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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1969

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. F. X. Richter, Minister A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS,
AERIAL TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, AND
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1968
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  Victoria, British Columbia, February 7, 1969.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department
of Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1968.
F. X. RICHTER,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, British Columbia, February 6, 1969.
The Honourable F. X. Richter,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1968.
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng.,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
  *****—
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Alfred John Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1968
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
The Department of Commercial Transport has been established since 1959,
and we look back over this 10-year period to assess to what extent progress has been
made in the various areas of Departmental responsibility. Considerable progress
has been made in all branches of the Department's work, and we now look forward
with confidence to the future, when more changes will likely be necessary due to the
rapidly expanding industrial development within the Province.
Much progress has been made to change regulations respecting commercial-
vehicle operations within the Province. Some of these changes were necessary to
provide a legal basis for what in fact was taking place, and other changes have been
made to keep up to date with changing modes of transport. Interchange of information between Provinces of Canada and American States through which British
Columbia based operators transport passengers and freight has been continuous,
and licensing agreements have been arranged with most jurisdictions. There has
been a major change in operation in this 10-year period, with specialized equipment
replacing older standard modes of transport.
In the field of railways, we have dealt with several major extensions to existing
lines and numerous minor changes. Our Engineering Branch has provided an
improved method of examining engineers and trainmen prior to certification. Railway signals have been installed at important railway crossings for public protection,
and new types of signals have been approved for general operation.
The rapid change in aerial-tramway construction for ski-ing and industrial
purposes within the Province is of major interest. In this period of 10 years, locations where facilities have been established have increased from 8 to 64, and we
now have 59 lifts of various types in addition to 73 rope tows. To ensure a reasonable degree of safety for passengers on these ski lifts, a new code was developed
for location, construction, and operation of aerial tramways. This code has now
been in effect since January, 1967, and a high degree of co-operation has been
received from industry in meeting these more rigid requirements.
With respect to safety of operation of industrial equipment on private roads,
progress has been made in the development of air-brake systems and examination
of operators. During this 10-year period 3,643 certificates have been issued to
operators of vehicles using air brakes.
During the year 1968 one major pipe-line project was started and is nearing
completion. This is the natural-gas pipe-line built by Pacific Northern Gas Limited
from Summit Lake to Prince Rupert. All of the main line and laterals have been
completed, tested, and placed into operation.
More stringent controls have been necessary with respect to the movement of
oversize and overweight loads by truck as tourist travel is heavy during summer
months.   Further restrictions will likely be required as traffic increases.
Two railway extensions on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway north of Fort
St. James and Fort St. John have been approved during the year, and location and
construction are proceeding.   In addition, an application by British Columbia Hydro
 FF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and Power Authority to build a railway to Roberts Bank has been dealt with as
required by the Railway Act.
Aerial-tramway construction has continued at a steady pace, with a number
of new installations being made during the year, including three chair-lifts and three
T-bar lifts. This area of operation now requires a major programme of inspection
during winter months. More installations are being planned at existing sites and
in new areas during 1969.
Further details with respect to progress within the Department during the 1968
year may be found in the following detailed reports.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
F. J. Regan, Director of Operations
The Weigh Scale Branch of the Department of Commercial Transport reports
a general increase in activity during the year under review. Not only has the number of commercial vehicles registered within the Province increased to a total of
173,000, as compared to 166,121 in the year 1967, but the number of permits issued
to allow the movement of oversize and overweight vehicles on public highways has
shown a proportionate increase.
In the field of oversize operation, the movement of house trailers, mobile homes,
and sectional buildings has continued to expand as the use of this type of accommodation grows in popularity in all parts of the Province. Approximately 50 per
cent of permits issued were for units of this type.
Although operation in the forest industry was curtailed somewhat by the unsettled labour situation in the Southern Interior section of the Province, the movement of forest products on public highways accounts for approximately 25 per cent
of the permits issued.
Transportation of machinery and heavy equipment is on the increase. This
situation has been brought about by new construction, industrial development such
as the pulp-mills and sawmill complexes, and an increase in mining activity in all
parts of the Province. Road construction by the Highways Department in various
locations is also a contributing factor in this type of oversize and overweight operation. In all, approximately 20 per cent of the total permits issued were connected
with the transportation of machinery and heavy equipment.
The remaining 5 per cent of the permits issued were for loads which were
uneconomical to reduce in either size or weight and are therefore permitted to travel
on the public highway system as in most cases their origin and destination preclude
their travelling exclusively by rail.
In June of 1968, regulations made pursuant to the Department of Commercial
Transport Act were completely revised. The major area of change was in the limitations in respect to the size and weight of vehicles and loads allowed on public
highways. Instead of the two previous schedules of weights, one allowable weight
schedule to a gross of 76,000 pounds was authorized on all highways within the
Province. The existing tandem-axle weights of 32,000 pounds and single-axle
weights of 18,000 pounds remained the same as in the past, as did the weight limitation of 600 pounds per inch of tire. The allowable size of vehicle combinations was
increased from 50 feet in length of 60 feet on all highways, and the height limit was
raised to 13 feet 6 inches from 12 feet 6 inches.
In addition to the above changes, special provision was made for the operation
on Schedule 1 highways (the main highway system) of combinations of vehicles to
a maximum length of 65 feet and 8 feet 6 inches wide. These units are mainly operated on interprovincial and international routes. The extra size will, of course, assist
those truck operators who travel from point to point within the Province on Schedule
1 highways and will provide for more economical movement of such items as
plywood and packaged lumber and palletted material which are a full 8 feet in length
and 4 feet in width.
Truck transportation in connection with the logging industry continues to show
an increase. There were 1,812 restricted-route permits issued during the year.
These permits provide for additional weight on specific routes. They are also approved by the Department of Highways after every reasonable effort is made to
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968 FF 11
ensure that extensive damage to roads and structures will not result from their
issuance.
The schedule of truck licence fees is based on the gross weight of the vehicle or
combination of vehicles. The Weigh Scale Branch is the only agency that is equipped
to ensure that commercial vehicles are properly licensed and that the various weight
limits are being reasonably adhered to. In order to supplement the existing facilities,
a new weigh-scale was opened at Terrace in the past year and an additional portable
unit was stationed at Williams Lake. This is not a full-time operation but rather
serves to make the Williams Lake station a dual-capacity facility and provides a
much better control in the enforcement of the Act and regulations in this Central
Interior point. Construction has begun on a new weigh-scale on Highway No. 5
near Kamloops. This station will assist in controlling commercial traffic on the new
Yellowhead route.
