Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1967 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1968

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0365669.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0365669.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0365669-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0365669-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0365669-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0365669-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0365669-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0365669-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0365669-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0365669.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1967
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes.,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1967.
Victoria, B.C.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 22, 1968.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of this Department for the year ended December 31, 1967.
The programme of regional organization of local government is nearly complete. In co-operation with the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, all
but two of the proposed 27 regional districts and all but four of the proposed
regional hospital districts are now incorporated. This programme commenced in
1965 with five regional districts incorporated by the end of that year. During 1966
a further six were incorporated. Fourteen regional districts were incorporated in
1967, for a current total of 25. The accompanying table indicates the variety of
functions which are being undertaken by regional districts. Statistical information
relating to each regional district is given in the report of the Director of Finance and
Statistics, included herein.
Each regional district incorporated this year has had incorporated with it at the
same time a co-existing regional hospital district fulfilling the requirements of the
Regional Hospital Districts Act in dividing and incorporating the whole of the Province into regional hospital districts.
While the regional district and the regional hospital district are separate corporations, the Board of Directors of the regional district is declared to be the Regional
Hospital Board in the Letters Patent of the regional hospital district, the effect being
a common Board of Directors.
Two previously incorporated regional districts were extended to coincide with
the boundaries of the new regional hospital districts incorporated for the same areas.
Two areas of the Province have yet to be established as regional districts. When
incorporated they will be co-existing with regional hospital districts. Two further
areas which have been declared as areas to be incorporated as regional hospital
districts will not be incorporated as regional districts as they contain no municipal
organization.   Both areas are isolated and require little in the way of services.
A considerable number of local government activities are becoming oriented
toward the regional districts. Already regional districts are showing their worth in
the provision of a level of regional local government, in co-ordination of municipal
services, activities, and enterprises, and in the development of services in unincorporated areas of the Province. It is anticipated they will play an increasingly important role in local government financing, both in regard to regional schemes and as
the financing agency for member municipalities.
It was found necessary to hold a public inquiry into the affairs of the Regional
District of Columbia-Shuswap. The inquiry was ordered at the request of the
Directors of three of the electoral areas of the regional district. Complaints had
been received from persons who deemed themselves aggrieved as a result of actions
by the Board, largely in regard to bulding regulations. Mr. C. H. L. Woodward,
Director of Administration, was appointed to conduct the inquiry. The recommendations made as a result of the inquiry were approved by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council.   The powers of the regional district were restricted in specific
 W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
fields in order to allow the development of services to be initiated at the instance of
the people. Amendments to the Municipal Act made at the 1967 Session of the
Legislature now ensure this approach to the provision of services and the application of regulatory powers.
Under the provisions of 1967 amendments to the Municipalities Enabling and
Validating Act, a Commission was established to study and report on the desirability
of the amalgamation of the City of Trail and the District of Tadanac. The Commission comprised three members, two appointed respectively by the Councils of Trail
and Tadanac and the Chairman, Mr. W. K. Smith, Director of Finance and Statistics, appointed by yourself. A majority report of the Commission recommended
amalgamation. Implementation of the recommendation has not as yet been
achieved.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued to the District of Summerland to
implement the petition of Council to increase Council membership from four to six,
exclusive of the Reeve. As an incentive to Municipal Councils to increase the
turnout at elections, an annual shield award, open to all municipalities, is given by
the Minister of Municipal Affairs. The recipients of the award in the three categories for the 1966 December elections were as follows:—
Per Cent
Cities and towns:  Fernie  74.1
District municipalities:  Port Alice  80.6
Village municipalities:  Port McNeil]  81.0
The last-named two municipalities are both " instant municipalities "; this serves to
indicate the interest shown by these new communities in local government. The
municipalities taking second place in each category and also worthy of mention were
Trail, 72.9 per cent; Gold River, 64.6 per cent; and Cumberland, 77.0 per cent.
Gold River is also an " instant municipality."
The four-year correspondence course in municipal administration offered by
the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British
Columbia under the sponsorship of the Department has a current enrolment as
follows: First year, 59; second year, 32; third year, 31; and fourth year, 9. In
addition, the course in property appraisal, open to Assessors, has a current enrolment of five students.
The Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented, granted 10
certificates of proficiency during the year. The following table illustrates classifications of certificates issued during 1967 and the number and classification issued to
date.
Certificates 1967 To Date
Junior  2 53
Senior Finance  2 74
Senior Administration   1 65
Property Appraisal  5 40
Totals  10 232
Commensurate with the increased involvement of the Department in housing
and urban renewal, a new division has been established, headed by Mr. J. T. Williams.   His report on these matters as Director of the division is included herein.
As in past years, senior members of the Department participated in the
annual convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and the annual
conference of the Municipal Officers' Association. Many other conferences on local
government and associated subjects were attended by myself and the senior staff.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967 W 7
In addition, the staff attended or participated in a large number of seminars and
similar workshop conferences on various topics relating to our field of responsibility.
In the fall a special two-day conference of the regional district secretary-
treasurers was convened jointly with the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service; this allowed the Department to discuss at length matters pertaining to the
regional districts and the regional hospital districts and afforded an opportunity to
the secretary-treasurers to acquaint themselves with the policies of both this Department and the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service in regard to regional
government activities.
According to the 19V56 Census, the population of the Province resident within
municipalities was 1,530,985 of a total population of 1,823,674. This is an increase of 246,441 or 19.2 per cent in municipal population over the 1961 population. A part of the increase may be attributed to new incorporations and extensions
of area of existing municipalities. The decrease in population of the village municipalities shown in the table below is due to a number of former villages changing
status to either town or district municipalities between 1961 and 1966. The breakdown of population between the various classes of municipalities as compared with
the 1961 populations is as follows:—
Population Percentage Increase, 1961 and 1966
1961
Census
1966
Census
Population
Increase or
Decrease (—)
Percentage
Increase or
Decrease (—)
Cities
680,171
519,990
17,672
66,711
771,729
646,541
56,561
56,154
91,558
126,551
38,889
—10,557
13.5
24.3
220.0
Villa pes
—15.8
Totals
1,284,544
1,530,985
246,441
19.2
Implementation of the announced 1968 revision of the Municipal Act is continuing. In order to give as wide a scope as possible to the drafting of recommendations to be included in the revision, several special legislative conferences have taken
place. The co-operation and assistance received from such groups as the Union of
British Columbia Municipalities and the Municipal Officers' Association of British
Columbia and other similarly interested organizations have been invaluable.
The most important changes and additions to legislation affecting local government organizations enacted by the 1967 Session of the Legislature are summarized
briefly as follows:—
Municipal Councils were empowered to compensate persons for any loss or
damage resulting from assisting municipal police officers or municipal officials in the
exercise of their duties. The limitation on indemnities paid to members of Council
was removed and references to British subjects were amended to read " Canadian
citizen or other British subject." This change was made because many of our new
Canadians when assuming Canadian citizenship feel strongly that they are Canadians and have no desire to be referred to as British subjects.
Amendments were made to the regional district provisions of the Act to stipulate, in effect, that a function may only be added to a regional district's powers at
the request of the Regional Board and consented to by the Councils and the ratepayers involved in the electoral areas. The Act is now specific that the initiative
rests with the area concerned.
The effect of the Regional Hospital Districts Act has been referred to earlier.
Of significance is the provision to place the assessment and taxation for regional
 W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
hospital district purposes on the same basis as school purposes. Certain other
amendments were made to relate the provisions of the Regional Hospital Districts
Act with the Municipal Act. In addition, there were other amendments of a general
and administrative nature.
An amendment to the Municipalities Aid Act provided that the per capita
grant paid to municipalities must be first applied to the construction, repair, or
improvement of streets and roads within the municipality and then to other services
which do not qualify for other grants or are included in shared-cost programmes.
There were various specific additions and amendments to the Municipalities
Enabling and Validating Act affecting a number of municipalities. Other amendments concerning municipalities were made to the Health Act, the Public Schools
Act, the Land Registry Act, the Provincial Home-owner Grant Act, the Pollution
Control Act, the Sheep Protection Act, and the Motor-vehicle Act.
The report of the Director of Finance, included herein, indicates that the very
satisfactory situation recorded in previous years in respect of municipal finances
generally in British Columbia is still evident. Municipal tax collections in British
Columbia municipalities continue at a very high rate. Credit for this excellent performance is probably due to two or three factors. Certainly of prime importance is
the determination of Councils and their staffs to achieve a good result, and this has
in many municipalities become a matter of civic pride. There is no question, however, that achievement has been made easier by the home-owner grant and by the
generally high level of economic activity. Capital investment in municipal plant
amounted to $118,000,000 in the year under review and reflects the continued development of services in the municipalities, particularly in the areas of water and
sewerage construction.
We have continued to maintain contact with investment and financial houses in
Eastern Canada by personal visit as well as by correspondence and more specifically
in conjunction with yourself in an effort to ensure an adequate dissemination of
information respecting the development of regional districts in British Columbia.
Considerable interest exists in these developments, particularly as they relate to
further financing of capital works.
I wish to extend my gratitude and appreciation for your leadership and direction during the past year, and would take this opportunity to express my appreciation for the courtesies and assistance extended to myself and the staff by Municipal
Council members and officers throughout the Province, and by the members of the
executive and staff of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, the executive
of the Municipal Officers' Association, and department heads and staff of other
departments of Government.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
Regional Districts as at January 19, 1968
w 9
Name
la
0 2
»9
u O
r »
__ *>
s
'5i
Si
«.„
■■c
T3S
~ —
o rt
a
s
1
s
"3
P.
o
'So
Si
60
□
1
a
s
'8
1
o
u
y
«
VI
M
B
o
o
o
V
m
•a
a
%
o
&
o
o
J
6*
.3
cs
A.
u
"y
«
o
y
o
s
s
n
00
o
Ih
Ph
a
_o
%
<D
Ih
o
V
Pi
4?
o
H
0
1)
es
u
■H
0
-o
5
t
Q
to
a
,o
t)
a
p «
Si .a
o ra
fi
3 o
BB
CO
Ih
u
113
tH
o
H
Ph
"3
o
&
s
o
OJ
o
a
o
<
%
u
g
p.
c
5
u
3
c.
