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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1968]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Minister A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS, AERIAL
TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION,
and ACCIDENT PREVENTION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1967
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
  Victoria, B.C., January 25, 1968.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1967.
R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, B.C., January 18, 1968.
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1967.
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng.,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1967
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
INTRODUCTION
Canada's Centennial Year has been an exciting and dynamic year for British
Columbia, particularly in the field of transportation. The Confederation Train,
which was initiated in Victoria the first week in January, rolled eastward across
Canada carrying with it a hundred years of history and its Centennial message. British Columbia's own Centennial Train, the " Dunrobin," contributed to the over-all
celebration by making a special trip under steam from New Westminster to Vancouver with a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television crew aboard making
movies for their production " Once Upon a Hundred Years."
During the year the Pacific Great Eastern Railway completed its new extension
to Fort St. James, a distance of 74 miles, so that in October, 1967, the first freight
train rolled into the town founded by Simon Fraser as the fur-trading capital of the
Northwest and known in those days as New Caledonia.
Construction of the Peace River and Columbia River dams has brought some
unique problems to highway transportation during the past year. Typical of these
problems was the movement of transformers at a gross weight of 262,700 pounds
and a steel shaft weighing 290,000 pounds to the W. A. C. Bennett Dam on the
Peace River. These are extremely heavy loads, and completion of the moves without
injury to personnel or damage to bridges was a relief to all concerned. The close
co-operation between personnel of this Department and the Department of Highways
made these moves possible.
Completion of more pulp-mills and extension of others has required an increase
in the number of trucks and rail cars required to transport pulp logs and pulp chips.
Increased activity in the mining industry will place heavier demands upon road
and rail transport.
Oil production increased in British Columbia so that both the Western Pacific
Products and Crude Oil Pipelines and the Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline had record
throughputs. A new oil refinery was constructed on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway lines at Prince George. This refinery, which is fed from the Wespac line, was
completed by the end of 1967. The British American Oil Company in Burnaby
announced an extension to its refinery to raise its production from 20,000 barrels per
day to 30,000 barrels per day, and this is to be completed before the end of 1969.
A new 6-inch jet-fuel pipe-line from Burnaby to Richmond was announced late in
1967. This line will transmit jet fuel from the Burnaby refineries to the new airport
terminal at Sea Island.
Due to increased production of crude oil in British Columbia, tariff rates for
pipe-line transmission have been reduced, with the result that well-head prices have
been increased. This not only means an increase in revenue to the producers, but it
also provides increased revenue to the Province from higher royalties.
Natural-gas production in 1967 increased and Westcoast Transmission Company opened its new 30-inch pipe-line from Fort Nelson to Chetwynd, a distance of
 GG 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
220 miles. The new gasfields in the Fort Nelson area are contributing to the
increase, and additional compressor-stations and looping were completed before the
end of 1967. Movement of component parts for these new compressor-stations
required the approval of several very heavy loads on the Hart Highway and the
Alaska Highway.
During the year the logging industry continued strongly and industrial transportation by logging-truck and railway was heavy. Considerable research was done
on the improvement of braking systems for trucks to cope with heavier loads and
increased speeds, and as a result a new safety braking system was developed for the
transport of workmen and for application to school buses.
During the year, approval was granted to the Kootenay and Elk Railway Company to build a railway from Elko to West Roosville for the purpose of transporting
coal from Natal to the Great Northern Railway and thence to a proposed port at
Roberts Bank near Vancouver. This would be an alternate route to using the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Transportation with respect to the ski industry was exceptionally busy during
the year. The Grouse Mountain Sky Ride was up-graded by installing two new track
ropes which were imported from Austria and the entire ropeway was speeded up to
cope with the increase in traffic. Four new chair-lifts and five new T-bars were
installed during the year and a number of rope tows were added throughout the
Province. In addition, all existing lifts were up-graded as to brakes and safety to
comply with the new Canadian Standards Association standards.
The foregoing are the highlights of the year 1967. The details are set forth in
their proper sequence throughout the following report.
 DEPARTMENT OE COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967
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 GG 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
(Licensing and Operations)
R. A. Hadfield, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
F. J. Regan, Director of Operations
The Department of Commercial Transport Act provides for the licensing of all
commercial vehicles operated on public roadways in the Province of British Columbia. The regulations made pursuant to the Act provide for the control and issuance
of temporary operation permits, quarterly licences for logging-trucks, the licensing
of non-resident commercial vehicles, and oversize and overweight permits for operation on Provincial highways.
The licensing of commercial vehicles and commercial trailers is under the
supervision and direction of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles who, utilizing a
network of motor licence offices, Government Agents, and weigh-scales, issues the
licences and maintains in the Motor-vehicle Branch central registry at Victoria the
statistical data necessary for operation of the Department.
The issuance of permits and licences, as well as temporary authority to operate
under the provisions of the Motor Carrier Act and Motive-fuel Use Tax Act, by all
weigh-scale stations in the Province has greatly reduced the delay experienced by
home-based industry as well as expediting the movement of vehicles arriving at the
Provincial boundaries from other Provinces and the United States.
Regular commercial-vehicle licences are issued at selected weigh-scales, some
of which are open 24 hours a day. At Chetwynd weigh-scale, where there is no
issuing office established, passenger licence-plates are issued as well as commercial
licences. During January and February of each year, assistance is provided for the
issuance of commercial-vehicle licences at Prince George and Kelowna and, to a
limited extent, at other locations. At Victoria, for a six-week period in January and
February, when prorate licensing for commercial vehicles is heavy at the Motor-
vehicle Branch, we provide the necessary help. This work of issuing licences to a
limited extent at weigh-scales, which was started in 1965, has proven satisfactory
and will be continued and expanded wherever possible. There is an advantage in
issuing licences for logging-trucks at weigh-scales as these are usually purchased on
a quarterly basis and the correct weight is available. Co-operation with the Department of Agriculture in enforcing the Stock Brands Act, and with the Department of
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources in gathering information on the movement of
forest products has continued during the year. Our field staff have continued to
perform certain duties with respect to the Motor Carrier Act. These duties consist
of checking commercial vehicles for operating authority and compliance with the
conditions of licence.
There was an increase in commercial-vehicle licences issued again this year.
Total registration of power units and trucks reached 166,121. Trailers totalled
19,292, including farm vehicles but excluding vehicles operated under reciprocity
agreements.
During the 1966/67 licence-year there were 1,009 new registrations of farm
trucks and 11,904 renewals.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967 GG 9
INTERPROVINCIAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS
In the year under review, an arrangement was finalized with the Province of
Nova Scotia providing reciprocity for trucks operating in the movement of household
goods. Discussions have been held with other Provinces on the whole question of
reciprocity of licences and regulations. It is anticipated that these exploratory meetings will continue and that more uniform procedures will result.
The prorate agreement that has been in operation since 1961 with 16 American
States has continued in a satisfactory manner. This agreement provides the means
for the licensing of 2,764 extra-provincial vehicles, an increase of 115 over the previous year.
OPERATIONS
There are 33 permanent weigh-scale stations located on the main highway
systems of the Province. These are supplemented by seven portable patrols which
travelled an average of 21,402 miles during the year. Personnel at these permanent
stations and on portable units, as well as local police and the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, are the main enforcement facilities that ensure the provisions of the
Act and regulations are complied with.
There are 44 Government Agent offices, 13 Motor-vehicle Branch offices, and
6 sub-offices that issue licences and permits. For the purpose of administration, the
Province is divided into five regions; Region 1—Vancouver Island; Region 2—
Lower Mainland; Region 3—Southern Interior; Region 4—Kootenays; Region
5—Central Interior; and Region 6—• Northern Interior. At each regional headquarters there is a Regional Supervisor responsible for the operations of the Weigh-
scale Branch in his area. Close liaison is maintained between the regional offices
and the head office at Victoria for the purpose of ensuring that there is uniform
practice, particularly in the issuance of oversize and overload permits. In order to
speed up the issuance of these permits, authority has been granted the field staff to
authorize loads within certain limits; however, it is still essential that many gross
oversize and overweight loads be authorized by headquarters. Before authority is
granted, every effort is made by consultation with the Department of Highways personnel, local police forces, and Public Utilities Commission personnel to ensure that
the movement can be made with a reasonable degree of safety.
Because of heavy build-up of summer traffic on the main highway systems of
the Province, it was necessary to restrict the movement of oversize vehicles during
the week-end periods of the summer months. The traffic build-up has reached a
point where it is not possible to move loads in excess of 12 feet wide during normal
working-hours; therefore, movements in the Lower Mainland area and on Vancouver Island have been made during the hours of 2 to 5 a.m., which is the lowest
traffic period.
In spite of the precautions taken, one serious accident did occur involving the
movement of an overwidth house on Highway No. 1. As a result of the police investigation into the circumstances of the accident, the permittee was found guilty of
dangerous driving under the provisions of the Criminal Code.
The movement of overweight loads in excess of 100,000 pounds gross weight
has shown a marked increase in the past year. This increase reflects the industrial
activity taking place in the Province as all these loads are non-reducible items of
heavy machinery or structural members that must be transported by road to industrial sites that are situated, in most cases, a considerable distance from rail-head.
In addition to these items, there has been a marked increase in the number of
heavy self-propelled machines used in the construction industry, and the transportation of these units is becoming a major problem.   The cost factor involved in reduc-
 GG 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ing the weight of the machine before it is transported by road is a major obstacle to
the full utilization of these expensive and efficient pieces of equipment. Studies are
now under way by the Department of Highways as to the practibility of allowing
heavy-type multi-axle units more freedom of movement when transporting heavy
construction machinery.
In order to facilitate the movement of commercial vehicles in the more remote
parts of the Province where normal permit facilities and weigh-scales are not available, Division 6 of the regulations was amended to allow the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police to issue an interim-type permit which provides for not only temporary operation, but authorizes the movement of oversize and overloaded vehicles and
gives temporary authority under the provisions of the Motive-fuel Use Tax Act. The
granting of this permit is contingent on the permittee obtaining the necessary permits
within seven days at a weigh-scale, motor licence office, or Government Agency.
In practice this has worked out very well and has greatly lessened the difficulties
encountered, particularly by the logging industry in the movement of off-highway
equipment from job-site to job-site or, when an industrial breakdown occurred, to
the nearest repair facility.
Due to the increase in the number of heavy loads and the increase in truck
movements throughout the Province, the maintenance and repair of some of our
weigh-scale sites has been a major item of expenditure in the past year. The scale
pits, scales, and driveways at Tupper Creek, Vanderhoof, and Prince George have
been renewed and replaced. Water and sanitation facilities were installed at Cache
Creek, and weigh-scale approach roads renewed at Sicamous and Williams Lake.
