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WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Fifty-first ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1968

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 WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fifty-fir st
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31, 1967
  REPORT OF THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD
Vancouver, B.C., February 23, 1968.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Sir,—As required by subsection (1) of section 58 of the Workmen's Compensation Act,
we now submit our Fifty-first Annual Report
of the Board for the year ended December 31,
1967.
The activities of the Board in the fields of-
claims processing, rehabilitation, rating and
assessing employers under the Act, and accident
prevention continued at a steady pace, as will
be noted in the statements and statistics shown
in this Report.
In most industrial classifications, higher assessment rates were levied during the year to
provide the funds to make increased benefits
possible.
At year-end the Board made major administrative changes to take effect January 1, 1968.
A Claims Advisory Service Department was
established to assist workmen, employers, and
their representatives, who require assistance in
the processing of work injury claims.
The purpose of this new department is to
ensure the highest standards of prompt and
efficient service to workmen and employers
covered by the Act.
The claims advisory service will also provide
information to claimants or their representatives
in person or by correspondence, give advice on
problems referred to it, and explain the reasons
for decisions on claims. The service will pinpoint and inform the Board of Commissioners
of specific problems in adjudication and service
provided by Board departments.
A full-time Board of Review to hear appeals
on claims was established by the Board of Commissioners.
The Board of Review will consist of three
full-time members, who have had considerable
experience in the adjudication of claims, who
are thoroughly trained in Board procedures
and regulations, and who have a sound working
knowledge of the Act. One member will be
appointed to act as Chairman.
The Board of Review will be completely independent of the Claims or other departments.
It will deal with claims and related matters
which come before it, having regard only to the
provisions of the Act, regulations,  and pro
cedures which have been laid down, and the
basic principles of workmen's compensation.
Prior to a review of a claim by the Board of
Review and prior to a decision being reached,
it shall not be discussed by the Chairman, a
Commissioner, or employee of the Board with
the Board of Review or any of its members.
The Board of Review will have the right to
obtain opinions from medical and legal officers
of the Board and independent medical specialists. In addition, the Board of Review will
have full discretion to determine its procedures
and may compel attendance of witnesses and
examine them under oath, compel the production and inspection of documents, and shall
have all of the other powers conferred upon the
Board under section 74 of the Workmen's Compensation Act.
The Board of Review will, over the signature
of the Board of Review Chairman, give in writing full reasons for its decision to the interested
parties concurrently with the announcement of
its decision.
INDUSTRIAL PAYROLLS-
COVERAGE—ASSESSMENTS
During the year 1967 there were 5,830 new
firm accounts established and 774 closed accounts revived, while 5,324 employers ceased
their operations under the Act. Hence at the
end of the year the number of firms on our
active register of employers showed a net gain
of 1,280 from the total at the end of 1966. For
the past 10 years the year-end totals were:—
1958  29,198 1963  33,199
1959  31,085 1964  34,704
1960  31,035 1965   36,321
1961  31,513 1966  37,273
1962  32,123 1967  38,553
Individual employers, partners in a partnership, independent operators, and others who
are not automatically workmen within the
meaning of the Act may apply for optional
personal protection. A total of 8,635 persons
took advantage of this coverage in 1967, comprised of 1,950 independent fishermen, 817
other independent operators, and 5,868 employers' personal coverage. A five-year comparison is as follows:—
 Independent fishermen  	
Independent operators	
Employers' personal coverage	
Totals	
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1,816
1,822
1,965
2,084
1,950
595
697
819
843
817
5,539
6,043
6,122
6,097
5,868
7,950
8,562
8,906
9,024
8,635
Farming is not an industry which is automatically within the scope of Part I of the Act,
but coverage may be extended on application.
During 1967, 319 employers in this industry
covered their workmen for the whole or part of
the year. Of these, 51 were new applications
received in 1967. During the year 46 farm
operators withdrew their applications for coverage.
Farm operators covered.	
New applications received-
Applications withdrawn	
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
255
274
284
297
319
48
51
49
45
51
32
38
33
29
46
Apart from handling these applications for
optional personal protection and new and cancelled firm accounts, our registrations section
also dealt with many other firm accounts with
respect to changes in name, address, or indus
trial classification.    In total, 25,119 firm accounts were processed during the year.
The chart below illustrates the trend in assessable payrolls within the past few years:—
CHART SHOWING TOTAL INDUSTRIAL PAYROLLS ASSESSED UNDER THE ACT
EACH YEAR FOR THE YEARS  1958 TO  1967
During the year 1967 the Board's staff of 27
field auditors submitted 48,820 reports showing
the audited assessable payroll of employers engaged in industries within the scope of Part I
of the Act. This entailed 26,555 visits to
employer's premises, audit of 3,830 records
brought into the Board offices by employers,
and audit of 18,435 statutory declarations received by mail. The total assessable payroll
for the year 1966 amounted to $2,807,959,853,
which was over $468 million hiaher than the
total for 1965. Some of this increase, however,
was due to the amendment of the Act in November, 1965, which raised the maximum from
$5,000 to $6,600 with respect to the annual assessable earnings for an individual workman.
A final figure for payrolls assessed in 1967 will
not be available until the end of this year, but
preliminary estimates indicate that it will be at
least $152 million higher than that for 1966.
For the past 10 years the total assessable pay-
roll*. havp. Keen as follows-	
 1958 $1,453,370,779
1959       1,601,220,486
1960    1,659,215,768
1961  1,680,946,3 82
1962  1,771,175,030
1963      1,881,589,546
1964   2,060,172,704
1965  2,339,713,672
1966  2,807,959,853
1967 (estimate)  2,960,500,000
The maximum earnings, for purposes both of
assessment and disability compensation, are
presently $6,600 per annum.
The Statistics Department maintains an index
of the distribution of workmen's earnings by the
amount of earnings. The progress of this index
over the past three years is shown below:—
Percentage of workmen earning more than $6,600_
Percentage of workmen earning more than $7,600..
1965
1966
1967
14.6
21.6
28.4
7.9
10.2
13.3
WORK INJURY CLAIMS
For the third successive year, the Claims
Department processed more than 90,000 new
claims during 1967.
The number of new claims processed during
the year totalled 93,659, in addition to those
reopened or continuing from previous years.
Fatal claims totalled 211, a decrease of five
under the previous year.
The volume of prior claims in which there is
continuing or further disability from an injury
or disease increases each year, and these claims
require as much or more consideration than
new claims reported.
The total number of injuries reported in the
years 1958 to 1967, as well as those which
proved fatal, is shown in the next column.
INJURIES
REPORTED
Total
Fatal
1958...
  75,039
1958..  	
... 208
1959...
  75,982
1959	
... 262
1960...
  73,437
1960	
... 212
1961...
  73,517
1961	
... 199
1962...
  76,617
1962	
... 204
1963...
  81,828
1963	
... 209
1964...
  87,827
1964	
.. 215
1965...
  94,632
1965 	
.. 253
1966
..     .... 95,322
1966	
... 216
1967___
   93.659
1967	
... 211
The number of claims for industrial diseases
decreased from the previous year. Particulars
of the 821 new claims under this heading are
set forth in Table E.
The following chart shows the number of work injuries reported annually and the number of
time-loss cases receiving first payment during each of the past 10 years:—
CHART SHOWING THE TOTAL NUMBER OF WORK INJURIES REPORTED AND THE TOTAL
NUMBER OF CLAIMS HAVING THE FIRST PAYMENT OF TIME-LOSS COMPENSATION
DURING EACH OF THE YEARS  1958 TO  1967.
INJURIES
90,000
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
0
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TOTAL WORK  INJURIES
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1958
1959  1960  1961  1962  1963
1964
1965  1966  1967
 A daily analysis is maintained of all time-loss
claims snowing the number of days from date
of lay-off to date of first payment of time-loss
compensation to injured workmen. This is
summarized monthly as to the reasons for any
extended delay. Approximately 37 per cent of
claimants received the first payment within 14
day of lay-off. Where delays occur, the main
reasons are the incompleteness of information
supplied on the forms filed by workmen or discrepancies in the information supplied by the
workmen, employers, and doctors. Other delays are caused by the late filing of workmen's
and employers' forms. This results in a great
deal of further time-consuming correspondence
or other inquiry before the claims can be adjudicated.
Average time in 1967 from lay-off to date of
first payment of time-loss was 20 days.
Throughout the year a Travelling Medical
Board visited specific areas in the Province to
hold medical examinations and discussions with
workmen in respect to their claims. This examining board visited 27 examination centres and
conducted 885 medical examinations. In addition to the above, claims field officers travelled
throughout the Province to interview workmen
with respect to their claims problems and to obtain further information that might be of assistance in adjudication of claims. In all, these
officers handled queries on 1,536 claims, necessitating interviews with workmen, pensioners,
employers, doctors, and other parties.
During the year the Board of Review gave
thorough study to 4,118 claims and conducted
183 hearings on claims. Hearings are held at
the request of the workman, union agent, solicitor, or employer. At times the Board of Review also may request a workman, an employer,
or a witness to appear in an endeavour to obtain
further information that may help to establish
the claim.
The Medical Review Panel conducted 94
medical examinations and appeals during 1967.
The Medical Review Panel is established under
section 55 of the Act to consider appeals made
by workmen or employers involving bona fide
medical disputes. Results of these appeals are
given in detail to the workmen concerned, and
the Medical Review Panel certificate is conclusive as to the matters certified and is binding on
the Board.
The worst industrial disaster in 1967 was the
Natal coal-mine explosion, which occurred
April 3rd. This tragic accident took the lives of
15 miners and 10 more were injured. It was
the worst coal-mine disaster in British Columbia since 1930, when 45 men lost their lives in
an explosion in the Blakeburn coal mine.
Because of the enormity of the disaster to the
small community of Natal, the Board dispatched
a claims field officer to the Natal area immediately to assist widows and injured workmen
with their compensation claims.
The total compensation cost of the Natal
disaster was $504,105.76. After representations had been made by the British Columbia
Mining Association and the Crows Nest Industries Limited, the Board of Commissioners
agreed to charge 50 per cent of the costs involved to the reserve fund set up under section
34 (1) (b) of the Workmen's Compensation Act.
Medical aid paid for injured workmen covers
hospital costs, medical fees, drugs, nurses, and
surgical supplies. Physiotherapy treatments are
also given to injured workmen at the Workmen's Compensation Board Rehabilitation Centre and other centres in outlying areas. When
required, transportation and subsistence allowances are paid for workmen while undergoing
medical examinations and treatment.
The amount paid for medical aid for injured workmen in 1967 includes:—
Hospital costs  $2,582,033
Fees to medical and other practitioners  2,114,372
Nurses, drugs, and surgical supplies  447,905
Physiotherapy  648,753
Transportation and subsistence  321,817
Total  $6,114,880
While the "medical aid only" category of
claims represents 65 per cent of the total
number of injuries, less than 3 per cent of the
compensation dollar is paid out to workmen
involved in this kind of accident. " Temporary
total disability " cases (popularly called " time
loss" accidents) represent 33 per cent of the
injuries and take 50 per cent of the compensation dollar. " Permanent disability " cases,
while representing only 1.7 per cent of the total
injuries, take up 34 per cent of the compensation dollar. Relatively, fatalities occur rarely,
only two-tenths of 1 per cent of the total injuries, but then account for 13 per cent of the
compensation dollar.
