2
7
4
12
23
7
14
26
2
3
1
2
1
4
6
4
8
11
75
45
1
10
25
77
1
5
2
2
1
3
3
3
8
8
2
1
1
16
20
3
3
62
1
1
39
10
47
70       34
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
7
1
2
2
1
3
1
4
1
26
4
20
5
68
79
4
4
4
3
58
2
9
4
9
2
3
1
1
3
1
1
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2
2
6
34
32
1
1
1
5
31
17
15
209
61
1
36
39
24
51
241
248
1
1
1
2
6
4
8
12
4
4
5
60
9
19
5
1
2
29
4
1
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2
2
6
35
32
1
1
4
5
32
17
16
209
61
1
36
39
25
51
242
251
1
1
1
3
6
4
8
12
4
4
6
61
10
19
5
1
2
30
4
1
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
$20.00
210.00
225.00
95.00
175.00
2,205.00
2,100.00
10.00
200.00
25.00
260.00
360.00
215.00
215.00
2,787.00
625.00
50.00
281.50
410.00
915.00
545.00
2,692.00
2,367.00
25.00
20.00
10.00
100.00
80.00
200.00
90.00
315.00
115.00
100.00
70.00
680.00
155.00
555.00
65.00
10.00
20.00
393.00
40.00
10.00
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1953—Continued
Description of Offence
Divisions (See Foot-note)
'A"
B
Special Fishery Regulations
Angling for trout during close season	
Allowing sawdust to pollute stream	
Commercial fishing for salmon without required licence	
Exceeding bag-limit or possession-limit on trout	
Jigging, molesting, or taking fish on spawning-grounds	
Possession of or using fish-roe in prohibited area .	
Taking or possession of undersized trout	
Taking trout other than by angling	
Using more than one line or rod	
Using gear designed to catch more than one fish	
Using live fish for bait	
Unlawfully selling trout	
Miscellaneous
Giving false information to an officer.	
Guide failing to make returns	
Guiding without a permit or licence	
Guiding on other than his own area	
Guiding more than two persons at a time	
Hunting or killing game on a game reserve	
Making false declaration to obtain bounty	
Non-resident hunting big game without a guide	
Obstructing Game Warden in the course of his duties	
Parent failing in responsibility when minor carrying firearms	
Shipping game improperly tagged	
Trespassing on private property	
Transferring game seals	
Totals  	
7
2
C"
D"
E"
16
24
8
2
1
2
3
5
14
1
3
18
	
1
6
2
4
1
9
1
1
2
1
2
1
36
3
1
8
1
4
1
2
8
2
19
184     186     459     281     409
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55
1
3
16
22
32
15
3
21
2
4
1
18
3
5
1
1
8
1
11
7
2
1
21
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56
1
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16
22
32
15
3
22
2
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1
18
3
5
2
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1
11
7
2
1
21
1
F 65
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
610.00
20.00
75.00
210.00
328.50
575.00
137.50
J25.00
212.00
20.00
55.00
25.00
230.00
30.00
210.00
10.00
10.00
125.00
10.00
200.00
140.00
20.00
25.00
210.00
10.00
19    1,500    1,519    $23,663.50
Gaol Sentences
Hunting or possession of upland game birds during close season—1, fourteen days.
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line—1, thirty days.
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals of female sex—2, total of three and one-half months.
Note.—"A" Division:   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    "B" Division:   Kootenay and Boundary
areas.    "C" Division:   Kamloops, Yale,  Okanagan,  Cariboo,  and Lillooet  areas.    "D" Division:   Atlin,  Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas,
land areas.
E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Main-
 F 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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F 67
Summary of Game-fish Culture Distributions, Showing Eggs, Fry,
FlNGERLINGS, AND YEARLINGS, 1953
Kind of Game Fish
Eggs
Cut-throat trout	
Eastern brook trout
Kamloops trout	
Totals -
268,750
2,763,275
3,032,025
Fry
419,740
87,850
2,870,729
3,378,319
Fingerlings
37,550
66,500
1,359,371
1,463,421
Yearlings
5,000
361,627
366,627
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1953
Hatchery
Cut-throat
Eggs or Fry
Eastern Brook
Eggs or Fry
Kamloops
Fingerlings
or Fry
Nelson .—
Puntledge Park-
Smiths Falls	
Summerland-—
Totals.
32,871
102,233
135,104
171,520
38,000
209,520
279,247
14,302
72,398
396.103
762,050
Summary
Eggs  -  3,032,025
Fry  3,378,319
Fingerlings  |  1,463,421
Yearlings  3 66,627
Total distributions  8,240,392
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1953  1,106,674
Total   9,347,066
 F 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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F 77
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 F 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1953
Area Pheasants
Vancouver Island—
Alberni  100
Courtenay    100
Duncan   j|  100
Galiano Island  48
Nanaimo-Parksville  100
Totals |  448
Lower Mainland— jfj.
jjl   Abbotsford - „__,-§ 473
Agassiz  195|||
Burnaby j  100
Chilliwack - p    780
Delta  1,503
Dewdney  3 6
Hatzic  225
Lulu Island  1,309
Langley  161
Matsqui -  418
Nicomen Island |  401
Pitt Meadows  814
Port Coquitlam  301
Sumas Prairie  590
Surrey  611
Totals  7,917
Interior—
Armstrong  115
Bella Coola 1  12
Creston   260
Dawson Creek  50
Enderby   100
Fort St. John      50
Grand Forks  100
Kamloops  210
Keremeos 	
Merritt   100
Savona   26
Smithers  50
Vernon  __
White Lake	
Totals 1  i ,073
Chukar Partridges
150
100
98
150
498
Note.—Total cost covering purchase of all game birds listed was $24,629.90.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 79
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1953
Number and Kind oj Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1953
Pheasants      5,229 Ducks       14
Quail _____  21 Partridge _________ 430
III f|        Number and Kind of Birds Raised, 1953
Pheasants.  14,804  '[p   II Ducks     45 ■%     -
Quail  83    ^        Partridge   965    ' ■
iff* Number and Kind oj Birds Purchased, 1953
^ Pheasants         651 Quail     20 ;
Number and Kind oj Birds Sold, 1953
Pheasants   10,712       ♦   Partridge   726
Quail  56 -Ip
Number and Kind oj Birds Killed, 1953
Pheasants      2,624 Partridge      29
ll Quail  28 . J|l||
Number and Kind oj Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1953
Pheasants  ,     7,348 Ducks     59
Quail  40 Partridge   640
Note.—During the year 1953 there were 105 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year 1953 sixteen of these farmers discontinued business. Game-
bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during 1953 amounted to $230 (2,300
bands at 10 cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1953
Sale oj Lists to Various Licence-holders, etc.
24 Game Convention minutes at 75 cents per copy  $18.00
2,300 game-bird bands at 10 cents each  230.00
198 trap-line transfer fees ($2.50 each)  495.00
Branding fee   3-00
Proceeds, sale of trout-eggs  19.50
Proceeds, sale of live fur-bearing animals  25.00
Proceeds, permits to export game meat—_  77.00
Proceeds, fee for tagging deer and moose hides  137.75
Proceeds, sale of two fur-traders' lists ($1.50 each)  3.00
 F 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1953
^Definition of Guide Licence Classifications #
A First-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a period
of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for a guide's
licence, and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
A Second-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence, but who cannot qualify as a First-class Guide.
An Assistant Guide shall be one who cannot qualify as either a First-class or Second-
class Guide, and shall be entitled to act as a guide in the hunting of game birds or in
angling for trout, and after securing a permit so to do from the Game Commission, when
employed by or under the supervision of a First- or Second-class Guide, to guide big-game
hunters.