3
s
<
bo
.g
■—
3
£
0
X
co
s
Ih
V
•o
Is
mo
o
1-
a
o
0
SJ
CU
.9
to
p
o
1
u
i-1
ih
—
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
P
p
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
p
p
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
p
X
p
X
X
p
p
p
X
p
X
p
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
	
X
p
p
X
p
p
p
X
Capital  of  British   Co-
Central Fraser Valley.-.
Central Okanagan	
Colutnbia-Shuswap	
p
Cowichan Valley~	
Dewdney Alouette	
Fraser-Fort George...	
Kootenay Boundary
—
Okan ag an-Similkameen-
Peace River	
—
Squamish-Lillooet	
—
Thompson-Nicola	
" X " indicates function.
' P " indicates partial function or area.
 W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND
DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 18, 1968.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The need for services in municipalities has continued to be a major concern, particularly in conjunction with the increasing costs that have to be met when
constructing projects. Increase in population in the municipalities and its relation
to density have contributed substantially to the demands for services such as sewer
and water. The relative growth of population within organized areas shown by the
differences between 1961 and 1966 Census would indicate that the trend will continue to make urgent the need for many local services.
Commensurate with the rise in population and development of services has
been the increase in the revenues of the municipalities to provide the services. In
the five-year period from 1962 to 1966, municipal revenues, including those of waterworks and other utilities, increased by approximately $101,000,000 to $322,000,000.
Debenture debt over the same period, however, only increased to $368,875,251
from $284,202,423. Continued expansion and development in the various areas
of local government has added to the complexity of the problems to be solved and
placed additional demands upon the staff. To keep abreast of the latest developments in the field of local government, members of the staff have, of their own
volition, undertaken special course study from time to time.
With the advent of the passage of the Regional Hospital Districts Act, the incorporation of regional districts and their development took on a new concept as the
Board of Directors of the regional districts also acts as the Board of Directors of the
regional hospital districts when both of the corporations are established.
Members of the senior staff held meetings throughout the Province to provide
an opportunity for those people interested in incorporation of regional districts to
express their views and acquire knowledge on the intent of the legislation. The
benefits that could be derived and the services that could be provided by incorporation were outlined, and as a result of the programme all but two of the areas described
in the Order in Council delineating the boundaries of regional hospital districts that
should also be regional districts have been incorporated. For the most part the
Letters Patent of the regional districts incorporated this year did not provide for the
assumption of functions or duties. As the people become aware of the advantages
of the regional districts, we expect the issue of supplementary Letters Patent authorizing the provision of various services will increase. If the number of requests
received in 1967 is any indication, the coming year will be an active one.
The role of the Regional Planning Division is changing with the incorporation
of regional districts. For over 20 years the Division has been involved in giving
planning advice to municipalities and administering land-use controls in unorganized
communities evolving into urban areas. Now with regional government in operation
throughout most of the Province, the Division has also to address itself to regional
land-use problems, including those on the metropolitan scale.
Meetings of the Federal-Provincial Co-ordinating Committee on Indian Affairs
were attended. A study of the feasibility of making provision for local government
to be available to administer the affairs of Indians on Indian reserves was considered;
at the last meeting local government on a village concept basis was recommended.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1967 W 11
Two meetings on the proposed changes of the Municipal Act, attended by the
executive of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and representatives of
the Municipal Officers' Association, were informative and rewarding.
While the volume of correspondence in the form of inquiries of the Municipal
Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme, administered by the Department on
behalf of the municipalities, has decreased from previous years, the interest of the
participating municipalities has not diminished. In the 1966/67 licence-year the
sum of $603,103 was received from the licence sales and distributed to the municipalities on a per capita basis. In all, 53,857 municipal commercial-vehicle plates
and 36,336 exempt plates were issued.
A record of major activities of the Department during 1967 would include the
following:—
(1) Three hundred and seventy-three visits were made to municipalities, improvement districts, and regional districts. The number of municipalities,
improvement districts, and regional districts actually visited was 136, some
receiving more than one visit.
(2) Three hundred and forty-six Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) One hundred and thirty-eight certificates of approval for municipal loan
by-laws were issued.
(4) Seventy-seven debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified
by the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 14,985 debentures of a
total par value of $18,204,255.
(5) Seven hundred and sixty-nine by-laws were examined and registered. Of
these, 80 were district by-laws, 221 were town by-laws, 439 were village
by-laws, 19 were regional district by-laws, 4 were local district by-laws,
and 6 were improvement district by-laws. Many of the by-laws required
advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Many draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for review
and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics, which includes
some 33 different schedules.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements. This phase of administration involves considerable correspondence with municipal officials
and auditors.
(9) Administration of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme.
(10) Administration of the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme.
(11) Administration of the Municipal Development and Loan Act was completed.
(12) By correspondence and by visits to the various municipalities, encouraging
the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative procedures.
(13) The programme involving the incorporation of regional districts continued,
and members of the staff attended innumerable meetings in all parts of
the Province to advise various groups interested in such incorporation; as
only two more incorporations will complete the programme, the next
phase will be to advise officials and members of the Boards on procedural,
financial, and administration matters and stress the need of establishing
priorities to achieve orderly growth.
Every effort was made to ensure the annual edition of Municipal Statistics was
available as early as possible.   Most of the information in the publication is used by
 W 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the investment houses, financial institutions, and others. In view of the importance
that is attached to this information, particularly when purchases of debenture issues
and other municipal financing arrangements are being considered, accuracy and
comparability on the basis of prior years is essential.
For the 10th consecutive year the Government of Canada has provided an
incentive for municipalities to undertake capital works for the relief of unemployment. In past years this programme was operative in the period of November 1st
to April 30th, but in 1967/68 the provisions only apply from November 1st to
March 31st. One-half (60 per cent in specified high-unemployment areas) of the
approved direct labour costs of accepted projects are paid by the Federal authority.
Only minor changes were made in the regulations, which did not materially affect
the type of project that may be undertaken.   Only capital projects now qualify.
The Province has agreed to pay the municipalities 50 per cent of direct labour
costs of any person employed on an accepted project who was receiving public
assistance prior to employment; this provision is an added incentive to the one
offered by the Government of Canada. In addition, when there are no welfare
recipients available for hire, the Province will pay 25 per cent of the direct labour
costs of persons no longer qualified for unemployment insurance. An indication of
the extent of the programme may be gained from the following:—
Cost of Projects      Man-days Work
Payroll
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
as at January 15,
as at January 15.
as at January 15.
as at January 15.
as at January 15;
as at January 15.
as at January 15,
as at January 15:
1961..
1962
1963..
1964.
1965.
1966.
1967..
1968..
$20,000,000
26,500,000
25,000,000
19,527,859
24,786,739
21,325,872
15,997,807
14,892,694
392,000
426,000
413,000
413,210
429,192
376,761
277,897
198,570
$7,000,000
8,333,333
7,500,000
7,979,178
8,892,222
8,514,822
6,523,076
5,175,120
These are estimated figures of the municipalities for the programme period.
The following tabulation gives a summary of British Columbia municipalities
participating in the Winter Works Programme as at January 15, 1968, according to
the records of this office:—
Number of men	
Man-days work	
Total cost of projects	
Federal share (payroll cost)	
Provincial share (payroll cost)
Municipal share (payroll cost)
Total payroll under offer	
3,115
198,570
$14,892,694
$2,590,986
$583,535
$2,000,599
$5,175,120
Nature and Total Cost of Projects
Waterworks
Sewers 	
Drainage .....
Roads 	
Sidewalks	
Buildings 	
Parks 	
Other	
$2,831,921
4,990,575
550,519
1,096,148
353,285
1,534,834
2,624,743
910,669
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1967 W 13
Municipalities Participating Number of A ccepted Projects
Cities  18
Districts  20
Towns  6
Villages  16
Other  18
Total  78
Cities	
Districts.
Towns __.
  105
  88
  17
Villages  29
Other  22
Total
261
Table 1 shows the summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme for the year 1966/67 as issued by the Department of Labour of the Government of Canada, and Table 2 indicates the same information for the current
programme as at January 5, 1968.
We have not been able to carry out the policy of having a senior member of the
Department visit each municipality at least once during the year; senior officials
were travelling extensively to attend public meetings on incorporation of regional
districts and to attend meetings of the Regional Boards. We expect that the new
incorporations will add substantially to the work load as new administrative procedures are inaugurated and new problems are met. The additional staff which
joined the Department late in 1966 and in 1967 both in the administrative and
planning fields will help us meet the more extensive work programme, and we hope
that more time may be devoted to assisting smaller municipalities in the future.
In January the Department vacated the offices on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building and moved to new quarters on the second and third floors in the British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Building on Pandora Avenue, where the
accommodation provides much-needed additional office space and facilities.
I would again express appreciation of the loyalty and devotion to duty which
all members of the staff have shown during the past year. For senior members this
has meant many week-ends of work in the field, curtailed holidays, or taking holidays
in piecemeal fashion.   All in all, it has been a job well done.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S.,
Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector
of Municipalities.
 W 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
as
o
fi
0.
<
a
a
a
z
a
w
w
w
H
P.
O
p.
w
VO
vo
as
w
9
Ch
w
g
H
Z
w
u
2
0
a
H
Z
►4
o
I—I
z
S
5
w
►J
.- o o
_> SO
o.§3
-a ^^
ugBn
(A
o
no
h
0<
£■2
UcaO
Si.**
2S«
|2   OJ
t*H .t!