In order to upgrade its weigh-scale facilities, the Department has experimented
with steel scale decks. These units have so far proved successful and will result in
greatly reduced maintenance costs and increased efficiency as redecking problems in
these cases will be eliminated. The Department of Public Works staff who design
this Department's scale buildings have developed a new concept in design that should
increase visibility and provide greater protection from accidental damage that is
sometimes caused by loaded trucks striking the weigh-scale building.
Progress in construction of Highway No. 16 from Prince George to the Alberta
Border has been carefully watched by the members of the motor-carrier industry.
Although the road is presently closed to traffic west of McBride, there has been a
considerable movement along this road of commercial trucks entering the Province
from Alberta. This movement has been to a degree controlled by our portable
operation working out of Prince George. In the same way, interest has been focused
on the Yellowhead route, Highway No. 5, which is nearing completion. There has
been a considerable movement of commercial vehicles along this route pending the
completion of the bridge structures. It has been possible for the Department to
maintain some control over this route by utilizing the Central Interior portable unit.
Plans are under way to construct a weigh-scale at Tete Jaune Cache on Highway
No. 16. This scale and the weigh-scale station being constructed on Highway No. 5
approximately 1 mile north of Kamloops will provide the necessary control and
assistance to the industry using these new routes. It is anticipated that it will be
necessary to maintain the Tete Jaune Cache weigh-station on a 24-hour basis.
 FF 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERMIT ISSUING OFFICES
Weigh-scales
Cache Creek.
Kinnaird.
Ruskin.
Chetwynd.
Midway.
Rutland.
Dawson Creek.
Pacific.
Saanich.
Deas Island North.
Parksville.
Sicamous.
Deas Island South.
Pattullo Bridge.
Terrace.
Duncan.
Port Mann East.
Tupper Creek.
Fernie.
Port Mann West.
Vanderhoof.
Fort St. John.
Prince George North.
Vernon.
Golden.
Prince George South.
Victoria (term permits).
Hunter Creek.
Quesnel.
Williams Lake.
Kaleden.
Rossland.
Yahk.
Kamloops.
Portable Patrols
v
Kootenay.
Okanagan.
Prince George.
Lower Mainland.
Peace River.
Victoria.
Nelson.
Department of Finance Government Agents
Alberni.
Ganges.
Powell River.
Ashcroft.
Invermere.
Prince George.
Atlin.
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert.
Burns Lake.
Kaslo.
Princeton.
Clinton.
Kelowna.
Quesnel.
Courtenay.
Kitimat.
Revelstoke.
Cranbrook.
Lillooet.
Rossland.
Creston.
Merritt.
Salmon Arm.
Duncan.
Nanaimo.
Smithers.
Fernie.
Nelson.
Terrace.
Fort Nelson.
New Westminster.
Vancouver.
Fort St. John.
Oliver.
Vanderhoof.
Golden.
Penticton.
Vernon.
Grand Forks.
Pouce Coupe.
Williams Lake.
Motor-vehicle Branch Offices
Abbotsford.
New Westminster.
Valemount.
Chilliwack.
North Vancouver.
Vancouver (Main).
Cloverdale.
Pemberton.
Vancouver (East).
Dawson Creek.
Sechelt.
Vancouver (Point Grey)
Kamloops.
Squamish.
Victoria.
Mission.
Trail.
Miscellaneous
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport, Vancouver.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 13
COMPARISON OF GROSS REVENUE COLLECTIONS FROM COMMERCIAL LICENCE AND PERMIT FEES FOR FIVE-YEAR PERIOD
1963/64 TO 1967/68, INCLUSIVE.
Source
1963/64
1964/65       1       1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
$8,910,152
404,410
74,299
66,001
447,681
$9,706,486    ]    $10,674,538
410.645    1           429.067
$11,281,095
459,048
97,934
99,604
706,213
$11,732,631
444,302
81,223
80,692
530,171
91,177
98,007
629,453
100,278
Temporary operation permits
Oversize and overweight permits
102,337
785,690
Totals	
$9,902,543
$10,809,217
$11,922,242
$12,643,894
$13,165,238
SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL-VEHICLE LICENCES AND PERMITS
ISSUED FOR FIVE-YEAR PERIOD 1963/64 TO 1967/68, INCLUSIVE
Source
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
132,267
14,567
13,909
25,535
25,348
142,886
15,364
14,518
30,452
29,470
155,670
16,720
16,978
36,732
32,919
165,703
17,085
19,057
38,179
36,101
175,358
16,142
20,929
39,137
44,777
REVENUE FROM GASOLINE AND MOTIVE-FUEL USE TAXES FOR
PASSENGER AND COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
Fiscal Year
Amount
1954/55  $17,455,000
1955/56  19,820,000
1956/57  22,593,000
1957/58  24,500,000
1958/59  26,100,000
1959/60  28,582,000
1960/61   30,093,000
Fiscal Year
Amount
1961/62  $39,262,000
1962/63  43,129,000
1963/64  46,420,000
1964/65  50,865,000
1965/66  56,441,000
1966/67  61,388,000
1967/68  65,548,000
 WEIGH-SCALES
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968 FF 15
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation )
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer
In the administration of railways, pipe-lines, industrial roads, and aerial tramways, the Engineering Branch has been fully occupied during the year. Railways
have expanded and the movement of bulk commodities, especially coal, potash, and
sulphur, is on the increase, and consequently railway yards and handling facilities
are being increased to cope with the situation. The movement of coal to Japan via
the new Roberts Bank superport is one example, and the opening of the Neptune
Wharves in North Vancouver is another example of today's trend in sphere railway
operation.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway has continued to expand and increase its
rail mileage by extensions into the north and also by increased trackage to serve the
growing needs of the large pulp-mill complexes and consortiums on the P.G.E.
railway lines. The Takla extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway was officially opened in August, 1968, at which time extensions to the Takla Lake area were
announced and an extension from Fort St. John to Fort Nelson was initiated, so
that the route was established before the end of the year with the actual construction
to be carried forward during 1969.
The signalization programme of level grade crossings on the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway was intensified during 1968 due to the Municipality of West
Vancouver electing, in the interests of safety, to signalize certain streets and roads
within the municipality. This facet of signal engineering is the specific responsibility of a signal engineer in our counterpart in other administrations.
The rail switching complexes in the pulp-mills and wharves in various parts of
the Province expanded their sphere of operation, and in cases where switching did
not justify locomotives and crews, trackmobiles have been obtained, and our engineers have trained and examined the operators in the use of air brakes and the
switching of railway cars. In some operations our engineers have assisted in the
placement and operation of signals. This has been done primarily to protect both
company switch crews and main-line switch crews when a main-line locomotive
and crew enter a private yard to pick cars and set out empties.
