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Mental Health Services Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1967]

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Services Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED
MARCH 31
1967
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C, CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the
year ended March 31, 1967.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Office of the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., January 26,1968.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Services Branch,
Vancouver, B.C., January 26, 1968.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch for the 12 months ended March 31, 1967.
F. G. TUCKER, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services.
 The Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health and Welfare, 1952-59 and
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, 1959-66.
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A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., F.A.P.A., Deputy Minister and Director of
Mental Health Services, 1959-67.
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I
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Page
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  9
Report—Business Manager  19
Report—Personnel Manager  40
Report—Social Service Consultant  44
Report—Nursing Consultant  47
Report—Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics  50
PART IL—RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
Report—Superintendent  53
Statistical Tables—Riverview Hospital  65
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Report—Superintendent  81
Statistical Tables—The Woodlands School  83
PART IV.—THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Report—Superintendent  89
Statistical Tables—The Tranquille School  92
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
Report—Superintendent  94
Statistical Tables—Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  99
Statistical Tables—Dellview Hospital, Vernon  106
Statistical Tables—Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  111
PART VL—COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre, Burnaby  115
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre, Victoria  124
Report—Director of Okanagan Mental Health Centre, Kelowna  126
Report—Director of Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre, Nanaimo  127
Report—Director of Kootenay Mental Health Centre, Trail  129
Report—Director of Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre, Chilliwack  131
Report—Director of North Okanagan Mental Health Centre, Vernon  133
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 Report of the Mental Health Services Branch
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1967
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
A. E. Davidson, M.D., Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services
and Director of Mental Health Services
The report submitted herewith records the highlights of the administration
of the Mental Health Services Branch during the eighth year of its existence as a
Branch of the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance. The Department was established pursuant to the Department of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance Act, which was passed by the Legislature in 1959". The Mental Health
Services of British Columbia, prior to April 1, 1959, were administered by the
Department of the Provincial Secretary, in which Department they were established
on October 12, 1872. Upon that date was opened the first Provincial Asylum in
the remodelled Royal Hospital, situated upon an Indian reserve across the inner
harbour from the site of the present Parliament Buildings. There was a total of
18 patients admitted to the asylum by December 31, 1872. The first mental health
legislation, namely the Insane Asylums Act, 1873, was passed by the Legislature
in 1873. It is reported that there were eight employees on the staff when the
Provincial Asylum was opened. It is, perhaps, not inappropriate in this Centennial
year to draw attention to the fact that mental health care has been provided for the
people of British Columbia 24 hours a day, 365 days every year, since 1872.
A review of the narratives and tables that constitute this report for 1966/67
will disclose the scope, magnitude, diversity, and geographical distribution of
mental health services available to the people of British Columbia. All of this
service is supplied under the aegis of the Mental Health Act, 1964.
A few highlights from the detailed reports have been selected to emphasize
the magnitude and ramification of the operations of the Mental Health Services
Branch:—
5,877 persons received psychiatric assessment, care, and treatment in the seven
community mental health centres operated by the Branch in 1966/67.
12,029 persons received psychiatric treatment as in-patients (Riverview Hospital, 7,554; Schools for the Mentally Retarded, 2,348;  Geriatric Division, 2,127).
2,166,052 patient-days of service were provided to the 12,029 in-patients
(Riverview Hospital, 1,007,478 patient-days;   The Woodlands School,
477,250 patient-days; The Tranquille School, 219,897 patient-days; Val-
leyview Hospital, 277,668 patient-days;  Dellview Hospital, 78,981 patient-days; Skeenaview Hospital, 103,778 patient-days).
4,011 persons were employed on March 31, 1967, in the Mental Health Services Branch to provide the services highlighted above.
$1,144,195 was expended to operate the community mental health centres.
$22,699,611 was expended to operate the in-patient institutions of the Branch.
The daily per capita cost for care in the institutions was $10.48.
 G 10
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
MAJOR EVENTS AND TRENDS
The emphasis upon the development of community mental health centres to
meet regional needs upon a local basis has been again stressed and efforts well
maintained in this direction.
The Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre, located in Chilliwack, was officially
opened by the Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance, on July 19, 1966. Dr. W. G. Jilek has been appointed Director of this
mental health centre. His report upon the first few months of service to the
Chilliwack region appears at page 133 of this report.
The Sage Building at The Tranquille School was completed this year. It was
officially opened by the Minister on July 21, 1966. The Sage Building provides
104 beds for the care and treatment of persons afflicted with severe mental retardation. It is well suited to the purpose for which it was designed. The first group
of patients was transferred to the Sage Building from The Woodlands School on
September 8, 1966.
The North Okanagan Mental Health Centre was established in the public
health building at Vernon. Dr. A. J. Bennee was appointed as Director of the
centre and it commenced operation in January. It has been well received by the
local community and the surrounding region and is providing a necessary specialized
health resource.
Construction and planning of new mental health facilities together with major
alterations, renovations, and maintenance of present plants has been constantly
to the fore in the year under review. With the increasing size of our physical plant,
its ageing, and the changes in assignment of space contingent upon new trends in
psychiatric care, this portion of the year's work is assuming major proportions.
The details of the projects in hand and contemplated are presented in the Report
of the Business Manager of the Branch which follows at page 19.
STATISTICAL COMMENTS
Tables 1 and 2, hereunder, provide in summary form the movement of patient
population in the several in-patient care psychiatric facilities operated by the Branch.
During the year 5,002 persons were admitted to the in-patient units of the
Branch. This is a decrease of 67 compared with 1965/66. There was a decrease
of 20 in the number of patients admitted to the Riverview Hospital—4,275 compared with 4,295 in 1965/66.
Table 1.—Showing Patients in Residence in Various Facilities of the Mental Health
Services Branch, April 1, 1966, and March 31, 1967, Together with Increase
or Decrease.
In Residence, Apr
. 1, 1966
In Residence, Mar.
31,1967
Increase
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Decrease
Riverview Hospital, Essondale	
The Woodlands School	
1,440
766
319
259
99
294
1,375
563
236
497
113
2,815
1,329
555
756
212
294
1,456
746
368
254
89
293
1,312
531
290
494
126
2,768
1,277
658
748
215
293
-47
—52
The Tranquille School	
+ 103
—8
+3
— 1
Totals 	
3,177
2,784
5,961
3,206
2,753
5,959
—2
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
G 11
Table 2.—Showing in Summary the Admissions and Population Increase of the
Mental Health Services Branch for the 10-year Period April 1,1957, to March
31, 1967.
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
65 Years
and Over
Admissions
15 Years
and Under
Informal
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase
1957/58..
1958/59-
1959/60...
1960/61-
1961/62...