 TOTAL COMPENSATION DOLLARS
WM  MEDICAL AID ONLY CASES
_■   TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY CASES
rnn-j permanent disability cases
II!   FATALITIES
15,000,000
10,000,000
5,000,000
1963
1967
 SILICOSIS, PNEUMOCONIOSIS, AND ASBESTOSIS
Part I of the following statement shows the
number of annual chest X-rays and medical
examinations made for the years 1963 to 1967,
inclusive. Annual examinations and certification of fitness certificates are required of
workmen working in mines and tunnels where
exposure to dust conditions is or may be
hazardous.
Discussions have been held with the Chief
Inspector of Mines under the Mines Regulation
Act with a view to amending and up-dating
present regulations applicable to the year 1968.
Part II shows the number of workmen partially or totally disabled by silicosis each year.
Figures are also given to show the number
of pensioners' deaths arising from silicosis or
other causes and a comparison of costs involved
for the five-year period.
Number of chest X-rays and
inations	
Number of first-time examinations	
Number of men not qualified for certification^
PART II
Pensions granted workmen with silicosis-.
Number of pensioners who have died—
15
1964
22
1965
15
1966
18
1967
6,997
6,395
8,140
11,169
9,031
2,589
2,498
3,669
5,649
3,444
106
74
114
158
81
15
from silicosis    .   	
15
9
13
328
$13,102
$348,576
$83,398
9
11
323
$22,039
$346,633
$90,178
6
11
324
$8,931
$286,407
$59,300
8
from other causes	
Total number of pensions being paid	
13
          328
16
315
Total cost of silicosis expenditures—
Time loss.             	
$9,451
$8,233
P.P.D.s and fatals	
....    $237,406
$300,859
Medical aid	
   $95,381
$74,448
 REHABILITATION CENTRE
The Board, through its Rehabilitation Centre,
provides out-patient rehabilitative treatment for
injured workmen. The treatment staff has remained fairly constant and consists of 6 medical
officers and a radiologist, 19 physiotherapists,
9 occupational therapists, 9 remedial gymnasts,
and 8 work officers.
Departments of Physiotherapy, Occupational
Therapy, and Remedial Gymnastics have been
well developed for many years and continue to
play a very important and necessary part in the
treatment programme. However, the Industrial
Department was only established in June, 1966,
and has been gradually expanded to meet the
increased demands made upon it. Activities are
designed to provide work of an interesting and
productive nature and are most useful in the
latter stages of recovery. Although specific
exercises continue as part of the treatment programme, the emphasis in the Industrial Department is on work that improves the workman's
strength and work tolerance and is not directed
to the specific injury. In addition to work areas
for sheet metal, welding, wrought-iron work,
construction, and motor mechanics, special
equipment has been added to meet the requirements of loggers. A Pan-Abode hut was purchased for erection and disassembling by patients who are carpenters and construction
workers.    This department is  able to  make
available many types of work projects which
are interesting and productive in nature.
A special programme has been developed
for back disabilities. By making use of films,
lectures, demonstrations, and printed booklets,
conventional treatment is provided for the
acute stage of the disability, followed by specific instruction in bending and lifting techniques, including their practical application on
suitable work projects. It is believed that by
providing treatment and information in regard
to the care of the back, an injured workman
can resume employment with less likelihood
of a recurrence.
The number of patients treated in hospitals
is much lower than in previous years. There
is no longer any necessity for Board therapists
to treat workmen in the acute hospitals because adequate treatment is now provided by
members of the hospital staff. Therefore,
Board therapists are only required to attend
patients in the convalescent hospitals where
long-term cases require attention.
The centre continues to assume its responsibility to the community by contributing to the
education of paramedical personnel. University and hospital authorities are given co-operation in the training of interns and nurses in
physiotherapy and occupational therapy.
Statistics for the years 1966 and 1967:—
1966 1967
1. Number of patients admitted        3,599 3,468
2. Average daily attendance           466 428
3. Average length of stay per patient 32.5 days 31.1 days
4. Number of patients treated in hospital           395 46
5. Average number of patients treated in hospitals
per day             31 14
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
All sections of this department were very
active during 1967. A total of 9,834 interviews
was held—5,349 interviews with workmen referred, 3,028 interviews with employers, and
1,457 calls were made to the various vocational
schools, trade unions, government agencies, and
others.
The rehabilitation officers made 84 field trips,
44 of which were confined to Vancouver Island,
the balance to Northern British Columbia,
Kootenays, Okanagan, and Fraser Valley areas.
The figures below will indicate a slight increase in case load from the previous year, but
not a large variation in the five-year period 1963
to 1967:—
 1963
Cases accepted for vocational service  248
Cases carried over from previous year  533
Total cases dealt with  781
Returned to former employer  78
Returned to work with other employer  142
Self-employed  11
Total cases closed as rehabilitated  231
Cases closed as not rehabilitated  72
Number of interviews with claimants   5,799
Number of interviews with employers  2,185
Number of interviews with other agencies  1,104
1964
324
486
1965
349
508
1966
387
418
1967
437
456
810
857
805
893
63
156
19
84
203
17
83
194
13
93
207
21
238
304
290
321
64
135
59
119
6,022
2,199
1,109
6,154
2,359
1,179
5,471
2.804
1,168
5.349
3,028
1,457
Orientation meetings of clinic patients continued through 1967, with a total of nearly 2,000
attending. The patients demonstrate a keen
interest in these meetings, asking numerous
questions and having many of their problems
resolved at that point.
VOCATIONAL TRAINING
The Board sponsored vocational training for
86 workmen during the past year in a wide
variety of occupations. The average cost of
training these workmen was $553.53 excluding
administration costs.
In addition to the 86 sponsored workmen
during 1967, there were 32 in training from the
previous year. One hundred and seven training
cases were closed during the year, and of this
number, 61 are presently employed as trained,
24 employed other than as trained, 22 not rehabilitated.
During 1967 the department conducted its
second survey of the Board's vocational training programme covering the period January 1,
1959, to December 31, 1965. The previous
review was undertaken in 1960 and covered the
period 1943 to 1958, inclusive.
Questionnaires were forwarded to 393 persons who had received and completed vocational
training between the years 1959 and 1965. Of
this number, 353 workmen responded, or 90 per
cent of total.
The following analysis indicates the good results of the work of this department in that 84
per cent of the workmen have benefited by the
training programmes. That it is appreciated is
demonstrated by the many letters of appreciation which the Board has received from workmen who have been rehabilitated.
Of the total of 607 Board-sponsored training
cases during the years 1959 to 1965, 214 were
not canvassed because their addresses were un
available or for other reasons.   An analysis of
the results of the survey is as follows:—
Workmen trained   607
Questionnaires sent  393
Questionnaires returned 353 (90%)
Questionnaires not returned1 40 (10%)
Questionnaires not sent2   214
Workmen employed as trained 223 (63%)
Workmen who have worked as trained .75 (21%)
Workmen employed in other occupations	
 48 (14%)
Workmen unemployed 7 (2%)
1 Thirty-seven of these workmen were employed when rehabilitation records were closed.
- Reasons: Workmen employed when rehabilitation records
closed, training not completed, addresses unavailable, deceased,
etc.
The recent structural changes in the employment service of Canada is being watched with
interest by all agencies. Meetings with regional
and metropolitan officers of Canada Manpower
indicate an awareness on the part of these officials of the need to adopt the rehabilitative approach which, along with appointment of rehabilitation officers, will provide a greatly improved service for employers, agencies, and the
working population. These meetings will continue during 1968 and should result in a better
co-ordination of services and an improved referral system.
All Canadian Workmen's Compensation
Boards were invited to send delegates to a meeting of Chief Rehabilitation Officers held in the
Ontario Workmen's Compensation Hospital and
Rehabilitation Centre at Downsview, Ont., May
9 to 11, 1967. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the Ontario and Saskatchewan Boards.
Eight Provinces, including British Columbia,
were represented at this three-day meeting, the
objective being discussions of work standards,
staff-training, vocational training, and problems
that are common to all rehabilitation departments.
in
 ACCIDENT PREVENTION, INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE, VENTILATION,
DUST CONTROL, AND FIRST AID
In 1967 the department continued a high
level of activity. Reports of the various sections show that in most areas, whether of routine
work or special projects, the year was the busiest
in the history of the department.
A satisfactory experience with the Accident
Prevention Regulations, adopted March 1,1966,
continued to be evident in 1967, and these regulations are reported to have been a model for
some other jurisdictions.
During the year special attention was given
to the problem of excessive dust evolution in
rock-crushing plants within the scope of the
Workmen's Compensation Act for accident-prevention purposes. The adoption of satisfactory
dust-control measures in such rock-crushers is
now effective, though the situation is under continuing review and scrutiny.
Consultations were held with committees
from industrial and management groups for the
purpose of standardizing the application of requirements of operator guarding of certain yarding, loading, and log-skidding equipment. The
constructive assistance of the conferees from
industry, manufacturers, and labour has resulted
in the development of a more standardized
approach to compliance with the appropriate
regulations.
During the year the department received, reviewed, and processed minutes of 8,659 safety
committee meetings in industry. The extensive
film library recorded 2,135 bookings and, in
addition to regular mailing of accident-prevention promotional material, the department filled
3,348 specific requests for literature.
During the year the department commenced
quarterly publication of a special digest of articles drawn from various sources which were
considered to have a special significance for the
industry of British Columbia.
In co-operation with the Public Information
Department, posters, data sheets and descriptive
material, pamphlets, booklets, programmes, and
handbooks were devised, revised, and published.
The department continued to enjoy excellent
co-operation and cordial relations with representatives of labour, with employers, individually
and as represented by associations, and with
government departments and other official
organizations in the Province and in other jurisdictions.
The standard of performance in all matters
associated with accident prevention in industry
within the scope of the Board's inspection continued to improve.
INSPECTION
A total of 19,141 inspections was made in
1967, constituting the largest number in the
history of the Board. In the course of these
inspections, 21,572 orders were issued for correction of hazardous conditions and 2,049
orders to improve first-aid facilities.
The inspection staff was maintained at 29
members and stationed in centres contiguous
to the principal concentrations of industrial
activities throughout the Province. One inspector was stationed in the Terrace area to give
more effective coverage of the expanding wood-
products activities in that region.
The latter part of 1967 saw a slow-down in
the forest industry in the Interior due to labour-
management disputes and a consequent work
stoppage. The inspection staff so idled was
diverted to other industries in a temporary capacity.
The Duncan Dam was completed during the
year, and it is gratifying to note that this project
was completed without loss of life and with a
minimal number of injuries reported. Likewise,
the High Arrow Dam project proceeded toward
early completion and also maintained a high
standard of safety and to date no fatalities have
occurred. Both the Mica Dam and the Portage
Mountain projects are entering stages where
special vigilance is necessary, and the staff is
giving these undertakings particular attention
and service.
In the opening months of the year a study
was made of the accident toll prevailing in the
forest industry, particularly the logging aspect.
As a result of this review, the Board approved
a series of workshop programmes aimed to assist control of the losses suffered in this phase
of industry. These workshops have to date attracted a great number of fallers and buckers,
and it is confidently anticipated the result will
justify the efforts expended.
Throughout the Province a high level of activity continues in installation of sewer and water
projects within the municipalities. The inspection staff has devoted a great deal of time in
ensuring that the excavation work is carried out
without undue risk to workmen. Despite this
coverage, accidents continue to occur, indicating
that insufficient attention is being paid by the
installers to the hazards inherent in this type of
work. It was necessary on several occasions
for the Board to order employers to remove
workmen from hazardous locations until dangerous conditions had been corrected.
