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Civil Service Commission 50th ANNUAL REPORT 1918-1968 Province of British Columbia January 1st to December… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1969]

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 Civil Service Commission
ANNUAL REPORT
1918-1968
Province of British Columbia
January 1st to December 31st, 1968
Published by Authority of the Legislative Assembly
  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Fiftieth Annual Report
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31
1968
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  The Honourable W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary.
 j; :*,::::;:: ^ ^   :%     x ^:    ;   ; J 8 :;;,; {^ iy t ^^ S.
H. M. Morrison, Ph.D., Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
 To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission, Province of British Columbia, from January 1 to December 31, 1968.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, British Columbia, January, 1969.
 The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 8 of the Civil Service Act
(chapter 56, Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1960), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from January 1 to December 31, 1968.
HUGH M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, British Columbia, January, 1969.
 THE EVOLUTION OF
THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
1918-1968
A Brief Summary of the Development of the Administration
of British Columbia's Centralized Personnel Agency
'HIS, the Fiftieth Annual Report of the Civil Service Commission of British
Columbia, marks a milestone in history and progress of this branch of
the Service, and should not be permitted to pass without a special note
of recognition. It was on February 14, 1919, when the Provincial Secretary presented to the Legislative Assembly the first report of the proceedings of the Civil
Service Commissioner, W. H. Maclnnes, from July 1, 1918, to January 31, 1919.
During the previous decade, special and intermittent attempts had been made
by the Legislature and Government to frame an intelligible system of personnel
administration based on merit selection and equitable wage administration. Apparently it was not until 1908 and 1909 that the Legislative Assembly felt this pioneer
public service required such organization. Prior to these years there had been two
Select Committees of the Assembly studying and reporting upon the Service. When
British Columbia joined the Canadian Federation, there were some 90 persons on
the public payroll, and these included many who correspond to elected officials today.
In 1878 the first Select Committee recommended a 9 to 5 work-day; 45 minutes
for lunch; no overtime was allowed for those required to finish their day's work;
one month's notice in lieu of termination; no commissions to be paid employees,
except to Sheriffs; and a " signing " register of attendance. Another Select Committee sat and reported in 1883. It reported that there was a substantial backlog
of uncompleted work, and it also recommended salary increases for public servants,
including Ministers of the Crown. At that time the number of employees, exclusive
of the Minister, in the Lands and Works Department, was three—a Surveyor-
General, a clerk of records, and a draughtsman. This corresponds today to some
8,701 employees in Lands, Forests, and Water Resources Department, the Highways
Department, and the Public Works Department.*
Not much was done in respect to the recommendations of the Select Committees. In 1908, however, a start on the creation of a public service with provision
for grading employees outlined through the Public Service Act came into being.
The Act, apparently, did not get off the ground, because it was repealed the following year by the Public Service Act of 1909.
This Act was an elaboration of the 1908 Act. It was an attempt to provide
for an efficient public service, which amounted to some 500 employees. A rough
system of grading was established, and there was provision for the appointment of
three Civil Service Commissioners and Examiners, three Grading Commissioners,
plus a " Registrar of the Public Service." (Paschal Walker, later Deputy Provincial
Secretary, served as Registrar from 1910 to 1918.)   Appointments and promotions,
* This information is based on a graduating essay for Political Science 490, University of Victoria, by Peter
J. T. Gibson, entitled " The Administration of the Administrative Classes of the Province of British Columbia."
vii
 although departmental or by Order in Council, had to have the certification of the
Commissioners as to possession of adequate qualifications or success in its examinations. Promotions involving salary increases were required to have the consent of
the Civil Service Commissioners.
By Order in Council approved July 30, 1910, Messrs. Alexander Robinson,
Superintendent of Education; William John Goepel, Inspector of Offices; and John
P. McLeod, Inspector of Legal Offices, were appointed Civil Service Commissioners
and Examiners. Further, by Order in Council approved November 4, 1910, their
duties were outlined. These duties were quite restricted, and advisory to the Executive Council. There was no power of appointment. Meanwhile, two years earlier,
by Order in Council approved March 20, 1909, three Grading Commissioners had
been appointed. Messrs. Moses B. Cotsworth (Chairman), J. A. Mara (a Justice
of the Peace), and W. Curtis Sampson (an accountant) were charged with grading
all employees who held positions on March 31, 1909. Their work was terminated
January 24, 1910, and by an Order in Council approved November 4, 1910, the
responsibilities were handed over to the Civil Service Commissioners.
In spite of the temporary nature of their tenure, Moses Cotsworth and his
Commissioners accomplished their work in an astonishingly competent manner.
They placed the Service on the road toward a defensible classification system. However, the Service was still too small to require the assistance of a centralized body.
The departments needed little such assistance. In spite of the good intentions of
the Act of 1909, the Civil Service Commissioners and Examiners accomplished
little except the setting of a few examination papers based on typing and shorthand
skills and knowledge of geography.
During the First World War, public service problems were naturally thrust into
the background, but even before the end of the war it was becoming evident that
some central authority was needed.* As a result, a Civil Service Act was passed
in the Legislature in 1917 which repealed the Public Service Act of 1909. This is
the first appearance of the term " Civil Service," except with the reference to " Civil
Service Commissioners " in the Act of 1909.
The Act of 1917 provided for a one-man Civil Service Commission " to test
and pass upon the qualifications of candidates for admission to or promotion in the
Civil Service." The general principle of competition was to be stressed, but all
appointments to a special grade labelled " technical " were to be by Order in Council.
The Act was proclaimed on May 17, 1918, bringing it officially into force on
July 1st of that year, the date of appointment of the new Commissioner. The first
Commissioner was actually a part-time Commissioner, Alexander Naismith Mouat,
the Comptroller-General.
It apparently became impossible for Mr. Mouat to continue in both positions,
and a few months later, on November 11, 1918, Mr. William H. Maclnnes was
appointed first full-time Commissioner.
The first report of the first full-time Civil Service Commissioner covered the
period July 1, 1918, to January 31, 1919. This showed concern about the erosion
of Civil Service salaries caused by the post-war inflation. Mr. Maclnnes submitted
a draft Act which later formed the basis of the Government's superannuation policy.
This resulted in the Civil Service Superannuation Act being passed by the Legislative
Assembly in April, 1921, and placed under the administration of the Civil Service
Commission.
The operation of the Act of 1917 was not on a full merit basis because the
sundry and technical classes were exempt.   Nevertheless, the 1917 Statute did per-
* It should be noted that in November, 1916—the first Liberal Ministry—premier H. C. Brewster announced
that he was opposed to patronage. Almost at once he laid off all road superintendents and brought in Professor
Adam Shortt to reform the Civil Service—extra "A History of British Columbia," by Margaret Ormsby, page 394.
 mit the learning and consolidation of techniques which led later to the Civil Service
Act of 1945. In 1926 Mr. Maclnnes was transferred to the position of Official
Administrator in Vancouver. For three years, 1926 to 1929, Arthur H. Cox was
Commissioner, to be followed by a career Civil Servant, A. Norman Baker. By this
time the superannuation duties were outweighing by far Civil Service duties, as
during the " Depression " years recruitment of staff was drastically curtailed.