The scale-site at Rossland was relocated. The Kinnaird weigh-scale was completed,
and construction started at a new installation at Terrace. The north-bound weigh-
scale at Pattullo Bridge was damaged when hit by a motor-vehicle in the spring, and
it has since been replaced and relocated on the outside traffic lane. This has allowed
for a better traffic pattern to be developed on the eastern bridge approach, which
allows for a more efficient traffic flow and minimizes the conflict between commercial
traffic and passenger traffic.
It will be necessary in the next few years to renew a number of scale installations
throughout the Province as many of our facilities are reaching their life expectancy.
Some of the replacements will be at new sites where changes have been made in the
highway system.
The opening of Highway No. 5 to traffic in the year 1968 will place an additional work load on the Weigh-scale Branch. This route will attract not only the
" line haul " trucker and commercial bus operations, but will be a major new route
for private freight vehicles and bus charter trips. In order to exercise a reasonable
degree of control not only of the weight and size regulations, but to ensure that the
proper fees are collected from non-resident vehicles, additional weigh-scale sites have
been acquired at Tete Jaune Cache on Highway No. 16 and near Kamloops on Highway No. 5: It is planned to open the new station at Kamloops in 1968, while Tete
Jaune Cache station will be deferred until traffic patterns have become established.
The trucking industry, as part of the general transportation system in the Province, does not, in itself, generate major commercial growth, but rather provides the
means by which the industrial development of the Province is sustained. During
the year under review, the industry has been able to meet the multitude of demands
placed upon it. These demands have been reflected in not only the total number of
permits issued, but also in the increased number of inquiries received from nonresidents, not only from the other Provinces of Canada, but from the United States.
These inquiries range from information in regard to regulations and terms of operation to the opportunities available in the trucking industry.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967
GG  11
As the general highway pattern in the Province has been fairly well established,
this Department, in conjunction with the Department of Highways, has been actively
reviewing the existing regulations with a view to simplifying the requirements and
up-dating standards in order to allow the trucking industry to compete on an equal
basis with other forms of transportation and at the same time, as far as it is possible,
to ensure that our regulations are not inconsistent with those in effect in other Provinces and adjacent American States. During the year it was possible to amend
Schedule 6 of the regulations and permit the operation on Highway No. 97 from
Prince George to Dawson Creek at a gross weight of 76,000 pounds, as well as on
Highway No. 3 from Kinnaird to Yahk. These amendments make it possible for
" line haul" freight operators to load to their maximum weight at Vancouver and
remain at that weight while travelling through the Province on the main highway
system.
The number of restricted-route permits issued for the movement of forest products on selected highways has shown a slight increase over last year. These permits
are normally renewed on a quarterly basis at the option of the permittee, and it is
impossible at any given time to determine the actual number in use. Records indicate though that the number of permits validated during the year reached a high of
1,520 compared to 1,250 for the preceding year.
Transportation of pulp chips from the source of raw materials to pulp-mills was
maintained at the same level as last year. In order that this product may be hauled
at a competitive and economic rate, truck and trailer combinations consisting of six
axles with a gross vehicle weight of 99,000 pounds are allowed on selected routes
throughout the Province. In view of new pulp-mill construction, it is expected that
in the year 1968 the pulp-chip hauling will increase, particularly in the East Kootenay.
The transportation of liquids by bulk tankers has steadily increased, particularly
from the Lower Mainland to the State of Washington. The variety of products now
moved is far too numerous to mention in a report of this type, but it is safe to say if
the product can be liquefied, it can and will be transported by truck. The only limiting factor is that of the safety of the load and the safety of the general public. As this
type of transportation grows, it will be necessary to further expand the regulations
governing the transportation of commodities considered to be dangerous.
I am pleased to report that the Department has continued to receive the excellent co-operation and close liaison from other Government departments, municipal
police forces, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in carrying out our mutual
responsibilities in the administration of the Act and regulations.
 GG 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERMIT ISSUING OFFICES
Weigh-scales
Cache Creek.
Chetwynd.
Dawson Creek.
Kamloops.
Midway.
Pacific.
Ruskin.
Rutland.
Saanich.
Deas Island North.
Parksville.
Sicamous.
Deas Island South.
Duncan.
Pattullo Bridge.
Port Mann East.
Terrace.
Tupper Creek.
Fernie.
Port Mann West.
Vanderhoof.
Fort St. John.
Prince George North.
Vernon.
Golden.
Hunter Creek.
Prince George South.
Quesnel.
Victoria (termpermits).
Williams Lake.
Kaleden.
Rossland.
Portable Patrols
Yahk.
Cranbrook.
Okanagan.
Prince George.
Lower Mainland.
Peace River.
Victoria.
Nelson.
Department of Finance Government Agents
Alberni.
Ganges.
Powell River.
Ashcroft.
Invermere.
Prince George.
Atlin.
Burns Lake.
Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Clinton.
Kelowna.
Quesnel.
Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Kitimat.
Lillooet.
Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Creston.
Merritt.
Salmon Arm.
Duncan.
Nanaimo.
Smithers.
Fernie.
Fort Nelson.
Fort St. John.
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Abbotsford.
Chilliwack.
Cloverdale.
Dawson Creek.
Kamloops.
Mission.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
Oliver.
Penticton.
Pouce Coupe.
Terrace.
Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Williams Lake.
Motor-vehicle Branch Offices
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Pemberton.
Sechelt.
Squamish.
Trail.
Miscellaneous
Valemount.
Vancouver (Main).
Vancouver (East).
Vancouver (Point
Grey).
Victoria.
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport, Vancouver.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967 GG 13
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation )
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer
GENERAL
The responsibility for the administration of railways, aerial tramways, pipelines, compressor-stations, tank-farms, and the storage and handling of flammable
and explosive commodities adjacent to railways comes within the scope of the
Engineering Branch, as does industrial transportation and the training of drivers
and enforcement officers in the use and testing of air brakes. Safety devices designed for use on motor-vehicles are tested and approved by the Engineering
Branch. Bridges and structures used in railways, pipe-lines, aerial tramways, and
on industrial roads are checked, approved, and inspected by the Department
engineers.
In the operation of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway the Engineering Branch
is required to check the dispatching of trains, the facilities for communications, such
as microwave radio, the inspection and approval of electrical installations, and the
inspection and approval of high-voltage (up to 500 kilowatts) transmission-lines
crossing the railway. The approval of new extensions includes the approval of all
engineering, as well as bridges and structures, with a final inspection before revenue
traffic may commence. As with all other railways under the Department's jurisdiction, the Engineering Branch is required to make an annual inspection and submit
reports in accordance with conditions found to exist at the time of the inspections.
The signalization of railway grade crossings has always been considered a
specialized field of engineering. This function is carried out by the Engineering
Branch, and a separate report with a recommendation is submitted with each application for signalization.
A few years ago all pulp-mills in British Columbia were on tidewater and
isolated from rail connection. In recent years the trend has changed so that all
pulp-mills now have a direct rail connection by being on one of the main-line railways, including the Pacific Great Eastern, or the pulp-mill is served by railway-car
barge, each mill having its own in-plant railway connected with a barge slip, and
each such in-plant railway having its own motive power. In this regard some mills
have steam locomotives, some diesel locomotives, and others trackmobiles. This
involves the training and certification of railway men, and in this regard the Engineering Branch is responsible for training and certifying the train crews as well as inspecting the track and equipment in all such plants throughout the Province, and this
includes plants served by railways under Federal jurisdiction.
The responsibility for the entire field of safety and accident prevention on railway operations is now a function of the Engineering Branch, and reports are submitted to the Workmen's Compensation Board. In this regard, therefore, the
Engineering Branch must maintain a close liaison with all facets of railroading and
must keep up to date with respect to accident-prevention practices throughout
Canada and the United States.   In this respect, close relations must be maintained
 GG 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
between management and the unions concerned if safe practices are to be enforced
throughout the industry.
Dock facilities and port railways have given the Engineering Branch additional
responsibilities. Bulk commodities such as potash and sulphur arrive by rail, and
large yards and switching facilities are necessary to accommodate the movement of
heavy tonnage during accelerated programmes of ship-loading. Coal has been
recently added as a bulk commodity. One of the wharves now utilizes 12 miles of
trackage with five locomotives working at times on a 24-hour around-the-clock
basis. It is expected that the trend to port rail facilities will increase in the near
future, as will truck transport, because the trend is to containerized shipments,
handled by ship, rail, and road transport.
The Engineering Branch is responsible for safety in public transport via aerial
tramway and in mountain ski areas. The Branch was largely responsible for the
new Canadian Standard Code to govern passenger-carrying aerial tramways in
Canada. The first code of regulations in the English language was written in 1949
by the Engineering Branch and was used in the United States and as far away as
New Zealand; however, as the tramway industry grew, improvements to tramways,
particularly those built in Switzerland and Austria, created a demand for a new
Canadian standard so lifts and tramways could be built abroad for Canadian use
and vice versa. Since the adoption of the new code in British Columbia, tramways
are being built in the United States to the Canadian code for use in that country.
All existing tramways in British Columbia have been up-graded to the new standards
during 1967, and seven new lifts have been designed and built according to the
new code.
Since 1962 there has been a Canada-wide demand for a uniform Canadian
pipe-line code to establish the special standards required to cope with the Canadian
climate and conditions in the industry throughout Canada. In this regard the
Chief Engineer of the Department is the Chairman of the C.S.A. Committee on the
Gas Pipe-line Code, and accordingly liaison has been established between the
Department and the National Energy Board in Ottawa, where meetings were held
in November, 1967. As a result a Canada-wide standard on the construction of
gas pipe-lines has been agreed upon, making it possible for a standard acceptable
alike to the 10 Provinces of Canada and the National Energy Board. The study
continues, and a special committee has been set up to bring about a new standard
to govern pipe manufactured for high-pressure gas pipe-lines as the present United
States standard does not lend itself to Canadian conditions.
In the field of air-brake research the Engineering Branch has continued to
blaze a trail in a wilderness of confusion. All air-brake components are made in
the United States, and each State has a different concept of what is required on
highway and industrial vehicles, and to make matters more difficult the Federal
Interstate Commerce Commission does not seem able to obtain a uniform standard.
As far back as 1955 the Engineering Branch had representation in Washington,
D.C, on truck brake regulations. At that time the Interstate Commerce Commission was seeking axle-by-axle protection, but the proposal was defeated; notwithstanding, the Engineering Branch at that time adopted the 1955 I.C.C. proposal
under the Industrial Transportation Act and so has, for the past 12 years, been
leading in air-brake research. One of the salient features of the Branch's success
in this regard is the publishing of approved schedule systems in a simple plan form.
This requires that the component parts be tested and approved, and thus gadgets
and poorly engineered components, which are made only to sell, are eliminated.
During 1967 an extensive research has been conducted with respect to spring
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG  15
parking-brakes, and in this regard Prof. W. O. Richmond, P.Eng., of the University
of British Columbia, has been engaged as a consultant by the Engineering Branch
to assist in this controversial field of research.
