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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1967 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1968]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1967
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit the Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1967.
RALPH R. LOFFMARK,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1967.
ROBERT F. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1967
FOREWORD
In 1967 British Columbia's development was spurred by a 4-per-cent rise in
population and by favourable export markets, especially for mineral production.
Between 1966 and 1967 the total population rose by 73,000 persons, and between
1965 and 1966 the comparable increase was 77,000 persons, representing the largest
post-war increases since 1956—57.
The total value of exports through British Columbia customs ports rose to
$2,100 million, relative to $1,803 million in 1966. Important gains were recorded
in mining-product exports to Japan, notably metal concentrates and non-ferrous
metals. Increased exports to Japan, India, U.S.S.R., Australia, and the Republic
of South Africa accounted for much of the growth in exports.
Most indicators of internal trade during 1967 registered a gain of around 6 per
cent; gasoline consumption increased 5.6 per cent over 1966, cheques cashed rose
by 6.4 per cent, and passenger-vehicle registrations were up 5.7 per cent. Retail
sales showed a similar growth rate, increasing 5.8 per cent over 1966.
The total number of employed persons increased 6.3 per cent, or by 43,000
persons to a level of 721,000. The average level of unemployment increased slightly,
reflecting in part the rapid rise in population during 1967.
Price pressures widened in 1967, with consumer prices showing an average
increase of 3.5 per cent. Whereas the highest rates of price change in 1966 were
largely confined to food and clothing, in 1967 the Consumer Price Index rose nearly
5 per cent in the housing, health, and recreation components. Per capita income in
British Columbia advanced to $2,522, or 4.1 per cent above 1966.
Total public and private investment was estimated at $2,580 million, with
investment by utilities accounting for the largest share, approximately $750 million.
Among utility projects, the Duncan Dam on the Columbia River and the W. A. C.
Bennett Dam on the Peace River were completed, and the power-house, related
structures, and transmission-lines connected with the latter project are under way.
The construction industry was stimulated by an upsurge in housing starts, which
increased 29.6 per cent over 1966 and set an all-time record.
Activity in the British Columbia mining industry was highlighted by the completion of two major mining sites—a $40 million iron-ore property on the Queen
Charlotte Islands and a $25 million molybdenum property at Alice Arm. The
value of all mineral production increased from $338 million to $392 million.
Operations in the forestry sector were keynoted by the completion of the $80
million Gold River pulp-mill and by the installation of an additional newsprint-paper
machine at Powell River, which raised the capacity of the latter plant to 660,000
tons annually. Provincial output of pulp increased an estimated 5.0 per cent. Paper
production declined slightly in the face of increased United States production and
a smaller than anticipated rise in United States newsprint consumption.
 U 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sawmill operators were encouraged by a rise in North American residential
construction and by gains in export lumber sales. The forest fire hazard followed
by the Southern Interior work stoppage combined to bring about a slight decline in
log production.
Although excessive summer heat forced the closure of some Provincial parks
because of forest fire hazard, tourism in British Columbia continued to advance.
The number of foreign vehicles entering the Province increased 9.7 per cent.
Returns of fishermen were lower than for the preceding year. Landed values
totalled $48 million, compared with $59 million in 1966.
Farm cash receipts reached $192 million, representing a slight gain above 1966.
The trade outlook for 1968 is brightened by the prospect of new trading
arrangements under the " Kennedy Round " of tariff negotiations. International
competitive pressures, however, especially in productivity and quality, will be ever
present. The rapid rate of population growth should also continue to point to
expansion in 1968. Recent devaluation of the pound sterling is not expected to
seriously hamper the Provincial economy in 1968, although some reduction in
exports during 1968 to the United Kingdom is a possibility.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE PROVINCE
The Industrial and Trade Office plays an important role in the Department's
responsibility for fostering new and expanded industrial and commercial enterprises
in British Columbia.
The office assists in securing data on location sites, furnishes composite industrial maps of certain areas, advises on availability of raw materials, and provides
information on the services offered by municipal, regional, and Provincial associations. This work is carried out in close co-operation with other British Columbia
Provincial Government departments, the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, manufacturing associations, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents,
and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
The following highlights the high level of industrial development activity
throughout British Columbia during 1967:—
• Total new capital and repair expenditures estimated at $2,580 million, of
which $1,525 million was spent on construction and $950 million on
machinery and equipment.
• Net production value of the Province's forest industry exceeded $1,000
million.
• In manufacturing, the value of factory shipments reached $3,086 million.
• Mineral production rose to a high of $392 million in 1967, as compared to
$338 million for the previous year. Production increases in copper and
fuels accounted in part for this advance.
• Exports through British Columbia customs ports increased to $2,100 million
in 1967, as compared to $1,803 million in 1966. Value of 1967 imports
rose to $800 million.
• Sales through retail outlets reached an all-time high of $2,539 million.
Interesting industrial highlights in British Columbia during 1967 included:—
• Completion of the $725 million W. A. C. Bennett Dam on the Peace River,
with initial power generation from this project scheduled for 1968. The
$33.5 million Duncan Dam, first of the three Columbia River Treaty dams,
was also completed during the year.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967
U 7
Major projects in the oil and gas industry, including completion of a $10.5
million offshore drilling rig, a new $9.5 million petroleum refinery at Prince
George, and a $2 million toluene (used in the manufacture of adhesives,
lacquers, plastics, and solvents) plant in Port Moody.
Three new major mines were brought into production, increasing this Province's output of iron, molybdenum, and silver. Projects under way will
add considerably to the supply of copper concentrate.
The chemical industry completed several major projects in 1967, with emphasis on the production of chemicals used in the pulp and paper industry.
Large projects completed or under way in the forest-products industry.
One new $60 million kraft-mill came into production, and two others
representing an expenditure of $112 million were under way. Numerous
expansion and modernization programmes were also initiated during the
year. Two new plywood-mills were completed during the year, representing a $5.5 million investment, and another Vancouver plywood-mill completed a $2 million expansion programme.
Substantial outlays expended on transportation and distribution facilities
during the year. Pipe-line construction, grain-storage facilities, a new bulk-
loading terminal, and expansion to rail, air, and shipping facilities are
among the major projects in this phase of development.
DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE PROMOTION
A proven technique of promotion is the publication of a number of reports
or surveys of interest to British Columbia businessmen, all of which are available
free on request.
During 1967 the " Trade and Industry Bulletin " completed 18 years of continuous publication listing trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under
licence agreements available to British Columbia firms, notice of tender, and news
of general commercial interest. The bulletin includes special features covering
participation in trade fairs, market reports on selected regions, and details of trade
missions. The increased use of the bulletin by the trade representatives of other
nations bears out the importance of this publication to commercial and industrial
organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the bulletin has increased to
1,900 copies a month.
As an aid to businessmen, a 10-page report, " Setting Up an Export-Import
Business," was distributed, which lists sources of information, useful publications,
a listing of foreign government representatives located in this Province, and a great
deal of other data of special interest to businessmen contemplating export or import
operations.
In co-operation with the British Columbia Centennial Committee, a revised
edition of " Invitation to Industry " was prepared during 1967, bringing the total
number printed of the Centennial edition to 60,000. All aspects of this Province's
primary and secondary industrial complex are featured, together with other facets
of life in British Columbia. Copies of this 52-page publication are widely distributed both within the Province and at industrial and trade events in other parts of
Canada, the United States, and elsewhere.
The "Regional Investment Opportunities," published in 1966, continued to
be of interest and was freely distributed. The survey lists numerous investment
opportunities in the field of professional offices, hotel and motel requirements, housing developments, warehousing, and wholesale and retail outlets.
 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The 16th edition of the "Directory of Handicraft Products and Producers in
British Columbia " was published in 1967, and copies were distributed to various
wholesale and retail organizations both at home and abroad. The directory lists
producers in the Province who are interested in finding a market for their products
and who are in a position to supply reasonable demands.
Many requests have been received for the pamphlet " Business Closing Days
in British Columbia." Inquiries were received from businessmen, salesmen, and
tourists requesting information on the hours of business of wholesale and retail
establishments in centres throughout British Columbia.
SEMINARS AND CONFERENCES
During the year the Department participated in and co-sponsored a number
of seminars and conferences in which industrial, trade, and general economic
matters were discussed in depth.
In co-operation with the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the
Vancouver Board of Trade and the British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, officials of this Department participated in " Operation Export," held in Vancouver from April 25th to 28th. The programme stimulated
further interest in export opportunities for British Columbia products, and provided
a means by which over 300 businessmen met with more than 60 government trade
officials, and through a series of interviews explored export potential for their goods
and services.
The Pacific Northwest Industrial Development Council held its annual conference in Vancouver from June 18th to 20th, and officials of the Department
participated both in panel discussions and in presenting the report on industrial
expansion, with emphasis on the development of industrial estates and new products.
On October 11th the Department participated with the Federal Department
of Trade and Commerce in jointly sponsoring the " Kennedy Round Trade Opportunities Seminar," at which " Kennedy Round " results were detailed, the implications of tariff concessions made by Canada discussed, and information given on new
export markets which have been created as a result of reciprocal lowering or
removal of tariffs.  Two hundred and fifty businessmen attended this seminar.