°W
a o
r
§■0
II
II
OOOOOOOOOOOOOO
oooooooooooooo
o q o^ ©^ q q o q o © o o q o
t* wj o" Ov" o" Ov" vo On" l> oo" es l> i-T in
wioor-civoovCTvooom oo t— rH
■*0\voionHvOH(so> hvo
** n-" es" rn~ es" ■<* cn
<N *
>o
OOOOOOOOOOOOOO
oooooooooooooo
qqqqqqqqqqqqoq
i-T 1-4" 00" i> ov" «n i>" r-^ ov" ©" m" ■■* ov" ■■*"
vDTj-vooOHVDTtomn r* cn n
t^-voT-iovfnt^es^i-H^Ttoo hpioo
w h w      rh" Tt" m-<ft&i>
■  tN
O,
©OOOOOOOOOOOOC
OOOOOOOOOOOOOC
q q o_ q o^ q q q q q q q Ob <
t-T Tt" in in t> d o" i> in es* vC cs" oT 1
T-40NCor^Ttforo<neSTt Ov cS l
\q r+ oc ov^ o^ *■* t# in Tt -*t      rn Tt 1
•4" eS" rn" es" S? r> f» w oo" Ov" I
«■ O 00 tH CS t-H \
movmvDf-ror-oor-voir.OrHc_h
voesoTtvoesvom»HOvvo(smo
rH Ov OvE-^rnoooveSeS^Ov i-H rt Vi M
f-T t> 00" in <n" in ■*£ o"h"o r-T 00" es"
r-foom*-ir*-ov[-~mm      *-i c* vi
mooTtinofSrnmeN«nm(SooTt
fnTtcooTtr-Oinoot^      oof^vo
cnTwuTrr«uinwi'
OHOO« co Ov Ov^ tO 0_ O^
<S m" rn rn vo vo ts" o" o" «n"
VOrl Hrl
§
vor.vov.inoM'too'tHvoriM
OvOVOOfSvovOOr^rH VOTtOv
«H rHOOOvrHCOin'rJ- CS
VOvOvDmvOHNTt'Mirti
OVOVOOeSVOVOOt^rH
rHrn HOOO\rH«lftTf
?ss
•a t3
i s
O   o
<H  u
9 S
Zfi
o u
J_ ■§
oS
•a P.
S45
u a
JO
cj ^
6
W
fi.eSii-SSBcl
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 15
oo
vo
as
1
z
<
1—1
Q
w
Q
Z
W
«
w
n
H
B.
o
ft.
n
00
VO
r»
vo
as
m
S
i
53
a.
O
O
e.
Ph
W
a
H
Z
w
u
z
►H
1/1
s
o
a.
w
H
Z
3
0.
z
p
w
H
BE
S
fi
■_. °£
z§«
S2
2 u
«*H.t_|
0ffi
Ih
I"
ca a
|R
S3
OOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOO
q q q q q q q q o^ q
o" oo vo *df cs" o" oo rn «n" cn
CS CS 9. f«l (t1 -C> V> t4>
** VO  00 rH th  en CS*
oooooooooo
OOOOOOOOOO
©^ o^ ©^ o^ o^ © © ©^ ©_ o
r^en"©",rt"f^'©vOt"^es"en
ovow-ir-ooovcnvocsvo
3trfrH TtTtTtOvOOV
** ov" vo" cs" t-c c-" ■*
(S rH
rH Ov
r» cs
r- oo
©©OOOOO©
O0©0©0©0
o^ © qoqo pp.
rn" oC H rf ©" cs" cs" oC
tooO*(Siovovo
m rn m *n r-r* rn m
o" ts" >o <n io Tt
r^ VO     <S rH
O O Q
OOP
ooo
mov'-*esejv»d-cso\v>es
VOrHinOSTtOOOvOmrH
es vo rn vo »60rtO'tq
in ^ n" Vl" ^ m o" VD <C o"
COCOrH OOOTtrHTtO\
oinvo
a\ t- ov
en rn es
HTtO\\OfOf)«HVOH
csvoTtoocnm^cst^©
TfOOrH VO V) CO © rH Ov
rn r-T ov" cs" Tt b* es"
VO VO cs
oo vo O
T*    t~~
cSTtmovvOcncScnest^
VOIOrt 7*TfrH00VOcn
© tJ «h en -tf cs
si "n
zfi
O   a
zz
.o -B
*. __ o y p. ■_ r.
5 ■__ *_ £; t_ J- 9
■g S "S 3 81_3 "S
= BJ3aS-Bl3o
aoS«<m><z
B-O
r-     d
 W 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE FINANCE
AND STATISTICS DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 18, 1968.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The real-property tax continues to be the major source of revenue of
municipalities in British Columbia. The growth in assessed values of real property
and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past 10 years is portrayed
in the following table:—
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1958    _	
1959
$3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
3,569,240,135
3,717,472,643
4,032,288,772
4,062,459,644
4,188,389,878
4,460,354,467
4,808,126,631
5,289,229,487
$2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
3,015,844,390
3,142,969,534
3,407,538,034
3,433,937,080
3,534,097,291
3,770,938,012
4,070,798,825
4,506,005,879
$2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
2,417,467,198
2,508,401,082
2,770,194,168
2,795,430,982
2,878,206,746
3,072,204,132
3,315,334,666
3,652,356,884
$1,562,991,738
1,721,746,794
1,843,967,404
1,920,101,216
2,182,411,559
2,224,805,763
2,294,697,747
2,365,897,598
2,549,447,799
2,781,601,367
$92,429,190
104,819,992
1960 ..   	
1961 .. -	
116,857,478
122,272,311
1962       	
128,865,831
1963
141,020,672
1964   	
154,074,236
1965-   ,	
172,163,583
1966   ._.
1967	
192,056,108
224,000,0001
1 Estimated.
On the basis of the present rate of growth it is anticipated that revenue from
real property and other sources of taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1967 will reach $224,000,000. This would represent an increase of approximately 60 per cent over the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1967 amounted to
$4,800,769,402. Of this amount, $3,652,356,884, or approximately 75 per cent,
represented assessment values in city, district, town, and village municipalities.
During the year 1966, the last year for which audited financial statements of
municipalities are available, municipal revenues, including those of waterworks
and other utilities, were in excess of $322,000,000, an increase of $38,000,000 over
the previous year. Revenue from taxation for school purposes, which forms part
of the total revenue of municipalities, amounted to $86,000,000 but was offset in
part by the application of the home-owner grant payments of approximately
$30,000,000, leaving a net of $56,000,000 in school taxes as having been paid by
the property-owners.
The value of capital projects undertaken by municipalities during 1966
amounted to $118,000,000, an increase of $15,000,000 over the previous year.
Capital works amounting to $99,000,000 were completed during the fiscal year,
leaving a balance of works in progress of $19,000,000 at the year-end. It is of
interest to note that of the $118,000,000 expended on capital projects, municipalities were able to provide $21,000,000 out of general municipal and utility revenue
funds, $5,000,000 from reserve funds, and approximately $8,000,000 was obtained
from grants-in-aid from the Provincial and Federal Governments.   The balance of
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1967
W 17
the amount expended was financed by debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and
other methods of financing. Figures indicating the activity in this area over the
past five years are as follows:—
Year
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Provided by—
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
1962...
1963...
1964...
1965...
1966.
$73,000,000
80,000,000
80,000,000
103,000,000
$55,000,000
62,000,000
62,000,000
87,000,000
118,000,000    |     99,000,000
$18,000,000
18,000,000
18,000,000
16,000,000
19,000,000
$12,000,000
12,000,000
15,000,000
16,000,000
21,000,000
$3,000,000
3,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
$4,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
7,000.000
8,000,000
The following table illustrates authorized term borrowing trends over the past
seven years. The marked increase in borrowing between the years 1963 and 1964
may be attributed to the municipal development and loan fund financing scheme.
However, the current increase in term borrowings is considered to reflect the demand
for services, principally sewerage and water, brought about by the continued development of the urban communities within municipalities.
Year Amount
1961  $15,030,152
1962  14,006,884
1963  14,581,981
1964  25,231,663
Year Amount
1965  $27,499,789
1966  24,663,3 8 8
1967  30,756,706
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1966, of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown by the following table. The debenture debt of the
metropolitan water and sewer boards is not included.
Sold
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities	
Districts  	
$61,227,163
76,275,088
7,232,066
6,744,091
64,500
$19,861,578
20,119,151
2,636,818
2,350,728
$81,088,741
96,394,239
9,868,884
Villages _	
9,094,819
64,500
$151,478,408
171,528,568
$44,968,275
900,000
$196,511,183
Vancouver 	
172,428,568
Totals 	
S323.071.476       1       $45,868,275       1     $368,939,751
Interest rates on municipal debentures have continued to rise over the past
year. The indications are that the current high rates will remain and may increase
still further. The problems associated with the marketing of municipal debentures
have been principally the availability of funds on the market, the timing of municipalities in going to the market, and the tailoring of an instrument that would be most
favourably received by the prospective purchaser. Meetings and talks have been
held with bond dealers, bankers, institutional buyers, and others in connection with
these matters, and a number of changes in the style of debentures and statutory bylaw procedures are contemplated as a result of these meetings. There are indications
that a return to the sinking fund style of debenture for larger issues may be more
attractive to the market than the present serial type of debenture. There is also
a possibility that a combined serial and sinking fund issue might prove attractive.
With the advent of regional districts which will be borrowing on their own behalf as
well as on behalf of member municipalities, it is essential that instruments offered
be tailored to meet the demands of today's market.
2
 W 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1 shows the annual amounts of debentures sold in the years 1957 to
1966 inclusive, debentures retired during these years, and the net increase or decrease
of debenture debt.