In 1931 it was decided to separate the administration of the Superannuation
Act from the jurisdiction of the Civil Service Commission, and Mr. Baker assumed
the position of Civil Service Superannuation Commissioner. Mr. Ross Napier, who
had been on loan as a departmental Commissioner from the Government Agency
at Vernon, was asked to accept the post of Civil Service Commissioner. However,
he never did assume the post, as the Government apparently changed its mind, and
appointed Mr. Roger Monteith, who served from 1931 to 1934. After the incumbency of Mr. Monteith, Norman Baker, the Superannuation Commissioner, again
assumed the duties of Civil Service Commissioner in addition to his superannuation
duties. In this way the Civil Service Commission became almost an appendage of
the Superannuation Branch. A violent dispute with Mr. Napier had greatly weakened the merit principles, and Mr. Baker was unable to repair or regain lost ground.
The pressures of World War II together with a larger Service (around 4,000)
started to reveal how weakened the Civil Service was, and how an overhauling was
needed. Accordingly, Mr. Baker was asked in 1942 to chair a Committee for Reorganization of the Civil Service. His fellow members were John Villiers Fisher,
Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance, and E. Wynn Griffith, Assistant Deputy Provincial Secretary. The Commission was ably assisted by Thomas Cole, of the
Finance Department.
In 1945 a new Civil Service Act came into existence, and the principles of merit
were strongly underlined. Powers of appointment and promotion were vested in the
Commission, as well as classification of positions. In addition, one of its duties was
to recommend salaries for classified positions, or changes in salaries, to the Executive
Council.
The Act marked a return to a three-member Commission, with A. Norman
Baker as Chairman and Executive Director of the Act, with the status of a Deputy
Minister. Messrs. J. V. Fisher and E. W. Griffith were appointed members in 1945.
In the same year two Personnel Officers were appointed to the Commission's staff—
namely, Robin L. W. Ritchie and Hugh M. Morrison, the latter as Chief Personnel
Officer. He accepted the position on a trial transfer from the school inspection staff
of the Education Department. In the following year all members of the Commission
were appointed Deputy Ministers: Mr. Fisher as Deputy Minister of Finance (October 1, 1946); Mr. Griffith as the first Deputy Minister of Welfare (October 1, 1946);
and Mr. Baker as Deputy Provincial Secretary (October 1, 1946), in addition to
being Chairman of the Civil Service Commission and Superannuation Commissioner.
In 1947 Mr. Baker died, and on May 28, 1949, the Chief Personnel Officer, Hugh
M. Morrison, was promoted to Chairman, now a full-time position.
Various developing factors guaranteed busy years for the Civil Service Commission, until today it has the fullest programme in personnel administration and
advisement of any public service or civil service in Canada. These factors were as
follows:—
(1) British Columbia has experienced the most rapid growth rate in population
of any Canadian Province. The population has more than doubled since
1945, and the Civil Service has expanded to some 25,000.
(2) Expanded government services, such as greatly increased public health,
mental health, and social welfare services;  expanded highway construe-
 tion, toll bridge and British Columbia Ferry Services; institution of hospital insurance service and medical insurance service; institution of many
large vocational schools and the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
(3) Expanded employee relations, including administration of an employee
grievance procedure. The Civil Service Act of 1945 contained provision
for the recognition of employee organizations, without limiting in any way
individual employee rights.
(4) The Act, as later amended, provided for in-service training and encouragement of such training by the Commission. In this connection, the Civil
Service Commission takes pride in the fact that among the Canadian
Provinces it instituted with Government approval and support
(a) the first supervisory training programme in 1949;
(b) the first executive development training course, with a university
diploma, 1956;
(c) the first (and still only) Government integrated and co-ordinated
employee safety programme, in 1962.*
The annual reports of the Civil Service Commission since 1946 reveal the manner in which the personnel administration of the Government of British Columbia,
through the centralized agency of the Commission, and through the various departments in liaison with the Commission, has progressed.
It is a progression in which the Government and the people of British Columbia may justifiably take a good deal of pride—in a sound Civil Service, responsive
to Government policies in the service of the people, f
CHRONOLOGY OF COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC
SERVICE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
GRADING COMMISSIONERS
March 20, 1909, to January 24, 1910:
Moses Cotsworth, F.G.S.
W. Curtis Sampson, C.A.
John A. Mara, J.P.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS AND EXAMINERS
July 30, 1910, to June 30, 1918:
Alexander Robinson (Superintendent of Education).
William John Goepel (Inspector of Offices).
John P. McLeod (Inspector of Legal Offices).
REGISTRAR OF CIVIL SERVICE
October 20, 1910, to June 30, 1918:
Paschal Walker.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS
July 1, 1918,. to November 11, 1918:
Alexander NaismithMouat (Comptroller-General).
* W. J. Williams: " Development of a Safety Programme for Provincial Government Service," Canadian
Public Administration (January, 1969).
t See also Hugh M. Morrison: " Changing Nature of Public Personnel Administration in British Columbia,"
Public Personnel Review (January, 1966).
 November 11, 1918, to April 30, 1926:
William Hedley Maclnnes (first full-time Commissioner) (administered first Superannuation Act from April 1, 1921).
May, 1926, to March 31, 1929:
Arthur Harris Cox (administered Superannuation Act).
April 1, 1929, to August 31, 1931:
Alfred Norman Baker (administered Superannuation Branch).
September 1, 1931, to March 31, 1934:
Roger George Monteith (full time).
April 1, 1934, to March 31, 1945:
Alfred Norman Baker   (Superannuation Commissioner and
Deputy Provincial Secretary from October 1, 1946).
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
April 1, 1945, to September 20, 1947:
Alfred Norman Baker, Chairman (Superannuation Commissioner and Deputy Provincial Secretary from October 1,
1946).
John Villiers Fisher, member (Assistant Deputy Minister of
Finance to October 1, 1946, when appointed Deputy
Minister of Finance).
Edgar Wynn Griffith, member (Assistant Deputy Provincial
Secretary to October 1, 1946, when appointed Deputy
Minister of Welfare).
Quorum of Members
September 20, 1947, to May 27, 1948:
J. V. Fisher and E. W. Griffith.
May, 1948:
Hugh Mackenzie Morrison, Chairman.
Members' Tenures
April 1, 1945, to January 8, 1951:
E. W. Griffith, resigned.
April 1, 1945, to October 5, 1961:
J. V. Fisher, appointment rescinded in order to be Agent-
General in London, England.
July 4, 1958:
Ernest Raymond Rickinson (Deputy Minister of Social Welfare).
October 5, 1961:
James Everett Brown (Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs).
 Photographs of Some of the Men Responsible for the Development
of the Administration of British Columbia's Centralized
Personnel Agency
Grading Commissioner:
Mr. Moses Cotsworth
F.G.S. 1909-1910
Commissioner and Examiner:
Mr. Alexander Robinson
1910-1918
First Full-time Commissioner
and Father of Superannuation:
Mr. William H. MacInnes
1918-1926
Commissioner:
Mr. Arthur H. Cox
1926-1929
Commissioner:
Mr. Roger G. Monteith
1929-1931
 Chairmen of the Commission
/*
•«■*.
■JT*
Civil Service Commissioner:
Mr. Norman A. Baker
1934-1945
Commission Chairman:
1945-1947
■i
Commission Chairman:
Dr. Hugh M. Morrison
1948-
Members of the Commission
Dr. John Villiers Fisher
1945-1961
Mr. Edgar W. Griffith
1945-1951
Mr. E. Ray Rickinson
1958-
Mr. J. Everett Brown
1961-
(Photographs courtesy Photographic Branch, Provincial Archives, Victoria Press Ltd., and Pacific Press Ltd.)
xiii
  HIGHLIGHTS DURING  1968
• Pay increases averaging about 6 per cent of payroll were granted.