11
 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMEN
«»MHHHHBHHHnHH
The use of personal protective equipment is an
important factor in the protection of workers from
injury in the thousands of industrial operations
throughout the Province.
The Board's accident prevention regulations give
particular emphasis to this phase of worker protection.
Some of the more widely used types are pictured
here being worn by safety-conscious working men
and women who regard their personal protective
equipment as a good friend to have around.
SAFETY    GOGGLES — used   and
valued by thousands of B.C. workers.
JEjUL    P_?OT_7^7W.r    Mf.FE-r     ,.,•__,_
FAD?   <SU1T?T fi. mv./_>/-.   the inne
rtrnVF.S—91   n,r r*„t nf nil i
 I     ■
A Good Friend of the B.G. Worker
HARD HATS—spike hammer dropped
150 feet   .    .    .    workman was saved
from injury.
LIFE-JACKETS — scores of boom
men and others who work around
water owe their lives to buoyancy
devices.
FOOT   GUARDS   AND    SAFETY
BOOTS — protect  feet from   injury.
 As in the past, the staff attended and lectured
at seminars, workshops, and similar gatherings,
with accident-prevention practices and principles as the basic theme.
Staff-training is maintained constantly, and
frequent discussion meetings are held to review
new equipment and procedures in an ever-
changing industrial world.
A slight decrease in projects involving rock
removal reflected in the number of workmen
applying for and obtaining blasting certificates.
Two hundred and seventy examinations were
held, and 230 certificates of competency were
issued. Three certificates were revoked for infractions of the regulations.
INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
A total of 304 inspections and investigations
was made during 1967 to identify and evaluate
industrial health hazards. Means of control
were developed for unsatisfactory health risks
to prevent industrial diseases.
A total of 562 body-fluid samples from lead-
workers was analysed in the laboratory to determine lead absorption levels. Results of these
determinations continue to show a lead problem
in the manufacture of lead storage batteries and
lead salvage operations. Atmospheric tests
taken at an indoor pistol firing range and determination of lead absorption levels of employees clearly demonstrated a lead hazard and
a need for improvement in ventilation for hazard
control.
A total of 296 body-fluid samples from mercury-handlers was analysed to determine absorption of this toxic metal. Absorption levels
were generally within a satisfactory range.
Cadmium exposures in silver soldering operations were evaluated following reports of fatal
exposures in operations outside British Columbia. Results confirm the hazard under conditions of poor ventilation. The normal ventilation requirements for soldering operations control cadmium concentrations within satisfactory
range.
The health aspects of the application of zinc-
rich protective coatings on steel and the zinc
oxide fume concentrations created by welding
and torch cutting treated steel were measured
at several stages during steel-hull fabrication to
ensure compliance with the regulations.
Vapour exposures during the coating and curing of plywood panels with urethane were evaluated. Crude urethanes cause unsatisfactory
atmospheric conditions even under conditions
of enclosure and ventilation. Improved-quality
urethanes eliminate the unsatisfactory risk under
conditions of good ventilation.
Explosions in chemical laboratories involving
strong oxidizing agents has focused attention on
precautions for handling unstable compounds
and protection for chemists.
Dermatitis continues to account for the greatest number of industrial-disease claims recorded.
Some of the mysteries of dermatitis occurring
in some industries have been resolved by the
excellent efforts of the dermatologists, but unusual sensitivities do not lend themselves to prevention until detected.
Detailed noise surveys were made at 272 locations in 50 industrial operations to evaluate the
noise exposures and to ensure compliance with
the regulations for hearing conservation. Surveys were also made to determine the attenuation achieved by the installation of muffling devices on heavy-duty equipment and power-saws,
the use of acoustic treatment on walls and ceilings, the installation of acoustically treated
operating-booths, and by the use of resilient
mountings on large compressor units. Greater
emphasis was placed on the need for pre-employment and periodic routine audiometric testing of workmen in noisy operations. Routine
audiometric testing of workmen exposed to
high-level noise in industry is receiving considerable acceptance by industry as a necessary
part of a hearing conservation programme.
Several lecture demonstrations on the methods of evaluating noise and its effect on hearing
were presented to interested groups at plants
and conventions. Some noise evaluation work
was done in co-operation with the Department
of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
DUST CONTROL AND VENTILATION
A total of 132 inspections was made during
1967 to evaluate exposures to pneumoconiosis-
producing dusts and to determine the necessity
for or effectiveness of dust-control measures installed.
Dust surveys were made as follows:—
Rock-crushing   21 surveys at 18 plants
Asphalt plants     8 surveys at 12 operations
Foundries   17 surveys at 12 plants
Assay grinding-rooms.    9 surveys at 5 operations
Construction tunnels...  18 surveys in adits at 4 projects
Industrial plants   13 surveys at 11 operations
Total  86
During construction period of underground
rock tunnels, workmen employed in specified
categories require a certificate of fitness. Certificates were checked for 627 workmen, with
the number of valid certificates being 615 or
98 per cent.
Dust concentrations are determined by the
konimeter method at underground construction
projects, dry-rock section of fertilizer plants,
 stone cutting and dressing operations, assay At underground construction projects  the
grinding operations, asphalt-mixing plants, rock- average of the dust concentrations follow:—
crushing plants,  and industrial plants  where mjmbeR OF PARTICLES PER CUBIC
there was exposure to rock dust.   In evaluating CENTIMETRE OF AIR
dust   Concentrations   obtained   with   the   koni- year Drilling      Mucking     General
meter, the figure of 300 particles or less per 1967  453        241 226
cubic centimetre of air is used as a level that 1966  310        354 154
can be obtained under good conditions of venti- 1965    334        348 107
lation and dust control. 1964   262 492 160
Dust conditions at underground construction projects are indicated by the following graph.
AVERAGE DUST CONCENTRATIONS AT UNDERGROUND  CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
Satisfactory results on dust control have been
achieved at a tunnel project with ground support being supplied by application of spray-
concrete material. Six surveys were made during the year, with the average dust concentration
being 298 particles per c.c. of air.
Tests were made for noxious gas and combustible gases at tunnelling operations for irrigation, water mains, and railway-construction
projects. The ventilating' systems were providing an adequate dilution factor.
Dust-control systems have been installed by
36 portable and 2 non-portable rock-crushing
plants. Surveys made at 10 of the above plants
gave an over-all average dust concentration of
224 particles per c.c. of air. For comparison
the average at 8 plants with partial or no mechanical exhaust was 783 particles per c.c. of
air.
A graph comparison of plants with effective
mechanical means of dust control and those
without effective mechanical dust control follows:—
15
 AVERAGE DUST CONCENTRATION IN PLANT WORK AREA OF
ROCK-CRUSHING PLANTS, 1967
The majority of portable asphalt-mixing
plants require further work on dust control to
reduce concentrations to a satisfactory level.
Two assay grinding-rooms with adequate exhaust from partial hoods at grinding equipment
achieved satisfactory results on dust control.
Dust exposures are evaluated by means of
the midget impinger air-sampling apparatus in
iron and steel foundries and in plants which
use asbestos fibre in a manufacturing process.
Conditions are considered satisfactory if dust
concentrations are 5,000,000 particles or less
per cubic foot of air.
In foundries, after sand has been conditioned
for use by addition of water, binding agents,
etc., dust conditions have been found satisfactory at moulding operations, where the major
portion of the crew is employed, and at core-
making operations. Surveys indicate that, for
effective dust control, exhaust ventilation is
required at mechanical shake-out operations
handling dry or partially dry sand, on screening
operations (rotary or shaker), on dry-sand
transfer systems (conveyor or elevator), and
at the sand-mixer unit.
In foundry cleaning sections, cleaning of castings carried out by an abrasive blasting process
is usually within an enclosed unit equipped
with a self-contained exhaust system which, with
proper maintenance, provides adequate dust
control. Dust surveys indicate exhaust ventilation is required, for effective control, at tumbling-mills, grinders (portable, pedestal, and
swing), chippers, and at abrasive cut-off wheels.
Several foundries require further work on
dust control at mechanical shake-out screens
and at some cleaning operations.
In manufacturing plants handling asbestos
fibre, dust-control measures are necessary at
hammer-mills, mixer, trim saws, and polishing
operations. In general, surveys have indicated
dust control is satisfactory.
FIRST AID
The year 1967 has been the busiest in the
history of the First Aid Section.
Throughout the year its efforts have been
directed toward improving the efficiency of industrial first-aid attendants in the field.
In this regard the section co-operated with
the Industrial First Aid Attendants Association
in conducting symposiums on the emergency
care and transportation of the injured, which
were held at Nanaimo, Victoria, Kamloops,
Kelowna, Trail, Cranbrook, Terrace, and Vancouver. In all, some 600 first-aid attendants,
ambulance and rescue personnel attended the
symposiums, and our appreciation is expressed
for the excellent co-operation of the local medical practitioners and hospital authorities in the
various areas who made these meetings possible
and successful.
The section assisted the St. lohn Ambulance
training-school throughout the year in arranging for the conduct and examination of some
127 industrial first-aid classes with a total enrolment of 2,580 students. The section arranged
 and conducted 2,654 examinations throughout
the year, and 2,371 students qualified as industrial first-aid attendants. As of December 31,
1967, there are 4,111 certified industrial first-
aid attendants in the Province.
Special classes and examinations were arranged and conducted in Edmonton and Calgary
to assist those firms engaged in the petroleum
industry in Northern British Columbia in complying with the regulations and making trained
personnel available to their employees in isolated areas.
Competitive training under simulated conditions was continued in 1967, and the section
assisted in sponsoring and conducting seven
area competitions at Victoria, Nanaimo, Kamloops, Nelson, Fernie, Terrace, and Vancouver.
The Provincial finals were conducted in Trail.
During the year a new training manual for
industrial first-aid attendants was in preparation, and it is expected this project will be completed in mid-1968.
The section staff conducted some 120 special
surveys and inspections of industrial operations
during the year to assist industry in providing
adequate first-aid facilities and ascertaining
future needs of individual plants.
The customary good relations were experienced with management and labour, and the
section is appreciative of the interest, co-operation, and support rendered by the various associations which have contributed greatly to its
activities during the year.
TECHNICAL SERVICES
The Technical Services Section provides technical advisory assistance to the Accident Preven
tion Department and industry on matters pertaining to accident-prevention control. Throughout the year the section had a very heavy work
load in all phases of its activity.
Some of the areas of involvement include a
continuing review of
(a) hazards of new and existing equipment
and processes;
(b) the effect of technological and procedural changes affecting the safety of
workmen including recommendation of
appropriate techniques of control of
hazards;
(c) the efficacy of, and the need for, revisions or additions to regulations;
(d) the findings and activity of other jurisdictions and authorities in the accident-
prevention field; and
(e) participation in
(i) the preparation and dissemination of educational and promotional
materials for staff and industry; and
(ii) departmental staff-training programmes.
The section represents the Board on several
committees of the Canadian Standards Association in the preparation and development of
national standards pertaining to safe work
practices and equipment.
In addition to work in the accident-control
field, the section, through the department, provides technical assistance to the Board on
problems related to the expansion and maintenance of plant facilities and systems-and-pro-
cedure work.
PUBLIC INFORMATION
The communicative process is important to
the efficient operation of workmen's compensation in the Province.
In recognition of this factor, the Board carries
out informational programmes to help workmen, employers, doctors, and others affected by
the legislation to become better informed on
their responsibilities under the Act.