The plans, profiles, and books of reference on the Roberts Bank railway were
submitted for approval. These were checked, approved, and passed on to the
Deputy Minister for final approval in accordance with the Railway Act. Bridge
plans and other engineering documents with respect to other railways were treated
in a like manner.
While it is true the diesel has largely replaced the steam locomotive, there are
still a few applications where steam is more economical, particularly where a large
investment is required to supersede a steam locomotive by a diesel and the switching
to be done is on a part-time basis, in which case the interest on the money invested
offsets the savings of diesel power. Where steam is still used, our engineers, due to
their steam experience, have been of great assistance to industry in keeping the
remaining steam power in operation, as a number of engines have been rebuilt so
that steam may continue to operate with a high degree of safety.
In the field of pipe-line construction the Engineering Branch has been fully
occupied. The approval of plans, the inspection of construction, and the final
pressure tests to prove the line in the case of the Pacific Northern Gas Limited were
 FF 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
carried out by both inspecting engineers in the field and engineers in the office acting
as a team so that the project was on schedule and the line put in operation.
In the production fields of Northern British Columbia, the construction and
testing of new gas-gathering systems and oil-production flow-lines has kept pace
with former years, and our engineers were kept busy in the field conducting tests
and making other inspections required under the Pipe-lines Act. As gas and oil
fields pass their peak of production, recovery methods are put into operation by the
producing companies. This usually requires additional compressor-stations to
raise the lowered well pressure above the pressure of the gathering system and, in
addition, injection-stations are installed to pump water into the geological structure
so that gas and oil may be recovered. These stations are, in some cases, combination
compression and injection, and all such plants are tested and certified annually by
field engineers.
The compressor-stations on the Westcoast Transmission Company pipe-line
and on the Alberta Natural Gas Company pipe-line within British Columbia are
inspected and certified annually by our engineers. Some of these stations are in
excess of 20,000 horsepower, with compressors handling large volumes of natural
gas at pressures in excess of 900 pounds per square inch. In addition, the oil
pumping-stations on the Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline and on the Western Pacific
Products & Crude Oil Pipelines are inspected and certified each year while our
engineers are in the area on pipe-line inspections.
In the field of storage and handling of dangerous commodities, our engineers
inspected all liquefied petroleum-gas unloading and storage stations adjacent to or
served by railways in all parts of British Columbia where such installations are not
operating under Federal jurisdiction. The loading and handling of chlorine by
railway tank cars presents many hazards as chlorine gas is lethal. Our engineers
approve all railway loading installations and all unloading installations in pulp-mills
and other points where this gas is used in industry. The year 1968 was quite active
in this field, and accidents and wrecks involving L.P.G. tank cars were investigated
and recommendations made during the year.
Industrial transportation continued to be one of our major functions during the
year. Inspections were made in all parts of the Province where generally arrangements are made by logging and mining companies to allow the general public access
and use of their company roads. This policy has been fostered by the Department
and is well received by the public. In all cases our engineers inspect the roads and
make recommendations in the interests of safety to all concerned. In a number of
cases the companies have their own police to enforce special regulations formulated
by the company and approved by Order in Council. This has done much to improve
the attitude of safe driving by the public on company roads. As an example, the
townsite of Cassiar operates all of its private traffic under special rules approved
under the Industrial Transportation Act as the roads are not public roads, but the
public use them with equal safety. Our engineers have assisted the companies in
formulating traffic regulations.
Under the Industrial Transportation Act and its regulations, an excellent liaison
with the Motor-vehicle Branch has existed over the years, and our engineers act
as technical advisers with respect to brakes and mechanical matters. As a result,
a number of safety improvements to braking systems have been adopted, and public
safety has been assured by the use of safer braking systems. In addition, our
engineers have conducted training courses for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
in all parts of the Province in order to train the officers in the proper methods of
checking airbrakes used on highways. In a number of cases certain of our engineers,
who are especially qualified in this facet of the work, have been requested to investi-
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 17
gate wrecks where air brakes and other types of retarding devices have either failed
or have been improperly handled, resulting in fatalities on the highways. In all
cases our engineers have made contributions to public safety by making recommendations and training drivers and law-enforcement officers in the proper use of this
equipment.
The phenomenal increase in the popularity of winter sports, especially ski-ing,
is common knowledge, and as British Columbia lends itself to this new and excellent
winter sport, our winter recreational areas are crowded. The construction of ski
lifts and aerial-tramway facilities to accommodate winter sports was therefore greatly
accelerated during 1968, with a projected programme over the next two years far
in excess of anything in past years.
Early in 1967 the new Canadian Standards Association Aerial Tramway Code
was adopted as part of the British Columbia regulations. The adoption of this code
has benefited both the Department and industry in general. The Province of Alberta
and the Province of New Brunswick have adopted this code, and as a result a
uniform Canadian standard now exists which establishes with manufacturers in other
parts of the world the requirements of safety standards in Canada.
The Canadian Standards Association Gas Pipeline Code and the Canadian
Standards Association Oil Pipeline Code, together with the proposed Canadian
Standards Association Code on Pipeline Materials, have placed the Department in
a strong position with respect to public safety and uniformity throughout the various
industries concerned.
In the field of railways the American Association of Railway Standards is the
guideline on all North American railways, and when such standards have been
adopted by the Railway Committee of Canada, they are adopted by British Columbia, which keeps our regulations up to the national standard.
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 FF 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year all common-carrier railways, all logging and mining railways,
tramways, aerial tramways, industrial roads, and pipe-lines were inspected. Some
of the details of these inspections are set forth in the following reports.
RAILWAYS
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Chief Engineer's Report
In accordance with established procedure, regular inspections were made of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway throughout the entire year of 1968. These inspections
covered the various facets of railway operation over the line. Our Inspecting
Engineers made regular inspections of motive power and rolling-stock as well as
safety inspections in shops and plants connected with the operation of the railway.
These inspections included inspections of railway grade crossings and overpasses,
as well as structures under, over, or through which trains are required to operate,
and, in addition, inspections were made of the microwave system used for train
dispatch and general communications.
During the second week of October, 1968, the general annual inspection of the
entire line and facilities was made in company with the regional manager, the chief
engineer, and other officials of the railway concerned with maintenance-of-way
matters. The trip was made by track motor from North Vancouver through to
Fort St. John and Dawson Creek. The traverse by track included the Mackenzie
Spur, 21.1 miles, and the Takla Subdivision from Odell to Fort St. James, 72.4
miles. The prime purpose of the annual inspection trip, normally conducted in early
October, is to check on the completion of work and replacements planned during
the previous year and carried to completion during the current year, and also to
discuss while en route the requirements for the coming year. This is in keeping
with good railway practice throughout the world.
