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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1967 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1967
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
  Victoria, B.C., November 9, 1967.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C, CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1967, is herewith respectfully submitted.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 9, 1967.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1967.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Hon. D. R. J. Campbell  Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson  Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler  Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social
Welfare.
R. J. Burnham  Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
R. I. Stringer  Director of Regional Services.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid  Departmental Comptroller.
T. D. Bingham  Superintendent of Child Welfare.
J. Noble  Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart  Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy  Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry  Division for the Aged.
Miss M. Jamieson  Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie  Superintendent, Provincial Home.
N. S. Brooke   {Casework Supervisors, Social Assistance and
Mrs. J. P. Scott  (    Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler  Training Supervisor.
A. A. Shipp  Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
A. G. Gilmore  Office Administrator.
Miss B. W. Snider  Research Consultant.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
C W. Gorby  Director Region I.
W. J. Camozzi  Director, Region II.
G. A. Reed  Director, Region III.
W. H. Crossley  Director, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore  Director, Region V.
A. E. Bingham  Director, Region VI.
A. J. Wright  Director, Region VII.
J. A. Mollberg  Director, Region VIII.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Part I.—General Administration:
Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social Welfare  9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  10
Part II.—Divisional, Institutional, and Regional Administration:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  13
Child Welfare Division  17
Medical Services Division  23
Division for the Aged  25
Accounting Division  27
Brannan Lake School for Boys  28
Willingdon School for Girls  30
Provincial Home, Kamloops  32
Welfare Institutions Board  34
Region I  3 7
Region II  40
Region III  41
Region IV  44
Region V  48
Region VI  51
Region VII  54
Region VIII  56
Part III.—Legislation  59
Part IV.—Statistical Reports and Tables  61
General Administration, Tables 1 to 3  61
Personnel, Tables 4 to 7  63
Social Allowance, Tables 8 to 10  65
Child Welfare, Tables 11 to 33  69
Medical Services, Tables 34 to 39  82
 Part IV.—Statistical Reports and Tables—Continued
Division for the Aged, Tables 40 to 85     84
Accounting Division, Tables 86 to 88     96
Brannan Lake School for Boys, Tables 89 to 93     97
Willingdon School for Girls, Tables 89 and 94 to 97     97
Provincial Home (Kamloops), Table 98  106
Welfare Institutions Board, Tables 99 and 100  108
 Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND
DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
It will be noted that some changes have been made in the format of this year's
Annual Report. It is hoped that these changes will improve the readability and
provide more detailed and definitive information.
The first part of the report contains the narrative reports of the divisions and
regions, followed by an outline of the pertinent legislation, and finally the statistical
tables concerning the total operation of the Department and each of its sections, at
both the Provincial and local level.
As noted in last year's report, the Department continues to provide a consultative service to local communities to assist them in isolating and dealing with problems
of particular concern. Further research is proceeding for the purpose of developing
better methods of recognizing family and community welfare problems and ways of
providing adequate treatment.
The information provided in the statistical tables is commented on in reports
of the divisions and regions. It is sufficient here to mention that while the total increase in case load is not great, the categories that require the most service—Family
Service, Social Allowance, and Child Welfare—are the ones most affected.* This
emphasizes the need for the continuing development of preventative services which
will be effective at the family and community level.
Progress was made during the year both in increases in staff and other resources
to assist persons in need. Three years of Federal-Provincial negotiations culminated
in the Canada Assistance Plan and in the signing of an agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Province of British Columbia. Two
important principles that were included in the plan were the acceptance of child
welfare as a shareable service under the plan and the recognition that money grants
do not solve all problems. Rehabilitation, counselling, and other services should be
available to persons in need and to persons who are likely to become persons in need.
Over a period of time the general effect of the plan should be to raise standards of
financial assistance and welfare services in all Provinces and result in a more uniform
level of service for all Canadians.
Projects continue to be used in various areas of the Province to test and improve
services both through the development of adequate resources and the more effective
use of staff time.   This method has proven most valuable and productive.
An Emergency Welfare Services planning committee was created to co-ordinate
and direct emergency welfare activities. This committee was active in preparing a
welfare plan to cope with the Province-wide flood threat last June.   The roles of
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 1 and 3 to 8, inclusive.
9
 H 10 SOCIAL WELFARE
Federal, Provincial, and Municipal welfare organizations in disaster were examined
and clarified. As a result of this clarification, planning and organizing at the local
level is now accelerating. The B.C. Division of the Canadian Red Cross Society has
formally agreed to make all its facilities available to government in disaster and has
accepted a major role in the emergency welfare programme. Provincial Civil
Defence added four emergency welfare house trailers to the fleet of seven emergency
welfare feeding trucks.
The Research Consultant's services were increased with an Assistant Research
Officer's appointment in October, 1966. Research is continuing to increase its
assessment of the Department's service through co-operation with the divisions and
the field services.
The Division of Office Administration, in co-operation with the Department of
Public Works, relocated seven offices, renovated one, and redecorated one. Plans
were completed for the relocation or renovation of seven additional existing offices.
Two Manuals were completed and distributed. A 200-page Services Policy and
Procedures Manual was completely revised and issued. This completes the Manuals
revision programme begun in 1965 when the Field Service Systems Manual was
published. In terms of information-handling requirements, a number of studies
were undertaken and various procedures concerned with the administration of field
offices amended.
The Director of Regional Services continued his liaison function between the
field and headquarters and has become increasingly involved in planning and various
other headquarters' functions.
The Matron and staff of the New Denver Pavilion have continued to give excellent service to their patients throughout the year.
During the year there was increased involvement with other Departments of
Government, Federal, Provincial, and Municipal, and private agencies, and their
willing co-operation is very much appreciated.
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. BURNHAM
I wish to submit the report of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare for the
fiscal year April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967.
The past several years have witnessed a number of impressive developments
in the Department of Social Welfare.
We have increased our bursaries in numbers and in amounts until now we are
expending in excess of $55,000 annually to provide, not only our staff, but also
those of several private agencies, with formal social-work training at university.
We have embarked on a number of experimental projects which are designed to
assist in our approach to the many social problems confronting us, as well as to help
find more economical methods of administration. A project to develop community-
based home-care services for elderly people is being designed. Another project has
been under way for some time to discover the most effective and positive ways of
dealing with deserted families. A study is being made to assist in developing effective methods in working with communities to help them build needed services, both
to prevent and handle social problems. A practical, on-the-job project was established during the year to review our administrative practices and thereby assist in
the review of certain procedures and the development of more effective ones.
A programme was launched early in the year to stimulate the development of
Homemaker Services throughout the Province and a grants system of assistance was
established.   Many communities responded enthusiastically and by the end of the
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 11
year we were assisting 25 different homemaker societies. Their work is producing
many positive results by providing a most helpful resource to families in difficulty
in a much more economical manner than would otherwise have to be utilized.
Financial assistance enabled the Family Service Association in Vancouver to expand
its service from 19 to 60 homemakers, and the Red Cross Homemaker Service, Victoria, from 20 to 60 homemakers. The New Westminster Homemaker Service was
developed during the year by the Kiwanis and then handed to the Red Cross to
administer on a continued basis.
They now have 25 homemakers on staff and are doing an excellent job in the
New Westminster and Coquitlam areas. There are many more examples of similar
developments throughout the Province and there will be many more to come during
the following year.
Our social-work staff has grown considerably during the past few years and
the public is demanding an ever-increasing number, as well as improved standard of
services. The need for a good staff-development programme has always been
stressed as we are required to hire people with little experience and training. Our
Training Division has employed excellent people who have responded well to the
in-service training provided them, and done, on the whole, a most commendable job
in the field. They need, however, continued exposure to training and this is done
through the provision of on-the-job supervision, reading material, extension courses,
institutes, workshops, and conferences, etc.
It is to be hoped that a greater number of training resources will be established
in the universities and community colleges in British Columbia during the coming
years. The establishment of undergraduate courses in social work has been given
very serious consideration and has been encouraged by the staff of the Department
of Social Welfare, as well as the establishment of another school of social work in
the Province. Such resources would prove of great value in the provision of continued, suitable welfare services to the people of this Province.
PERSONNEL
Miss Margaret Jamieson, Personnel Officer
In reviewing the fiscal year ending March 31, 1967, it seemed appropriate to
make a few comparisons with the Annual Report for the year ending March 31,
1962. It was during 1962 that the first Department Personnel Officer was appointed
to maintain staff, provide liaison with Civil Service Commission, and carry out the
many duties involved in personnel procedures. These comparisons are not intended
as a study in depth, but merely to indicate the forward strides accomplished in
increasing staff to meet demonstrated need for social welfare services.
During this period the total personnel staff (clerical, professional, and technical) increased 26.4 per cent from 605 to 764. During this same period the number
of cases being served increased from 80,135 to 82,889, a net gain of 3.43 per cent,
or 2,754 cases* There is, of course, a high incidence of services provided to opened
and closed cases during the same period.
The greatest increase was in social-work staff, which accounted for 113 of 159
new positions. The effect of the Department's bursary and training programme is
reflected in the increase in the number of persons with professional training from 95
in 1962 to 134 in 1967, a 29.3-per-cent increase.* In addition to the 369 Provincial
social-work staff, there are a number of municipalities employing a total of 116
social workers.
' See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 4 to 7, inclusive.
 H 12 SOCIAL WELFARE
Provincial-Federal welfare grants for staffing various projects are outlined in
the report of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
Due to the increasing complexity of client problems and the extended variety
of services being given (child day care, community welfare activities, accelerated
programme for adoption of children, and many others), there is need to provide staff
with appropriate qualifications and training to ensure that meaningful services are
available according to the case requirements. Clerical staff, welfare aides, social
welfare workers, caseworkers, supervisors, administrators and directors, institutions
and field offices, divisions and senior administration, all have a responsibility in developing existing services and exploring new resources to benefit the people they
serve.
One of our social workers, Miss Ruth Fleming, was the tragic victim of a fatal
motor accident.
Despite the growing number of positions elsewhere, our rate of staff turnover
has not increased materially in ratio to the increase in staff appointments.
Our thanks go to all who assisted in maintaining staff this past year, with special
appreciation to our Training Division, the Civil Service Commission, and our Personnel clerical staff.
TRAINING DIVISION
Douglas W. Fowler, Supervisor
The problem of recruiting and training new staff for the Department continues
to be an important challenge to this Division. It is becoming increasingly apparent
that we will be more and more dependent on our own training programmes to prepare staff for the work of our Department as professional social-work schools will
not, in the foreseeable future, be able to supply the demand.
In the past year we have made 85 new appointments to our staff and 14 persons
were reappointed. Two eight-week in-service training classes were held, which included 60 of our own staff and 7 others who were staff members of municipal
agencies and Vancouver Children's Aid Society.
The new persons employed were selected from 189 applications for employment. The great majority of new staff members held a Bachelor of Arts degree.
The remainder were able to offer experience in social work or some related field in
lieu of formal education.
Our recruiting efforts have taken staff members to all four universities and the
effectiveness of this programme has been well demonstrated.
Future plans involve the development of more training for staff at the field level.
We have authority to employ an additional staff member and this position was filled
temporarily during the summer months. When we have a permanent person in this
position our programme of staff training at the field level will be expanded.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 13
PART IL—DIVISIONAL, INSTITUTIONAL, AND
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
The Division's programme is based
on the Social Assistance Act and regulations.    This includes provision for
(1) income maintenance with supplementary benefits for those whose needs
cannot be met in any other way and
(2) services of a rehabilitative and
preventive nature.
The programme is overseen by the
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
Division, which is staffed by two consultants. Their responsibility is to
provide consultation and guidance to
field personnel and to assist the Department in staff training and programme planning.
The social assistance programme is
the most decentralized programme of the Department. Responsibility for individual
decision-making is delegated to local staff who are most knowledgeable of the individual situations and who are thereby able to provide assistance rapidly. As a
result no one in the Province is obliged to go in immediate want.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES
During the fiscal year expenditures totalled $37,235,267, an increase of approximately 9.5 per cent over the preceding year. Breakdown of this expenditure
is shown in Tables 8, 9, and 10 of Part IV. Cost of housekeeper, homemaker, and
homemaker services is shown separately for the first time.* There were 73,035
applications for assistance and 69,660 cases were closed during the year.f Many
of the applications were reapplications because of short-term employment or movement from one geographical location to another involving different social welfare
offices. An appreciable number were transients who required services from a number of different offices in the Province. As at March 31st, recipients of assistance
totalled 73,846, of whom 18,119 were single persons, 14,001 were heads of families,
and 41,726 were dependents, including children and wives. This case load was
comprised of 55 per cent single persons, 23 per cent one-parent families, 15 per cent
two-parent families, 5 per cent couples, and 2 per cent children in the care of relatives. Of these recipients 1,852 were elderly persons being assisted with the cost
of boarding or nursing-home care. Shelter became a more critical problem during
the year with many families faced with rapidly rising rental rates for accommodation.
This has necessitated provision of additional financial assistance. Other additional
financial help provided by the Department in situations of serious need includes
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 8.
t See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 2 and 10.
 H 14 SOCIAL WELFARE
grants for purchase of clothing, for home repair, for school starting supplies, and for
other situations of exceptional need. Where necessary the cost of transportation is
provided to enable access to health services or to enable employable persons to take
advantage of employment opportunities. Many families have difficulty budgeting
in keeping with their income and contract extensive indebtedness. The Social
Assistance programme plays an invaluable role as the sole means of maintenance
for many British Columbians for whom other income is not available. They perhaps
suffer most of all from the general stigma that is regrettably associated with public
welfare programmes. That this is unjustified is shown by the relatively small percentage of fraud, generally estimated at less than 2 per cent, that takes place, and
by the fact that recipients who are able to forego public assistance do so when the
opportunity arises. When fraud is detected, referral is usually made to the Courts,
which are able to take account of mitigating circumstances.
FAMILY SERVICES
Family Services include both rehabilitation and prevention because both in the
end are commonly dependent on services to the whole family. The basic method
is through the skills and services of social workers whose role is to help people to
help themselves in overcoming their handicaps and making use of available opportunities.
REHABILITATION
Usually this is directed to employment but it may also involve upgrading in
individual functioning, as for example with an elderly or disabled person where employment may not be a feasible objective. Many persons are assisted monthly in
returning to employment and this is reflected in a large monthly turnover of cases.
Many others are referred for retraining. During the fiscal year 706 recipients were
accepted for vocational training under Federal-Provincial programmes. Numbers
of others were assisted or encouraged to upgrade their knowledge and skills through
local adult education programmes, and occasionally through correspondence courses.
Where indicated the Department has provided fees. Rehabilitation committees are
now functioning in most areas of the Province. These combine the knowledge and
resources of Departments of Health, Social Welfare, and Manpower in assessing and
rehabilitating persons handicapped by physical or mental health problems. In practice, the bulk of those helped are social assistance recipients, although referrals are
also made by doctors and by other agencies. Usually social workers in this Department carry the responsibility for providing any needed social services. In one region
a small pilot experiment in basic literacy and educational upgrading has been undertaken over a period of two years with a group of seven persons using the services of
local teachers. Of this group, two were married, one was able to obtain clerical
employment, one was passed into vocational training, two required further academic
training in preparation for entry to vocational training, and one will require continuing assistance but has been greatly helped in her social adjustment. The expenditure for the programme was less than the cost of maintaining one of these recipients
on assistance. It is hoped to duplicate this on an expanded scale in another district
through local adult education auspices. At the end of the fiscal year responsibility
for adult occupational retraining was assumed by the new Federal Department of
Manpower and the focus was enlarged from retraining of unemployed to retraining
the labour force. The impact would appear to be to reduce the opportunity for the
social assistance recipient in gaining access to vocational training. To compensate
for this special arrangements are being worked out between the Department of
Education and the Department of Welfare to ensure continuance of opportunity.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 15
Hostels have continued to prove valuable in coping with the problems of
transient single men, particularly by affording them an opportunity to become settled
and to obtain employment.
Contrary to popular opinion, careful surveys here and in other parts of the
continent have conclusively shown that the bulk of social assistance recipients are
in fact not rehabilitative to employment because of such factors as age, health, need
of mothers to care for the children, and serious psychological or social handicaps.
Numbers who might otherwise be helped are simply not acceptable to employers and
the indications are that this proportion is likely to increase as employers become
more selective in keeping with changing technological requirements. This may
require reappraisal in future of the appropriate role of welfare programmes and of
possible alternative ways of providing for income maintenance. In general it may
be said that the rehabilitative services of the Department are relatively efficient in
encouraging the bulk of recipients who are reasonably employable back into the
stream of employment. This efficiency is likely to be increased as the rapid growth
of vocational adult educational facilities for upgrading and retraining increase the
opportunities of those who can benefit from this.
PREVENTIVE SERVICES
These generally are services that seek to prevent further problem development
in families that are chronically dependent on public assistance. Often they are also
provided to a number of border-line income families not in receipt of social assistance. The stress of poverty tends to produce family breakdown and a variety of
serious personal problems that not only cause great suffering but may also disastrously affect the capacity of children to make the kind of adjustment needed for
future self-dependence. Failure to provide services may result not only in family
breakdown but also in children becoming wards of the Department or of families
not in receipt of assistance becoming dependent on assistance.
Probably many problems in delinquency, alcoholism, desertion, and similar
ills could have been prevented if professional services had been available sooner.
Unfortunately this kind of service must commonly be given a lower priority than
more immediate problems, particularly that of administration of financial assistance
to large numbers of applicants. Despite this the endeavour is continually made to
provide as effective a service as possible, particularly in helping families to stay
together and function more adequately and in helping to resolve problems in the
care of children. Communities turn readily to the Department for help to the
extent this can be provided. The staff of the Department in turn endeavour to
encourage communities to develop their own helping resources where this is
appropriate . One example is the development of local Homemaker Services, which
have undergone a considerable expansion during the year. These provide for a
substitute mother in certain family situations where the mother is absent because of
health or other exigency. They have also proved invaluable in enabling many
elderly persons to remain in their own home rather than to be faced with the alternative of institutional care which in fact may be more costly. In order to give concrete help and encouragement in the development of these services, the Department
has established a system of small grants to assist with necessary administrative costs.
The staff of the Department are often assisted in providing services by a variety of
local fraternal organizations who are able to provide financial and other help in
particular situations. They also co-operate with doctors, public health nurses, hospitals, schools, Department of Manpower offices, and other professional and knowledgeable persons and agencies providing services in the community.
 H 16 SOCIAL WELFARE
Two of the more promising attacks on the problem of poverty that have come
into prominence are Head Start and Community Development programmes. Head
Start is basically a cultural enrichment programme for pre-school aged children of
economically deprived families. This originated out of the findings that children
from such families tend to suffer from a cultural deprivation that seriously retards
their school performance, which thereby leads to early drop out. This in turn perpetuates the problem of poverty into the further generation. Fees are being provided
to enable a number of pre-school children of social assistance recipients to attend
day-care centres, play-schools, or kindergartens. The Community Development
programmes focus on enabling groups of people with common problems to come
together and become actively involved in finding their own solutions. It has been
found that when people are involved in this way they can often achieve more progress
than is possible by other methods. One of the advantages is that it can enable social
workers and other professionals to assist larger numbers of clientele at one time.
Both of these kinds of programmes have had some limited development outside of
the Department. The staff of the Department also undertake from time to time to
work with groups of social assistance recipients in relation to specific problems. It
is anticipated that utilization of these methods in the social assistance programmes
will expand in future as they prove to be a more effective and economic method of
assisting larger numbers of people to cope with some of the problems that are
characteristic of low-income families.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
Twenty-seven Boards of Review were held during the year, of which 18 were
in favour of the applicant.
The Division is sincerely grateful to the staff of the Department and to the
many persons throughout the Province who have assisted in carrying out the
objectives of the programme.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 17
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
T. D. Bingham, Superintendent
J. V. Belknap, Deputy Superintendent
The Child Welfare Division has responsibility for the Department's services for families and children other
than those families in receipt of financial assistance.
Legislative and administrative authority for the various programmes is
decentralized to the many departmental district offices and the three children's aid societies.   The major role
of Divisional staff is to enhance the
capacity to provide service to each
district office and children's aid society.   This is done through consultation, field trips, policy changes, improving procedures, and participating
in staff-development programmes.
There is an increasing request for service both by families wishing or requiring
direct social-work help and by community groups who wish to involve themselves
in meeting the communities' needs on behalf of families and children.