During the year an interim edition of the
" Information for Workmen " handbook was
published. A total of 75,000 copies was printed,
and approximately 1,000 union locals in the
Province were advised that quantities of this
publication were available without charge from
the Board. Revisions to this handbook will be
made in 1968, and sufficient copies will be
printed for circulation to every workman under
the Act who requests a copy.
The " Information for Employers " booklet
was revised, and copies were sent to every new
employer registered with the Board. A revised
edition of this booklet will be completed in
1968, and copies will be forwarded to all employers under the Act.
The Board continued to publish the " News
Bulletin," and 11 issues were circulated during
the year to persons interested in being kept informed on developments in workmen's compensation and industrial accident prevention. The
number of copies of the December, 1967, issue
mailed on request was 16,074. During the year
a total of 179,925 copies was circulated.
To commemorate its 50th anniversary, the
Board published a 24-page historical brochure
entitled "50 Years of Service." A total of
25,000 copies was printed and circulated to
17
 interested persons throughout the Province.
The anniversary of workmen's compensation in
the Province was publicized on Board stationery, posters, and in other literature. In addition, articles on the development of the legislation appeared in numerous newspapers, and
labour and management periodicals.
The Public Information and Accident Prevention Departments co-operated in the production of industrial safety literature. Fluorescent
posters, booklets, pamphlets, accident diagrams,
and other material were designed, edited, and
published for circulation by the Accident Prevention Department to industry. A 17-minute
safety film entitled " Men around Conveyor
Belts " was also produced. This sound and
colour film featured the 3-mile conveyor belt
which was used to transport material for the
construction of the W. A. C. Bennett Dam at
Portage Mountain.
Editorial assistance was provided by the
Board to the Forest Products Safety Conference
Planning Committee. A 40-page booklet was
prepared of proceedings of the conference which
was held at Vancouver in April and attended by
over 400 delegates from British Columbia and
the Western States. The Board also provided
promotional assistance to the British Columbia
Safety Council and Industrial First Aid Attendants Association of British Columbia.
A series of advertisements in the " Fisherman " publication was begun, advising independent fishermen of the coverage available to them
under the Act.
The Board conducted numerous speaking engagements and tours of its facilities during the
year. Interested groups were given the opportunity of learning about the operations of the
Board and the legislation under which it functions.
The Board wishes to express its appreciation
to the publishing media of the Province for their
efforts in furthering the cause of industrial accident prevention.
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
During 1967 the head office medical staff has
supervised, reviewed, and advised on an ever-
increasing number of claims for injury and recurring disability; 2,651 physical examinations
were carried out at the head office, of which
1,429 were for the assessment of permanent
partial disability.
The medical officers, in rotation, have made
17 trips to the outlying areas of the Province,
visiting 27 centres. A total of 885 medical
examinations was carried out on these visits.
Assistance wherever possible has continued
to be given to injured workmen by a medical
officer who makes regular visits to the general
and convalescent hospitals in conjunction with
a representative of the Claims Department.
These regular visits have proven beneficial both
to the workman and to the Board in alleviating
anxiety and clarifying many problems.
The committee struck in 1966 by the British
Columbia Medical Association to study the
implications of pre-existing conditions in relation to the application of section 7 (5) of the
Workmen's Compensation Act had several meetings, as reported last year, and presented a final
report to the Commissioners. Their memorandum of procedure was accepted and approved
by the Board, and it is hoped the new procedure
will alleviate some of the difficulties that had
formerly been experienced.
The Board's staff has continued to co-operate
with the Trauma Research Unit and the Department of Continuing Medical Education of the
University of British Columbia in distribution
to the medical profession of bulletins on matters
of interest in the treatment of traumatic injuries
throughout the year. This series of seminars
has also been sent to the other Workmen's Compensation Boards across Canada and has been
received with considerable interest.
As in previous years, the medical officers
have attended meetings of their respective associations and conventions, keeping up to date
with the new concepts in medicine and new
methods of treatment as they developed.
A close rapport with the British Columbia
Medical Association and with the medical profession at large has been maintained through
regular meetings with the liaison committee of
the British Columbia Medical Association,
where mutual problems are discussed, with benefit to all.
Dr. J. Ross Davidson retired at the end of
1967, and Dr. T. Stewart Perrett was appointed
Chief Medical Officer.
 BENEFITS TO PENSIONERS
The number of persons in receipt of pensions continued to increase during 1967:—
Dec. 31,1963 Dec. 31, 1964 Dec. 31, 1965   Dec. 31, 1966 Dec. 31, 1967
Widows               1,959 1,965 2,026 2,041 2,040
Children                  2,141 2,167 2,728 2,828 2,908
Mothers                      76 73 73 72 74
Fathers  ______                 13 13 11 15 15
Other dependents                  23 20 20 19 18
Workmen receiving permanent disability pensions              11,356 11,603 11,747 11,842 12,016
Capitalized   reserves   required   for
pensions (excluding silicosis)  $91,170,190 $93,725,419    $129,278,856 $139,920,380    $148,645,776
Capitalized   reserves   required   for
pensions for silicosis    $5,170,023 $5,118,959 $6,417,662 $6,519,762 $6,443,402
This five-year comparative statement of
monthly allowances paid to widows, children,
etc., under the provisions of the Act shows the
increase in the number of pensions awarded in
the year 1967. The number of workmen receiving monthly allowances for permanent partial or permanent total disability was 12,016.
FINANCE
At the 1967 Legislative Session an amendment to the Workmen's Compensation Act was
made by the addition of section 27b. This
amendment provides that the compensation
payable to workmen who, on the 1st day of
April, 1967, are in receipt of compensation for
permanent total disability shall, on and after
that date, be not less than $150 per month.
The Act was also amended by adding subsection (3) to section 36, as follows:—
" There shall be paid out of the Consolidated
Revenue Fund to form part of the Accident and
Silicosis Funds an amount sufficient to provide
fifty per centum of the present and future costs
of the increases in compensation resulting from
the increases made under section 27b."
The cost of these increases amounted to
$477,195 for the Accident Fund and $69,803
for the Silicosis Fund, a total of $546,998. The
British Columbia Government paid $273,499,
which was credited to the Accident Fund and
Silicosis Fund respectively. The balance of
$273,499 was charged to classes.
Accident Fund cash receipts and expenditures transactions during 1967 were as follows:-
1967 1966 Increase
Receipts        $57,419,271 $41,850,944 $ 15,568,327
Expenditures       33,642,158 32,517,267 1,124,891
Silicosis Fund cash receipts and expenditures transactions during 1967 were as follows :-
Increase
1967 1966 (Decrease)
Receipts     $993,756 $963,241 $30,515
Expenditures    853,497 857,751 (4,254)
Additional income was derived from increased assessment rates, increased payroll
maximums, and increased investment income.
These increased revenues offset in part deficits
incurred in class funds due to statutory requirements for provision of increased pensions and
Consumer Price Index adjustments.
The Statement of Assets and Liabilities, Exhibit A, of this Report shows the financial posi
tion of the Workmen's Compensation Board as
at December 31, 1967.
Liabilities for costs of accident claims incurred and in process but not fully paid have
also been determined by the actuary and have
been charged $2,945,777 to implementation
costs and $42,330,648 to classes.
At the end of the year there was a deficit
balance   in   the   class   funds   amounting   to
19
 $12,539,864. This will be recovered through
payroll assessments to be made in such manner
and at such times as the Board may deem
equitable.
The actuary's report for 1967 contains an
evaluation of a contingent liability for future
benefits not yet awarded for silicosis claims.
This amount has not been charged to the Silicosis Fund, as section 35 (2) of the Workmen's
Compensation Act provides that reserves, in the
case of silicosis claims, be set up through an
assessment levy in respect of claims allowed
during the year.
The following statement gives details showing the provision for life and term pensions
awarded, including interest accrued, actuarial
requirement, and excess of reserve funds over
actuarial requirement:—
PENSION FUND RESERVES
Accident Fund
Provision for life and term pensions awarded (see Exhibit A)       $149,464,451
Requirement in accordance with actuarial certificate....       148,645,776
Excess over requirement.....    $818,675
Silicosis Fund
$6,509,946
6,443,402
$66,544
Total
$155,974,397
155,089,178
$885,219
The following chart shows the distribution of funds expended during the year:—
CHART SHOWING THE DISTRIBUTION OF EVERY $100 OF EXPENDITURE
17.08%
MEDICAL AID
9.51%
ADMINISTRATION  AND
OPERATING EXPENSE
34.98%
PERMANENT DISABILITY
AND DEATH  AWARDS
2.64%
ACCIDENT PREVENTION  AND
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
35.79%
TIME-LOSS COMPENSATION
Investments held on account of the Accident Fund and Silicosis Fund as compared with the
previous year are as follows:—
1967 1966                         Increase
Book value as at December 31st  $171,499,587 $152,140,585 $19,359,002
Market value as at December 31st...      142,919,700 132,739,681            10,180,019
Par value as at December 31st     174,884,800 155,079,800           19,805,000
As securities are purchased by the Board
with the long-term view in mind, these investments will, at maturity, be redeemed at the par
value, which is considerably more than either
the current book values or market values. A
list of investments held is shown on Schedule 2.
The Superannuation Fund of the Board is
controlled by the trustees of the Workmen's
Compensation Board Superannuation Fund.
These trustees are the Chairman of the Board,
the Comptroller of the Board, and the Superannuation Commissioner of the  Province of
 British Columbia. The latter trustee administers the Fund. A statement of revenue and
expenditure for the period April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967, together with a balance-sheet
as at March 31, 1967, covering the transactions
of the Fund for the fiscal year, follow the statistical section of this Report. The audit certificate is signed by the Comptroller-General of the
Province of British Columbia.
A Statement of Receipts and Disbursements
for the year ended December 31, 1967, and a
balance-sheet as at December 31, 1967, showing the financial transactions and position of the
Workmen's Compensation Board Superannuation Fund (1941) are also shown following the
statistical section of the Annual Report. This
superannuation plan was superseded by the
superannuation plan now in effect for Workmen's Compensation Board employees and as
older employees retire will eventually become
non-existent.
GENERAL
Effective January 1, 1967, more than 5,000
dependents of fatally injured workmen and
more than 10,000 permanently disabled workmen received a 4.04-per-cent increase in their
pensions and allowances. A further 2-per-cent
increase went into effect January 1, 1968, for
pension recipients. These increases arose from
the provisions in the Act, introduced November
2, 1965, which call for increased pensions as
the Consumer Price Index rises.
Since January 1, 1966, four 2-per-cent increases have gone into effect as a result of this
legislation.
A committee has been appointed by the Government to study and review recommendations
made in the Report of the Royal Commission of
Inquiry with respect to various sections of the
Act. At the 1965 Legislative Session, Bill 69,
incorporating amendments to the Act, was introduced and was deferred for further examination. The Government at the 1968 Session has
referred the Bill to a legislative committee.
On March 21, 1967, the Legislative Assembly enacted Bill 71, amending the Workmen's Compensation Act as follows:—
" 2. Section 7 of the Workmen's Compensation Act, being chapter 413 of the Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1960, is amended
by adding the following as subsection (6):—
"'(6) Where a workman was not disabled
from earning full wages at the work at which he
was employed within twelve months of his last
exposure, but the Board is satisfied that his disablement or death was caused by employment
in compressed air in the Province, the Board
may pay the compensation provided by this
Part. This subsection applies to disablements
occurring on or after the first day of January,
1965, and is retroactive to the extent necessary
to give full force and effect to its provisions
accordingly.'