The percentage of current revenue required to service debenture debt excluding
utilities in the various classes of municipalities in 1966 was as follows: Cities (excluding Vancouver), 8.98 per cent; districts, 7.88 per cent; towns, 7.96 per cent;
villages, 5.64 per cent.
Debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived from
user charges paid by the consumer and by frontage taxes.
On the basis of an analysis of the financial and statistical information available,
it would appear that the financial position of British Columbia municipalities is
continuing to improve and that, generally, they all enjoy a favourable financial position. Table 2 and Chart 1 indicate the trends in various financial aspects of municipal government compared to population and income. The increase in total revenue
as indicated by the table and chart resulted from an increase of $10,000,000 in the
Provincial Government grants, raising the amount paid to municipalities to approximately $53,000,000 excluding capital and special-purpose grants and the increase
in revenue derived from school tax levies, which increased to $86,000,000. The
increase in school tax was offset to some extent, in so far as the residential homeowners were concerned, by an increase of $4,000,000 in the Provincial home-owner
grants paid to municipalities on their behalf.
Reserve fund balances of the various municipalities have again shown a marked
increase over the previous year. At the end of 1966 these balances, which are held
for a variety of purposes, amounted to $30,000,000, an increase of $1,800,000 or
6.4 per cent over the previous year, after giving effect to the fact that for the third
consecutive year approximately $5,000,000 from reserve funds was expended on
capital works projects.
The total of reserves and surpluses held in all accounts of the municipalities
was $81,050,893. This amounts to 35 per cent of the total annual revenue excluding
school taxes of the municipalities. While the reserve funds are held in liquid form
or in investments authorized by Statute, a portion of the surplus is represented in
arrears of taxes and other receivables.
In the year under review, tax collections in municipalities continued to improve
to the point where the collection of current taxes in cities and districts exceeds 96
per cent of the levy, villages collected in excess of 95 per cent, while towns was
slightly less than 93 per cent. Following established policy, correspondence has
been directed to any municipality where the arrears of taxes were in excess of 10 per
cent of the current levy in an effort to determine the cause and what steps may be
taken to correct the situation.
One of the primary indications of the ability of the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly and also an indication of the efficiency of the administration
of the municipality is the tax-collection picture. The collection of current taxes in
British Columbia municipalities continues to be the highest among the Provinces in
Canada publishing statistics on a comparable basis, while the percentage of arrears
of taxes is the lowest, as a comparative study of 1965 statistics indicates.
British Columbia— Per ^^
Collection of current taxes  95.83
Arrears on adjusted levy     5.82
Alberta—
Collection of current taxes  87.03
Arrears on adjusted levy  22.63
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967 W 19
Saskatchewan—
Collection of current taxes  89.12
Arrears on adjusted levy  19.01
Ontario—
Collection of current taxes  92.52
Arrears on adjusted levy     9.88
Nova Scotia—
Collection of current taxes  85.80
Arrears on adjusted levy  26.00
Chart 2 shows the percentage of tax collections from the period 1956 to 1966,
inclusive, and Table 3 shows the outstanding taxes as a percentage of current levy
for selected years. The cities and districts continue to improve, with the villages and
towns showing a slight decline in performance. However, the over-all average is
still well within acceptable standards. Table 4 reveals further information relative
to tax collections in British Columbia municipalities for the years shown.
Economic factors have, of course, contributed to the establishment of this
favourable position in the property tax field. However, municipal treasurers and
collectors are continuing to develop techniques which are proving to be successful in
maintaining a high rate of tax collection, and they are to be congratulated for their
efforts in this regard.
Some indication of the extent of the development of regional districts is contained in other sections of the Report of the Department. The tables which follow
this section of the Report show the regions alphabetically by name, date of incorporation, member municipalities and electoral areas, population, and assessment. The
responsibilities and functions of the Division have been extended considerably by
the introduction of this concept of local government. New budgetary processes
have been developed to satisfy statutory requirements and also to serve the administrative requirements of the regional districts. These include the provisional budget,
annual budget, and the long-term capital budget. There will likely be some modification of these processes as the activities of the regional districts continue to expand
and as further experience is gained in the field.
The last edition of the publication " Municipal Statistics " contained financial
and other information of those regional districts which had been incorporated prior
to December 31, 1966. No attempt was made at the time to report the financial
activities of municipalities on a regional basis, and they were reported by class of
municipality; that is, cities, districts, towns, and villages. It is proposed that future
issues of the Municipal Statistics will reflect this information by municipalities on
a regional basis with a suitable summary by region.
This change to financial reporting on a regional basis has received very careful
study. While it will cause some inconvenience to those who have been accustomed
to carrying out their analysis by class of municipality, we feel sure that the change
will result in the production of much more meaningful financial and other statistics.
The functions of the Division also include a continual review of the financial
position and administrative practices of the municipalities, regional districts, and
other areas of local government. A close liaison is maintained with financial institutions, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and other departments of government in
an effort to ensure that financial and other information required is available on
a uniform and comparable basis. In this regard we have continued to receive the
highest degree of co-operation from municipal officials.
W. K. Smith,
Director, Finance and Statistics Division.
 W 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
to
ft
<
t-eSm            oocoo            hodc
VO   O    Tt
mcSrH             ovo-rj-             n in sc
o oo r^-
VO
r."*oo           vovoon           TtTto^
00  Ov  rH
w
VO
wmnm            movin            mt^r-
CS 00 vo
>
Ov
r-i £*- »n            oo on co           es co cc
cn in cm
lOr-OO                   00rH\O                  NOTt  —
Tt   Tt    W
a
en" Tt oo           oo' vo" cs"           cn"      C
X
H
w
P.
r- o r-          csmov          Ttm —
rH  rH  O
mm©           ooooon           onOnc
co r- vo
O
m
oocn           OrHoo           r-H Tt
m cn ri
Ph
VO
»OMH                   i—I  CO  (N                   rHOOVC
rn \o in
Ov
Ttmco           r- co co            co rH co
o\vor)
w
0_
!—i in in            corHt-           (-I en •—■           cn Tt on
in *t                 rn in vo
*-•
<
	
P.
mvoov            OOvrH            inovvc
Tt  cn  rH
(J
r-mcn                VO rH Tt                H Tt vc
vo r^ on
w
Tt
CO  I>  rH                   cn^tOv                  rHTj-VC
t-h in in
ft
VO
W- 00 CS WO              ONCSvo              cnrtoc
t~^ i—i m
OS
r- T)T-                Ov rH 00                eSTtt^
t-  VO  rH
rH
vo rn cs            t-r i>                 oo es m
On Tt in
p.
in  Tt  rH                   Tt  Tt
o
w
tn
<
Ttvoco            esovcn           es©es
vo as r-
Ovvocs            Ttmcc            ooooo
O  OO  rH
W
cn
Ovvocn           oo n ^            ccTtt
©  t0  ff
P.
vo
wo'vOtj-"           oo" cs" vo"           en" cd m
i/iKh-
u
ON
O vo cn             ova-*             oomit
r- cn cn
Ttom             en m t»             t^csu-
Ov Tt in
z
t— ■* cn             O Tt «n
)—t
1-1
Ph
	
OOONOV                   rH  f-  Tt                   Ov  VO  C*"
t> Tt cn
inOvw-j            Mon            escno-
VO VO O
(N
OOON                   OOt-rH                   TtTtO"
vo vo O
VO
W-MVOV1                   ITI^H                   CSOr-
Tt   ©   TT
ON
i-Hin»n             rnrnoo             rS Ov c*-
00  r-  rH
Tf  rH CS                  rtOO                   m  rH  C*~
Tt  Cn  rH
H   W
SOin-rS                    IflTtH
5 o
< o
cn cn ©            OvOTt            hm(M
cn o t?
i-hCSO\              ONOOO              VO On C
Tt «n y-<
Q 5
Ph   ►>
,_!
Ttcno^           OvinTj-            TtTtc
t~l rH  Tt
VO
6<J vo r-" On"             r-" vo" rn"             vo" tJ-" 0C
cn" co" Tt
ON
vo co CS           HfNO\            r-coc
On rn rg
1-1
<-tO\N                   r-^ ^ NO                          rH  rH                  <N  m  v_-
Tt m                 m cn rn
H   O
w z
* 3
vovo©          voTtcs           Tt-nr-           mONvo
s 3
co r- vo           NX\t            ooonc
cn Ov co
o
VOrHTt             oocnTt             tNcnr-
rH in IT
NO
woovo'es"          in rn cs           o"r-^r*
©"©"Ov
Ov
^noom            Ttr-r-            wtfr
«n   CO   rH
SB
vo oo C-            incnrH            es cs ^           mcncs
vo cn es            en cn
Ph   ^O
VO f^  ON                  CSrHrH                   O  Tt  VC
r- rH vo
Ph  >0
vo vo Ov            r- o r—           rninm
<N CO Ov
ft 2.
Ov
^t R **\         r"i ^ ^t.        m_. * ^
en vo VC
&o-rnfno             mori"            ov r--
Os" co" in
Ov
ooc~-rH             ooaov             co c— vc
r~ co On
g o
Ovinrj-           Tt ob <n          mnc
V0*» *■;
l> cn Tt              r- co rn
cn      e^
SJ   H
O
60   !C
OVOtt                rn^HO                eN O 00                ONOnO
w on
tt ^
Tti-nes          cscnov           co©r-
m © in
oo
On Ov ©_             r-(N"*              cOOr-
CO  Tt  Ov
in
w vo" en" en"           Tt" in on"           Tt" m" c
oTo oe
5
On
oesoo             a.coo             co cn ir
O CN CO
MTliH                   00000                           rH  -^                 VO^trH
H
Z
w
Ph
cn cn                 m co es
w
co co o             vo O vo
O Tt NO              (S to On
OOO
co r- —i
ft
r-
»n
es no m           ©* r* f-
W- vo fS cn             rH vo m
CS 00 tJ-
rH   oCr-.