Vancouver Island and Mainland Coast North to North End oj Vancouver Island
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Flesher, Eric Reed, Phillips Arm 2nd
Gilbert, Walter E., Box 290, Chilliwack.___ 2nd
Hancock, Arthur C, Lake Cowichan    1st
Hancock, Joseph A., Lake Cowichan    1st
Houghton, Lawrence, 590 Bruce Ave., Nanaimo f  2nd
Kirkman,   Jack,   Box   43,   Harrison   Hot
Springs    2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River 2nd
Robertson, George R., 2329" Blanshard St.,
Victoria 2nd
Ryan, J., Campbell River 2nd
Saharchuk, Allan, Box 534, Hope   1st
Stanton, James, Minstrel Island   1st
Williamson, David, Campbell River 2nd
Mainland Coast (Stewart South, Including Bella Coola)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Brynildsen, Guy Alger, Bella Coola- 2nd
Bugnella, Angelo, Stewart 2nd
Elsey, George Allen, Bella Coola 2nd
Fraser, J. G., Sandspit 2nd
Letho, John, Stewart 2nd
Mack, Clayton, Bella Coola    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola    1st
Nygaard, Wilfred, Bella Coola 2nd
Siwallace, Andrew S., Bella Coola — 2nd
Skuce, Herb, Box 59, Kitimat    1st
Stan wood, Larry,   145  East Ninth Ave.,
Prince Rupert 2nd
Adams Lake-Salmon Arm-Revelstoke-Vernon Areas
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Cullis, Herbert W., Taft 2nd
Dawson, Vincent, Adams Lake 2nd
DeSimone, Samuel H., Revelstoke    1st
Gardiner, Robert, Albas    1st
Gardiner, Robert, Sicamous  2nd
Hansen, Chase E., Cherryville 2nd
Harrison, Bryan, Adams Lake    1st
Harrison, Robert Owen, Adams Lake    1st
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Hurstfield, Francis, Scotch Creek 2nd
Kachuck, John, Trout Lake 2nd
LaForme, George W., Revelstoke   1st
May, Arthur William, Celista 2nd
Mellinchuk, Fred, Ewings Landing 2nd
Robertson, Douglas F., Squilax 2nd
Upper, Clarence F., Revelstoke 2nd
Cassiar District (Atlin-Telegraph Creek District)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Asp, Philip, Lower Post  2nd
Ball, George B., Telegraph Creek    1st
Carlick, Tom, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Carlick, Walter, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Dennis, Alex., Telegraph Creek 2nd
Dennis, John Creyke, Telegraph Creek,    1st
Jack, Alex., Telegraph Creek 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Jackson, Dick, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Nole, Bell, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Simpson, Walter S., Telegraph Creek 2nd
Tashoots, Frank Pete, Telegraph Creek— 2nd
Tashoots, Jack Pete, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Walker,   Thomas  A.,   R.R.   1,   Qualicum
Beach            lst
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 81
Kamloopt District (Savona-North Thompson-Clearwater-Spences Bridge-Merritt)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Archibald, D. A., Clearwater  2nd
Archie, Sam, Buffalo Creek 2nd
Blair, Percy, Little Fort 2nd
Boule, James, Savona    1st
Brousseau, Clifford, Savona    1st
Brown, Starr, Little Fort 2nd
Burdett, George, Savona    1st
Burdett, Loretta, Savona 2nd
Cahoon, Charles, Kamloops  2nd
Carter, Cecil, Black Pool 2nd
Clearwaters, Ralph, Westsyde  2nd
Cochran, Glen, Darfield  2nd
Comeau, William R., Savona    1st
Cooper, Norman, Savona  2nd
DeVooght, Andrew P., Vavenby  2nd
Dunbar, George, Kamloops  2nd
Ellis, Douglas K., Battle St. E., Kamloops   1st
Farquharson,   Jim,   c/o   Forest   Service,
Kamloops   2nd
Fennell, Amos C, Chu Chua  2nd
Gourlay, James R., Barriere    1st
Grant, Gordon, McLure    1st
Hagen, Harry, Barriere 2nd
Helset, Ted, R.R. 1, Clearwater    1st
Hogue, Henry, Clearwater  2nd
Hogue, John, Clearwater [    1st
Hoover, Eldred, R.R. 1, Westsyde    1st
Humphrey, Ashton C, Knutsford :  2nd
Johnston, Stan, Black Pool    2nd
King, Marvin L., East Black Pool  2nd
> _ Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Korsvick, George, Valemount  2nd
Laidlaw, Ronald H., Merritt  2nd
Langton, Murray, Red Lake  2nd
Latremouille, Joseph, Little Fort    1st
Lean, Theodore, Clearwater    1st
Lafave, George E., Louis Creek ±  2nd
Lafave, John, Louis Creek    1st
Loveway, Thomas, Little Fort 2nd
Ludtke, Charles, Clearwater  2nd
Ludtke, Laurence, Clearwater-    1st
McDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater    1st
McGarrigle, William J., Little Fort  2nd
Morton, Alfred, Louis Creek    1st
Mountford, Gordon E., Merritt  2nd
Murray, George E., Savona    1st
Nelson, Gerald, Black Pines  2nd
Perry, Samuel, Kamloops  2nd
Petell, Seymour, Savona  2nd
Rainer, Karl, Darfield 2nd
Rodgers, Francis A., Spences Bridge  2nd
Sand, Martin J., Vavenby 2nd
Sarver, Lyle D., Pritchard  2nd
Scott, Duncan, Barriere    1st
Small, Reg, Clearwater  2nd
Thacker, George, Walhachin    1st
Threlkeld, H., Savona t  2nd
Turner, John, Criss Creek 2nd
Tuson, Clifford, Copper Creek    1st
Whittaker, John, Lac le Jeune, Kamloops._. 2nd
Wilson, Donald, Vinsulla 2nd
Cariboo District "A " (100 Mile House South, Including Ashcroft)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Abbs, R., Fawn ijjj  2nd
Baker, James A., Clinton 2nd
Bates, F. M., Clinton    1st
Bones, Alex., Clinton    1st
Bones, Frank, Clinton  2nd
Bones, Peter, Clinton    1st
Bones, Teresa, Clinton   2nd
Brooke, H. A., Cache Creek  2nd
Chabara, Anna, 70 Mile House    1st
Cleveland, J. G., Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, R. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, Weston, Bridge Lake    1st
Coldwell, H. W., Jesmond    1st
Collins, E. M., Cache Creek    1st
Collins, Milton A., Cache Creek    1st
Cunningham, C. B., Bralorne    1st
Dougherty, C. A.,,Clinton    1st
Dougherty, E. G., Clinton    1st
Duncan, Peter, Clinton  2nd
Dyer, Guy H., 70 Mile House  2nd
Eden, D. D., 70 Mile House  2nd
Eden, R. B., 70 Mile House  2nd
Faessler, C. J., Bridge Lake    1st
Fenton, Charlie, Clinton    1st
Fenton, Walter, Big Bar Creek    1st
Flaherty, R. J., Fawn    1st
Forde, H. D. W., Clinton 2nd
Fowler, Norman A., Loon Lake 2nd
Gaelick, W. T., Fawn P.O  2nd
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn P.O  2nd
Gammie, Bert, 70 Mile House    1st
George, Henry, Cache Creek 2nd
Graf, J. A., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Graf, Mike, R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Grice, Percy, 70 Mile House  2nd
Grinder, Bert, Clinton 2nd
Grinder, Isadore, Clinton  2nd