• 6,812 employees received merit increases within salary ranges.
• 5,185 appointments were made to permanent and temporary positions.
• 930 employees gained promotion through competitions.
• 12.7 per cent of promotions were made by transfer from one department to
another.
• 21 student employees received Diplomas in Public Administration.
• There was a 17.7-per-cent turnover of staff in permanent positions.
• There were three " million man-hour " British Columbia Safety Council awards
presented to the Department of Finance, Department of Highways (Region 2),
and the Nelson Forest District.
• The accident-prevention programme has saved about four million dollars since
1962.
• 20 grievances entailing formal legal hearings were presented to the Civil Service
Commission.
• 64 employees received 25-year continuous-service awards from the Prime Minister and the Executive Council at two luncheons.
• The Fifth Annual Civil Service Commissioners' Conference was held in St. John's,
Newfoundland, in August.
• Sick leave averaged a total of 6.20 days per employee.
 SECRETARY
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 CONTENTS
Page
vii
5
Preface	
Introductory 	
Size and Composition of the Civil Service       5
Separations        6
Recruiting and Selection Division       7
General Entrance Examinations  10
Competitions for Promotion  11
Special Activities—Recruiting and Selection Division  12
The Vancouver Office  13
TheEssondale Office (Valleyview)   13
Classification and Wage Division  14
Staff Training  15
Sick and Special Leave  18
Accident Prevention  19
Grievances   22
Employee Relations  22
Appendix  23
Statistics  24
  REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Pursuant to Section 8 of the Civil Service Act, from
January 1 to December 31, 1968
The Civil Service Commission met 53 times during the year. Of this number,
20 meetings were convened to hear grievances from individuals and groups of
employees. During the other meetings 28 representations on salaries and working
conditions were presented by groups of employees or departmental officers.
In addition to grievance hearings referred to the Commission, 18 individual
grievances were dealt with satisfactorily by the Chief Personnel Officer. Apart from
his normal duties as overseer of the Commission's procedures, the Chief Personnel
Officer also became a member of the Management Committee of the British Columbia Ferries.
The Screening Committee, responsible for reviewing problems of employees
unable to perform their duties due to ill health, dealt with 16 cases in 1968. Seven
of these were re-established in different types of employment, four retired, and five
are pending.
A review of the Commission's regulations governing sick leave was made by
the Chief Personnel Officer in consultation with departmental Personnel Officers.
As a result, several changes are being considered. The regulation with respect to
compensation for standing by was amended to provide for five hours' pay for each
24 hours standing by in place of the previous four hours' pay. Regulations governing substitution in a higher position were revised to reduce the waiting period from
three months to one month in certain cases. A provision was approved whereby
employees with 25 years of continuous service may be afforded two weeks' vacation
in addition to their normal vacation in any one year after completion of 25 years'
continuous service. The Cabinet approved the Commission's recommendation that
employees required to work on 10 statutory holidays be compensated by pay or
time off at time and one-half.
For the seventh consecutive year, pay increases were granted to all Government
employees, amounting to an average of about 6 per cent of payroll, involving an
increase in payroll costs of $4.5 million.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
On December 31, 1968, there were 25,438 Government employees (see Table
I of the Appendix). One hundred and twenty-five Magistrates' positions were added
to the payroll this year, which were not on the payroll in 1967. There were 24,368
Government employees plus the 125 Magistrates in 1967, a total of 24,493. Hence
there were 945 more Government employees on December 31, 1968, than there
were on December 31,1967, just under 4 per cent more. The largest increases in
numbers of employees occurred in the vocational schools, the British Columbia
Institute of Technology, the Department of Agriculture (Dairy Herd Improvement),
the Public Health Services, the Mental Health Services, the British Columbia Medical Plan, and the British Columbia Ferries services.
Of the 25,438 Government employees, 15,148 were classed as permanent employees and 10,290 were classed as temporary employees. On December 31, 1967,
there were 14,670 permanent employees and 9,698 temporary employees.
 Z 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following graph indicates the percentage of employees within each of the
major occupational groups in the main Civil Service schedules:—
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
35%
31%
M
1
18%
Wills
2%
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llllll
.::....,„„ „!
iministrative
Clerical
Technical
Professional
Manual
and
Group
Group
Group
Group
Executive
Groups
There was a 1-per-cent increase in the clerical group and a 1-per-cent decrease
in the professional group as compared with 1967, the other groups remaining the
same.
SEPARATIONS
During the year, 2,678 employees left permanent positions within the Civil Service. This represents a turnover of 17.7 per cent. In 1967, 2,826 employees left
permanent positions, representing a turnover of 19.2 per cent. There was a significant decrease in turnover in 1968 as compared with 1967.
The following graph shows the percentage of turnover during the last 10
years:—
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
RATE OF TURNOVER
Z 7
30%
25?
20%
15%
10%
5%
21.36
18.14
7l9       17.64        I8-3                        ^
17.7
1fi 1A
TT         1h"!7.          u
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962        1963
YEAR
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
During 1968, 43 employees were dismissed as unsatisfactory, the probationary
periods of 99 employees were extended, and merit increases were withheld in the
case of 82 employees.
RECRUITING AND SELECTION DIVISION
General
The Civil Service Commission, with headquarters at Victoria, operates branch
offices of the Recruiting and Selection Division at Vancouver and Essondale. The
branch office reports follow this general recruiting summary.
There was a welcome easing in the recruiting demands from the records set in
the previous year. A 9-per-cent decrease in the number of appointments made in
1968 reflected the Government's policy of restraint in the rate of expansion of
services, plus a reduction in the rate of turnover. The greatest proportion of recruiting took place during the mid-year period, when turnover due to outside employment
opportunities was at its peak. There were expansions in the ferry service and the
Medical Plan staff, as well as requirements for holiday relief staff. The usual reduction in competitions during the latter part of the year did not develop, however;
October and November were two of the busiest months in terms of promotional
selections. There were staff changes in the Recruitment and Selection Division itself,
with appointments of a new Selection Officer in Charge, a female Selection Officer
at Essondale, and a Selection Officer at Victoria, resulting from staff transfers and
a resignation. Important changes also took place in the office staff with turnover
in the positions of testing clerk, secretary, and reception clerk.
With the salary adjustments coming into effect at the beginning of the fiscal
year in April, there was generally less difficulty in recruiting during the next several
months in most classifications. Competitive position deteriorated once again, however, and a number of professional grades, particularly those in short supply, were
difficult to recruit. Vacancies continued to exist for qualified audit accountants,
psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric social workers, supervising social workers,
petroleum engineers, hydraulic engineers, forest engineers, and agricultural special-
 Z 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ists. The senior recruiting officer from the Essondale office made a special recruiting
trip out of the Province in an effort to recruit Mental Health Services professional
staff. Four major recruiting efforts were also required for staffing of motor-vehicle
licence offices during their rush period, the expansion of the Public Service Medical
Plan staff, the recruitment of several Assistant Directors of Mental Health following
the major reorganization and re-emphasis in the programme of that department, the
expansion of staff for the British Columbia Ferries due to shift reorganization and
additions which became effective July 1st. While there was some reduction in the
total volume in all categories from the peak reached in 1967, volumes were still
ahead of 1966 in all categories, except the number of promotional competitions and
the number of persons taking examinations. The remarkable decrease in this latter
item in the Essondale office was due to a postponement until after the new year of
the annual promotional examinations for charge nurses and assistant charge nurses.