1962/63...
1963/64...
1964/65-
1965/66...
1966/67-
2,936
2,993
3,296
3,924
4,193
4,248
4,569
4,518
5,069
5,002
442
425
506
580
557
554
550
702
844
757
106
135
182
254
200
213
243
215
206
175
1,012
1,118
1,316
1,695
2,023
2,086
2,187
2,194
2,278
2,095
Totals-
40,748
5,917
1,929
18,004
38
-90
20
42
-156
—63
31
—39
-92
—2
—311
1.29
—3.00
0.61
1.07
—3.72
— 1.48
0.68
—0.86
-1.81
—0.04
In the schools for the retarded there was an increase of 57 in the numbers
admitted—333 compared with 276 in 1965/66.
The Geriatric Division experienced a small reduction in admissions; in 1966/67
the total was 651, which is 14 fewer than in the previous year.
The three tables depicting the movement of population in the several divisions
in the Branch which appear at the conclusion of this portion of the report show in
full detail the operations of the Branch institutions.
It is to be noted that the Riverview Hospital cared for 7,554 patients in
1966/67, a slight decrease from the 7,706 under care in 1965/66. More persons
were cared for in the schools for the retarded — 2,348 compared to 2,198 in
1965/66. In the Geriatric Division there were 2,127 patients under care in
1966/67, an increase of 130 from the previous year's total of 2,097.
On March 31, 1967, there were two fewer patients in residence in the institutions than on the same date in 1966. The statistical reports of the Branch, in so far
as the institutions are concerned, suggest that a plateau has been reached with respect
to admissions, discharges, and totals under care. This matter will be watched
closely in the next 12 months to evaluate the trends that appear to be developing.
GENERAL COMMENTS
The 35th annual graduation exercises of the Department of Nursing Education
were held in the auditorium of the New Westminster Secondary School (Massey
Wing) on the evening of April 27, 1966. The address to the graduates was given
by Dr. Donald H. Williams, Professor and Head of the Department of Continuing
Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia. Ninety-
eight students were awarded diplomas in psychiatric nursing. The graduating class
contained 81 women and 17 men.
The graduation tea was held in the lounge of Nurses Home 11 at Essondale
on April 24, 1966, and the graduation dinner-dance was held on April 29, 1966,
at the Coach House Inn, North Vancouver.
The 1966 annual meeting of the Council of Psychiatric Nurses was held on
April 21, 1966, in Vancouver. Two hundred and sixty-three applicants were
licensed pursuant to the Psychiatric Nurses Act and regulations in 1966/67. As of
December 31, 1966, 1,689 nurses were holding licenses pursuant to the Act. Psychiatric nurses numbered 1,663, and nurses in mental deficiency numbered 26.
 G 12 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
On March 21, 1967, at a meeting of the Mental Health Services Branch Conference, the following six persons were appointed to sit on the Council of Psychiatric
Nurses for a three-year term, pursuant to section 5 (b) of the Act: Dr. B. F. Bryson,
Mrs. H. Duke, Dr. L. E. Ranta, Mrs. D. Slaughter, Mr. L. J. Wallace, Mr. C. B.
Watson.
Public education with respect to mental health has been carried on this year
in accordance with the patterns which have been described in previous reports.
It should be recorded that the professional staff of the Branch have participated
wholeheartedly in this most important aspect of the Service. It can be confidently
reported that the cumulative impact of public education with respect to mental
illness and modern concepts of treatment and community care has brought about
a most welcome public understanding of this major health and social problem.
Efforts to enlarge further the scope of public knowledge of mental health problems
and priorities must be continued.
The co-operation of the Canadian Mental Health Association and the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia has been of assistance in many
ways. Through their volunteer programmes, these public-spirited associations have
assisted a great deal in the care of the patients in the mental hospitals and the schools
for the retarded. Volunteer workers from the associations are an important link
in the maintenance of open lines of communication between patients and their families and communities.
Again, it is a pleasant duty to record on behalf of the patients and staff their
appreciation for the splendid volunteer services that have been so cheerfully given.
The in-service programme of training special teacher-counsellors, which is
arranged by the Vancouver School Board, was provided financial assistance by
means of a Mental Health Grant. In addition, the clinical facilities of the Branch
provided clinical demonstrations and lectures. During this year 11 teachers were
enrolled in the programme. Since it was started in 1955, 113 teachers have completed the course and upon their return to the school system they have given significant leadership in utilizing their unique skills in assisting the school, home, and community to understand the needs of students. Their influence in recognizing and
referring children with special problems of learning, emotion, and behaviour has
been a splendid contribution.
The Mental Health Services Branch continues to be represented on the board
of directors of the Narcotic Addiction Foundation of British Columbia and on the
Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia. Each of these organizations has been
operating for several years. One can now detect positive changes in our communities which spring directly from their educational and clinical services. Their leadership in these health fields, which have long suffered from public prejudice and
rejection, is worthy of special notice. The directors and staffs of both organizations
are indeed pioneers in an especially difficult field of human betterment.
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and
Welfare, made available to the Province of British Columbia a Mental Health Grant
" to assist in an extended programme for the prevention and treatment of mental
illness, including rehabilitation and free treatment." The Mental Health Grant was
established in 1948.   This was the 19th year of its availability to this Branch.
In 1966/67 the Mental Health Grant available totalled $793,913. Project
submissions for the year utilized all funds available.   By March 31, 1967, reim-
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 13
bursement in the sum of $793,764.44 had been received by the Province for expenditures made on account of approved Mental Health Grant projects. This represents virtually 100 per cent of the funds available.
In 1966/67 nine projects were supported by the Mental Health Grant. Three
of the projects assisted in the postgraduate training of mental health professional staff
together with the provision of professional staff employed in the treatment programmes of the Mental Health Services Branch institutions and community mental
health centres. Assistance was also provided for salaries for qualified instructors
employed in the School of Psychiatric Nursing operated by the Branch. The amount
expended on these three projects totalled $592,515.80.
The postgraduate programme of training in the specialty operated by the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, was assisted as in previous
years. The purpose here remains the training of physicians to qualify as specialists
in psychiatry in order that they may be available to participate in the expansion of
the public psychiatric services and in the teaching and research programmes of the
university department. The teaching programme is, in large measure, centred at
the Vancouver General Hospital. Therefore, a complementary grant to assist in the
operation of the Psychiatric Out-patient Department is made to that institution. In
1966/67 a total of $107,425.65 was expended on these projects.
The Metropolitan Health Committees of Victoria and Vancouver continue to
be supported by grants which assist them in defraying the salaries of mental health
professional staff for the operation of their mental hygiene clinics. The grant in
1966/67 totalled $67,673.