The Engineering Branch assists the Motor-vehicle Branch in the evaluation and
design of air-brake systems for road vehicles, particularly school buses. The Society
of Automotive Engineers in the United States has recommended that for school
buses three breaking systems should be incorporated—namely, (1) the service
brake or primary system, (2) the emergency or secondary system which becomes
available should the primary system fail, keeping the control and stopping under
the control of the driver, and (3) a parking-brake system which comes on in the
event the first two systems fail. Such a system, known as Schedule U, has been
installed on school buses during 1967, and further research by the Engineering
Branch has, by the end of 1967, produced an alternative dual system for school
and other buses which gives the necessary added protection without the use of
protection valves.
RAILWAYS
During the year all railways were inspected in accordance with the Railway
Act. Separate reports covering the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, the British
Columbia Hydro Railway, the Englewood Division Railway of Canadian Forest
Products Limited, the Crown Zellerbach Nanaimo Lakes Railway, and the MacMillan, Bloedel Railway at Nanaimo River are included further on in this Report.
The railway at Kitimat was inspected and found to be in order. The motive
power was tested and certified, and the crews checked as to operating procedure.
On the same trip the Inspecting Engineer inspected the railway of the Columbia
Cellulose Corporation at Watson Island, near Prince Rupert. It was found the
locomotive was in a poor state of repair. Wheels had sharp flanges, and an indifferent attitude existed with management. The locomotive could not be certified, and
the Engineering Branch is taking steps to correct matters at this plant.
At Prince George the three pulp-mill in-plant railways were inspected. The
attitude of management in these plants as to safety matters is excellent, and everything possible is being done to promote railway safety. The Northwood Pulp and
Paper Company has its own diesel-electric locomotive and operates an interchange
with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. It also has a trackmobile for dumping
chips.   This operation was found to be first class.
The Prince George Pulp and Paper Company has two trackmobiles to handle
chip-dumping, and the Pacific Great Eastern Railway switches the plant. The
chlorine and ammonia unloading were given special attention as these are classed
as dangerous commodities.   The trackage and facilities were found to be in order.
The Intercontinental pulp-mill was not yet in operation during the track inspection; however, the track was in order and was properly installed with no close
clearances.   A follow-up inspection will be made early in 1968.
Adjacent to the pulp-mills a new oil refinery has been completed during 1967.
This plant is served by both pipe-line and railway, and both pipe-line and trackage
were inspected. A close clearance existed at the tank-car loading-racks, but this
was corrected before the plant opened for traffic.
The in-plant railway of the pulp-mills at Kamloops and Castlegar were both
inspected during the year. Special instructions were given as to car-handling as
it was found, at times, bulldozers were used to move cars. This is considered
a dangerous practice, and trackmobiles were obtained and employees trained and
examined as to safe practices in railway operation.
 GG 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Plans for the railway facilities at Crestbrook Industries pulp-mill, near Canal
Flats, have been approved, and the trackage was under construction by the end
of 1967.
At Powell River a new barge slip has been completed with new yard trackage.
A trackmobile has been installed to do the switching. This machine is equipped
with air brakes, and crews were trained and examined by engineers from the
Engineering Branch. At Port Mellon the track and locomotive were inspected and
found to be in order so that certificates could be issued.
At Woodfibre the barge slip was inspected, as were the tracks in the yard.
A trackmobile is in operation at this plant, and as it was purchased without air
brakes, the company was instructed to equip the machine accordingly with the
regulations, Part V.
On Vancouver Island the Harmac pulp-mill trackage and locomotive were
inspected. This operation is in a satisfactory condition and well handled. At
Crofton the trackage and locomotive were inspected. Certain work was required,
which was promptly done on the part of the company. At Alberni the pulp-mill
trackage and locomotive were found to be properly maintained with certified crews
doing the switching, while at Duncan Bay the track and barge slip were found in
order. The steam locomotive at this site was hydrostatically tested, and it was
found the air compressor was in poor shape. The Inspecting Engineer made
arrangements to have the compressor overhauled while a spare compressor was
borrowed from Nanaimo Lakes.
At Chemainus the logging-railway connecting the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway with the log-dump at tidewater was inspected. This operation was found
to be in good operating condition. The safety device at the dump, developed by
the Engineering Branch several years ago, still continues to serve the interests of
safety at this operation. The steam locomotive No. 1044 was hydrostatically tested,
and the boiler was certified for 185 p.s.i. working steam pressure. The stand-by
locomotive was also tested and found to be in safe condition. The plant track was
inspected, and it is noted considerable ties were changed during the year.
In Victoria the plant railways of Morris Greene Industries and British Columbia
Forest Products were inspected, as were the locomotive cranes operating on these
railways. Both steam-crane boilers were tested and the boilers certified. At one
of the plants a large portable steam boiler was tested and approved for 150 p.s.i.
working steam pressure.
The locomotive cranes at the shipyards and the foundries in the Vancouver
area were inspected and certified, and the tracks in some cases required repairs as
locomotive cranes become dangerous when operating on soft and poorly aligned
track.
In the Revelstoke area the locomotive cranes used in the pole-yards were
tested and approved.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Chief Engineer's Report
During the third week in September, the annual inspection of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway was conducted by track motor from North Vancouver through to
Fort St. John and Dawson Creek in the Peace River District. The chief engineer,
the regional manager, the chief right-of-way agent, and other officials and the
appropriate roadmasters of the railway accompanied me during the inspection.
Two track motors were used, one following the other at the prescribed distance in
accordance with rules.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG  17
It was noted slashing had not been completed between West Vancouver and
Mileage 14.00, which had been discussed during preliminary inspection earlier in
the year. This, however, was to be in hand during the winter as crews became
available. A great improvement was noted in track conditions between North
Vancouver and Squamish, especially where 100-pound rail has been laid with
creosoted ties and crushed-rock ballast.   Alignment was good.
The number of miles of 100-pound rail laid in 1967 was 5.6, so that a total
of 160 miles is now laid with 100-pound rail. Of the total of 2,671,200 railway
ties on the main line, approximately 45 per cent are now creosoted No. 1 ties.
Crushed-rock ballast is now being used on this line, and the track is up to main-line
standards. It is interesting to note in this regard Canadian Pacific Railway locomotives of the 3,000-horsepower class were borrowed from the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1967 to make trial runs on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. The track
stood up and the locomotives performed as well on this line as they did on the
transcontinental railway for which they were designed.
The yards at North Vancouver, Squamish, Lillooet, Williams Lake, Chetwynd,
Dawson Creek, and Fort St. John were inspected and, with the exception of details,
were found to be in proper condition. A special inspection was made of the Prince
George South Yard. This yard is better described as an industrial park as it contains
miles of tracks and sidings where various industries have been established over the
past three years. A new chemical plant was inspected during the tour of inspection,
as were sawmills, pole-yards, creosoting plants, machinery display depots, oil-
storage and propane-storage plants, and a huge material depot of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.
All spur lines, sidings, and trackage have been approved by the railway submitting plans in the prescribed manner so they could be approved in accordance
with the requirements of the Railway Act.
Overhead wire crossings of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
lines were inspected at all points on the line. The 500-kilovolt transmission-line
was nearing completion, and it was noted the crossings of the 500-kilovolt lines are
constructed in accordance with plans submitted and approved; however, it was
noted some of the smaller lines constructed over the past five years do not have the
dead-ending shown in the drawings which were approved prior to construction.
This was taken up with British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority officials, and
it was agreed certain crossings will require to be up-graded when the opportunity
permits.
The following work was completed during the 1967 betterment programme:—
Miles of 100-pound rail laid        5.6
Miles of sidings installed        3.1
Number of sidings installed        5
Bridges rebuilt       7
Bridges replaced with fill       1
Miles of ballast in track  147
Miles of rail rewelded ends     28
Miles of ditching and shoulder     67
Miles of extensions completed  42 miles of track laid, 74 complete
Number of bridges retied     11
The tunnel at the summit of Pine Pass has given trouble over the years with
water seepage causing serious icing during the winter months. In former years,
doors were installed at the north portal to prevent icing due to wind. During 1967
a programme of concrete impregnation was carried out whereby liquid concrete
 GG 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
was pumped into the rock walls, floor, and roof of the tunnel. It was noted concrete extruded several hundred feet distant as it followed and sealed fissures in the
rock and, as a result, the water seepage was reduced. It is expected this will lead
to a satisfactory conclusion at this location.
During construction " shoe-flies " were constructed in the main line around
permanent bridge-sites, especially on long tangent locations. This was a far-sighted
programme at the time as temporary wooden structures in final location sites would
have prevented or impeded the installation of permanent steel bridges on tangent
at a time when traffic would warrant their construction. During 1967 steel bridges
were completed in two of these sites—Hasler, Mileage 642.5, and Pine No. 1, Mileage 601.3—with others planned for 1968.
In the 1966 Report, signalization was recommended at the following mile-
Recommended for 1965/66 and Completed in 1967
Mileage 3.49, main line:   24th Street, West Vancouver.
Mileage 6.36, main line:  West Vancouver.
Mileage 497.70, main line:  Hart Highway.
Hart Highway.
Hart Highway.
Hart Highway, Chetwynd.
The following level crossings are recommended for signalization in 1968:—
Recommended for 1968 and to Be Completed in 1968
Mileage 4.25, main line:   29th Street, West Vancouver.
Mileage 42.44, main line:   Leskies, Squamish.
Mileage 65.20, main line:  Pemberton Highway.
Mileage 71.17, main line:  Pemberton Highway.
Mileage 466.00, main line:   Cariboo Highway, Prince George.
Mileage 579.3, main line:  Hart Highway.
Mileage 6.1, Kennedy spur:  Hart Highway.
Mileage 11.2, Dawson subdivision:   Hart Highway.
List of All Signalized Crossings on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
as of December 31, 1967
Mileage 499.85, main line:
Mileage 511.25, main line:
Mileage 658.50, main line:
Mileage
Name of Crossing
Date
Status,
Installed
1967
1956
In.
1967
In.
1956
In.
1967
In.
1964
In.
1966
In.
1966
In.
1960
Removed.
1967
In.
1966
In.
1960
Removed.
1963
In.
1966
In.
1956
In.
1967
Not completed.
1966
In.
1967
In.
1967
In.
1967
In.
1967
In.
1959
In.
1959
In.
2.1, mainline...
3.49, main line..
3.62, mainline-
6.36, main line...
36.2, main line	
39.0, main line.....
39.1, mainline —
39.3, main line...
44.35, main line...
159.1, mainline—
253.9, mainline ..
344.8, main line	
373.0, main line.—
384.1, mainline	
466.0, main line.....
486.0, main line	
497.7, main line	
499.85, main line.
511.2, mainline.—.
658.5, main line....