Ph
ON
co o oo             cn oo Tt
in on m
On rn oo            vo vq 0>
rH  CO  r*-
O
rn cn"                oo c-I in
co      r
cn
H
Z
5
o
S
«
CA
<
ca
tH
j
o
u
<
-o
a
z
*
t*
S
bo
z
<
G
q
(2
2
C
u
H
a
PJ
u
J
<a
—
t:
•a
CO
u_  aj
a
t)
u
(/
a
a-
«
<
S *3 f
:
^iH
q
5
^
c/_    U    '-
18    U    l
G
O a.
Z
4
S
H
0
-.
Z
a
2
«
z
a
z
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1967
W 21
Table 2.—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1956 	
1957	
1958	
1959 	
1960	
1961 ...
100.00
107.47
110.91
115.24
118.72
118.24
124.05
126.75
130.90
135.53
137.92
100.00
116.34
134.68
152.68
165.07
176.25
186.74
199.73
214.34
244.39
276.05
100.00
99.81
107.24
103.49
79.20
84.00
95.96
109.60
145.87
170.99
173.74
100.00
107.36
109.77
121.81
127.89
129.67
130.61
139.67
142.13
148.23
162.15
100.00
113.99
126.31
138.13
148.51
154.66
170.17
171.72
176.81
188.72
203.66
100.00
108.36
112.04
119.29
124.39
126.37
1962     	
1963..	
1964 	
1965	
1966  ..
134.86
142.23
154.97
174.95
194.63
Census years:   1956, 1961, 1966.
 W 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(/.
z
£
0
H
10
H
U
P.
H
[/>
ft
</!
PJ
H
c
Ph
O
!x
>
PJ
H
Z
Z
o
m
pj
p.
CO
K
u_
b
Ph
<
u
PJ
pj
>H
53
PJ
53
Ph
H
o
0.
PJ
O
n
Ph
<
H
PJ
Z
ST
w
<
U
-J
0.
hJ
PJ
Oh
>
<
Q
Z
v.
<
<
in
PJ
____!•__
Z<-.n
S6
8
8
8.
Ov"
3
cn r~       en rn
oocn       cSrH       no —<       e-Jim
CD
Z
3
z
<
H
09
H
D
o
hJ
Ph
H
cn c-      en t-
or-     oo vo     vocs     coo      es
Tt cn       vo vo
Tt«-H ©rH OONHM VO *t CS CS cneOCSeS COrneSOC cnrncsov
! M w *2 i n w «o    ' os bi r tfl £i       JP
'3 S u ;W § «   «*  Si .!__.«& _.   °   <«  & "  ei  S,
,/)   .H rfl   «-H 05   ■« 09   "H tfi   ««H (fl   —H      3      SO ^   »f4     £       00 B)   '[H      fi      "0 Hi   «-H      (-       W)
I S * i cS .h i a B I "-b i Sj3 i o_5 5« i u£§d t « £s £ « i « is 5 «
I   +3  to   |  *"__   w>   I   w  «o   I"  «   I   «  !«   |  S  w  g S   |  "fl  g  g "   |   «  w  g g   |   *_J  to  g ^
3u38u5£0q8G5t¥u3&uSh>30qh>3u^
On On On Ov ov On Ov ON On Ov
a 11 a
U0H>
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
Table 4.—Percentage Tax Collections
W 23
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939                     	
81.10
94.13
95.12
95.42
95.82
95.92
96.28
91.00
95.74
94.65
94.95
95.11
95.66
96.03
77.60
92.32
95.12
95.27
95.52
96.05
96.51
89.55
88.69
91.36
90.80
91.88
92.87
92.81
76.50
92.45
94.73
95.21
95.09
96.04
95.21
99.10
100.46
100.17
100.32
100.45
100.01
100.40
103.10
100.57
99.56
99.92
99.78
100.39
100.20'
95.80
99.28
99.94
100.16
100.10
100.31
100.67
97.06
98.00
101.00
97.87
100.25
99.93
98.90
98.30
99.90
101.53
100.53
99.99
'100.31
99.08
40.16
1946                                           	
7.85
1962	
6.75
1963	
6.30
1964	
5.70
1965	
5.49
1966	
5.12
Vancouver
1939               	
30.06
1946	
5.90
1962               	
7.83
1963	
7.50
1964           	
7.34
1965	
6.45
1966                            	
5.80
Districts
1939            	
34.81
1946                     _
9 45
1962 —	
6.47
1963 	
6.28
1964	
6.03
1965	
5.33
1966	
4.64
Towns
1958 	
13 62
1959	
15 18
1962	
11 58
1963               	
12 71
1964     	
11 47
1965	
9 94
1966                    	
10 16
Villages
1939      	
38 71
1946  	
11 90
1962	
7 32
1963..	
666
1964	
6 28
1965    	
5 52
1966	
6 48
 W 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS    OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
CHART  1
LEGEND
ssssssssasPopulation  in   millions ••♦•• Maximum values taxable in
 Total   revenue   in   millions   of  dollars hundreds of millions of dollars
Building   permits   in    millions  of  dollars      Personal   income in hundreds
Debenture   debt     in     millions   of    dollars
of  millions of dollars
1
^
_.—"*"
^—-
~^
^
^^	
,--•"
 _—•""
f^"
^---
■-"""
90
60
SO
	
30
10
 ••••"
...—••••
»♦♦♦•»♦♦♦♦«
«***
s
a
5
4
3
2
cacoovic^
sssooaooao*
B5MS00O0000
XiClW£££C££
-VYYgflTYYT'A
SOOEZBH-SSZ
S22222S22-2S
22>2222SSV22
S^SSZSS^KSS1
annajaaiggjag
1
65 1966
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1967
W 25
PERCENTAGE      TAX       COLLECTIONS
CHART 2
LEGEND
 Cities  Villages
Districts _._- — Vancouver
•••♦••♦•♦Towns
PERCENTAGE OF CURRENT LEVY COLLECTED
OUTSTANDING TAXES AS A PERCENTAGE OF CURRENT LEVY
1956 57 53 59 60 61 62 63
Note: The     classification   of    Towns     was    established    in   1958
65 1966
 W 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGIONAL DISTRICTS
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated April 21, 1966.)
Population,
Census
Year 1966
City—Port Alberni
Villages—
Tofino 	
Ucluelet	
Improvement districts—
Beaver Creek 	
Cherry Creek	
Electoral areas—A to D
Totals 	
18,538
477
1,054
1,900
1,300
4,948
28,217
Assessments
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
$40,077,411
588,518
1,124,595
2,074,438
1,754,021
22,057,611
$67,676,594
BULKLEY-NECHAKO REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated February 1, 1966.)
Towns—Smithers                        	
       3,135
Villages—
Burns Lake ... -                   	
       1,290
Fort St. James	
       1,213
Fraser Lake .   	
       1,093
Houston . -  	
            699
Telkwa ..    	
          668
Vanderhoof            „
       1,507
Electoral areas—A to F                 ._
10,210
Totals     	
     19,815
$4,496,968
1,439,687
1,048,076
1,375,650
590,453
430,766
1,917,376
21,697,764
$32,996,740
CAPITAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated February 1, 1966.)
City—Victoria	
Districts—
Central Saanich
Esquimalt 	
North Saanich ..
Oak Bay 	
Saanich 	
Town—Sidney
Electoral areas—A to G
Totals
57,453
$119,823,141
3,640
8,668,030
12,891
16,118,731
2,891
9,248,988
18,123
42,676,475
58,845
98,582,773
3,165
6,383,607
24,338
57,057,330
181,346
$358,559,075
CARIBOO REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Proposed.)
Towns—
Quesnel   5,725
Williams Lake  3,592
Village—100 Mile House  829
Electoral areas—A to J   20,630
Totals
30,776
$8,205,998
6,618,933
1,417,298
40,480,077
$56,722,306
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 27
CENTRAL FRASER VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated October 17, 1967.)
City—Langley
Districts—
Langley ...
Matsqui ..
Sumas .—
Village—Abbotsford
Electoral area—A —
Totals
Population,
Census
Year 1966
2,800
.    15,767
.    16,161
.     5,445
792
202
.    41,167
Assessments
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
$5,880,897
24,094,490
21,068,048
10,695,998
3,116,187
394,227
$65,249,847
CENTRAL KOOTENAY REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated November 30, 1965.)
City—Nelson	
Towns—
Castlegar	
Creston 	
Kinnaird 	
Villages—
Kaslo 	
Nakusp 	
New Denver
Salmo 	
Slocan 	
Silverton 	
Electoral areas-
Totals
-AtoK
9,504
$14,520,508
3,440
4,447,056
2,920
5,326,666
2,869
4,063,885
940
705,899
1,282
1,472,805
623
422,033
925
876,530
357
583,948
247
188,151
21,455
63,047,722
44,562
$95,655,203
CENTRAL OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated August 24, 1967.)
City—Kelowna 	
District—Peachland	
Electoral areas—A to H
Totals
17,006
709
16,039
33,754
$36,643,732
1,309,520
32,852,903
$70,806,155
COLUMBIA-SHUSWAP REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated November 30, 1965.)
City—Revelstoke   4,791
District—Salmon Arm  4,801
Villages—
Golden   2,590
Salmon Arm  1,854
Electoral areas—A to D   12,427
Totals
26,463
$7,120,411
6,054,902
4,533,351
3,234,967
17,928,363
$38,871,994
 W 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
City—Courtenay 	
Districts—•
Campbell River
Gold River	
Town—Comox	
Villages—
Cumberland	
Zeballos	
COMOX-STRATHCONA REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated August 19, 1965.)