The School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, received support
for the salary of a student fieldwork placement supervisor again. In 1966/67, $6,500
was expended for this project.
CONCLUDING REMARKS
This report cannot leave my desk without special mention of the retirement of
the Honourable Eric Martin from the portfolio of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance. Mr. Martin devoted much of his energy and attention to the mental
health problems in British Columbia and he was most helpful and encouraging in
his efforts to keep the Mental Health Services Branch progressive and current in its
facilities and purpose.
It so happens that the conclusion of this fiscal year coincides with my retirement from the Civil Service of British Columbia. My career has been wholly in
the field of mental health and embraces 35 years' experience. It may be of value
to record some impressions and comments upon the trends in the care of the mentally
ill in British Columbia during this period. In essence, my career has embraced the
transition of a mental health service from an era of paternalistic custodial care to
one of active modern psychiatric therapy, both within institutions and followed up
into the community upon discharge of the patient. There has also been a ramification of community facilities throughout the Province to meet local needs in local
regions. This, undoubtedly, will be the pattern which will continue to develop in
the foreseeable future.
During the 35 years that I was employed with the Mental Health Services of
British Columbia, much progress was made in knowledge regarding mental health
and mental illnesses and many changes have occurred in the treatment methods and
in the organization of the Service. I assumed the position of Director of Mental
Health Services in August, 1958, and was appointed Deputy Minister of Mental
 G 14 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Health Services in April, 1959. This latter appointment occurred at the time when
the Mental Health Services were transferred from the Department of the Provincial
Secretary to the newly established Department of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance.
This development reflected considerable change in the status of mental health
in British Columbia, both from the fact that it was finally included in the total health
field and also from the fact that the head of the Branch had Deputy Minister status.
British Columbia was the first Province in Canada to establish the position of Deputy
Minister of Mental Health. This resulted in much closer recognition and more
attention to mental health problems as it gave much more direct contact with the
various agencies of Government.
As I have noted, the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance has
devoted much of his energy and attention to mental health problems. The Honourable Eric Martin served as Minister during my entire tenure of office and I would
like at this time to acknowledge the consideration and ready help I have always
received from him in my attempts to deal with the various problems.
It was also possible to have direct contact with other Government departments
and the excellent and ready co-operation which I always received from the departments closely related to the Mental Health Branch has been most sincerely appreciated.
The following are some of the more significant developments occurring during
the eight years in which I served as Deputy Minister of Mental Health:—
—The further transition from custodial care to the more active psychiatric care
of patients admitted to mental hospitals. During this period of time there has
been a very marked increase in the number of patients seeking admission to
hospitals and, as a result of a very marked step-up in the treatment programme, considerable increase in the discharge rate of these patients has
resulted. Actually during the eight years a steady decrease in the resident
populations of the mental hospitals occurred.
—The development of regional mental health centres scattered throughout the
Province has been a most important advance. The mental health centres
have been established in conjunction with the public health regions of the
Province. The first regional mental health centre was established in the
Okanagan Valley, centred at Kelowna, and since then similar centres have
been established in Nanaimo, Trail, Chilliwack, Kamloops, Prince George,
and Vernon. With the development of regional mental health centres the
policy of developing psychiatric wards within a general hospital in the regions
has resulted in a marked improvement in the type of psychiatric care which
patients are able to obtain in their own community.
—The abandonment of the mental home at Colquitz was a positive accomplishment. This institution had long been considered unsuitable for the
treatment of psychiatric patients and, with the decrease in population in the
mental hospitals on the Mainland, a gradual withdrawal from Colquitz was
planned and carried out. The institution was closed down on January 29,
1964. Since then the expansion of the mental health centre in Victoria and
the planning of a comprehensive mental health facility is aimed to bring more
and improved psychiatric care to the people of Vancouver Island.
Other significant developments are:—
(1) The opening and development of The Tranquille School for the care and
treatment of mentally retarded persons.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
G 15
(2) The beginning of a forensic psychiatric clinic at Burnaby for the evaluation and treatment of those psychiatric cases where there are medico-legal
implications.
(3) The planning and initiation of the construction of a residential treatment
facility for emotionally disturbed children at the Burnaby Mental Health
Centre.
(4) The rewriting of the mental health laws of the Province, both in the replacement of the Lunacy Act by the Patients' Estate Act and the writing
of the Mental Health Act, 1964. The Patients' Estate Act, administered
by the Department of the Attorney-General, separates the procedure for
declaring a person to be incompetent from those procedures dealing with
the admission to hospital and psychiatric care of such persons. The
Mental Health Act, 1964, attempts to bring the treatment and care of the
mentally ill more in line with the treatment of physical illness and to make
such treatment more readily accessible to those requiring it.
All of these developments reflect the advances in the care of the mentally ill
which have taken place in British Columbia in recent years. The developments
were largely the result of a conscientious and devoted effort by the senior members
of the staff of the Mental Health Services Branch. I would like to acknowledge the
tremendous assistance I have always received from the staff members during my
period of office as Deputy Minister of Mental Health in British Columbia.
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF INCREASES AND DECREASES IN RESIDENT POPULATION BY MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES BRANCH, 1957/58 TO 1966/67.
Fiscal Year
Riverview
Hospital!
Schools for
Mentally
Retarded
Geriatric
Division
Total
1957/58
—23
— 144
—229
—92
—236
— 137
—55
— 134
—103
-47
+76
+86
+93
+75
+73
+62
+79
+77
+31
+51
-15
—30
+ 156
+59
+7
+ 12
+7
+ 18
—20
-6
+38
1958/59
—88
1959/60
+20
1960/61
1961/62.
+42
— 156
196?. .63
—63
1063/64
+31
106-1/6.
—39
1065/66
—92
1066/67
2
1 For the years 1957/58 to 1964/65 shows combined figure for Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
(now incorporated into Riverview Hospital).
 G 16
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF TOTAL PATIENTS UNDER CARE FOR
MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BRANCH BY
FISCAL YEARS 1957/58 TO 1966/67.
Fiscal Year
Riverview
HospitaU
Schools for
Mentally
Retarded
Geriatric
Division
Total
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
7,122
7,121
7,163
7,376
7,679
7,765
7,931
7,540
7,706
7,754
1,373
1,481
1,740
1,868
1,960
2,023
2,042
2,178
2,198
2,348
1,349
1,373
1,459
1,587
1,642
1,677
1,738
1,937
2,097
2,127
9,844
9,975
10,362
1960/61
1961/67.
10,831
11,281
1962/63                                                                                  .