The annual inspection was completed just ahead of the first snows of winter;
in fact, some light snow was encountered in crossing the Rocky Mountains in the
summit area through the Pine Pass. The inspection trip revealed that the maintenance work and capital work projected for 1968 was well in hand and generally was
completed well ahead of freeze-up. The gunnite and cement work in progress in
the Azouzetta Tunnel was not completed, and this was due to a late start; however,
is was noted the cement work done during 1967 and 1968 has made a tremendous
improvement, so that it is expected winter operating conditions in this tunnel will
be greatly improved, particularly when the current cement impregnation programme
is nearer completion.
It is to be noted the capital work done over the past few years with the work
completed during 1968 has upgraded the main track of this railway to transcontinental standards. A total of 186,752 ties was installed in 1968, 177,577 of which
were treated ties with a life expectancy of 20 to 25 years. On the main track,
crushed-rock ballast was applied to 63.4 miles of trackage in 1968, which included
ploughing out old ballast, lifting and realigning the track, and installing new crushed-
rock ballast. Generally this treatment has been given to track where the 100-pound
rail has been laid, and with the ditching, drainage, and slope improvements carried
out over the entire line, such track so completed is now to main-line standards.
Crushed-rock ballast has been provided by the company's forces, and inspections were made of the pits and the stockpiles. Proper attention is being paid to
the size gradation and the sharpness of the aggregate. The programme of rock-
crushing was completed at the time of the inspection, and the contractors had
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968 FF 19
removed most of the machinery. One contractor had completed a contract for
approximately 200,000 tons, so that sufficient material is stockpiled for part of the
1969 programme.
The procurement of 100-pound rail to replace 85-pound rail has made the
use of crushed-rock ballast and treated ties economically feasible on this railway.
With respect to 100-pound rail, over the past five years a total of 162 track miles
of 100-pound rail has been laid to replace the 85-pound rail. The 85-pound rail
has been thus made available for branch lines and new construction, and 150 miles
of 100-pound rail is now on order for the 1969 programme on the same basis.
A serious fire on the deck of the Fraser River Bridge at Lillooet on June 1,
1968, destroyed the entire deck structure, so that the main line was out of service
between June 2nd and June 18th while the entire deck system, including 14 sets of
steel stringers, was entirely renewed and an entirely new deck system constructed.
The cause of the fire has not been established to date.
Seventy bridges were repaired under the general maintenance programme, and
an inspection of the work showed good workmanship. Ten trestles required
emergency repairs during the year. These were inspected during the annual general
inspection and found to be in order. Eight trestle bridges were replaced with fill
during the year. In some cases, crib work and pile-bin walls were constructed.
These were inspected and found to be in order. At Misinchinka River the shoofty
trestle was replaced with a gluelaminated girder structure on concrete foundations,
built on permanent alignment, which required considerable approach fill and trackage
realignment. Inspection revealed the work properly done with a satisfactory
clean-up and pick-up of materials.
A cursory inspection was made of the Cottonwood Bridge as this is a major
structure on the line. The ground at the abutments has consolidated and drainage
is being maintained. On the east side, at the north end, the river bank has sloughed
considerably, so that it has been necessary to do a great amount of earthwork and
cribbing to retain the bank at this point and to " berm up " in order to maintain
hydraulic balance of the clay-bearing soil at the bridge-site. The bridge structure
is in excellent shape, and the very minor repairs required last year had been taken
care of prior to the inspection.
In the cattle country it was noted that 14.7 track miles (29.4 fence miles) of
new fencing had been constructed during 1968, and in addition 9 fence miles were
given repairs to the equal of new fencing. It was noted that less cattle were at large
on the right-of-way during the 1968 inspections than were in evidence during former
years.
The 1967 inspection revealed many areas of the line required an extensive
slashing programme, particularly between North Vancouver and Squamish, between
Quesnel and Prince George, and on the Dawson Creek branch line. It was noted
on the 1968 inspection that the company had let a five-year contract for chemical
weed control in two categories—(a) ballast weed control and (fo) track-side brush
control out to the right-of-way fences. The inspection revealed both categories
have proved most effective. The ballast spray has eliminated most of the problem
in the track area, but on the track-side category, which was hand-sprayed, time
will be required for the dead leaves and stems to mulch.
Particular attention was paid during the October inspection to the condition
and safety of grade level crossings and signalization in the interest of public safety.
Over the past few years a programme of signalization of level crossings has been
brought forward successfully, so that an average of four crossings have been signalized per year over the past three years. The specialized type of equipment used
for this work is imported from the United States, and as deliveries are slow, it is
 FF 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
common practice to be a year behind in completing some installations. It is for
this reason that where four crossings have been signalized in any one year, if often
happens that six will be completed in one year and only two in another. At the
writing of this report, six signals are under construction, with four, and possibly
five planned for 1969. It is, therefore, probable that as many as 10 new crossings
could be reported signalized in 1969 as six were carried over from 1968. During
the October inspection, 18 signalized crossings were inspected and found to be in
proper working-order. Six crossing signals under construction were inspected, and
four sites for signalization in 1969 were discussed and laid out on the ground.
The Prince George Industrial Park of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway has
continued to expand, and during the many 1968 inspections new sidings and trackages were inspected and clearances approved. A new chemical plant was inspected,
as were the rail facilities for new sawmills, planing-mills, and machinery establishments throughout the new industrial park. Inspections were made at the three new
pulp-mills at Prince George as well as at the new oil refinery. In some instances,
track clearances required adjustments, and in some cases the tracks were moved
over to establish the proper limits.
At Mackenzie the new manufacturing plants were checked out as to rail
facilities. In one case the chip-loader required certain changes, and when these
were made a follow-up inspection was conducted. The oil-storage plants at Mackenzie and at Fort St. John were inspected, and certain adjustments made to comply
with established rules. During the year all oil storage and L.P.G. storage and
handling plants were inspected on this railway. In all cases, follow-up inspections
revealed repairs had been completed as required.
A programme of shortening sidings and removing unnecessary sidings and
spurs has been put into effect on this railway. It can be reported that during 1968
nine sidings were taken out and five were shortened, and the rails and materials
were salvaged and used in new construction. In this regard, several new sidings
were installed to accommodate new and expanding industries over the entire line.
This shows good planning on the part of railway management.