60.3, Dawson subdivision_
1.5, Taylor spur.. 	
13th St....
24th St....
25th St....
Burkhill..
Woodfibre _
Logging Crossing..
Squamish Access-
Cleveland Ave	
Brackendale	
Lillooet  	
100 Mile House..
Macalister	
Dog Prairie	
Quesnel  	
Prince George	
Salmon Valley	
Odell	
Summit Lake-
Bear Lake	
Chetwynd-
Alaska Highway-
Alaska Highway..
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967 GG  19
The advent of improved diesel power on this railway has raised its status to
that of the other two leading railways in Canada in so far as equipment, road-bed,
and operation are concerned. To cope with the maintenance of its 57 diesel-
electric locomotives, the railway has completed an extension to its Squamish shops
during 1967. The extension includes a modern drop-pit so that diesel bogies
(trucks) can be lowered and turned with a minimum of manpower and time. This
new equipment and facilities, coupled with the modern wheel-truing machine, axle
lathes, wheel lathes, and presses, places the Squamish shops of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway by far the largest and best-equipped railway locomotive-shops in
British Columbia.
In addition, new and modern paint-shops have been installed at Squamish,
where railway cars and locomotives can be painted and baked by modern methods
equal to anything on other railways in Canada. In addition to the car and locomotive repair facilities, a modern forge-shop with oil furnaces and power-hammer
has been installed, including spring-making and temporary equipment.
A large parking-lot has been black-topped adjacent to the shops to accommodate parking for employees and others serving the railway.
During the latter part of the year, the railway celebrated Railway Day in
Squamish when the new shops were shown to the public, and at which time the
Prime Minister of British Columbia, who is also president of the railway, officiated
at the presentation of an ancient steam locomotive to the Municipality of Squamish.
This locomotive was originally No. 2 of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and was
the railway's first steam locomotive, built in 1910. (No. 1 was a construction
dinkey.) The locomotive ran between North Vancouver and Horseshoe Bay from
1914 to 1920. It was then sold to Comox Logging and Railway at Courtenay,
where it hauled logs from 1920 to 1946. It was taken to Ladysmith in 1946, where
it hauled logs until 1961 for Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited, when it was retired
from service due to dieselization.
One of the Branch engineers, knowing its history, arranged to have Crown
Zellerbach donate the locomotive back to its original owners, the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway Company. At the Railway Day celebrations at Squamish, Mr.
R. G. Rogers, president of Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited, officially presented
the engine to the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, president of the railway, who, in
turn, presented it to Mr. P. J. Brennan, Reeve of the District of Squamish. This
engine is therefore preserved and dedicated as a monument to the early pioneers
who built the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and the Town of Squamish.
Inspection of Takla Extension
On October 5, 1967, in company with officials of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, an inspection was made by track motor of the Takla extension of the railway, a distance of 77.6 miles.
The track was completed and ballasted at the time of the inspection, with the
exception of a sink-hole area between Mileages 25 and 29. This area was slow-
ordered to 10 miles per hour.
The line is laid with untreated No. 1 ties, using 85- and 70-pound re-lay steel,
with considerable new 85-pound rail laid during 1967. The track is in good alignment.
Bridges were inspected and found to be up to standard, glulam spans having
been used and installed to standards approved by the Department.
 GG 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dispatching was checked from various locations, and at all times communication was maintained with the dispatcher in Vancouver.
At Fort St. James it was noted an excellent job of track clean-up had been completed. The piggy-back ramp was completed and in order, and the facilities to the
Imperial Oil Company bulk plant were inspected and found to be up to the required
standards.
It is recommended that both the north and south turnouts from the main line
to serve this extension be equipped with reflectorized switch targets rather than oil-
burning switch lights.
In view of this extension being properly completed, I would recommend that
pursuant to section 179 of the Railway Act it be declared open for the carriage of
traffic.
Summary
It can be reported that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is being properly
maintained and operated and its facilities are being expanded commensurate with
the growth of British Columbia. I have found it to be in safe operating condition
and that the public interest is being properly served.—Robert E. Swanson, P.Eng.,
Chief Engineer.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 30th an inspection was made of the railway facilities owned and
operated by the above Authority in the Fraser Valley and New Westminster districts.
In company with Mr. Fred Friedel and Mr. W. Alcock, maintenance-of-way
superintendent and roadmaster respectively, a trip was made by a " Kalamazoo "
track vehicle between New Westminster and Chilliwack, a distance of 63.8 miles.
At this time the main-line sidings, shops, and buildings were inspected. During the
year 10,000 yards of crushed-rock ballast were laid as part of the regular track
maintenance. Seven thousand treated ties were laid, together with 2 miles of 85-
pound re-lay steel.
Industrial expansion over the entire line has necessitated the installation of 20
new sidings. The diversion at Langley, which would have by-passed the trackage
through the main part of the city, was not completed due to the anticipated development failing to materialize. However, it is expected that the diversion will go
through in 1968.
In the freight yard in Burnaby, a 50-car receiving and departure track was laid
to facilitate the hauling of increased traffic.
The grade has been laid for a new spur which will serve Associated Foundry
Limited in Newton. The completion of this project will depend on the foundry's
decision to move from its Burnaby Lake line.
Highway-crossing protection signals at Newton, Langley, Abbotsford, and
Chilliwack were in working order.
All bridges were inspected and found to be in good condition, with creosoted
timbers used throughout. These included Serpentine River, Salmon River, Gifford
Slough, Chilliwack River, Vedder River, Knox Slough, and Whatlam Road bridges.
Mileage posts, derail signs, and other markers, with the exception of whistle
posts and cross blocks, are of metal construction. The numerals or letters are coated
with reflectorized paint and provide excellent visibility. The installation of reflectorized targets on main-track switch stands was authorized by Order in Council.
These are in use throughout the system and are proving quite satisfactory.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967 GG 21
The new equipment-maintenance shop was completed in 1967 and made available to the mechanical forces. The shop is well designed and is equipped with a 25-
ton overhead crane with 5-ton auxiliary which will facilitate the handling of heavy
machinery and car parts. A new G.M. 1,000-horsepower diesel-electric locomotive
was added to the fleet, bringing the complement to 15 diesel-electric and two electric
locomotives.
Rolling-stock inspections carried out during the year have revealed no cause for
complaint, which indicated an excellent maintenance programme.
Track-maintenance forces were observed in the area of Mileage 54 working
under the protection of standard flagging procedures.
Some cross blocks require repainting, and it is understood that this will be taken
in hand at once.
However, in general the operation was found to be in good condition.—
W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Crown Zellerbach Canada Logging Railway
Chief Engineer's Report
During the first week in November, 1967, the annual inspection was made of
the Crown Zellerbach Railway from Nanaimo Lakes to Ladysmith. Twenty-two
miles of main-line track were inspected by track motor. Mr. Gordon Naylor, superintendent, and Mr. F. Duncan accompanied me during the inspection.
Generally, the track was found to be in good alignment and well maintained.
There appeared to be a shortage of ties spread out along the right-of-way in comparison with previous years, and the number of renewals for 1967 was questioned. The
company's tie-mill burned down, and arrangements for an outside tie contract were
pending at the time of the inspection. In the past this railway had been using yellow
cedar ties, and it was observed that yellow cedar ties have lasted as well as creosoted
ties used on other railways on Vancouver Island.
All the bridges were inspected, and it was found proper maintenance is being
done on an orderly basis. No serious defects were found, with the exception of
proper terminations of the Jordon rails on the Nanaimo River bridge, near Extension.
The Branch was notified subsequent to the inspection that this condition had been
corrected within three weeks after the inspection.
The north approach of the Nanaimo River bridge was completely renewed in
1967, the south approach renewal having been reported in the 1966 Annual Report.
The 1967 work on the north approach entailed all new red cedar piling with new caps
and sills. This work was completed during the late summer shutdown, and an on-
the-job inspection was made at that time by one of our Branch engineers. This
bridge is now in a satisfactory condition.
The log-loading works were found to be in satisfactory condition at First Lake.
The log dump at Ladysmith and the yards were inspected and found satisfactory.
Bark and other hazards appeared to be cleaned up on a regular basis. The rigging
and equipment used for dumping were found to be up to the required standards.
The shops and the motive power were inspected. The diesel locomotive had
given trouble during the year, and arrangements were made by our Branch engineers
to have the wheels turned at Squamish, where the most up-to-date facilities in British
Columbia exist for such specialized locomotive repairs.
The line is operated jointly by Crown Zellerbach and MacMillan Bloedel, the
latter company operating steam locomotives and the former diesel-electric motive
power.   Dispatching is done by Crown Zellerbach from the " Diamond " in Lady-
 GG 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
smith, where the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway crosses this line. The dispatching
system was in order and proper records were in evidence.
The railway crossings were inspected and found to be in order. Slashing out
was required at the McKay Lake road crossing.
It can be reported this railway is in good safe condition and is being properly
maintained and operated.—Robert E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer.
Canadian Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
During the period November 6 to 10, 1967, inspections were made of the railway and facilities owned and operated by the above company on its Englewood
Logging Division.
In company with Roadmaster Arthur Home and Bridge Foreman Gary Collins,
a trip was made by power-car over the main haulage line from Beaver Cove to the
Sutton reload, a distance of approximately 91 miles.
The sidings at the Croman, Woss, Duncan, Maquilla, and Sutton reloads were
also inspected and found to be in order.
The following conditions were noted:—
Beaver Cove Dump Trestle:   Completely redecked, also caps, stringers,
and bracing.   New piling was driven within the last five years.
Beaver Cove Yard Tracks: Good condition.   Some packing missing from
guard-rails and frogs. Highway signs are in good order.
Span, Mile 0.4: Fairly good.
Kokish River Bridge: Will require new ties and guard-rails in 1968.  The
steel span is rusting badly.   It is strongly recommended that a good
sand-blasting job be carried out next summer and the metal parts of
this bridge be repainted.
Elk River Bridge: Shoring at north end of bridge is good and no movement is indicated.   Renew bad-order ties.
East Fork Bridge:  Ties reported as being badly cut due to derailments
have been renewed or turned.   Bad-order guard to be renewed.
Tsultan River Bridge:  Renew ties.  There is no indication of movement
at north side cement footing where water sloughing is reported. This
should be watched at low water.   Clean out brush.
Halfway Island Bridge:  Some stringers showing signs of rotting.   Should
be checked by drilling.   Secure loose guard-rails.
Noomas Creek Bridge: Check stringers for rotting.   Finish brushing out.
Storey Creek Bridge: Shim upstream Pile No. 1 bent at north end.   Clean
out brush.
Kinmin Creek Bridge:   Clean out brush.    Intermediate cap has been
shimmed with good bearing.
Main Line at Siding No. 3: Renew bad-order frog.
Bridge at Mile 21.5:  Creek channel is filling up.   Recommend cleaning
out to prevent flooding.