Population,
Census
Year 1966
         4,913
Electoral areas—A to J
Totals
7,825
878
2,671
1,277
229
20,460
38,253
Assessments
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
$9,241,642
25,785,518
6,837,106
4,364,545
1,040,248
266,683
46,939,832
$94,475,574
COWICHAN VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated September 26, 1967.)
City—Duncan 	
District—North Cowichan
Town—Ladysmith  	
Village—Lake Cowichan .
Electoral areas—A to C .
Totals 	
4,299
10,384
3,410
2,353
12,018
32,464
$7,434,540
23,707,344
4,029,578
2,320,232
60,361,909
$97,853,603
Districts—
Maple Ridge ..
Mission 	
Pitt Meadows
DEWDNEY ALOUETTE REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated October 27, 1967.)
19,287
5,351
2,247
Town—Mission City        3,412
Electoral areas—A to E        2,215
Totals
32,512
$28,348,577
6,038,962
3,522,766
5,926,186
5,315,338
$49,151,829
EAST KOOTENAY REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated November 30, 1965.)
Cities—■
Cranbrook   7,849 $9,491,686
Fernie   2,715 2,160,046
Kimberley   5,901 4,503,315
District—Sparwood   1,928 3,067,636
Villages—■
Chapman Camp  664 784,963
Invermere   1,022 1,541,389
Marysville  1,126 942,513
Electoral areas—A to G  8,965 42,602,798
Totals   30,170 $65,094,346
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 29
FRASER-BURRARD REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated June 29, 1967.)
Cities—
New Westminster
North Vancouver
Port Coquitlam .._
Port Moody	
Vancouver 	
White Rock 	
Districts—
Burnaby
Coquitlam
Delta 	
Fraser Mills 	
North Vancouver
Richmond 	
Surrey
West Vancouver .
Electoral areas—A and B
Totals 	
Population,
Taxable for
Census
Regional District
Year 1966
Purposes, 1967
38,013
$56,303,874
26,851
37,686,952
11,121
12,089,197
7,021
11,702,674
410,375
762,029,325
7,787
15,021,482
112,036
236,071,344
40,916
55,380,162
20,664
47,006,415
164
2,695,419
48,124
70,641,939
50,460
92,881,820
81,826
121,878,422
31,987
98,049,310
3,788
21,197,514
891,133
$1,640,635,849
FRASER-CHEAM REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated September 29, 1967.)
City—Chilliwack
Districts—
Chilliwhack .
Kent 	
Town—Hope	
Village—Harrison Hot Springs	
Electoral areas—A to F      4,429
Totals
8,681
20,070
2,642
2,948
486
4,429
$14,126,818
25,694,101
4,104,333
4,778,699
1,719,147
12,474,847
39,256
$62,897,945
FRASER-FORT GEORGE REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated March 8, 1967.)
City—Prince George
District—Mackenzie .
Villages—
McBride	
Valemount 	
Electoral areas—A to H .
Totals 	
24,471
111
652
656
25,230
51,120
$37,790,385
1,563,324
629,357
462,863
87,030,251
$127,476,180
 W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
KOOTENAY BOUNDARY REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated February 22, 1966.)
Cities—■
Grand Forks.
Greenwood -
Rossland 	
Trail 	
District—Tadanac
Villages—
Fruitvale 	
Montrose	
Warfield 	
Electoral areas—A to E
Totals
Population,
Census
Year 1966
Assessments
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
2,556
911
4,264
11,600
367
$3,311,904
765,818
2,418,640
11,402,705
11,978,699
1,203
1,079
2,255
6,911
1,273,140
1,162,690
2,584,893
30,487,982
31,146
$65,386,471
MALASPINA REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated December 19, 1967.)
District—Powell River	
Electoral areas—A to D
Totals
12,578
3,500
16,078
$30,920,162
13,593,061
$44,513,223
MOUNT WADDINGTON REGIONAL DISTRICT
Districts—
Port Alice	
Port Hardy	
Villages—
Alert Bay	
Port McNeill	
Electoral areas—A to D
(Incorporated June 13, 1966.)
1,383
1,262
795
437
4,519
Totals
8,396
$5,491,849
1,316,169
697,738
791,193
14,045,902
$22,342,851
City—Nanaimo
Villages—
Parksville __
NANAIMO REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated August 24, 1967.)
     15,188
Qualicum Beach
Electoral areas—A to I
Totals 	
1,426
855
21,535
39,004
$15,340,730
2,814,528
3,354,517
103,303,219
$124,812,994
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 31
Cities—
Armstrong 	
Enderby 	
Vernon	
Districts—
Coldstream 	
Spallumcheen 	
Village—Lumby 	
Electoral areas—A to F
NORTH OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated November 9, 1965.)
Population,
Census
Year 1966
Totals
1,426
1,114
11,423
2,660
2,076
879
7,445
27,033
Assessments
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
$1,556,872
1,446,397
22,234,665
4,817,650
2,960,149
1,065,456
11,976,834
$46,058,023
OKANAGAN-SIMILKAMEEN REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated March 4, 1966.)
City—Penticton	
District—Summerland
Villages—
Keremeos	
Oliver 	
Osoyoos ..
Princeton
Electoral areas—-A to H
Totals
15,330
4,585
525
1,563
1,166
2,151
9,975
$51,036,791
8,457,791
785,384
2,787,011
2,682,158
2,277,270
22,857,538
35,295
$90,883,943
PEACE RIVER REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated October 31, 1967.)
City—Dawson Creek	
District—Hudson's Hope
Villages—
Aennofield 	
Chetwynd
Pouce Coupe	
Taylor 	
Town—Fort St. John	
Electoral areas—A to E
Totals 	
12,392
$17,626,916
3,068
1,028,326
989
862,112
1,368
1,588,267
602
492,733
595
658,675
6,749
9,780,250
15,034
74,287,569
40,797
$106,324,848
City—Prince Rupert
Villages—
Masset	
Port Edward
SKEENA A REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated August 17, 1967.)
     14,677
Electoral areas—A to D
Totals	
541
1,006
3,434
19,658
$36,779,455
309,532
1,386,995
11,509,789
$49,985,771
 W 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SKEENA B REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated September 14, 1967.)
Districts—
Kitimat	
Terrace	
Villages—
Hazelton 	
Stewart	
Electoral areas—A to C
Totals 	
Population,
Census
Year 1966
Taxable for
Regional District
Purposes, 1967
9,792
8,637
$38,758,960
11,689,500
403
522
5,786
260,981
941,299
8,945,759
25,140
$60,596,499
SQUAMISH-LILLOOET REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Proposed.)
District—Squamish        4,240
Villages—
Pemberton 	
Lillooet 	
Electoral areas
Totals
172
1,379
4,474
10,265
$11,963,928
256,034
1,405,074
7,737,532
$21,362,568
SUNSHINE COAST REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated January 4, 1967.)
Villages—
Gibsons Landing	
Sechelt	
Electoral areas—A to F	
Totals
1,450
$2,290,200
468
1,360,352
6,072
34,381,476
8,090
$38,032,028
THOMPSON-NICOLA REGIONAL DISTRICT
(Incorporated November 24, 1967.)
City—Kamloops _
Town—Merritt ...
Villages—
Ashcroft 	
Cache Creek
Clinton	
Lytton
Electoral areas—A to N ...
Totals
22,078
4,500
1,154
674
983
414
25,706
$45,928,787
5,440,757
1,134,228
1,370,938
1,096,121
439,248
80,812,235
55,509
$136,222,314
Totals
OCEAN FALLS REGIONAL DISTRICT
       4,723
$23,629,524
Totals
STIKINE REGIONAL DISTRICT
       1,923
$3,880,288
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 33
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, ADMINISTRATION DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 18.
E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
1968.
Sir,—During the year, 121 term borrowing by-laws of municipalities and
regional districts were recommended for the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities. Of this total, 107 were subsequently approved, when necessary, by the
owner-electors, resulting upon adoption in new borrowing authority in the amount
of $30,756,706 for the various categories shown in the table appearing below. The
table summarizes 1967 term borrowing by issuing authorities and includes borrowing under the short-term provisions of the Municipal Act.
This is the first year of reporting for the regional districts. Prior to 1967 there
were no significant borrowings by the regional districts.
Borrowing for the Year 1967
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$1,647,000
1,085,000
315,025
649.500
228,209
60,000
433,180
23,000
$13,037,000
2,650,000
186,000
779,500
4,268,000
243,000
$83,830
295,000
388,200
75,000
$815,000
11,270
$15,582,830
$301,000
875,000
1,145,000
4,342,270
1,764,225
673,000
12,125
3,322,000
4,508,334
288,936
5.415
303,000
,
722,116
24,500
151,516
7.500
211,931
Totals 	
$2,345,500 | $4,440,914
$21,315,016
$1,136,381  | $1,518,895
1'
$30,756,706
Borrowing by the City of Vancouver and by the metropolitan water and sewer
boards is not subject to the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities, and therefore is not included in the table.
There was an increase of 26 approved borrowing by-laws and an increase of
$6,093,318 over the totals of the previous year. Included in the increase are nine
regional district by-laws in the total amount of $2,345,500. A number of very large
sewer projects initiated by several district municipalities contributed to the substantial increase in borrowing compared with 1966. In addition to the new borrowing
proposals, 46 debenture issue by-laws were approved; these by-laws specified the
details of borrowing which had previously been approved in principle only.
Short-term capital borrowings included in the above table, all of which were
bank loans rather than debenture issues, amounted to $440,106. Many preliminary
borrowing approvals were granted for a variety of new local improvement projects.
The financing arrangements for these undertakings have yet to made and are awaiting by-law preparation and completion of construction.