" 3. The Act is further amended by inserting
the following as section 27b:—
" ' 27b. Notwithstanding any other provision
of this Act, the compensation payable to work
men who, on the first day of April, 1967, are in
receipt of compensation for permanent total
disability shall, on and after that date, be not
less than one hundred and fifty dollars per
month.'
"4. Section 36 is amended by adding the
following as subsection (3):—-
'"(3) There shall be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund to form part of the
Accident and Silicosis Funds an amount sufficient to provide fifty per centum of the present
and future costs of the increases in compensation resulting from the increases made under
section 27b.' "
The present offices of the Board are inadequate and overcrowded. Working conditions
are unsatisfactory in such a situation. This was
brought before the Royal Commission and is
mentioned in the report.
Plans for an addition to the existing head
office building were prepared by the Board's
architects, Wilding & Jones, almost two years
ago, but the building programme has been delayed by the refusal of the City of Vancouver's
Technical Planning Board and members of the
City Council to permit construction to proceed
on a comprehensive development zone basis.
The Board requested City Council to rezone
both blocks in which the head office building
and rehabilitation clinic are situated. Further
negotiations are continuing, and it is hoped that
objections will be withdrawn to allow the building programme to proceed.
During the year 1967 the Board exercised its
power and authority under section 42 of the
Act to charge 60 employer firms for 70 claims
where the employer had neglected or refused to
register or file payrolls with the Board as required by Part I of the Act. Employees of
these firms were injured by accidents and the
costs involved became a charge against the employer. The cost of these injuries varied from
$6 to $3,084.38.
 The Board wish to thank those groups and
organizations interested in compensation matters for their co-operation and assistance in
dealing with the various activities of the Workmen's Compensation Board, particularly employer and labour organizations,  as  well as
those concerned with the various medical groups
and groups of other qualified practitioners.
The Board also wish to thank the staff for
their loyalty and devotion in carrying out their
respective duties and responsibilities.
Respectfully submitted.
J. E. EADES, Q.C.,
Chairman.
E. V. ABLETT,
Commissioner.
HECTOR WRIGHT,
Commissioner.
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23
 CONDENSED STATEMEIN
FOR THE YEAR ENI
T OF FUND TRANSACTIONS
)ED DECEMBER 31, 1967
CURRENT             PENSION RESERVES
FUNDS            Accident Fund     Silicosis Fund
$51,042,592
931,571        $6,252,656        $284,919
Exhibit B
CONSOLIDATED
FUNDS
INCOME—Additions to fund:
Assessments collected from employers   	
.$51,042,592
Investment income, net	
7,469,146
$51,974,163
$6,252,656
$284,919
$58,511,738
EXPENDITURE—Net reductions to fund:
Cost of workmen's claims
Time-loss compensation paid	
$12,807,397
■6,114,881
12,523,366
($12,271,489)
10,542,655
(477,195)
(276,065)
($303,898)
678,300
(69,803)
(9,864)
$12,807,397
Medical Aid provided      	
6,114,881
Pensions   awarded — capitalized   values   transferred to reserves	
($52,021)
31,445,644
Operating expenses
Vocational rehabilitation	
Accident prevention, industrial hygiene, first aid
and investigation, etc	
General and administration expense	
$156,352
816,361
3,379,708
$4,352,421
4,352,421
Pensions paid from reserves—to workmen and/or
11,220,955
Cost of increases—section 27  (b),  1967 amendment
Awarded
Charged to classes__.            	
$273,499
The Province of British Columbia—grant	
Implementation Costs—additional requirement—
interest    	
(273,499)
285,929
$559,428
$36,357,493
($2,482,094)
$294,735
$34,170,134
ADDITIONS TO FUNDS for the year	
REDUCTIONS TO FUNDS for the year	
ADD—FUND BALANCES at January 1, 1967
$15,616,670
15,777,895
$8,734,750
139,920,380
$9,816
6,519,762
$24,341,604
162,218,037
$31,394,565    $148,655,130     $6,509,946      $186,559,641
IMPLEMENTATION COSTS —claims in process
January 1, 1967
Processed during 1967—actuarial valuation  809,321
Still in process  2,945,777 3,755,098
FUND BALANCES at December 31, 1967       $34,340,342    $149,464,451     $6,509,946      $190,314,739
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 Government of Canada.. 	
Canadian National Railway    	
Province of British Columbia    	
Province of Ontario	
British Columbia Highway and Toll Authority	
British Columbia Power Commission  	
British Columbia Electric Company Limited	
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
Greater Vancouver Water District  	
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage Board	
British Columbia School Districts Capital Financing Authority....
District of Burnaby    	
City of Vancouver	
Vernon Irrigation District  	
Valleyview Irrigation District	
Ontario Hydro-electric Commission  	
Quebec Hydro-electric Commission..... _..._  	
Alberta Government Telephone Commission 	
British Columbia school districts, unconditionally guaranteed by
the Province of British Columbia.. 	
Schedule 2
BER 31, 1967
Par Value
Book Value
$16,870,000
$16,712,850
4,900,000
4,816,125
3,864,000
3,783,877
9,825,000
9,662,124
13,000,000
12,650,000
10,735,000
10,458,793
14,697,500
14,237,300
43,176,900
42,614,651
8,267,000
7,997,453
4,915,000
4,759,907
5,125,000
5,098,350
4,403,000
4,321,322
93,000
89,336
500,000
496,250
500,000
486,150
505,000
491,011
20,381,000
20,188,375
290,000
287,937
800,000
784,000
12,037,400
11,563,770
$174,884,800
$171,499,581
STATISTICS
NUMBER OF WORK INJURIES
During the year 1967 there were 93,659
work injuries reported. This is a 1.74 per cent
decrease from the number of work injuries reported in 1966. These were proportioned by
industrial groups as follows:—
Per Cent
Forest products  21.5
Construction industry and allied trades   18.6
General manufacturing  17.3
Trade and service industries    16.9
Operations of the Federal, Provincial, and
municipal governments       9.6
Transportation       6.3
Mining and smelting        5.0
Per Cent
Navigation and wharf operations     2.9
Fishing and fish-packing industry     1.0
Light and power       0.9
NUMBER OF CLAIMS
In the year 1967, first payments were made
on 156 fatal claims, and monthly pensions were
awarded to 115 widows, 259 children, and 16
other dependents.
There were 1,352 first awards and 104 increased awards made for permanent disabilities
during the year 1967. The table below shows
the distribution of the first awards by part of
body impaired and by extent of disability.
Part of Body Impaired
Total
Number
of Cases
Number of Cases by Percentage of Permanent Total Disability
0.00
to
9.99
10.00
to
19.99
20.00
to
29.99
30.00
to
39.99
40.00
to
49.99
50.00
to
59.99
60.00
to
69.99
70.00
to
79.99
80.00
to
89.99
90.00
to
99.99
100.00
Head  29
Eyes    57
Shoulders    75
Arms  73
Hands  131
Thumbs  65
Fingers    407
Back    69
Spine  24
Legs    338
Feet or toes  34
Internal  6
Arm with other disabilities  18
Leg with other disabilities  3
Other multiple injuries   5
Industrial diseases  3
Silicosis  15
Totals   . 1,352 1,006  200  52
11
12
51
45
97
60
403
47
7
235
29
5
37
13
11
17
5
3
20
3
68
3
4
6
1
1
1
15
1
2
1
' 1
1
4
1   3
2
10
21
19
19
6   6
22
 The total number of first awards made in
1967 was 27 greater than the total in 1966.
The number of awards for 50 per cent or greater
disability increased from 53 to 54.
The first payment of time-loss compensation
was made on 27,436 claims during the year
1967, a decrease of 2.9 per cent from the number made in 1966. Of these 27,436 claimants,
91 per cent were males and 9 per cent were females. Only 2 per cent had disability benefits
in addition to those provided by the Act.
TYPE OF ACCIDENT
Accidents where workmen were struck by
objects and materials accounted for 9,348 of the
27,436 new time-loss cases. In this category
4,041 were struck by materials being handled,
2,420 were struck by equipment, such as tools,
lines, chokers, etc., 2,264 by falling and flying
objects, 301 by transportation agencies, and
322 by miscellaneous objects and materials.
A summary of the total number of cases and
percentage distribution for each type of accident
is as follows:—
Number of
Cases        Per Cent
Struck by objects and materials .... 9,348 34.0
Falls and slips on the same level... 5,513 20.1
Falls from one level to another  3,510 12.8
Striking against or stepping on objects and materials  3,195 11.6
Over-exertion resulting in strains
and sprains  2,688 9.8
Caught in, on, or between  1,167 4.3
Contact with electricity, temperature extremes, and harmful substances     1,090 4.0
Vehicle and transportation accidents    471 1.7
Industrial diseases  379 1.4
Explosions   75 0.3
TIME LOST FROM WORK
There were 1,134,581 days lost from work
during 1967 due to injuries; 68 per cent of the
time loss resulted from accidents occurring in
1967, 25 per cent in 1966, and 7 per cent in
1965 and prior years. These figures represent
the actual number of days lost by injured workmen who received time-loss compensation in
1967 and makes no provision for workmen who
were disabled for less than four working-days,
nor does it include time charges arising from
permanent disability and fatal accidents.
By industrial groups the time lost was distributed as follows:—
Days Lost Per Cent
Forest products    298,041 26.3
Construction industry and allied
trades...   244,611 21.6
General manufacturing  166,272 14.7
Trade and service industries .....  142,368 12.5
Transportation      79,804 7.0
Operations of the Federal, Provincial,  and  municipal  gov-
ments      74,856 6.6
Mining and smelting      58,948 5.2
Navigation and wharf operations      44,482 3.9
Fishing and fish-packing industry      15,842 1.4
Light and power       9,357 0.8
STATISTICAL TABLES
On the following pages five statistical tables
are presented.
Industrial classification descriptions are shown
in detail preceding Table A-l.
Table A.—Table A is in two parts, Table A-l
showing the number of first payment cases paid
during the year by type of claim and industry
and Table A-2 showing claim costs during the
year by type of claim and industry.
Table B.—Table B segregates, by class and
subclass of industry, the number of days lost
during 1967, the corresponding wage loss, and
the average weekly wage at the time of the accident for the cases compensated. In addition,
Table B shows the number of cases having the
first payment of time-loss compensation during
the year and segregates these cases by type of
accident and whether receiving benefits for disability from a source other than the Workmen's
Compensation Board.
Table C.—Table C segregates, by year of accident occurrence, the number of days lost, the
number of cases having the first payment of
time-loss compensation, and the number of cases
which were reopened for time-loss compensation during the year 1967.
Table D.—Table D segregates, by five-year
age-groups, the number of cases having the first
payment of time-loss compensation during the
year 1967 by class of industry. Table D also
shows the average age.
Table E.—Table E segregates, by type, the
number of industrial diseases for which claims
were received during 1967.
 CLASSES OF INDUSTRY
Class No. 1
Subclass
2 Logging.
Log-hauling.
Christmas-tree cutting.
Log sorting and booming.
4 Pulp and paper.
5 Sawmills.
Planing-mills.
Wooden-box works.
Creosoting, wood-preserving, and the operation
of pole assembly yards when such operation
is conducted as a separate industry.
7    Sash and door.
Veneer, plywood, hardboard, and flakeboard.
Kiln-drying lumber.