Mile 23 to Mile 25: Good ballast conditions.
Steele Creek Bridge: Eighty-five new braces were applied and other braces
respiked.   Bottom upstream span stringer to be renewed on account
of dry-rot in core.
K10 Twin Bridge: Poor bearing at rail and plumb piles, south end No. 1
bent.   Drill cap; it appears to be rotting.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967 GG 23
Kl 1 Twin Bridge: Bent No. 2 wired to Bent No. 1, Bent No. 3 wired back
also and holding satisfactorily.   Consideration is being given to replacing K10 and Kl 1 with fills.
Siding No. 6: Replace poor rail on main line, west side.
Woss Yard: Straighten switch stand at north end.   Renew missing blocking in frogs and guard-rails.
Gold Creek Bridge: One pile in the fourth bent closest to south end tower
was cut off at ground-level and mud block put in.   Follow this procedure with remainder of piles in this bent on account of being bad
at ground-level.
Rice Creek:  Being replaced by culvert and fill.
Groves Creek Bridge: Good condition.
Davie Creek Bridge: Shim Pile No. 1 bent, north end.   Cap in this bent
is a buckskin and starting to rot.   Some ties are spike split.
Maquilla Bridge: Rebuilt 1967.   Good condition.
Mile 48 to Mile 54: Ditching required.  Water on track.
Fire Creek Bridge: Good condition.
Mile 54.4:  Straighten bent switch stand.
Vernon Yard: Renew packing missing from frogs and guard-rails.
Generally the track is in good condition with the exception of those portions
between Mileages 26 to 28.5 and 32.5 to 35. The rail is 70-pound weight and not
in good condition, with numerous " Dutchmen " inserted. This can be dangerous,
as evidenced by the broken rail end found a few miles north of Woss on the day of
this inspection. It is recommended that the 70-pound rail be replaced with 80- or
85-pound rail. A considerable number of angle bar bolts were found to be loose,
caused generally by rail movement due to the absence of rail anchors. This also can
cause rail breakages with resultant derailments.
Rail Cars 121, 122, 125, 129, 130, and Internal-combustion Locomotive 252
were inspected, reservoirs tested, and certificates issued.
Samuel J. Hardy passed a successful examination as a diesel-electric engineer.
A number of skeleton logging-cars were inspected and found to be in good condition,
with the testing of air-brake appliances being carried out by the company car-shop
forces at regular intervals.
An independent survey of the railway bridges on the entire Englewood Division
was carried out by Dobson Construction, and its conclusions are considered when
making out this report.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
MacMillan Bloedel Railway
Chief Engineer's Report
An inspection was made of the MacMillan Bloedel spur of the Nanaimo Lakes
Railway during the first week of November. This railway spur serves the MacMillan
Bloedel Nanaimo River operation and connects the operation by rail from the Nanaimo Lakes main line. A railway bridge over the Nanaimo River is the focal point
of interest to the Branch engineers as this bridge employs the first large glulam span
used on railways in British Columbia. The glulam span is the third bridge to be
constructed at this point. The first one was replaced after 20 years by a red cedar
structure which washed out during high water. The glulam span was installed, which
gave the necessary river clearance and has proved quite satisfactory. The 1967 inspection revealed the bridge to be in good condition.
 GG 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The track and the loading-works were inspected and found to be in order. Both
steam locomotives were tested during the year and the boilers certified.
This operation can be reported in a safe and satisfactory condition.—Robert
E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer.
Canadian Industries Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 23rd an inspection was made of the barge slip, trackage, and
diesel locomotive owned and operated by the above company at its James Island
operation.
The locomotive was inspected and the air reservoirs hydrostatically tested.
Since the last inspection, the wheels on the right side of the locomotive continue
to wear to a greater degree than the left side. The abrasive shoes that were applied
improved the contour of the tread but not sufficient to warrant a further application.
It is strongly recommended that in order that the tire wear be more evenly
distributed the locomotive should be turned end for end. The flange wear can also
be minimized.
Proper close clearance signs as indicated to Mr. Ron Hurst are required at the
barge-slip entrance.
Generally the railway is in good condition.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 23 rd an inspection was made of the railway facilities owned and
operated by the above company at its Crofton operation.
The diesel-electric locomotive was inspected, reservoirs tested, and certificate
issued with defects noted.
An inspection was made of the trackage in the dock area and also the pulp and
paper area on the upper level. Generally the track is in good condition with close
clearance signs, derails, and derail signs properly displayed.
It was noted, however, that chlorine cars were being unloaded without the
protection of signs denoting that unloading was in progress. The signs require
painting with anti-corrosive paint and relettered white on a blue background. A
derail is required less than a car length from the unloading position on the sulphur
dioxide car unloading track, and the appropriate signs are also required to be positioned when unloading is in progress.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Equipment Inspections during 1967 under the Railway Act
Following is a list of individual inspections carried out by Department engin
eers:
Chlorine tank cars tested and inspected  50
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  37
Electric locomotives inspected and certified  6
Self-powered rail cars inspected and certified  18
Diesel-electric locomotives and cranes inspected  82
Air reservoirs tested and inspected  250
Railway cars inspected on industrial railways  280
 Vancouver Wharves Limited, North Vancouver, showing the track and railway cars
handling potash and other bulk commodities.
New construction on the Mackenzie subdivision of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
 Typical weigh-scale operation.
 Examples of oversize and heavy loads on British Columbia highways.
 Heavy off-highway equipment on private industrial road.
Weighing with new portable scales.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
GG 25
Equipment Inspections during 1967 under the Railway Act—Continued
Railway cars inspected on common-carrier railways
Miles of track inspected
Aerial tramways inspected and certified	
Diesel-electric locomotive engineers examined and certified.
Railway conductors examined and certified	
Power-car operators examined and certified.
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified _
Steam-locomotive engineers examined and certified
Motormen examined and certified (Cominco Ltd.)
Trackmobile operators examined and certified	
Switchmen examined and certified	
460
2,574
89
8
6
4
5
1
14
67
16
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage
Industrial Railways
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Gauge
Main
Sidings,
Etc.
Total
1. Aluminum Company of Canada
Ltd.
Montreal	
Revelstoke
Vancouver
Montreal	
Vancouver
Vancouver
Montreal	
Montreal
Trail	
Trail 	
Vancouver
Vancouver
Squamish
Mesachie Lake
North Vancouver
Prince George
Victoria 	
Victoria
Kamloops
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Mesachie Lake
New Westminster
New Westminster
Calgary, Alta.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Honeymoon
Bay
Vancouver
Kitimat	
Revelstoke	
Crofton	
New Westminster
Nimpkish Valley
Port Mellon	
James Island..	
Watson Island
Trail 	
Kimberley 	
Ladysmith	
2.90
0.92
1.50
3.00
91.00
0.50
6.25
1.00
9.00
21.80
3.19
6.09
0.92
4.00
6.00
110.10
1.00
7.50
7,01
1.00
12.01
25.82
3.00
0.30
7.50
2.00
3.50
0.20
0.30
2.70
5.39
4.10
2.20
1.00
1.50
1.30
3.16
0.33
4.70
5.20
3.76
3.51
1.25
6.00
7.60
111.87
Standard.
3. British Columbia Forest Products
Ltd.
4. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd.	
5. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.	
6. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
7. Canadian Industries Ltd..	
8. Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd	
2.50
3.00
19.10
0.50
1.25
7.01
3.01
4.02
3.00
0.30
1.50
1.90
3.50
0.20
0.30
2.70
3.81
3,10
i.oo
1.30
3.16
Standard.
30" and
standard.
Standard.
Standard.
30" and
standard.
Standard.
18"
10. Cominco Ltd.	
11. Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd.	
12. Elk Falls Co Ltd.
18", 36".
Standard.
13. F M.C. Chemicals Ltd	
Squamish	
Mesachie Lake 	
North Vancouver
Prince George
Vancouver  ....
Victoria 	
Kamloops 	
Chemainus	
Dunsmuir District
Harmac Pulp Div.
Port Alberni	
Powell River	
Vancouver	
Prince George
Crofton	
Port Coquitlam
New Westminster
Taylor	
Prince George
Woodfibre	
Twigg Island
North Vancouver
Honeymoon Bay-
New Westminster-
Hun tingdon-
Chilliwack
14. Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd 	
6.00
0.10
Standard.
18. Island Tug & Barge Ltd.         	
1.58
1.00
2.20
1.50
19. Kamloops Pulp & Paper Ltd.
20. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
Standard.
21. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd 	
22. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
23. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd 	
24. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.	
25. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd 	
Standard.
Standard.
Standard.
Standard.
26. Northwood Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd..
27. Osborne Bay Wharf Co. Ltd	
0.33
28. Pacific Coast Bulk Terminals Ltd.
4.70
29. Pacific Coast Terminals Co. Ltd..
5.20
3.05
30. Pacific, Jefferson Lake, Westcoast
(Pacific Petroleums Ltd.)
31. Prince George Pulp & Paper Ltd...
0.71
3.51
C1)
Standard.
32. Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd	
1.25
6.00
7.00
76.58
Standard.
34. Vancouver Wharves Ltd.'  —...
35. Western Forest Industries Ltd.
36. British    Columbia    Hydro    and
Power Authority
0.60
35.29
Standard.
Standard.
■ Ferry slip.
 GG 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage—Continued
Common-carrier Railways
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Gauge
Main
Sidings,
Etc.
Total
37. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
38. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
39. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver    .
Vancouver to Fort
St. John and
Dawson Creek
Mackenzie spur	
Takla extension „.
788.60
21.70
74.00
172.22
5.20
1.50
960.82
26.90
75.50
Standard.
Standard.
Standard.
Recreational Railways
40. Cowichan Valley Forest Museum
Duncan	
Vancouver
Saanich	
Victoria	
Duncan	
Vancouver	
Saanich	
Fort Steele
0.875
0.42
0.20
1.75
0.125
1.00
0.42
0.20
1.85
36".
18".
10".
0.10
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
There are 56 ski areas in British Columbia with 118 registered facilities, including rope tows, chair-lifts, T-bars, gondola-lifts, and aerial tramways employing
passenger-carrying cabins. Safety in public transportation being the purpose of
all inspections and approvals in this diversified field, much has been done over the
past year to implement the safety standards established by the new Canadian
Standards Code governing the design and construction of all types of passenger-
carrying aerial tramways.
The industry was notified in 1966 that, with the new regulations in force, the
various tramways would require to be up-graded during 1967 to meet the new
safety standards. The need of more rigid safety standards became a matter of
public demand following a serious accident on a chair-lift on Grouse Mountain
in 1966 when a gear-box failed, causing the lift to reverse out of control so that
several passengers were injured. The implementation of the higher standards was
therefore welcomed by the industry as a whole, and the work of conversion went
ahead to completion during 1967.