Additional participation in conferences emphasized the importance of world
trade to this Province's economy, also the role of, and need for, productivity improvement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOOD PRODUCTS MISSION, UNITED KINGDOM
AND WEST GERMANY, MAY 29 TO JUNE 19, 1967
This mission was initiated to explore the market potential in the United Kingdom and West Germany for British Columbia food products, with particular
emphasis on frozen and canned fruits and vegetables.
While certain of these products have been exported from this Province to the
United Kingdom for a number of years, it was considered that a broader penetration
of that market, as well as West Germany, might be achieved.
A party of 12, headed by the Honourable Francis X. Richter, Minister of
Agriculture, representative of government and industry, comprised the mission.
Export markets were investigated in London, Bonn, and Hamburg during the three
weeks allotted for coverage of the two countries.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 9
Tangible returns in the form of firm orders, plus the encouraging response
of potential buyers, provided new impetus to both the production and processing
fields in this Province, and the market knowledge gained through direct personal
contact gives grounds for an optimistic outlook.
B.C. WINDOW ON THE WORLD
This event was sponsored by the Department through the British Columbia
International Trade Fair organization and co-ordinated by the World Trade Committee of the Vancouver Board of Trade.
The month-long programme was announced by Government proclamation
and took place during the period April 25th to May 27th.
Operation " B.C. Window on the World " was divided into five parts:—
(1) " Operation Export," April 25th to 28th: Exporters and manufacturers
interviewed 61 Canadian Trade Commissioners from all parts of the
world. Appointments were scheduled by the Federal Department of
Trade and Commerce. During this period over 2,400 business appointments were completed.
(2) "World Trade and the New Generation," May 1st to 3rd: A series of
assemblies in each of 17 senior secondary schools in Vancouver, addressed by teams composed of business leaders and senior representatives of academic, government, and technical institutions. A 50-minute
programme was presented in each school outlining the significance of
world trade to the economy of British Columbia and Canada and relating
to post-secondary levels of education for the business world. Study folios
of printed material were presented to each school library for use by class
discussion groups.
(3) "World Trade and the Citizen," May 8th to 12th: Each day at the
Vancouver Public Library a symposium co-sponsored by the University
of British Columbia Extension Department and the Vancouver Board of
Trade. The sessions, which were open to the general public, were addressed by government, business, and academic leaders. Subjects
covered were background of British Columbia trade patterns, international
business and economic growth, British Columbia's market opportunities,
and British Columbia's trade future.
(4) " World Trade and the Consumer," May 15th to 20th: A retail promotion programme in the Vancouver area featuring the wide range of goods
available to consumers through world trade.
(5) "British Columbia International Trade Fair," May 17th to 27th.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
The fourth British Columbia International Trade Fair, largest ever held in
Western Canada, opened May 17, 1967, at the Pacific National Exhibition grounds
in Vancouver. Consumer and capital goods from more than 50 nations were on
display for 10 days, attracting the attention of 140,000 viewers, including several
thousand buyers and businessmen.
Her Royal Highness the Princess Alexandra officially opened the fair on May
18th in company with her husband the Honourable Angus Ogilvy, His Honour the
Lieutenant-Governor, the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Ministers of the Provincial
Government, and leaders of the British Columbia business and industrial community.
 U 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
United States buyers arriving at the International Trade Fair.
Major exhibits from 15 governments were complemented by products from
more than 1,000 manufacturers from around the world. The 1967 British Columbia
International Trade Fair was fully 30 per cent larger than the third fair in 1964 and
twice as large as the first fair in 1958.
Comments from international exhibitors clearly indicated the fair, sponsored
by this Department, has entered an era of international importance which will continue to grow in future years.
Great Britain was by far the largest exhibitor in the 1967 fair, occupying an
entire building to show the wares of dozens of British industries. Sir Peter Allen,
Chairman of the British Committee for Exports to Canada, reflected the general
reaction of international exhibitors when he said:—
" The British Pavilion at the B.C. International Trade Fair has been a resounding success. Results far exceeded expectation and we are delighted with the
response from buyers and public alike."
Strong international flavour for the fair was provided by outstanding exhibits
from the Governments of Austria, West Germany, Italy, France, New Zealand,
Sweden, Belgium, Republic of China, Czechoslovakia, The Netherlands, Japan[
Hawaii, and Alaska. A late arrival which added further stimulation was an exhibit
featuring products of the U.S.S.R.
Many of the exhibitors reported vigorous interest in the consumer and industrial products on display.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 11
The Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce acknowledges the generous volunteer services of the directors of the British Columbia International Trade Fair. Specific mention is also made of the contribution by Mr.
W. J. Burnett, president of the fair during most of the planning and organizing
stages, and the Honourable William M. Hamilton, who assumed the duties of
president when Mr. Burnett left the Province to assume a new post two months
before the fair opened.
DEPARTMENTAL EXHIBIT AND PROMOTION
The Department's mobile display provides a medium for effectively telling the
story of industrial expansion taking place in the Province and also of promoting this
Department's services and publications. Events at which the exhibit was incorporated during the year include " Operation Export, 1967," held in Vancouver between
April 24th and 28th; the British Columbia International Trade Fair, May 17th to
27th; and the Hadassah Bazaar and Exposition, held November 1st and 2nd in
Vancouver.
Sections of the exhibit and other promotional material were used when the
Department participated with the Hudson's Bay department store in a British Columbia products and services promotion entitled "British Columbia Unlimited."
This promotional programme took place in Vancouver from May 11 to 20, 1967.
Featured were a wide range of interesting displays which had the enthusiastic cooperation of British Columbia's industrial, manufacturing, and educational groups.
Additionally, a number of cultural and artistic organizations contributed their time
and talents to produce special events during the programme. One of the highlights
of the promotion was a fashion show presented by the designers and craftsmen of
British Columbia's clothing industry.
Revisions to the text and photographs of the exhibit are presently under way,
and it is proposed to use the exhibit during 1968 at industrial and trade events both
in British Columbia and outside the Province.
During 1967 the Department continued its comprehensive programme of publicizing existing industrial development opportunities in the Province and in furthering
the sale of British Columbia goods and services at home and abroad. In carrying
out the programme, liaison was maintained with advertising and publicity firms in
Canada, the United States, and Europe through the use of press releases, advertising
layouts, photographs, and copies of Departmental reports which were dispatched
on a regular basis. Contact was also maintained with public information officials
in various Provincial and Federal departments of government and with local
companies.
During the year under review, the number and variety of general mail inquiries
received by the Department increased about 46 per cent, and there was a similar
rise in the number of telephone inquiries for information of a general or specific
nature. An increase was also noted over previous years in the number of inquiries
from potential immigrants asking about establishing small businesses in British
Columbia. Relevant information was provided on the economy and sources of
additional information.
Numerous requests continue to be received for literature, pictures, and specific
information on industrial projects from writers and publishers in this and other
countries, indicating the increased awareness by international journalists of this
Province's economic development and potential.
 U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FROM
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
The severe restrictions which the United Kingdom Government has imposed
on the country in an endeavour to return to economic stability culminated on November 19, 1967, in the devaluation of sterling. It is expected that there will be
increased buying by Canadian firms in the United Kingdom, and this trend will also
apply in those European countries that have devalued at the same time as Britain.
On the other hand, exports from this Province to the United Kingdom will come
under pressure of higher British prices arising out of the same devaluation.
VISIT OF THE PRIME MINISTER
The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett visited Britain, Belgium, Bavaria, Sweden,
and Finland during October. Consultations were held in each of these countries
regarding the possibilities of co-operation in the further development of British
Columbia's natural resources.
ORDER OF THE DOGWOOD
Early in the year Mr. E. C. Westwood, the Agent-General, presented, on behalf
of the Government, the Order of the Dogwood to Her Majesty the Queen Mother
at a private audience at Clarence House. Sir Robert Bellinger, the Lord Mayor of
London, was the first British recipient of the order, which he received while participating in the opening ceremonies at Fort Langley. On April 25, 1967, Lord Amory,
governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, was also presented with the order. In
January, 1967, the Agent-General had the honour of being appointed a freeman of
the City of London.
IMMIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT
During 1967 the number of immigration inquiries increased. Personal interviews were held with prospective emigrants by the interviewing staff of British
Columbia House. Inquiries about the settlement of professional and business men
were given special attention. This office confines itself to disseminating general
information about the Province and advises on the various attendant problems—
transfer of capital, employment, and the most suitable parts of the Province for
individual requirements. Subsequent to the devaluation of sterling there has been
an upsurge in the number of inquiries, and it is expected that this will increase still
further. The Canadian High Commissioner's Office in London reported that the
number of emigrants from the British Isles was 63,291 last year, of whom 8,304
stated their destination to be British Columbia. This figure is adjusted upward as
new Canadians move to the Pacific Coast after a stay of a year or so in eastern and
central Provinces.
SPECIAL RECRUITMENT CAMPAIGNS
School-teachers
Mr. A. W. Hyndman and Mr. D. N. Weicker, District Superintendents of the
Department of Education, visited Great Britain to interview over 300 applicants
for teaching posts in the Province. Following these interviews a number of appointments were offered and accepted.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967 U  13
British Columbia Ferries Engineering Staff
As a result of advertisements in various journals placed by this office, over 200
applications were received for appointments on the engineering staff of the British
Columbia Ferries. Mr. W. B. Weston, operations manager of British Columbia
Ferries, visited London, Liverpool, and Glasgow and interviewed about 40 of the
applicants, nine of whom were selected.