The following table illustrates the major breakdown of recruiting and selection
activities as distributed between the Commission's three offices:—
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
Distribution of Work Load
Z 9
1967
1968
Per Cent
Change
from 1967
1968
Distribution
Requisitions and requests for staff—
Victoria	
Essondale..
Vancouver..
Totals .
Competitions—
Victoria	
Essondale..
Vancouver..
Totals..
Examinations  (persons taking written examinations)—
Victoria 	
Essondale.
Vancouver-
Totals..
Appointments (initial hiring) —
Victoria 	
Essondale	
Vancouver..
Totals..
Total positions filled (including competitions) —
Victoria     	
Essondale..
Vancouver..
Totals...
3,773
1,778
543
6,094
866
212
189
1,267
1,950
454
470
2,874
2,659
1,401
352
4,412
3,579
1,590
548
5,717
4,072
1,427
518
6,017
746
209
125
1,080
2,137
175
522
2,834
2,624
1,249
382
3,225
1,436
524
5,185
+7.9
— 19.7
—4.6
— 1.3
— 13.9
-1.4
—30.4
— 14.8
I +9.6
I
|        -61.4
I
I        +H-0
-1.4
-1.3
— 10.9
+ 8.5
|       4,255        | -3.7
-9.9
-9.7
-4.4
-9.3
 Z 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL ENTRANCE AND PROMOTIONAL EXAMINATIONS
Examinations to establish qualified lists for such positions as stenographer,
typist, clerk, and draughtsman were held as follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
Number of
Occasions
Victoria
Clerk-Typist..
Clerk	
Clerk-Stenographer 1_
Clerk-Stenographer 2.
Draughtsman 1	
Draughtsman 2	
Draughtsman 3	
Key-punch Operator..
Data Processing Operator-
Personnel Officer...	
Examiner of Titles	
Clerk, Land Registry	
Surveyor, Land Registry-
Totals, 1968..
Totals, 1967-
Essondale
Clerk-Typist..
Clerk	
Clerk-Stenographer 1_
Clerk-Stenographer 2..
Fire-fighter	
Cook 1 	
Cook 2  	
Cook 4	
Dietary Aide 2 .
Totals, 1968..
Totals, 1967..
Vancouver
Clerk-Typist	
Clerk  	
Clerk-Stenographer 1 	
Clerk-Stenographer 2	
Draughtsman  	
Examiner of Titles 	
Clerk, Land Registry 	
Key-punch Operator	
Cook 2   	
Cook 3  	
Personnel Officer 	
Switchboard Operator.. _
Surveyor, Land Registry 	
Public Information Officer 	
Stockman 	
Office Equipment Operator	
Multilith Operator...  	
Fishery Officer 	
Miscellaneous clerical	
Totals, 1968  	
Totals, 1967	
770
930
125
146
82
17
6
14
12
16
2
16
1
2,137
1,950
32
53
10
39
14
5
13
3
6
175
454
74
213
31
125
4
2
9
10
4
2
12
4
1
2
8
6
1
7
7
522
470
492
618
73
86
58
13
4
11
10
12
2
16
1
64
66
58
59
71
76
67
79
83
75
100
100
100
1,380
65
1,145
59
25
42
10
38
8
5
12
3
5
148
324
78
79
100
97
57
100
92
100
83
85
71
61
182
27
105
3
2
9
10
4
2
5
3
1
1
7
6
1
7
5
82
85
87
84
75
100
100
100
100
100
42
75
100
50
87
100
100
100
71
441
84
373
79
254
53
69
76
8
2
1
9
2
5
2
6
1
488
504
17
29
9
26
1
2
2
1
2
89
139
51
101
19
92
3
2
4
9
1
1
2
4
1
2
4
1
1
1
3
302
256
In total, 2,834 persons sat for the foregoing written examinations during 1968.
There were increases at Victoria and Vancouver, but a substantial decrease at the
Essondale office due to a change in examination schedules, which resulted in an
over-all decrease of 40 from 1967. Sixty-nine per cent of the applicants qualified.
The examinations were held on 487 separate occasions in Victoria, 302 occasions
in Vancouver, and 89 occasions at Essondale.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
Z 11
Competitions for Promotion
Apart from appointments through entrance examinations, there were 1,080
competitions held in 1968, a decrease of 187 from 1967. Of these competitions,
120 were handled by the Civil Service Commission Personnel Officer attached to
the British Columbia Ferries. Civil Service Commission officers did not participate
in 19 competitions which were under delegated jurisdictions, such as the Provincial
Gaol Service. Excluding several competitions in which there were no applicants
and five competitions with over 100 applicants, the average number of applications
received per competition during 1968 was 12.9. There was an average of 8.4 applications in the professional-level competitions. These competitions resulted in 930
candidates being appointed to the various Government departments and agencies.
Sixty-six per cent of these appointments were promotions within the Service, and
70%
65%
60%
55%
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
66%
62
ye*****0*"^
-"'"                                               5
RVICE
PROMOTIONS F
IOM WITHIN THE SE
43%
II
% £
%
APPOINTMENTS FRC
iM OUTSIDE THE SEI
VICE           ~"^**"l'»i«4
Wo
*»««w_ 34%
9.5
12.7%
6%                                   6-
"%
PROMOTIONS FROM
■             II    	
ONE DEPARTMENT TO ANOTHER
1
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
 Z 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the remainder were initial appointments. The number of promotional appointments
made from one department to another was 118. This was 19 per cent of the in-
Service promotions or 12.7 per cent of the total appointments from promotional
competitions.
This represents a very high level of interdepartmental mobility and indicates
a healthy acceptance of merit system principles and a Service-wide viewpoint by
selection panels and departments. Reflected in these figures were a number of secretarial appointments at the Clerk-Stenographer 3 level resulting from an agreement
with the employees' association to cancel qualified lists at this level and fill vacancies
by individual competition for a trial period.
Special Activities
The four officers in the Victoria recruiting division convened 285 selection
panels which interviewed 1,301 candidates. They also held 1,993 individual recruiting or counselling interviews with applicants. In addition to the recruiting of
new employees and the conducting of promotional competitions, the Recruiting and
Selecting Division, through its offices in Victoria, Vancouver, and Essondale, devoted considerable time to answering letters of inquiry and inquiries received by
telephone and over the counter concerning employment. During 1968 the Victoria
recruiting officers answered 1,026 such letters of inquiry. Selection officers also
took part in Career Days at secondary schools and administered employment examinations for typists and stenographers at vocational schools and in commercial departments of secondary schools in Victoria and Nanaimo. Arrangements were again
made for a general employment briefing session for graduating students at the University of Victoria with follow-up interviews. In this matter of university recruiting,
the Civil Service Commission took membership in the University Career Planning
Association and delegated the Chief Selection Officer to attend the association's
annual conference. Subsequently, the Chief Selection Officer organized a one-day
university recruiting seminar attended by 39 personnel and other professional officers
from 13 departments who are involved in university recruiting. The seminar included presentations by the student-placement officers-in-charge from the University
of British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University. Addresses
by the Dean of Student Affairs and a recent graduate from the University of Victoria
proved interesting. A video-tape presentation and workshop sessions on interviewing, recruiting procedures, and techniques rounded out the programme. This was
the first such university recruiting seminar in the Provincial Service.