All existing chair-lifts in British Columbia which did not fully meet the new
standard were converted during the year. In most cases the conversion required
an automatic emergency brake on the bullwheel coupled with an overspeed stop
operating in both directions and, in addition, required an anti-roll-back device
which automatically trips the emergency brake, preventing unintended backward
motion without the impact jolt inherent in ratchet-type back-stops. Over and
above these requirements a satisfactory service brake was required and, in some
cases, the addition of stand-by power, such as a gasoline engine, to unload the lift
should the main power fail during operation.
On the newer lifts, automatic de-ropement stop switches were installed with
rope guards and rope catchers, but on lifts of older designs such devices were considered impracticable unless the lift had been designed to accommodate this modern
type of automatic control. Bullwheel catchers and rope catchers in the mountain
and valley stations have always been a requirement in the British Columbia Regulations, but, to assure safety, these were redesigned in a number of cases.
In addition to the conversions, four new chair-lifts were installed and tested
during the year. The testing of new lifts and converted lifts required our Engineers
being present while dead-weight, such as sand bags, concrete blocks, or lead ingots
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG 27
are loaded on one side of the lift equal to the weight of all the ascending or descending passengers on either side of the lift. When thus loaded with weights, our
Engineers conduct stopping tests, slip tests, back-stop tests, and over-speed tests,
using a stop-watch and setting the deceleration rate according to code requirements.
In addition, all chairs are tested with a weight of six hundred pounds on each chair
while the chair was hammered for soundness. Nine chair-lifts were tested in this
manner during the year, with some of them tested several times. In all, 16 deadweight tests were conducted on chair-lifts alone during the year.
Four new T-bars were installed during the year. The work of inspection on
T-bars is similar to that carried out on chair-lifts, except that dead-weight tests are
not conducted as the passengers are never off the ground during transit. Dangers
to passengers are usually due to falling ropes, T-bars or de-ropements.
The Branch engineers appreciated the acquisition of a Ski-doo during the
year, which permits them to get around the mountain installations to inspect towers
and tower sheaves. This piece of equipment doubles the number of lifts an engineer can inspect, and it adds to the over-all efficiency of the Branch. The Ski-doo
is excellent also for the inspection of rope tows, and its use speeded up the work
in the late part of the year.
The gondola-lift in the Whistler Mountain area is giving excellent service, and
it is serving a large mountain area as it provides transport to the two chair-lifts, the
upper T-bar, and portable rope tows. This area was inspected several times during
the year.
The " sky ride " type of aerial tramway has been given special attention during
1967 as the new code has been enforced during the year. No problems have arisen
on Mount Jarvis or at Kemano, and these trams continue to operate in a satisfactory manner. The hauling-rope at Dog Mountain has been approved until June,
1968, after which this rope is to be renewed as it is nearing the condemning limit
by code requirement.
The main track ropes on the Grouse Mountain Sky Ride were renewed during
1967 as the original ropes were presenting many problems. Our engineers could
not allow the tramway to operate at its designed speed of 10 metres per second,
and it was restricted to a speed of 6 metres, as above this velocity, vibration was
creating problems with broken rivets in the car-supporting members. Repairs were
made to keep the tramway in operation until new ropes could be imported from
Austria. The original ropes proved to be inferior to the specifications authorized
when the lift was built in 1966. The construction of these original ropes was such
that " waviness " was in evidence and " Z " wires were showing evidence of failure.
The new ropes are excellent, and all vibration has been eliminated with their installation. The tramway now operates at full speed of 10 metres per second and
passenger capacity has been increased accordingly. Facilities in both the Valley
Station and the Mountain Station have been improved to accommodate the increase
in traffic.
In conjunction with the Grouse Mountain Sky Ride, a new chair-lift facility
has been added to serve the Blueberry Bowl area. This new lift was built in
Switzerland and installed by Swiss engineers on Grouse Mountain. This lift was
built to the new Canadian code, and the workmanship and the performance is
excellent. The lift tested out with a minimum of difficulty and was completed and
certified to operate on December 24, 1967.
The new chair-lifts at Manning Park, Grandview, and Kimberley were designed in Vancouver by Robert McLellan & Company and built by Murray Latta
Machine Company, of Vancouver. These lifts are top quality and meet the requirements of the code in every way.   The new chair-lift at Mount Last was built
 GG 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
by Mueller in Switzerland with the towers and chairs built in British Columbia by
the Vernon Machine Works. This also is an excellent design and is well built and
installed to meet the new code.
Three of the new T-bars were built by Doppelmayr in Austria and supplied and
installed through Douglas Mervyn, of Kelowna. The equipment was found to be
excellent, and only slight innovations were required in order to comply with the code.
Following is a list of the areas and the facilities throughout British Columbia
which have been registered, approved, and inspected by the Department.
Aerial Tramways Registered with the Department of Commercial
Transport to December 31, 1967
Location No. and Name
Location
Gondola
Chair-
lift
T-bar
J-bar
Tow
Rope
Industrial
Freight
North Vancouver.	
1
1
3
2
2
1
i
~~2~
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
I
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
~1
i
i
i
i
1
2
4
3
1
1
i
1
"l
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
~1
2
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
i
6. Mount Becher.	
Courtenay.	
—
1
Prince George	
11. Wells  	
Wells  .
12. Dog Mountain (B.C. Telephone)	
1
13. Mount Jarvis (C.N.R.) 	
East of Hope	
North of Kamloops	
South of Kamloops	
Mount Revelstoke Park
South-east of Revelstoke...
North of Vemon	
1
14. Tod Mountain          ..    .
16. Mount Revelstoke.. .    .
17. Mount MacKenzie.	
18. Silver Star Mountain
--
West of Invermere  	
71.  ..ihsnn Valley
Manning Park	
Princeton...	
West of Princeton. 	
Fast of Osoyoos
26. North Star Mountain  .
Kimberley	
Fernie
28. Silver King 	
29. Salmo	
Salmo	
30.  Red Mountain
Rossland	
Lakelse Hotsprings	
Salmon Arm	
Kamloops...	
South of Nakusp.	
Smithers    ,	
Prince Rupert 	
Terrace.-	
Kitimat           	
Rogers Pass	
Blue River	
Burns Lake 	
3R. Kitimat
39. Glacier.	
40. Bine. River
—
42. Little Squaw Valley	
North of Williams Lake-
South-east of Quesnel	
East of Hope
—
Prince George
47  Fort St John
Fort St. John   	
48. 100 Mile House  	
100 Mile House	
LaclaHache..	
East of Alberni	
East of Sicamous	
Fniitvaln
54. Mount Last	
West of Kelowna	
South of Kamloops	
-
56,   Mc.Bridp
McBride.	
2    1    13
31
5
64
3
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG 29
 GG 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
GG 31
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG 33
PIPE-LINES
Oil and gas pipe-lines continue to be used more and more as a means of transport. The trend to the north-west of the Province has continued with respect to
oil and gas discovery, and pipe-lines continue to expand to gather this natural resource and transport it to market.
The Branch engineers ha,ve been occupied during the year in evaluating and
processing applications to build new lines or to up-grade present lines to meet with
the demands of changing needs. A great many short feeder lines have been installed
and tested in the new gasfields adjacent to Fort Nelson. Three gas-lines feed the
Westcoast system, which, in itself, has required to be up-graded as to capacity
during the year. This has been accomplished on the part of Westcoast by looping
and by the addition of compressor-stations, and while the Westcoast line itself
operates under the over-all jurisdiction of the National Energy Board, the compressor-stations require to be inspected as to pressure vessels, fire protection, housekeeping, and general safety. Gas pressures ranging up to 1,000 p.s.i. are commonplace in this type of installation, which requires constant vigilance on the part of
our engineers and the operating companies.
All compressor-stations on the Westcoast system and other feeder systems in
the northern area were tested and certified, as were the pumping-stations on the
Trans Mountain Oil pipe-line, the Western Pacific, Trans-Prairie, and the Blueberry systems. Tank-farms were inspected and found to be in order. The compressor-station on the Alberta Natural Gas main transmission-line in the Crowsnest
was inspected and certified.
The Pacific Northern Gas pipe-line, approved in 1966 to transmit gas from
the vicinity of Prince George to Prince Rupert, did not get under way during 1967;
however, Westcoast has pointed out that this line, as originally projected, requires
to be rerouted in several places due to the river conditions in the country through
which the line is to traverse. In addition, the pipe will require to comply with the
new C.S.A. standards, and it is understood at this writing this line will get under
way during 1968.
The lines of Inland Natural Gas Company were inspected where required
during the year, and the compressor-station near Penticton was inspected and certified. It is expected considerable new construction should take place at Inland
during the year 1968.
Columbia Gas, in the Kimberley area, operated normally during the year, and
routine inspections and approvals were carried out in the usual manner.
The British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority in the Lower Mainland
area has been quite active during the year. The activity has been due to up-grading
a number of trunk lines which were formerly considered to be gas mains. In such
cases, statistics with engineering plans were submitted for approval, after which
our engineers attended the tests and issued certificates authorizing such lines to
operate at the higher approved working-pressure. In most cases with B.C. Hydro,
such pipes are hydrostatically tested, and the test is held for 24 hours while the
lines under test are kept under constant surveillance.
Natural gas is being installed in Squamish, and the gas is being transported
as LNG by truck from a liquefication plant in Richmond. The Pacific Great
Eastern Railway is presently preparing to heat its shops in Squamish with natural
gas from the new system. It is expected it will only be a matter of time until pipelines are extended to serve the Squamish area.
The storage and handling of propane on and adjacent to railways is governed
by regulations pursuant to the Railway Act, and the Branch engineers make inspec-
 GG 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
tions of all installations on the P.G.E. and B.C. Hydro and, in addition, they inspect installations on the C.P.R., the C.N.R., and the Great Northern where such
installations are not located on the actual right-of-way and governed by the Railway Committee of the National Transport Commission. This work is always done
in co-operation with the Federal Inspectors as a close liaison exists between the
Engineering Branch and the Transport Commission in Ottawa. All bulk-storage
facilities adjacent to or served by railways were inspected during the year.
The Westridge plant of Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company is served
by the C.P.R. but is on private property. This plant was inspected and certified
for its second term during 1967.
Late in the year 1967 the Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company submitted
plans (through its British Columbia subsidiary company) to construct a 6-inch
jet-fuel pipe-line from Burnaby to the Vancouver International Airport on Sea
Island in Richmond. The new line will connect with all the refineries in the Lower
Mainland area so that they can take advantage of this new common-carrier pipeline to transport jet fuel to the rapidly expanding industry of air transport. The
plans were in order and approved and forwarded to the Deputy Minister for his
attention in obtaining final approval.