Grinder, J., Big Bar Creek    1st
Grinder, Louise M., Clinton 2nd
Grinder, Walter, Big Bar Creek    1st
Hall, M. L., Fawn.__   2nd
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake    1st
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake 2nd
Higginbottom, A., Empire Valley, Clinton.-   1st
Higgins, Cecil, Fawn P.O    1st
Higgins, Ed, Fawn P.O    1st
Higgins, K. E., Fawn P.O  2nd
Higgins, Marion, Bridge Lake    1st
Higgins, Ronald, R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Hodges, E. W., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Horn, Walter A., 70 Mile House 2nd
Huckvale, Jim, Fawi%r    1st
Hunter, Mickey, Ashcroft 2nd
Johnson, James A., 100 Mile House    1st
Johnson, W. C, Clinton  2nd
Johnson, Zale A., Clinton    1st
King, C. J., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
King, Gordon B., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Knauf, Harold, Fawn P.O    1st
Larson, Jack O., Bridge Lake    1st
Larson, K. J., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Larson, L. L., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Leavitt (Jr.), F. W., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
LeBourdais, Joe, Clinton 2nd
Lehman, Bert, Lillooet 2nd
Levick, J. S., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
 F 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District ((A " (100 Mile House South, Including Ashcrojt) —Continued
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Long, C. H., Fawn 2nd
Loring, Edwin, Clinton 2nd
McFaul, S. F., 70 Mile House 2nd
MacLean, D., Fawn 1 2Jld
McMahon, J. C, 70 Mile House    1st
McNeil, B. Spencer, Fawn    1st
McNeil, Herbert M., Fawn    1st
Mackie, J. C, Fawn 2nd
Matier, Muriel, Ashcroft 2nd
Mooring, Alex., Fawn P.O    1st
Nordgren, Jonas, Fawn  2nd
Olafson, H. J., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Osterlund, Ed, Moha 2nd
Owens, John Henry, Ashcroft 2nd
Parent, S. J., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Park, A. H., 70 Mile House 2nd
Park, Jack P., 70 Mile House    1st
Parkes, L. G., 70 Mile House 2nd
Perrault, Joe, Jesmond 2nd
Petrie, Donald, Bridge Lake    1st
Pierro, John, Cache Creek 2nd
Pigeon, Aure, Clinton    1st
Pigeon, Clarence, Clinton    1st
Pigeon, J. R., Clinton    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Pigeon, Norman, Clinton    2nd
Pollard, J. H., Clinton \  jst
Powell, H. J., Fawn   ist
Powell, T. G., Fawn   ist
Reinertson, R. J., 100 Mile House   \^
Rideout, Robert L., Box 1802, Ashcroft 2nd
Roberts, R. V., Fawn P.O   \^
Scheepbower, Jacob Aster, 70 Mile House. 2nd
Scheepbower, John C, 70 Mile House 2nd
Scott, Doug, 100 Mile House   ist
Sedman, John E., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Siebert, John, Jesmond   ist
Singleton, Wilfred, Fawn P.O   ist
Thomason, D. M., Bridge Lake   1st
Thorsteinson, Charles, Fawn 2nd
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn P.O 2nd
Van Horlick, Buster, Clinton 2nd
Vequeray, A. E., Jesmond 2nd
Vequeray, R. J., Clinton  1st
Walsh, F. C, 70 Mile House  2nd
Whitley, W. P., 70 Mile House 2nd
Womack, C. B., Fawn  1st
Wrigley, E. W., 70 Mile House 2nd
Young, William, Clinton 2nd
Cariboo District " B" (100 Mile House North to Marguerite
and Williams Lake, East of Fraser River)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Archie, Jacob, Canim Lake    1st
Ash, Chris, Big Lake 2nd
Asserlind, H. C., Keithley Creek 2nd
Atkins, D., Horsefly 2nd
Barrett, Stan, Horsefly 2nd
Bob, Ed, Canim Lake    1st
Bobb, E. R., Marguerite 2nd
Bowe, Alfred, Williams Lake 2nd
Christopher, David, Canim Lake 2nd
Daniels, George, Canim Lake 2nd
Decker, English, Canim Lake 2nd
Dick, Mathew, Alkali Lake 2nd
Dixon, Morris, Lac la Hache 2nd
Dodd, John E., 150 Mile House 2nd
Eagle, C. B., Lac la Hache    1st
Goetgen, G. E., Horsefly    1st
Graham, Jack, Horsefly 2nd
Graham, James, Horsefly 2nd
Greenlee, E. L., Canim Lake    1st
Gunn, J. M., Horsefly    1st
Haller, August, Lac la Hache 2nd
Hamilton, G. G., Williams Lake 2nd
Hamilton, Herbert M., Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Peter, Williams Lake 2nd
Hamilton, Roy, Williams Lake 2nd
Hamilton, Theodore H., Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake 2nd
Hockley, George, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, F. C, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, Perry, Horsefly 2nd
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly    1st
Hubbard, I. H., Horsefly.    1st
Jacobson, John, Big Lake 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Lake 2nd
Jones, Fred E., Horsefly    1st
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly   1st
Krebs, L. B., Lac la Hache 2nd
McBurney, Aubrey, Keithley Creek 2nd
McDougall, Robert, Big Lake   1st
Mitchell, Samuel, Williams Lake    1st
Moore, James, Ochiltree 2nd
Morgan, Dallas, Likely   1st
Morris, Daymond L., Forest Grove   1st
Nicol, Alex., Horsefly   1st
Nicol, Shelley, Horsefly   1st
Oak, E., Horsefly 2nd
Paxton, H. E., Marguerite 2nd
Petrowitz, Arthur, Williams Lake___ 2nd
Pinkney, Robert, Canim Lake   1st
Racher, W. J., Horsefly   1st
Reid, W. R., Horsefly 2nd
Robertson, William, Soda Creek 2nd
Roper, Alf, Canim Lake   1st
Sharp, W. M., Ochiltree 2nd
Thygasen, Julius, Horsefly   1st
Vaness, John, Horsefly   1st
Walters, Glen, Horsefly   *st
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly   1st
Webster, Alister, Horsefly 2nd
Westwick, Burton, Williams Lake 2nd
Westwick, Lawrence, Williams Lake 2nd
Wiggins, Wiley, Miocene  2nd
Williams, Aubrey, Horsefly |Mj
Williams, Mrs. Thelma, Horsefly 2nd
Wotzke, Herbert, Williams Lake 2nd
Wynstra, Jack, Horsefly 2nd
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
Cariboo District j C J (Quesnel-Barkerville, North jrom Marguerite)
F 83
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Allen, George H., Quesnel    1st
Armstrong, Wilfred, Quesnel 2nd
Becker, Fred W., Wells    1st
Bowden, Robert, Quesnel 2nd
Coldwell, Harry B., Quesnel (Punchaw Lake)   1st
Harrington, A. G., Quesnel    1st
Heaton, William F., Buck Ridge    1st
Henricksen, Arvid, Wells 2nd
Knudsen, Leonard, Box 841, Quesnel 2nd
Laurent, Louie, Quesnel (Nazko) 2nd
Lavington, Art, Quesnel (Nazko)    1st
Lavington, H. A. Dude, Quesnel    1st
Lavoie, George, Batnuni Lake (Quesnel).__ 2nd
Miller, Issac Edward, Quesnel  (Punchaw
Lake) I    1 st
Moffatt, Ronald Henry, R.R. 1, Quesnel    1st
xt j . ,. Class of.