The Provincial Government departments at Victoria also participated for the
first time in 1968 in a secondary-school work experience programme organized by
the school counsellors, whereby 26 Grade XII commercial students selected by their
counsellors and teachers were placed for one week during the Easter holidays in
14 departments as unpaid trainee workers. Arrangements were made for liability-
release forms, and the Commission obtained the co-operation of the British Columbia Government Employees' Association in agreeing with the principle of this unpaid
training programme.
In the matter of staff development within the recruiting division, all Personnel
Officers were encouraged to actively participate in local personnel-management association activities. One recruiting officer attended the Pacific Northwest Personnel
Management Association Conference in Oregon, and another recruiting officer and
the clerk in charge of the reception office attended two evening sessions sponsored
by the Greater Victoria School Board on supervision and handling of grievances.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
The Vancouver Office
Z 13
The work of this office was mainly concerned with the recruitment and selection of office personnel and advising Governmental officials in Vancouver and the
Lower Mainland area on matters relating to personnel practices and procedures.
With the expansion of Government offices and activities in the Burnaby area, consideration was given early in the year to combining the Vancouver and Essondale
offices of the Civil Service Commission into a single unit. However, a study of work
load and staff distribution did not justify this change. Arrangements were made,
however, through the Vancouver office for some clerical and stenographic testing
to be carried on at Chilliwack in the Fraser Valley through the good offices of the
Court Registrar at that location.
The following table shows the number of competitions and appointments handled by the Vancouver office during the last five years. While the number of promotional competitions dropped rather sharply, and this reflected in the total appointments made, there was at the same time an 8.5-per-cent increase in the hiring and
placement of beginning-level office staffs to an average of 32 per month.
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
95
668
140
936
180
755
189
548
125
524
The number of applications in some competitions also increased, with an average of over 100 for such categories as Fire-fighter, Tourist Counsellor, Motor
Licence Clerk, Consumer Tax Inspector, and Sheriff's Officer. There were 69
selection panels convened, which interviewed 258 candidates. In addition, 392
persons were interviewed or counselled separately. During 1968, daily telephone
and counter inquiries increased as well, with as many as 70 applicants responding
in person to the newspaper advertisements or seeking general information concerning employment opportunities. The majority of these inquiries resulted in formal
applications for employment. Similarly in the matter of written examinations in
the Vancouver office, the year ended with an 11-per-cent increase, as shown earlier
in this Report. Examinations were administered on 302 occasions to 522 candidates, including a number of employees taking promotional tests.
The Essondale Office
The Essondale office is located at Valleyview Hospital and is primarily engaged
in recruiting and selection for the various Mental Health Services institutions
throughout the Province. There was, however, a marked and intentional increase
in the professional and technical staffing for other departments, such as at Oakalla
Prison Farm, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, the Dairy Branch Laboratory, Health Services laboratories, and the Veterinary Branch of the Department
of Agriculture at Abbotsford.
There was a further decrease of nearly 10 per cent or 154 in the total appointments made during 1968 from the previous year. This was primarily due to a
37-per-cent reduction in the number of holiday, sickness, and miscellaneous relief
personnel required because of more extended scheduling of relief periods.
The following table shows the total number of appointments made by institution:—
 Z 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Appointments
1964 I  1965
I
1966 I 1967
1968
Percentage of Total
Appointments
1964 ]  1965
I
1966
1967
1968
Tranquille	
Dellview.	
Skeenaview..
Vista, Venture, and Mental Health Centres,
except Burnaby  	
Valleyview   	
Woodlands  ._	
Riverview   	
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby 	
Headquarters and Education Centre	
Departments of Public Works and Agriculture and other areas  _
Totals-
154
39
32
18
149
364
484
24
21
189
38 |
22 |
I
18 I
150
353
517
31
13
23
272
46
33
22
188
394
643
42
42
18
229
46
43
25
186
293
663
33
35
37
165
27
52
28
156
277
597
53
31
50
1,294 11,354   1,700 |1,590   1,436     100.00|100.0 |100.0 1100.0   100.0
11.90
3.01
2.47
1.39
11.52
28.13
37.40
1.85
1.62
0.71
13.9
2.8
1.6
1.3
11.1
26.1
38.2
2.3
1.0
1.7
16.0     14.'
2.7       2.1
2.0 |    2.1
1.3
11.0
23.2
37.8
2.5
2.5
1.0
2.3
11.5
1.9
3.6
2.0
10.9
19.3
41.5
3.7
2.2
3.4
In examining the table above, it will be noted that there was a substantial increase in recruiting for the Mental Health Centre and the new Youth Development
Centre at Burnaby and also in the number of appointments handled for departments
other than Mental Health Services. Although not reflected in numbers, a great deal
of recruiting effort was spent by the Essondale staff in seeking qualified persons for
the eight other Mental Health Centres established in keeping with the policy of decentralization of mental health care to the communities.
Appointments for the nursing divisions of the Mental Health Services were
down 12.4 per cent from the 1967 total to 725 appointments. Particularly significant here is that within this smaller group there was an increase in the number of
trained nursing personnel hired, so that the proportion of trained to untrained nursing personnel rose from 51.4 to 61.8 per cent of those hired. The number recruited
from the nursing school operated by the Mental Health Services has increased over
that of previous years, and it appears that the point may be reached before long
where out-of-Canada recruiting for psychiatric nurses may be discontinued. During
the year there were 83 new positions filled in various categories, of which approximately one-third were for Riverview Hospital and one-quarter for the Mental Health
Centre and Youth Development Centre at Burnaby.
There were 209 competitions held in this office. During the year 1,550 persons
applied for these competitions. Of this number, 783 were interviewed, resulting in
186 being selected. With promotional competitions and beginning-level recruiting
combined, there was an average during the last four months of the year of 36 personal inquiries and 112 telephone calls per day. There were 1,407 recruiting interviews carried out during the year.
CLASSIFICATION AND WAGE DIVISION
The number of individual position-classification reviews increased to 765 from
727 in 1967. Table 2 of the Appendix indicates the number of reviews by department; upward revisions totalled 543, downward revisions were 10, and 212 remained unchanged.
1968 was a record year for studies of all types, and former outside agencies
which have come under the scope of the Civil Service Act since 1965 contributed
to the increased work load, as did requests from departments for greater assistance
in matters involving organization and staff needs. A considerable backlog of work
remained at the end of the year.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968 Z 15
The Division investigated 126 requisitions for appointment, prepared or
amended 140 position specifications, and investigated 32 requests for extensions to
casual appointments. Wage surveys were carried out in detail, and numerous outside concerns were visited for the purpose of ensuring proper matching of positions.
Many trips were made to the Greater Vancouver and Essondale areas, plus trips
to the Okanagan, Kamloops, and Prince George areas.
The Chief Classification Officer appeared as a Commission witness at the
Mediation Commission hearing relating to salaries and conditions of employment
affecting psychiatric nurses employed by the Province of British Columbia. The
statistical data utilized by the counsel for the Civil Service Commission were prepared by the Division.