Inspections revealed that trader sidings are being kept in a much cleaner and
safer condition than in past years, and it was not necessary during 1968 to enforce
corrective measures upon the sawmills and planing-mills, as was necessary in former
years. Inspections at the Taylor refinery showed improved conditions over former
years. In this respect a meeting was held at the Taylor plant regarding switching
agreements and the placement of derails and visual signals. This method of handling
safety matters works very well as safer conditions are thus brought about and the
companies benefit from our experience and the experience of the railway.
The communications department and dispatching procedures were inspected.
This railway is much farther advanced in the technology of microwave (radio) dispatching than either of the transcontinental railways, and during the year officials
from the Railway Committee of the Federal Department of Transport Inspections
made a survey of some of the advanced techniques used by the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway. A number of improvements and additions have been made during 1968
in which solid state has been introduced. Other changes were required to accommodate the new extensions of railway to Fort Nelson and the Takla branch, and
generally it can be reported the dispatch communication system is working well
and is entirely satisfactory.
Stations and passenger facilities were inspected and found to be satisfactory.
Waiting-rooms and washrooms were found to be clean and well maintained. Platforms were clear and in order.
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 FF 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Motive-power, rolling-stock, and shop inspections confirm that the equipment
is being properly maintained in accordance with the rules and regulations pursuant
to the Railway Act.
Summary.—It can be reported that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is
being properly maintained and its facilities improved and expanded commensurate with the growth of British Columbia so that it is in safe operating condition
and the public interest is being properly served.—Robert E. Swanson, P.Eng.,
Chief Engineer.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 5th an inspection was made of the railway facilities and trackage owned and operated by the above Authority.
In company with Mr. Fred Friedel and Mr. W. Alcock, division engineer and
roadmaster respectively, a trip was made by motor-vehicle between New Westminster and Chilliwack, during which time the main-line track, sidings, passing-tracks,
buildings, bridges, and yards were inspected.
All crossings were found to be in order and protected with regulation signs.
The automatic signals at Newton, Langley, Abbotsford, and Chilliwack are in
working-order and being properly maintained.
Personnel responsible for the maintenance of the track are carrying out their
duties in an efficient manner. This is evidenced by the good condition of the entire
line. Approximately 4,500 No. 2 treated ties have been laid so far in 1968, and
it is intended that 2 miles of re-lay steel will be in place by the end of the year.
An effective weed-control programme was carried out, with the result that ballast
weed and right-of-way brush was held to a minimum.
A 700-foot extension was made to the trackage adjacent to the Northern
Pacific Railway interchange at Mileage 42, as well as an additional 4,280 feet of
storage trackage in the same area.
The steel has been removed from the passing-track at Mile 10 and the use of
this passing-track has been dispensed with.
Switching operations in the New Westminster marshalling yard have been
improved with the installation of 58 spring switches. It is learned that the foregoing switches can be made to operate automatically through an operational tower
control if conditions should warrant such control in the future.
The locomotive and car shops were inspected and found to be in a clean and
orderly condition.
Motive power consists of eleven 900-horsepower General Motors diesel-
electric, four 600-horsepower General Electric diesel-electric, and two electric
locomotives. An additional 1,000-horsepower diesel-electric locomotive is ordered
for delivery in April, 1969.
A diesel-powered rail car is available for use on track and equipment maintenance. Four new cabooses were built in 1968 and are of a type exclusive to
British Columbia Hydro design and use. The design was approved by the Department, and regular inspections were made as the caboose construction was in
progress.
Regular inspections were made of all the motive power and rolling-stock,
with annual certificates issued to their good operating condition.—W. F. Thomas,
Inspecting Engineer.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968 FF 23
Canadian Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
During the period November 25th to 29th an inspection was made of the railway trackage, bridges, and equipment owned and operated by the above company
at its Englewood Logging Division.
In company with Roadmaster Art Home and Bridge Foreman Garry Collins,
a trip was made by rail car from Woss Camp to Beaver Cove at tidewater and from
Woss Camp to Sutton Reload, the latter being the extreme south end of the line.
The inspection covered the main line, sidings, shop tracks, camp yards, and reload
sidings. There are approximately 110 miles of standard-gauge trackage at this
operation, and, in general, it was found to be in good condition. The following
conditions were noted:—
Beaver Cove Yard and Dump:   New piles driven at Bents 1 to 11 and
decking renewed in this area.   The dump is now in good condition.
Mile .04 Span:  The track is sinking at the camp end of the span.   The
bracing and piling are deteriorating.   It would be advisable to drive
supporting bents at each end until such time as a complete renewal
can be done on the entire span.
Kokish River Bridge:   Approximately 75 per cent of the steel span has
been sand-blasted and painted.   The remainder will be done when
weather conditions permit; otherwise, the bridge is in good condition.
Elk River Bridge: The bridge is to be completely redecked in 1969.   The
dump cap that was reported as being in poor shape was inspected
and found to be in order.
East Fork Bridge:   Good condition.    The queen post span brace was
changed in 1968.
Tsultan River Bridge: Good condition. The ties have been changed, but
the work has not been completed in that the tie ends require to be
squared off. The concrete under the tower at the B.C. end is undermined, but it is intended that this condition will be corrected at low
water by placing sacks loaded with sand and cement in the undermined area.
Halfway Island Bridge:   Stringers and caps were renewed in 1968.    This
has improved the condition of the span as reported in 1967.
Noomas Creek Bridge:   Brush to be cleared out from under this bridge.
A complete redecking is contemplated for the week-end following
this inspection.
Storey Creek Bridge:   Stabilize No. 1 bent at B.C. end.   Shows signs of
moving, indicated by bent brace.   Rail is low at this end.   A redecking is contemplated for 1969.
Kinman Creek Bridge:  Requires redecking in 1969.   Intermediate caps
were changed at the north end in 1968.
Mile 21.5 Bridge:  Good condition.
Steel Creek Bridge: Bottom span logs were renewed in 1968. All piles
were bared at ground-level, tested for soundness, and found to be
in satisfactory condition.
K10 Twin Bridge: The piles were dug out at ground-level and found to
be fairly good. The ties are moving and require to be secured. Nos.
1, 2, and 3 caps on the west end of the bridge are to be shimmed.
A fill is contemplated to replace both K10 and Kll Bridges as the
condition of both bridges is practically identical.
L
 FF 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Gold Creek Bridge:   A new approach was installed at the west end of
the bridge, and it is now in good condition.
Rice Creek Bridge:  Replaced by fill and culvert.
Groves Creek Bridge:  Good condition.
Davie Creek Bridge:  Some small ties require renewal.
Bridge 59.2:  Clean debris from under bridge.
Maquilla Creek Bridge:  Good condition.
Fire Creek Bridge:  Good condition.
Vernon Camp Yard:  Renew packing in guard-rails and frogs.