1963/64
1964/65
11,465
11,711
11,655
1065/66
12,001
1066/67
12,029
i For the years 1957/58 to 1964/65 shows combined totals for Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES,
APRIL 1, 1966, TO MARCH 31, 1967
Psychiatric
Division
M.
Schools for Mentally Retarded
Division
M.      F.
T.
Geriatric
Division
M.
Total
M.
In residence, April 1,1966	
On extended leave, carried forward
from 1965/66—
In boarding home	
Other	
On   escape,   carried  forward  from
1965/66. __ 	
Total as at April 1,1966	
Admissions—
First admissions to Mental Health
Services	
Readmission to different facility-
Readmission to same facility	
Total admissions	
Transfers in  	
Total admissions to individual
facility	
Total under carei..
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died	
On  extended  leave  in  boarding
homes 	
Other	
On escape	
Total separations-
Transfers out	
Total separations from individual facility	
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31,1967-
1,440
131
80
1,375
170
75
2,815
301
155
1,656|1,623| 3,279
980
1
1,047
984
1,250
1,964
1
2,297
2,028|2,234| 4,262
8|        5|      13
1
2,036| 2,239
4,275
.3,692|3,862] 7,554
1,937
61
156
52
4
2,181
68
186
100
4,118
129
342
152
4
2,210| 2,5351 4,745
26|      15] 41
I
2,236 j 2,550 4,786
+ 16| -63] -47
1,45611,312 2,768
1,085
799
1,884
113
17
1,146|    869| 2,015
120
15
57
118]      741    192
66]      75|    141
184
149
1,330] 1,018
333
2,348
137
20
149|    1251    274
67|      721    139
216     197     413
+29| +22| +51
1,114]    821 1,935
I
652
82
610
132
1,262
214
734|    742] 1,476
237
20
11
248
24
485
44
19
268|    280]    548
69]      34|    103
1
337|    314
651
1,07111,056| 2,127
32
252
101
33
215
161
65
467
262
385]    409|    794
50|      27|      77
435     436     871
— 16] +10|    —6
636     620 1,256
3,177
263
91
2,784
365
81
5,961
628
172
3,536|3,234|   6,770
1,290
29
1,095
1,279
31
1,278
2,569
60
2,373
2,414|2,588|   5,002
143|    114|      257
1
2,557] 2,702
5,259
5,950| 5,822| 11,772
2,031
326
316
67
4
2,251
288
425
105
4,282
614
741
172
4
2,744|3,069|   5,813
143|    114|      257
2,887 3,183    6,070
+29| —31(     —2
3,206 2,753    5,959
i Total under care for all Mental Health Services includes total as at April 1, 1966, plus the total admissions
to individual facilities minus transfers out.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
G 17
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1966, TO MARCH 31, 1967
Geriatric Division
Valleyview Hospital,
Bssondale
Dellview Hospital,
Vernon
Skeena-
view
Hospital,
Terrace
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
M.
F.
T.
In residence, April 1,1966	
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
259
79
497
124
756
203
99
3
113
8
212
11
294
652
82
610
132
1,262
214
nth.:.
Total as at April 1,1966	
338
621
959
102
121
223
294
734
742
1,476
Admissions—■
First   admissions   to   Mental
173
18
9
198
15
7
371
33
16
54
2
1
50
9
1
104
11
2
10
1
237
20
11
248
24
8
485
Readmission to  different facility _ 	
Readmission to same facility	
44
19
200
220
420
57
60
117
11
268
280
548
Transfers in	
13
11
24
8
23
31
48
69
34
103
Total  admissions  to  indi-
213
231
444
65
83
148
59
337
314
651
551
852
1,403
167
204
371
353
1,021
1,029
2,0501
Separations—■
25
130
96
251
46
27
158
147
332
26
52
288
243
583
72
4
69
5
78
6
57
14
"~77
1
10
126
19
155
1
3
53
F6
4
32
252
101
385
50
33
215
161
409
27
65
Died...    	
On extended leave in board-
467
262
Other  	
794
Transfers out  —
77
Total separations from in-
297
358
655
78
78
156
60
435
436
871
Net increase or decrease 	
-5
-3
-8
-10
+ 13
+3
-1
-16
+ 10
-6
In residence, March 31,1967
254
494
748
89
126
215
293
636
620
1,256
i Total under care for the Geriatric Division includes total as at April 1, 1966, plus the total admissions to
individual facilities minus transfers out.
 G 18
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1966, TO MARCH 31, 1967—Continued
Schools for Mentally Retarded
The Woodlands School,
New Westminster
The Tranquille School,
Tranquille
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
In residence, April 1, 1966  	
766
37
10
563
60
3
1,329
97
13
319
13
1
236
3
3
1
555
16
4
1
1,085
50
11
799
63
6
1
1,884
On   extended   leave,   carried   forward
from 1965/66—
113
Other  	
17
On   escape,   carried   forward   from
1965/66.     ..
1
Total on books, April 1, 1966	
813
626 | 1,439
333
243
576
1,146
869
2,015
Admissions—
First  admissions  to Mental Health
Services       	
69
8
35
46
7
16
115
15
51
4
2
1
4
5
6
73
8
37
47
7
20
120
15
Readmission to same facility	
57
112
4
69
8
181
12
6
62
5
67
11
129
118
66
74
75
192
Transfers in
141
Total    admissions    to    individual
facility —	
116
77
193
68
72
140
184
149
333
929
703
1,632
401
315
716
1,263
946
2,2091
Separations—
57
12
41
11
30
4
67
3
87
16
108
14
5
1
18
4
7
1
11
2
12
2
29
6
62
13
59
15
37
5
78
5
99
Died	
On   extended   leave   in   boarding
homes	
Other     	
On escape	
18
137
20
121
62
104
68
225
130
28
5
21
4
49
9
149
67
125
72
274
Transfers out
139
Total separations from individual
facility.  	
183
172
355
33
25
58
216
197
413
Net increase or decrease _	
-20
—32 |   —52
+49
+54
+103
+29
+22
+51
In residence, March 31,1967	
746
531  | 1,277
1
368
290
658
1,114
821
1,935
i Total under care for the Schools for Mentally Retarded Division includes total as at April 1, 1966, plus
total admissions to individual facilities minus transfers out.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 19
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
F. A. Matheson, Business Manager
Attached are the financial reports of the British Columbia Mental Health
Services Branch for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1967.
The over-all daily average population as illustrated in Table A shows a slight
decrease from $5,937.61 for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1966, as against
$5,934.38 for this fiscal year. Maintenance expenditure increased from $20,745,-
127 to $22,699,611 or $1,954,484. The daily per capita cost rose from $9.57 to
$10.48.
The rise in expenditure is further shown in the gross operating costs (Table
B).   Salary increases once more were the chief cause of this increase.