Compared with other years, there was a decrease in the number of by-laws
presented for the assent of the owner-electors at the December, 1967, elections;
this would indicate that the municipalities are feeling the effect of the difficult money
situation, and projects which might otherwise have been advanced for the approval
of the owner-electors have been postponed. In an effort to keep borrowing to a
minimum, the Department has discouraged borrowing other than for priority projects considered to be essential.
 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Trends in borrowing approvals during the last five years are indicated by the
following table:—
Trends in Borrowing Approvals, 1963-67
Year
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
1963„
1964..
1965_
1966.
1967..
$2,345,500
$4,479,226
10,590,529
10,122,759
12,601,600
4,440,914
$7,417,135
11,064,131
13,532,776
10,206,513
21,315,016
$601,000
1,250,540
2,010,500
771,500
1,136,381
$2,066,554
2,326,463
1,833,754
1,083,775
1,518,895
$14,563,915
25,231,663
27,499,789
24,663,388
30,756,706
A number of municipalities have shown interest in the regional districts as a
means of financing current borrowing projects; this involves borrowing by the
regional district on behalf of the municipality and at its sole cost. It is anticipated
that the municipalities will likely be turning more and more to the regional districts
for borrowing assistance. This enables borrowing to be undertaken on a wider
credit base and should result in more readily saleable issues of " package offerings "
of several municipalities as a single issue of the regional district. A greater degree
of flexibility in the types of security offered is anticipated.
Experience in the past year has revealed that one of the important roles played
by regional districts is providing the means by which small unincorporated communities may gain needed services. By making use of the administrative and financial organization available through the regional districts, a small community may
receive at is sole cost such basic services as fire protection and garbage collection or
the provision of other amenities, such as community recreation facilities.
Several regional districts have been empowered to undertake local works and
services in this manner, and a number of designated service areas have been established. Term borrowing has been undertaken to finance a variety of services or
projects, with many more in the preliminary planning stage. The establishment of
the benefiting service area is dependent upon a favourable vote of the property-
owners in the area.
The primary advantage of the service area concept of regional districts is that
it provides a means by which the smaller unincorporated community, whether urban
or rural, may avail itself of any number of needed services without the necessity of
incorporating as either a municipality or an improvement district. The provision
of services through the administrative organization of the regional district should not
be considered to be an alternative to municipal incorporation if the scale of services
needed can best be provided through incorporation as a municipality. All costs
attributable to the service, whether for debt or operation, are met by the benefiting
properties either through taxation or service charges.
During the past year several municipalities exercised their privilege under the
provisions of the Municipalities Assistance Act of applying to the Province for a
guarantee of the payments of principal and interest on debenture issues. Guarantees in the total amount of $2,797,484 were extended to debenture issues last
year, as follows:—
Delta         $99,483
Enderby   55,000
Fruitvale  30,000
Gold River     1,015,000
Houston         13 0,000
Invermere        135,000
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 35
Lillooet	
Mackenzie
Montrose __
OUver	
Qualicum Beach
Terrace 	
Vanderhoof 	
Total
$77,000
570,000
20,000
253,000
78,000
267,000
68,000
$2,797,484
A summary of the amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province under the
Municipalities Assistance Act and the Village Municipalities Assistance Act outstanding as at December 31, 1967, is indicated below:—
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
$730,700
576,500
1,708,000
820,700
$14,436,500
12,229,430
1,909,200
3,708,500
$15,167,200
12,805,930
3,617,200
4,529,200
Totals	
$3,835,900
$32,283,630
12,730,000
733,000
1,840,000
96,000
19,813,000
$36,119,530
12,730,000
1              733,000
Greater Nanaimo Sewer and Drainage District 	
1,840,000
96,000
  	
19,813,000
$3,835,900
$67,495,630
$71,331,530
In addition to the guaranteed debt recorded above, there is also outstanding
under the Vancouver and Districts Joint Sewerage and District Act debenture debt
totalling $24,612,000.
The guarantee of the Province under the Municipalities Assistance Act is
available in respect of the payments of principal and interest on debentures issued
for self-liquidating water and sewer systems only. Proof of self- liquidation is the
granting or substantiating of a certificate of self-liquidation under the Municipal
Act. During 1967 the Inspector of Municipalities granted 10 subsisting or provisional certificates to 10 municipalities. Six of these certificates were for waterworks
systems and four for sewer systems. To date 104 waterworks systems have been
certified as self-liquidating, with 75 subsisting and 29 provisional certificates issued.
Eighty-two sewer systems have been certified, of which 27 have been granted subsisting certificates and 55 provisional certificates. Only a few municipal waterworks
and sewer systems are not certified as self-liquidating. This, therefore, relieves in
most cases the general mill rate of the provision of debt charges, operating, maintenance, and replacement costs.
An active interest in municipal incorporation was shown by a number of
communities. Seven incorporation plebiscites were held, three at the direction of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council following petitions by local incorporation committees and four initiated by the Boards of Trustees of improvement districts. The
Village of Midway was incorporated on May 25, 1967, after a successful poll, and
the Village of South Fort George was incorporated just after the end of the year.
Incorporation was the subject of two plebiscites at Bella Coola and also of plebiscites
 W 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
held at Chase, Ganges, and Sooke, but the three-fifths majority of votes was not
attained and the proposals did not succeed.
At least five other communities are in the process of studying the advantages
of incorporation and have requested relevant information, which indicates there
will be continued interest in municipal incorporation in 1968.
Three improvement districts have been incorporated under the Municipal Act
—Atlin for street-lighting, Cortes Island for electric power, and Cowichan Bay for
fire protection. Both Cortes Island and Cowichan Bay Improvement Districts were
incorporated following a successful poll; a poll was not necessary at Atlin. As
progress is made by the regional districts in providing services on a benefiting area
basis, the requests for incorporation of improvement districts are expected to
diminish.
Fire protection provided by the Princeton Fire Protection District has been
assumed by the Village of Princeton, which resulted in the dissolution of the improvement district incorporated under the Water Act.
A number of municipalities changed status after the 1966 Census figures were
released as substantial increases in population of some of the municipalities were
recorded. Until the 1966 Census figures were available, the population of the
municipalities was based on those reported by the 1961 Census, unless the area had
been incorporated since that date or the municipality extended in area.
The former Villages of Sidney and Smithers were placed in the status of town
municipalities, effective lanuary 1, 1967.
The Village of Comox changed status to a town muncipality, effective April
1, 1967, and the Village of Kinnaird changed status to a town, effective August 5,
1967. In the latter part of the year the Local District of Cache Creek was raised in
status to a village, effective November 28, 1967.
A number of municipalities with conterminous boundaries dealt with the issue
of amalgamation, and the owners of land within six municipalities and one improvement district voted on the issue. The owner-electors of the City of Kamloops and
the Town of North Kamloops voted in the affirmative, and the effective date of the
amalgamation was November 4, 1967. The amalgamation of the Cities of Alberni
and Port Alberni authorized by Letters Patent issued in 1965 became effective
October 28, 1967. Plebiscites on amalgamation of the District of Salmon Arm and
the Village of Salmon Arm and also on amalgamation of the Town of Sidney and
District of North Saanich were unsuccessful. The owners of land in the Quinsam
Heights Waterworks District voted against amalgamation with the District of Campbell River.
Eighteen extensions of boundaries by supplementary Letters Patent were
authorized for the following municipalities:—
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
Municipal Boundary Extensions, 1967
W 37
Area (Acres)
Population
Before
Change
After
Before
Change
After
Cities
Courtenay 	
Courtenay 	
840.00
1,285.60
4,297.00
2,054.00
6,008.15
2,075.00
8,070.00
581.68
1,043.00
952.35
3,856.22
2,207.00
1,187.00
556.00
602.50
882.20
165.663
663.00
445.60
267.40
7.98
318.42
114.90
57.50
480.00
1,298.78
106.00
3.63
11.58
512.00
162.00
7.23
4.95
23.62
55.00
281.20
1,285.60
1,553.00
4,304.98
2,372.42
6,123.05
2,132.50
8,550.00
1,880.46
1,149.00
955.93
3,867.80
2,719.00
1,349.00
563.23
607.45
905.82
220.663
944.20
4,913
5,223
12,392     '
2,556
24,471
11,423
1,262
2,671
2,920
11,405
5,725
3,167
795
1,290
829
1,507
310
78
65
109
8
41
13
425
51
5,223
12,392
2,634
24,536
11,532
Districts
1,262
Towns
Castlegar..   	
2,679
2,961
11,418
5,725
3,592
Villages
Alert Bay.....	
795
Burns Lake 	
Lumby  	
100 Mile House ,
1,290
829
Vanderhoof 	
1,558
The table above shows the adjustment in areas as well as the alteration in population. Primary populations are those established by the 1966 Census, and the
additional populations are those of the extension areas only, determined by local
count.
Seven extension proposals were submitted at the direction of the Minister for
the assent of the owners of land within the extension areas; three of these received
the required three-fifths majority, and supplementary Letters Patent were issued
extending the areas of the municipalities concerned.
Under the provisions of the Local Services Act, a local area for fire protection
was established adjacent to the Village of Parksville pending formation of the
regional district.
Thirty-eight Minutes of Council were prepared appointing members to various
Zoning Boards of Appeal and Boards of Commissioners of Police.
The activities of the Division have become wider in scope with the advent of
regional districts. With nearly the whole of the Province being included within
regional districts, much time was and will be spent dealing with matters pertaining
to them. The review of all types of by-laws, both of the municipalities and the
regional districts, and the analysis of new borrowing proposals, continue to absorb
much of our time. We endeavour to give special attention to the needs and problems of the smaller municipalities, including assistance in the preparation of bylaws and suggestions on various means of dealing with specific problems. Because
of the need to devote so much time to the establishment and development of regional
districts during the past three years, we have to some extent not kept up with this
part of our work. Now that nearly all the regional districts are incorporated, it is
hoped that in the year ahead more time can be spent in broadening and developing
services for the smaller municipalities as a part of an over-all programme of further
improving the standards of local government.