Miscellaneous studies carried out during the year were as follows: —
Classification and Organization Study:
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
Stock-keeping operation, Deas Dock, British Columbia Ferries.
Provincial Museum.
Division of Rehabilitation.
Division of Venereal Disease Control.
Business administration area, Riverview Hospital.
Classification and Salary Study:
Key-punch operators, data-processing operators, and programmers.
Postal clerks.
Public information officers.
Instrument-makers.
Non-professional instructional staff, British Columbia Institute of
Technology, Burnaby.
Mechanical superintendents.
Recreational consultants.
Classification Study:
Terminal staff, British Columbia Ferries.
Typing staff, Purchasing Commission.
Needs Study:
Clerical staff, Department of Commercial Transport.
Clerical staff, Securities Commission.
Clerical staff, Real Property Taxation Branch.
Overtime Study:   Drivers, Postal Branch.
Tool Requirement Study:   Automotive mechanics.
Orthopaedic Shoe Repair Requirement Study:   Mental Health Services.
Staff Requirement Study:   Cooks, Willingdon School.
Numerous salary survey returns were completed for other organizations.
STAFF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
Executive Development Training Plan
Fifteen employees enrolled in Class XI are in the third and final year of the
programme, 29 employees enrolled in Class XII are in their second year, and 30
employees are enrolled in the first year.
Twenty-one employees enrolled in Class X (Interior Class) of the Executive
Development Training Plan received their Diplomas in Public Administration at a
special academic assembly at the University of Victoria on November 1, 1968.
 Z 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A,
q ^
*;K
ill »" If      *f '       *    '
& <£M "■ '       ft
!     "     f     f    I   ^
Graduates of Class X and their department or service and location in which
they are employed are as follows: D. J. Warren, Finance, Kamloops; J. R. Callag-
han, Highways, Kelowna; R. Macgregor, Finance, Grand Forks; J. H. Ryley,
Finance, Cranbrook; T. G. White, Public Works, Prince George; E. E. Benwell,
Liquor Control Board, Fort St. John; M. E. Goddard, Recreation and Conservation, Nelson; D. G. Bowman, Highways, Revelstoke; T. C. Chapman, Finance,
Penticton; P. E. Bishop, Highways, Prince George; A. C. MacPherson, Forest
Service, Prince Rupert; D. Thom, Lands Service, Vancouver; H. T. Butler, Recreation and Conservation, Prince George; R. F. Sheppard, Recreation and Conservation, Grand Forks; Professor N. Swainson, Director of the Programme; K. I. Booth,
Finance, Cranbrook; D. L. Thompson, Liquor Control Board, Fernie; J. C. Lyons,
Recreation and Conservation, Nanaimo; J. A. Mollberg, Social Welfare, Dawson
Creek; R. G. White, Highways, Nelson; L. C. Hopper, Attorney-General, Haney;
and J. W. Cartwright, Recreation and Conservation, Kamloops.
Correspondence Course in Public Administration
Thirty-five students enrolled in Class IV of the Correspondence Course in
Public Administration received their certificates on April 10, 1968. Dr. H. M.
Morrison, Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, presented the certificates at
a luncheon held on the completion of the three-day workshop. The employees who
received the certificates had successfully completed 24 assignments during the fall
and winter months and had participated in a three-day workshop on " The Principles of Management in the Public Service."
Mr. C. J. Ferber, Comptroller-General for the Province, gave lectures on Provincial fiscal and accounting procedures, and on the use of computers. Mr. H.
Turner, Administrative Officer, gave an interesting talk on the superannuation plan.
Miss M. Campbell, Staff Training Officer, conducted the sessions on supervision.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
Z  17
The employees who received their certificates are as follows: A. J. Baker,
Lands Service; H. E. Beier, Public Works; E. G. Boese, Commercial Transport;
J. Buckley, Travel Industry; A. J. Caldow, Agriculture; H. A. Davie, Public Utilities Commission; A. W. Dayle, Education; E. P. de Cunha, British Columbia Ferries, Highways; W. J. Doddridge, Highways; F. S. Evans, Labour; D. Frost,
Attorney-General; Mrs. M. Y. Glendinning, Mental Health Services; G. W. Harper,
Highways; C. W. House, Lands Service; K. L. Johnson, Highways; T. C. Jones,
Forest Service; O. T. King, Highways; M. A. Kirk, Health Services; H. J. Lanki,
Attorney-General; J. C. Leman, Recreation and Conservation; Miss S. L. MacLean,
Health Services; N. J. Manson, Public Works; W. L. Marshall, Finance; A. W.
Milton, Finance; E. A. Mitchell, Mines and Petroleum Resources; J. F. W. Moore,
Finance; M. G. Oswell, Agriculture; M. U. Rose, Attorney-General; R. C. Smith,
Education; B. R. Stewart, Agriculture; D. G. Touchette, Hospital Insurance Service; H. L. Turner, Forest Service; S. H. K. Warner, Attorney-General; C. Webster, Finance;  and D. J. Younie, Forest Service.
Appraisal Courses
Thirty-five employees from the Lands Service, Finance Department, and the
Forest Service completed the third and final year of the appraisal course at a two-
week institute held in early April, 1968.
Two employees completed their credits for full accreditation as A.A.CI.'s,
bringing the total number of Provincial and municipal government employees who
have taken the appraisal courses under the sponsorship of the Civil Service to 60.
Personnel Officers' Course
Five Personnel Officers attended a 24-hour course on personnel policies in the
British Columbia Civil Service. The Staff Training Officer conducted this programme for the newly recruited Departmental and Civil Service Commission officers.
 Z 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seminar for Staff Training Officers in the Public Service
A three-day seminar of staff training officers in the Federal, Provincial, and
municipal governments was held in Victoria in early September, 1968. Twenty-
three training officers from across Canada attended. The programme included a
discussion of staff-development programmes being offered in each jurisdiction; programmes in the planning stages; the role of the universities in staff development in
the public service; the role of the consulting firms in staff development; accident-
prevention programmes; supervisory training and management development courses.
The exchange of information was most valuable.
The Staff Training Officer of the British Columbia Civil Service Commission
was in charge of the seminar. Mr. G. Duclos, Director-General of the Federal
Public Service Commission's Staff Development and Training Division, volunteered
to act as a liaison officer for the exchange of information between training officers
in the Public Service Commissions across Canada.
Seminar on Training Techniques
On November 29th a seminar on training techniques was held in the viewing
room of the Visual Education Branch, Vancouver. Seventeen employees from seven
departments of Government attended this seminar, which was arranged by the Staff
Training Officer of the Civil Service Commission for employees involved in departmental programmes. The programme featured five filmstrips, one film, and a demonstration on the use of visual aids. Discussions were also held on the preparation
and presentation of course material.
Departmental Training Programmes
In addition to the training programmes sponsored by the Civil Service Commission, many of the departments of Government conducted training programmes
directly related to the work of the department concerned.   Major in-Service training
programmes of a continuing nature are listed below:—
Attorney-General:
Probation Officer-in-training Course.
Security Officers' Academy Course.
Education:   Teacher Education Programme for Vocational Instructors'
Certificate (Summer School).
Forest Service:  Forest Service training-school.
Mental Health:
School of Psychiatric Nursing.
Psychiatric Aide Programme.
Highways:
Engineering Aide Programmes.
Paving.
Social Welfare:
In-Service Social Workers' Training Programme.