There is a growing awareness that social welfare is not solely the concern of
the social worker but is also the concern of the educator, public health and mental
health personnel, correctional staff, and the concerned citizens. This means additional co-operative endeavours by all staff on behalf of clients served by the Department of Social Welfare. Similarly the social worker is becoming more and more
involved in the classroom, in preventive public health programmes, as a member
of the mental health clinic team, and as a resource person for the Courts. Throughout the Province the social worker is viewed as an integral member of the community with professional skill in providing leadership and concern for the well-being
of all members of our increasingly complex society.
SERVICES TO FAMILIES
Family Services
During the year the Department announced a bold new programme of supplementary payment to non-profit organizations establishing day-care centres. This
service has been enthusiastically received as many communities recognized the
need to provide a positive environment for pre-school children where the mother
was required to work.
Day-care experience for a child can be one of the most enriching experiences
of a child's pre-school life and for many children affords an opportunity for enabling
him to get along with others. The experience also allows for a wider and more
fascinating world to open before him. Thus his life in school and his adolescence
are enhanced.
As day care is extended, particularly to children whose homes provide limited
opportunities, it is foreseen that fewer children will encounter major problems in
adjustment to school and in their homes and communities.
2
 H 18 SOCIAL WELFARE
With the increasing support of services such as day care, homemaker, and casework intervention, along with other needed community services in health and education, more families are strengthened in times of social crisis.*
Protection Services
There has been increasing public recognition of the incidence of severe child
abuse. As a result of this, the Protection of Children Act was amended, making
it mandatory that any case where a child is harmed by an overt action, or by neglect,
must be reported to the Superintendent of Child Welfare or to a children's aid
society. It is tragic to have to report that children today are battered to the degree
that they suffer permanent disability or death at the rate of one per month in British
Columbia. Speedy intervention by skilful persons at the earliest sign of such
behaviour remains the best protection the community can provide. Through family-
life education and further strengthening service to families under stress, prevention
can be attained, f
Unmarried Parents Services
Approximately one child out of every eight children born in our Province is
born out of wedlock. In 1960 the figure was about one out of every fifteen children.
This incidence relates to the rapidly declining total number of births and the steadily
increasing number of out-of-wedlock births (up to 3,897 from 3,670 in the past
year).
Our society must squarely face the issues involved, which raises the questions:
Should abortion laws be changed? Should young people, married or not, be provided with knowledge and the means to prevent unwanted pregnancy? Will such
action, if undertaken, make for an increase in promiscuous behaviour? Does more
liberal sexual activity lead inexorably to faulty inter personal relationships and thus
to increased social disintegration? Our society is now carrying an added social and
financial burden because of unwanted children. If we as individuals are concerned
with these problems, we must then dispassionately search out the answers to the
questions posed, rather than continue debating the issues on an emotional basis.
With this knowledge we must effect the necessary changes in our society.
From a review of individual cases, social workers quickly arrive at the conclusion that there are many persons who, if provided with birth-control knowledge
and the means, would willingly limit their families. We as social workers believe
it is in the best interest of families and children to help those who wish to limit their
families to do so. In our experience it is naive to think that all persons who wish
to limit their families have available the knowledge and means to do so.
Services to assist the unmarried mother to keep her child, if she so desires, are
occupying increasing attention. Many of these mothers with the support of a loving
husband and father could provide outstanding care for their children. Yet if they
attempt to raise their children alone without the full backing of their own family,
they are faced with an almost insurmountable task. To provide full care for a child
while the mother works is so expensive that few mothers, from a financial standpoint
alone, can care for their children.
The child is the one who invariably suffers the most. Society therefore must
consider alternate ways and means of aiding such children or face the larger price
of providing care in someone else's home.
Congregate care homes for unmarried mothers and assured income from unmarried fathers are two approaches which must be explored.!
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 11.
t See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 11 and 12.
% See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 13 and 14.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 19
SERVICES TO CHILDREN IN CARE*
The disproportionate increase in the numbers of children cared for each year
in foster homes is a source of deep concern. Although it must be realized that some
of the increase reflects the growing placement resources the Department has made
available to children in need.
The number of children admitted for care by the Department and the children's
aid societies grows at a faster rate than that of the general population growth of
children in the Province.
Reasons for this include the increasing number of children born out of wedlock,
many of whom are relinquished to our care. As well as this, more disturbed children
are recognized as many excellent facilities are developed and supported by the child
welfare programme.
We find that the number of Indian children requiring care increases each year.
This relates, in part, to the accelerated transition of Indian people to the urban
centres and thus stress on Indian families. It also appears partly due to the fact
that the birth rate among Indian families is at least double that of the total
population.
Foster Homes
To sit up at night to comfort a colicky baby, to wait up at night for a teenager
to come home, to change sheets daily for an enuretic child—this is accepted as
" parenting."   To do this for love alone for someone else's child is ideal " fostering."
To prepare a toddler for a move back to his mother or to a new adoptive
mother requires a love that goes beyond the ordinary love of most of us. This we ask
foster parents to do. Each one of us must be grateful for the efforts of nearly 5,000
foster parents who care for our foster children.
Foster Parents' Associations
At the year's end 35 groups of foster parents had been formed throughout the
Province. Activities included meetings to recruit other foster parents, publication
of newsletters, children's clothing exchanges, night school child-development courses,
and social events.
The second annual foster-parents' conference was held in conjunction with the
Child Welfare League of America Northwest Regional Conference in Victoria.
Foster parents reviewed the foster-home programme and in doing so learned more
about themselves. Through discussion with a representative group of foster children they learned more of the attitudes and feelings of the children they care for.
The foster-parent association development has caught the attention of child
welfare administrations throughout North America.
Youth Conference
The Department of Social Welfare imaginatively sponsored a conference of
22 teenage children in care. The purpose of the conference was best described in
the words of the Honourable Dan Campbell, Minister of Social Welfare, when he
said "... this is an eyeball-to-eyeball confrontation where you (foster children) are equal partners with members of the Department in reviewing the policies
and programmes of the Department as they affect you."
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 15 to 24, inclusive.
 H 20 SOCIAL WELFARE
The delegates quickly centred on the need for improving communication
between the members of the Department, foster parents, " own parents," and foster
children. The child-care programme has already benefited from the provocative
recommendations received.
Smaller conferences throughout the Province are seen as a helpful continuance
of this approach.
Special Placement Resources
During the year the Department's capacity to help emotionally disturbed and
brain-damaged children was increased. Anderson Centre was established in Vancouver to assist up to 18 disturbed children. The Island Centre opened to serve
12 brain-damaged children whose behaviour was beyond that which could be managed in their family home.
The Children's Foundation in Vancouver and Sevenoaks in Victoria both
expanded their capacity from 16 to 24 children.
The children admitted to these intensive-treatment resources were totally unmanageable in the community. The only alternative would have been custodial
or mental hospital care. The hope for a healthy level of functioning for most of
these children seemed slight. A follow-up survey was made of children who had
left treatment centres in previous years. It was reassuring to learn that approximately 60 per cent of the children are now doing well, while the remainder who
have not yet responded remain in institutions.
While the Child Welfare programme must continue to expand the special
placement resources for which it is primarily responsible, there is need for this load
to be shared more fully with community groups, mental health and educational
services.   Progress is being made in these co-operative endeavours.
New Denver Youth Centre
The New Denver Youth Centre completed its first year of operation most
successfully. Due to continuing modification to the buildings, full occupancy of
30 boys is expected to occur within the next fiscal year.
A summer-camp programme for boys from foster homes and the centre was
enthusiastically received.
The co-operation of the people in the small but active communities of New
Denver and Silverton has been most appreciated by staff and boys alike. We know
of no communities in British Columbia that have extended themselves as much in
support of programmes for children. The centre hopes to reciprocate by making
its facilities widely available to all persons in the area.
Maintenance Costs
As the people throughout the Province are realizing that the well-being of
every child in our Province is the concern of the child welfare programme, it follows
that ever-increasing demands are placed on the services.
The cost of providing services has grown correspondingly to a gross expenditure
of $8,882,375, up $1,284,291 from the previous year.*
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 25.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 21
ADOPTION SERVICES*
The total number of children placed for adoption increased from 1,394 to 1,471
in the year under review. This is a gratifying increase. However, there are warning
signs which reveal that we are not able to increase the number of placements as
rapidly as the supply of children is increasing.
Renewed efforts in recruiting and a new programme of permanent placement
must be furthered.
Planned Permanent Foster Home Placement with
Eventual Adoption
Many families have the wish to extend their love to another child through
adoption, but for economic reasons many young families have to postpone this event.
Through planned permanent foster-home placement with adoption as the eventual
goal, delay is avoided by bringing the " chosen child " into the family. Continuing
study is under way to expand this service and still provide the security of adoption.
Adoption Court Orders
Adoption orders were granted securing new families for 2,207 children during
the year.
Experience throughout the Province along with increasing public interest has
led to a study of different ways of preparing adoption petitions to alleviate the
growing legal costs to adopting parents. Some Provinces in Canada have approved
plans whereby no costs accrue to persons who adopt. While no solution has been
reached to date, the review continues with every hope that an answer will evolve in
the coming year.
CONCLUSION
As we pause during our centennial year to share in the pride of our nation in
its achievements, we realize that our future community rests in the hands and minds
of today's and tomorrow's children. Our family and child welfare programmes
must therefore be of a nature and design which will prepare children for that future.
The programmes that are developed must be in balance with all other social welfare
programmes, as well as those affecting the physical and mental health and education
of families and children.
In looking back we gain a measure of understanding of the advances made over
the past 100 years. Exploitation of children in the labour field has been overcome.
Much of the indignity of illiteracy, the pangs of hunger, and the scourge of crippling
and disfiguring diseases has been eliminated.
The present-day community affords today's child privileges and opportunities
of a magnitude never before imagined in our history. Our system of communication,
scientific technology, medical care, and education allows for a future that offers
promises never before dreamed of. The accomplishments of the past act as a spur
to prepare a society where a new certainty of values and morality will ensure the
security of future generations.
The catalogue of social ills that beset us supplies us with challenges and opportunities to open new areas of enlightenment and achievement:
—the challenge of helping families become more secure sanctuaries for raising
children;
—the opportunity to assist Indian children gain equal opportunity in every
sphere;
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 26 to 33, inclusive.
 H 22 SOCIAL WELFARE
—the goal of ensuring that every child born into a family is wanted;
—the excitement of seeing programmes evolve that change deeply disturbed
youngsters to happy children;
—the possibility that every family can have adequate housing;
—the chance to see all children develop their full potential for education and
living;  and
—the hope that ways will be found to prevent children from needing to come
into hostile conflict with the laws of our society.
It is the responsibility of all of us to clarify and, if necessary, redefine the
principles upon which our social welfare policies are based. Within the Province
new ways are being explored to encourage those persons directly affected by our
policies to engage in the review of present policies and determination of new
approaches.
Similarly, opportunities must be made for more skillful tools to allow communities to analyse their needs and involve themselves in the resolving of the problems
unique to their local area.
The Department, as well as working with the families and communities, must
equip itself to weld its various programmes with those of other Departments into
a concerted force which may be applied to solving the many problems which
confront us.
Thus the child welfare programme, mindful and grateful for its widespread
support, must continue to " re-tool" to form, along with other social welfare programmes, education and health into a useful consortium to assist the family in its
community. While united programmes must recognize individual needs, it is seen
that individual needs can only be adequately met within the context of a strong
family and community.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 23
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.B., Ch.B., Director
The aim of this Division is to help
restore health and useful function
while still encouraging the integrity
and responsibility of the individual
and his family as citizens.
In line with this policy of assistance
and with contributions by professions
and suppliers in the health field, we
are able to provide defined services by
dentists, pharmacists, optometrists,
and prosthetists. We also provide
items including medical appliances,
glasses, drugs, and transportation to
specialists as a supplement to the financial assistance provided by the
Department of Welfare.
Essential to this objective are the
efforts of the person himself, his family, friends, and the voluntary organizations in
all communities. These efforts should include tangible help to supplement the wide
range of assistance presently available from the Department of Welfare.
Thanks also to the co-operation and contribution of the health professions we
believe that the extent of our benefits compares favourably with any public welfare
programme on this continent. For example, resulting from this co-operation the
recently revised drug programme makes available good quality drugs on a responsible basis.
To effect this rehabilitation objective, the Division acts in many ways. These
include the administration of programmes for services and items outlined above.
The Division also provides consultation at all levels within the Department of Social
Welfare.
It also performs a liaison function with other departments of government, the
organized professional associations, universities, and other organizations responsible
for health care within the Province.
The following are programmes presently administered by Medical Services
Division:—
1. Drugs.—All persons eligible for welfare health benefits may obtain free
prescription drugs through retail pharmacies. The wide range of drugs immediately
available is listed in a drug benefit list. Private physicians may request authorization
through a drug advisory committee to prescribe other drugs.
When special authorization is received from the Drug Advisory Committee,
the Provincial Pharmacy, a part of Medical Services Division, dispenses the drugs.
The Provincial Pharmacy also provides all drugs and medical supplies for welfare
patients in private hospitals.
2. Dental.—Basic dental services are provided through dentists of the patient's
choice on certification by the local welfare office that the patient is eligible for this
service.
3. Optical.—On certification of eligibility, glasses are provided on the prescription of an ophthalmologist or the service may be rendered by an optometrist.
 H 24 SOCIAL WELFARE
4. Transportation.—Assistance is provided for necessary transportation for
medical reasons, with emphasis on doctors' referrals to specialists.
5. Appliances. — Surgical appliances are provided when prescribed by a
physician.
The administration of these programmes includes discussions with the professional suppliers of service regarding the extent of the service available to welfare
clients and the fees to be paid. The Division is making every effort to have policies
and allowable payments clearly stated so that programmes may be administered
equitably and this complex service rendered rapidly.
Clear definitions also make possible the use of data processing, both in the
collection of statistics and the payment of accounts. Most dental accounts are now
processed mechanically and preliminary plans are being made for data processing
of other accounts in the welfare health programme.
During the year there were no significant changes in the functions of the
Division, nor in the volume of services provided. There was an increase in expenditures in several areas, as may be noted in the statistical tables which have been prepared in the Departmental Comptroller's office. The total cost of health benefits
provided to welfare recipients during the year was $5,539,026.
Several of the forms used in connection with medical services have been
reviewed. The purpose of the Medical Certificate for Applicant for Social Allowance has been clarified and the form revised to stress rehabilitation.
The average number of persons eligible for medical coverage each month
during the year was 76,783, an increase of 1,138 over the previous year.
Some changes were made in the welfare dental-fee schedule, which increased
costs.
The welfare drug programme requires constant review because of advances in
pharmacology and changes in methods of operation of drug companies and retail
pharmacies.
For the second consecutive year the cost of providing prescription drugs has
declined slightly. This may be attributed to the introduction of the Drug Benefit
List in October, 1965. During 1966/67 the Drug Advisory Committee revised this
formulary. New items were added and the format was improved to make the use
of the list more convenient for physicians and pharmacists.
Much time was spent this past year on studies relating to the problems of
chronic care.
The Medical Services Division wishes to thank all those working in the health
field for their co-operation, without which it would be impossible to provide such
effective health assistance benefits. The co-operation of other government departments, voluntary agencies, and staff in all sections of the Department of Social
Welfare is also very much appreciated.*
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 34 to 39, inclusive.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 25
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES BOARD
E. W. Berry, Chairman
The Provincial authority for the
administration of the Old-age Assistance Act, the Blind Persons Act, and
the Disabled Persons Act is a Board
within the Department of Social Welfare consisting of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council. Besides the Chairman,
present members are Mr. J. A. Sadler
and Mr. H. E. Blanchard.
In addition to being charged with
the administration in British Columbia of the above three Acts, including
the consideration of applications for
and the payment of assistance or an
allowance, the Board is the central
agency for the processing of all applications within the Province for Supplementary Social Allowance and related health
services, and grants these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
Social workers attached to the Board complete applications in the home where
necessary and otherwise at the Board office for those clients living in the City of
Vancouver who wish to apply for the categorical allowances and for Supplementary
Social Allowance. Welfare workers from the Board also make annual visits within
the city and throughout the Province, where feasible, mainly in connection with the
Supplementary Social Allowance programme.
The effect of the lowering of the age of eligibility for Old Age Security which
began on January 1, 1966, continued to have its impact throughout the fiscal year
on the Old-age Assistance case load. Persons reaching 69 years of age during 1966
and those becoming 68 years of age in 1967 were transferred to Old Age Security
one and two years earlier respectively than was the case prior to the change in Old
Age Security legislation. On January 1, 1967, alone, 1,600 persons in receipt of
Old-age Assistance, who were born in 1898, became eligible for Old Age Security.
The latter part of the fiscal year was an extremely busy time for the Board.
The Federal Government had enacted legislation effective January 1, 1967, providing for a guaranteed income supplement of up to $30 a month, in addition to
the $75 Old Age Security. The Board was administering Supplementary Social
Allowance of up to $30 a month to over 22,000 of these recipients and although the
budget limits for the needs test or budget-deficit approach to the payment of Supplementary Social Allowance were increased to take care of the additional income from
the guaranteed income supplement, each person's " need " was different and many
adjustments in rates had to be made.
To add to the administrative problems, Federal authorities were not in a position to take immediate action on their legislation and many thousands of retroactive
payments had to be.made by them. However, the recipient of Supplementary Social
Allowance did not suffer as a result, because the Provincial Government continued
these payments until he received the retroactive guaranteed income supplement payment from the Old Age Security Division.   Also, in the month in which the retro-
 H 26 SOCIAL WELFARE
active cheque was received by the recipient, the Provincial Government paid him
one-half of his former entitlement as a 100-per-cent charge to British Columbia.
Continuing entitlement, if any, was then determined on the basis of the client's need
and subsequent payments were shared equally between the Federal and Provincial
Governments under the newly approved Canada Assistance Plan. At this time,
even though a recipient might have had no continuing entitlement to Supplementary
Social Allowance, health benefits were continued to him if he previously qualified
for them.
The guaranteed income supplement had a profound impact on the Supplementary Social Allowance case load and while the fiscal year ended before the real
effect could be felt it appeared that the guaranteed income supplement was replacing
and would continue to replace Supplementary Social Allowance for some time in
meeting the recipients need in thousands of cases. Also, as benefits under the
Canada Pension Plan become available to more recipients of Old Age Security, and
in progressively larger payments, it seems reasonable to assume that only a small
proportion or a " residual " group will be eligible for Supplementary Social Allowance in the future.
Normally, a fairly large percentage of recipients of Old-age Assistance continue
to be eligible for Supplementary Social Allowance on being transferred to Old Age
Security. However, as these people now qualify for the guaranteed income supplement on transfer, less than 40 per cent continue to be eligible for Supplementary
Social Allowance. By January, 1970, persons reaching 65 years of age will all be
eligible for Old Age Security and the Old-age Assistance case load will be nonexistent. With the Old-age Assistance case load non-existent and relatively few
numbers of Old Age Security recipients eligible for Supplementary Social Allowance, who then will qualify for the services to the aged provided by the district and
municipal offices? Also, what services will be provided in the future? In the past,
the prerequisite for availability of service was eligibility for any of these allowances
and a fair percentage of the aged population qualified. In the future, the aged
population will not be economically disadvantaged, but will be needing services
nevertheless. When large numbers of people need services, the problem becomes
one in which governments at all levels must concern themselves.
In anticipation of such an eventuality, an announcement was made in the
Legislature that a new Division for the Aged was being created which would be
responsible for developing services and resources for the aged in the Province.
A considerable number of agencies whose functions relate to the problems of the
aged already exist in the private sector, but as the ageing population increases and
many more services are required, the public sector must assume greater responsibility. It is in this area that the Division for the Aged will in future, therefore, be
assuming a leading role.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of government and many
outside agencies*
* See Part TV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 40 to 85, inclusive.
1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 27
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The gross expenditure for the fiscal
year 1966/67 is $72,812,300, which
is an increase of $4,545,700 or
6.7 per cent over the fiscal period
1965/67
The largest section of expenditure
continues to be payments of Social
Allowance, which is $37,372,500.
This expenditure accounts for 51.3
per cent of all moneys appropriated
by the Department of Social Welfare.
Average monthly number receiving
assistance during 1965 / 66 and
1966/67 is shown in Table 86.*
The Accounting Division prepares
monthly cheques for all cases living
within unorganized areas, exception
being emergency allowances which are issued to the field offices by the nearest
Government Agency. The system operates with little difficulty and a minimal
amount of time is involved.
The second largest expenditure shown is allowances for the aged and handicapped.   These payments are direct aid to clients and amount to $15,862,900, or
21.8 per cent of the expenditure for the Department of Social Welfare.   The Old-
age Assistance expenditure is decreasing yearly with the lowering of the age-limit
whereby recipients are transferred to the Old Age Security pension rolls.