Water Resources Service
Advertisements placed in the national press brought in replies for positions as
engineers with that department (civil or sewerage works). Mr. A. F. Paget, the
Deputy Minister, visited London and interviewed applicants, a number of whom
were offered appointments.
Visits by Government Officials
This office made arrangements for the Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General and Minister of Commercial Transport, to tour dock and harbour
installations in London, Rotterdam, and Antwerp.
The Honourable W. K. Kiernan, Minister of Recreation and Conservation,
visited London with the object of examining the prospects for the increase of tourists from the United Kingdom and Western European countries.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell, Minister of Municipal Affairs, attended a
municipal government conference in Stockholm and later visited London.
Mr. R. J. Wilkinson, Live Stock Commissioner, and Mr. K. Savage, Dairy
Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, visited various agricultural establishments in the United Kingdom. The Agent-General's staff assisted in arranging their
appointments and itineraries.
Visitors
During the year 4,263 visitors to Britain registered by signing the visitors'
book maintained for British Columbians. In addition, 30,685 letters, cables, and
parcels were handled on their behalf. As is usual, the office was called upon on
several occasions to provide special assistance and advice to visitors.
Films and Publicity
Films on travel, industry, and the way of life in British Columbia were shown
at schools, associations, clubs, etc., in the United Kingdom, as well as at individual showings.   Audiences totalled approximately 29,000.
Newsletter
The Newsletter issued under the office of the Agent-General is increasing in
circulation. Mr. Charles Tickle, who had been editor of the Newsletter since 1960,
died suddenly in the early part of the year. His place has been taken by Mr. Mark
Nichols, a Vancouver journalist now residing in London. Condolences are extended
to the family of Mr. Tickle.
Tourism
An increased number of inquiries on travel to British Columbia have been
handled. A campaign to increase the circulation of the "Beautiful British Columbia" magazine was initiated in the latter part of the year. Special prices for
Christmas gift subscriptions were offered to firms and institutions in London and
 U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
on the Continent doing business in British Columbia. A substantial number of
subscriptions were taken up under this plan. The Department of Travel Industry
initiated a vigorous campaign of advertising in the national press for individuals
wishing to subscribe to " Beautiful British Columbia." This campaign has resulted
in a much wider circulation of the magazine than was hitherto the case.
REPORT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR
During 1967 the following commercial inquiries were received from territory
served in the United Kingdom and countries of Western Europe:—
Commercial sales to British Columbia  167
Establishing factory or warehouse in British Columbia  25
Patents processes, technical assistance  5
Partial manufacture or assembly  10
Investments  27
Re-establishment of small business or profession  78
Totals  312
During the year a further 93 trade inquiries were received from British Columbia companies, an increase of eight over last year. Suitable contacts were
arranged for the majority of British Columbia firms seeking assistance in establishing
of new export markets.
TRADE WITH EUROPE THROUGH CUSTOMS PORTS IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The United Kingdom, West Germany, The Netherlands, Italy, France, and
Belgium-Luxembourg are British Columbia's ranking European export markets.
During 1967 exports to the United Kingdom and Western Germany dropped noticeably, but there was a substantial increase in the Province's sales to The Netherlands,
Italy, France, and Belgium. There was a small increase in exports to Sweden,
Greece, and Eire.
TRADE MISSIONS FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year the British Columbia Food Products Mission, headed by the
Minister of Agriculture, the Honourable Francis X. Richter, visited the United
Kingdom and West Germany.
The Vancouver Board of Trade Goodwill Mission visited Denmark, Russia,
Yugoslavia, and Belgium. Mr. William G. Leithead, president of the Board of
Trade, headed the group, composed of 48 members.
Mr. F. E. Atkinson, managing director of the Okanagan Regional Development
Council, was accompanied by the Industrial and Trade Counsellor when he visited
Britain, Holland, and Germany.
TRADE MISSIONS FROM BRITAIN
A Housing Study Mission from Britain and Ireland during the year visited
British Columbia. The mission consisted of 24 members, representing construction
and architectural companies. A number of European missions also visited Canada
during the year. Three other missions from the United Kingdom visited British
Columbia during this year—the Book Development Council Mission to Canada,
North Staffordshire Chamber of Commerce Mission to Canada, and Export Council
for the Gift Industry.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967 U 15
NEW LUMBER, PLYWOOD, AND PULP SALES DISTRIBUTION
During 1967 a new pattern for the distribution of sawn lumber, plywood, and
pulp became operative. A large British Columbia-based lumbering firm and a
British marketing organization announced plans for the building of three new
packaged-lumber docks at Newport, London, and Hull. The dock at Newport was
officially opened by the Prime Minister, the Right Honourable Harold Wilson.
Bulk carriers now being built will discharge packaged timber by ships' cranes
directly to timber sheds on the wharf. Deliveries to points in the United Kingdom
will be made by lorries.
A second British Columbia-based lumber and plywood firm has announced
reorganization plans whereby packaged timber and plywood from British Columbia
will be carried by specially designed ships and stored at Tilbury (London) dock
for bulk handling and rapid country-wide distribution.
Other British Columbia firms are also reorganizing their marketing practices.
DRIVE FOR (BRITISH COLUMBIA) TIMBER FRAME
CONSTRUCTION
The Lumber Manufacturers' and Plywood Manufacturers' Association of
British Columbia continued during the year to maintain a competent staff of advisers
in London and Utrecht, Holland. They advise builders on the most effective use of
timber in house construction. In April the Agent-General officiated at the opening
of a new subdivision of timber frame houses built in Frome, Somerset. This ceremony marked the completion of 1,000 houses.
 U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO
Provincial production records, industrial expansion, and economic growth have
been reflected in the activities of British Columbia House. From year to year there
has been a steady increase in the number of inquiries received from United States
business organizations and individuals.
Perhaps the most significant factor affecting future relationships between
Canada and the United States has been the " Kennedy Round " of tariff negotiations
concluded in 1967. At the end of the year it is still too early to fully assess the final
effect on trade between the two countries resulting from the reduced tariffs proposed
in the agreement. However, there has been observed in the last quarter of the year
considerable pressure in the United States for establishment of import quotas on a
wide range of export products from Canada and other countries. The implementation of such a policy could offset the gains in trade arising from implementation of
the tariff negotiations.
PROMOTIONAL AND REPRESENTATIONAL ACTIVITIES
During 1967 British Columbia was the subject of a number of feature articles
in United States national and international publications. The Province was grouped
with the States of Florida and California as the three regions of North America
enjoying the fastest rate of growth. To take advantage of this national publicity,
British Columbia House, in co-operation with the Greater San Francisco Chamber
of Commerce, sponsored a day-long seminar on the theme " Doing Business in and
with the Province of British Columbia." The seminar took place on November 9th,
and the Mayor of San Francisco declared that November 9th would be British
Columbia Day.
During the year this office was active in the promotion of two new non-stop
air services between San Francisco and Vancouver.
British Columbia House co-operated with the administrative staff of the 1967
British Columbia International Trade Fair in inviting buyers from California to
attend that fair.
The staff continues to carry on a programme of personal contact with large
and small businesses in California and across the United States. They also maintained close working relationships with Canadian Government representatives in
California and with American and Canadian financial institutions and transportation
companies.
TRAVEL PROMOTION
British Columbia House conducted a full programme of travel promotion
during 1967. More than 350 tourist film showings were presented by the staff of
this office and by loan to organizations, and these were viewed by audiences totalling
more than 31,000.
In response to coupon requests, 28,145 promotional packages were mailed to
individuals with approximately 3,000 more packages being forwarded to travel
agencies. Over 900 packages of travel literature were sent to transportation companies and A.A.A. clubs. During the year the story of British Columbia was related
to 3Vi million people through the medium of a booth at fairs.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967 U 17
Travel to British Columbia was maintained at a very high level in spite of the
Canada-wide attractions offered by the Centennial celebrations. In an effort to
extend the tourist season in British Columbia, this office has vigorously promoted
the winter attractions of the Province, particularly the fine ski facilities available to
the visitor.
It is estimated by California sources of information that approximately 56 per
cent of California tourists visited British Columbia in 1967.
IMMIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT
British Columbia House has become a source of much detailed information
for California residents planning to move to Canada's West Coast. More than 900
immigration inquiries were processed in this office in 1967, and close liaison was
maintained with the Canadian Immigration Service offices in San Francisco and
Los Angeles. The majority of inquiries come from members of the professions,
teachers, trade and service personnel, and skilled labourers and craftsmen. In most
cases the prospective immigrants have sufficient funds available to establish themselves in British Columbia, and many have capital to invest in land or in a small
business or joint-venture enterprise. It is reported that some 20,000 United States
citizens emigrate to Canada each year, with 4,400 locating in the Province of British
Columbia.
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
A steady increase has been noted in trade between British Columbia and the
United States. In 1966 the total of exports through British Columbia customs ports
to the United States amounted to $757 million, while imports from the United States
entering through British Columbia customs ports totalled $407 million. Pulp and
newsprint continue to dominate British Columbia's exports to California, accounting for more than 70 per cent of the total value. Other commodities contributing
considerably to the total of exports include lumber, fish and fish products, fertilizers,
live stock and meat products, whisky, fresh apples, jams and jellies, bakery products,
metals and minerals.