Maintenance revenue increased from $1,915,661 to $1,948,878 or $33,217
for 1966/67.
The Department of Agriculture supplied produce valued in excess of $400,000
to mental health units from operations at Colony and Tranquille Farms.
As a point of interest and additional information, this year's financial reporting has been further streamlined, that is, the total expense of the mental health
care of $235,089 is shown in Table L, General Administration. Secondly, heat,
light, power, and water expenses have been assumed by the Public Works Department for payment, but the cost of this charge is included under Buildings, Grounds,
etc., in the expense statements.
During this year activity increased within the community services, due mainly
to successful personnel recruitment. This development is subsequently reflected in
the expense statement appended to this report. I refer in particular to the mental
health centres of Trail, Nanaimo, and Chilliwack.
Again, this year, the Mental Health Services Planning Committee was very
busy in connection with the following major capital projects:—
(1) Mental Health Facility, Victoria.—Plans and specifications for this project
were completed and are due to go out to tender on April 3, 1967. However, in the meantime, the Public Works Department let three contracts
totalling $357,534 for the shell of the single-story section of the building and foundation work for the main building. These contracts have
all been completed.
(2) Residential Care Centre for Children, Burnaby.—Plans and specifications
for this project were completed and a contract in the amount of $759,500
was let for the site preparation and construction of the three residential
units. It is expected that tenders for the balance of the project, consisting of the activity and training building, school building, food centre, etc.,
will be called shortly before the present contract is completed.
(3) Glendale School, Victoria.—Preliminary planning for the main hospital
building has been completed and the architect is now working on the detailed plans. Two contracts totalling $56,961 for land clearing and some
excavation work have been awarded. In addition, tenders closed in
March, 1967, for the shell of the boilerhouse and laundry. Low tender
was $343,000 and it is expected that the contract will be awarded early
in the next fiscal year.
(4) Sage Building, The{ Tranquille School. — This new 104-bed unit for
severely retarded was completed and officially opened by the Honourable
Eric Martin on July 21, 1966. The first group of patients was transferred
from The Woodlands School to this building on September 8, 1966.
(5) Kitchen and Dining-block, The Tranquille School.—These new facilities
were completed and started operating during March, 1967.
 G 20 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
(6) Renovation of Centre Building, Wards J, K, and G, and " Con," The
Woodlands School, New Westminster.—A contract in the amount of
$498,000 for the renovation of Wards H, E, and F and the centre section
of the Centre Building was let and the contractor is now making good
progress on this phase. Planning is proceeding on the next phase of this
project and it should be ready for tender when the present contract is
completed.
I am pleased to be able to report that again this year, in addition to maintaining the buildings, grounds, equipment, and furnishings of all our institutions in a
satisfactory manner and the purchase of a considerable amount of furniture and
equipment, both new and replacement, a great deal of planning and major improvements were also carried out. Some of the main items of interest in this regard are
as follows:—■
Riverview Hospital, Essondale.—A new electronic pill counter was purchased
for the joint use of the Central Pharmacy and the Riverview Pharmacy.
The new admitting suite in the Centre Lawn Building was completed late in
the last fiscal year and was furnished and placed into operation on May 18, 1966.
The main entrance to the Centre Lawn Building was completely renovated.
Central garbage-can washing facilities were installed at Colony Farm.
Some $40,000 worth of new X-ray equipment ordered during the last fiscal
year was received and installed in the Crease unit.
Traffic lights were installed at the intersection of the Pitt River Road and
Colony Farm Road.
Wall-to-wall carpets were installed on Ward West 3, Crease unit, on an experimental basis.
Plans have been completed for the relocation of the H-l dining-room, Occupational Therapy Department, and Recreational Therapy Department facilities in the
East Lawn Building.
Plans have been completed and work started in the old Public Works Building
to provide accommodation for the Rehabilitation Department.
Plans were completed for the alterations to the ground floor of the West Lawn
Building to provide for central linen service, Housekeeping Department, and barber
shop.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster.—A complete new sound system
for all the buildings was installed.
A contract in the amount of $52,141 was let for the first phase of the new
Industrial Therapy Building.
New central supply facilities were installed in the Fraserview Building.
Alterations are under way on the ground floor of the Fraserview Building
to provide new facilities for the X-ray Department, Laboratory, Physiotherapy
Department, etc.
The Tranquille School, Tranquille.—The Public Works Department purchased a new pumper truck for the Fire Department. The old pumper truck is
to be transferred to the Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace.
Contract was let in the amount of $21,900 to construct a covered link to the
Recreation Hall. This covered link ties in with the tunnel system and will allow
the students to make use of the Recreation Hall without going outside in the
inclement weather.
Contract in the amount of $123,661 was let for the airconditioning of the
Greaves Building.
Plans for the expansion of the laundry building have been completed.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 21
A contract in the amount of $47,900 was let for improvements to the filter
system.
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale.—Garburetors were installed in the kitchen
on all nine wards of the cottage units.
A new passenger vehicle was purchased.
The Valleyview Building was redecorated.
Street-lighting was installed in front of Wards 1, 6, 7, 8, and 9.
New draperies were installed on Wards 4, 5, 7, and 9.
Dellvie\w Hospital, Vernon.—A standby diesel-electric generator was installed.
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace.—A standby diesel-electric generator was installed.
The hospital sewerage system was connected with the municipal system.
The Public Works Department is making arrangements to replace all the light
fixtures and locks on the hospital building.
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby.—Alterations were completed to provide accommodation for a Forensic Clinic. Dr. E. Lipinski was appointed Director and
this new service started operation on October 13, 1966.
Mental Health Centre*, Vernon.—Accommodation was provided in the Public
Health Building, Vernon, for a mental health centre. Dr. A. J. Bennee was appointed
Director and this new mental health centre started operating in January, 1967.
Mental Health Centre, Chilliwack.—The addition to the Public Health Building to provide accommodation for the mental health centre was completed and
officially opened by the Honourable Eric Martin on July 19, 1966. Dr. W. G. Jilek
has since been appointed Director.
Retirements, Resignations, and Staff Changes.—It was with regret we learned
that due to ill health, the Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and
Hospital Insurance, had to relinquish his portfolio. We are, however, pleased to
receive the announcement that the Honourable W. D. Black was appointed Minister
of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, succeeding the Honourable Eric Martin.
It was also with regret that we learned that Dr. A. E. Davidson, Deputy Minister of Mental Health, resigned on March 31, 1967, to accept a post with the Federal
Government in Ottawa.
Dr. A. D. Sleigh was appointed Director of the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby,
succeeding Dr. K. Davies, who resigned to enter private practice.