In the matter of uniform standards, the Engineering Branch is represented on
the committee of the Canadian Standards Association, and as a result the Branch
has been quite active in the formulation of the new all-Canadian pipe-line codes
for oil and gas pipe-lines. A meeting was held in Ottawa during November, 1967,
at which the National Energy Board and all the Provinces were represented, as
well as the pipe-mills, the steel companies, and the pipe-line companies. As a
result of the deliberations, the Gas Pipe Line Code, as proposed, was amended so
that it was acceptable to the National Energy Board as a basis for Federal regulations, and, as a result, it is hoped the Provinces will see fit to adopt this code so
that regulations will be on a common basis throughout Canada.
In addition, a new section was set up under Canadian Standards Association
to formulate a new all-Canadian standard for high-strength line pipe so the physical
properties of such pipe in future will be compatible with the Canadian climate and
conditions encountered in Canada. The Branch is represented on this committee,
making a total of seven C.S.A. committees in which the Engineering Branch has
active participation.
Statistics as to the activity of the Engineering Branch in pipe-line matters
follow in normal sequence in this Report.
Annual Inspections under the Pipe-lines Act, 1967
Miles of new pipe-line inspected and tested 113.93
Compressor-stations inspected   33
Pumping-stations inspected   17
Water-injection systems inspected      9
Number of tank-farms inspected      4
Approval of plans and specifications for pipe-line projects  49
Number of new extensions to pipe-line projects approved  49
Certificates of inspection issued under the Pipe Lines Act authorizing the operation of new extensions to pipe-line projects  53
Number of pipe-line crossings of railways approved   10
Number of pipe-line crossings of highways approved     9
Number of pipe-line crossings of other pipe-lines approved  21
Power-line crossings over pipe-line right-of-way approved  40
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
New Pipe-lines and Pipe-line Extensions Approved, 1967
GG 35
Name of Company
Oil or
Gas
Project
No.
Pipe-line Location
Mileage
British Columbia Hydro and Power
Authority 	
Gas
B.C. Oil Transmission	
Canadian Kewanee Ltd	
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd..
Oil
Gas
Imperial Oil Ltd—
Mobil Oil Canada Ltd...
Pacific Petroleums Ltd..
Pacific Northern Gas Ltd...
Placid Oil Co._
Tenneco Oil and Minerals Ltd..
Oil
Gas
Uno Tex Petroleum Corporation _
Union Oil Co	
1405
1406
1410
1411
1414
1416
1429
1430
1433
1438
1439
1444
1445
1448
1453
1407
1420
1402
1435
1436
1437
1440
1441
1442
1447
1449
1404
1431
1451
1419
1408
1412
1413
1426
1427
1432
1434
1443
1450
1452
1422
1418
1409
1425
1446
1403
1415
1417
1424
Total-
New Westminster-
Grandview	
Chetwynd..
Vancouver Airport-
Richmond	
Tsawwassen—	
Burnaby	
Surrey..
Tsawwassen (up-grading)..
Vancouver Airport	
Grandview District
(up-grading) „
Richmond (up-grading)	
Tsawwassen	
North Vancouver	
Mission District (up-grading)..
Fort St. John ...
Yoyo Field-
Prince George	
Mile 110, Hart Highway-
Cariboo Indian School	
Taghum... 	
Prince George..
Kelowna	
Vernon 	
Quesnel..
Prince George	
Boundary Lake Field	
Rigel Field	
Rigel Field	
Sierra Field	
Boundary Lake Field .—
Clarke Lake Field	
Apache Field	
Yoyo Field  	
Kotcho Field .	
Buick Creek Field	
Blueberry Field	
Fort St. John	
Jedney Field  	
Clarke Lake Field	
Summit  Lake  to  Prince  Rupert (approved only)	
Yoyo Field	
Inga Field  	
Yoyo Field. 	
Inga Field	
Stoddart Field 	
Wildmint Field	
Bulrush Field	
Prince George	
0.89
0.20
0.20
3.09
0.10
0.10
0.60
1.00
5.00
1.40
5.80
8.40
0.17
1.44
22.90
1.60
2.18
0.30
5.00
2.50
0.16
0.80
0.70
1.80
1.40
0.68
2.00
1.20
3.80
1.90
0.54
5.30
1.50
6.10
3.40
2.80
0.17
0.38
20.60
0.90
436.90
1.29
6.60
2.27
9.79
1.13
2.60
0.75
4.20
584.53
 GG 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CRUDE OIL
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
'TRANS-MOUNTAIN
OIL  PIPE-LINE
TRANS-PRAIRIE
PIPE-LINE
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
GG 37
NATURAL GAS
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
WESTCOAST
TRANSMISSION
->-____■    GAS TRuNK LINE
OF B.C.
— —  INLAND NATURAL
GAS
— ^— COLUMBIA NATURAL
GAS  LIMITED
._-_- ALBERTA NATURAL
GAS TRANSMISSION
LINE
 GG 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
The Industrial Transport Section of the Branch has been very active during
the year. This division has always been a challenge, especially for the new men,
as the tremendous equipment used throughout industry continues to employ new
techniques and to require special methods of test and evaluation by our engineers.
As an example, it was thought when spring brakes or " maxi brakes " were introduced, all braking problems would be solved, but as the application of these devices
increased, it became evident the " maxi brake " was an excellent parking-brake
but it was no match for air application, especially on grades up to 25 per cent. Our
engineers set up a test procedure as a research project and, as a result, found out
the effectiveness of the various devices. Manufacturers were quick to admit the
effectiveness of these brakes as parking-brakes, but as stopping or emergency brakes
they were less than 50 per cent effective. However, as a safety device our engineers pointed out their advantages as a vehicle cannot be moved unless the air
for the brakes has been pumped up. Studies have been made by our engineers
on the effectiveness of exhaust brakes and retarders, and in a number of cases their
use has been recommended and justified.
In the field of logging a relatively new type of tractor has been introduced
from Eastern Canada and the United States. This type of tractor is commonly
known as a " Tree Farmer " or " Timber Toter." On the flat swampy country for
which this machine was designed, it was relatively safe, but in the mountainous
country of British Columbia its brakes were totally inadequate, and, as a result, the
Branch was forced to require the installation of an extra drum with disc brakes or
a secondary system so that the brakes were at least 50 per cent fail safe. The
loggers and the suppliers were most co-operative in most cases. The problem was
such that the Workmen's Compensation Board called a meeting, at which our engineers were asked to outline recommendations both for brakes and anti-roll-over
devices.   In addition, a safety arch was recommended to protect the driver.
In the field of mining our engineers work with the Chief Inspector of Mines,
and jointly they have recommended many safety devices which have saved lives
in that industry. In one case, a method of stand-by power was recommended for
power-steering where vehicles are too large to be manually steered should engine
power fail. The Department of Mines and Mineral Resources has adopted the
regulations of the Industrial Transportation Act, and, as a result of co-operation
between the engineers of both Departments, safety has been greatly improved.
In the oil industry, access problems have arisen, and our engineers have
assisted so that the oil and gas industries have benefited by the application of our
regulations pursuant to the Industrial Transportation Act.
Logging-trucks throughout the Province have been inspected during the year,
and all accidents have been investigated. A fatal accident occurred near Pemberton, and our engineer found the cause was the lack of a parking-brake. Charges
were laid through the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and, as a result, the company was fined for not maintaining its vehicles in accordance with the Act, and the
driver was fined for not being in possession of a certificate to operate air-equipped
vehicles.
It has always been the policy of the Branch that a properly trained and well-
informed driver is a much safer employee than is an employee who is complacent
as to safety rules, especially where air brakes and heavy grades are encountered.
The engineers have therefore gone forward with their training programmes, and
lectures have been conducted in the Queen Charlotte Islands, all parts of Vancou-
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967
GG 39
ver Island, the Kootenays, the Interior, and the North at Prince George and
Terrace. These lectures are well received, and subsequent to the lectures our
engineers conduct examinations and certify many drivers. A list of such lectures
and examinations is set forth in this Report, together with other related statistics.
Where industrial roads (logging, mining, etc.) cross or enter upon highways,
a permit to do so is required under section 6 of the Industrial Transportation Act.
In all cases the Department of Highways makes application through our Engineering Branch so that applications are processed and a certificate is ultimately issued
authorizing construction. In some cases stop signs are required, and in others
yield signs are recommended. At times the proposed location is considered unsafe
and, in the public interest, the crossing is relocated.
This Section of the Branch works with the Department of Education and conducts lectures in the vocational schools at Nanaimo, Prince George, Nelson, and
Burnaby, and, in addition, the Branch puts on a course for heavy-duty mechanics
at the school in the Branch's Vancouver office.
A close liaison exists between the Motor-vehicle Branch and our Engineering
Branch, and, as a result, courses are conducted by our engineers for the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police in Victoria and in other parts of the Province. In addition, the Engineering Branch tests mechanical devices and braking systems for the
Motor-vehicle Branch, as well as assisting in school-bus mechanical matters.
In the field of accident investigation, our engineers, when requested, assist the
Vancouver and New Westminster City Police, as well as the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, in the various Lower Mainland and the Interior areas. The engineers have, from time to time, evaluated probable speeds and appeared in Court
for the Crown. The over-all co-operation with law enforcement, in the long run,
assists the Branch in its own traffic problems under the Industrial Transportation
Act as traffic in places such as Kitimat and Cassiar, as well as such rural centres as
Englewood, is governed under the Industrial Regulations.
Annual Inspections under the Industrial Transportation Act
1965
1966
1967
295
68
158
110
21
450
350
158
28
245
46
161
98
25
730
494
140
56
280
48
Crummies (workmen's buses)  —   -	
Miscellaneous vehicles (including highway vehicles) 	
130
40
30
819
Logging-truck operators certified —	
British Columbia Vocational Schools and other institutes (air-brake examinations)
331
172
118
Air-brake Lectures Conducted during 1967
Attendance
Date Place at Lectures
January 16-18—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Kamloops     84
February 8—Prince George Vocational School      19
February 20-22—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Burnaby  132
March 9-11—Nanaimo Vocational School  114
 GG 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Air-brake Lectures Conducted during 1967—Continued
Attendance
Date Place at Lectures
March 15—Burnaby Vocational School  33
March 22—Nanaimo Vocational School  20
April 13—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Lake Cowichan  23
May 2—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Campbell River  24
May 3, 6—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Franklin River  47
June 14—Haney Correctional Institute   35
June 23—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Juskada, Q.C.I  10
June 23—Crown Zellerbach Ltd., Sandspit, Q.C.I.   15
June 25—Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd., Moresby Inlet, Q.C.I       5
July 11, 12—Nelson Vocational School  36
September 18—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Squamish  39
September 20—Burnaby Vocational School  27
September 27—MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Squamish  18
September 29—Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd., Terrace  40
October 19—Prince George Vocational School   14
November 2-4—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  84
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
GG 41
ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAMME
During the year under review, the Department of Commercial Transport was
awarded a gold certificate " award of merit " for having operated a total of 455,032
consecutive man-hours without a time-loss accident from October 15, 1964, to
January 31, 1967.