Sutton Creek:  New.   Good condition.
Ditching is required between Mileages 53.9 and 60.5.   Ties are moving in the
area of Mileage 57.7.   This is due to the absence of rail anchors.   It is estimated
that 10,000 new ties and 5,000 rail anchors were installed in 1968.
One mile of 80-pound re-lay steel was laid between Mileages 32.5 and 33.5.
It is anticipated that 4 miles of 80-pound re-lay steel will be laid between Mileages
23.5 and 34.5 in 1969. The foregoing should not be delayed as four broken rail
joints were detected at Mileage 33.7. This is, no doubt, caused by loose angle-bar
bolts, poor rail, and lack of rail anchors in this section of the track.
Sectionmen were observed working in the Vernon section without the protection of flags.
Rail Cars 121, 122, 125, 129, and 130 and also Diesel Locomotive 252 were
inspected, reservoirs hydrostatically tested, and certificates issued with defects noted.
One hundred and eight skeleton logging-cars were inspected and were in good running condition. For the year 1968 it is estimated that 385 cars will have been
through the repair-shop for wheel changes, air-brake maintenance, and other repairs.
It is the intention to dispense with the use of skeleton cars with wooden sills;
therefore, a programme is in progress to build a number of all-steel cars each year.
At present there are approximately 400 cars of various types on the division. Seven
new steel cars were built in 1968.
An independent survey of all the bridges on the Englewood Division by North
Shore Constructors is presently being done, and it is requested that the company
forward a copy of the report of its survey to the Department.—W. F. Thomas,
Inspecting Engineer.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 7th an inspection was made of the railway trackage and equipment owned and operated by the above company at its Crofton pulp-mill site.
Sidings, chemical-unloading spurs, and general track layout were found to be
in good condition. Chemical cars at the unloading-stations were properly secured
and protected by derails and the appropriate signs.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 9 was inspected, reservoirs tested, and certificate issued with defects noted.
In order to facilitate the handling of pulp and paper from the warehouses to
the foreshore, nine company-owned flat cars have been widened to 11 feet 6 inches
by adding to each side of the deck. There was some concern that the added width
would be a hazard to the switchmen when alighting from the locomotive. I am of
the opinion that as long as these cars are not mixed in a train of standard-width cars,
there should be no cause for concern. These particular cars are termed " captive "
cars in that they do not leave the mill-site, and it is understood that they are not
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 25
used with other types of cars in the train. On main-line railways, it is permissible
to have standard-width cars with loads 12 feet 6 inches wide, and they may be in a
train of mixed cars. It was reported that Flat Cars Nos. 1, 2, and 3 had been
rejected by the train crews because of thin wheel flanges. It was found that the
wheels of Car No. 3 require to be changed. Cars Nos. 1 and 2 are fit for service.
The following items require attention:—
Install light at the north end of No. 2 dock warehouse to illuminate
" Clearance Not Standard" sign as per Swan-Wooster Drawing
U-1754-08-213.
Derail sign required at derail at north end of pulp warehouse.
Repair bent steps and make hand-brake to operate on Car No. 6.—W. F.
Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Crown Zellerbach Canada Logging Railway
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On October 8th an inspection was made of the railway line operated by the
above company between Ladysmith and Nanaimo Lakes, a distance of 22 miles.
The inspection was made by rail car in company with Company Superintendent
Gordon Nayler and Railway Supervisor Robert Duncan.
The fine is operated jointly by Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited and Mac-
Millan Bloedel Limited. Motive power running on this line includes one diesel-
electric locomotive and two steam locomotives. Dispatching is done by radiotelephone, with a land-line telephone used as stand-by.
Generally the railway is in good condition and is being well maintained.
Approximately 3,500 fir ties have been renewed in 1968 to date, and others have
been marked for renewal. Two thousand rail anchors were also renewed in 1968.
Considerable gravelling has been done this year and has considerably improved the
condition of the right-of-way. Two culverts have been put in at Mile 17.5 and
Mile 19.5.
The loading-works at First Lake were inspected and found in good condition,
as were bridges which span Nanaimo River, Boulder Creek, and Deadwood Creek.
The following is required:—
Renew packing missing from guard-rails and switches.
Clean brush from around piling, Boulder Creek Bridge.
Slash brush from both sides of track north and south at Spruston Road
crossing.
Repaint whistle signs with rust-proof paint.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting
Engineer.
PIPE-LINES
Extensive exploration programmes during 1968 have continued to expand the
boundaries of proven petroleum reserves in the northern section of the Province,
with recent discoveries in the Fort St. John and Fort Nelson fields. Quite significant gas reserves have been discovered north-east of Fort Nelson, and recent
developments in many other areas have required a steady increase in flow capacities
of gathering systems and compressor-stations.
Oil production has increased steadily, and some transmission-lines and
pumping-stations are reaching their maximum capacities Present water-flooding
and gas-injection stations are being extended, and several new systems are under
construction.
 FF 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In addition to increasing flow capacities, many significant advances are being
made in increased safety and reliability of existing pumping-stations and control
centres through the installation of the finest obtainable remote-control and automatic safety systems. This equipment will, no doubt, contribute to the already
enviable safety standards evidenced in the many stations presently installed on gas
and oil pipe-lines.
A 6-inch jet-fuel line is being constructed by Trans Mountain Enterprises of
British Columbia Limited from its Burnaby terminal to a modern storage and
refuelling terminal at the new Vancouver International Airport. This line will be
completed early in 1969.
The British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority distribution-lines are being
extended throughout many areas in the Lower Mainland to supply some outlying
communities and recently completed industrial plants with natural gas.
The Inland Natural Gas Company Limited in 1968 extended its distribution
system to provide natural gas to the Villages of Clinton, Ashcroft, and Princeton,
the District of Coldstream, and the District of Peachland including Westbank.
Natural gas has also been provided to Falkland, Westsyde, and Midway.
Columbia Natural Gas Limited, serving the East Kootenay region, completed
22 miles of 8-inch line from Wycliffe to Skookumchuck to the new pulp-mill in that
area and 13 miles of 8-inch line looping the original line from Gold Creek to
Cranbrook.
Distribution systems which are being extended in the northern region by Plains
Western Gas & Electric Company Limited include the addition of a 4-inch line
looping the original gas transmission-line from Taylor to Fort St. John and a general
expansion of all gas services in that area.