In 1967 a number of new products of British Columbia origin were introduced
to the California market, including a line of ladies' fashion wear, which was well
received in Southern California. An agricultural product with a new concept for
crop-growing was being introduced at the end of the year and appears to have great
export sales possibilities. Lesser-volume items entering California from British
Columbia include baked goods, confectionery products, fruit juice, giftwares, pulp,
cedar shingles, asbestos, lead, aluminum in pigs, copper in ores, concentrate,
and furs.
In the field of industrial development, a San Francisco construction firm, heading a consortium of five companies, was awarded the largest single construction
contract ever offered in Canada. Their bid of more than $136 million won the
contract for construction of the Mica Dam on the Columbia River system. Another
Bay area company proposes a multi-million-dollar project in the coalfields of Southeastern British Columbia with allied transportation and shipping facilities. Two
major United States forest products companies are expanding their present facilities
in the Province. Another California forest products company has indicated interest
in the forest resources of British Columbia and in 1968 will investigate the possibility of making a substantial investment in the Province.
In other than resource-based industries, a large California electronics firm
which had sales representation in Canada undertook to expand into an assembly
operation in Vancouver and is now serving the Canadian market from this location.
2
 U 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The company had enjoyed sales of some $300,000 annually, and it is anticipated
that these sales will now increase to exceed $1,500,000 annually within three years.
Other companies which either established facilities during the year or were
actively investigating British Columbia as a location for future expansion include an
investment and securities firm; a trailer and mobile-home manufacturer; a food
processing and distributing company now serving more than 5,000,000 meals daily
in institutions in the United States and Eastern Canada; a manufacturer of hydro
installation equipment, ships, barges, and deep-sea dock facilities; an aircraft component firm producing hydraulic equipment; and a plastic- and fibreglass-products
manufacturer.
British Columbia House has received inquiries from industrial firms regarding
the possibility of the construction of a loading-dock for general cargo shipments at
Tsawwassen and Prince Rupert. The Prince Rupert inquiry included information
on coal, lumber, potash, pulp, and newsprint originating in Central Northern British
Columbia. A direct mail campaign produced inquiries from the computer and data-
processing systems division of a major California firm, and from a manufacturer of
store fixtures and furnishings interested in a possible licence manufacture agreement.
During the year more than 45 inquiries were received regarding industrial
development opportunities, small-business establishment, and general capital investment.
VISITORS
The office continued to be a focal point for British Columbians travelling in the
Western States, and the staff were called upon to arrange special events on behalf
of the visitors. More than 1,350 visitors signed the guest register at British Columbia House, San Francisco, in 1967.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967 U  19
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
During 1967 the Bureau of Economics and Statistics continued in its function
as an advisory body aiding government and other public agencies in matters regarding economics and industrial development. A broad range of economic research
was undertaken, some of which led to regional surveys, industry studies, and trade
reports, and both the Government and the public were informed of current business
conditions, trends, and outlook. In co-operation with various other Provincial
Government departments and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, a wide range of
statistical information concerning British Columbia was collected and disseminated.
Regular publications were continued. These issues included " Facts and Statistics," " Industrial Expansion in British Columbia," and " Preliminary Statement
of External Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports." The "Salary and
Wage Rate Survey " was produced in co-operation with the Federal Department of
Labour. The booklet " Establishing a Business in British Columbia," which outlines
government regulations and available services, was revised, as was the " Manual of
Resources and Development," which concisely describes the Provincial economy.
Many special projects were undertaken by the Bureau, resulting in the preparation of two industry studies and two regional surveys. In both " The Steel Drum
Industry " and " The Papermaker Felts Industry," markets for these products were
anlaysed and British Columbia production potential was outlined. Economic surveys of the Kimberley area and the South Coastal regions were published, and a
regional survey of the Cranbrook area was made, from which a report will be
distributed early in 1968.
The " Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity " was issued regularly throughout
the year, supplying statistical information and an analysis of the current conditions
in the Province. At the end of the year the annual " Summary of Economic Activity " was released, reviewing the performance of each sector of the economy during
the past year and providing a statistical supplement covering the last decade. The
"Business Outlook, 1968," was also published, analysing the results of a survey
of 300 major companies. This publication describes the 1967 experience of these
firms and outlines their prospects for the coming year.
Two other publications released this year are " Selected Forestry Industry
Statistics of British Columbia " and the " British Columbia Wholesale Directory,"
which incorporates all wholesalers, distributors, manufacturers' agents, importers,
and exporters in the Province.
In addition to preparing the regular publications and special reports, staff
members were called upon to answer numerous requests about the British Columbia
economy and to supply statistical data on all forms of economic activity.
Throughout the year, members of the staff attended and participated in several
conferences. In January the Bureau was represented at the Agricultural outlook
Conferences convened in Prince George, Kelowna, and Vancouver. Senior members of the staff attended the Federal-Provincial Conference on Economic Statistics,
held in L'Esterel, Quebec, to continue the liaison among Federal and Provincial
departments concerned with such statistics. In addition, a member attended an
interprovincial trade conference in Ottawa. Other conferences attended include
the Pacific Northwest Trade Association meeting in Spokane, the Resources Ministers' Conference in Montreal, and the Trade and Industry Council meeting in New
Brunswick. A member attended an Interstate Commerce Commission hearing in
Pordand and a railway costing hearing in Winnipeg concerning rules and regulations
 U 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
of railway costing. The Bureau was represented at the Mines Ministers' Conference
in Regina and at the " Kennedy Round " seminar which took place in Vancouver
in October.
During the year the Bureau library continued to receive many economic, trade,
and business journals, which served to aid staff members in keeping abreast of new
business developments and research techniques.
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1965, 1966, and 1967
Unit or
Base
Period
1965
1966
1967
Preliminary
Estimates
Income—
$000
$
$000
Number
Number
Number
$000
$000
$000
Units
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Tons
Tons
000 kwh.
000 gallons
$000
$000
M cu. ft.
M f.b.m.
M sq. ft. (%")
Tons
Tons
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Cases
Vehicles
4,080,000
2,270
2,731,000
667,000
639,000
28,000
2,813,410
2,181,000
422,518
21,398
1,623,905
661,861
2,240,604
434,775
354,422
575,160
15,610,338
2,526,246
18,974,093
445,773
33,646,743
970,000
1,533,000
7,409,000
1,615,000
3,275,000
1,539,000
280,652
32,696
28,694
48,667
43,149
12,405
14,493
21,499
165,620
84,666
913,957
627,759
4,539,000
2,422
3,123,000
710,000
678,000
32,000
3,055,530
2,524,000
429,305
17,753
1,803,481
726,152
2,398,807
424,011
382,218
671,040
16,159,739
2,498,277
20,786,821
483,012
38,057,010
1,000,000
1,602,000
7,444,000
1,678,000
3,809,000
1,679,000
338,266
56,014
36,268
47,667
34,437
28,072
17,340
20,778
190,148
117,984
1,819,215
701,730
4,910,000
2,522
3,420,000
Employment—
761,000
721,000
Unemployed  	
40,000
3,086,000
Capital investment—
2,580,000
515,000
23,000
External trade—
Exports through British Columbia customs ports.
Imports through British Columbia customs port..
Domestic trade—
2,100,000
800,000
2,539,000
426,000
414,000
800,000
16,200,000
Railway freight originated or loaded in British
P.G.E. freight originated or loaded in British
3,248,540
Energy consumption—
Electric power  — _	
21,600,000
510 000
40,500,000
1,012,000
1,573,000
7,312,000
1,748,000
4,000,000
1,650,000
391,800
88,400
42,700
42,600
32,900
31,300
25,400
19,900
191,500
98,000
1,470,000
770,000
Forestry—•
Mining—■
Total value of production  	
Fisheries-
Tourism—Foreign-licensed passenger vehicles entering British Columbia from the United States
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 21
PERSONAL  INCOME  IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
V
•S     3
59 61 63 65 67
800
J90
400
V.
Employment
1 1
57 59 61 63 65
67
 U 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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FACTORY SHIPMENTS
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CAPITAL AND  REPAIR  EXPENDITURES
2.4
1.6
.8
63 65
67
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 23
c
EXPORTS AND   IMPORTS THROUGH   B.C. CUSTOMS  POF
2000 __
»   160
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2.4
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o
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 U 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
c
ELECTRIC  POWER CONSUMPTION
J
20.
15.
.2     10.
v. 57    59 61 63 65 67  _y
NET VALUE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTION
1000
900
=S    800
500
700	
600
57 59 61 63 65 67
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 25
400
MINERAL PRODUCTION
Z)
57 59 61 63 65 67
c
FARM  CASH   RECEIPTS
57 59 61 63
 U 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
D
COMMERCIAL FISHING
57
59
i I I 1
61
63
65
67
FOREIGN-LICENSED PASSENGER  VEHICLES  ENTERING B.C.
800
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 27
TRANSPORTATION
A new publication, consisting of an analysis of railway freight rates applicable
to shipments of lumber and forest products from all areas of British Columbia to
14 major destinations in Canada and the United States, was released in the early
part of the year.
In May of 1967 the Bureau presented to the Interstate Commerce Commission
a statement of Government policy on behalf of the Minister of Commercial Transport. This was in regard to an application by a responsible Vancouver-based motor
carrier to provide freight service between British Columbia and the States of Oregon
and California. Permission to do so was granted by the Interstate Commerce Commission later in the year.