C. H. L. Woodward,
Director, Administration Division.
 W 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA j
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 16, 1968.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—Twenty-five regional districts have now been formed in the Province,
and 12 of these have planning as one of their functions. Of these 12, five have
operating planning offices with a planning staff. Three are using the services of
planning consultants, and the remainder are carrying on a planning programme with
the guidance of the staff of the Division. In some instances we are doing preliminary planning work in conjunction with the staff and members of the Board. There
is still a shortage of qualified planners in Canada, but, in spite of this, most of the
regional districts are managing to attract planners.
There are still four Regional Planning Boards in operation in the Province—
namely, the Lower Mainland Regional Planning Board, the Capital Region Planning Board, the Central Okanagan Regional Planning Board, and the Thompson
Valley Regional Planning Board. Each of these has a planning staff and continues
to operate under the terms of Part XXI of the Municipal Act.
In all, communities containing about 80 per cent of the population of the
Province now have means and access to direct planning advice from local and
regional sources.
It is a requirement of the Municipal Act that as each regional district takes on
planning as a function, a Technical Planning Committee is formed. It is the duty
of this Committee to advise the Regional Board on planning matters and to act as
liaison between the administration of the Board and respective departments of
government and the member muncipalities. The Municipal Act was amended to
provide for additional members to the Committee this year, including a representative from the Forest Service, the Fish and Wildlife Branch, the Parks Branch of the
Department of Recreation and Conservation, and those Provincial Crown agencies
as may be designated by the Minister. These amendments also allow the Minister
to designate employees of such departments and Crown agencies of the Government of Canada to the Technical Planning Committee. Planning officers of the
Division sit on the Technical Planning Committees and also are advising Boards
on planning problems and the institution of planning programmes.
We have drafted interim zoning by-laws and other regulatory controls as a
stopgap to provide a minimum standard until such time as regional districts can
prepare and adopt the most important function, which is the overview of land use
in their areas in the form of regional plans. To this end, we are also drafting subdivision by-laws in conjunction with all the other departments of the Provincial
Government dealing with the subdivision of land and a model zoning by-law which
can be adapted to the needs of the electoral areas of the regional districts. The
Division now has had 20 years' experience in land-use planning of communities
which are evolving into urban areas, and this advice can be used and save the
regional district the time and expense of duplicating this work and allow them to
get on with the preparation of the regional plans.
A great deal of work has been done in the preparation of necessary maps which
legally define the boundaries of the regional districts and the boundaries of the
electoral areas which make up the component parts of the regional district, aside
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 39
from municipalities. The forest inventory base map was used and proved to be an
effective means on which the necessary overlay of boundaries could be drawn. A
calculation of the areas of the regional districts and their population has also been
made. In some of the smaller regional districts we were able to give further aid
by helping to prepare necessary base maps and give assistance to their staff in getting land-use planning on the way.
The Division continued to give advice to small municipalities that are unable
to secure assistance of other professional planners, and a land-use plan and necessary
development control by-laws were prepared for the Village of Clinton. The necessary by-laws have now been adopted by the Council. We have been able to assist
the Village of Masset on the Queen Charlotte Islands in representing the Provincial
and municipal interest and, in co-operation with the Department of National Defence, to help create an integrated military-civilian complex within the village. The
Village Council, Provincial departments, the School Board, and the various Federal
departments dealing with housing now have all agreed on a general layout for the
village. Our usual assistance in vetting and drafting of land-use by-laws for villages
has continued throughout the year.
At the request of the Housing Commissioner, the staff from time to time have
helped in preliminary studies of urban renewal projects for smaller communities
and have occasionally given an opinion on public housing building plans.
A number of municipalities in the Fraser Valley are now considering the
adoption of official community plans. This is following the lead of the District
Municipality of Surrey, which passed an official community plan covering the entire
municipality last year. There also have been negotiations with four resource-
development groups studying the feasibility of incorporating communities under
section 10a of the Municipal Act.
The Division hosted a one-day meeting of all the regional planning officers in
the Province at Parksville prior to the annual meeting of the Planning Institute of
British Columbia, and the Division was active wherever possible to talk to all groups
who are interested in planning.
Zoning regulations for Community Planning Area Number 4, a community of
15,000 people on the western part of the metropolitan area of Victoria, were prepared in conjunction with the staff of the Capital Region Planning Board and
adopted after a number of public meetings and hearings.
One hundred and forty-seven applications for change of zoning were received
by the Division last year, making an increase of 27 from the year before. These
applications varied from fairly simple routine land-use changes to complex developments involving a variety of land uses over a large area. Accordingly, a great deal
of time was taken to study these applications fully so that full technical advice could
be given to the Minister.   In some cases special field trips were necessary.
The Division is continuing preparing subdivision layouts of difficult areas in
community planning areas where large parcels of land have been broken down
without thought of the ultimate urban pattern.
The Division, in co-operation with the National Research Council, provided
a course for building inspectors at Parksville in January. Subjects covered included
the National Building Code, By-laws and Administration, Performance Technique
of Buildings, Foundations and Loads, Wood and Plywood Design Techniques, and
Plastic Pipes and Plumbing Systems. Sixty-three municipal and Provincial inspectors attended the course. Continuing assistance is provided to regional districts
and municipalities with building by-laws and building codes. This year the Department introduced the new short form of the National Building Code.   This simpli-
 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
fied and compact code is designed to provide minimum building standards for
smaller centres and low-density areas, and is being well received by municipal building inspection staffs and the building public.
In some of the community planning areas, notably around Kelowna, Vernon,
Nanaimo, Kamloops, Campbell River, Courtenay, and the Langford-Metchosin
community, there was a sharp increase in the number of dwelling units built. There
was a decrease in the community planning area around the City of Prince George,
but the building activity still remains above average. The number of dwelling units
built in the community planning areas represented over 8 per cent of the housing
stock built in British Columbia in 1967, and the total value of all construction increased 7 per cent from the previous year. Details are shown on the following
table:—
Community Planning Areas
Dwelling
Units
Built,
1967
Dwelling
Units Built
since Areas
Established
Total Value
of All
Construction,
1967
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna)	
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon)	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal)  —
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Langford-Metchosin)	
Community Planning Area Number 6 (Nanaimo)   	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (Prince George) 	
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops)__ 	
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel)	
Community Planning Area Number 11 (around Alberni)	
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)	
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven, near loco)	
Community Planning Area Number 14 (north of Campbell River
to south of Courtenay)    	
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)	
Community Planning Area Number 16 (Sicamous)	
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)	
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60 miles
north of Prince George)  	
Community Planning Area Number 22 (Chase)  	
Community Planning Area Number 23 (Shawnigan)	
Community planning areas now part of a municipality or a regional district  	
Totals	
460
60
10
173
484
153
255
17
6
6
16
226
38
7
46
11
16
2,676
765
585
788
3,414
1,883
2,055
275
39
258
72
973
302
47
105
14
39
26
953
$7,458,752
1,529,891
1,216,984
4,136,706
10,540,748
4,881,258
5,047,806
299,250
86,720
145,698
329,805
4,452,503
868,327
95,872
750,983
11,000
85,170
155,870
651,690
1,993
15,269
$42,745,033
Don South, M.T.P.I.C,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1967
W 41
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, HOUSING AND
URBAN RENEWAL DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 18, 1968.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The Division of Housing and Urban Renewal came into being during
1967 to assist in the general administration of the Housing Act in the provision of
low-cost housing, development of land for housing purposes, and urban modernization and redevelopment.
Through the past years, the Department has taken firm action in recognition
and definition of the municipal problems, aided in determination of the best solutions, and procured co-operative action in relief or eradication wherever the proven
need arose and within the possibilities of sensible financing.
During 1967 three innovations have been introduced in the interests of improving the effective and economic provision of public housing and its management. One
approach was the development of housing for senior citizens in Vancouver by calling
for proposals from developers. The result has been a saving of time in preparation
and anticipated saving of money in the resulting co-operative action. The second
innovation was to accelerate the provision of housing for families receiving social
assistance by direct purchase of existing homes scattered throughout the community.
It is believed that this dispersal concept will aid more rapidly the development and
rehabilitation of families by being assimilated within a normal community atmosphere.
The third departure from past practice has been the creation of the British
Columbia Housing Management Commission. This body will supplant the system
of local housing authorities, which were comprised of private citizens serving voluntarily. The newly established Commission will manage all public housing provided
under government auspices in British Columbia. Federal, Provincial, and municipal
partnership interests will be served by employees, the relationship to the owners
will be direct, and a multiplicity of authorities will be avoided.
The table shows the consolidated position of activity to date of the three major
activities—urban renewal, provision of public housing, and development of land.
 W 42                                                  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Projects Completed or Approved to December 31, 1967
Municipality
Urban Renewal
Housing Units
Land Assembly
135 lots
157 lotsi
50 lotsi
Kimberley
NnfJil
177 lotsi
)  185 lotsi
(   501	
j   50
j  132 lotsi
I
{   30
Trail
Project No. 1
< No. 1—272 lotsi
{ No. 2—208 lots
Prnjpr-f Nn. 1 2
F.P. No. 1—2242
Project No. 2-
F.P. No. 2—1692
Prnjpr-t No. 1
F.P. No. 3—1592    "
F.P. No. 4—2342 .    ..
F.P. No. 5—1882	
Project No. 12..
F.P. No. 6—3762
F.P. No. 7—154
FP Nn  R—137.
p.p. Nn 9—304
FPNn, 10—210
180
Totals
Project No. 2.. ~	
8 projects
2,560 units
1,316 lots
i Sold.           2 Completed.
J. T. Williams,
Director, Housing and Urban Renewal.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British C
olumbia.
1968
1,530-268-1208
  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0365669/manifest

Comment

Related Items