Mr. W. Tattrie, Superintendent of Works, Prince George, was appointed
Superintendent of Works, Tranquille, succeeding Mr. W. Smith, who passed away
suddenly.
Miss Peggy Dingle, Consultant in Medical Records, retired after forty-two
years' service with the Branch. The Honourable Eric Martin presented Miss
Dingle with a watch on behalf of the Government on her retirement.
Mr. N. K. Barr, Business Administrator, Riverview Hospital, resigned on
May 31, 1966, to accept a position as Director, Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops.
Mr. W. O. Booth, Business Administrator at The Woodlands School, was
appointed on September 1, 1966, as Business Administrator of the Riverview Hospital, succeeding Mr. Barr.
Mr. H. F. Hayes, Habilitation Officer, The Tranquille School, was appointed
Business Administrator at The Woodlands School on January 1, 1967, succeeding
Mr. W. O. Booth.
 G 22
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1957/58 to 1966/67.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1957/58
1,266.21
3,410.79
285.36
538.56
231.34
288.63
235.31
$2,484,024.86
5,716,745.90
460,863.85
898,225.93
395,584.86
379,826.63
1,077,897.96
$1,961.78
1,676.08
1,615.03
1,667.83
1,709.97
1,315.96
4,580.76
$5.37
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam
Home for the Aged, Vernon 	
Home for the Aged, Terrace—	
4.59
4.42
4.57
4.68
3.61
12.55
Totals for the year	
6.256.20
$11,413,169.99
$1,824.30
$5.00
1958/59
The Woodlands School	
1,377.31
3,301.84
282.99
539.13
226.33
282.92
236.88
$2,968,725.50
6,088,091.20
488,028.69
961,921.63
410,529.00
386,804.84
1,149,344.46
$2,155.45
1,843.84
1,724.55
1,784.22
1,813.86
1,367.19
4,852.01
$5.91
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam
5.05
4.72
4.89
4.97
3.75
13.29
Totals for the year _ __.
6,247.40
$12,453,445.32
$1,993.38
$5.46
1959/60
226.80
3,135.48
1,395.44
53.74
283.50
560.16
230.92
285.18
$1,233,254.59
6,672,849.09
3,443,231.64
400,957.24
523,480.74
1,400,239.30
444,975.54
412,230.25
$5,437.63
2,128.17
2,467.49
7,461.06
1,846.49
2,499.71
1,926,97
1,445.51
$14.86
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
The Woodlands School 	
5.81
6.74
The Tranquille School, Tranquille	
20.39
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz   .	
5.05
6.83
Dellview Hospital, Vernon _
5.26
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace...
3.95
Totals for the year 	
6.171.22
$14,531,218.39
$2,354.68
$6.43
1960/61
237.72
3,008.02
1,415.30
126.01
287.16
695.41
232.05
290.70
$1,313,678.32
6,775,567.11
3,637,555.12
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
$5,526.16
2,252.50
2,570.17
4,305.66
1,805.93
2,522.97
1,934.03
1,437.41
$15.14
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
The Woodlands School   ..
6.17
7.04
The Tranquille School, Tranquille
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale
11.80
4.95
6.91
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
5.30
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace
3.94
Totals for the year
6,292.37
$15,409,097.08
$2,448.85
$6.71
1961/62
241.92
2,824.58
1,351.62
250.33
284.90
736.29
230.38 .
287.28
$1,344,906.48
6,927,591.07
3,639,782.25
657,736.27
507,315.85
1,848,097.68
464,314.47
443,255.07
$5,559.30
2,452.61
2,692.90
2,627.47
1,780.68
2,510.01
2,015.43
1.542.94
$15.23
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
The Woodlands School 	
6.72
7.38
The Tranquille School, Tranquille	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale...  	
7.20
4.88
6.88
5.52
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
4.23
Totals for the year 	
6,207.30
$15,832,999.14
$2,550.71
$6.99
1962/63
236.68
2,719.32
1,365.03
307.13
214.18
724.07
232.55
296.21
$1,371,120.17
7,058,027.01
3,817,685.18
779,642.07
478,229.75
1,939,191.04
469,458.08
441,445.13
$5,793.14
2,595.51
2,796.78
2.538.48
2.232.84
2,678.18
2,018.74
1,490.31
$15.87
7.11
7.66
6.95
6.12
7.34
5.53
4.08
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale....
The Woodlands School 	
The Tranquille School, Tranquille	
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale.- 	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
Totals for the year..	
6,095.15
$16,354,798.43
$2,683.25
$7.35
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
G 23
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1957/58 to 1966/67—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1963/64
220.63
2,791.99
1,306.35
433.92
94.07
737.69
236.51
292.83
$1,442,627.00
7,534,673.00
3,916,660.00
1,077,011.00
414,787.00
2,029,118.00
512,128.00
713,594.00
$6,538.67
2,698.67
2,998.17
2,482.05
4,409.35
2,750.64
2,165.35
2,436.89
$17.87
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
7.37
8.19
6.78
14.41
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  ...
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace   	
7.52
5.92
6.66
Totals for the year 	
6,113.99
$17,640,598.00
$2,885.28
$7.90
1964/65
227.59
2,740.84
1,314.20
512.79
753.91
234.70
290.44
$1,573,366.00
8,054,536.00
4,501,364.00
1,509,947.00
2,351,885.00
553,985.00
510,679.00
$6,936.16
2,938.71
3,425.17
2,944.57
3,119.58
2,360.40
1,758.29
$18.94
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
The Woodlands School
8.05
9.38
The Tranquille School, Tranquille.	
8.07
8.55
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace 	
6.47
4.82
Totals for the year... .. 	
6,074.47
$19,055,762.00
3,137.02
$8.59
1965/66
2,797.80
1,291.27
562.37
763.44
227.35
295.38
$10,230,637.00
4,981,190.00
1,876,093.00
2,510,228.00
595,532.00
551,447.00
$3,656.67
3,857.59
3,336.05
3,288.05
2,619.45
1,866.91
$10.02
The Woodlands School 	
10.57
The Tranquille School, Tranquille	
9.14
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
9.01
7.18
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
5.11
Totals for the year.   	
5,937.61
$20,745,127.00
$3,493.85
$9.57
1966/67
Riverview Hospital, Essondale
2,760.21
1,307.53
602.46
760.73
219.13
284.32
$11,162,462.00
5,376,492.00
2,267,399.00
2,668,056.00
635,710.00
589,492.00
$4,044.06
4,111.95
3,763.57
3,507.23
2,901.06
2,073.34
$11 08
The Woodlands School..	
11 27
The Tranquille School, Tranquille   .