As of January 1, 1966, Old Age Security limit dropped from 70 to 69.
As of January 1, 1967, Old Age Security limit dropped from 69 to 68.
By January, 1970, the Old Age Security age-limit will be 65.
The third largest section of welfare expenditure is maintenance of dependent
children, which amounts to $8,988,000 or 12.3 per cent of the total welfare expenditure.   This section continues to rise, with a steady increase of children coming into
the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the Children's Aid Societies.   It
can be expected that this section of welfare costs will continue to rise.    Table 87
shows the rapid increase in children coming into care and the resultant day care
required, t
The fourth section of expenditure provided medical services, drugs, and optical
for 76,783 persons in the year 1966/67.
The fifth section of expenditure, Field Service, provided in the main for administration and social work throughout the Province. This section increased by
$383,000, largely due to salary revision.
The section on Institutions covers expenditures for the Provincial Home, Willingdon School for Girls, Brannan Lake School for Boys, and the New Denver
Pavilion.
Administration costs have increased by $58,400 and as of the previous fiscal
year the total costs in this section amounted to 1.21 per cent of all moneys spent by
the Department.
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 86.
t See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 87.
 H 28
SOCIAL WELFARE
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS
J. Noble, Superintendent
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
In April, 1966, the retirement of
Mr. F. G. Hassard as Superintendent
was announced, along with the appointment of Mr. J. Noble as his successor.
Changes have been made in the
privilege system and in the progress-
rating system with the intention of
placing more responsibility on individual boys for their own progress
through the School.
Stressing the need for reception and
orientation of new boys, we now have
one man who is fully occupied in this
task.
In order to give increased responsibility to selected boys, we now have
an Honour Group which operates with minimum supervision from the staff.
In order to give visiting parents the opportunity to discuss their boys, we now
have a caseworker on duty every Sunday afternoon.
We have taken the first steps toward introducing group counselling as a full-
time measure in rehabilitation at the School.
During the year twice-monthly visits to the School by Dr. G. M. Kirkpatrick
were initiated and have continued for the purpose of psychiatric assessment of
selected boys.
Also during the year a project was initiated involving the use of a full-time
social worker in the supervision of boys on provisional release in Vancouver. This
worker makes frequent visits to the School in order to see Vancouver boys and to
discuss their progress and future planning with the staff. In this way a continuity
of servce is provided from the time of committal to the point of final release.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
In an effort to raise the standard of staff selection, vacant positions have been
widely advertised. This has had good results, with the co-operation of the Civil
Service Commission, and the initial period of probation is being intensively used as
a further method of selection.
We have initiated a staff-training programme in which staff will be involved in
regular meetings where the emphasis will be on participation and discussion. It is
hoped that later we will use films and visits and possibly develop a staff library.
POPULATION
The total number of committals for the year was 450. This included 104
recommittals, giving a recidivism rate of 23.1 per cent. Twenty-two boys were
recalled from provisional release, which makes a total of 472 admissions. We
worked with 888 boys during the year, both in the School and on provisional release.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 29
The average daily population was 189, giving a total of 68,934 inmate-days.   This
is the highest the School has ever known.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
In the summer of 1966 a number of boys attended the Sea Cadet Camp at
Comox. We are grateful to the officers at H.M.C.S. Quadra who accepted our boys
on exactly the same terms as all other Sea Cadets. This venture proved so successful
that it is planned to send an increased number for a longer period to the 1967 camp.
The boys at the school continue to give assistance in local projects in co-operation with the Chamber of Commerce, the Recreation Commission, and the service
clubs.
Another contribution was the cone-picking project. A very large harvest of
cones was gathered in by boys from the School at a time when other help was
unavailable due to the commencement of the school term.
As usual, the boys repaired and repainted a large number of broken toys for the
Salvation Army Christmas Cheer campaign.
The Superintendent accepted a number of invitations to speak to community
groups and a variety of groups have visited the School, including in-service trainees
from our own Department, from the Probation Service, and trainee school counsellors. As a result of a meeting with a local church group, three families volunteered to take boys into their own homes for brief visits. These are boys who, for
various reasons, do not have visitors.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND OPERATION
Brannan Lake School is not a prison, nor is it for segregation of the unwanted.
It is a centre for rehabilitation of the socially handicapped, taking its place as part of,
and not apart from, the total community effort. This role is clearly defined in the
Training Schools Act, which states that the purpose of the School is the treatment,
training, reformation, and rehabilitation of the children in our care.
To this end the staff operate as a team but with differing areas of responsibility.
We have a full-time academic programme with five teachers and one industrial arts
teacher. We have a variety of work projects and we are attempting to increase our
steady work assignments such as the forestry, motor mechanics, painting, etc. The
day-to-day lives of the boys are influenced by their contacts with the group leaders in
the cottages and the caseworkers. We make a continuing assessment of each boy's
progress by various means and attempt to individualize the treatment plan for each
boy.
Brannan Lake School is often referred to as the last resort. I would like to say
that we at the School bear this title with pride.*
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables and Graphs 89 to 93, inclusive.
 H 30
SOCIAL WELFARE
WILLINGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
Miss W. M. Urquhart, Superintendent
Willingdon School for Girls is a
Provincial Training School operated
by authority of the Federal Juvenile
Delinquents Act and the British Columbia Training-schools Act. Committal is by Court order and the
School has no control of admissions.
Releases are arranged on a co-operative basis between school and community social agencies on a provisional basis. Final releases are
granted by the Release Board after a
satisfactory adjustment in the community.
It is the responsibility of the School
to provide a programme of training
and treatment which will stimulate in
the girls a desire to learn and form good work habits and pursue healthy activities in
a socially acceptable manner. In the correction field, we are never satisfied or complacent but are always striving and experimenting in a desire to help our young
people live happier fives.
We are fortunate to have a high degree of stability in our staff which makes it
possible for real teamwork. There were two major staff changes this year. The
Chief Supervisor resigned to continue his education and the high-school teacher left
to further her teaching experience in Canada. In May, 1966, our senior cook was
seriously injured in a car accident and will not be able to return to her position.
In October, the second cook went on sick leave with a heart condition and on the
advice of his doctor has had to request a transfer to light work. These two positions
have not been filled by permanent appointment at year-end.
There has been an increase in the average daily population. During January
and February there was a marked increase in admissions, for no apparent reason,
and our facilities were taxed to the limit, causing pressure on both staff and the girls.
We have continued our regular academic and occupational training programme
and our recreational activities. This year we were pleased to add a third teacher to
our staff to do remedial work with the younger children. This is a most successful
addition both for the children involved and because it has freed the other two
teachers to give more time to the advanced grades and children who were " underachieves " in the regular schools. This spring five girls travelled to Victoria to be
the guests of the Minister of Social Welfare for luncheon in the Members Dining
Room and to attend a session of the Legislature. This was a " fabulous " experience! A group of girls made the placecards for head-table guests and served at the
banquet and luncheon for the B.C. Association of Social Workers' meetings in
April, 1966.
Our volunteer groups have continued to work with us. They add variety to an
institutional programme and bring quite a group of people from the community into
the School to mingle with and become friends of the girls. The most popular is a
group of young adult boys and girls from a local church who spend one evening every
week playing team games and having a social time with the girls.   The Elizabeth Fry
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 31
Society has continued monthly parties and visitors for girls and provided a volunteer
librarian and also a volunteer to assist with a " sing-along " group. Another volunteer has had a guitar group. Religious services are held every Sunday for both
Protestants and Roman Catholics and on a voluntary basis are well attended.
We continue to receive psychiatric help from the Provincial Mental Health
Centre and find both the psychiatrist and psychologist developing a keen interest and
acceptance of the total School programme. The therapy group for eight to ten girls
has continued to have weekly sessions.
Again we welcomed a group of seven Master's degree students and their supervisor from the School of Social Work who had their practice placement in our School
from September to April. These enthusiastic young social workers add to our casework and group-work services and act as a stimulant to our three social workers and
all other staff. We have no hesitation in stating that the use of this institution for a
student placement is highly successful for all concerned.
Last summer we put about two acres into vegetable garden and a number of
girls worked off some of their energy during long summer days working with our
gardener.   Gardening, however, is not too popular with most girls.
In January and February the Public Works painters redecorated the whole
School with the exception of the girls' bedrooms. This was a major operation at a
time when we were overloaded with girls and the co-operation which existed between
our staff and girls and the painters speaks well for the progress we have made—even
when girls could not use their own washrooms and when the smell of paint made
some quite ill, there were no angry words or problems. This is the first major painting job on the School since we moved in 1959.
Over 30 groups toured the School during the year. These included high school
Special Counsellors, Probation staff, Department of Social Welfare In-Service,
University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University students, Vancouver
City College Welfare Aide class, student nurses, members of the Legislature, clubs,
etc. This ever-increasing part of our work is becoming both time-consuming and
wearing, especially as it can generally only be shared by the Chief Supervisor and the
Superintendent.
It would appear that Willingdon School has moved from an isolated institution
to a position in the community of social agencies.*
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 89 and 94 to 97, inclusive.
 H 32
SOCIAL WELFARE
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
This is the annual report of the
Provincial Home (for older men),
Kamloops, for the fiscal year ended
March 31, 1967.
The Provincial Home is governed
by the Provincial Home Act. There
is accommodation for 150 men. Requirements for admittance are one
year residence in British Columbia,
ambulatory, and with no contagious
diseases. Residents consist of all nationalities and faiths, with an increase
in native Indians applying during the
past year. Our facilities in this retirement home provide housing, recreation, board, and medical facilities.
The average life expectancy of a resident upon acceptance is five to seven years.
The per capita cost has risen considerably over last year due to increases in the
cost of services, particularly medical and provisions. The inmate-days are down
from the previous year, thus contributing to the raise. The Home is on-going; there
was an increase in short-term residents, as 89 men were admitted during the year and
75 took leave of absence.
The Home now cares for older youths who require supervised temporary
accommodation pending completion of other arrangements. During the year 39
cases were cared for.
Considerable improvements have been made to the Home, consisting of air-
conditioning being installed in Wards 2, 4, 5,10, 12, and 13. Wards 4, 5, 7, 10, 12,
and 13 were completely redecorated. The west windows of Wards 3, 7, and 10 had
shade screen installed, which proved beneficial. New equipment purchased for the
Home consisted of many items, the major one being an automatic ironer for use in
the laundry.
Medical services continue to be supplied by the Irving Clinic doctors, who visit
weekly and when required. Physiotherapy is also used with success. The staff of
the Home (31) continue to work with individuals suffering from conditions such as
diabetes, results of poliomyelitis, cancer, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, paraplegia,
arthritis, and the effects of amputation, as well as a host of other chronic diseases.
A good balanced diet is maintained.
An example: Steve was born in 1911 in Yugoslavia and came to British
Columbia in 19*51. His education is limited, so he worked as a labourer and used
his money for alcohol, eventually losing his job and going on social assistance. He
spent over a year in the Provincial Mental Hospital. In 1962 he was run over by a
train, requiring an above-the-knee amputation of his left leg. He was fitted at the
G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre with a prosthesis and later returned for a refitting.
He is a diabetic and a heart case. Presently this man moves about the Home and
grounds satisfactorily, appears cheerful, and enjoys the comforts provided. He has
been a resident since 1965.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 33
One of the highlights at the Home during the year was the presentation of the
Pioneer Medallion to 22 residents, as each had residence in Canada prior to January
1, 1892. Local committees came to the Home for this occasion. Another highlight,
and this particularly for the staff, was the Award of Merit, a silver-on-gold certificate,
presented to the Provincial Home by the B.C. Safety Council, for having operated
431,931 consecutive man-hours without a lost-time accident from June 1, 1960,
to February 28, 1967.
By providing cheerful surroundings, together with such activities as handicrafts
and hobbies, gardening, social, cultural, and educational facilities and programmes,
it is felt that the longevity and usefulness of the residents will be increased, and they
will have a better reason for living. We are good to them as they trust their last
years to us.
I wish to express the Home's appreciation to all who have assisted in its work
during the past year.*
* See Part TV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Table 98.
 H 34
SOCIAL WELFARE
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report
of the Welfare Institutions Licensing
Act for the year 1966. As licences
are issued on the basis of the calendar
year, this report covers the period
from January 1, 1966, to December
31, 1966.
LICENCES
A total of 1,015 licences was issued
during the year 1966, of which 165
were new licences and 850 were renewals. In a number of cases renewal licences were not issued, due
to lack of approval from one of the
local inspectors, either Municipal or
Provincial.
Case load at December 31, 1966,
totalled 1,191, of which 960 were licensed institutions and 231 were files pending.
4
BOARD MEETINGS
Thirteen regular Board meetings and two special meetings were held during
1966. During the year Mr. James Mainguy resigned from the Board and Mr. Jack
Bainbridge was appointed as representative of the Department of Hospital Insurance.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
One new specialized institution for the care of children was licensed during the
year, leaving a total of 10 as at December 31, 1966.
Number of institutions licensed in 1966  10
Number of children cared for        480
Total days' care  66,091
Private Boarding Homes
The number of privately operated boarding homes for children continues to
decrease.   A total of 12 was licensed with four new licences and five closed, leaving
only 11 at the year's end.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1966  12
Number of children cared for  67
Total days' care  10,935
B. Day Care of Children
Family Day Care
There continues to be considerable movement in the numbers of day-care
homes. A total of 60 licences was issued during the year, and there were 29 new
licences with 25 homes being closed, leaving a total of 57 licensed homes as at
December 31, 1966.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 35
Number of family day-care homes licensed in 1966  60
Number of children cared for        527
Total days' care  32,723
Group Day Care
During the year through Child Welfare Division, a new government policy of
subsidization of non-profit day-care facilities was inaugurated. This policy added
impetus to the establishment of new facilities, and in the last few months of 1966,
nine new group day-care facilities were licensed. It is expected that this trend will
gain momentum as more groups are made aware of the help now available.
Number of day-care groups licensed in 1966  21
Number of children cared for     1,025
Total days' care  93,673
Kindergartens, Play-schools, Etc.
In spite of kindergartens becoming part of the public school system in some
areas, the number of privately operated and co-operative kindergartens continues
to increase. Most of these operate for a half-day only, but some have different
groups both morning and afternoon. There also appears to be a trend toward
full day care in some kindergartens, and the Board plans to take a look at this
development.
Number of kindergartens licensed in 1966  362
Number of children registered        19,830
Total attendance days  1,674,797
Schools for Retarded Children
A total of 32 licences was issued during the year, but the closing of seven
schools taken over by local school boards reduced the number at the year's end to
25. It appears that we have passed the peak of the schools being operated by local
groups, as more and more are being accepted into the public school system.
Number of schools licensed in 1966  32
Number of children registered        444
Total days' care  56,013
MATERNITY HOMES
One of the three maternity homes which have been operating in the Province
for many years ceased to function in this capacity at the end of 1965. Another
small home, operating on Vancouver Island, was licensed.
Number of homes licensed in 1966  3
Number of mothers cared for        409
Total days' care  25,194
AGED-CARE
Proprietary Institutions
A total of 344 homes was licensed during the year, with a total of 312 being
carried forward as of December 31, 1966.
It was reported last year that there were many vacant beds. This is no longer
the case, and it is very difficult to find accommodation, particularly in the lower price
range.
 H 36 SOCIAL WELFARE
There are practically no new premises being opened in the Lower Mainland or
Victoria areas. The principal reason for this is the more stringent zoning regulations
in effect, together with stricter application of by-laws regarding the use of basement
accommodation. The high cost of land, and high building costs make it almost
economically impossible to build a new facility on a profit-making basis.
Number of proprietary institutions licensed in 1966  344
Number of persons cared for  5,809
Total days' care   1,141,581
Non-profit Institutions
Three new non-profit institutions were licensed during the year.
Number of non-profit institutions licensed in 1966  42
Number of persons cared for       2,794
Total days' care  682,699
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
Two new licences were issued during the year, both for small institutions set
up to care for alcoholics.
Number of hostels licensed during 1966  11
Capacity         277
Number of persons cared for     5,198
Total days' care  62,684
ADULT DISABLED PERSONS
Eighteen licences for this type of care were issued during the year. The
majority of these homes are small, having five or less guests, but all appear to be
doing a satisfactory job, which has helped to make the boarding-home project of the
Mental Health Services a success over the past several years.
Number of homes licensed in 1966  18
Capacity        109
Number of persons cared for        137
Total days' care  37,491
SUMMER CAMPS
The biggest project for summer camps during 1966 was a new set of regulations
drawn up by a committee composed of members of the B.C. Camping Association,
the Consultant on Sanitation of the Department of Health Services, and the Chief
Inspector of Welfare Institutions. It is expected that these proposed regulations will
be approved under the Health Act.
Number of camps licensed in 1966  106
Number of children attending     36,960
Number of attendance days  337,655
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act.*
* See Part IV, Statistical Reports and Tables, Tables 99 and 100.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 37
REGION I
C. W. Corby, Regional Director
GENERAL COMMENT
The population continues to increase throughout the region. The
growing population affects certain
centres to a greater degree than others.
Campbell River, which is the supply
point for the northern half of the
Island, is presently opening up at a
surprising rate.
New communities are springing up
around industrial complexes at Port
Alice and Gold River. Other northern
communities, such as Port McNeill,
Port Hardy, and Kelsey Bay, are
showing benefit from new ferry services.
Heavy tourist traffic, formerly confined to the south, is reaching ever-
farther north. The Island is one of
the faster-growing regions in the
Province and this growth is involving
the Indian population as well as our more settled communities.
The movement of Indians into our urban communities, their special need for
physical facilities, such as housing, sanitation, health, and rehabilitative assistance,
constitutes one of our more serious social problems.
ADMINISTRATION
Movement of peoples, cultural changes, and growing population, along with
industrial expansion, create many more social problems than where people have had
an opportunity to become settled and so it has been in Region I. The heavy increases in the number of people served has had a corresponding effect upon the
management of providing service.
The need for reorganization and planning has been complicated by the familiar
problem of staff turnover due to educational leave, retirement, and job change. The
direction and supervision of new staff places demands on supervisory time which
slows service innovation and planning. The region is grateful for imaginative consultative help from divisions and senior administration. Extra staff has been provided, which, of course, begets the need for more space and equipment, and these
have all been put to good use. However, the work load is growing faster than the
extra staff and equipment can handle. In a word the service subject is growing faster
than the administrative clothing to cover the need.
This report must not fail to mention with gratitude the increased incomes to the
aged, which have allowed so many older people to attain a greater degree of financial
independence and thus to lessen administrative supervision by our field offices. This
is the only category where case loads are dropping.
 H 38 SOCIAL WELFARE
SERVICES
In the year 1966/67 the region served 9,352 persons. This was an increase of
2,131 people over last year. In this expanded service certain regional trends were
evident. There has been a higher percentage of younger couples with family problems. The transient family is on the increase and services to this group are difficult
because they remain often only for emergent help. Many of these families are arriving from other parts of British Columbia and Canada. Although unemployment is
seasonal, whenever it occurs there are transitory case load pressures which must be
anticipated.   Logging, lumbering, and fishing are particularly affected.
There is a ferment among our local Indian population and consequent demand
for services of all kinds to cope with their new and urgent problems. The movement
from reservations to urban centres has created an acute housing problem. Family
counselling, protection services, and the establishment of special social resources
such as the Friendship Centre in Alberni and an expanded placement programme
cannot keep up with the need.
The Indian Department, Public Health, and our own Welfare services are all
involved in a long pull to bring about the goal of integrating native peoples.
In spite of service pressure, some innovations have been instituted. The first
inter-agency co-ordinated service to assist unmarried mothers has been established
in the Greater Victoria area within the Family and Children's Service. The full
co-operation of all agencies accomplished this development.
There have been further inter-agency meetings to discover ways by which
overlapping of services to multi-problem families can be lessened.
In summation, the year 1966/67 has produced an unprecedented demand for
service in Region I.   The outlook suggests the need will continue.
(a) Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
This year has seen the establishment of a badly needed rehabilitation committee
in the Victoria area. The Vancouver Island region, except for the vast undeveloped
area north of Campbell River, now has virtually 100 per cent coverage for this
important consultative service.
It should be mentioned that referral to rehabilitation committee is selective and
perhaps greater numbers should have been referred. However, a great deal of planning for educational upgrading, training, and job placement is concluded in the district offices and because of the increased service pressures from other categories, time
limitation is a factor in making full use of the consultative machinery available.