In August of 1967 the Board of Transport Commissioners held hearings in
Winnipeg to discuss the problems of enacting those sections of the new National
Transportation Act which call for decisions based upon the railway's costs of providing a specific service. A watching brief was maintained at this meeting, and at
the year-end preparations were under way for the submission of a brief to the
Canadian Transportation Commission regarding the effect of various costing proposals on the Province.
Also under way at the year-end was a study on the transportation of live stock
and dressed beef into British Columbia and a study regarding shipments of domestic
feed grain into and within the Province.
During the year the Bureau provided transportation information to other Government departments and Crown corporations, industrial concerns, and private
individuals. Transportation statistics and freight tariffs have been maintained on a
current basis. Detailed studies were made of railway freight charges assessed
against shippers of cement, hay, and holly.
Legal counsel for British Columbia was successful in its bid to prevent the
proposed Great Northern Pacific and Burlington lines merger from also including
the Milwaukee Railroad in the merger plan. In so doing, British Columbia shippers
will continue to enjoy, in the words of the Commission, service at the United States-
Canadian Border from a " viable transcontinental rail competitor."
MINING
It is the responsibility of the Bureau to collect and compile the production
statistics on all minerals, with the exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum.
The statistics which it compiles are published in detail in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The preliminary estimate of the value of mineral production in British Columbia for 1967 is $391.8 million. This production is a new record and represents the
largest single annual increase ever recorded. The estimated increase is $53.5
million above the value for 1966, almost 16 per cent.
Copper continues to be the leading mineral, with an estimated value of $88.4
million, greater than the combined value of the next two minerals, crude oil and zinc.
Copper now represents 22.6 per cent of the total value of mineral production and
showed an increase of 57.5 per cent above the 1966 value. Although no new
copper mines came into production during the year, some of the major mines increased their production over the previous year. The average price of copper in
1967 is slightly less than the 1966 average. Rising prices during the latter part of
1967 reflect the effect of the United States copper strike that began in mid-July.
 U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The value of crude-oil production continues to increase, largely a result of
several oil pools being put on new pressure maintenance schemes. The 1967
estimate is $42.7 million, up from $36.3 million in 1966.
Zinc and lead, long the leading minerals, both show a decline from 1966 and
continue to reflect the bringing into production of the Pine Point mine in the Northwest Territories. The estimates for zinc and lead are $42.6 million and $32.9
million respectively.
The value of molybdenum shows a marked gain, due to an increase in quantity
and to price for molybdic oxide. In production, it is now the fifth ranking mineral,
reaching a total of $31.3 million and represents 8 per cent of the total value of
mineral output. The first large-scale production began in 1965. Further increases
are expected in 1968.
The value of natural gas increased 46.5 per cent over 1966, reaching a total of
$25.4 million. This remarkable growth has developed from a combination of increased sales and improved recovery as permitted by the regulating authorities.
Other significant production categories are sand and gravel, $22.6 million;
iron concentrates, $19.9 million; asbestos, $18.5 million; and cement, $16.3
million.
In general, future prospects for mining in British Columbia are good, with increases foreseen principally in production of copper, molybdenum, and fuels.
EXTERNAL TRADE
During 1967 the Department answered many requests for assistance in developing foreign trade and for general advice and information including trade statistics.
These requests were received from individuals, businesses, universities and schools,
libraries, representatives of foreign governments, and other Provincial Government
departments. Included were special compilations to assist trade groups visiting
British Columbia and to assist missions originating in the Province which went overseas seeking new export markets.
Mid-1967 marked the successful completion of the " Kennedy Round " of
tariff negotiations. In order to advance the Departmental programme of providing
information to British Columbia businessmen and to point out the potential for
increased trade, the Department participated with the Federal Government and
trade associations in a seminar held at Vancouver in October. A special study
entitled " The Kennedy Round—A Preliminary Appreciation of Its Effect on British
Columbia Trade and Industry " was prepared for the use of those taking part in the
seminar.   The report in now available to the general public.
Completed and published during the year was the latest report in the " Pacific
Rim " series, " Market Opportunities in California for British Columbia Businessmen." The report is a companion to the 1966 publication on the States of Washington and Oregon. This publication lists quantities and values of selected imports
through each of the three California customs districts in 1964. As in the preceding
study, data on population, income, employment, and payrolls are provided. Approximately 1,200 copies of the report were distributed. The popular " Summary
of Pacific Rim Trade Opportunities," first published in 1965, was brought up to
date and reprinted in March. More than 1,200 copies of this report were provided
to interested persons. In addition, almost 1,000 copies of the annual " Preliminary
Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports, 1966," were
distributed. A report, " World Trade and the New Generation," was prepared for
use in conjunction with these seminars.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967
U 29
Exports and Imports
The first of the following two tables shows exports of products of British Columbia origin through all Canadian customs ports, and the second shows imports
through British Columbia customs ports. Following these are two tables showing
the destination of exports and the origin of imports. The export statistics are based
on estimates derived from various sources and differ from the regularly published
export statistics, which include all products shipped from British Columbia, regardless of origin. This special tabulation excludes products originating in other
Provinces and makes allowance for British Columbia products exported via customs
ports in other Provinces. Import statistics give the value of all commodities entering
Canada through British Columbia customs ports irrespective of their ultimate destination. At the present time there are not sufficient data available to estimate the
Province's consumption of imported goods.
Exports of British Columbia products through all Canadian customs ports are
estimated at $1,318 million in 1966, compared with $688 million in 1956 and $841
million in 1961. Imports through British Columbia customs ports have also shown
growth, rising from $508 million in 1956 to $726 million in 1966. However, as will
be noted in the accompanying table, imports tend to fluctuate with the economic
climate and level of capital investment of Western Canada, and it was not until 1964
that the import value of 1956 was exceeded. Exports of British Columbia products,
on the other hand, have increased each year, except for a small decline in 1957
and 1958.
Examination of the tables showing the direction of British Columbia exports
and imports through this Province's customs ports will show the outstanding increase
in the Province's trade with Japan. In 1956 it was estimated B.C. product exports
to that country were valued at $30 million, and were third in rank; in 1966 Japan
was British Columbia's second most important market and purchased nearly $155
million worth of this Province's products. A similar change occurred in the rank of
Japan as a supplier of goods imported through British Columbia customs ports.
Imports of Japanese products in 1956 were valued at $29 million, compared with
$87 million in 1966. Japan now ranks second in importance as a source of imports,
whereas in 1956 is was third most important. These developments have reduced
the United Kingdom from our second most valuable trading partner to third, but the
United States still continues to dominate, both as a market and as a supplier.
 U 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
British Columbia Product Exports to Commonwealth and Foreign Countries for the
Years 1956, 1961, and 1966 (Excluding Gold and Non-trade Items)1
Country or Area
1966
1961
1956
$806,500,000
154,500,000
150,700,000
84.900,000
28,900,000
17.300,000
75,700,000
$540,100,000
55,600,000
115,900,000
32,500,000
18,100,000
10,200,000
68,900,000
$503,000,000
Japan  	
29,500,000
83,200,000
11,200,000
11,800,000
9,600,000
40,000,000
Totals.  _ _ -	
$1,318,500,000
$841,300,000
$688,300,000
1 Estimates of products of British Columbia origin shipped through all Canadian customs ports and subject
to revision.
Imports through British Columbia Customs Ports from Commonwealth and Foreign
Countries for the Years 1956, 1961, and 1966 (Excluding Gold and Non-
trade Items).
Country or Area
1966
1961
1956
$407,100,000
87,400,000
54,500,000
37,500,000
27,800,000
13,700,000
98,200,000
$226,400,000
38,100,000
57,300,000
23,600,000
15,800,000
9,800,000
50,900,000
$333,500,000
29,300,000
64,900,000
26,000,000
11,900,000
Australia- _   —  	
5,200,000
58,100,000
Totals	
$726,200,000
$421,900,000
$528,900,000
FORESTRY
The Bureau, in active co-operation with other Provincial departments, the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and industrial associations, is responsible for collecting statistical data on all phases of the forest industry. Following compilation and
analysis, the information is published or otherwise made available to interested
parties. During the year, material was supplied to industry, research organizations,
government agencies, and private individuals.
In October of 1967 the third Dominion-Provincial Conference on Forestry and
Forest Product Statistics was held at Ottawa under the sponsorship of the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics. The Bureau of Economics and Statistics, aided by the Council
of Forest Industries of British Columbia and representatives from the major forestry
firms, prepared and presented a brief on behalf of the Province. The brief, which
suggested ways and means of improving the quality and timeliness of Federally
collected and published forest industry statistics, received a favourable hearing from
the Dominion Bureau. As a result of the conference, many of British Columbia's
requests will be met. The necessary liaison between Provinces, and with the
Dominion Bureau, has been reaffirmed.
During 1967 the British Columbia forest industry experienced a period of
mixed demand for its principal products. The net result was a modest advance in
gross sales accompanied by a decline in profits. The net value of forest industry
production has been estimated at $1,012 million, up 1.2 per cent over the corresponding value for 1966.*
* The net value of forestry production has been revised downward owing to duplication in the Federally
released logging and manufacturing industries statistics. The total forest industry figures shown above were the
result of an effort to eliminate duplication. Logging net value statistics are now being revised by the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics to the same basis as the manufacturing industries and will be published when available.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 33
Wood-pulp production maintained an unbroken upward trend begun in 1958,
although this year's increase was not as large as the 1965-66 increment. Total paper
production declined slightly due to a reduction in market demand for newsprint.