Manufacture of laminated beams.
9    Shingle-mills.
10 Manufacture of excelsior.
Manufacture of staves and heads.
Manufacture of wooden pipe.
Manufacture of wooden barrels and cooperage.
Class No. 3
1 Coal-mining (exclusive of silicosis).
Class No. 4
3 Sand pits, shale pits, and gravel pits.
Stone-quarrying and stone-crushing.
Lime-quarrying.
Clay-mining.
Peat digging and processing.
Lime kilns.
Manufacture of gypsum.
Manufacture of cement and stucco.
Manufacture of bricks.
Manufacture of tiles and terra-cotta.
Stone cutting and dressing.
Monument lettering and setting.
Manufacture   of   cement   blocks   and   other
cement or concrete products, N.E.S.
Manufacture of prestressed concrete beams.
11 Metal-mining (exclusive of silicosis), reduc
tion of ore, N.E.S., and mine tunnelling.
Diamond drilling (exclusive of silicosis).
18    Aluminum smelter.
Class No. 6
2 Manufacture of cans, tin pails, tin tubs, and
similar tinware products.
Manufacture  of paint,  varnish,  putty,  wood
filler, and allied synthetic resin compounds.
Manufacture  of  cardboard or plastic boxes
and containers.
Operation  of tanneries  and manufacture  of
shoes.
Assembly of metal  stamps,  scales, precision
instruments, and other small metal products.
Manufacture of soap and cleaning compounds,
including   synthetic    detergents,   bleaching
powder   or  liquid,   javelle   water,   laundry
bluing,   scouring   powders   and   household
waxes, polishes, glue and mucilage.
Manufacture of biscuits and confectionery.
Manufacture of rubber tires, mats, mouldings,
belting, and hose or similar plastic or syn-
Subclass
Manufacture of plastics and synthetic resins,
including alkyd resins, phenolic resins, vinyl
resins, soybean plastics, thermoplastics,
transparent cellulose film or film from synthetic resins.
Porcelain enamelling.
Manufacture of matches.
Manufacture of trunks and bags.
Manufacture of iron beds, bed springs, mattresses, metal furniture, and metal Venetian
blinds.
Manufacture of acetylene gas and compressed
or liquefied oxygen, distribution of propane
gas.
Manufacture of batteries.
Repair and service of outboard motors or
other small gasoline engines.
Armature rewinding for small motors with no
installation work.
Exterminating and fumigating service.
Bridge operation.
Assaying and industrial testing laboratories
and electrical corrosion-control.
Manufacture or reconditioning of glass bottles
and jars.
Manufacture of fertilizers, N.E.S.
Manufacture of insecticides and weed-control
products, N.E.S.
Operation of greenhouses and horticultural
nurseries,   including Christmas-tree  farms.
Curing of hides and wholesaling of raw hides.
Manufacture of lighting fixtures and electrical
control panels.
Manufacture of paper bags or plastic bags.
Manufacture of envelopes.
Manufacture of stationery.
Manufacture of paper products, N.E.S.
Upholstering of furniture and the operation of
upholstery shops.
Carpet-laying and linoleum-laying.
Glass cutting, grinding, and polishing and
manufacture of mirrors and glass products,
N.E.S. (This category includes installation
of replacement window glass, etc., but does
not cover construction of glass walls, facades,
etc., which is part of the general building
construction  industry.)
Manufacture of asphalt roofing, asphalt shingles, asphalt tile, asphalt siding, waterproof
roofing fabric, tar paper, and tar-saturated
felt roofing.
Installation and repairs of bowling equipment
or billiard equipment.
Operation of public warehouses, excluding
trucking or cartage.
Manufacture of acids, alkalis, and salts.
3    Fur-goods industry.
Leather-goods shops, including assembly and
repair of luggage, handbags, and small leather
goods.
Shoe-repairing.
Tea-blending, coffee-roasting, and manufacture
of miscellaneous food products, including
peanut butter, soybean paste, flavouring extracts and syrups, food colourings, gelatine
powders, and packaged spices.
Manufacture of pharmaceuticals, medicines,
cosmetics, and toilet preparations.
Watch repairs, lens-grinding, and manufacture
 Subclass
Manufacture of lamp shades.
Manufacture and repair of vacuum cleaners,
washing-machines, radios, television receivers, pianos, household electrical appliances,
typewriters, adding-machines, cash registers,
X-ray equipment, and physiotherapy equipment.
Distribution and servicing of automatic music
machines or other automatic vending machines.
Picture-framing.
Manufacture of rubber stamps and assembly
of small rubber or plastic articles.
Silversmithing and electroplating.
Manufacture of pottery and clay or plaster
ornaments.
Manufacture of ink.
Bicycle repair-shops.
Furniture and cabinet making without machinery.
Appliance and tool rental.
Locksmithing.
Collection and processing of used photographic
film for argent recovery.
4 Manufacture of furniture   (exclusive  of  up
holstering), and manufacture of wooden
Venetian blinds.
Manufacture of pails (wooden) and tubs
(wooden).
Manufacture of abrasives.
Manufacture of wooden coffins.
Manufacture of artificial limbs.
Manufacture of brooms, brushes, and mops.
Manufacture of wooden toys and wooden
spokes.
Carpenter-shops and woodworking plants.
Manufacture of tar.
Manufacture of pitch.
Manufacture of charcoal.
Sintering tungsten.
Construction of rowboats and canoes, manufacture of plastic boats.
Manufacture of rock wool.
5 Park operations other than municipal, N.E.S.
Amusement parks.
Horse-race courses.
Ice rinks.
Roller rinks.
Bowling alleys.
Dance halls as a business.
7 Manufacture of non-alcoholic beverages.
8 Manufacture of alcoholic beverages.
9 Manufacture of sugar.
Manufacture of food products, N.E.S.
17 Manufacture of sails, canvas work, tents and
awnings.
Manufacture of ropes and twines, etc.
18 Manufacture of clothing, hats, buttons, drapes,
cloth window blinds, and cushions.
19 Knitting-mills.
Manufacture of cloth, weaving-mills and spinning-mills.
Manufacture of textiles, N.E.S., and manufacture of carpets.
20 Poultry hatchery (where not part of farming
operation), poultry-killing and poultry-dressing.
Manufacture of bakery products.
21 Retail stores.
Photography studios, photographic film processing, motion-picture and video-tape production and editing.
Subclass
Private schools, N.E.S.
Barber-shops.
Hairdressing establishments and .beauty parlours.
Auctioneering establishments.
Billiard parlours.
Manufacture of cigars.
Dental laboratories.
Finance, insurance, real estate, and law business (on request).
22    Operation of commercial buildings, apartment
buildings, and lodging houses.
Operation of chair-lifts and ski tows.
Boarding-car operations and industrial catering.
Operation of commercial and industrial properties.
Cemetery operations.
24 Canning and packing of fruit and vegetables.
Manufacture of dairy products and ice-cream.
Hop-growing (on request).
Rice-milling.
Mushroom-growing (on request).
Cold-storage plants.
25 Cleaning and dyeing.
Laundries.
26 Hospitals.
Sanatoria.
Clinics (on request).
Branches of the Victorian Order of Nurses (on
request).
Offices or establishments for the practice of
any of the healing arts or sciences, N.E.S.
(on request).
Nursing homes.
Veterinary hospitals.
Steam-bath service.
27 Hotels (including restaurants and public houses
where operation is part of hotel business).
Private clubs.
Public houses when operated by a separate
company.
Auto camps, motels, and tourist camps.
Marina operation.
Golf, tennis, and lawn-bowling associations.
Catering, N.E.S.
Restaurants, N.E.S.
31 Surveying.
32 Flour-milling.
Grain elevators.
Manufacture of macaroni,  noodles,  and spaghetti.
Feed and farm supply dealers.
36 Oil refining and oil distribution.
Operation of oil pipe-line and natural-gas pipeline.
Manufacture of phenol and like petrochemicals,
N.E.S.
37 Meat-packing.
Stockyards.
Wholesale meats.
Manufacture of sausages and sausage casings.
Curing, smoking, or other manufacture of prepared meat products.
Canning of meats.
Canning of animal-foods.
Manufacture of meat pies, frozen dinners, and
similar products, N.E.S.
Frozen-food locker systems.
39    Printing with publishing, job printing, lithographing,  embossing,  engraving,   bookbinding, silk-screen printing.
Showcard and display painting (shop only).
43    Farming and threshing (on request).
 Subclass
Subclass
46
Operation of motion-picture houses and film
Plumbing, installation and servicing of heating
distributors.
equipment, N.E.S., pipefitting and sanitary
Operation of other theatres.
engineering, N.E.S.
52
Ice-harvesting and manufacture of artificial ice.
Manufacture of refrigerators, installation and
Operation  of coal-yards,  sawdust-yards,   and
repair of refrigeration equipment, N.E.S.
wood-yards.
Manufacture of sheet-metal articles, erection
Travelling wood saws.
and repair of sheet-metal, tar, and gravel
Manufacture of compressed-sawdust fire logs.
roofing, asphalted roofing.
54
Wholesale establishments.
Galvanizing, metal enamelling and tinning.
Physicians',  dental,  beauticians',  and  barbers'
Installation and maintenance of radar systems
supply houses.
or microwave or other similar communica
Manufacturers' agents.
tion systems.
Other wholesalers, N.E.S.
Manufacture   of   truck   bodies   and   trailers,
56
Trade-union employees.
N.E.S.
57
Lumber and builders' supply yards.
11
Electrical wiring of buildings, construction and
Lumber wholesalers.
installation   of   electric   lighting   systems,
58
Domestic and other household employees (on
N.E.S., and armature winding, N.E.S.
request).
Installation and manufacture of neon signs.
59
Automobile and motorcycle sales, automobile
13
Janitor   service,   N.E.S.,   floor-polishing   and
and   motorcycle   repairs,   garages,   parking-
floor-waxing service.
lots, service-stations, and automobile paint
Window-cleaning.
ing.
14
Rolling-mills.
60
Manufacture of explosives.
21
Marine railway operation, dry-dock operation,
and repair of all vessels.
Class No. 7
Construction of wooden vessels.
1
Construction, repair, and servicing of aircraft
Steel-ship building.
(exclusive of flying personnel), aerial trans
22
Shiplining.
portation industry (exclusive of flying per
25
Construction of reservoirs, dams, and flumes.
sonnel),  and operation  of airfields  as an
Construction of piers, wharves, and dry-docks.
industry.
Pile-driving.
2
Aerial testing, flying, and aerial demonstrating
Tunnelling, N.E.S., drilling, N.E.S., and rock-
as an industry, aerial transportation, aerial
tunnelling.
advertising, and aerial crop dusting and in
Construction of training-walls to deflect water,
sect control (exclusive of ground employees).
construction of jetties or causeways.
5
Lathing.
Bridge-building.
Painting.
External steam cleaning of buildings.
Plastering.
Steel-frame erection and repairs.
Insulation   of   buildings   and   installation   of
Steel-frame painting.
acoustic board.
Moving buildings.
Dry-wall application.
26
Road-making.
Tile-setting.
Land-clearing and land-grading as an industry.
Terazzo-laying.
Airport construction.
Floor-laying.
Construction and repair of dykes.
6
Building construction, roofing, chimney-clean
Railway   construction,   N.E.S.,    and   railway
ing.
demolition, N.E.S.
Masonry.
Dredging.