(b)  Child and Family Services
Statisticians have pointed out that the heavy wave of post-war babies has
matured and is taking its place in society. This group, with its youthful marriages,
is showing a high incidence of family breakdown, necessitating many more children
coming into care. The preventive treatment needs of young families somehow
requires of us new approaches and innovations of service. The people to give this
difficult service must be prepared through training. We must also recruit people
most suited to the task. In spite of changes to bring about greater service efficiency,
we cannot escape the fact there must be more staff at the local level to do the job or
prevention services will not be effective.
(c) Services to the Aged
The older age-group of Vancouver Island continues to be augmented by arrivals
from other areas.   Many of these elderly people require a continuing and increasing
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 39
need for boarding, nursing, and private hospital facilities.   Resources for people in
the interim and nursing-home care range continue to be in short supply.
The recent increases in the income of our aged people have made many independent of our Department and freed our local social workers from a great deal of
administrative detail. Further decentralization of these services is timely and already
administrative trends in this regard are a bright spot in our reorganizational picture.
Services to the aged pose a heavy co-ordinating responsibility on government,
whereby the full partnership of Health, Mental Health, and municipal communities,
as well as Welfare, must continue if the important service needs to our retired group
are to be met.
(d) Community Services
The year produced very healthy community activities. Our field offices, in
conjunction with our divisional offices, have conferred and consulted with local committees and agencies in the Victoria complex and elsewhere on the Island, for the
development of day-care services to families and the provision of local homemaker
services.
Retarded Children's Association branches in Nanaimo, Courtenay, and Comox
are well along in the development of local facilities for handicapped children.
Foster Parents' Association branches are being formed throughout the region,
encouraged by our divisional, regional, and local field staff and community leaders.
A second Foster Parents' Association convention received regional support.
The region also joined with the private agencies and the Child Welfare Division in
the first convention of older foster children.
The Open Door Society, promoting placement of children of mixed racial
origin, has made a beginning.   A branch is presently being formed in Nanaimo.
Vancouver Island responded positively to the J.E.F.F. (Joint Effort for Fostering) campaign to provide badly needed foster and adoption homes. Unfortunately
this has increased our work load, but over-all responsibility for children cannot be
escaped by any other means than by direct service.
A badly needed group home has been opened in the outpost area of Alert Bay
to add to the variety of community development activities which have already
reached that northern part in recent months.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
My special thanks go out to the field workers and clerical staff of the region
whose morale has remained high in spite of staff turnover and increasing work pressures. The regional office and the Department are well aware of the time taken over
and above a heavy office and field responsibility to consult, advise, and encourage
all the community activity which has taken place. I can only say that past experience confirms we shall never regret the involvement of the local community. Without their help our job becomes extremely difficult, if not impossible. Finally, may
I acknowledge the generous and interested help of Divisions and senior administration. It is my considered opinion that the participation by Divisional Consultants in
planned staff meetings at the local level produces positive results toward the development of new policies, Departmental planning, and services to people.
 H 40
SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION II
The area has experienced major
industrial, economic, and population
growth. The growing network of
freeways and transportation systems is
ensuring rapid and continuing growth
of communities on the periphery of
Vancouver. The population expansion throughout the area has increased
the demand for land and homes, with
the over-all result housing is an ever-
greater universal problem. This, together with other sociological problems associated with economic development, has resulted in increasing responsibilities and demands for services
from the Provincial and municipal
welfare administrations within the
region. Concerning housing, reference should be made to the following projects:
In Richmond the Kiwanis Club added a thud phase to its senior citizens' housing
programme; the Raymur housing development in Vancouver is almost complete
and is expected to help many families; on the Sechelt Peninsula, served by the
Vancouver Provincial district office, the Kiwanis Club is active in senior citizens'
housing.
Throughout the region this year many communities have established or enlarged
public and private human-betterment programmes. Reference to some will give an
indication of the public interest in their neighbours' welfare.
On the Sechelt Peninsula, the Lions Club is helping marginal families, a Juvenile Court Committee has been formed, and a school counsellor appropriated for.
In Squamish, reflecting the growth of industrial development and better transportation, the Lions, Kiwanis, and Women's Institutes are active. Private but publicly financed agencies such as the Alcoholism and Narcotic Addiction Foundations
have been working closely with the Department and community. In New Westminster and the District of Coquitlam, a home-maker service is established and three
new day-care services are operational within New Westminster.
Powell River has established a recreation department (a rehabilitation committee meeting monthly), has gained a Probation Officer, doubled the visits of the
mental health travelling clinic, formed a Youth Council and Big Brother organization, and home-maker and day-care services are contemplated. During 1968 it is
expected a 40-bed boarding home will be available and a 40-bed chronic wing to
the local hospital will be under way.
Vancouver City has backed the East Enders Society, which gives shelter and
help to women off the streets of skid row. In addition, the administration is developing a hostel system, and in the interim private agencies are giving emergency
service.
In Burnaby the community is developing foster-home associations.
Housing remains a pre-eminent problem. The proliferation and refinement in
all service agencies results in great competition for staff. We are not a residual
agency; indeed, we can give leadership, but we are hiring younger less-experienced
people; therefore, we need an enriched supervisory staff, special-project endeavours,
or supernumerary staff to meet our minimum hopes for service for those immediately
in need.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 41
REGION III
G. A. Reed, Regional Director
Region III has continued the economic, resource, and population growth
noted in the previous report. In some
areas of the region in particular, the
increased economic activity has contributed to a shortage of suitable housing. The municipal welfare departments have extended to the staff of
this region the utmost of co-operation
and they have shared our concern and
desire to assist those in need. This
co-operation has been appreciated,
and some of the developments reported here belong as much to the
municipal welfare departments as to
the Department of Social Welfare.
During the year planning was under
way to include the Golden area in the
region.   With the development of the
Rogers Pass, this area can be serviced
more easily by the office in Revelstoke rather than Cranbrook.
Both the Director of Social Welfare and the Assistant Director visited the staff
in a number of the offices. The several visits of the Director of Regional Services
were appreciated by staff and the ensuing discussions helped to keep staff informed
of new developments and to give them a sense of partnership in the over-all planning
of the Department. Staff in all parts of the region took full advantage of the seminars led by members of the Faculty of the School of Social Work. The staff valued
and appreciated this opportunity to enlarge their knowledge in this field of study and
look forward to the continuation of these seminars. During the year staff meetings
were held regularly and much of the time was devoted to an examination of how
services could be improved and further resources developed. For the first time
during one of the meetings of District Supervisors they were joined by the Public
Health Nurse Supervisors, so that areas of joint concern, responsibility, and cooperation could be explored.   This was a very profitable experience.
The table showing the number of cases by category of service in the region
shows a total increase for the 10 Provincial offices and four municipal offices combined of approximately 400 cases. The offices in Oliver, Penticton, Revelstoke, and
Salmon Arm show a slight decrease in case load. In the Kamloops area in particular
there was a noticeable increase in the social assistance cases and particularly in the
one- and two-parent family cases. The staff have reported an increase in the
number of single persons in the 18-to-23-year age-group who are moving from place
to place and who lack trained job skills. They also reported that there is an increasing number of families coming in from out of Province, where they have in some
cases left both jobs and suitable accommodation to move to this area without definite
job prospect's or secured accommodation. These families in part accounted for the
higher amount of assistance granted to employables than was expected. The turnover of cases opened and closed each month continued at a high level.
 H 42 SOCIAL WELFARE
The concern for rehabilitation noted in previous reports continues. Our staff
participated in regular meetings of the rehabilitation committees in three major
centres. The staff have reviewed their case loads in order to refer cases to these
rehabilitation committees and the considerable help of the Rehabilitation Consultant
in this is greatly appreciated. A rehabilitation committee has commenced in Salmon
Arm and Canada Manpower is making regular visits to this area, thus giving great
assistance to those needing employment.
The statistics show a sizeable increase of children in care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare throughout the region. I know staff have made every effort to
bring services to families to enable them to give adequate care to their children.
However, despite this emphasis, children-in-care has increased, and while there has
also been an increase in the number of foster homes, there continues to be a need for
this resource. During the summer months the children-in-care increased because
of transient children who became stranded in various areas. During the year a
receiving home was opened in Merritt, and in a number of other areas staff are working with community groups who are interested in helping to establish group-care
facilities. Foster Parents' Associations exist in three areas with others on the verge
of forming. These associations have been of great value and assistance to us in our
child-care programme and on behalf of staff, I would like to note our appreciation to
these associations. During the year they formed a Regional Foster Parents' Association.
The need for day-care services is receiving much examination in the region.
A course for Day Care Supervisors has been put on in Kelowna, and a Day Care
Service, sponsored by the Salvation Army, commenced operating in Vernon. A start
was made on the Marion Hilliard Home for Unmarried Mothers. This new resource
is sponsored by the Anglican Council for Social Services in Kamloops. In Penticton
our staff carried on a project where they worked with a group of Indian children who
were before the Courts, and our services assisted in preventing them being put in
custodial facilities.
The number of cases involving citizens who receive a disability pension or
assistance for the aged, show over-all decreases. However, the need for community
resources continues. In Penticton the Soroptomist Club sponsored a Meals on
Wheels service which has been quite successful. Other communities are actively
planning similar programmes. Our boarding-home resources seem to be sufficient,
but there is continued need for intermediate care and nursing-home care resources.
All communities in the region are taking an ever-increasing interest in activities
that will provide services for those needing them and will co-ordinate existing services. Homemaker Services have started in Merritt and Kamloops and planning is
under way for one in Salmon Arm. Staff have assisted in the planning of these
services and the new Homemaker Services, along with the existing Homemaker
Services in Penticton and Kelowna, have received grants from the Department. The
Kelowna Homemaker Service has compiled an excellent manual for the home-
maker and they deserve much credit for this. Copies of this manual have been made
available to other services. In Penticton our office became a member of the Penticton Health and Welfare Association and our staff have participated with this group
to assess the community for the need for services to children and for families to
prevent family breakdown that leads to neglect and desertion. This will amount to
a social profile of the community. Our staff have also directed much concern to the
use of volunteers, not only in community activity, but how volunteers can assist us to
give better service. In Kelowna, our staff has worked actively with community
groups in their Directory of Community Resources and in their Community Information Service and Volunteer Bureau.   During the year staff spoke to a number of
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 43
organizations on our needs and services and we have appreciated and wish to
acknowledge the interest and support of many organizations in all communities.
In Vernon our staff participated with others in a public Family Planning Institute.
I cannot close this report without commending the staff for their devotion to
their task and their commitment to service to people in the face of increasing
demands on their time. Any progress achieved by staff has been greatly assisted by
the co-operation, encouragement, interest, and assistance of many groups and
organizations in the communities. This has involved other government departments,
schools, community agencies, and the community at large, and for the staff, I extend
our appreciation.
 H 44
SOCIAL WELFARE
^
*-4A.
REGION IV
W. H. Crossley, Regional Director
GENERAL COMMENTS
During the year there were several
significant economic changes and population shifts which affected our services at the time they occurred, even
though they might not be reflected in
the year-end statistics shown in the
statistical tables covering the region.
Amongst these was the closure of the
H.B. Mine, at Salmo, a Cominco operation, employing roughly 100 men,
which had some economic impact on
this small community and the surrounding area. Most of the men were
placed in other employment elsewhere
by Cominco, but there was a small
number who required assistance. Perhaps a deeper and more subtle result
will be the family disruption that will
affect the lives of some children in the
next few years, since many of the men
who own homes in Salmo have left their families there and have gone to work at
Cominco operations elsewhere. These families have become in effect one-parent
families. In the fall through to the early spring there was a slump in the lumber
markets which particularly affected the East Kootenay area where the lumber industry is not as diversified as it is elsewhere. Some mills closed down and some of the
larger ones reduced the number of shifts, leading to an increase in Social Allowance
to families during the winter months which is partially reflected in the Table of Costs.
On the positive side, there was continued increased employment in the region
as a result of the dam construction at the Duncan and High Arrow Dams. However,
this, together with the publicity about a pulp-mill to be built at Skookumchuck,
attracted a more than usual number of transients to the region. We particularly
noticed a large number of transient families arriving from the East in to the Cran-
brook-Creston area.
The population increase brought about in the Castlegar area, in the Kaslo area,
and to a lesser extent in the Nelson and Trail areas, as the result of the influx of
workers on B.C. Hydro projects, resulted in a very tight housing situation with
inflated rentals which adversely affected Social Allowance families and, in fact, many
low-income families not in receipt of Social Allowance.
The backbone of the economy in the region continued to be the lumbering
industry and the Cominco operations in Trail and Kimberley. Tourism played an
increasing role in the Cranbrook area where many people are employed in service
facilities.
ADMINISTRATION
There were more staff changes in this fiscal year than had occurred in the region
for some time with attendant disruption in service. This was particularly true of the
Cranbrook, Trail, and Grand Forks offices, although we were fortunate that some
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67       H 45
of these changes took place at a time when it was possible to employ people who
were available for summer employment. In Grand Forks there was a disruption in
service while one social worker carried this area for over two months in the autumn
until a replacement could be found. In Trail there was a change of District Supervisors in June. However, it was a great help in Trail to have a Federal-Provincial
Child Welfare Project staffed with a trained and experienced social worker at the
beginning of May. Five regular social workers left our staff as did one Acting
District Supervisor during the year. The addition of a third social worker to the
Creston complement at the end of November, by the year's end, was resulting in an
improved level of work evidenced notably by a decline in the rate of admissions of
children into care.
The level of service in the Golden District was improved through opening a
sub-office there in December. We were fortunate in being able to staff this on a
temporary basis with an experienced, trained social worker resident in Golden. This
lessened the pressure on the Cranbrook office in trying to serve this district some 200
miles away where there is an active Child Welfare case load and a heavy flow of
transients.
During the year staff time was devoted to meetings, surveys, and policy formulation with respect to the relocation of our clients in the Natal-Michel area likely to be
affected by the Urban Relocation scheme.
To enhance staff knowledge and improve communication, a one-day meeting
of senior clerical staff was held in Nelson in the spring, with the Office Administrator from Victoria as consultant.
SERVICES
(a) Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
This year due to economic factors mentioned under General Comments above,
there has been an increase in the Social Allowance case load. We now know that
this is also in part the inevitable result of having construction projects widely publicized in the area, since this attracts people seeking employment from within and
without the Province.
The content of the case load is of interest when some interpretation is given
to the figures shown under Social Allowance in the region in the statistical tables.
It will be noted that the greatest number of Social Allowance cases, apart from single
persons who are largely transients, are in the one-parent family grouping. These
are families that suffer separation, widowhood, or who are unmarried mothers in
receipt of Social Allowance who have kept their children. It is obvious that this
group will require and do require a great deal of social work help to prevent breakdown and deterioration, since the mother in most instances is faced with the difficult
task of trying to fulfil the role of two parents. The over-all increase in Social Allowance families and Social Allowance costs as reflected in the statistical tables is not
high in relation to the economic situation and population increase.
The rehabilitation committees in Cranbrook, Nelson, and Trail have continued
in operation and have been successful in helping some clients back to employment.
They effectively cover the whole region, since cases from outlying offices are referred
to the nearest rehabilitation committee. The staff devoted one day of their Regional
Conference to discussions concerning rehabilitation led by the Rehabilitation Consultant and the Supervisor of the Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division.
Two changes in administration occurred when on July 1st Creston and Castlegar became per capita municipalities responsible for participation in Welfare costs
under the Social Assistance Act. Creston commenced administration of Social
Allowance cheques in July but Castlegar, under the new Departmental policy, while
 H 46 SOCIAL WELFARE
participating in the per capita costs, did not administer cheques because the number
they would issue would be too small to be an efficient unit of administration.
(b) Child and Family Services
There has been a decrease in the Family Services category of cases across the
region from 153 down to 129. This, however, is not significant since the decrease
is small and spread throughout the District offices. Most Family Service cases are
cases where there is either a concern with respect to the children and the family is
not in receipt of Social Allowance or else they are troubled parents coming to the
office for help with marital problems or with behaviour problems their children
suffer. Most of this type of family service work is in actuality hidden in our Social
Allowance case load where a great deal of protective and preventive work is extended to families in order to help safeguard family life and the children involved.
The child-in-care case load unfortunately increased with the largest increase
in admissions to care proportionately occurring in the Creston, Nelson, and Trail
offices. This does not necessarily mean there were more children taken into care,
although this would be true of Creston. Nelson, however, has quite a few children-
in-care transferred into the area to attend the Vocational School and this would be
a factor in the increase. Accommodation for these children is difficult to locate.
Trail, with the Child Welfare Project worker having a chance to approve a backlog
of available foster homes, has become a resource area not only for this region but
for other regions and much of the increase in the child-in-care case-load in Trail is
the result of children being transferred in from foster homes in other areas either to
a more permanent placement or because they require Mental Health services available through the Mental Health facility in Trail.
The adoption picture is encouraging because the decrease in Pending Adoption
Homes from 65 to 29 reflects a determined effort by the staff to clear a backlog of
pending adoption home studies, particularly in the Cranbrook and Trail areas. This
meant that a great many more homes became available for placement of children
requiring them. We have throughout the region attempted to place more emphasis
on prevention and thus stem, if possible, the flow of children coming into care.
A very heartening development occurred in February when the Supervisor of
Adoption Placement Section held meetings with all regional professional staff to
discuss the Adoption Programme and to help with any problems occurring in the
adoption placement field. At this time meetings were held in Cranbrook and in
Nelson which resulted in the formation of a chapter of the Open Door Society in
Cranbrook, and a significant number of people becoming interested in this society
in the Nelson and Trail areas.
Foster Parents' Associations are now organized and under way in Cranbrook
and in Nelson and on the verge of organization in Trail. These are very keen
groups, vitally interested in our programme and offering us their helpful, constructive criticism and suggestions. With respect to resources for children, the Dr. Endi-
cott Home in Creston, a facility for mentally retarded children from 6 to 18,
continued to operate successfully with very close co-operation from this Department.
The Nelson Child Care Society continued activity and by the end of the year their
architect had completed his preliminary drawings for an Observation and Receiving
Home.
(c) Services to the Aged
There has been a great deal of interest shown this year in the region in developing boarding-home facilities for the aged. However, concrete developments have
not at this point materialized because the groups are in the survey and organizational
stage.    In Trail the Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs are jointly sponsoring a boarding
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 47
home for senior citizens and have considerable finances amassed to this end. Unfortunately they have not located suitable land within the city at the time of writing.
In Creston plans are well under way and a society has been organized to build a
20- to 30-bed boarding home. A 50-bed Tom Uphill Memorial Home in Fernie
at the year's end was very nearly completed and it was anticipated that they would
be starting to admit their first boarders soon after completion. The Cranbrook
Rotary Project Society is building a senior citizens' low-rent housing project at Cranbrook of 12 units. They have been approved for a grant under the Elderly Citizens'
Housing Aid Act and in August they received approval through N.H.A. for a
$64,670 mortgage loan. Interest in boarding-home development has also been
shown in Grand Forks, Brilliant, and Kaslo. Of concern at the present time is the
fact that nursing-home and extended-care beds are all located in the Nelson area,
while boarding-home beds are by and large at the present time all located in the East
Kootenay area. With the extended care programme being planned in new hospital
construction and with some communities showing an interest in boarding homes it
seems that this problem will be solved in the coming two or three years.
The Pavilion at New Denver, a small 14-bed nursing home operated by this
Department for a number of years, offered 5,102 patient-days care this year. The
patient population is divided equally between male and female patients in two
wards. The small community of New Denver is to be commended for the interest
they take in the well-being of the patients. Many improvements to the Pavilion
were completed by the Department of Public Works this past year.
Emergency Welfare Services
Our responsibilities for Emergency Welfare Services under the Civil Defence
Act were fulfilled this year largely in the training of pepole throughout the region in
the operation of the feeding van. Up to the end of March, seven communities had
participated in this training with a total of 106 people donating 140 hours of their
time to learning how to use the van should it be needed in an emergency in their
community.
Community Services
The many hidden activities that come under this heading are too diverse and
numerous to catalogue apart from two highlights. However, some have been referred to under other headings, since our staff have been consultants in all planning
and development activities mentioned. They have given, in addition, numerous
talks to interested groups throughout the region, involved a spectrum of organizations in assisting clients and have written articles for community newspapers, our
helpful allies.
One of the highlights is the continuation or development of properly constituted
Homemakers Societies in Trail, Nelson, and Kimberley who, aided by Departmental
grants and consultation, are offering much needed homemaker help in their communities. The second is the distinct possibility that Community Welfare Councils
will develop in Trail and Rossland as the result of meetings held there. These
councils, if organized, would lead to liaison, priority setting, and advisory assistance
between community organizations themselves and government Departments in those
communities. I hope they will become " Citizen Advisory Councils " as far as our
Department is concerned.