Office Administration Programme.
Sick and Special Leave
Sick leave granted during the period October 1, 1967, to September 30, 1968,
totalled 89,010 days—75,728.5 days with pay and 13,281.5 days without pay, an
average of 6.20 days (see Table III, Appendix), and an increase of 0.29 day over
the average for the previous 12-month period of 5.91 days.    These figures are
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968 Z 19
exclusive of sick leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and the
Department of Veterans Affairs section of the Sick Leave Regulation.
The above figures do not include the Gaol Service, which average was 6.84
days; the Liquor Control Board (average 7.03 days); nor the British Columbia
Ferries or daily-rate employees, totals for which are not available.
The average number of days' sick leave per employee (exclusive of the above
groups) for the past 10 years was as follows:—
Year Ended
Sept. 30
1959	
Average per
Employee
  5.85
Year Ended
Sept. 30
1964	
Average per
Employee
  5.91
1960	
  5.73
1965	
  5.62
1961	
       5.37
1966	
  6.10
1962	
  5.53
1967	
  5.91
1963	
  5.59
1968	
  6.20
Seventeen employees were granted leave for the purpose of training with
Reserve units of Her Majesty's forces, and 104 employees were granted leave for
the purpose of further training and study. Three employees were loaned to the
University of British Columbia, and one was loaned to the Bridge, Structural and
Ornamental Iron Workers' Union for the purpose of instituting a programme to
increase the opportunity for employment of pre-apprentice school graduates.
The assistance and co-operation of the Director of Occupational Health in connection with sick-leave incidence is much appreciated. Further details will be found
in the Report of the Health Branch.
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
During 1968, employees of the British Columbia Ferries of the Department of
Highways, and of the Liquor Control Board, were brought within the central safety
programme. This expansion of the scope of the programme, coupled with general
development of the Service, led to an increase of man-hours of exposure of 11 per
cent compared with 1967.
In previous years our accident-frequency statistics have been based on the
number of accidents involving employees in one or more days lost time from duty.
Due to a change in the machine-handling procedures of the Workmen's Compensation Board, those figures are no longer available to us. Accordingly all frequencies
quoted in this Report are based on compensable accidents—that is, where time lost
exceeded three days—in line with general industrial practice in British Columbia.
To enable proper comparisons to be drawn, figures for 1967 quoted in this Report
have been restated on the compensable basis now being used.
While 13 departments recorded zero or lower frequencies than in 1967, nine
departments had higher accident rates. All department frequency was 11.9 in 1968,
the same as in 1967. Cost rate was down 4 per cent compared with the previous
year. In general terms, therefore, the accident picture showed little change compared with 1967.
Despite the lack of improvement in over-all results, steady progress was made
in reducing accidents in major higher-hazard departments; for example, the Forest
Service reduced its accident frequency from 11.9 in 1967 to 9.2 in 1968, an improvement of 22 per cent. This was the lowest ever recorded by the Service and a very
creditable result in view of the severe hazards involved. The Department of Recreation and Conservation showed an improvement of 47 per cent over 1967, frequency
for 1968 being 5.2, another fine record.   Progress in those areas was offset, how-
 Z 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ever, by the high frequency of 21.2 in Mental Health Services, down 13 per cent
from 1967, and the Department of Highways frequency of 12.2 in 1968 was practically unchanged from 12.1 in 1967. In this latter case we have reached the point
where improvement is becoming increasingly difficult due to the nature of the work.
The British Columbia Ferries had the highest frequency in the Service at 24.7. It
was not possible to commence any programme in this division in 1968, but efforts
will be concentrated in this area and in Mental Health Services in 1969. When it
is realized that the departments mentioned—that is, Mental Health, Highways, and
Ferries division—account for about 45 per cent of the total Service man-hours, it
is apparent that safety performance in those three areas is crucial to over-all results.
Special projects conducted during the year included a slide training programme
on flagman safety made in co-operation with the Department of Highways; depth
studies of work accidents at three major mental health institutions and in one forest
district; meetings with management and supervisors at all levels in Mental Health
Services; visits to Liquor Control Board stores on initiation of the Liquor Control
Board safety programme; meetings with youth crews of the Department of Recreation and Conservation throughout the Province; and the initiation of headquarters
safety committee and work on organization structures in Mental Health Services.
The Division co-ordinated efforts of the Motor-vehicle Branch and major departments in setting up departmental defensive-driving courses, which work will be
continued in 1969.
The Co-ordinator attended 17 headquarters safety committee meetings, five
local safety committee meetings, and 19 other meetings. He lectured for one session
at the British Columbia Safety Council accident-prevention course at the University
of British Columbia on safety organization in a multi-department setting. He made
three depth studies in Mental Health Services and one in the Forest Service. Personal visits were made to 65 Liquor Control Board stores in the Kootenays, Fraser
Valley, Vancouver, and on Vancouver Island. He visited the National Safety Congress in Chicago and discussed matters of mutual interest in safety with senior
officials of the Government of Ontario. Forty-nine per cent of his time was spent
away from Victoria.
The Safety Officer attended five safety rallies, conducted four film shows and
three workshops, and participated in 82 other meetings. He investigated the one
fatality arising during the year and made five depth studies in the Department of
Highways. He conducted an extensive series of meetings with supervisors of Mental
Health Services at Riverview, Valleyview, and Woodlands institutions and visited
all youth crews of the Department of Recreation and Conservation in the Province.
He attended the British Columbia Safety Conference in Vancouver and co-operated
in the planning of a special regional safety project for the Department of Highways,
which will be effective throughout 1969. Sixty-six per cent of his time was spent
away from Victoria.
Highlight of the year's activities was the annual safety presentation ceremony,
held at the Parliament Buildings on December 17th. On that occasion 19 British
Columbia Safety Council awards were presented to 14 entire departments and major
operating divisions. The function was attended by members of the Cabinet, 23
Deputy Ministers and senior departmental officials, the Chairman of the Workmen's
Compensation Board, and the president and the general manager of the British
Columbia Safety Council. The Provincial Secretary, the Honourable W. D. Black,
gave the main address, and the awards were presented by the Honourable W. A. C.
Bennett.   The main results were summarized as follows:—
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
  ■  :■'■.:,.    f^S
Z 21
In 1968 two employees were seriously injured and one killed on duty. The above
display at the awards presentation ceremony illustrated the expected results if there
had been no safety programme.
(1) There was one fatal accident, compared with 12, 8, 5, 2, 3, and 0 in the
previous years.
(2) The visual display indicated that, based on 1962 experience, without a
safety programme we could have expected 26 serious injuries (we actually
had two) and 14 fatalities (instead of the one actually occurring).
(3) For the first time, three "million man-hour" awards were presented in
one year—to the Department of Finance (for the fifth time), the Department of Highways (Region 2), and to the Nelson Forest District.
(4) Travel Industry, Recreation and Conservation, and the Water Resources
Service won entire department awards for the first time (bronze awards),
while Safety Engineering Services Division of the Department of Public
Works won the first major division award to be presented to this department.
(5) Of the 19 awards presented, the British Columbia Forest Service won six;
the Forest Service had its lowest accident frequency on record, every
forest district except Vancouver qualifying for one or more entire district
awards.
(6) The awards presented represented 8,575,904 man-hours free of compensable injury worked by 3,693 employees, our best record so far.