10 31
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale
9.61
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
7.95
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace
5 68
Totals for the year	
5,934.38
$22,699,611.00
$3,825.10
$10.48
 G 24 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table B.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in All Mental Health Institutions for the Year
Ended March 31, 1967.
Gross operating costs—
Riverview Hospital, Essondale   $11,162,462
The Woodlands School, New Westminster  5,376,492
The Tranquille School, Tranquille  2,267,399
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  2,668,056
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  635,710
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace   589,492
Gross cost, all institutions  $22,699,611
Less collections remitted to Treasury       1,948,878
$20,750,733
Daily average population  5,934.38
Gross per capita cost, one year  $3,825.10
Gross per capita cost, one day  $10.48
Net per capita cost, one year  $3,496.70
Net per capita cost, one day  $9.58
Revenue (Patients' Maintenance Collections) of the Mental Health Services
for the Past 10 Years
1957/58  $1,724,046.70 1962/63  $2,025,854.46
1958/59  1,838,158.33 1963/64  1,751,281.00
1959/60  1,821,810.53 1964/65  1,866,781.00
1960/61  1,906,847.71 1965/66  1,915,661.00
1961/62  2,150,802.56 1966/67  1,948,878.00
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
Table F.—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1967
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expense
Net Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost of
Operation
Yearly per
Capita Cost
Salaries  —	
Office expense  _
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment-
Medical care	
Dietary  	
Laundry	
Gratuities to patients 	
Patients' library-
Maintenance and operation of equipment-
Transportation	
General supplies-
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Audio-visual	
Motor-vehicles and accessories-
General expense	
Burials 	
Buildings, grounds, etc...
As per Public Accounts..
Less—'
Increase in inventory from institutional stores	
Rent deductions  	
Board  	
Adjusted expenditure..
$2,011,294
9,220
2,779
2,101
120,031
304,433
19,000
3,776
64
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384
97,798
2,218
741
8,480
2,034
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$2,590,000
7,568
197
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$2,567,205
$100,851
$100,851
$100,851
$2,011,294
9,220
2,779
2,101
120,031
304,433
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3,776
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384
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2,218
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$2,690,851
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$2,668,056
$2,643.90
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G 31
Table I.—Institution Stores
Net undistributed stores as per Public Accounts	
Adjustments re farm profits	
Inventory adjustment—
Plus on hand, March 31, 1966 __
Less on hand, March 31, 1967 __
Net increase in inventory1
$63,700
62,561
$126,261
543,947
584,074
$86,134
iThe increase in inventory has been transferred to the following  institutions  proportionately  using the
1 vouchered expenditure " as the basis for distribution:—
Riverview Hospital  $48,235
The Woodlands School   _   24,979
Valleyview Hospital    12,920
$86,134
Table J.
Salaries
-Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1967
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment.
Medical care	
Dietary
Laundry _,	
Maintenance and operation of equipment.
Transportation 	
General supplies	
Occupational and recreational therapy
Patients' education	
Motor-vehicles and accessories
General expense.
Buildings, grounds, etc.
Total
- $573,395
4,642
__      11,161
4,045
__      30,852
- 12,338
1,500
2,267
1,563
4,409
1,297
1,133
1,916
__ 38,572
__      78,474
.. $767,564
Salaries 	
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment.
Medical care	
Mental Health Centre, Victoria
  $124,006
  1,802
  1,404
  193
  14,391
Maintenance and operation of equipment  530
General expense  10,286
Buildings, grounds, etc.  13,166
Total
$165,778
 G 32 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table J.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1967—Continued
Mental Health Centre, Kelowna
Salaries   $49,514
Office expense  559
Travelling expense  3,136
Office furniture and equipment  236
Medical care  6,274
Maintenance and operation of equipment  411
General expense  2,753
Total     $62,883
Mental Health Centre, Trail
Salaries   $34,966
Office expense  824
Travelling expense  1,033
Office furniture and equipment  555
Medical care  3,803
Maintenance and operation of equipment  298
General supplies  118
General expense  137
Total     $41,734
Mental Health Centre, Nanaimo
Salaries   $38,654
Office expense  1,158
Travelling expense  3,264
Office furniture and equipment  52
Medical care  10,937
Maintenance and operation of equipment  810
General expense  266
Total     $55,141
Mental Health Centre, Kamloops
Salaries   $4,878
Travelling expense  427
Medical care  931
General supplies  13
General expense  41
Total  $6,290
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 33
Table J.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1967—Continued
Mental Health Centre, Chilliwack
Salaries   $7,143
Office expense  811
Travelling expense  468
Office furniture and equipment  8,950
Medical care  1,645
General supplies  154
General expense  110
Total     $ 19,281
Expansion of Community Services
All expenditure     $25,524
Grand total, $1,144,195
 G 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table K.—Expense Statements of the Rehabilitation Centres
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1967
Vista Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries   $25,566
Office expense  203
Travelling expense  51
Dietary  4,660
Laundry  31
General supplies  565
General expense  274
Buildings, grounds, etc.  1,551
Total     $32,901
Venture Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries   $23,106
Office expense  229
Travelling expense  152
Dietary  6,749
General supplies  852
General expense  347
Buildings, grounds, etc.  2,083
Total     $33,518
Rehabilitation and After-care Programme
Salaries   $ 142,291
Office expense  555
Travelling expense  8,058
Office furniture and equipment  1,949
Gratuities  20
Medical care  40,340
Dietary  307
Transportation  1,061
Occupational therapy  447
General expense  248
Total  $195,276
Grand total, $261,695
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 35
Table L.—Expense Statement of General Administration, Mental
Health Services Branch, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1967
Salaries   $278,036
Office expense  10,927
Travelling expense  10,669
Office furniture and equipment  2,811
Grant to trustees of Patients' Comfort Fund  8,000
Grant to University of British Columbia for Mental Health
Research  30,000
General expense  854
Administration of Psychiatric Nurses Act  2,317
Council of Psychiatric Nurses for Bursary Trust Fund  1,200
Mental health care  235,089
Total  $579,903
Table M.—Expense Statement of the Department of Nursing Education,
Essondale, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1967
Salaries   $909,131
Office expense  5,889
Travelling expense  1,765
Office furniture and equipment  948
Medical care  731
Dietary  9,527
Laundry  5,000
General supplies  27,919
Audio-visual   276
General expense  5,986
Total  $967,172
 G 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1966/67
Table L—General Administration—
Salaries       $278,036