From the above comments and summary of events it will be seen that the
programmes that we administer in the region have kept the staff exceedingly busy
throughout the year. However, the co-operation and encouragement that they have
received from the communities and the individuals they serve has made this worth
while.
 H 48
SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Director
The population of the region as a
whole continued to increase during
this period. However, there was a
noticeable movement of population
within the region. Some left smaller
communities due to changing patterns
in the lumber industry, moving to the
larger centres. On the other hand the
instant town of Mackenzie in the
Rocky Mountain Trench north of
Prince George meant that some considerable numbers were shifted into
a remote area with the resultant uncertainty of access in the winter season.
The economy was buoyant at the
beginning of the fiscal year. This was
exemplified by such developments as
the Parkwood Shopping Centre in
Prince George and the expansion of
the relatively new community of Fraser Lake west of Vanderhoof. The tourist industry showed a substantial increase in the summer months.
However, the carpenters' and Pacific Great Eastern Railway strikes darkened
the picture by mid-summer and by the end of the fiscal year signs of a slow-down
were becoming more evident. Residential construction decreased, while the influx
of new residents continued. This resulted in a housing shortage of serious proportions.
The total case load in the region showed an almost consistent increase from a
low in April, 1966, to a high in March, 1967. Since total staff remained unchanged,
the relationship of staff to case load deteriorated. At the same time the administration of services to this expanding case load was hampered by a change of supervisory
staff.
The supervisory situation in the Quesnel and Williams Lake offices was improved by the appointment of a District Supervisor in Williams Lake on March 1,
1967, and the fact that this relieved the Quesnel Supervisor and enabled him to give
full-time to supervision to his office.
The two Prince George offices were amalgamated on January 16, 1967, to
occupy the entire lower floor of the Spruce Capital Building. 1717 Third Avenue.
This accommodation affords sufficient individual offices for all the social-work staff
with some allowance for further expansion. It also provides a more adequate
staff/conference room and improved general office and waiting areas.
A considerable advantage was experienced in the Prince George Office by
utilization of specialized intake workers. However, this arrangement suffered an
unfortunate limitation for some time through changes of staff.
Services after hours and on week-ends were improved by the assignment of
one worker to that duty. This worker also took on the Court work, an arrangement
which served to improve liaison with Magistrates and police.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 49
The Vanderhoof district office staff remained the most stable, but did suffer
from lack of a supervisor for the last five months of the fiscal year.
The Williams Lake district office had some turnover of staff, but entered into
a new situation with the appointment of a resident supervisor on March 1st.
Staff meetings were scheduled on a monthly basis. There is some movement
away from attention on administrative matters to discussion of topics more related
to staff development. A particularly helpful institute on " The Social Worker's Use
of Self in Relationship " was held in Prince George under the leadership of Miss
Helen Bateman from the B.C. School of Social Work and was attended by almost
every staff member of the social-work staff. Other significant experiences for some
members of staff included attendance at the Child Welfare League Conference and
the Foster Parents' Conference in Victoria.
The Prince George Rehabilitation Committee remained active and effective.
One social worker was assigned to the majority of the social welfare cases considered
by that committee. This social worker also gave particular services to the Prince
George Vocational School by attending weekly counselling sessions with any clients
in training.
The Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare spoke to a Foster Parents' meeting held in Vanderhoof on March 8, 1967. Attendance was small but discussion
good. The Deputy Superintendent and the Regional Director, together with two
social workers, also met with the executive of the Vanderhoof Retarded Children's
Association.
In Prince George a drive for new foster homes was conducted. This drive produced homes for children under 12, but was not successful in finding much-needed
homes for teenagers.
Services to the aged have been maintained on a good standard. The demands
of this case load were such that earlier plans for the social worker to serve the aged
clientele in the Vanderhoof district had to be shelved.
A most significant development was the formation of the Prince George and
District Community Welfare Council in November, 1966. That council, with a
broad base in community, has co-ordinated and encouraged a number of projects. It
has been involved in a Directory of Resources, a Homemaker Services Agency which
is presently prepared to function once a manager has been found, a recommendation
to the City of Prince George for the establishment of a Family and Children's Court
committee, the formation of a committee concerned with the particular problems of
the Island Cache area bordering on the City of Prince George, and to participate in
a committee called by the City of Prince George to look into subsidized housing.
Social-work staff in Prince George were also actively involved with the Mental
Health Screening Committee, Career Days programmes at the senior secondary
school, an institute on ageing presented by the R.N.A.B.C, and a one-day conference
on health and welfare by the Catholic Women's League. They also spearheaded an
interest in problems of alcoholism, which resulted in the establishment of a committee
to look into the possibilities of opening a Halfway House for Alcoholics in Prince
George.
Staff of the other three district offices were no less active in community concerns, having given many talks to local community groups, participated in Career
Day activities at the local secondary schools, and attended meetings of such associations as Retarded Children's Association and Canadian Mental Health Association.
They were also involved with the Cariboo Integration Council in the Williams
Lake area, which is concerning itself with improving communications between
Indians and white communities.
4
 H 50 SOCIAL WELFARE
The fiscal year 1966/67 was one with particular difficulties because of large
turnover amongst both supervisors and social-work staff accompanied by a steady
increase in total case load. At the same time there was a general increase in community concerns with Social Welfare and the staff responding by greatly increasing
their activities in their local communities. The response of community, individuals,
organizations, and civic personnel has been helpful and encouraging. My sincere
thanks go out to them.
Also I wish to thank the staff, both social work and clerical, for their devoted
attention to the needs of their clients and their communities.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 51
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Director
This report has to do with the role
of the Department field staff in the
Fraser Valley during the year under
review.
The past fiscal year was very busy
and all staff worked hard to keep pace
with a 15-per-cent increase in the
Social Allowance and Child Welfare
case loads.
In June of the year under review,
one of our social workers, Miss Ruth
Fleming, died as a result of injuries
sustained in a car accident while returning from a field trip to Hope.
Services to others was certainly a
quality of her life and we remember
her warm interest in people, especially
children. Miss Fleming designed the
cover of the Department pamphlet, "A
Manual for Foster Parents."
Staff training and development has become a necessity. No longer can this be
looked upon as an option or a luxury. Staff must be equipped to meet the changing
social conditions. The Fraser Valley staff attended an inter-regional conference at
Prince George in September. Fifteen of our staff took part in an institute on basic
casework techniques given at Abbotsford in February and March. This was sponsored jointly by the Department and the Extension Department of the University of
British Columbia.
ADMINISTRATION
The region is served by five Provincial district offices plus Surrey Social Welfare
Department, a municipal amalgamated office. The Provincial offices are located in
Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Haney, Langley, and White Rock. The Regional Director
is located in Abbotsford.
In June of the year under review, Surrey added a deputy municipal administrator to assist in the supervisory and administrative work of that office. A supervisor was added in March to the Abbotsford office, to provide leadership for our
work in the Mission area.
At the end of the year the field staff in the region totalled 48 social workers, 7
supervisors, 1 deputy municipal administrator, 1 municipal administrator, and 1
Regional Director.
In December the Chilliwack office secured additional office space through an
arrangement made between the Department of Social Welfare and the Township of
Chilliwhack. This greatly assisted in the implementing of Social Welfare services in
Chilliwack.
SERVICES
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
Social Assistance and rehabilitation services were provided for people in need,
under the terms of the Social Assistance Act and regulations.   Those assisted were
 H 52 SOCIAL WELFARE
individuals and families who were in financial need because of illness, inability to
obtain employment, lack of a family breadwinner, or disablement.
In addition to determining need and eligibility and providing maintenance, the
social workers try to study the problems of personality and family relationship. The
purpose is to assist people to make the most satisfactory adjustment possible within
their circumstances.   Many of these people present perplexing social problems.
The regional Social Allowance case load increased from 4,370 to 5,023 cases
during the year.
People on Social Allowance, in this time of affluence, experience difficulty in
providing housing, food, clothing, and recreation at a level the rest of us take for
granted. Many individuals and families were assisted with overages when faced with
special needs which could not be met through their regular monthly Social Allowance
grant.
Child and Family Services
It would be ideal if all children could grow up in their own homes, living with
their parents. However, sickness or family problems sometimes make this impossible. Also, some unmarried mothers cannot make a plan which includes the child.
When this happens, the Department must intervene and protect the children by taking them into care. The number of children coming into care in the year under
review, increased to 457, from 316 admitted during the last fiscal year. At the end
of the year there were 863 children-in-care in the region (approximately 16 per cent
increase over the previous year).
This increase placed a heavy burden of work on staff in adoption placement,
work with unmarried mothers, foster placements and supervising of foster placements, home finding, and protection work.
We pay tribute to our foster parents, who are the backbone of the child-care
programme. They are the ones who meet the every-day crises. A foster parent
training course was held in the spring for foster parents of the Langley-Surrey area.
The purpose was to assist them to be better able to handle the problems they face in
their role of foster parents. The course was given at Cloverdale, one night a week
for five weeks. It was jointly sponsored by the Department of Social Welfare, Adult
Education for Langley and Surrey, and the Surrey Social Welfare Department.
Services to the Aged
At the end of the fiscal year there were 4,047 persons over the age of 65 years
receiving financial assistance and/or medical coverage on a needs-test basis. This
was a decrease of 392 cases over the previous year. The new federal Guaranteed
Income Supplement which was effective January 1, 1966, brought about a lessening
of need for this assistance.
In serving those over age 65, the principal complicating factor other than age
or dependency was ill health and chronic physical handicaps. Staff helped in working out social plans for many who could no longer live in their own homes. Some
were in hospital when the social worker was notified that a social plan was needed.
Social workers called into play a wide range of resources to meet the demands. Staff
were hard pressed during the past year to meet all the requests for social plans for
those who required nursing-home care.
Disabled Allowances
Under this heading is service to people who are blind or disabled in some other
manner. The case load increased slightly during the year for this group. The total
at the end of the year was 449, an increase of 25 over the previous year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 53
Community Services
Staff played a vital part in helping three communities create resources for the
prevention of dependency. Community Homemaker Services were established in
Abbotsford, Chilliwack, and Surrey. Each qualified for a Department grant, along
with the existing Homemaker Service at White Rock.
The purpose of the Homemaker Service is to assist families where illness or
other incapacity threatens to disrupt the household, by providing the family with a
trained homemaker to do light housework, plan and prepare meals, and care for children. These four homemaker groups recruit, train, and supervise homemakers.
They render a valuable service to their communities.
The staff were involved to a greater extent in planning and co-ordinating within
government structure. Employment, public and mental health, rehabilitation and
corrections, cannot be isolated from social welfare services. Supervisors and social
workers took part in Mental Health Screening committees, which are now operating
in all sections of the region. Several additional rehabilitation committees were
established during the year under review and they now serve Hope, Agassiz, Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Mission, Langley, and Haney. Our social workers take part on
these local committees which meet monthly. The committees are comprised of
representatives of the local Health Unit, Manpower, and our Department. A regional
Rehabilitation Consultant was appointed during the year, and he gives leadership to
the committees.
Because of the nearness to the Greater Vancouver area, there are increasing
numbers of agencies and institutions which have established treatment or resocializa-
tion programmes in the Fraser Valley. Department staff provide co-ordination,
liaison, and social welfare services for them. For example, Miracle Valley, the
Salvation Army rehabilitation project located north-eath of Mission, had 80 persons
on Social Allowance at the end of the year. A social worker visits weekly to assist
in meeting financial and medical needs.
This region continues to co-operate with the Mental Health Services at Riverview Hospital in the community resettlement of the mentally disabled. These are
chronically ill patients who no longer require psychiatric or custodial hospital care.
Riverview Hospital accepts continuing responsibility and ongoing supervision. Our
staff assist in making the placements and arrange financial and medical assistance
for those who qualify.
This fiscal year closes in Canada's Centennial year. In the Fraser Valley as in
all parts of Canada, we have been recalling with pride the pioneers who cleared the
land, formed settlements, built roads, and educated the children. We are amazed
at the fortitude of those first settlers.
Looking at the pictures of the past makes it seem unreal today, as we are
talking of the Fraser Valley becoming a part of a metropolis. We trust that we are
also pioneering so that the work and the planning that we do will be of benefit to
those who follow.
I wish to thank the various community organizations and municipal officials
for their interest and co-operation, also other departments of government. A special
word of appreciation to the social workers and clerical staff, Provincial and municipal alike, who with energy and skill tackled the problems we faced during the year.
 H 54
SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION VII
A. J. Wright, Regional Director
In general the economic situation
remained relatively stable and at a
healthy level. There were, however,
some economic problems. Recovery
from a poor fishing year the previous
year, prolonged strikes on the waterfront and at Columbia Cellulose mill
had an adverse effect on Prince Rupert's economy. These had a far-
reaching effect in that the interior logging industry suffered severely, reaching a peak in January. Recovery from
this began with the advent of spring.
The Smithers area was not as fortunate. A serious fire at the Hazelton
sawmill resulted in a shutdown and
closed completely shortly afterward.
This has plunged that area into an
economic depression. On the other
hand, business expansion in Smithers
itself has been extensive. It is a slower, but steadier growth than in the western
segment of the region.
The economic situation in the Burns Lake area remains unchanged.
Case loads increased in the three larger offices, but it is felt that this was proportionate to the increase in population.
Although there were no changes in staff complement during the year there were
changes made in the Terrace office accommodation which has increased the efficiency of that office. There are also negotiations in progress to establish an office
in Kitimat which should be completed in the next year. This will give a more efficient
service to that area.
Social Allowance in all categories showed significant increases during the year,
particularly in Smithers and Prince Rupert. This, in part, reflects the economic
climate as indicated above. Single Social Allowance issuance particularly to the
transient show the sharpest increase as job seekers travel through seeking employment in the seasonal occupations and pulp-mill and highway construction. There is
an ever-increasing problem in finding accommodation for them in the three large
centres but Friendship House in Prince Rupert provides hostel facilities, it is at
times filled to capacity, and men must be turned away. Accommodation that these
men can afford in this region is at a premium at almost all times of the year. Housing for all economic groups, particularly the low-income group, is extremely difficult
to obtain.
In Terrace the Child Welfare Project moved into its second year. By focusing
our attention on the development of foster and adopting homes we have found that
there are a large number of untapped resources in the Terrace-Kitimat area. These
have proved invaluable to the surrounding offices, where it is found that there is an
acute shorage of such homes, made worse by the continual rise in the number of
children-in-care in all areas. This project was instrumental in the establishment of
Foster Parents' Associations in Kitimat and Terrace.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 55
Progress continues to be made with the provision of services to the aged. Prince
Rupert has a senior citizens' housing project which is filled to capacity and has a
waiting-list. Consideration is being given to enlarging the present facilities or building more units in another area. In Terrace, tenders have been called for the construction of a 22-unit home. Smithers and Burns Lake also have active committees
working on similar projects. Surprisingly, Pioneer Home, a boarding-home for single
older men has numerous vacancies. This may be a trend in smaller communities
that we are now swinging away from the boarding-homes in favour of self-contained
apartments, which certainly provide more privacy and activity for those who can
still fend for themselves.
In the area of combined Child Welfare and Community Services, expansion of
specialized resources has also been noted. There are now three day-care centres in
operation, caring for an approximate total of 60 children a month. Two are located
in Prince Rupert, one sponsored by Friendship House Association and the other by
the Salvation Army and one in Terrace sponsored by the Baptist Church. The
United Church in Smithers is also looking into the possibility of establishing one.
The Receiving Homes in Prince Rupert, Terrace, and Hazelton have now been
in operation for several years. They provide valuable emergency service to the social-
work staff and the children requiring their care. At times they have been used to
over-capacity. In spite of this it is not felt that additional homes are necessary at
this time. During the year another type of Receiving Home was opened in Prince
Rupert. This was a home for infants up to the age of three years, and operated in
a private home. The capacity of this home is four infants. The infant Receiving
Home in Smithers closed, primarily because such a resource is not needed in that
particular area. A new type of home was established in conjunction with the United
Church Hospital in Hazelton and opened in the fall. This is a home for Indian children of pre-school age who for various reasons have had numerous admissions to
hospital. In these instances the child is discharged to this home. Work by the social
worker, public health nurse, and Matron of the home is undertaken to improve the
home situation to the point where the child can go home to a healthier environment.
Early indications are that this is proving highly successful, reducing re-admissions to
hospital and lessening the degree of child neglect in the Hazelton area.
Resources for teenagers remain a problem in the region, but steps are being
taken to lessen this. In Prince Rupert, McCarthy House for Girls is operating to
capacity and work is progressing on a similar project for boys. It is hoped that this
will open some time in the next year. Improved probation services in the region
have lessened the demand on the social workers' time, which gives them a better
change to improve our services.
All members of the staff have been active in community activities during the
year. Talks were given to students in Terrace, Kitimat, Smithers, and Burns Lake
High Schools. Addresses were also given to interested community groups throughout the region. Mental Health committees are very active in both Hazelton and
Smithers. We have enjoyed fine co-operation and good relationships with community leaders and allied agencies in all areas of the region.
 H 56
SOCIAL WELFARE
REGION VIII
J. A. Mollberg, Regional Director
The Portage Mountain Dam is
still under construction, oil exploration is extending northward, and farming is expanding at a steady pace. The
population, while increasing, continues to be highly transient with many
new people with their accompanying
problems entering the region. Many
organizations and professional groups
along with our Department have invested a great deal of time and effort
to help the community and individuals
to meet the many problems with which
they are confronted. The following
will be a report of the services provided by our Department in endeavouring to fulfill our responsibility to
the people of Region VIII.
ADMINISTRATION
The Department of Social Welfare has two district offices in the region, one in
Dawson Creek consisting of seven workers, five and one-half stenographers, and a
district supervisor serving the South Peace River area. The second in Fort St. John
consists of five workers, three stenographers, and a district supervisor serving the
North Peace River area and the northern portion of the Province to the Yukon
Border. Changes in staff were four social workers in Dawson Creek and two in
Fort St. John. Office accommodation has remained unchanged, although facilities
in our Dawson Creek office are far from adequate, and efforts are being made to
obtain new quarters.
Our staff-development programme has continued throughout the year, consisting of staff meetings attended by members of senior administration or the divisions. An institute was also held in conjunction with the School of Social Work,
University of British Columbia, on the topic " Community Development." We also
joined with Regions V, VI, and VII in a three-day inter-regional conference in
Prince George, which proved most helpful and successful.
SERVICES
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
The number of social assistance recipients and the cost of this service has
increased since last year, as well as the variety and degree of problems our clients
are experiencing. Employment opportunities have been less, and the influx of
people seeking work on the Portage Mountain Dam has continued. Unfortunately,
once these people arrive in the area they sometimes find the expected work is not
available and social assistance is necessary.
One of the major problems facing the residents of this region is the lack of
suitable housing, particularly low-cost housing. A second problem is that of
alcoholism and the lack of treatment facilities, particularly for the female alcoholic.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 57
We would like to acknowledge the help and co-operation received from the Alcoholic Anonymous Association, who have worked closely with our Department in
order to help these people.
Our rehabilitation committee, consisting of representatives from the Department of Health, Canada Manpower, Dawson Creek Vocational School, Rehabilitation Division, and our Department continued to function throughout the year.
Our hostel for single transient men continues to operate, and has been an excellent and valuable resource in this region.
Child and Family Service
The year 1966 saw an increase in the number of adoption applications, which
is due primarily to the increased publicity in this regard. The statistics also show
a substantial increase in the number of unmarried parents. However, the actual
number has only risen slightly as the increased figures show an earlier referral to our
Department and cases actually remain open for a longer period of time, thus accounting for much of the increased statistical count.
Many women's organizations and our Foster Parents' Association continue to
help us in our foster- and adoption-home recruitment campaigns. Their help is most
gratefully acknowledged. We also sent delegates to the Provincial Foster Parents'
Conference, which proved most helpful to the Foster Parents' Association, as well
as our own staff.
Our Rotary Receiving Home in Fort St. John for children 12 to 18 years old
continues to function most adequately, and is helping to meet the need for the whole
region. A similar resource is in the developmental process in Dawson Creek, and it
is hoped that we will have this operating in the coming year.
There has been a continued increase in the number of children in our care.
These are children whose own parents are unable to care for them for many and
various reasons. Some only require a short period of time while their parents are
helped to solve their problems, whereas others are under the care of the Superintendent until adoption or other permanent planning can be arranged. The increase in
Region VIII is less than the Provincial average, however, this is a continuing problem
which must be faced in the years to come.