Pacific Northern Gas Limited in 1968 completed 445 miles of gas transmission-
line from Summit Lake to Prince Rupert, including laterals, to supply the large
industrial centres in Prince Rupert, Kitimat, and Terrace as well as all communities
within reach of this line. For the first time in Canadian pipe-line construction,
helicopters were used in stringing pipe and transporting workmen to overcome
ground access and weather conditions encountered throughout a substantial part
of this route. Many ingenious procedures were employed to maintain suitable
operating conditions in these areas. This line will bring gas to the aluminum
smelters, fish-packing plants, pulp and paper plants, and numerous large industries
now proposed or under construction.
The expansion and increasing complexities of gas and oil production and
transmission systems require many additional man-hours in the field by our
Inspectors as well as extensive design studies. Each project entails a detailed
analysis of proposed routes, material specifications, maximum design pressures, and
proposed testing procedures. Highways, railways, bridges, and other services that
cross or are crossed by the pipe-line require the processing of drawings and careful
liaison work with all governing authorities. Careful administration during this
groundwork period is fully rewarded through the period of construction, inspection,
and testing which follows. Detailed test procedures are submitted and reviewed
on each project well in advance of completion dates. This practice has proven
invaluable during the field inspection and testing period. Included in such proposals are the test locations, a list of testing equipment, location of block valves,
crossings and laterals, a plan and profile of each section, type of fluid to be used,
and, where hydrostatic tests are proposed, the elevation of high and low points.
Hydrostatic heads are calculated and test pressures shown for the test location and
maximum and minimum elevation in each test section. Care must be taken to
assure that the minimum test pressure is held at all points, and that the design
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 27
pressure at the lowest elevation is not exceeded during the required 24-hour test
period.
During 1968 the Canadian Standards Association Code Z-184, "Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems," was adopted by regulation in British
Columbia, and Code Z-183, "Oil Pipeline Transportation Systems," was also
approved. These codes, which were formulated specifically for Canadian requirements, constitute the most up-to-date uniform set of standards. A related code
dealing with material standards is being developed by Canadian Standards Association to replace the existing American Pipe Institutes Standards, which do not suit
the Canadian climatic conditions.
Pipe-lines Constructed during 1968
Company
Location
Length
(Miles)
Type
Canadian Kewanee Ltd	
Canadian Delhi Oil Ltd. ...
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd.
Columbia Natural Gas Ltd...
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd..
Champlin Petroleum Ltd	
Pacific Northern Gas Ltd..	
Fort Nelson area..
Kobes area	
Princeton, Coldstream, and Peachland Districts
Wycliffe-Skookumchuck	
Clinton and Ashcroft.._ 	
Fort St. John area  	
Summit Lake-Prince Rupert .
2
51
44
35
19.1
91
445.12
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
Natural gas.
i Approximate.
2 Main line and laterals.
: .. \ '...■■...'.       ■ ■. ■    ■
iii_-iia»il-i-ii)»-i-_f-»t
Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company's Westridge tank-farm.
 FF 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CRUDE OIL
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
'TRANS-MOUNTAIN
OIL  PIPE-LINE
TRANS-PRAIRIE
PIPE-LINE
WESTERN PACIFIC
PRODUCTS
AND CRUDE OIL
PIPELINES LTD.
■ BRITISH COLUMBIA
OIL TRANSMISSION
COMPANY LTD.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 29
NATURAL GAS
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
WESTCOAST
TRANSMISSION
GAS TRUNK LINE
OF B.C.
 FF 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
Extensive industrial-road construction was carried out in many areas of the
Province in 1968, and significant progress continues to be made through improvements in logging and mining equipment in general. Through this period, detailed
studies were continually in progress in our Engineering Branch to analyse and appraise proposed equipment revisions and additions by suppliers and manufacturers.
Access roads include those in the Kitimat-Kemano area, reaching back as far
as Ootsa Lake, and in the Terrace area northward toward the upper reaches of the
Nass River. Similar extensions will, no doubt, be required to supply the numerous
pulp-mills, sawmills, and ore-processing plants now proposed or under construction.
During 1968 we again experienced several logging-truck accidents on private
roads. Here, as in the past, the majority of such accidents can be attributed to
excess speed and poorly adjusted brakes.
Regular instruction courses and on-the-job demonstrations provided by our
Inspectors are being increased and supplemented by extra refresher courses in many
areas to reduce the possibility of accidents. Experience has proven that in all cases
where drivers have been given a full understanding of the simple but important
adjustments and checking procedures, accidents attributed to air-break failures are
reduced. Extra instruction is frequently required to bring drivers up to date on
new equipment which has been approved and installed on trucks and other mobile
units.
Retarder systems, known generally as " engine brakes," have contributed to
accidents primarily in the Northern Interior, and reports indicate need for more
thorough driver-training in the use of this equipment.
The several makes of rubber-tired four-wheel vehicles known generally as " log
skidders " have required considerable attention with respect to braking systems and
general stability. Such units must be adapted to our rough coastal terrain and particular attention given to braking systems. Careful maintenance and a more thorough training period must be provided for drivers, particularly in rough mountainous areas.
Emergency-tank systems are now recommended for all new trucks whenever
such trucks and tractor-trailer units are equipped with spring brakes.
The heavy-duty logging-truck trains developed a few years ago are now operating successfully in Courtenay, Ladysmith, and several other large areas on Vancouver Island and the Mainland. Some difficulties have been experienced with
these units due to the inherent time delay in brake response on rear trailers. These
difficulties have been overcome by recent design changes, including the use of suitable relay valves on all trailers in these trains.
Our Inspectors, who are thoroughly familiar with all recently approved airbrake system components, conduct our driver-training courses, examinations, and
other training programmes throughout the Province. A detailed list of lectures
given during 1968 is listed elsewhere in this Report. In addition, we have had a
marked increase in the number of on-highway drivers who are sent to our offices
by company employers requiring their drivers to obtain " air tickets " for operation
of truck-trailer combinations using air brakes. Applicants are instructed and examined in the Department's offices in Vancouver, where full use is continually being
made of instruction facilities. Prearranged inspections, instruction courses, and
examinations were also conducted in Williams Lake, Quesnel, Prince George, Chet-
wynd, Terrace, Nelson, Cranbrook, and on Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968 FF 31
Accident investigations were made in response to requests by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Vancouver City and New Westminster police departments,
and training courses were given to Motor-vehicle Branch Inspectors, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, vocational-school students, mechanics (night school), Department of Highways drivers, Workmen's Compensation Board Inspectors, and others.
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Conducted during 1968
Lectures held  3 5
Lecture attendance  1,133
Logging-truck operators certified  456
British Columbia vocational schools (air-brake examinations)  202
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (air-brake examinations)  66
Additional Lectures and Examinations Held for
Other Agencies
Number Attendance
Workmen's Compensation Board  5 8
Haney Correctional Institution  1 38
Department of Highways   2 53
 An " ordinary " load of logs.