The presentation of this award to the Department was made by the Prime
Minister at a public ceremony in the main Legislative Buildings on December 12,
1967. The award was received on behalf of the Department by the Deputy Minister, Mr. A. J. Bowering.
In an effort to maintain this excellent record of safety, Department personnel
are alert to potential accident hazards that may be encountered during their duties.
The staff of the Weigh-scale Branch, who are required to work on the highway in
heavy and fast-moving traffic areas, are equipped with reflectorized rain clothing.
Their vehicles, which are mainly used to stop traffic, are being re-equipped with
the newest type flashing lights in order to provide a more adequate warning to
approaching traffic.
In addition to this, the co-operation of local police forces, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the Department of Highways patrol vehicles and personnel has gone a long way to ensure that when traffic checks are necessary, they
are carried out in as safe a manner as possible.
The programme of replacing the older-type portable scales, which were a
cumbersome and potentially dangerous method of weight control, with a new-type
compact scale has been continued and should be completed next year. These new
scales allow a much faster weight check to be carried out, thus reducing the accident potential by decreasing the exposure time. As well as being much easier to
set up and move, they have the added advantage of being free from projections,
thus they minimize the hazard of the vehicle being weighed striking a part of the
scale, causing it to be dislodged with consequent injury to the weighmaster.
In order to improve communications between the drivers of trucks and weighmasters at our permanent scale installations, a modification of the standard truck
signal light was installed at Hunter Creek Weigh-scale Station located on Highway
No. 1 west of Hope. This system has proved quite satisfactory. It enables the
drivers of large trucks to clearly understand the directions given by the weighmaster. A study is being made of signal systems in use in other parts of North
America, and it is hoped that a more satisfactory method of signalization will be
evolved, not only in order to save time for the industry, but to minimize the accident
hazard that is caused when a number of large and noisy vehicles are present at a
scale-site.
The cardinal principle of the Engineering Branch of the Department of Commercial Transport is safety—public safety and safety as to workmen on the job.
Over the years the doctrine of the Branch has been that a safe workman, properly
trained, is the best safety device yet devised by human effort. Training of workmen is therefore one of the Branch's paramount functions. A certain percentage
of all accidents are accidents attributable to human failure. It would therefore be
pointless for the Branch engineers to concentrate their efforts solely on equipment
failures when the people themselves using the equipment require to be trained in
the proper and safe use of the machinery they are operating.
Training courses in the use of air brakes, heavy-truck equipment, and railway
equipment are conducted by the Branch in the Vancouver office, as well as on the
road in many parts of the Province.   Specially equipped panel trucks are used for
 GG 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
lectures and personnel training. Movie projectors, slide projectors, and cut-away
models are used as visual training aids.
In addition, special training and examinations are being conducted in the ski
areas to ensure that qualified attendants operate the various tramways and machinery used to transport the public.
It is felt the prevention of accidents is a worth-while human effort, and the
Branch engineers are dedicated to this end.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967
GG 43
PERSONNEL
A. Shaw, C.O.A., Administrative Officer
During the year several personnel changes were made as a result of retirement
and resignation, as follows:
Retirement
Field
       1
Headquarters
Resignations
     7
1
New appointments—
Permanent    	
     7
3
Temporary
1
Transfers
     3
Promotions
     5
Number of competitic
>ns held 	
     6
1
To fill the vacancies by the above-noted resignations and retirement, interviews were held in Fernie, Prince George, Fort St. John, Golden, and Dawson
Creek.
Transfers were made to meet Departmental requirements and at the request
of the individual staff members concerned.
As a result of preliminary studies initiated in the latter part of 1966, the status
of the weighmaster group was the subject of an intensive reclassification survey
during 1967. This is the first general reclassification study made with respect to
the weighmaster group since the original job specification was established in the
formative years of this Branch. After completion of classification questionnaires
by a representative group of weighmasters and personal field investigations by a
member of the classification division of the Civil Service Commission, a recommendation was made that the weighmasters' classification be revised in keeping
with the current operational procedures. In making this recommendation, recognition was given to the increase in initial qualification required and the extensive
number of operational responsibilities inherent in the present-day function of a
weighmaster.
The initial function of a weighmaster was comparatively simple in that industry
had not reached the level of activity or expansion that is enjoyed at the present time.
The duties of the weighmaster group have increased proportionate to the rate of
industrial expansion.
By reason of the fact that a commercial vehicle must stop at a Department
weigh-scale, economic feasibility demands that those matters inherent in legislation
pertaining to other Government departments in their relationship with the commercial-vehicle industry be checked at that time. This function, now carried out by
the weigh-scale staff, increases the area of responsibility of a weighmaster and necessitates that he have a working knowledge of the related legislation and functions of
these other Government departments. This factor is now recognized in the proposed
classification revision for the weighmaster group, and it is anticipated that this will
be finalized at an early date.
Promotion was obtained for one Inspector in the Department's Engineering
Branch in Vancouver. This promotion was based on personal qualifications plus
on-the-job experience.
In order to meet the increased work load in the Department occasioned by
industrial development in the Province, an additional Administrative Officer was
appointed.
 GG 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The general improvements to Departmental facilities at the many locations
throughout the Province enhance the working conditions of the field staff, and these
considerations are appreciated by the staff.
It can be reported that, generally speaking, the response to advertisements respecting positions with the Weigh-scale Branch have been encouraging in so far as
the degree of interest is concerned; however, there is room for improvement in the
general calibre of the individual applicants. It is hoped that the proposed revised
classifications, if placed in effect, will do much to encourage improvement in this
regard.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1967
GG 45
ACCOUNTS BRANCH
D. I. Ewan, C.O.A., Senior Clerk
The Accounts Branch, which has a small staff, is handling an increasing number
of permits for oversize and overweight loads which must be audited. During the
months of June to October an average of over 4,000 permits of this type were processed. There has been an increase of 81 per cent over a five-year period and an
increase during the past year of 26 per cent.
Many of the companies which formerly operated on term permits have found
it to their advantage to use short-term permits, which may be obtained at the local
weigh-station. The provision of an increased number of issuing offices in the Province has assisted in this change being made, which makes it possible for companies
to obtain permits as required without arranging advance-payment deposits.
This office is appreciative of the co-operation extended by the Data Processing
Branch of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for its
processing of our accounts receivable. It is hoped that this service may be extended
to include other facets of the Department's operation where volume warrants.
Departmental revenues have increased approximately 6 per cent, which is a
small decrease from the previous year's trend. Some of this change may be attributed
to a lengthy fire season and industrial negotiations in the industry.
In keeping with the Department's policy of up-dating and modernizing office
equipment and procedures, compatible equipment has been purchased for use in the
various branches of the Department. Further, a study is presently under way in relation to the storage of plans and maps on microfilm with a view to alleviating the
presently overburdened storage facilities. If this proves to be practical, greater flexibility and convenience will result with respect to the availability of these maps for
general public use.
International truck movements show an increase in operation, as is indicated
by an increase of 36 per cent in the number of companies registered and an increase
of 21 per cent in the number of vehicles involved. Records kept at border-point
weigh-stations provide information which is useful in checking applications for new
years' licences.
The following tables show results of the activities of the Weigh-scale Branch
during the past year. Other tables relating to the Engineering Branch are included
elsewhere in this Report.
Table 1.—Revenue from Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes
for Passenger and Commercial Vehicles1
Fiscal Year Amount Fiscal Year Amount
1955/56  $19,820,000      1961/62  $39,262,000
1956/57  22,593,000      1962/63   43,129,000
1957/58   24,500,000      1963/64  46,420,000
1958/59   26,100,000      1964/65   50,865,000
1959/60  28,582,000      1965/66   56,441,000
1960/61   30,093,000      1966/67   61,388,000
1 Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
 GG 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 2.—Summary of Commercial-vehicle Licences and Permits Issued
January 1, 1967, to December 31, 1967
Month
Number of
Commercial
Vehicles Registered and
Licensed1
Number of
Commercial
Trailers Registered and
Licensed1
Number of
Non-resident
Permits
Issued
Number of
Temporary
Operation
Permits
Issued
Number of
Oversize and
Overweight
Permits
Issued
Number of
Vehicles
Checked
at Weigh-
stations
January 	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
Totals
27,416
80,870
21,259
7,321
7,115
5,596
3,670
3,286
3,000
2,696
2,172
1,720
166,121
7,640
7,015
1,594
858
477
496
307
180
165
191
194
175
975
1,155
1,792
1,025
1,274
1,615
1,517
1,495
1,549
1,274
1,111
1,050
2,215
2,196
4,392
3,974
4,055
4,244
3,194
3,195
3,190
3,020
2,932
2,550
19,292
15,832
39,157
2,868
2,935
3,710
2,467
3,485
4,083
4,121
4,059
4,173
4,412
3,961
3,540
43,814
91,826
99,192
119,309
94,335
95,254
132,878
100,182
106,627
133,481
116,835
109,888
107,060
1,306,867
1 Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
Table 3.—Summary of Prorate Operation, 1967
Companies
Prorated
Tractor
Units
Trailer
Units
63
305
250
2.764
133
6,754
Totals
368                   3.014
6,887
Table 4.—Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections from Commercial
Licence and Permit Fees for Five-year Period 1962/63 to 1966/67,
Inclusive.
Source
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
Commercial motor-vehicle licences
Non-resident commercial permits
Trailer fees.. —	
Temporary operation permits	
Oversize and overweight permits...
$8,253,251
381,673
61,409
62,909
368,716
$8,910,152
404,410
74,299
66,001
447,681
$9,706,486
410,645
81,223
80,692
530,171
$10,674,538
429,067
91,177
98,007
629,453
$11,281,095
459,048
97,934
99,604
706,213
Totals	
$9,127,958
$9,902,543
$10,809,217
$11,922,242
$12,643,894
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1967 GG 47
Table 5.—Summary of Violations Issued, January 1, 1967,
to December 31, 1967
Licence and Permit Violations
Gross vehicle weight   1,059
Motor-vehicle registration  723
Licence-plates  687
Trailer plates  200
Quarterly licence  24
Non-resident permit  75
Temporary operation permit  9
Motive-fuel emblem   105
Overweight permit required  28
Oversize permit required  64
Restricted-route permit   30
Highway-crossing permit   15
Proration   4
Other   36
Total violations   3,059
Total number of vehicles checked  1,306,807
Motor-carrier Violations
Motor-carrier plates not displayed  434
Motor-carrier licence not carried   403
Conditions of licence not carried  336
Operating otherwise than permitted by licence  506
Total violations   1,679
Total number of vehicles checked        21,429
Oversize and Overweight Violations
Oversize and overweight violations issued  1,443
Oversize and overweight prosecutions, including those through
Royal Canadian Mounted Police  1,369
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
730-368-3383
 

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