Services to the Aged
Our elderly population remains relatively small in this region. Because of this,
services for these people have not developed as quickly as has happened in other
parts of the Province. Rotary Harbour, a low-cost housing scheme for elderly citizens, continues to operate in Dawson Creek. The Pioneer Home, a similar home,
was also opened in Fort St. John on December 3, 1966, with 16 suites. These are
excellent resources, and the communities of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John should
be commended for their efforts. Unfortunately, no community has developed boarding- or nursing-home facilities for the elderly who need this type of care. Plans are
progressing for a continued-care unit in conjunction with the hospital in Pouce
Coupe, and a start has been made on the formation of a society for the development
of boarding-home facilities in the South Peace.
Community Services
The Dawson Creek Homemakers' Association commenced operation October,
1966. This is proving to be a very necessary and worthwhile resource, and I would
like to thank the community for their time and effort in having this developed. A
similar resource is still very much required in Fort St. John, as well as the development of day-care services in both communities.   With the increase of one-parent
 H 58 SOCIAL WELFARE
families and working mothers, the need for these services is going to increase rather
than decrease. Another very interesting and worthwhile development was the
mothers " morning out" sponsored by the United Church Women in Dawson Creek.
Under this programme, mothers who would ordinarily be unable to get out were
provided with one morning a week to attend a programme for both their entertainment and education. This was done on a trial basis, and it is hoped that it will be
continued in the coming year. A One-Parent Association also continued to function
during the year, and our staff were also active with professional committees looking
at problem families in both Fort St. John and Dawson Creek and the Family and
Children's Court in Dawson Creek. We have also received excellent co-operation
from the schools, hospitals, Canada Manpower, and the Department of Public
Health. We have been especially pleased with the help and co-operation received
from the doctors and lawers during the past year.
In conclusion, I would like to thank the community, our staff, and all the many
individuals and organizations who have helped to make our programme meaningful
and effective to those people in need in this region.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 59
PART HI.—LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. Ill)
This Act establishes the Department of Social Welfare as having jurisdiction
of all matters relating to social and public welfare and social assistance.
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 360, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial assistance
and other services that are essential for a reasonably normal and healthy existence
to individuals and families who are unable to maintain -themselves by their own
efforts.
PROTECTION OF CHILDREN ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 303, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are
neglected, abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship.
CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED PARENTS ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 52, as Amended)
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of
wedlock are protected.
ADOPTION ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 4 as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted
children as those of children born to both parents in a family.
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 270)
The purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance to persons between
65 and 68 years of age who have limited assets or income.
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 113, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to persons over 18 years of age who are
totally and permanently disabled and who have limited assets or income.
BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 29, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to blind persons over 18 years of age
and who have limited assets or income.
 H 60 SOCIAL WELFARE
TRAINING-SCHOOLS ACT
(1963, Chap. 50)
The purpose of this Act is to provide training, reformation, and rehabilitation
of children committed to the training schools.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS LICENSING ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 406, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to ensure that adequate standards of care and supervision are provided for persons who receive services from such institutions as
boarding-homes, orphanages, maternity homes, hostels, creches, day-nurseries, playschools, and kindergartens.
PROVINCIAL HOME ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 307, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 61
PART IV.—STATISTICAL REPORTS AND TABLES
Table 1.—Comparison of Number of Cases by Category of Service
in the Province as of March 31, 1966 and 1967
Cases at March—
Change
Per Cent
Category
1966
1967
Change
1,911
16,702
1,553
3,902
6,702
653
2,047
18,119
1,669
4,896
7,436
767
+136
+1,417
+116
+994
+734
+114
+7.1
Social Allowance—
+8.5
+7.5
+25.5
+ 11.0
+ 17.5
Totals
29,512
32,887
+3,375
+ 11.4
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
597
2,633
7,102
26,659
628
184
830
844
2,351
4,536
951
767
58
591
2,813
5,966
26,127
644
197
827
1,038
2,558
5,222
1,008
835
30
99
-6
+ 180
— 1,136
—532
+ 16
+ 13
-3
+ 194
+207
+686
+57
+68
-28
99
-1.0
+6.8
Old-age Assistance	
-16.0
—2.0
Adoption home pending    	
Adoption home approved 	
+2.5
+7.1
Child in adoption home	
-0.4
+23.0
+8.8
+15.1
+6.0
Child-in-carei  	
Unmarried parent	
+8.9
-48.3
Health and institutional service  	
Area Development Projects
Totals
79,563
82,889
+3,326
i Note.—The total number of children in care shown in this table differs slightly with the Child Welfare
Division's statistics because of the approximately 1-week delay in reporting.
2 Research project providing total service in a Vancouver City area.
Table 2.—Number of Cases Receiving Service in the Province, by
Category of Service, during the Year 1966/67
Category
Cases Open
First of
Year
Cases
Opened
during
Year
Cases
Closed
during
Year
Cases Open
End of
Year
Cases
Served
during
Yeari
Family Service	
Social Allowance-
Single person	
Couple.
Two-parent family.
One-parent family-
Child with relative-
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance .
Old Age Security Supplementary Allowance	
Adoption home pending	
Adoption home approved .
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved	
Child-in-care	
Unmarried parent	
Welfare institution	
Health and institution service-
Area Development Projects	
Totals	
1,911
16,702
1,553
3,902
6,702
653
597
2,633
7,102
26,659
628
184
830
844
2,351
4,536
951
767
58
79,563
2,896
48,346
3,384
11,073
9,384
848
245
1,087
3,830
8,308
1,338
848
1,715
1,399
1,373
4,418
1,565
268
389
132
102,846
2,760
46,928
3,268
10,079
8,647
738
251
907
4,966
8,840
1,322
835
1,718
1,205
1,166
3,732
1,508
201
416
33
99,520
2,047
18,119
1,669
4,896
7,436
767
591
2,813
5,966
26,127
644
197
827
1,038
2,558
5,222
1,008
835
30
99
82,889
4,807
65,048
4,937
14,975
16,086
1,501
842
3,720
10,932
34,967
1,966
1,032
2,545
2,243
3,724
8,954
2,516
1,035
447
132
182,409
i Cases served during year is total of cases open first of year and cases opened during year.
2 Research project providing total service in a Vancouver City area.
 H 62
SOCIAL WELFARE
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 63
The following Tables 3-1 to 3-8, inclusive, are available from the Department
of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., on request:—
Table 3-1.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region I as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-2.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region II as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-3.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region III as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-4.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region IV as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-5.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region V as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-6.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VI as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-7.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VII as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 3-8.—Number of Cases by Category of Service for Administrative Offices
in Region VIII as of March 31, 1966 and 1967.
Table 4.—Total Number of Casual and Permanent Staff (Clerical, Professional, and Technical) That Were Employed, and Their Location
in the Department, as of March 31, 1962, and March 31, 1967.
1962 1967
General Administration  16 12
Field Service  322 437
Medical Services Division  13 18
Child Welfare Division  27 38
Provincial Home  34 35
Brannan Lake School for Boys  62 62
Willingdon School for Girls  50 50
Old-age Assistance Board  76 77
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  5 5
605 734
New Denver Youth Centre       16
Japanese Pavilion, New Denver       14
764
 H 64
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 5.—Total Social-work Staff Employed for Fiscal Years Ended
March 31, 1961, and March 31, 1962; and March 31, 1966, and March
31, 1967.
1961/62
1966/67
University
Trained
In-
service
Trained
Total
University
Trained
In-
service
Trained
Total
Total staff March 31, 196L.
Completed formal training
89
+5
147
—5
236
Total staff March 31,1966
(including institutions)	
Completed formal training
during fiscal year	
Staff appointed April 1,
1966, to March 31, 1967-
Resignations, deaths (1),
and transfers (1), April
1, 1966, to March 31,
1967	
Totals—	
128
+ 12
216
—12
344
94
24
28
142
54
37
236
78
65
	
Staff   appointed  April   1,
1961, to March 31,1962_
Resignations, deaths  (2),
and transfers (2), April
1,   1961,  to March 31,
1962
140
17
23
204
67
36
344
84
Total   staff,   March   31,
1962 (excluding institutions)— 	
Brannan Lake School for
Boys   and   Willingdon
School for Girls
90
5
159
2
249
7
59
Totals
95
161
256
134
235
369
Table 6.—Total Social-work Staff, According to Degrees and Training,
as at March 31, 1962, and March 31, 1967
1962
1967
Men
Women
Totals
Men
Women
Totals
5
3
17
3
6
1
2
77
4
2
22
21
9
2
2
80
9
5
39
24
15
3
4
157
9
5
28
2
13
3
7
97
12
~30
20
10
2
3
128
21
5
58
22
One year of training at School of Social Work,
23
Two years of training at School of Social Work,
but no degree
In-service trainees now taking course  	
In-service trained	
5
10
225
Totals . -  	
114
142
256
164
205
369
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 65
Table 7.—Social Worker Separations Which Occurred during
Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1966/67, by Reason
Domestic 	
To further education	
To accept other employment
111 health	
Deaths 	
Transferred	
Services unsatisfactory ___
To accept municipal job
Voluntary retirement	
Temporary only	
Personal 	
To return to another Province or country	
To accept Federal Government employment
Totals
1961/62
.. 19
.. 14
_ 10
._ 3
._ 2
._ 2
._ 2
._ 2
_    1
.. 10
65
1966/67
17
4
15
2
1
1
5
3
1
281
1
3
2
83
1 Twenty-four of whom not shown in Table 5 because of short-term temporary employment.
Table 8.—Expenditures for Social Allowances,
Basic Social Allowances	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing-
and boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis),
special allowances and grants	
Housekeeping and Homemaker Services	
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its
home by fire or similar circumstances	
Tuberculosis cases—
(a) Boarding-, nursing-, and private-home
care   $129,135
(b) Transportation  213
(c) Comforts allowance      	
Hospitalization of social assistance cases (short stay, etc.)___
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts	
Municipal share of costs	
Reimbursement from other Provinces	
Federal-Provincial cost sharing	
1966/67
$32,301,487
4,488,095
279,986
22,861
129,348
13,490
$37,235,267
$3,806,767
260,407
18,256,490
 H 66
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Regions
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1966 and 1967
Persons
Costs
March, 1966
March, 1967
March, 1966
March, 1967
Region I
Provincial—
264
236
502
224
761
597
476
249
607
444
1,079
754
$9,464
9,194
22,005
11,749
31,507
23,642
$16,642
9,305
Courtenay  	
23,419
20,026
Nanaimo    	
48,884
30,982
Totals 	
2,584
3,609
$107,561
$149,258
Municipal—
Alberni	
Campbell River   ..   .._
205
151
129
29
170
182
84
662
210
48
510
582
1,675
258
292
152
57
170
234
94
767
354
63
560
692
2,050
$7,007
5,662
5,512
1,332
6,235
10,222
2,971
26,854
7,998
1,806
20,825
34,419
92,425
$8,897
7,729
Courtenay 	
6,253
2,372
Duncan 	
8,394
Esquimalt    ...
15,498
Ladysmith  	
Nanaimo  	
North Cowichan	
3,527
30,692
13,192
Oak B ay 	
1,750
Port Alberni..	
22,979
Saanich _	
40,187
Victoria— 	
115,507
Totals .. 	
4,637
5,743
$223,268
$276,977
Region totals...	
7,221
9,352
$330,829
$426,235
Region 11
Provincial—
New Westminster	
17
387
60
50
561
77
$641
15,980
2,457
$1,213
Vancouver _	
20,442
Westview	
3,550
Totals... 	
464
688
$19,078
$25,205
Municipal—■
Burnaby _	
Coquitlam.	
2,636
655
374
1,587
682
359
368
181
211
644
16,355
134
2,891
990
457
1,937
791
448
411
203
218
649
17,337
234
$140,563
36,362
16,829
76,068
33,147
18,940
18,286
6,854
5,960
28,591
910,430
11,527
$145,154
44,843
Delta	
20,533
New Westminster	
83,935
North Vancouver City... _ 	
39,491
North Vancouver District	
22,939
Port Coquitlam	
21,815
Port Moody  	
7,131
Powell River	
8,448
Richmond _	
29,908
Vancouver 	
West Vancouver- .	
977,041
16,182
Totals	
24,186
26,566        |
$1,303,557
$1,417,420
Region totals 	
24,650
27,254        |
$1,322,635
$1,442,625
Region 111
Provincial—■
854
684
345
270
411
523
242
433
632
1,264
812
325
254
337
442
515
164
487
800
$34,280
26,519
12,529
$41,225
Kelowna 	
Lillooet 	
30,798
11,002
7,390
9,879
15,760
18,661
5,959
13,690
21,036
12,143
Oliver 	
16,963
Penticton __     	
Revelstoke 	
19,508
4,119
15,458
Vernon    	
27,053
Totals      	
4,394
5,400
$158,313
$185,659
Municipal—
1
51        1
38
581        |
1
         ]
$1,934      |
1,184
17,820      |
1
Kamloops	
650        |
!
$20,300
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 67
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Regions
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1966 and 1967—Continued
Persons
Costs
March, 1966
March, 1967
March, 1966
March, 1967
Region III—Continued
Municipal—Continued
Kelowna   	
Merritt 	
738
151
380
773
113
155
150
341
784
186
446
837
102
179
136
392
$27,574
5,467
13,261
30,976
4,144
5,708
6,038
14,074
$35,241
6,859
21,906
Penticton  	
Revelstoke	
34,749
3,848
6,915
6,264
13,950
Vernon  	
Totals...	
3,471
3,712
$128,180
$150,032
7,865
9,112
$286,493
$335,691
Region IV
Provincial—
Cranbrook. 	
633
598
244
325
728
240
712
744
508
349
321
513
264
664
$22,802
24,296
10,813
14,502
32,942
9,637
23,088
$26,722
Creston   	
20,498
12,017
15,231
27,179
11,489
28,559
Fernie	
Grand Forks 	
Nelson     _
New Denver 	
Trail 	
Totals.	
3,480
3,363
$138,080
$141,695
Municipal—
Castlegar 	
I                         I
Cranbrook..	
246
243
137
222
195
$7,470
$8,447
6,307
Creston _	
193
98
5
104
497
102
199
7,886
5,192
200
4,086
20,769
3,366
9,405
9,052
6,161
Greenwood   	
80
336
3,310
17,499
Rossland 	
Trail   	
243
12,378
Totals .	
1,444
1,456
$58,374
$63,154
Region totals	
4,924
4,819
$196,454
$204,849
Region V
Provincial—
Prince George 	
1,792
469
159
557
2,106
615
202
808
$68,766
17,468
5,576
16,037
Quesnel	
Vanderhoof    ..  	
19,688
6,620
21,556
Totals	
2,977
3,731
$107,847
$131,157
Municipal—
576
327
40
681
306
33
$30,073
11,662
1,134
$36,512
11,366
985
Quesnel    	
Williams Lake _	
Totals...   	
943
1,020
$42,869
$48,863
Region totals _	
3,920
4,751
$150,716
$180,020
Region VI
Provincial—
Abbotsford  	
Chilliwack  	
Haney  	
384
535
95
376
696
123
$14,580
20,819
3,563
$14,511
28,880
4,430
Totals... 	
1,014
1,195
$38,962
$47,821
Municipal—
Chilliwack City 	
491
1,221
114
213
891
1,267
479
1,399
146
199
1,166
1,342
$20,632
48,540
3,892
7,499
38,706
60,873
$21,141
53,179
Hope      	
5,433
7,951
48,632
70,752
 H 68
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 9.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and Costs in Region
by Provincial and Municipal Areas in March, 1966 and 1967—Continued
Persons
Costs
March, 1966
March, 1967
March, 1966
March, 1967
Region VI—Continued
Municipal—Continued
Matsqui  —	
773
464
306
158
3,731
414
864
425
280
213
4,364
447
$37,659
18,765
10,798
8,688
160,545
23,393
$40,890
19,993
10,913
Sumas—	
Surrey     	
White Rock                                	
10,651
184,996
25,851
Totals                                      	
10,043        |      11,324
$439,990              $500,382
Region totals  	
11,057        |      12,519
$478,952             $548,203
Region VII
Provincial—
332
179
709
308
287
$11,458
5,734
24,728
5,252
$9,982
9,353
Terrace  	
154
280
9,724
Totals       	
1,374                  1,702
$47,172              $61,690
Municipal—•
Kitimat  	
35
$1,453
23,353
13,641
	
$19,469
15,054
Terrace	
373                     453
Totals 	
980        |           903
$38,447                $34,523
2,354        |        2,605
$85,619               $96,213
Region VIII
Provincial—
1,024
624
1,235
695
$32,757
22,151
$48,633
27,472
Fort St. John 	
Totals	
1,648         |        1,930
$54,908      j        $76,105
Municipal—
894                1,166
355        |           338
$35,109               $47,149
15,201                 14,642
Fort St. John 	
Totals _
1,249         |         1,504
$50,310      |        $61,791
9.897          1          1.414
$10*;.218        1        $117,896
Table 10.—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowance and
Costs by Regions in March, 1966/67
Persons
March, 1966 March, 1967
Costs
March, 1966      March, 1967
Region I	
Region II	
Region III _
Region IV	
Region V	
Region VI ......
Region VII..
Region VIII.
7,221
24,650
7,865
4,924
3,920
11,057
2,354
2,897
Totals..
64,888
9,352
27,254
9,112
4,819
4,751
12,519
2,605
3,434
$330,829
1,322,634
286,493
196,454
150,716
478,952
85,619
105,218
73,846
$2,956,915
$426,235
1,442,625
335,691
204,849
180,020
548,203
96,213
137,896
$3,371,732
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 69
Table 11.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial
Assistance from Department of Social Welfare) Served by Department of Social Welfare during Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Year
April 1966	
May, 1966	
June, 1966	
July, 1966	
August, 1966	
September, 1 gee-
October, 1966	
November, 1966-
December, 1966...
January, 1967	
February, 1967	
March, 1967	
1,911
1,886
1,887
-1,887
1,890
1,892
1,926
1,976
1,993
1,994
1,976
2,030
212
334
241
228
265
309
311
269
242
276
270
235
237
333
241
225
263
275
261
252
241
294
216
218
1,886
1,887
1,887
'1,890
1,892
1,926
1,976
1,993
1,994
1,976
2,030
2,047
1,861
1,899
1,901
1,896
1,881
1,802
1,792
1,844
1,871
1,904
1,871
1,911
Table 12.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare
and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children, by
Type of Service for Fiscal Years 1965/66 and 1966/67.
Type of Service
Opened during
Year
Carried during
Year
Incomplete at
End of Year
1965/66
1966/67
1965/66
1966/67
1965/66
1966/67
101
300
86
7
122
376
77
15
134
316
112
10
163
418
122
19
41
42
45
4
45
50
Immigration	
Legitimation. —	
31
3
Totals
494
590
572
722
132
129
1 Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
2 Children's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table 13.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of
Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1966/67
Number at
Beginning
of Fiscal
Year
Number
Opened
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Served
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Closed
during
Fiscal Year
Number
at End of
Fiscal Year
645
699
121
164
1,319
922
312
233
1,964
1,621
433
397
1,258
924
306
240
706
697
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver
127
157
Totals 	
1,629
2,786
4,415
2,728
1,687
 H 70
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 14.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia by Age-group of Mother during Fiscal Years 1965/66 and 1966/67
Fiscal Year
Age-group of Mother
Under 15
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40 Years
and Over
Total
1965 /66   	
1966/67    -
Percentage increase or decrease
over previous year. 	
34
38
11.8
1,282
1,490
16.2
1,293
1,304
0.9
533
558
4.7
457
453
-0.9
71
54
-31.5
3,670
3,897
6.2
Table 15.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during and at End of Fiscal Year 1966/67
Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  2,595
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver   1,327
Victoria Children's Aid Society      870
During
1966/67
7,786
4,792
At March 31,
1967
1,665
919
547
5,409
3,131
Totals
12,578
8,540
Table 16.—Number of Children in Care1 of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, by Regions,
and by Societies as at March 31, 1967.
Children in Care
Superintendent of Child Welfare-
Region I 	
Region II..
Region Ill-
Region IV-
Region V~
Region VI	
Region VII—	
Region VIII-
S.C.W. and agency wards supervised by another Province  	
Total   of   Superintendent   of   Child
Welfare  _ 	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver-
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Total of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid
Societies  	
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
601
751
698
306
437
555
304
143
55
70
83
27
39
71
34
22
J.D.A.