Reinforced-concrete  work  and cement  work,
Gravelling of roads, runways, and sidewalks,
N.E.S.
surfacing of roads, runways, and sidewalks.
Erection and installation of tanks.
Manufacture of asphalt paving material.
Erection of aerials.
Excavation work as an industry.
Installation  and removal  of boilers,  engines,
Landscape gardening and other gardening as an
and machinery.
industry (exclusive of market gardening).
Installation of marine elevators and ornamental
Waterworks construction and extension.
ironwork.
Operation and maintenance of waterworks.
Handling scrap metal and junk.
Operation and maintenance of irrigation-works.
Manufacture, installation,  and repair of ele
Sewer construction, operation, and maintenance,
vators.
septic-tank construction and maintenance.
Non-industrial building construction, N.E.S.
Construction of oil and natural-gas pipe-lines.
7
Manufacture of stoves, furnaces, engines, boil
Construction of transmission lines or ducts, in
ers,  automobile  springs,  guns,  armaments,
stallation of transmission-line appliances.
ornamental ironwork, etc.
Water-well drilling or digging.
Manufacture of structural steel.
47
Consulting  engineering  and  architecture   (on
Manufacture of lead articles and babbit.
request).
Manufacture of nuts, bolts, nails, and spikes.
48
Oil and gas producers, explorers, and devel
Machine-shops and foundries.
opers.
Blacksmith-shops.
Exploration drilling and geophysical  contrac
Acetylene and electric welding.
tors.
Manufacture of saws and saw-repairing.
Oil- and gas-well drilling, N.E.S.
Manufacture of wire and wire products. Manu
Offshore oil- and gas-well drilling.
facture of wire fence and other wire prod
Servicing of oil and gas wells by means of ser
ucts that does not involve drawing wire from
vice rigs.
rods or other extrusion process.
Servicing of oil and gas wells by means other
Handling machinery and machinery rental.
than service rigs.
 Class No. 8
Class No. 11
Subclass
Subclass
1
Operation of electric light and power plants
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' As
and lines, construction of electric light and
sociation.
power plants by an electric light and power
company for the purpose of its business.
Class No. 12
Installation and maintenance of cable television
service.
Canadian National Railway and others.
Operation of natural-gas distribution systems
(exclusive of trans-provincial pipe-line sys
Class No. 13
tems), construction of natural-gas distribu
tion  system  by  a  natural-gas  distribution
Government of the Province of British Colum
company for the purpose of its business.
bia—
8
Operation of telegraph systems.
1
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Broadcasting stations.
2
Government of British Columbia.
Operation of telephone systems.
4
Liquor Control Board.
11
Operation of bus lines and electric railways,
5
Workmen's Compensation Board.
maintenance of bus lines and electric rail
7
Provincial Government (Canadian Voca
ways.
tional Training).
Operation of chartered bus service, including
10
Civil   Defence   (Federal-Provincial   Agree
school bus service.
ment).
12
Taxicab operations, U-drive operations, opera
11
British Columbia Ferry Authority.
tion of ambulance service, automobile and
12
Learners in vocational training school.
truck rental.
13
Dental Technicians' Board.
Funeral-undertaking.
51
Trucking, hauling, freighting, N.E.S.
Class No. 14
Class No. 9
1
Municipal corporations including construction
work.
1
Navigation.
Municipal parks boards including construction
Marine salving.
work.
2
Stevedoring, wharf operations.
Municipal water boards including construction
6
Canning and packing fish, manufacture of fish
work.
oil, manufacture of fish fertilizer, fish whole
Municipal cemetery boards including construc
saling, oyster cultivation, kelp collection.
tion work.
7
Fishing, fish collection, and whaling.
6
School boards.
9
Shipping operations, N.E.S.
Library boards.
Town planning boards.
Class No. 10
Class No. 18
Canadian Pacific Railway  Company  and
others—
Great Northern Railway Company and others.
1
Railway operation.
2
Navigation.
Class No. 19
3
Express.
4
Light- and power-plant operation.
Government of Canada.
6
Mining and smelting.
9
Aerial transportation.
Class No. 20
11
Operation of golf association.
12
Trucking and hauling.
Northern   Alberta   Railway   Company   and
13
Building construction.
others.
31
 TABLE A-l.—NUMBER OF
FIRST
PAYMENT
CASES
CHARGED IN 1967
ANALYSED
BY INDUSTRY AND TYPE OF CLAIM
Subclass
Medical
Aid Only
Temporary
Total
Permanent
Disability
Fatal
Grand
Total
Subclass
Medical
Aid Only
Temporary
Total
Permanent
Disability
Fatal
Grand
Total
Class No. 1
Class No
7
2 _ _
3,652
2,571
201
43
6,467
1	
80
18
98
4	
1,828
220
31
2
2,081
2	
22
8
2
6
38
5- -
2,438
1,461
123
3
4,025
5	
6..	
417
4,597
396
2,625
15
125
1
7
829
7,354
7	
1,349
387
41
1
1,778
7	
5,303
2,409
79
2
7,793
9	
302
156
21
479
11	
491
169
8
3
671
10....	
11
18
4
33
13	
14	
63
25
74
34
3
140
59
Totals.-
9,580
4,813
421
49
14,863
21	
832
467
21
2
1,322
22	
25	
1
1,186
2
670
40
4
3
1,900
26	
1,162
801
42
8
2,013
Class No. 3
47 	
80
24
1
105
48	
135
159
4
5
303
1	
73
68
8
16
165
Totals..
14,394
7,856
340
38
22,628
Class No. 4
Class No.
8
3	
348
196
13
2
559
1	
441
191
8
1
641
11	
1,235
601
45
7
1,888
8	
286
61
2
349
18	
350
59
5
414
11	
100
57
1
158
12	
44
37
4
1
86
Totals ..
1,933
856
63
9
2,861
51	
1,155
1,108
37
10
2,310
Class No. 6
Totals..
2,026
1,454
52
12
3,544
Class No,
9
2	
1,286
687
33
2,006
3	
297
96
3
396
1	
226
278
11
9
524
4.	
441
284
25
750
2	
744
856
28
2
1,630
5	
38
11
49
6	
276
159
6
1
442
7	
155
82
1
238
7	
145
181
15
4
345
8	
130
51
8
189
9	
2
4
1
7
9. 	
35
40
1
76
17 	
11
10
21
Totals..
1,393
1,478
61
16
2,948
18	
65
40
1
106
19	
11
24
35
20	
246
206
10
462
Class No.
10
21	
2,170
886
19
1
3,076
22	
181
112
6
299
1	
1
135
6
1
143
24	
662
448
17
2
1,129
2	
14
14
25	
162
92
3
257
3	
26	
1,154
587
7
1,748
4	
35
8
43
27	
1,146
740
27
2
1,915
6	
846
149
15
1,010
31 	
101
48
3
152
9	
1
39
1
41
32	
171
108
2
281
11	
36	
256
81
3
340
12	
1
64
1
66
37	
371
231
7
1
610
13	
4
4
39
186
74
7
267
43	
46	
44
18
34
8
3
1
81
27
Totals..
888
409
23
1
1,321
52	
29
27
56
54	
786
327
15
1
1,129
Class No.
11
56	
4
3
7
57	
395
179
4
578
1,924
493
47
2
2,466
58	
2
	
2
59	
1,989
664
20
1
2,674
60	
20
	
20
Class No.
12
Totals..
12,560
6,182
226
8
18,976
366
200
6
1
573
 TABLE A-l.—NUMBER OF FIRST PAYMENT CASES CHARGED IN 1967
ANALYSED BY INDUSTRY AND TYPE OF CLAIM—Continued
Subclass
Medical
Aid Only
Temporary
Total
Permanent
Disability
Fatal
Class No. 13
Class No. 14
Class No. 18
21 8 1
Grand
Total
1 _,
157
143
8
308
2	
1,353
576
18
....  1,947
4	
22
22
44
5	
8
3
11
7	
10	
3
3
11	
135
93
1
229
12	
145
11
156
13	
Totals..
1,823
848
27
....  2,698
1	
6	
1,233
590
781
244
30
16
1
1
2,045
851
Totals..
1,823
1,025
46
2
2,896
30
Subclass
Medical
Aid Only
Temporary
Total
Permanent
Disability
Fatal
Class No. 19
1,427 237 16
Class No. 20
Section 34
Grand
Total
1        1,681
Totals, all
classes. 50,233    25,927      1,337 155    77,652
Silicosis Fund
2 1-15 1
17
(1) (*)-.
(1) (d)...
2
      2
Totals..
2
2
Grand
totals...
50,235
25,928
1,352
156 77,671
33
 TABLE A-2.—CLAIM COST CHARGED IN 1967 ANALYSED BY INDUSTRY
AND TYPE OF CLAIM
Subclass
Medical Aid
Only
Temporary Total
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Permanent Disability
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Fatat
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Grand Total
2    $67,855.99
4  33,549.46
5    39,079.10
7    21,425.90
9    5,001.69
10  586.40
Totals  $ 167,498.54
Class No. 1
$2,439,390.80
226,732.56
812,330.85
250,863.08
83,205.23
10,932.56
$2,318,388.73
268,953.32
729,550.40
240,404.89
144,269.82
40,272.26
$882,470.50
61,253.25
72,590.32
4,328.82
$3,823,455.08        $3,741,839.42    $1,020,642.89
$5,708,106.02
590,488.59
1,653,550.67
517,022.69
232,476.74
51,791.22
1,753,435.93
$1,039.28
Class No. 3
$68,668.68 $50,322.61
$271,240.39
$391,270.96
3____.    $6,035.03
11  24,128.38
18   6,379.69
Totals  _ $36,543.10
Class No. 4
$89,577.52
534,039.83
52,660.65
$118,116.73
427,659.54
19,039.98
$95,175.94
192,936.81
$676,278.00
$308,905.22
1,178,764.56
78,080.32
$564,816.25       $288,112.75        $1,565,750.10
2_.
3..
4..
5..
7..
8-
9..
17.
18..
19..
20..
21..
22..
24..
25-
26..
27..
31..
32..
36..
37-
39-
43..
46..
52..
54..
56..
57..
58..
59..
60..
$18,834.38
4,244.64
6,849.32
936.31
2,212.77
2,152.33
523.60
144.15
1,042.47
153.30
3,647.73
32,568.39
2,966.77
10,654.32
2,836.13
15,347.62
20,005.29
1,451.08
2,483.49
3,833.41
7,365.26
2,685.08
785.92
348.88
658.35
12,759.12
108.40
6,447.57
30,766.24
207.94
Class No. 6
$298,714.80
48,180.55
124,238.42
6,705.03
22,341.27
32,548.08
17,371.38
2,518.55
6,347.85
6,018.51
85,677.35
300,572.16
74,556.26
193,417.55
35,374.67
216,438.74
280,674.73
25,639.81
57,982.05
47,022.85
96,499.73
26,182.06
20,807.84
1,616.74
14,172.46
138,079.65
1,542.45
92,151.51
139.15
315,488.66
$167,058.27      $484,607.45
47,811.16      100,236.35
87,009.07  218,096.81
69.41      7,710.75
466.34     25,020.38
75,918.22     110,618.63
494.03     18,389.01
6.00  2,668.70
5,339.24      12,729.56
1,391.05       7,562.86
25.010.09      114,335.17
148,240.35 $367.18 481,748.08
41,406.42   118,929.45
44,265.89 42,475.16 290,812.92
10,489.74     48,700.54
35,277.39       267,063.75
84,584.31 52,284.83 437,549.16
11,206.71      38,297.60
47,370.33   107,835.87
11.309.10    62,165.36
14,430.59 320.00 118,615.58
30,663.35 320.00 59,850.49
16,232.13  37,825.89
10,681.68       12,647.30
132.45     14,963.26
83,803.05 25,305.26 259,947.08
17.60      1,668.45
7,657.62      106,256.70
   139.15
101,472.81 1,986.13 449,713.84
49.41      257.35
Totals      $195,020.26        $2,589,020.86        $1,109,863.81       $123,058.56        $4,016,963.49
 TABLE A-2.—CLAIM COST CHARGED IN 1967 ANALYSED BY INDUSTRY
AND TYPE OF CLAIM—Continued
Subclass
Medxal Aid
Only
Temporary Total
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Permanent Disability
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Fatal
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Grand Total
1    ...