Name and Address of Guide Licence
McKenzie, Albert J., Cinema 2nd
McKenzie, James Henry, CinemsL. . 1st
McKitrick, Roy D., Wells    _       1st
McKitrick, William, Wells i 2nd
McKort, Irvin James, R.R. 1, Alexandria.... 2nd
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel       1st
Orr, William M., Chilliwack 2nd
Paley, Robert G., Quesnel    1st
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel "r;   2nd
Quanstrom, Harry, Quesnel  &      1st
Rawling, Arden L., Quesnel \ 2nd
Redlack, Louis Wilfred, Hixon Creek P.O. 2nd
Sorum, Erick, Quesnel  2nd
Tibbies, Fred C, Quesnel    1st
Trudeau, Oscar, Quesnel (Nazko) 2nd
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West oj Fraser River)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Auchanachie, J. W., Alexis Creek 2nd
Blatchford, John A., Alexis Creek    1st
Bliss, Bill, Alexis Creek    1st
Boullion, Jimmy Sammy, Hanceville 2nd
Bryant, A. L., Anahim Lake    1st
Butler, Leonard, Tatla Lake  2nd
Camille, Francis, Canoe Creek 2nd
Capoose, Oggie, Anahim Lake 2nd
Charlie, Jimmie, Forest Grove 2nd
Christy, Frank, Pavilion    1st
Christy, Thomas, Moha 2nd
Church, Dick, Big Creek    1st
Clayton, John, Anahim Lake 2nd
Collier, Eric, Riske Creek 2nd
Dester, Batiste, Kleena Kleene    1st
Dorsey, Lester, Anahim Lake |   1st
Edwards, Ralph, Bella Coola 1 2nd
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek 2nd
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek    1st
Erickson, C. B., Anahim Lake 2nd
Garner, Tom, Duncan 2nd
Hance, Grover, Hanceville    1st
Hansen, Fred, Kleena Kleene    1st
Haynes, Harry K., Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Haynes, Kenneth, Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Henry, Cecil, Big Creek    1st
Henry, Eagle Lake, Alexis Creek    1st
Holte, James, Anahim Lake    1st
Holte, Tommy, Anahim Lake 2nd
Holtry, Lewis, Anahim Lake    1st
Hudson, E. R., Kleena Kleene 2nd
Hugo, A. M., Big Creek    1st
Jack, Johnny, Alexis Creek 2nd
Johnson, W. T., Riske Creek    1st
Johnston, Vic, Riske Creek 2nd
Knolls, Alvis, Redstone 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Koster, Henry, Empire Valley, Clinton 2nd
LeLievre, Lind, Penticton    1st
Lloyd, David, Kleena Kleene 2nd
Louie, Freddie, Canoe Creek    1st
Mack, Maxine, Alexis Creek 2nd
Maindley, John, Alexis Creek 2nd
Maxted, William, Big Creek    1st
Moore, Gerry, Tatlayoko Lake 2nd
Mullens, B. A., Tatla Lake 2nd
Mulvahill, R., Redstone    1st
Mulvahill, William, Redstone 2nd
Nicholson, Donald R., Tatla Lake 2nd
Nicholson, Terry, Tatla Lake 2nd
O'Keefe, Wally, Bridge River    1st
Paxton, Alex., Alexis Creek    1st
Paxton, Ann, Alexis Creek 2nd
Petal, Henry, Alexis Creek 2nd
Phillips, Floyd, Anahim Lake    1st
Rafferty, A. T., Riske Creek 2nd
Reynolds, A. J., Big Bar Creek    1st
Reynolds, H. D., Big Bar Creek    1st
Robson, Bert, Atnarko 2nd
Rosette, A., Gang Ranch    1st
Schuk, Edward, Tatlayoko Lake 2nd
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake    1st
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek 2nd
Stowell, O. E., Meldrum Creek 2nd
Sulin, Willie, Anahim Lake  2nd
Ulm, Roy C, Soda Creek 2nd
Vogelaar, Pete, Alexis Creek 2nd
Watson, Arthur, Alexis Creek 2nd
Watt, Bruce, Big Creek 2nd
Wilson, David, Tatla Lake    1st
Witte, Duane, Big Creek.    1st
Witte, Frank, Big Creek    1st
Yoxall, Alfred, Alexis Creek 2nd
 F 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prince George District "A " (Prince George East to Jasper)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Bricker, William, South Fort George    1st
Brooks, George, South Fort George    1st
Cannon, Walter L., Sinclair Mills 2nd
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Box 393, Prince
George     1 st
Crate, Lloyd, Lucerne  2nd
Gaugh, Allen H., Prince George    1st
Hansen (Jr.), Anund, Hansard 2nd
Hansen (Sr.), Anund, Hansard    1st
Hargreaves, Roy F., Mount Robson    1st
Henry, Gordon K., Box 225, Prince George 1st
Henry, Mack G., Box 225, Prince George... 2nd
Henry, Walter J., Box 225, Prince George.. 1st
Hobe, Henry, Hansard 2nd
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Hoff, William M., Chief Lake . 2nd
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek   ist
Hooker, Kenneth W., Dome Creek 2nd
Hensen, Arne, Dome Creek 2nd
Mills, Marshall, Tete Jaune    ist
Monroe, Everett A., McBride 2nd
Neighbor, Hersch, Tete Jaune    \^
Prather, Oliver J., Longworth 2nd
Reid, William, Box 2215, Prince George 2nd
Simmons, Herbert, Box 1973, Prince George   1st
Wade, Gordon, South Fort George 2nd
Zlot, Martha, Prince George 2nd
Zlotucha, Antoni, Box 792, Prince George.. 2nd
Prince George District "B" (Prince George West to Terrace)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Anderson, Duncan, Babine 2nd
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank 2nd
Berghammer, Joe, Fort McLeod 2nd
Blackwell, Allan Edgar, Wistaria 2nd
Boyko, William, Finlay Forks 2nd
Buchanan, Curtiss A., Vanderhoof  2nd
Campbell, Ronald B., Vanderhoof  2nd
Campbell, Theodor Blair, Hazelton 2nd
Cooke, Ted, Vanderhoof    1st
Cowan (Jr.), Hugh S., Clemretta 2nd
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof    1st
Donald, James, Babine 2nd
Easter, Calvin B., Fort St. James    1st
Foote, Charles H., Fraser Lake 2nd
Foote, Charles W., Fraser Lake 2nd
Gilliland,    Donald   Wallace,    Germanson
Landing .    1 st
Grainger, Barry, Nor alee 2nd
Harrison, Alford J., Burns Lake 2nd
Haugen, Karl, Manson Creek 2nd
Henson, Frank E., Marilla    1st
Hipp, Anthony J., Terrace 2nd
Johnson, George M., Vanderhoof 2nd
Johnson, Howard T., South Fort George.... 2nd
Johnson, John H., South Fort George 2nd
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake,    1st
Leon, Paddy, Topley 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Loback, Wesley L., Marilla    1st
Lord, Roy E., Burns Lake 2nd
Loss, Helmar Fredrick, Topley 2nd
McConachie, Harry R., Fort St. James    1st
Mclntyre, Allan, Vanderhoof 2nd
McKenzie, George, Fort Fraser 2nd
McNeill, Clifford, Ootsa Lake    1st
McNeill, John W., Ootsa Lake    1st
Menard, Gerard, Nithi River 2nd
Mierer, John, Vanderhoof 2nd
Moran, Thomas E., Vanderhoof 2nd
Munger, Francis Woodside, Noralee 2nd
Nelson, George, Vanderhoof    1st
Nelson, John N., Noralee    1st
Pease, Clarence A., Nithi River    1st
Plowman, Clarence, Nithi River 2nd
Plowman, Enid, Nithi River 2nd
Prince, Alex., Fort St. James 2nd
Prince, Dixon, Fort St. James 2nd
Prince, Teddy, Fort St. James 2nd
Rowland, Edward F., Decker Lake 2nd
Smith, Craig H., Fort St. James   1st
Smith, Richard H., Fort St. James    1st
Van Tine, Doug, Ootsa Lake 2nd
Van Tine, James, Ootsa Lake    1st
Vanzanten, James, Francois Lake 2nd
Wheeler, William H., Burns Lake 2nd
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 85
Peace River District and Lower Post
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Anderson, Edward, Dawson Creek 2nd
Apsassin, Daniel, Fort St. John 2nd
Artemenko, William, Fort St. John 2nd
Beattie, Donald, Hudson Hope 2nd
Beattie, Robert, Gold Bar 2nd
Belcourt, Clarence, Kelly Lake (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)  .  2nd