Had it not been for interrupted production in the Interior sawmilling industry,
lumber production would have reached an all-time high instead of a forecast fraction decline. The plywood industry is expected to surpass all previous production
levels for the 10th year in succession. The harvest of timber from British Columbia's
forests fell slightly below last year's record.
Capital expenditures by the forest industry are expected to be $230 million,
down from last year's record $330 million, but still well above the 1957-66 10-year
average of $148 million. The decline in 1967 capital expenditure was attributable
to the 1966 completion of three major pulp and paper projects. The pulp and paper
industry leads with a $150 million investment, followed by logging at $50 million
and the wood industries at $30 million.
Provincial pulp capacity increased by 260,000 tons a year with the coming on
line of the $60 million bleached-kraft mill at Gold River in June of 1967. Kraft-
pulp capacity is now approximately 3,000,000 tons a year, while productive capacity
for all wood pulp (includes sulphite and groundwood) totals about 4,800,000 tons
a year. This represents increases of 45 and 30 per cent respectively over the corresponding figures for 1965. Further projects scheduled for completion in 1968
will add 430,000 tons a year to kraft-pulp capacity.
Newsprint capacity was augmented by 160,000 tons a year when the 10th
newsprint machine at Powell River began production in June. A second newsprint
machine will be producing at Crofton early in 1968, at which time Provincial newsprint capacity will reach 1,680,000 tons a year.
Work commenced on a 140,000-tons-a-year kraft-pulp mill at Skookumchuck
during June of this year, and it has been announced that construction is scheduled
to begin in the spring of 1968 on a 260,000-tons-a-year kraft pulp and paper mill
near Kitimat. Four additional mills, with secured timber supplies and financial resources, are planned for completion before 1972. These mills will be built near
Quesnel, Houston, and Mackenzie at a combined cost of about $225 million.
Two new veneer and plywood plants became operative during the year. One
at Vancouver was designed to produce 50,000,000 square feet (%-inch rough) a
year of Douglas-fir and spruce plywood, and the other at Nelson had a rated annual
capacity of 40,000,000 square feet (%-inch rough) of spruce plywood. These two
plants added nearly 5 per cent to Provincial capacity.
Despite some production gains, reported forest-industry employment fell during
1967. Primarily the drop could be traced to the drought-induced forest closures of
August and labour disputes in the Interior lumber industry. Employment generated
by new pulp and paper facilities more than balanced lay-offs resulting from temporary shut-downs within that industry.
November devaluation of the British pound came too late in the year to have
an effect upon 1967 forest-product exports to the United Kingdom. The outlook
for 1968 remains good.
LABOUR
Arrangements with the Federal Department of Labour during the year enabled
the Bureau to utilize current data concerning occupational salaries and wage rates
in British Columbia. For the first time, this information has been taken directly
from survey questionnaires used jointly by both authorities.
 U 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Through joint use of the Federal questionnaire, elimination of the separate
survey previously conducted each year by this Bureau was made possible. While
favourable comment was generally expressed, a number of employers viewed the
loss of this annual survey information with some concern, until assured a publication
based on the new joint survey would be released later in the year. It is planned that
next year this interim survey report will be replaced by a new expanded survey
showing wage and salary data on an industry basis, and also by regions. As in
previous years, the current survey was used as a basis for specialized wage and salary
information required by the Civil Service Commission in its studies of comparative
levels of wages and salaries in business and industry.
During the year the Bureau started receiving monthly employment and payroll
statistics from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. This information will be available
later on a detailed regional and industry basis.
The labour section was again concerned with the compilation of the tables and
text included in the statistical sections of the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour. The 1967 material provided by the Bureau appears in that publication
under headings of "Highlights of the 1967 Statistical Report on Trades and Industries " and "Annual Survey of Organized Labour in British Columbia, 1967."
With reference to organized-labour statistics, a continuing co-operative agreement with the Federal Department of Labour provided the primary source for information on trade unions in this Province. A follow-up survey of non-respondents
was completed by the Bureau during the year as a complementary service to Ottawa.
A current directory of trade unions in British Columbia was compiled for the
Provincial Department of Labour from the information obtained from the joint
Federal and Provincial survey of labour organizations.
Concerning labour income in this Province, revised totals representing the
wages and salary portion of labour income in British Columbia are shown in the
table following for the years 1955 to 1967:—
Estimated Annual Wages and Salaries in British Columbia
Total Wages Total Wages
Year and Salaries Year and Salaries
1955  $1,365,000,000      1962  $2,008,000,000
1956  1,579,000,000      1963  2,159,000,000
1957  1,687,000,000      1964  2,362,000,000
1958  1,683,000,000      1965  2,731,000,000
1959  1,790,000,000      1966  3,123,000,000
19"60  1,858,000,000      1967  3,420,000,000!
1961  1,894,000,000
i Preliminary estimate.
Source:   Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Otawa.
PUBLICATIONS
Periodical
"Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity."—(Monthly.) Presents current data
on the various statistical series which measure business activity in the Province.
Includes an analysis of general business conditions with charts and special articles.
Also announces the latest publications released by the Bureau.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 35
"Summary of Economic Activity in British Columbia."—(Annual.) Reviews
the economy during the past year with particular regard to the developments in the
basic and secondary industries. It also provides statistical series and charts for a
10-year period, showing production, retail sales, population growth, and numerous
other indicators of economic significance.
" Business Outlook."—(Annual.) Issued at the end of the current year, it indicates business conditions during the past year and the outlook for the coming year.
This publication covers the following economic factors: Sales, prices, employment,
wages, earnings, and capital expenditure. It is based in part on a survey of 300 of
the major companies in British Columbia.
"Establishing a Business in British Columbia."—Provides prospective investors and businessmen with a general picture of the part played by the three levels
of government—Federal, Provincial, and Municipal—in regulating and assisting
industry in British Columbia. Reference is made to official sources for further information on particular subjects covered in the text.
"Facts and Statistics."—(Annual.) Portrays graphically some of the salient
features of British Columbia's economy and describes its geography, government,
judiciary, education system, etc.
"Industrial Expansion in British Columbia."—(Annual.) A summary of
reported industrial expansion in the Province listed by census divisions and type of
industry and indicating whether under consideration, under way, or completed.
Quarterly supplements for the current year are also available.
" Dominion Bureau of Statistics Consumer Price Index."—(Annual.) Summary
card showing annual Canadian figures starting in 1913 to current year, plus monthly
figures for the past three years. The Vancouver City price indexes are given yearly
from 1951, plus monthly figures for the current year. To keep this folder current,
the Bureau forwards a monthly circular giving the latest data.
"Salary and Wage Rate Survey."—(Annual.) This annual publication summarizes salary and wage rates of selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in commercial and industrial establishments for British Columbia.
" Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs
Ports."—(Annual.) Provides detailed statistics of imports and exports through
British Columbia customs ports for those commodities having an aggregate value of
$75,000 or more.
"Selected Forest Industry Statistics of British Columbia, 1966."—(Annual.)
A comprehensive statistical summary of the forest industry in a Provincial and
National perspective covering production, employment, and trade.
Occasional
" British Columbia Manufacturers Directory, 1966."—A directory of products
manufactured by British Columbia industry. Includes the name, address, and
employment size group of manufacturing companies. This new edition replaces the
British Columbia Trade Index.
"British Columbia Wholesale Directory."—(1967.) Lists British Columbia
wholesalers and distributors, the product's they handle, and their employment-size
group.  In addition, there is a list of importers, exporters, and manufacturers' agents.
"Population Maps of Census Divisions."—Show the 1966 population by
enumeration areas, cities, towns, district municipalities, and villages. A series of
10 maps, one for each census division, is available, at a nominal charge of $1 (95
cents plus 5 cents tax) for each map.
 U 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Manual of Resources and Development."—Contains up-to-date information
about the location and development of British Columbia resources and is well documented with maps and diagrams.
"Materials and Components Used by British Columbia Manufacturers in
1963."—Second of a series with 1965 figures expected in 1968. It is hoped that
this series will encourage further investigation by private enterprises as to the feasibility of producing some of these products in British Columbia.
" The Kennedy Round."—A preliminary appreciation of its effects on British
Columbia trade and industry.
" Industry Studies."—A series of studies analysing industries which are located,
or might be encouraged to locate, in British Columbia. The latest are on steel
drums and papermaker felts.
Area Surveys.—These are detailed studies of economic areas in British Columbia. Reports on the " South Coastal Region " and " Kimberley Region," published
in 1967, are the most recent. Data for all areas of British Columbia are covered in
the 1966 edition of the Regional Index.
" Freight Rates in Effect on Lumber and Forest Products from British Columbia Points to Canadian and American Markets."—(January, 1967.) This study
presents a general picture of the freight charges applicable to rail movements of
lumber from British Columbia to major markets in Canada and the United States.
Trade Studies.—(1) " Market Opportunities in California'for British Columbia
Businessmen," 1967. This study of imports and employment and payrolls and an
outline of the economy of California is designed to point out export opportunities for
British Columbia manufacturers.
(2) " Summary of Pacific Rim Trade Opportunities," 1967. This study reviews and outlines the contents of each of the previous Pacific Rim studies, enabling
firms or individuals to quickly and accurately determine which study will best meet
their needs.