Partially made-up logging-train.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1968
FF 33
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
The remarkable increase in ski-ing activity and the use of lifts by hikers, tourists, and all who are interested in the great outdoors has resulted in continued rapid
growth of our aerial-tramway industry. Fifteen lifts of all types have been constructed, or are under construction, since January 1, 1968.
With over 130 lifts of all types operating, relatively few accidents were reported,
and in no cases were accidents attributed to faulty equipment. The promotion and
careful administration of up-to-date codes and regulations has been a prime function of our Engineering Branch since the inception of this industry, and the Department has made a worth-while contribution toward the attainment of present high
safety standards. Our standard inspection forms, listing 25 check points, are completed during each inspection, and recommendations and comments recorded thereon
for necessary attention. These records, together with monthly reports submitted by
all lift operators, form an excellent reference, and improved operating and maintenance standards were indicated in all areas.
Regulations for location, construction, and operation of aerial tramways
adopted in 1967 provided the British Columbia tramway industry with a complete
and up-to-date tramway code. The adoption of this code by designers and ski club
executives has been of great assistance in the approval of recent lifts. Most manufacturers and suppliers have without question complied fully with code requirements.
Some lifts, however, of foreign manufacture that do not comply with regulations
have been rejected until changes are made in the equipment. In these cases, clubs
are advised not to purchase such lifts until the manufacturer has submitted drawings
and such drawings have been approved in writing by the Chief Engineer of the
Department after necessary changes are made.
The careful control maintained from the first submission of proposed tramways
through to the completion, testing, and putting in operation of each project places
a heavy load on the Engineering Branch. This early checking produces gratifying
results as smooth operation follows in ensuing years.
Expansion and revisions to existing equipment, together with progress inspections, required at several stages for new lift construction, have required the scheduling of field inspection trips on a year-round basis. Here again smoother operation has been obtained and a degree of relief provided during the rush period normal
to the early ski-ing season.
The 15 new ski lifts installed during the past year include several small ski-ing
facilities near towns and villages. Ideal ski-ing facilities are being provided for both
novice and expert skiers.
Garibaldi Lifts Limited has installed a new 3,600-foot Mueller chair-lift, and
it is doing extensive work on existing and new ski runs. The new lift constitutes
another well-planned step in the development of one of America's finest all-year
ski-ing and recreational areas.
Toward our eastern boundary in the Columbia Valley, Fairmont Hot Springs
Resorts Limited is constructing its first 2,300-foot Deppelmayr T-bar. Here again
we have all-year recreation in a beautiful mountain park land.
In the northern section of the Province, several new recreational areas are being
developed. A new ski area is being established on Purden Mountain, 38 miles east
of Prince George. Here Purden Lake Ski Development Limited has installed a
3,800-foot chair-lift and a 2,000-foot T-bar, both manufactured by Mueller of
Switzerland.
North of Prince George at Pine Pass, the Azu Lift Company Limited has
installed its first T-bar, a 2,000-foot lift also manufactured by Mueller.
 FF 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Three major lifts have been installed in the central area of the Province. Apex
Alpine Recreations Limited has added a 2,500-foot Mueller T-bar to its existing
lifts on Apex Mountain. Silver Star Sports Limited has just completed installation
of its first chair-lift, a 5,600-foot lift manufactured by Mueller of Switzerland. This
ski resort, located on Silver Star Mountain near Vernon, is now equipped with one
pomalift, three T-bars, and the new chair-lift. Tod Mountain Resorts Limited has
added a Hall T-bar to its previous equipment; also a vast improvement has been
made on the access road.
Industrial equipment access has required the installation of two cable-car river
crossings and one large reversible aerial tramway. The reversible tramway, located
near Salmo, was designed by Robert McLellan & Company of Vancouver and built
by Murray-Latta Machine Company, also of Vancouver, for the British Columbia
Telephone Company. This lift is to be used as a means of access to new microwave
equipment.
In addition to the major lifts briefly defined above, numerous small lifts and
rope tows were registered, tested, and approved during 1968.
 t....:w ^
^OD;::;M^ H:iM ^ ? ::: 1 rCi .^y;«: :s: S iMS': iW ? fflJS ii. ij: S j! ?
Industrial-type passenger and freight aerial tramway, Mount Jarvis.
 FF 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Aerial Tramways Registered with the Department
Transport to December 31, 1968
of Commercial
Location No. and Name
Location
Gondola
Chair-
lift
T-bar
J-bar
Rope
Tow
Industrial
Freight
i
1    1      3
1
1
2
1
3     1
4    |    _
2 [    ....
3 I
4. Whistler Mountain— 	
Garibaldi Park _ 	
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
Courtenay _  	
1    1
1
1
1
7. Green Mountain  	
8. Kemano (Alcan)       .,
1
1
Kemano  	
11. Wells                                             	
Wells     _
12. Dog Mountain (B.C. Telephone)	
13. Mount Jarvis (C.N.R.)               -
....    |    ....
1    I
North of Kamloops 	
2    |    ....
2    |    —
2    j    ....
2    [    _
1 [    —
2 j    ___
1    j    .._
2
1 |    —
2 j    __
1
1
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
—
1
Mount Revelstoke Park-
South-east of Revelstoke....
21. Gibson Valley
22. Princeton 	
Princeton	
Kimberley 	
29. Salmo ___   	
S almo 	
Rossland 	
30. Red Mountain 	
Kamloops	
South of Nakusp __ 	
Smithers.   	
Prince Rupert 	
Terrace   	
Kitimat  	
37   Rnrnite.
18    Kitimaf
39. Glacier.          	
40. Blue River
42. Little Squaw Valley	
North of Williams Lake
South-east of Quesnel	
i    l
1
1
....
1
_
1
1
Aspen Grove 	
1    |    ....
2 | 77
i  j  ....
i  j  ....
i  j ....
i
46. Prince George  	
47. Fort St. John
Fort St. John   	
48. 100 Mile House
100 Mile House	
l
1
—
51. Chetwynd 	
Chetwynd , „	
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
53. Fruitvale..
Westbank 	
1
56. McBride__.__ 	
1
1
1
57. Clearwater— 	
58. Golden  	
61. Zymoetz River (B.C. Telephone)	
South-east of Terrace	
East of Prince George	
1
67. Salmo (B.C. Telephone)—  	
....
-    |      1
....    |       1
1    |    ....
....    |    ....
69. Azu Lift Co.                    	
72. Fairmont Hot Springs Resort	
Totals                           	
Fairmont Hot Springs	
2
16
30    |      5
i
73    |     6
1
  Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  

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