$1,203.78
299.45
6.114.62
67,817.31
78,706.58
7,459.55
902.16
554.87
11,994.45
9.00
21,997.49
20,558.72
1,312.74
2,584.68
Class No.
$6,911.64
25,038.02
278,096.40
1,642,960.01
1,233,287.38
106,278.67
29,918.33
13,850.63
262,329.57
308.42
538,719.56
628,194.82
13,971.72
111,699.31
7
$151.15
18,113.09
53,918.07
1,243,230.44
469,807.17
103,839.89
18,475.96
26.25
148,788.41
369.06
442,535.50
293,260.10
2,652.36
50,023.45
$8,266.57
2. 	
5 	
6  .
7	
11	
$193,531.43
43,196.15
195,726.13
71,356.70
107,943.99
236,981.99
381,325.24
3,149,733.89
1,853,157.83
325,522.10
13	
49,296.45
14	
14,431.75
21	
20,726.85
443,839.28
22  	
686.48
25  	
114,518.51
218,549.14
1,117,771.06
26	
1,160,562.78
47	
17,936.82
48	
134,220.82
298,528.26
Totals	
$221,515.40
$4,891,564.48
$2,845,190.90
$1,099,769.72
$9,058,040.50
1	
8 	
$7,081.84
4,013.54
1,386.67
547.77
19,009.05
Class No.
$155,254.58
32,184.40
16,578.84
27,837.99
677,370.30
8
$245,481.05
3,091.80
8,790.33
30,238.47
211,372.78
$27,600.61
$435,418.08
39,289.74
11  ....
26,755.84
12	
225.00
219,198.08
58,849.23
51  	
1,126,950.21
Totals....	
$32,038.87
$909,226.11
$498,974.43
$247,023.69
$1,687,263.10
1 —
2	
6	
7  	
9   	
$3,902.35
12,019.51
4,108.63
2,581.92
39.65
Class No.
$181,887.32
421,459.10
90,750.88
117,719.08
1,776.66
9
$83,370.48
240,689.99
32,663.15
52,656.42
3,220.42
$173,321.22
80,788.27
6,738.40
46,774.43
$442,481.37
754,956.87
134,261.06
219,731.85
5,036.73
Totals	
$22,652.06
$813,593.04
$412,600.46
$307,622.32
$1,556,467.88
1	
$3.00
Class No.
$63,770.00
4,144.35
10
$21,851.38
$69,321.69
$154,946.07
2.    .
4,144.35
3	
4	
6	
9  	
456.68
14,639.37
1.05
3,038.11
150,791.04
13,667.17
288.31
98,557.91
3,315.61
3.60
3,783.10
263,991.92
16,983.83
11.  	
12 	
9.00
43.15
20,660.21
6,301.47
26,970.68
13  	
43.15
Totals	
$15,152.25
$256,070.88
$130,314.68
$69,325.29
$470,863.10
$35,202.05
Class No. 11
$400,228.97 $457,285.80        $66,640.17
$959,356.99
35
 TABLE A-2.—CLAIM  COST CHARGED IN  1967  ANALYSED BY INDUSTRY
AND TYPE  OF CLAIM—Continued
Subclass
Medical Aid
Only
Temporary Tota!
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Permanent Disability
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Fatal
(Includes Medical
Aid)
Grand Total
Class No. 12
$6,215.24 $134,219.88 $57,345.51 $466.64 $198,247.27
1_
2..
4..
5..
7..
10..
11..
12..
13..
Totals..
$2,013.10
22,919.07
322.50
106.20
848.50
1,833.66
2,198.68
$30,241.71
Class No. 13
$58,574.52
299,748.20
9,281.94
466.70
34,351.93
2,542.92
$79,858.73
146,135.25
2,868.71
$404,966.21
$228,862.69
$22.50
$22.50
$140,446.35
468,825.02
9,604.44
572.90
848.50
39,054.30
4,741.60
$664,093.11
Totals..
$19,534.29
10,970.78
$30,505.07
Class No. 14
$459,576.86
112,051.71
$234,186.54
65,335.95
$34,004.43
46,228.05
$571,628.57
$299,522.49 $80,232.48
$747,302.12
234,586.49
$981,888.61
Class No. 18
$470.11 $2,206.73 $4,693.96
$7,370.80
Class No. 19
$49,487.94 $275,411.02 $39,092.17 $796.20 $364,787.33
$28.65
Class No. 20
$28.65
Totals, all classes    $843,610.53      $15,816,538.51      $10,440,725.18    $3,574,953.60      $30,675,827.82
Silicosis Fund
$413.67 $10,216.89 $272,502.51       $100,386.50
$383,519.57
(1)  (W-
(1)  (d).
Totals-
Section 34
$15,290.76
6,723.37
        $236,762.12 $252,052.88
$74,710.75 34,436.33 115,870.45
$22,014.13
$74,710.75       $271,198.45
$367,923.33
Paid as investigation	
$18,373.00
$18,373.00
Grand totals	
.    $862,397.20
$15,848,769.53
$10,787,938.44   $3,946,538.55
$31,445,643.72
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41
 TABLE C.—ANALYSIS BY YEAR OF ACCIDENT OCCURRENCE  OF TOTAL DAYS
LOST DURING 1967 AND OF NUMBER OF NEW AND REOPENED TIME-LOSS
CASES.
Year of Accident
Number of
Reopened
Claims
Number of
New Claims
Total Days Lost
1923  	
1930 	
1
1
4
1
3
2
3
1
7
5
5
6
3
2
6
5
10
11
1
10
10
5
9
17
17
15
22
23
24
37
62
100
160
938
1,441
	
284
223
1933...   	
103
1934  	
109
1935   	
328
1937...   	
1938....    	
	
309
9
1939    .
191
1940    .
539
1941     .
209
1942..  	
268
1943	
497
1944	
655
1945	
69
1946	
1947	
1
32
531
1948 	
553
1949 	
447
1950..     .
523
1951 	
3
1952 	
668
195 3 .    .
943
1954    .
421
1955     	
	
897
1956     .
774
1957                         	
1,297
1958	
1959  	
1960  -.-.
1961   	
1962                 	
1-
1
2
1
1
1
13
39
2,269
25,109
1,532
1,839
3,207
1,436
3,202
1963 	
1964 	
7,891
16,117
1965    	
1966.  	
1967  	
35,597
280,918
771,960
Totals	
2,967
27,436
1,134,581
 TABLE D.—AGE  OF CLAIMANTS, IN  FIVE-YEAR-AGE  GROUPS,  TO  WHOM  THE
FIRST PAYMENT OF TIME-LOSS  COMPENSATION WAS MADE  IN  1967
Number of Cases by Class of Industry
Age
Class Numbers
°T_
.He
c
o
a. *j
(/.CI
Total
Num-
1
3
1
4   |    6
1
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
18
19
20
Cases
Under 15
3
375
852
742
714
720
581
453
344
264
170
58
7
3
570
1,108
672
659
672
692
605
575
453
269
107
31
6,416
6
15-19-
2
12
13
6
12
13
7
8
9
9
1
38
173
136
134
128
130
67
52
36
22
11
1
"928
388
1,225
1,123
1,125
1,125
934
769
617
505
295
107
21
87234
27
155
245
254
247
193
154
105
93
34
10
1
57
219
178
167
202
186
159
137
124
94
25
7
16
79
46
47
56
48
44
42
30
22
3
31
87
68
63
60
45
63
38
41
35
10
1
9
51
29
21
21
19
24
12
11
9
1
70
124
106
99
107
78
102
86
53
48
2
25
96
95
83
123
139
147
133
114
88
24
6
1
1
2
3
1
1
16
23
16
21
19
32
44
1,624
20-24..
4,205
25-29	
1
3,471
30-34..
3,395
35-39...
3,492
40-44...
3,093
45-49
1
3
4
2
4
1
15
1
........
2,639
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69	
39
30
14
2,192
1,768
1,112
363
Over 69......
........|       76
Totals...
5,283
92
1,518
1,555
433
542
207
875
1,073
9
254
2[27,436
Average
age	
36
40
35
37
37
37
39
38
38
35
37
43
39
42
1         1
591    401       37
1
Note.—Class numbers shown in the above table may be identified by reference to the industrial classification preceding Table A-l.
TABLE E.—TYPES OF INDUSTRIAL DISEASES FOR WHICH
CLAIMS WERE RECEIVED DURING 1967
Dermatitis           348
Staphylococcus infection...            33
Tenosynovitis      — 170
Infectious hepatitis        4
Bursitis    50
Lead poisoning            8
Carbon monoxide poisoning          19
Respiratory irritation  _      63
Chemical poisoning          12
Conjunctivitis  ...          27
Infected blister       29
Deafness       23
Silicosis          15
Salmonellosis           2
Vibration            2
Miscellaneous      16
Total..
821
"
 WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD SUPERANNUATION FUND   (1941)
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31,  1967
Bank balance as at December 31, 1966         $3,249.25
Receipts—
Contributions—
Staff        $1,184.61
Board           1,184.61
     $2,369.22
Interest—
Investments          $1,725.00
Bank        67.57
       1,792.57
Total receipts           $4,161.79
Disbursements—purchase of—
Investments       $5,378.62
Interest thereon   12.34
      5,390.96
Excess of disbursements over receipts    _         1,229.17
Bank balance as at December 31, 1967     $2,020.08
BALANCE-SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1967
ASSETS
Cash in bank         $2,020.08
Investments (at cost or par, whichever is lower)     38,847.37
Staff Board
Deposits with Government Annuities Branch— Accounts      Accounts
Balance January 1, 1967  $6,584.25 $13,760.75
Less annuity purchased     1,071.34      2,785.53
$5,512.91  $10,975.22
16,488.13
  $57,355.58
LIABILITIES
Interest not yet allocated—
Balance December 31, 1966        $2,667.32
Interest—
Net received       $ 1,780.23
Less credited to accounts .         1,759.72
  20.51
$2,687.83
Provision for service pensions—
Staff......     $24,670.31
Board......         29,997.44
54,667.75
$57,355.58
Approved on behalf of the Board.
J. E. EADES, Q.C., Chairman.
AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE
The accounts of the Workmen's Compensation Board Superannuation Fund (1941) for the year ended
December 31, 1967, have been examined under my direction, and I have obtained all information and explanations
I have required.
The accompanying statements of assets and liabilities and the statement of receipts and disbursements are as
shown by the books of the Fund.
In my opinion, the accompanying statement of assets and liabilities and the statement of receipts and disbursements present fairly the financial condition of the Fund as at December 31, 1967, and the results of its operations
for the year then ended.
C. J. FERBER, C.A.,
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