(Note.—A complete listing of Bureau publications is contained in the Department's " List of Publications," obtainable free of charge.)
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967 U 37
DATA PROCESSING CENTRE
During the past year the major change and accomplishment in the Centre has
been the introduction of two new medium-sized computer systems. These systems
represent the new type of computers presently available, and they have contributed
toward the Centre being able to cope with an increasing volume of work with no
staff additions. These increases have been caused primarily by larger input volumes
on existing applications, the result of population growth and economic progress
within the Province.
With new model equipment systems available, it was possible to release two
older models of computers. Elimination of older equipment will be completed early
in 1968 with the release of a small computer presently used to handle technical and
scientific projects and to run a plotter.
The Centre presently has the following complements of staff and equipment
providing operating, and systems and programming services to nearly all Government departments, services, and agencies:—
Staff
Key-punch and verifier operators and coders  68
Computer and ancillary equipment operators     9
Computer systems analysts and programmers  17
Equipment
Punch-card equipment—
Thirty-four key-punches. One collator.
Twenty-five verifiers. One reproducer.
Five sorters. One interpreter.
Computers—
One 360/30 with high-speed card reader/punch, high-speed card/form
printer, seven magnetic-tape drives, two disk drives.
One 360/40 with high-speed card reader/punch, high-speed printer, six
magnetic-tape drives, three disk drives.
One 1620 with low-speed card reader/punch, low-speed printer, two disk
drives, Calcomp plotter.
SYSTEMS AND PROGRAMMING DIVISION
Staff in this Division were occupied almost full time on the following projects
and areas of work:—
Training.—All programmer-analysts were required to take at least one month's
formal training to prepare for the new computer systems. This training has covered
the capabilities of this new equipment, new programming languages, and monitoring
systems used to control the operation of the computers. This formal training has
been supplemented by additional on-the-job training.
Maintenance.—The normal demands for revisions and maintenance of programmes for existing data-processing applications have been handled by the programmers. This maintenance has been restricted to work caused by changes in
legislation, regulations, and Government policy.
Research.—Considerable time was spent on research and development work.
This covered several different subjects and has producd a noticeable improvement in
the activities within the Centre.   The more important investigations dealt with capa-
 U 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
bilities and limitations of equipment, machine instruction and control techniques
(software), and documentation techniques.
System Management.—The introduction of new computer systems created a
need for a group of specialists working full time on the control and development of
software, and to act as a liaison between the Systems and Programming Division and
the Computer Section. This resulted in the establishment of a System Management
Section staffed with four programmer-analysts. This Section is responsible for the
accuracy and reliability of all software and instructions provided to the Operations
Division by programmer-analysts from the Centre and from user Departments.
They are also responsible for the introduction of computer monitoring systems.
OPERATIONS DIVISION
Work volumes in this Division, which are reflected by volume of cards keypunched, have increased by approximately 10 per cent in the past year. Although
there has been a slight decrease in staff in the Division, this increase in work has had
little effect on services to departments.   New equipment, improved operating pro-
Key-punch Section.
cedures, and introduction of organization, scheduling, and control changes have
achieved improved data-processing services to many departments. Highlights in
work sections within this Division during the past year were:—
Computer Section.—This was the only Section in the Division affected by the
new computers. All computer operators were required to take formal and on-the-
job training to familiarize themselves with the new equipment. Most of this training
was completed in September. This new equipment has made it possible for this
Section to readily handle over a 7-per-cent increase in work volumes. This Section
has also provided a back-up service to departmental data-processing installations.
The Department of Finance has used this service on four or five occasions to assist
in payroll processing.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 39
I
["XW-t "•   •     •- • ~"!j '" •*v'V'- •-••"<^i*«?r;
■
. -«•• -*•*!,;.f •'•
Computer Section of the Data Processing Centre.
Unit Record Section.—Organization changes, increased computer use, and
new work methods have brought about a staff reduction and savings in equipment
rentals in this Section. Equipment rentals, which were reduced by $25,000 in the
past year, will be reduced further in 1968.
Data Preparation Section.—This Section has also achieved a slight staff reduction due to introduction of new equipment and changes in management practices.
This has allowed the key-punch units to handle an approximate 10-per-cent increase
in card volumes and to handle work backlogs from key-punch units in the Department of Finance, Division of Vital Statistics, and the British Columbia Medical
Plan.
Scheduling and Control Section.—Through staff reductions in the above Sections it was possible to establish a formalized scheduling and control group in the
Operations Division. This group is responsible for scheduling all work in, through,
and out of this Division, balancing of statements and reports produced by computer,
and maintaining completely accurate and up-dated magnetic-tape and disk libraries.
It also acts as the contact or liaison with staff from all departments using the services
of the Centre. Creation of this Section has proven most valuable, and has contributed significantly toward providing more efficient data-processing services to user
departments.
TRAINING ACTIVITIES
As indicated in the preceding divisional reports, training activities have been
quite extensive in the past year. Now that the Centre has a well-appointed training-
room, all data-processing training for Government staff is being co-ordinated by the
Centre. Training needs are determined and arrangements are made to see that
necessary courses are given to programmers, operators, and interested administra-
 U 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tors.   As a result, well over a dozen subjects have been covered in great detail and
there has been a total enrolment of over 200 Government employees.
Two successful management seminars on computer concepts were also conducted. These seminars, as well as a series of lectures for the Executive Training
Class, were organized in co-operation with the Civil Service Commission Training
Officer.
WORK DISTRIBUTION
The following tables show the estimated values and percentages of work done
in the Centre by departments and by branches within department.
Table 1.—Estimated Value of Services Provided to Departments for the 12-month
Period Ended September 30, 1967, by Department and Percentage of Service
Used.
Estimated Value to Nearest $1,000
'ercentage of Service
Department
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Service
Agriculture  __. . 	
6.5
249.2
2.0
10.4
12.1
7.6
9.6
2.5
0.3
15.8
14.1
0.1
4.4
46.9
5.7
0.9
10.0
262.5
0.6
9.2
2.9
76.6
55.3
25.7
6.7
0.2
25.8
0.2
13.7
0.2
4.7
12.1
11.4
2.9
0.9
34.2
1.2
5.3
11.4
1.5
1.2
15.5
0.6
3.0
0.2
2.7
17.4
545.7
2.6
20.8
2.9
94.0
74.3
35.3
10.7
1.7
57.1
0.8
30.8
0.3
9.3
61.7
17.1
3.8
1.7
63.9
0.5
2.7
3.2
2.0
2.5
0.7
0.1
4.1
3.7
1.1
12.1
1.5
0.2
1.9
50.6
0.1
1.8
0.5
14.6
10.6
4.9
1.3
5.0
2.7
0.9
2.3
2.2
0.6
1.2
44.0
1.5
6.9
14.7
1.9
1.5
19.8
0.8
4.0
~0.3
3.4
1.7
55.3
0.3
2.1
Finance. _    	
0.3
9.6
Health Services and Hospital
Insurance       —	
Highways          	
Industrial Development, Trade,
7.5
3.6
1.1
0.2
5.8
Mines and Petroleum Resources
0.1
3.1
Recreation and Conservation....
0.9
6.2
1.8
Other    ....	
0.4
Totals
388.1
520.7
77.5
986.3
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967
U 41
Table 1a.—Estimated Value of Services Provided to Departments for the 12-month
Period Ended September 30,1967, by Branch within Department and Percentage of Service Used.
Estimated Value to Nearest $1,000
Percentage of Service
Department and Branch
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Service
Agriculture—
0.4
5.5
0.4
0.2
8.8
1.2
0.9
9.2
6.7
1.3
0.2
0.1
1.4
0.1
0.1
1.7
0.2
1.2
0.9
Herd Improvement Branch
Soils Survey Branch   ..
0.7
0.1
Engineering.	
Totals 	
6.5
10.0
0.9
17.4
1.7
1.9
1.2
1.7
Attorney-General—
1.7
3.9
196.6
5.1
41.9
0.2
0.5
220.1
3.5
38.2
16.3
3.7
14.0
1.9
4.4
433.0
12.3
94.1
0.4
1.0
50.4
1.3
10.8
0.1
42.5
0.7
7.3
0.1
21.0
4.8
18.1
0.2
Land Registry 	
0.4
43.9
1.3
Liquor Control Board	
9.5
Total!.
249.2
262.5
34.0
545.7
63.9
50.6
44.0
55.3
Commercial Transport—
Weigh-scales Branch	
2.0
0.6
2.6
0.5
0.1
0.3
Education—
4.2
2.1
1.9
0.2
2.0
1.1
5.2
0.3
2.6
0.8
0.4
6.1
7.3
2.6
2.8
2.0
1.1
0.5
0.5
0.1
0.5
0.2
1.0
0.1
0.5
1.0
0.5
0.6
0.7
High School Correspondence
0.3
0.3
Inspector of Schools	
0.2
10.4
9.2
1.2
20.8
2.7
1.8
1.5
2.1
Finance—
	
2.8
0.1
	
2.8
0.1
1
1        0.5
	
0.3
Assessment  Equalization
Board
     |        2.9
	
2.9
     1        0.5    |    .	