Belcourt, Francis, Dawson Creek    1st
Belcourt, Maglorie, Hazelmere P.O., Alta... 2nd
Brown, Wesley J., Mile 195, Fort St. John ._ 1st
Calliou, John, Kelly Lake, (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.)       1st
Calliou, Pete, Moberly Lake 2nd
Callison, Dennis W., Fort Nelson    1st
Callison, Elisha Oscar, Fort Nelson    1st
Callison, Frederick, Atlin    1st
Callison, Narred Lynch, Lower Post    1st
Cameron, Pat, Moberly Lake    1st
Cameron, Ralph, Moberly Lake 2nd
Chipesia, John, Mile 232, Alaska Highway 2nd
Clever, Gene B., Bennett 2nd
Courvoisier, Henry C, Fort Nelson..    1st
Dahl, Joel O., Fort Nelson    1st
Dalziel, George C, Dease Lake    1st
Dhenin, Rene G., Fort St. John    1st
Durney, Milo, East Pine    1st
Edzerza, George, Atlin    1st
Elden, Otto, Little Prairie .    1st
Fleet, Delbert J., Fort St. John .  2nd
Garbitt, Theophile S., Moberly Lake    1st
Gauthier, John, Moberly Lake 2nd
Gladue,   Isadore,   Kelly  Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Golata, Francis W., Dawson Creek    1st
_ T Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Hambler,  Albert,  Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Johnston, Freddie, Mile 747, Alaska Highway 2nd
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope  2nd
Larson, Albin O., Fort Nelson    1st
Letendre,  James,  Kelly  Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Letendre, Roland, Kelly Lake (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)  2nd
Longhurst, William James, Lower Post    1st
McDonald, Charlie, Mile 442, Fort Nelson 2nd
McGarvey, George, Hudson Hope 2nd
McGarvey, Morris M., Taylor    1st
MacLean, Arthur J., Fort St. John    1st
McLean, William, Little Prairie    1st
Mould, Thomas John,  Mile 496, Alaska
Highway     1 st
Nyman, Robert, Atlin 2nd
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake    1st
Peck, Donald Ross, Mile 200, Trutch    1st
Peck, O. Keith, Hudson Hope 2nd
Peterson, A. F., Muncho Lake    1st
Powell, Gary J., Hudson Hope    1st
Powell, Jack K., Fort St. John  2nd
Ross, James A., Mile 147, Fort St. John.    1st
Rutledge, Leo, Hudson Hope    1st
Simpson, William H., Fort St. John 2nd
Varley, James, Mile 533, Alaska Highway._ 2nd
Wanyandie,  Paul,  Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)  2nd
Warn, William F., Groundbirch 2nd
Wilde, Thomas, Fort St. John  2nd
Williams, Jack, Atlin 2nd
West Kootenay (Including Nelson-Creston, Kootenay Lake, and Lardeau)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Bennett, Arthur, Box 482, Kaslo 2nd
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell 2nd
Fletcher, J. R., Nelson 2nd
Koch, Charles A., Sanca 2nd
MacNicol, J. W., Johnsons Landing 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide /Iiic6nce
Newbrand, Emil, Box 109, Nakusp 2nd
Oliver, George J., Gray Creek 2nd
O'Neil, Richard, Sirdar g* 2nd
Schwartzenhauer, Carl, Deer Park 2nd
Simmons, R. T., Lardeau 2nd
Boundary Districts (Grand Forks West to Princeton, Including Kettle Valley and Ashnola)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek 2nd
Bradshaw, George A., Westbridge 2nd
Carey, Charles Bertram, Westbridge 2nd
Clark, Herbert G., Keremeos    1st
From, Helge, Westbridge.. 2nd
From, Oliver G., Westbridge  2nd
Hall, D. Elmer, Westbridge 2nd
Holding, Richard, Princeton 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Lawrence, George N., Hedley 2nd
Lewis, James William, Princeton    1st
Lutner, E. C, Beaverdell 2nd
Manion, William Bartlett, Tulameen 2nd
Noren, Carl S., Westbridge 2nd
Smith, Howard J., Westbridge 2nd
Tower, Stanley, Princeton 2nd
Wright, Brian (Pat), Princeton    1st
 F 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
East Kootenay "A 1 (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden District)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Alexander, Michael, Spillimacheen    1st
Anderson, Charles D., Windermere    1st
Belcher, Walter L., Canal Flats  2nd
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele 2nd
Brewer, Carl, Canal Flats 2nd
Canning, Lester, Skookumchuck 2nd
Capilo, Louie, Athalmer    1st
Cooper, Albert, Invermere    1st
Drysdale, A. J., Skookumchuck  2nd
Dubois, Vaughn, Windermere    1st
Gabry, Mike, Brisco  2nd
Goodwin, Dave, Invermere 2nd
Goodwin, Ellwood, Edgewater    1st
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats    1st
Hanson, Tyvegert, Wilmer    1st
Harrison, William, Edgewater    1st
Hogan, Charles A., Harrogate    1st
Jimmie, Joe, Windermere  2nd
Johnston, Alex., Invermere 2nd
Joseph, Camille, Fairmont 2nd
King, Norman, Golden    1st
Kohorst, Charles, Edgewater 2nd
Lawrence, Charles, Golden    1st
Lindborg, Axel, Golden    1st
Mitchell, Robert A., Brisco  2nd
Morigeau, Martin, Fairmont    1st
Name and Address of Guide Licence
McClain, Jesse L, Spillimacheen   isj
Mcintosh, Ewen, Athalmer 2nd
McKay, Gordon, Invermere   ist
McKay, James, Invermere 2nd
Nicholas, Dominic, Windermere   ist
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele   ist
Pelton, Robert, Cranbrook    \^
Pommier, Emile, Skookumchuck 2nd
Rauch, Harold, Golden   ist
Reay, C. D., Jaffray 2nd
Romane, Bill, Golden    ist
Seward, Arvid, Golden    1st
Seward, Roy S., Golden 2nd
Sheek, Patrick, Golden 2nd
Strain, George, Spillimacheen    1st
Tegart, George, Edgewater   1st
Tegart, James, Brisco    1st
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco .    1st
Thompson, James, Edgewater   1st
Thompson, John, Edgewater 2nd
Thompson, Lioel, Edgewater    1st
Tyler, Graham, Invermere 2nd
White, James Freeman, Fort Steele    1st
Wolfenden, Winston, Brisco    1st
Fisher, Tommy, Fairmont 2nd
Buckman, Alan, Fort Steele 2nd
East Kootenay "B" (Cranbrook East to Crowsnest, Including Fernie and Natal)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Ashman, Levi, Waterton, Alta 2nd
Baher, Fred, Natal    1st
Baher, Martin C, Natal    1st
Baher, Mike, Natal    1st
Barnes, Alfred, Fernie    1st
Barnes, J. N., Fernie    1st
Cutts, Jack, Fernie 2nd
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie    1st
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie 2nd
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal    1st
Gorrie (Jr.), Methden, Flagstone 2nd
Gorrie (Sr.), Methden, Flagstone    1st
Gravelle, Alec, Flagstone    1st
Gravelle, Nick, Flagstone  2nd
Hammer, Andy, Wardner  2nd
Hicks, Frank, Fernie    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Hicks, Phillip, Fernie    1st
Keer, Eugene W., Marysville 2nd
Kubinec, Pete, Fernie    1st
Logan, Mrs. Doris May, Wardner 2nd
McGinnis, Earl, Natal    1st
McGuire, Albert, Flagstone 2nd
McKenzie, Fergus, Fernie   1st
Phillips, Frank,   1551  St. Andrews Ave.,
North Vancouver 2nd
Porco, Albert, Box 289, Natal    1st
Riddell, Harry Scott, Wardner 2nd
Rosicky, Anton, Wardner    1st
Rothel, Malcolm, Natal    1st
Travis, Frank, Natal 2nd
Volpatti, Benjamin J., Natal    1st
Wise, Charles, Flathead, via Trail Creek,
Mont.  2nd
Assistant Guides
Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland, and Mainland Coast
Brynildsen, Lloyd A., Bella Coola.