(7) During the year a total of 184 British Columbia Safety Council awards
were won by units of various departments, compared with 154 in 1967,
the best previous record. These included three " million man-hour "
awards, six awards of honour, nine silver-on-gold, and 14 bronze-on-gold,
all major awards for outstanding safety performance.
 Z 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1968 was a busy year, with increasing demands on the staff and resources of
the Division. The Division is indebted for the fine co-operation and assistance of
the Workmen's Compensation Board, the British Columbia Safety Council, the editor
of the Civil Service Newsletter for valuable Service-wide publicity, and the support
and co-operation of Ministers, Deputy Ministers, and all levels of the Service.
GRIEVANCES AND HEARINGS
As indicated at the beginning of this Report, the Commission heard 20 grievances from individuals and groups of employees, and 28 representations on salaries
and working conditions were reviewed. These hearings and meetings take up a substantial portion of the Commission's time, and the Commission acknowledges the
great assistance and advice afforded by solicitors assigned as counsel to the Commission by the Department of the Attorney-General.
The Chief Personnel Officer and the Chief Classification Officer, who was called
as a witness, assisted in preparing the Commission's case before the Mediation Commission with respect to grievances submitted by psychiatric nurses. Mr. A. Mercer
presented the Civil Service Commission's case to the Mediation Commission.
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
The Chairman managed, during his busy year, to visit Government offices and
employees in Prince George in January and Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton in
May.
The Civil Service Newsletter continued to be published monthly, with many
informative articles. The circulation of the Newsletter is over 25,500, and this tends
to provide communication and understanding between the Government and its
employees.
There were a number of changes in the Commission's staff of Personnel Officers.
Mr. C. Spence, of the Fire Marshal's Office of the Department of the Attorney-
General, joined the staff of the Recruitment and Selection Division. Mr. G. L.
Tomalty, of the Riverview office, was transferred to the Mental Health Services, and
was replaced by Mr. J. F. Jauck, a transfer from the Public Health Services. Mrs.
M. G. Cameron, of the Riverview office, resigned and was replaced by Miss B.
McTavish; in addition, there were a number of changes in the Commission's clerical
staff.
The Chairman attended the Fifth Annual Conference of Canadian Civil Service
Commissioners, held in St. John's, Nfld., in August.
In conclusion, the Chairman wishes to record his sincere appreciation to his
two colleagues on the Commission, to each member of the Commission's staff, the
Government Agents, to the Civil Service Commissions of other Provinces and the
Federal Government for their able assistance, and to you, Mr. Minister, for your
sympathetic appreciation of the Commission's problems.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. R. Brown, Member.
E. R. Rickinson, Member.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
Z 23
APPENDIX
Twenty-five-year continuous-service certificates were awarded to the following
Government employees in December, 1968:—
Department of Agriculture
James Stewart Allin.
Miss Leah Katherine Reid.
Miss Hildegarde Frieda Rositch.
Department of the Attorney-General
Miss Charlotte Gardner Crawford.
Walley Ellsay.
Miss Bessie Maybee.
John Brett Walkinshaw.
Department of Education
Alexander Bennett.
Robert Douglas Crawford.
Department of Finance
Thomas Arthur Johnston.
Miss Elva Marion Stacey.
Frederick Andrew White.
Forest Service
Cecil Fredrick Appleton.
Douglas Sydney Barnes.
Ralph Oliphant Christie.
Frederick Gerrard Hesketh.
Marvin Oliver Kullander.
Health Services
Mrs. Grace Mary Donald.
Mrs. Madeline Johnson.
Miss Edith Christina Nelson.
Mrs. Dollie Edna Sharp.
Charles Robert Turner.
Department of Highways
Ambrose Casagrande.
Kenneth Byron Charters.
Raymond Chamberlain.
Miss Mary Jean Grant.
Arthur Holzworth.
Cecil William Hunter.
Louis Milton Johnson.
Jack Korenko.
Albert Lenny.
Frederick Alexander Norcross.
Carman Saporito.
William Kenneth Trail.
Department of Labour
Miss Mona Florence Morgan.
Liquor Control Board
David Bain.
George Victor Cooper.
Patrick Mark Kyle.
Frederick George Spracklin.
John Charles Trainor.
John Thomson Westwood.
Mental Health Services
Jacob Rudolph Bauer.
Randolph Phifer Cleven.
Peter George Fritz.
Miss Kathleen May Grey.
Gordon Andrew Grieve.
Miss Hattie Jane Ion.
Dr. Francis Evan McNair.
Mrs. Jessie Katherine Neal.
Leslie James Osmond.
Mrs. Rose Mary Phillips.
Public Utilities Commission
Mrs. C. E. Macdonald.
Cedric Norreys Cook.
Department of Recreation and Conservation
Allan Ford Gill.
Workmen's Compensation Board
Miss Dorothy Barron.
Olaf Helgeson Brekka.
Miss Frances Dorothy Foster.
John Alfred Humphreys.
Miss Selma Viola Lola Ljungh.
Harold Macintosh.
Dr. Carl Robert McKinnon.
Dr. William Edward Milbrandt.
Mrs. Lucille Ann Smith.
Mrs. Dorothy Eunice Stothers.
 Z 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Number of Full-time Permanent and Temporary Employees in Each
Department and Agency as at December 31, 1968
Department
Permanent
Temporary
Combined
Legislation	
Premier's Office .
Agriculture..
Attorney-General 	
Commercial Transport	
Education  	
Finance  	
Public Health Services	
Mental Health Services	
Hospital Insurance Services-
Highways..
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce .
Labour     	
Lands Service   	
Forest Service  _ _ _	
Water Resources _
Mines and Petroleum Resources-
Municipal Affairs.
Provincial Secretary 	
Civil Service Commission	
Superannuation Commission-
Public Utilities Commission...
Public Works	
Recreation and Conservation-
Travel Industry 	
Social Welfare 	
Totals-
Liquor Control Board.	
British Columbia Ferries..
Grand totals	
2
5
326
2,289
106
323
665
1,101
3,676
129
400
84
146
319
832
148
119
42
407
37
49
55
633
246
37
701
12,879
985
1,284
15,148
1
114
246
2
823
45
537
357
1
4,214
23
40
1,361
63
22
7
205
3
9
635
158
31
170
9,071
708
511
10,290
3
5
440
2,535
108
1,146
710
1,638
4,033
130
4,614
84
169
359
2,193
211
141
49
612
40
58
55
1,268
404
68
871
21,950
1,693
1,795
25,438
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1968
Z 25
Table 2.—Classification Reviews by Departments in 1968 with Comparative Figures
for Previous Years
Department
Upward
Revisions
Downward
Revisions
Reviews
Resulting
in
No Change
Total
19
125
14
43
5
27
4
5
22
34
9
10
9
27
23
13
5
19
22
14
7
87
1
1
1
1
2
2
0
2
1
22
I
12
16
7
2
2
6
22
5
2
2
11
	
4
9
4
11
3
9
7
54
21
148
1
26
Finance - —
59
12
29
4
7
28
56
14
12
11
Provincial Secretary	
Public Utilities Commission 	
Public Works	
38
27
Recreation and Conservation   	
22
10
31
Public Health 	
27
Mental Health    	
25
14
143
Totals, 1968	
543
10
212
765
Totals, 1967  	
Totals, 1966	
Totals, 1965	
727
711
682
Totals, 1964	
541
 Z 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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