0.3
Forest Service—
5.2
3.8
2.1
1.0
1.8
6.8
13.1
54.9
0.4
4.9
7.4
10.6
15.2
60.8
1.3
1.0
0.6
0.3
0.3
1.3
2.5
10.5
0.6
6.3
0.8
Research	
1.1
Engineering 	
1.5
6.2
12.1
76.6
5.3
94.0
3.2
14.6
6.9
9.6
Health Services and Hospital
Insurance—
4.6
3.0
14.3
41.0
2.8
8.6
21.7
52.6
1.2
0.8
2.7
7.9
3.7
11.0
2.2
5.3
7.6
55.3
11.4
74.3
2.0
10.6
14.7
7.5
Highways—
Bridge Engineering	
6.2
3.4
0.2
19.2
6.3
0.2
25.4
9.7
1.6
0.9
3.7
1.2
	
2.6
Research and Development	
1.0
Totals
9.6
25.7
	
35.3
2.5
4.9
	
36
Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce—
Bureau of Economics	
Labour—
2.5
0.3
6.7
0.2
1.5
1.2
10.7
1.7
0.7
0.1
1.3
1.9
1.5
1.1
0 2
Lands Service—
Survey and Mapping	
11.1
4.7
20.9
4.9
0.3
15.2
32.3
24.8
2.9
1.2
4.0
1.0
0.3
19.5
3 3
Water Rights Administration
2.5
Totals	
15.8
25.8
15.5
57.1
4.1
5.0
19.8
5.8
 U 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 7a.—Estimated Value of Services Provided to Departments for the 12-month
Period Ended September 30,1967, by Branch within Department and Percentage of Service Used—Continued.
Estimated Value to Nearest $1,000
Percentage of Service
Department and Branch
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Data
Preparation
Computer
Program-
ming-
Analysing
Total
Service
Mines and Petroleum Resources—
Petroleum and Natural Gas...
0.2
0.6
0.8
0.8
0.1
Provincial Secretary—
Queen's Printer  _
8.9
0.2
5.0
2.4
0.3
2.7
11.3
0.5
19.0
2.3
0.1
1.3
0.5
2.2
1.1
0.5
3.5
0.1
11.3
1.9
Totals   	
14.1
13.7
3.0
30.8
3.7
2.7
4.0
3 1
Public Works—
Public Works	
0.1
4.4
46.9
0.2
4.7
12.1
0.2
2.7
0.3
9.3
61.7
1.1
12.1
Recreation and Conservation—
Fish and Wildlife 	
0.9
2.3
0.3
3.4
09
Social Welfare—■
Accounts Division	
6.2
Water Resources—■
1.5
4.2
5.1
6.3
	
6.6
10.5
0.4
1.1
1.0
1.2
0.7
Water Investigation 	
1.1
Totals.  	
5.7
11.4
	
17.1
1.5
2.2
	
1.8
Other-
0.9
1.9
1.0
	
1.9
1.9
0.2
0.1
0.2
	
0.2
British  Columbia  Medical
Plan
0.2
Totals
0.9
2.9
._.
3.8
0.2
0.6
0.4
388.1
520.7
77.5
986.3
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1967
U 43
Table 2.—Estimated Value of Services by Department for Five Years Based on
12-month Period Ended September 30,1967
Department
Value to Nearest $1,000
Five-
year
Increase
Percent-
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
Total
Increase
Agriculture 	
4.8
49.3
5.8
51.4
8.0
92.6
1.7
14.0
62.6
35.5
17.6
38.4
0.6
31.3
0.7
17.5
7.9
29.5
7.6
1.3
5.7
205.7
1.1
12.8
0.2
82.6
46.3
24.2
47.9
0.4
30.6
1.3
25.0
17.4
545.7
2.6
20.8
2.9
94.0
74.3
35.3
10.7
1.7
57.1
0.8
30.8
0.3
9.3
61.7
17.1
3.8
12.6
496.4
2.6
—6.2
2.9
53.7
49.4
4.8
-9.6
0.5
28.6
0.8
16.9
0.3
7.5
37.2
16.5
3.8
1.7
69.1
0.4
Education  	
Finance ___ _._	
27.0
40.3
24.9
30.5
20.3
1.2
28.5
16.2
67.5
25.6
17.3
30.1
0.5
32.1
2.7
20.9
—0.8
0.4
7.5
Health and Hospital Insurance Service
6.9
0.7
Industrial   Development,   Trade,   and
Commerce 	
-1.3
3.9
0.1
13.9
1.8
24.5
0.6
2.3
Public Works     	
1.7
23.8
6.7
0.1
6.0
34.6
5.8
1.4
1.0
5.2
2.3
Other      	
0.6
Totals 	
267.6
302.4
366.8
531.6
986.3
718.7
100.0
 U 44                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3.—Estimated Value of Work by Department and Type of Application for
12-month Period Ended September 30,1967
Estimated Value to Nearest $1,000
Department
Percentage of
Total
Data
Computer
Program-
Prepara
ming-
Total
Service
tion
Analysing
A. Record-keeping and Statistics
Agriculture   	
6.0
10.0
16.0
1.6
210.1
225.0
20.0
455.1
46.2
10.6
5.2
9.3
1.8
1.2
0.4
21.1
7.4
2.1
0.8
Forest Service   ,	
7.6
52.0
11.4
71.0
7.2
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce	
2.5
6.7
1.5
10.7
1.1
0.3
4.0
0.2
1.3
1.2
2.4
1.7
7.7
0.2
0.8
Public Works	
0.1
0.2
0.3
4.4
46.9
0.9
4.7
12.1
3.0
0.2
2.7
9.3
61.7
3.9
0.9
6.2
0.4
Other
298.6            326.3              41.0
665.9              67.5
B. Engineering and Scientific
Agriculture—      .
0.6
0.9
1.5
0.2
Forest Service  	
7.0
74.9
4.9
86.8
8.8
Highways
9.7
25.7
  .
35.4
3.6
11.1
20.9
0.2
0.3
0.6
32.3
0.8
3.3
0.1
Mines and Petroleum Resources     	
Water Resources _ 	
5.7
11.5
17.2
1.7
Totals 	
34.1             133.2                6.7
174.0               17.7
C. Accounting
38.6
37.1
13.9
89.6
9.1
2.0
0.6
2.6
0.3
2.9
3.3
	
2.9
3.3
0.3
0.3
Lands Service  _  	
4.7
4.9
15.2
24.8
2.5
Provincial Secretary  	
10.1
12.4
0.7
23.2
2.3
Totals. _	
55.4              61.2              29.8
146.4      j        14.8
388.1
520.7
77.5
986.3      1      100.0
t
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1967 U 45
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce lends support, including financial assistance, to the British Columbia Research Council, which
was incorporated in 1944 under the Societies Act.
In broad terms, the objectives of the Council are to provide scientific, technical,
and marketing services to industry in British Columbia, Canada, and abroad. The
primary objective is to conduct research leading to the establishment of new industries and the economic development of the natural resources of British Columbia.
From a modest beginning, the Council has grown with the development of the
Province. It now employs a staff of 89, and operates from its own establishment,
located on the campus of the University of British Columbia.
Financial support comes from a Provincial grant through the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce and from earned income from contract research for industry and Government agencies. It also receives a limited
amount of financial assistance from the National Research Council and other
organizations.
INCOME
1,200
1,100
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
Pi
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O  300
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FROM B.  C.  GOVERNMENT
FROM RESEARCH CONTRACTS
 U 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Each year the British Columbia Research Council publishes an annual report
on its various programmes, results of operations, and financial affairs, which may be
obtained upon request from the Director of the British Columbia Research Council.
The Council is supervised by a board of management, which met and reviewed
the activities of the Council on April 13, June 21, and November 15, 1967. Membership consisted of the following:—
Dean W. M. Armstrong, Faculty of Applied Science, University of British
Columbia.
Mr. John Bene, President, Weldwood of Canada Limited, 900 Kent Street,
Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mr. Edward Benson, Vice-President and General Manager, Pacific Press Limited, 2250 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Head, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology,
University of British Columbia.
Dr. R. E. Foster, Director, Forest Products Laboratory, 6620 North-west
Marine Drive, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Mr. A. Fouks, Q.C., 6637 Cartier Street, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Dr. John A. Gower, Exploration District Manager, Kennco Explorations
(Western) Limited, 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Mr. G. H. Gwyn, Works Manager, Kitimat Works, Aluminum Company of
Canada Limited, Kitimat, B.C.
Mr. Gerald H. D. Hobbs, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, 450 Southeast Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mr. J. E. Liersch, Vice-President, Canadian Forest Products Limited, 505
Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. Harold Madsen, Head, Entomology Section, Research Station, Canada
Department of Agriculture, Summerland, B.C.
Mr. F. D. Mathers, Chairman of the Board, Royal City Foods Limited, 12
Front Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Mr. H. T. Miard, Deputy Minister, Department of Highways, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mr. C. W. Nash, Manager, Load Development, British Columbia Hydro and
Power Authority, 970 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Mr. A. F. Paget, Deputy Minister of Water Resources, Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mr. Robert F. Renwick, Deputy Minister, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mr. E. G. Shorter, Vice-Chairman, Board of Directors, MacMillan Bloedel
Limited, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Dr. Gordon M. Tener, Professor, Department of Biochemistry, University of
British Columbia.
Dr. G. M. Volkoff, Head, Department of Physics, University of British Columbia.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
1,530-1167-9340
  

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