Gilker, Richard,  349 Fourth Ave. E., Prince
Rupert.
Hallstrom, Douglas, Campbell River.
Harford, H., Port Alberni.
Hayes, Donald, Campbell River.
McPhee, A. G., Lake Cowichan.
McPhee, Alwyn George, Lake Cowichan.
Marshall, D., Campbell River.
Meredith, T. J., Campbell River.
Saugstad, Stener O., Bella Coola.
Stanwood, Larry, Prince Rupert.
White, Chester, Campbell River.
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan Districts
Bailey, Bruce, Revelstoke.
Beacott, Phil, Sicamous.
Davis, George E., Revelstoke.
Levis, James E., Trout Lake.
Martin, Pete, Sicamous.
Newman, Jack S., Sorrento.
Wallis, Edward H., Revelstoke.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 87
Grand Forks-Greenwood
Nelson, Jonas Ludwig, Grand Forks.
Bagg, Maurice, Savona.
Bagg, Melvin, Savona.
Barron, William, Blue River.
Cahoon, Pierre, Kamloops.
Cober, John A., Heffley Creek.
Comeau, Gordon, Savona.
Craddock, Derek, Little Fort.
Dever, Mrs. Dolly, Savona.
Devooght, Rodger P., Vavenby.
Evans, Jack, Clearwater.
Hansen, Howard, Little Fort.
Helset, Roy, R.R. 1, Clearwater.
Humphrey, Frank C, Kamloops.
Jules, Hyacinth, Savona.
Jules, J., Savona.
Ludtke, Fred W., Clearwater.
McDougall, Wally, Darfield.
Kamloops District
McLean, Clifford, McLure.
Marsden, Gladstone, Savona.
Michel, Pete, Little Fort.
Mitchell, John, Barriere.
Munter, Arnold, Clearwater.
Peacock, C, Kamloops.
Pearson, Ralph, Red Lake.
Petersen, Ross, Savona.
Phillips, Roy, Savona.
Reaugh, Howard, Walhachin.
Reid, T. H., c/o City Hall, Kamloops.
Richmond, Stuart, General Delivery, Kamloops.
Smedley, G. R., Chase.
Wagner, Martin, Battle St. E., Kamloops.
Wharton, Francis, Little Fort.
Wyant, John, Little Fort.
Prince George District "A
ft
Chambers, James E., 1988 Hemlock St., Prince
George.
Cook, Peter Herbert, Aleza Lake.
Duncan (Jr.), W. J., Valemount.
Eckel, Laurence V., Box 781, Prince George.
Fleming, Gordon, Mount Robson.
Hansen, James, Hansard.
Johnson, M. Joan, South Fort George.
Knust, Lewis K., Box 1279, Prince George.
Mahoney, Gerald, Prince George.
Sait, F. F., McBride.
Svendsen, Oswald, Valemount.
Sweder, George A., Box 1924, Prince George.
Warren, Robert O., Prince George.
Witt, Ferdinand A., Box 934, Prince George.
Witter, Wilbert H., Box 165, Prince George.
Prince George Dictrict " B "
Alex, Armond, Fort St. James.
Alexander, Albert, Germansen Landing.
Alexis, John, Fort St. James.
Andros, R. W., Vanderhoof.
Belcourt, Stanley A., Topley.
Bjornestad, Jorgen, Pinchi Lake, Fort St. James.
Brown, John S., Burns Lake.
Buckell, Ronald E., Salmon Arm.
Elstone, L. C, Marilla.
Grainger, Martin, Noralee.
Hewitt, Harold F., Colleymount.
Isadore, Jimmy, Fort McLeod.
Kereluik, R., Fort St. James.
Loper, Howard, Vanderhoof.
Lord, Samuel V., Burns Lake.
Mattess, August, Fort St. James.
Mattess, Louis A., Fort St. James.
Plowman, Gerald, Nithi River.
Plowman, William C, Endako.
Reid, Lawrence, Vanderhoof.
Sam, Justa, Fort St. James.
Skog, Martin, Vanderhoof.
Thomas, Steven, Germansen Landing.
(( A *>
Cariboo District "A
Alexander, A., Fawn.
Black, John P., Bridge Lake.
Brearley, T. E., Fawn.
Bryant, Norman, 70 Mile House.
Bryson, R. C, Shalalth.
Carriere, Edward, Bridge Lake.
Carter, J. M., Clinton.
Cleveland, Glen E., Bridge Lake.
Code, H. C, Fawn.
Colin, Arthur, 100 Mile House.
Deane-Freeman, B., J., Bridge Lake.
DeLare, J. L., 100 Mile House.
Dougall, Ninian, Bridge Lake.
Flaherty, R. W., Fawn.
Gaignor, D. C, Jesmond.
Graf, M. H., R.R. 1, Fawn.
Grandberg, Norman, Fawn.
Grinder, Fred, Empire Valley.
Grinder, Louisa, Big Bar Creek.
Haywood-Farmer, Frank, 70 Mile House.
Johnson, O. M., Clinton.
Kerr, James D., Bralorne.
Kelley, C. E., R.R. 1, Fawn.
Kent, W. R., Lytton.
Knauf, Mrs. E. C, Fawn.
Koster, Francis, Empire Valley.
Krinke, Paul, Bridge River.
Langton, J. C, Clinton.
Minnabarriet, Percy, Cache Creek.
Nelson, R. C, Clinton.
Park, Gene, 70 Mile House.
Paulson, Clifford, Pavilion.
Peters, Ben, Shalalth.
Pigeon, Albert, Clinton.
Reeder, H. G., Big Bar Creek.
Ross, P. J., Bridge Lake.
Sam, Able, Cache Creek.
Shulders, Bruce, Clinton.
Smith, Jack, Clinton.
Stephens, Paul, Shalalth.
Woodman, Lloyd, Bridge Lake.
 F 88                               ^  -     '          "
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District "B"
Archie, Joe, Forest Grove.
Lowry, Howard, Horsefly.
Coon, Robert H., Keithley.
McBurney, Gordon, Likely.
Crosina, James, Big Lake.
Morris, Mrs. Daymond, Forest Grove.
Dick, Richard, Alkali Lake.
Ogden, L. C, Lac la Hache.
Exshaw, Torry, Williams Lake.
Ogden, P. S., Lac la Hache.
Gunn, J. A. M., Horsefly.
Pickering, Leonard, Williams Lake.
Hagen, Oscar, Keithley Creek.
Schultz, Bert, Big Lake.
Houseman, Harvey, Canim Lake.
Stubitsch, Frank, Big Lake.
Huston, R. W., Beaver Lake.
Cariboo District " C "
Anderson, A. P., Box 810, Quesnel.
Leake, Clarence, Quesnel.
Coldwell, Reg, Quesnel.
Ross, Nick, Quesnel.
Erdman, Richard, Quesnel.
Webster, H. James, Narcosli Creek.
Harrington, Ronald S., Quesnel.
Wilkinson, Hugh J., Quesnel.
Leake, Bill G., Quesnel.
Cariboo District "D 1
Andy, Mac, Alexis Creek.
Janke, Gerald, Alexis Creek.
Barlow, Jennie, Riske Creek.
Jasper, Delmar, Alexis Creek.
Blatchford, Bob, Alexis Creek.
Johnston, George, Riske Creek.
Bliss, Jack, Alexis Creek.
Leith, Robert, Anahim Lake.
Bobby, Felix, Alexis Creek.
Lucyk, Peter, Alexis Creek.
Bonner, James, Big Creek.
Lulua, Tommy, Alexis Creek.
Bracewell, Alfred, Tatla Lake.