Wards
6,126
509
79
35
40
34
18
25
15
5
115
  I
5
1
3,910 |
401 '1
256
1,227 i
720 'j
269 |
46 |
39 [
23 ]
32
18
70
376
Other
Provinces'
Wards
111
Non-
Wards
i
i I
20 |
24 J
5 1
4 [
24 '
9 [
64
100
137
29
55
151
12
20
Other
Agency
Non-
wards,
Wards,
and
Before
Court
40
30
12
14
17
29
12
5
1  |
18
139
96 [
569 |
177
5,409
6 1
3 j
6
258 |
97 [
101 |
96
42
78
1,665
919
547
1,025
393
Total
846
1,006
994
415
570
855
380
204
8,540
l" In care " is denned as the actual number of children being cared for by the agency, regardless of which
agency has legal responsibility for the child.
Note.—The total number of children-in-care by regions differs slightly with the regional reports because of
the approximately one week's delay in reporting.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 71
Table 17.—Number of Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies, by
Legal Status, by Regions, and by Societies as at March 31, 1967.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Provinces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare—
601
751
698
306
437
555
304
143
146
115
55
70
83
27
39
71
34
22
79
35
40
34
18
25
15
5
14
5
7
20
24
5
4
24
3
9
20
64
100
137
29
55
151
12
20
29
1
806
976
982
401
553
826
Region VII             	
368
Region VIII                   —    .
199
209
121
Total number of children who are the legal responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare
4,056
401
270
116
598
5,441
Vancouver Children's Aid Society—■
1,227
90
46
1
32
2
	
258
6
1,563
Children in S. CW. or other agency card 	
99
Total number of children who are the legal responsibility of Vancouver Children's Aid So-
1,317
47
34
264
1,662
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver—
720
64
39
18
97
874
64
Total number of children who are the legal responsibility of Catholic Children's Aid So-
784
39
18
97
938
Victoria Children's Aid Society—
269
28
23
1
70
4
101
3
463
Children in S. CW. or other agency carei	
36
Total number of children who are the legal responsibility of Victoria Children's Aid Society..
297
24
74
104
499
Total number of children who are the legal responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare
and three Children's Aid Societies	
6,454
511
396
116
1,063
8,540
iThe Children's Aid Societies' children in another Province are included in section "(Vancouver, Catholic,
and Victoria) Children's Aid Societies children in Superintendent of Child Welfare or other agency care."
There are a total of 18 of these children {See Table 16.)
Table 18.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Age-group at March 31, 1967
Age-group
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
971
724
1,448
1,137
627
502
423
246
325
276
196
199
239
109
248
156
82
85
78
53
116
131
90
1,711
3- 5 years  	
6-11    „                                                   	
1,132
2,137
12-15    „             	
1,700
16-17    „    	
995
18-20   „    	
79                  865
Totals	
5,409
1,665
919
547              8,540
 H 72
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 19.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care as at March 31, 1967
Type of Care
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
4,167
230
306
308
333
65
1,274
89
45
72
167
18
693
35
24
66
91
10
347
27
47
21
97
8
6,481
381
Free home andfree relatives' (or parents') home
Adoption home	
422
467
688
A.W.O.L	
101
Total	
5,409
1,665
919
547
8,540
Table 20.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during
Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act
Committed under Juvenile Delinquents Act 	
1,664
116
980
68
220
10
554
192
6
223
155
26
192
2,231
158
1,949
Other Provinces' wards.  	
68
Total of new admissions 	
2,828                    784                    421                     373                 4,406
Transfer of supervision    	
204                     195                       44         |             30                    473
Total new admissions and transfers
3,032                   979                   465                   403
1                !
4,879
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 73
Table 21.—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies during
Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Reason
Number of Children
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Physical abuse...
Parental neglect-
Desertion or abandonment-
Emotional disturbances needing treatment-
One parent deceased	
Sole parent deceased-
Parental illness, mental-
Parental illness, physical-
Awaiting adoption placement-
Removed from adoption placement-
Awaiting permanent plan-
Rehabilitation plan for parents-
Physical handicap 	
Mental retardation— —
Delinquent behaviour (.Juvenile Delinquents Act only)
Transient     	
Unmarried mother	
Parental failure to provide needed medical treatment
or prevention     _..
Parent or parents imprisoned.
Inability of family to provide needed education and
training    _  	
Requested by other Province  	
Transfer of guardianship.   	
Change of legal status 	
Request by other agency 	
Total new admissions-
Transfer of supervision from other agencies..
Total new admissions and transfers..
28
413
351
82
48
24
146
186
434
4
125
331
9
36
110
146
43
33
72
58
67
82
2,828
204
3,032
3
171
35
11
5
3
39
42
268
3
106
28
1
6
9
3
7
1
15
16
784
195
979
4
57
43
13
54
1
171
2
39
4
421
44
465
1
150
14
7
5
27
27
52
2
17
25
1
2
28
5
6
1
1
373
30
403
36
794
443
104
56
32
225
309
755
9
419
386
11
44
186
154
60
46
96
83
67
90
4
|    4,406
'I       473
4,879
Table 22.—Number of Children Discharged from Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status
during Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
722
66
603
765
52
262
1
43
388
189
4
46
151
31
7
94
176
1,204
78
Before Court i     	
786
1,480
52
Other Provinces' wards	
Total direct discharges from care	
2,208
190
694
236
390
83
308
23
3,600
532
Total direct discharges and transfers
2,398
930
473
331
4,132
1 This table is not entirely comparable with previous years as a change has been made to include
Court" and "Apprehended but Not Presented " under one heading.
Before
 H 74
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 23.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1966/67
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Wards
Twenty-one years of age _ 	
119
60
8
202
16
52
383
48
19
3
28
85
80
26
6
3
24
5
129
16
11
3
8
209
85
14
265
109
52
Adoption order granted  -	
600
Sub-totals 	
840
263
193
38
1,334
Before the Court (Protection of Children Act)
249
128
3
221
42
1
44
1
1
6
88
341
216
2
3
Apprehended but not presented 	
222
Sub-totals      —	
601
43
46
94
784
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age   	
1
4
658
104
5
1
258
124
1
147
3
1
128
47
6
2
5
1,191
278
Other                	
767
388
151
176
1,482
2,208
694
390
308
3,600
Transfer of supervision  	
190
236
83
23
532
2,398
930
473
331
4,132
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 75
Table 24.—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1967.
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Health Institutions
General hospitals  	
Private hospitals	
12
7
2
45
6
4
30
......
6
16
......
1
5
......
23
7
2
Woodlands  and  Tranquille  Schools   and   other
96
Other —	
6
Totals	
72
34
22
6
134
Educational Institutions
Jericho Hill School.    	
4
2
45
3
1
......
2
7
	
4
5
Indian residential schools 	
Other....	
52
3
Totals    	
54
1
	
9
64
Residential Institutions
St. Christopher's School. 	
9
9
1
2
176
4
17
6
5
11
1
57
2
2
1
1
21
......
1
2
4
2
25
1
1
18
4
23
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A  	
3
2
279
7
17
Other	
8
Totals	
224
76
26
35
361
Treatment Centres
13
12
16
3
22
5
10
2
2
4
......
4
	
1
13
1
1
4
20
27
Sevenoaks —	
29
4
1
10
Other                	
22
Totals 	
66
17
10
20
113
Training Schools
37
23
6
5
8
5
7
7
58
Willingdon School for Girls 	
40
Totals—	
60
11
13
14
98
Correctional Institutions
City and Provincial gaols and related correctional
institutions  —	
53
2
9
1
8
1
10
—
-
80
4
2
Other  —	
	
Totals  --	
57
10
9
10
86
Grand totals  	
533
149
80
94
8561
lThe total of this table should agree with the total for institutional care in Table 19. However, in the
process of amalgamating the reports of the Children's Aid Societies and Superintendent of Child Welfare, it has
not been possible to achieve complete statistical accuracy.
 H 76
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 25.—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of Superintendent of
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child
Welfare Division foster homes  $4,333,083
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Children's Aid
Societies	
Gross cost of transportation of children in care
of Superintendent	
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants
being permanently planned for by Superintendent 	
4,450,585
57,036
41,671
Gross expenditure	
Less collections
$8,882,375
1,942,907
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts  $6,939,468
Table 26.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of
Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Years 1965/66
and 1966/67.
Regions
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  240
Vancouver Catholic Children's Aid Society    73
Victoria Children's Aid Society     92
Sub-totals 	
1965/66
1966/67
989
276
103
107
985
405
486
Grand totals
1,394
1,471
Table 27.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption
by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during
Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Department of
Social
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Interracial origin and origin other than white.	
103
63
92
20
6
14
3
5
5
8
142
77
41       j       11
152
Totals	
258
(.1                     98          1          18
371
l Children over one year of age who are of interracial origin and origin other than white or have a health
problem have been shown in either of these two categories and are not shown in the category " Over 1 year of
age."
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 77
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 H 78
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 29. — Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Social Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Type of
Placement for Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Type of Placement
Direct Placement
Foster Home to Adoption
Total
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probationi
Within
Same Home
In Another Home
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probationi
Region I   	
68
131
36
24
21
59
14
8
1
17
24
12
14
13
9
6
7
1
100
120
65
58
45
67
25
18
8
1
9
2
1
1
186
284
Region III—   	
Region IV-	
Region V 	
113
98
79
136
45
Region VIII 	
34
10
Sub-totals  	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver   	
Victoria Children's Aid Society...	
362
193
89
55
1
103
51
14
10
506
31
42
14
985
276
103
107
699
1
178
579        1           14
1,471
i These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
Table 30. — Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Social Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Religion
of Adoption Parents for Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Religion
Total
Atheist
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Hebrew
Buddhist
157
261
94
75
66
121
36
24
10
29
23
19
23
13
14
9
10
	
1
186
284
113
98
79
136
Region VII  — — —
Region VIII                .	
45
34
10
1
844
272
98
140
103
9
3
1
985
276
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver
103
107
1      1     1.214
252
3
1
1,471
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 79
Table 31. — Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of
Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the Fiscal Year
1966/67.
Ages
Number of Children
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouvei
Children's
Aid
Societv
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Regions I
to VIII
Outside
Province
295
132
14
8
126
2
15
15
40
162
30
28
30
111
3
24
15
10
111
25
14
7
71
4
16
9
6
29
18
2
2
19
8
3
14
2
1
10
2
2
10
1
1
2
4
2
	
1
1
4
1
2
1
—
1
1
1
1
....
1
~i
975
10
276
103
107
Birth up to but not including 15 days. 	
15 days up to but not including 1 month	
1 month up to but not including 3 months...
3 months up to but not including 6 months _
6 months up to but not including 1 year	
1 year    	
2 years —   	
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Totals.
 H 80
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 32.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than
White Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies According to Sex of Child and Religion of
Adopting Parents during Fiscal Year 1966/67.
Sex of Child
Religion of Adopting Parents
Male
Female
Total
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Buddhist
Total
Department of Social Welfare
33
4
7
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
29
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
6
..„
62
5
9
3
11
1
58     '
4
8
1
'1
'1
4
1
3
"
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
62
5
9
3
1
Native Indian and Chinese	
1
4
1
3
11
1
Chinese..      	
1
1
55
48
103
95     '
7               1    |    103
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
.3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
..-
1
.._
....
1
1
1
5
3
2
5
3
2
5
Negro and white.  	
3
2
Mexican and white  ~	
12
8
20
20
|      20
Catholic Children's Aid Society,
Vancouver
2
1
1
1
6
2
1
8
2
1
1
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
1
—
8
2
1
1
1
Filipino-    	
1
5
9
14
14      I'             1      14
Victoria Children's Aid Society
1
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
1
1
1       3
Native Indian  _.	
-    |        2
Sub-totals  —-	
1
4
5
3
2
....    |        5
73
69
142
118
23
1
142
 report of the department of social welfare, 1966/67     h 81
Table 33.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by Regions, and Children's Aid Societies during Fiscal Year
1966/67.
Region and Society
Type of Placement
Agency
Relative
Private
Stepparent
Other
199
67
3
4
265
148
17
15
136
58
9
11
87
29
4
3
86
40
4
6
144
89
10
12
62
25
2
2
34
22
2
Total
Region I	
Region II	
Region III	
Region IV	
Region V	
Region VI	
Region VII ...
Region VIII.
Sub-totals_
Vancouver Children's Aid Society.	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver-
Victoria Children's Aid Society 	
Sub-totals	
Grand totals..
1,442 622
79
64
273
445
214
123
136
255
91
58
1,013
478
51      1
53
1,595
246
78
105
58
19
67
10     |
3      1
5
8
3
322
103
177
429
144
28      |
11
612
2,207
 H 82
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 34.-
-Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years
1962/63 to 1966/67
Year
Medical
Drugs i
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1962/63 	
1963/64... 	
1964/65 ...  	
1965/66 	
1966/67	
$1,919,185
2,015,598
1,970,136
1,985,970
2,422,702
$1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
2,148,641
2,095,733
$513,762
534,820
588,500
590,074
670,580
$92,192
104,671
104,057
113,337
118,003
$108,482
116,709
133,268
144,757
183,285
$39,165
35,698
34,986
40,510
48,723
$4,610,292
4,964,944
5,035,070
5,023,289
5,539,026
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table 35.-
—Payments
to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Other
Total
1962/63    	
$1,912,970
2,009,854
1,965,208
1,979,597
2,414,967
$6,215
5,744
4,928
6,363
7,735
$1,919,185
1963/64  	
1964/65  	
2,015,598
1,970,136
1965/66....   	
1966/67
1,985,970
2,422,702
Table 36.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with
Average Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1962/63..
1963/64.
1964/65..
1965/66.
1966/67..
32,527
34,388
35,016
36,219
38,072
4,813
5,359
5,953
6,558
7,270
30,152
28,522
26,347
25,010
24,533
6,746
6,259
5,863
5,582
4,593
2,155
2,214
2,215
2,276
2,315
76,393
76,742
75,394
75,645
76,783
Table 37.—Drug Costs
Fiscal Year
Number of Prescriptions
Provincial
Pharmacy!
Drugstores
Total
Cost of Medicines
Provincial
Pharmacy 2
Drugstores
Total
1962/63-
1963/64..
1964/65..
1965/66.
1966/67..
25,436
21,055
19,665
18,972
18,318
696,364
689,038
703,071
619,845
629,085
721,800
710,093
722,736
638,817
647,403
$171,143
190,911
226,291
274,239
267,836
$1,766,363
1,966,537
1,977,832
1,874,402
1,827,897
$1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
2,148,641
2,095,733
i The number of prescriptions shown for the Provincial Pharmacy covers only the number supplied to individual patients and those drugs which, by law, are required to be numbered. The bulk of the volume goes to
nursing homes and are not counted in the number of prescriptions.
2 The cost of drugs for the Provincial Pharmacy includes all costs with the exception of the cost of those
supplied to certain Provincial Government institutions.
 report of the department of social welfare, 1966/67     h 83
Table 38.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
1962/63  	
$229,099
264,977
310,009
$64,317
64,120
61,700
$220,346
205,723
216,791
$513,762
1963/64      -
534,820
1964/65  	
588,500
Fiscal Year
Examinations,
Prophylaxis,
Miscellaneous
Surgery
Restorations
Dentures
and
Repairs
Total
1965/66 —	
1966/67	
$64,209
80,893
$49,652
73,568
$237,004
312,686
$239,209
203,433
$590,074
670,580
Starting in 1965/66 newer statistical reporting has resulted in more detailed
information on dental costs. This detailed information cannot be given for the years
prior to 1965/66.
Table 39.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1962/63   	
1963/64 _     	
1964/65
$19,362
20,803
20,268
24,384
27,005
$72,830
83,868
83,789
88,953
90,998
$92,192
104,671
104,057
113,337
1965/66
1966/67- - 	
118,003
 H 84
SOCIAL WELFARE
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67
Table 41.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received
Reapplications 	
Applications granted
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)
H 85
2,043
131
1,841!
325
Table 42.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence
Income in excess	
Unable to prove residence
Transfer of property
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance .
Information refused	
Applications withdrawn
Applicants died before grant
Whereabouts unknown	
Assistance from private sources
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous 	
Number
_ 54
... 1
- 7
_ 90
... 2
... 2
... 8
... 33
... 88
... 14
... 18
... 4
... 2
... 2
Totals
325
Per Cent
16.7
0.3
2.2
27.7
0.6
0.6
2.5
10.1
27.1
4.3
5.5
1.2
0.6
0.6
100.0
Table 43.—Sex of New Recipients
Male ...
Female
Totals
Number
983
907
1,890
Per Cent
52.1
47.9
100.0
Married
Single ...
Table 44.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
      703
      388
Widowed
Separated
Divorced
426
295
78
Totals
Per Cent
37.2
20.5
22.5
15.7
4.1
1,890        100.0
i Includes some left over from previous year.
 H 86                                                  SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 45.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Men              Women          Number          Per Cent
Age 65   731           686        1,417          74.9
Age 66  151           115           266          14.1
Age 67               .    67             67           134            7.1
Age 68                     34             39             73            3.9
Totals   1,890        100.0
Table 46.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 47.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men              Women          Number          Per Cent
British Columbia        116           122           238          12.6
Other parts of Canada  264           250           514          27.2
United States of America     81           104           185            9.8
British Isles  179           196           375          19.8
Other parts  of British  Commonwealth -       2               4               6            0.3
Other foreign countries  341           231           572          30.3
Totals   1,890        100.0
Table 48.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 49.—With Whom New Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 50.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67       H 87
Table 51.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1967, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta .   _     . ...     	
  13
Saskatchewan   ..          _ __ 	
     1
Manitoba        .         . .       _   _   _    	
. ..         ...3
Ontario _ ..    _ _         	
     6
Quebec              .
     3
New Brunswick        	
Nova Scotia     _ _           	
Yukon Territory   __ _ ._   _.	
Prince Edward Island '	
Newfoundland  	
Total 	
  26
Table 52.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According
to Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $75)
Amount of Assistance
$75	
$70 to $74.99 --.-
$65 to $69.99 .
$60 to $64.99 .
$55 to $59.99 _
$50 to $54.99 .
$45 to $49.99 .
$40 to $44.99 .
$35 to $39.99 __..
$30 to $34.99....
$25 to $29.99 ....
$20 to $24.99 ....
Less than $19.99
Total _
Per Cent
87.60
2.28
1.60
1.42
1.22
1.20
1.03
.76
.54
.70
.47
.39
.79
100.00
Table 53.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65	
Age 66	
Age 67	
Age 68 (to December 31,1966)
Number
... 35
... 49
... 50
... 67
Per Cent
17.4
24.3
24.9
33.4
Totals
201
100.0
 H 88 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 54.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia  12
Reinstated  151
Suspended  311
Deaths   199
Transferred to other Provinces  20
Transferred to Old Age Security  2,827
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  3,974
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  59
Transferred to British Columbia  4
Reinstated  7
Suspended  14
Deaths   2
Transferred out of British Columbia    46
Transferred to Old Age Security  112
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  100
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  4,074
BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES
Table 55.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  54
Reapplications     5
Applications granted  3 3
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  13
Table 56.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not blind within the meaning of the Act    4 30.7
Income in excess     6 46.2
Applications withdrawn        	
Died before grant        	
War Veterans' Allowance         	
Information refused     2 15.4
Whereabouts unknown     1 7.7
Other        	
Totals   13        100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67
Table 57.—Sex of New Recipients
H 89
Totals _
Male .      ..
Number
  22
Per Cent
66.7
Female 	
  11
33.3
Totals
Table 58.-
Married    _ 	
  33
—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
          .             12
100.0
Per Cent
36.4
Single	
              14
42.4
Widowed	
           3
9.1
Separated.    	
    ....                 4
12.1
Divorced	
33
100.0
Table 59.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Men
Ages 18 to 19	
Ages 20 to 24	
Ages 25 to 29	
Ages 30 to 34     3
Ages 35 to 39	
Ages 40 to 44	
Ages 45 to 49	
Ages 50 to 54	
Ages 55 to 59	
Ages 60 to 64	
Ages 65 to 68	
1
Women
Number
Per Cent
6
2
8
24.2
2
1
3
9.1
...