MacLean, Bob, Penticton.
Bragg, John, Anahim Lake.
Meldrum, Ervin, Redstone.
Brebner, Bob, Alexis Creek.
Moore, K. B., Tatlayoko Lake.
Bryant, Mrs. A. L., Anahim Lake.
Myers, Phillip, Hanceville.
Bullion, Sammy, Alexis Creek.
Myers, Tony, Hanceville.
Butler, Lee, Tatla Lake.
Olsen, John N., Hagensborg.
Cahoose, Gus, Anahim Lake.
Petal, Tony, Alexis Creek.
Cahoose, Mike, Anahim Lake.
Pinter, Andy, Penticton.
Chell, George, Alexis Creek.
Potvin, A., Alexis Creek.
Church, R. B., Big Creek.
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville.
Cluck, Jeo, Meldrum Creek.
Quilt, Johnny, Hanceville.
Cunliff, Tom, Alexis Creek.
Quilt, Louis, Hanceville.
Dester, Mack, Kleena Kleene.
Quilt, P., Hanceville.
Dorsey, Steve, Anahim Lake.
Rosette, Alex., Gang Ranch.
Elkins, Baptiste, Anahim Lake.
Sammy, Eugene, Alexis Creek.
Elkins, Jack, Alexis Creek.
Scott, Bob, Riske Creek.
Elkins, Marvin, Alexis Creek.
Sill, Frank, Anahim Lake.
Embreus, Jorgen, Alexis Creek.
Sills, Edward, Alexis Creek.
Emile, Joseph, Gang Ranch.
Sing, Isaac, Anahim Lake.
Emmit, Duncan, Hanceville.
Snow, Shannon, Penticton.
Fraser, Thomas, Penticton.
Squinas, Harry, Anahim Lake.
French, Bob, Redstone.
Squinas, Louis, Anahim Lake.
Gemmell, W., Hanceville.
Stewart, Robert, Anahim Lake.
George, Andy, Alexis Creek.
Stum, Daniel, Alexis Creek.
George, Otto, Hanceville.
Sulin, Fatty, Anahim Lake.
George, Owie, Hanceville.
Sulin, Sam, Anahim Lake.
Gibbons, Ronald, Anahim Lake.
Thompson, C. A., Anahim Lake.
Grambush, Donald, Anahim Lake.
Timothy, Dominic, Kleena Kleene.
Gregg, Frank, Kleena Kleene.
Timothy, Isador, Kleena Kleene.
Haller, Joe, Riske Creek.
Turner, George, Hanceville.
Higgingbottom, Pete, Big Creek.
Turner, Timothy, Redstone.
Holtry, Mrs. Lewis, Anahim Lake.
Turner, Timothy, Kleena Kleene.
Howarth, D., Hanceville.
Warde, Don, Big Creek.
Hugo, Jack, Big Creek.
Webb, John, Kleena Kleene.
Hunlin, Andrew, Redstone.
Wilson, Gordon, Anahim Lake.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953
F 89
Peace River
Allick, Amos, Lower Post.
Barkley, Jesse, Hudson Hope.
Beattie, Robert H., Hudson Hope.
Beattie, James, Gold Bar.
Beattie, William, Gold Bar.
Belcourt, Adolphus, Hazelmere P.O., Alta.
Belcourt, George, Kelly Lake.
Belcourt, George, Little Prairie.
Bigfoot, Charlie, Mile 232, Fort Nelson.
Brady, Otto S., Mile 147, Alaska Highway.
Brown, Robert, Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Joe, Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Joseph, Kelly Lake.
Calliou, Urban, Little Prairie.
Cardinal, Alex., Moberly Lake.
Cardinal, Harvey, North Pine.
Chief, Charlie, Lower Post.
Chingee, Sam, McLeod Lake.
Copperthwaite, Hai¥y, McLeod Lake.
Coutrille, Fred, Soberly Lake.
Davis, Albert, Moberly Lake.
Davis, Angus, Moberly Lake.
Desgalier, Louis, Moberly Lake.
Desjarlais, Joe, Moberly Lake.
Dopp, Bruce D., Fort St. John.
Durney, Lauril, East Pine.
Ellis, Clarence H., Hudson Hope.
Frame, Alex., Muncho Lake.
Frank, Ernest, Lower Post.
Frank, Isaac, McLeod Lake.
Frank, Lester, Dease Lake.
Gairdner, Ernest, Fort Nelson.
Garbitt, Pat, Moberly Lake.
Gauthier, Alexis, Moberly Lake.
Gauthier, Archie, Moberly Lake.
Gauchier, Lome, Kelly Lake.
Gilliland, Frank, Lower Post.
Goodvin, Russel B., Taylor.
Gullickson, Eugene, Taylor.
Hambler, George, Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Harrold, Angus N., Fort Nelson.
Harrold, Garnet, Fort Nelson.
Henyu, Lawrence, Lower Post.
Hillgren, Knute, Lower Post.
Johnston, Young. Billy, Teslin Lake.
Larocque, Elzear, Little Prairie.
Letendre, Fred, Moberly Lake.
McDonald, Billy, Fort Nelson.
McGuire, Colum, Rolla.
Melville, Kennedy, McLeod Lake.
Mitchell, Gabriel, Moberly Lake.
Mykoose, Joe, Moberly Lake.
Napoleon, $4lix, Moberly Lake.
Nehas, Raymond, Lower Post.
Nichols, Frank C, Little Prairie.
Olson, John V.., McLeod Lake.
Paquette, Marvin, Moberly Lake.
Powell, Hubert Lloyd, Fort St. John.
Redhead, Simon, Little Prairie.
Rissling, Peter W, Dawson Creek.
Ross, Robert Lynn, Mile 147, Alaska Highway.
Skaret, Gilbert, Coal River.
Southwick, Harvey, Fort St. John.
Southwick, Tullie Oliver, Fort Nelson.
St. Pierre, Sam, Trutch.
Testawitch, Alex., Fort Nelson.
Thomas, Albert N., McLeod Lake.
Thomas, Johnny, Progress.
Torkensen, Gordon, Dawson Creek.
Trca, Joe, Taylor.
Vince, Robert Garry, Fort St. John.
Abou, Charles, Telegraph Creek.
Ball, Robert, Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, Thomas, Telegraph Creek.
Louie, Steven, Telegraph Creek.
Cassiar
Nole, Loveman, Telegraph Creek.
Quock, Charles, Telegraph Creek.
Quock, James, Telegraph Creek.
Cummings, Raymond, Boswell.
Johnson, Lloyd H., Port Crawford.
West Kootenay District
Rowe, William E., Box 103, New Denver.
t<   A >>
East Kootenay UA
Barbour, J. A., Wilmer.
Belcher, Lome W., Canal Flats.
Dorion, Douglas, Golden.
Elliott, Edward, Wilmer.
Ellis, Cam, Skookumchuck.
Granger, Clifford, Fort Steele.
Jones, John, Moyie.
King, Ronald, Golden.
Major, Lon Walter, Parson.
Nixon, Arthur, Invermere.
Pelton, Robert G., Cranbrook.
Pommier, Louis Emil, Cranbrook.
Smith, Josephine M., Fort Steele.
Smith, Bert T., Invermere.
Tegart, Dennis, Brisco.
Tegart, Ray, Invermere.
Thornton, George, Invermere.
Thouret, George R., Radium.
Tippie, Ray, Athalmer.
Wallin, Dawson, Invermere.
Wolfenden, James, Brisco.
Wolfenden, Ray, Brisco.
Wormington, Sam, Kimberley.
Zinkan, E. J., Windermere.
 F 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ft nt *-
East Kootenay "B
Ar buckle, David, Fernie.
Baker, Vernon, Fernie.
Billy, Andrew, Natal.
Bush, William, Ta Ta Creek.
Cassarini, Louis, Natal.
Qmliffe, Jack, Galloway.
Cunliffe, John, Fernie.
Eddy, Simpson, Wardner.
Gorrie, Thomas G., Flagstone.
Harder, David, Campbell River.
Johnson, Mervin E., Box 1046, Cranbrook.
Kaisner, Fred, NataL
Kaisner, George, Natal.
Kubinec, John, Fernie.
Lee, Ray J., Box 1142^Cranbrook.
McDonald, Sam, Fernie.
Marcer, Clem, Fernie.
Morris, Cody, Keremeos.
Murdoch, Gordon, Fernie.
Musel, Gordon, Natal.
Phillips, Alex., Flagstone.
Porco, John, NataL
Rosicky, Andrew, Wardner.
Rothel, William, Natal.
Starr, Percy, Fernie.
Travis (Jr.), Frank, Natal.
Travis, Harold, Natal.
Wojtula, Ogie, Natal.
NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS
Beloud, Ben, Mile 1,016, via Whitehorse, Y.T.
McCullough, Henry, Wembley, Alta.
Ray, Jack, Hinton Trail, Alta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alta.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 91
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st, 1953
Attorney-General (Minister)    1 Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C. Victoria
Game Commission (members) Frank R. Butler ZZT Vancouver.
James G. Cunningham  Vancouver
Scientific Advisers Dr. W. A. Clemens  yjjS^g; .
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan .Vancouver.
Headquarters .3L
Chief Clerk ...H. D. Simpson  Vancouver
Intermediate Clerk _ . J. McLellan  Vancouver*
Intermediate Clerk W. FowkeslQ  Vancouver
Intermediate Clerk .-.Miss I. Lawson  "Vancouver
Secretarial Stenographer. Miss J. SrMth  ~"~ Vancouver
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. M. Drihkwater.  " Vancouver'
Clerk-Stenographer Miss E. P. Golder        Vancouver
Clerk-Stenographer. Miss R. McKay  Vancouver
Clerk-Stenographer .Miss T. McKajL.     Vancouver!
Clerk-Stenographer „ Mrs. J. Whitfield Vancouver!
Clerk .Miss M. Miller .Vancouver.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland)
Inspector G. C. Stevenson Victoria.
Intermediate Clerk D. Keirs Victoria.
Stenographer Miss J. Bull . Victoria.
Corporal Game Warden O. Mottishaw Nanaimo.
Game Warden _F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden R. W. Sinclair. Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak.
Game Warden _W. S. Webb Alberni.
Game Warden _R. S. Hayes .Campbell River.
Game Warden | _C. E. Estlin Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir .Duncan.
a t> j»
B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts)
Inspector . C. F. Kearns .Nelson.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. A. L. Robinson Nelson.
Game Warden ■_„ R. A. Rutherglen Nelson.
Corporal Game Warden .. A. F. Sinclair. Grand Forks.
Game Warden P. D. E$rart Castlegar.
Game Warden J. W. Bayley Cranbrook.
Game Warden JR.. R. Farquharson . Cranbrook.
Game Warden _:____ § JB. Rauch Creston.
Game Warden...^i. J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden ..    _W. A. McKay Golden.
Game Warden   |        J. V. Mackill Invermere.
Game Warden      |  A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden  A. F. Gill Princeton.
u
C1 Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts)
Intermediate Clerk  -G. Ferguson Kamloops.
Stenographer  Mrs. S. D. Bertoli Kamloops.
Game Warden   _  J. P. C. Atwood .Kamloops.
Game Warden  H. Tyler .Kamloops.
Game Warden  |  K. R. Walmsley Alexis Creek.
Game Warden  I _        -W. I. Fenton .Clinton.
Game Warden "_       1  X). D. Ellis Kelowna.
Game Warden   _        _  -R. S. Welsman —-Lillooet.
Game Warden  _  -E. M. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden   I  -H. J- Lorance Quesnel.
Game Warden "_  G. A. Lines Revelstoke.
Game Warden "_       Z   "   _      JD. Cameron .Salmon Arm.
Game Warden".       _ "ZL.Z A. S. Frisby -Yx?rS°n'
Game Warden." _       -E. Holmes -Wells.
Game Warden    ' '"  L. Jobin Wi hams Lake.
Game Warden  -J. il Gibault Williams Lake.
 F 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
c    I d I division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River,
and Yukon Boundary Districts)
Inspector . W. A. H. Gill .———. Prince George.
Intermediate Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
Stenographer Miss N. Wilson—I Prince George.
Game Warden..... A. J. Jank . Prince George.
Game Warden L. I. Olson Prince George.
Game Warden R. A. Seaton Prince George.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden C.J.Walker. Prince Rupert.
Stenographer Miss B. Stalker Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. H. Richmond Burns Lake.
Game Warden J. A. McCabe Fort Nelson.
Game Warden B. Villeneuve Port Nelson.
Game Warden H. O. Jamieson Fort St. John.
Game Warden J. Dowsett Lower Post.
Game Warden J. M. Hicks McBride.
Game Warden _G. R. Taylor Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden L. J. Cox.— .Smithers.
Game Warden j J. D. Williams Terrace.
Game Warden L. G. Smith .Vanderhoof.
| EI Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley District)
Corporal Game Warden L. R. C. Lane Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden R. K. Leighton Vancouver.
Game Warden JF. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Warden H. D. Mulligan Vancouver.
Game Warden W. T. Ward Vancouver.
Corporal Game Warden _W. J. Mason Alert Bay.
Game Warden — D. A. MacKinlay Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. J. Butler . Chilliwack.
Game Warden _H. P. Hughes Cloverdale.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Xadner.
Game Warden :P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden B. E. Wilson Powell River.
Game Management Division
Chief Game Biologist Dr. J. Hatter .Vancouver.
Regional Game Biologist _E. Taylor Vancouver.
Regional Game Biologist JP. W. Martin Kamloops.
Regional Game Biologist . JD. J. Robinson Nanaimo.
Regional Game Biologist JL. Sugden Williams Lake.
 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1953 F 93
H        Fisheries Management Division
Chief Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin      _ Vancouver
Division Fishery Biologist JDr. C. C. Lindsey.      Vancouver.
Division Fishery Biologist R. G. McMynn    „      __ ..Vancouver
Division Fishery Biologist S. B. Smith Vancouver.
Division Fishery Biologist J. Barrett  Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist T. G. Northcote    _ Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist N. G. Perret           Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Officer G. E. Stringer. .    Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Officer. JE. H. Vernon .Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Officer. F. Maher Nelson.
Assistant Fishery Officer. D. P. Scott Salmon Arm.
Fishery Officer. J. D. Inverarity .Courtenay.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Fishery Officer F. H. Martin Kamloops.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer. R. A. McRae Nelson.
Fishery Officer D. Hum .Summerland.
Hatchery Officer J. J. Phelps .Courtenay.
Hatchery Officer. J. C.Lyons Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer. .N. W. Green .Summerland.
Hatchery Officer. L. E. Hunter .Summerland.
Hatchery Officer J. G. Terpenning Vancouver.
Stenographer .Miss M. Jurkela Vancouver.
Predator-control Division
Supervisor of Predator-control G. A. West Vancouver.
Assistant Supervisor of Predator-control E. H. Samann .Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter. W. J. Hillen Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter N. Lingford Abbotsford.
Predatory-animal Hunter G.Haskell Cranbrook.
Predatory-animal Hunter J. Varty .Cranbrook.
Predatory-animal Hunter__._ J. Kandal Grand Forks.
Predatory-animal Hunter J. Dewar Nanaimo.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. M. Hames Merville.
Predatory-animal Hunter. C.G.Ellis Pouce Coupe.
Predatory-animal Hunter. M. W. Warren Prince George.
Predatory-animal Hunter. A. E. Fletcher Smithers.
Predatory-animal Hunter M. Mortensen.. .Williams Lake.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
1,110-754-2039
   

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