2
2
6.1
3
3
9.1
1
1
3.0
1
1
3.0
	
1
1
3.0
1
2
3
9.1
4
1
5
15.2
2
2
4
12.1
2
2
6.1
Totals
33
100.0
Table 60.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 61.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men
British Columbia     8
Other parts of Canada  11
United States of America	
British Isles     1
Other parts of British Commonwealth 	
Other foreign countries     2
Totals
22
Women
4
4
Number
12
15
2
4
Per Cent
36.4
45.4
1
6.1
2
12.1
11
33
100.0
 H 90 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 62.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 63.—With Whom New Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 64.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 65.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1967, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta  9
Saskatchewan  1
Manitoba  1
Ontario  2
New Brunswick  1
Total  14
Table 66.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According
to Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$75       93.39
$70 to $74       1.66
$65 to $69.99         .41
$60 to $64.99       2.06
$55 to $59.99         .63
$50 to $54.99	
$45 to $49.99	
$40 to $44.99	
$35 to $39.99	
$30 to $34.99	
$25 to $29.99	
$20 to $24.99	
$19.99 and less	
Total 	
.41
.41
	
1.03
100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67       H 91
Table 67.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Ages 18 to 29
Ages 30 to 39
Ages 40 to 49
Ages 50 to 59
Ages 60 to 69
Totals
Number
1
1
3
4
9
18
Per Cent
5.6
5.6
16.6
22.2
50.0
100.0
Table 68.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
Transferred to other Provinces ...
Returned to British Columbia ...
Transferred to Old Age Security.
Deaths	
(b)
Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia.
Retransf erred to British Columbia
Reinstated 	
33
13
3
2
40
16
4
2
3
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  4
Deaths .  2
Transfers to Old Age Security  2
Suspended   5
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
Other Provinces	
440
44
484
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES
Table 69.—Disposition of Applicants
New applications received
Reapplications
Applications granted	
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
344
60
I991
179
i Includes some left over from previous year.
 H 92 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 70.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not 18 years of age     	
Too much income  6 3.5
Refused information  7 3.9
Whereabouts unknown  1 0.5
Unable to meet medical test  147 82.2
Mental hospital  3 1.6
Hospital  3 1.6
Nursing home            	
Application withdrawn  6 3.5
Died before grant  2 1.1
Not sufficient residence  2 1.1
War Veterans' Allowance     	
Allowance under Blind Persons' Allowances Act     	
Receiving Old Age Security            	
Referred for rehabilitation     	
Institutions          1 0.5
Unable to prove residence  1 0.5
Totals       179        100.0
Table 71.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male      104 51.5
Female        98 48.5
Totals      202        100.0
Table 72.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married        31 15.3
Single       142 70.3
Widowed            7 3.5
Separated        16 7.9
Divorced           6 3.0
Totals      202 100.0
 report of the department of social welfare, 1966/67     h 93
Table 73.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Men              Women          Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19     44             39             83 41.1
Ages 20 to 24       7             13             20 9.9
Ages 25 to 29       3               7             10 5.0
Ages 30 to 34       5               7             12 5.9
Ages 35 to 39       4              2               6 3.0
Ages 40 to 44       4               6             10 5.0
Ages 45 to 49       5               3               8 4.0
Ages 50 to 54       8               8             16 7.9
Ages 55 to 59       8               4             12 5.9
Ages 60 to 64     16               8             24 11.9
Ages 65 to 69     __..               1               1 0.4
Totals       202 100.0
Table 74.—Forms by Which Age Proven
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 75.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men              Women Number Per Cent
British Columbia     53             66 119 58.9
Other parts of Canada     34             23 57 28.2
United States of America       2               2 4 2.0
British Isles        3               3 6 3.0
Other  parts  of  British  Commonwealth            	
Other foreign countries     12               4 16 7.9
Totals   202 100.0
Table 76.—Where New Recipients Are Living
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 77.—With Whom Recipients Live
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Table 78.—Economic Status of New Recipients
This table is available on request from the Department of Social Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 H 94 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 79.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31, 1967, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta  11
Saskatchewan     3
Manitoba     6
Ontario  14
Quebec     3
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia     2
Yukon     1
Northwest Territories	
Total   40
Table 80.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According
to Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Per Cent
$75  94.42
$70 to $74.99  1.15
$65 to $69.99  0.54
$60 to $64.99  0.54
$55 to $59.99  0.83
$50 to $54.99  0.50
$45 to $49.99  0.45
$40 to $44.99  0.37
$35 to $39.99  0.29
$30 to $34.99  0.21
$25 to $29.99  0.29
$20 to $24.99  0.21
$19.99 and less  0.20
Total  100.00
Table 81.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19
Ages 20 to 24
Ages 25 to 29
Ages 30 to 34
Ages 35 to 39
Ages 40 to 44
Ages 45 to 49 .
Ages 50 to 54
Ages 55 to 59
Ages 60 to 64 .
Ages 65 to 69
Totals
2
3.8
1
1.9
1
1.9
4
7.4
3
5.6
6
11.1
4
7.4
10
18.6
14
25.6
9
16.7
54
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 95
Table 82.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
Transferred to other Provinces	
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security
Deaths 	
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended
New transfers to British Columbia	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended.
Reinstated 	
Deaths	
Transferred to Old Age Security _.
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
Other Provinces	
2,236
186
200
116
11
5
49
53
16
42
10
9
1
3
2,422
Table 83.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Infective and parasitic diseases	
Neoplasms	
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases	
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs	
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders	
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs	
Disease of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement	
Congenital malformations	
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)	
Totals 	
Number
Per Cent
2
0.9
1
0.4
2
0.9
95
47.3
64
31.8
8
4.0
2
0.9
11
5.5
5
2.4
1
0.4
11
5.5
202
100.0
 H 96
SOCIAL WELFARE
GENERAL INFORMATION REGARDING OLD AGE
SECURITY CATEGORY
Table 84.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received	
Reapplications received	
Applications granted.
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, dead, etc.)
697
151
517
3351
i Does not include pending cases.
Table 85.—Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social
Allowances as at March 31, 1967
British Columbia cases
Other-Province cases...
Total
21,588
415
22,003
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
Table 86.—Average Monthly Case Load Showing Heads of Families, Single
Persons, and Dependents in Receipt of Social Assistance for 1965/66
and 1966/67.
Heads of families
Single persons	
Average
Case Load
and Recipients
per month,
1965/66
_   11,317
_. 16,675
Total case load
Dependents 	
Total recipients
27,992
32,861
60,853
Average
Case Load
and Recipients
per month,
1966/67
12,366
17,404
29,770
36,307
66,077
Table 87.—Monthly Average Number of Children-in-care and Monthly
Average Number of Days' Care by Supervising Agency for Fiscal
Years 1964/65 to 1965/66 and 1966/67.
Monthly Average
Number of Children
Monthly Average
Number of Days' Care
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1,236
675
307
1,351
718
352
1,409
759
391
3,980
35,322
19,523
8,784
94,578
38,156
20,598
9,891
101,109
40,155
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Van-
21,830
11,113
Child Welfare Division foster homes	
3,266    |        3,494
114,149
Tntalq
5.484    1        5.915
6,539
158,207
169,754
187,247
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67        H 97
Table 88.—Comparison of Gross Expenditures and per Cent of Total
Expenditures of Department of Social Welfare by Major Categories
of Expenditure for Fiscal Years 1965/66 and 1966/67.
Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1965/66
1966/67
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
$825,600
1,067,400
2,654,300
6,687,500
5,023,300
34,144,000
17,864,500
1.2
1.6
3.9
9.8
7.4
50.0
26.2
$884,000
1,128,600
3,037,300
8,988,000
5,539,000
37,372,500
15.862.900
1.2
Institutions - 	
1.6
4.2
12.3
7.6
51.3
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Social Allowances
21.8
Totals 	
$68,266,600
100.01
S72.812.30O    I     100.01
i Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
INSTITUTIONS
Table 89.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1966/67
Location of Family and
Children's Court
Region I—
Alert Bay	
Girls
Committed
       1
Boys
Committed
2
Campbell River ,       	
       1
4
Chemainus
1
Courtenay    .             . 	
              3
6
Duncan                  	
               1
4
Lake Cowichan    	
1
Nanaimo    	
     7
13
Port Alice             „   ..
1
Port Alberni  	
     1
2
Sooke     	
     1
Victoria      ~
               6
43
Wellington              .    	
              1
Region II—
Bella Bella         	
     1
1
Bella Coola	
5
Burnaby                     	
       6
15
Coquitlam  	
6
Delta 	
     1
New Westminster   ..
               1
10
North Vancouver	
     2
21
Ocean Falls	
1
Pemberton	
Powell River      . 	
            .     1
1
1
Richmond	
     3
3
 H 98 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 89.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1966/67—
Continued.
Location of Family and
Children's Court
Region II—Continued
Sechelt	
Girls
Committed
       3
Boys
Committed
3
Squamish       	
                         1
2
Vancouver	
West Vancouver 	
  28
     1
105
5
Region III—
Ashcroft 	
     1
Chase    	
                         1
1
Clinton       ..
1
Enderby  .. .. 	
                          1
1
Kamloops       	
     3
13
Kelowna ___       __ . 	
     1
7
Keremeos     .
1
Lytton    	
        2
1
Merritt       .
                1
12
Oliver             -    	
2
Penticton     .. .. . _.
8
Revelstoke _ 	
     1
3
Salmon Arm   .      	
11
Vernon                  	
1
Region IV—
Cranbrook	
Greenwood   	
1
1
Invermere                    	
2
Kimberley	
Nelson        .. .    	
	
3
5
Sparwood 	
Trail               ....
     1
1
9
Region V—
Alexis Creek        . .. ...
1
Fort St. James	
McBride                  	
  12
                 1
10
Prince George.       	
14
Quesnel     _             ..
1
Vanderhoof 	
Williams Lake  _ _ ..
     1
3
Region VI—
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack 	
Cloverdale	
Haney                   . 	
     1
     5
       2
1
11
25
2
Langley	
Matsqui        .       ..
        2
2
1
Mission          . .            .
        1
3
Sumas                        . 	
1
2
White Rock	
5
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67        H 99
Table 89.—Number of Committals to Training Schools of Boys and Girls
from Various Family and Children's Courts by Regions, 1966/67—
Continued.
Location of Family and
Children's Court
Girls
Committed
Region VII—
Burns Lake
Kitimat	
Masset	
Prince Rupert
Smithers 	
Terrace	
2
5
2
2
Region VIII—
Cassiar 	
Dawson Creek .
Fort Nelson	
Fort St. John ...
Yukon Territory	
Boys
Committed
2
1
2
7
3
3
1
9
1
3
Table 90.-
Salaries	
Office expense .
-Financial Statement, Brannan Lake School
for Boys, 1966/67
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment.
Medical and dental services	
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering	
Laundry and dry-goods	
Equipment and machinery	
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment.
Transportation
Motor-vehicles and accessories
Incidentals and contingencies
Repairs to furnishings and equipment
Training-programme expense	
Less—
Board   $2,097
Rentals   3,270
Sundry  237
$359,061
3,502
987
1,087
15,388
19,928
73,003
15,811
3,887
1,376
8,534
2,288
5,347
2,422
4,932
761
4,579
$522,893
5,604
$517,289
 H 100 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 90.—Financial Statement, Brannan Lake School
for Boys, 1966/67—Continued
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory as at March 31, 1967     $27,112
Inventory as at March 31,1966       18,615
       $8,497
$508,792
Add—
Public Works expenditure  $101,436
Less rental credit  912
     100,524
$609,316
Per capita cost per diem: $609,316-=-68,934=$8.84.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $507,521
Add—
Salary adjustment     $15,372
Public Works expenditure  $101,436
Lew rental credit  912
     100,524
     115,896
$623,417
Less—
Board        $2,097
Rentals         3,270
Sundry  237
Increase in inventory        8,497
       14,101
$609,316
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67      H 101
Table 91.—Age-distribution of Boys Committed to Brannan Lake
School by Number of Boys, Age, and Recidivism, 1967/68
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
10 yrs.        llyrs.        12 yrs. 13 yrs. 14 yrs. 15 yrs.        16 yrs.        17 yrs. 18 yrs.
First commitals.
Recidivists.
 H 102
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 92. — Committals and Recommittals of Boys to Brannan Lake
School Showing Number of Boys Committed on First and Subsequent
Committals.
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
Number of committals at time of last committal.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67      H 103
Table 93.—Number of Quarterly Admissions of Boys to Brannan Lake
School for Quarterly Periods Ending April 1, 1964, to April 1, 1967
130
120   --
no   --
100
$>o
80
April
July
Oct.
Jan.
April   July
Oct.
Jan.
April
July
Oct.
Jan.
1964
1965
1966
1967
April.
 H 104
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 94.—Record of Population Movement for Ten-year Period
at Willingdon School for Girls, 1957/58 to 1966/67
Fiscal Year
1
ov
tn
^.
£
ov
S
Ov
m
Ov
©
vo
Ov
VO
~>
VO
Ov
VO
3
cn
vo
Ov
tn
VO
i
8
tn
Ov
r-
vo
VO
VO
Ov
62
13
58
7
66
9
91
5
77
11
82
11
87
17
88
18
97
14
92
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
11
Number in Oakalla, April 1st	
Number elsewhere/other institutions,
April 1st 	
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
3
55
100
15
115
13
125
11
1
1
Number on provisional release, April
1st   .  	
4
66
15
81
18.5
72
9
3
96
10
106
9.4
79
5
9
81
13
94
13.8
100
11
22
94
7
101
6.9
99
17
1
12
102
15
117
12.8
113
19
13
119
15
134
10.4
79
14
3
51
59
7
66
10.6
75
7
118
11
Total number of admissions	
129
8.5
•103
Number of A.W.O.L., March 31st
Number elsewhere/other institutions,
March 31st 	
14
2
Number in Oakalla, March 31st	
Number on provisional release, March
31st 	
4
58
51.6
18,851
12.4
187
3
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
9
91
76.5
28,010
10.4
147
11
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
22
82
73.4
26,783
11.4
213
12
87
80.0
29,216
12.5
195
12
88
86.7
31,735
10.8
186
55
97
89.1
32,524
9.2
164
	
51
92
82
29,923
10.5
130
72
Number in School, March 31st	
88
Average daily population	
87.5
31,926
Average length of stay (months)	
9.5
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year
150
Table 95,
Age
12 years...
13 „   ...
14 „   ...
-Range of Age of Girls upon Admission to Willingdon
School for Girls for Fiscal Year 1966/67
Number of
Girls
...      4
...    6
... 21
Age
15 years.
16 „   .
17 „   _
Number of
Girls
... 37
... 34
... 27
Table 96.—Court Charges for Girls Committed to Willingdon
School for Fiscal Year 1966/67
Unmanageability  59
Theft   25
Government Liquor Act infractions  20
Unsatisfactory probation  13
Wilful damage  5
Breaking and entering  5
Sexual immorality  4
Assault   4
Possession of an offensive weapon  2
Driving without a licence  1
Fraud   1
Vagrancy  1
Robbery   1
One child was given the following four charges, all recorded on one committal
form, " Robbery, breaking and entering, theft, and wilful damage."
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67      H 105
Table 97.—Financial Statement of Willingdon School for Girls
for Year Ending March 31, 1967
Salaries 	
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment
Medical and dental services	
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering	
Laundry and dry-goods	
Good Conduct Fund	
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Transportation
Vocational and recreational supplies
Motor-vehicles and accessories	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Boarding-out care	
$248,934
2,763
1,671
421
3,021
6,513
40,575
391
1,628
946
1,976
5,544
1,577
3,999
3,415
2,210
878
15
$326,477
Less—
Board      $2,178
Rentals        2,040
4,218
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory as at March 31, 1966  $10,946
Inventory as at March 31, 1967     12,518
$322,259
Add Public Works expenditure
Per capita cost per diem $375,364-r-31,926=$11.76.
Maintenance receipts, $3,101.51.
1,572
$320,687
54,677
$375,364
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $315,629
Add-
Salary adjustment  $10,848
Public Works expenditure     54,677
Less—
Inventory increase
Board and rentals .
65,525
$381,154
$1,572
4,218
5,790
$375,364
 h 106 social welfare
Table 98.—Expenditure for Provincial Home, Kamloops,
Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1967
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1966  133
Inmates admitted during the year     89
  222
Inmates discharged     75
Inmates deceased     27
  102
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1967  120
Total number of inmate-days 44,682
Financial Statement, 1966/67
Salaries  $135,576.43
Expenses—
Office expense  577.65
Travelling expense  133.83
Medical services  12,950.10
Clothing and uniforms  944.60
Provisions and catering  38,175.90
Laundry and dry-goods  7,123.21
Equipment and machinery  860.09
Medical supplies  5,338.18
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,077.20
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,519.08
Transportation  761.65
Incidentals and contingencies  3,876.95
Burials  3,150.00
$212,064.87
Less—
Board   $444.00
Rent   300.00
  744.00
$211,320.87
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure  $211,320.87
Public Works expenditure       20,166.90
Total expenditure  $231,487.77
Cost per capita, $231,487.77-^44,682=$5.1807.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $104,023.41.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1966/67      H 107
Table 98.—Expenditure for Provincial Home, Kamloops,
Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1967—Continued
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $43,240.61
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $104,023.41
Municipalities  3,918.41
Transfers  from Provincial  Home
Trust Account  4,18 3.75
Receipts from Government of Canada under the Canada Assistance Agreement  51,486.41
Maintenance collections, transient
youths  692.64
Other maintenance collections  7,719.92
Salary adjustment  6,348.00
     178,372.54
$221,613.15
Add Public Works expenditure       20,166.90
$241,780.05
Less pensioners' comforts       10,292.28
Total expenditure (as above)  $231,487.77
 H 108
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 99.—Summary of Information Regarding Licensed Welfare
Institutions for Calendar Years 1963 to 1966, Inclusive
1963
1964
1965
1966
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions  	
9
19
250
60
306
55
65,657
10,664
93
6,856
29,106
236,768
311
30
33
9
17
250
61
338
66
62,022
14,086
94
7,093
29,821
285,614
324
31
32
9
16
250
65
348
71
60,359
14,916
99
7,696
35,626
299,484
343
29
62
12
12,126
691
167
317
18,224
514
547
580
1,571,328
66,111
33,667
59,398
327
3,642
5,062
1,055,647
39
1,988
2,557
641,285
9
246
3,431
53,465
3
83
438
27,084
15
95
111
28,769
8
12
Capacity—
249
58
Number of children under care—■
480
Boarding homes._ _ __	
Number of days' care—
67
66,091
10,935
Summer Camps
106
8,120
36,960
337,655
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
362
24
60
21
Capacity-
8,919
661
103
9,639
727
139
10,079
543
207
524
Number of children enrolled—
15,720
610
192
17,769
708
364
1,597,324
83,881
37,752
19,830
444
527
Group day care   	
Number of attendance days—
1,025
...
1,349,595
81,576
15,529
1,674,797
56,013
32,723
93,673
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Proprietary institutions—
325
4,843
6,776
1,481,205
321
3,516
5,012
965,344
38
1,980
2,584
757,223
7
214
5,579
40,337
3
87
471
28,710
11
71
85
18,992
344
3,928
5,809
1,141,581
Non-profit institutions—
42
2,130
2,794
682,699
Adults—Employable
6
169
16,349
46,201
3
81
433
26,049
5
36
37
11,410
11
277
Number of persons under care	
5,198
62,684
Women—Maternity
3
83
409
25,194
Adult Disabled Persons
18
109
137
37,491
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1966/67      H 109
Table 100.—Welfare Institutions Statistics for Period
January 1, 1966, to December 31, 1966
Licensed
Jan. 1,
1966
New
Licences
Closed
Dec. 31,
1966
Children, total care—
Boarding homes.
Institutions	
Camps.
Children, day care—
Kindergartens	
Schools for retarded children.
Family day care    _
Group day care	
Aged-
Boarding homes 	
Institutions 	
Adults, employable	
Homes, maternity	
Adult disabled persons _
Totals	
12
9
99
332
27
53
11
313
39
9
3
15
4
1
9
51
5
29
9
56
3
2
1
4
5
2
37
7
25
2
57
11
10
106
346
25
57
18
312
42
11
3
19
922    |
174
136    |
960
Carried forward
New licences	
Closed
922
174
1,096
136
960
Carried forward
New cases	
Closed
Total case load-
Licensed ...
Pending
Licences Pending
Jan. 1,
1966
New
Applications
Closed
Dec. 31,
1966
Children, total care—■
5
31
73
1
54
7
111
2
6
1
12
7
1
6
71
3
60
25
79
1
6
6
18
84
2
72
10
121
1
6
1
10
6
1
Camps    	
Children, day care—•
Kindergartens —  	
19
60
2
42
Group day care	
Aged—
22
69
1
1
Homes, maternity     	
8
Totals.      	
303
259
331
231
303
259
562
331
"231
960
231
1,191
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
1,530-1167-9255
      

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