Expenses        301,867
Vouchered expenditure      $579,903
Deduct salary adjustments  14,820
As per Public Accounts        $565,083
Table M—Department of Nursing Education—
Salaries       $909,131
Expenses  58,041
Vouchered expenditure      $967,172
Deduct salary adjustments  18,924
As per Public Accounts  948,248
Table J—
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby—
Salaries       $573,395
Expenses        194,169
Vouchered expenditure      $767,564
Deduct—
Buildings and grounds  $78,474
Portion of farm profit  480
  78,954
As per Public Accounts  688,610
Mental Health Centre, Victoria—
Salaries       $ 124,006
Expenses  41,772
Vouchered expenditure      $165,778
Deduct buildings and grounds  13,166
As per Public Accounts  152,612
Mental Health Centre, Kelowna—
Salaries        $49,514
Expenses         13,369
As per Public Accounts  62,883
Mental Health Centre, Trail—
Salaries        $34,966
Expenses  6,768
As per Public Accounts  41,734
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 37
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1966/67—Continued
Table J—Continued
Mental Health Centre, Nanaimo—
Salaries         $38,654
Expenses  16,487
As per Public Accounts  $55,141
Mental Health Centre, Kamloops—
Salaries   $4,878
Expenses  1,412
As per Public Accounts  6,290
Mental Health Centre, Chilliwack—
Salaries   $7,143
Expenses         12,138
As per Public Accounts  19,281
Expansion of Community Services—Deduct salary adjustments,
all mental health centres  38,400
Table C—Riverview Hospital—
Salaries   $7,387,587
Expenses     2,387,673
Vouchered expenditure  $9,775,260
Deduct salary adjustments        423,588
$9,351,672
Add sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc  89,354
As per Public Accounts       9,441,026
Table K—
Vista Rehabilitation Centre—
Salaries         $25,566
Expenses  7,335
Vouchered expenditure        $32,901
Deduct—
Salary adjustments    $672
Buildings and grounds  1,551
  2,223
As per Public Accounts  30,678
 G 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1966/67—Continued
Table K—Continued
Venture Rehabilitation Centre—
Salaries         $23,106
Expenses  10,412
Vouchered expenditure        $33,518
Deduct—
Salary adjustments    $648
Buildings and grounds  2,083
  2,731
As per Public Accounts  $30,787
Rehabilitation and After-care Programme—
Salaries       $ 142,291
Expenses  52,985
Vouchered expenditure      $195,276
Deduct salary adjustments  5,064
As per Public Accounts  190,212
Table F—Valleyview Hospital, Essondale—
Salaries   $2,011,294
Expenses        555,911
Vouchered expenditure  $2,567,205
Deduct—
Salary adjustments  $118,164
Portion of farm profit       10,082
        128,246
$2,438,959
Add sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc.  22,795
As per Public Accounts       2,461,754
Table G—Dellview Hospital, Vernon—
Salaries       $421,8 81
Expenses        121,510
Vouchered expenditure      $543,391
Deduct salary adjustments  21,300
$522,091
Add—
Portion of farm loss    $330
Sundry adjustments, board, rent,
etc  5,684
  6,014
As per Public Accounts         528,105
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 39
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1966/67—Continued
Table H—Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace—
Salaries       $343,760
Expenses        141,382
Adjusted expenditure      $485,142
Deduct salary adjustments  17,700
$467,442
Add sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc.  7,784
As per Public Accounts        $475,226
Table D—The Woodlands School-
Salaries   $4,027,285
Expenses        931,857
Adjusted expenditure  $4,959,142
Deduct—
Salary adjustments  $216,108
Portion of farm profit       20,396
        236,504
$4,722,638
Add sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc.  31,395
As per Public Accounts       4,754,033
Table E—The Tranquille School—
Salaries   $1,412,355
Expenses        523,791
Adjusted expenditure  $1,936,146
Deduct salary adjustments  61,836
$1,874,310
Add—
Portion of farm loss  $1,481
Sundry adjustments, board, rent,
etc  19,075
  20,556
As per Public Accounts  1,894,866
Table I—Net Undistributed Stores (as per Public Accounts) (prorated to Riverview Hospital, The Woodlands School, and Valleyview Hospital)   63,700
Total Mental Health Services Branch expenditures as per
Public Accounts  $22,397,393
 G 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
PERSONNEL REPORT
J. Dowling, Personnel Manager
The establishment of the Mental Health Services Branch increased during the
fiscal year as follows:—•
Community services   20
In-patient care facilities  69
Total  89
As of March 31, 1967, there were 4,011 persons on Branch payrolls. This is
193 more than on March 31, 1966, comprising 152 employees in various classifications and 41 student psychiatric nurses. The increase was constant throughout the
fiscal year with quarterly averages showing 207 more people on the payrolls than
in the previous year.
Over-all staff turnover, excluding students and relief staff, was up substantially
from 20.5 per cent to 28.6 per cent. Notwithstanding the very high volume of
separation and recruitment activity as detailed in Table B attached, staffing throughout the Branch was fairly well maintained.
Staff turnover in the psychiatric nurse classifications was only fractionally different from the previous year. There was, however, a 15.9 per cent rise in the turnover
of registered nurses. While this rate of turnover is regrettable it is not alarming
because registered nurses comprise only 5.54 per cent of the total nursing staff. At
the close of the fiscal year the number of registered nurses on staff was at a record
high.
While the total number employed in the nursing services of the in-patient care
facilities has risen by 3.43 per cent, the number of males as a percentage of total
nursing staff has declined again. Ten years ago male staff comprised 42.94 per cent
of nursing staff. At the close of the fiscal year the corresponding figure was 32.89
per cent. This trend is important and is likely to continue. It must be taken into
account in all planning and over-all considerations affecting nursing services.
The volume of work throughout the year was exceptionally heavy, but apart
from participation in effecting the reorganization of Riverview Nursing Services,
nothing of particular importance has been undertaken.
Figures covering personnel activity and the staffing position are provided in the
following tables:—
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation to
Separation and Recruitment
Staff recruited, excluding students  1,589
Staff separated, transferred, etc., excluding students  1,437
Increase       152
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1967  3,707
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31,1966  3,555
Increase       152
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 41
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation to
Separation and Recruitment—Continued
Quarterly staff average, excluding students, 1966/67  3,975
Quarterly staff average, excluding students, 1965/66  3,809
Increase       166
Male        Female Total
Student enrolment as of March 31,1967       14        290        304
Student enrolment as of March 31,1966      25        238        263
Change   —11      +52      +41
Student quarterly average, 1966/67      281
Student quarterly average, 1965/66      240
Change     +41
Table B.—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Services, Excluding Student Psychiatric NURSES. Established Positions
Recruited Separated
Physicians  42 42
Dentists  1 2
Registered nurses  74 61
Psychiatric nurses  326 244
Female psychiatric aides  183 188
Male psychiatric aides  72 93
Teachers   4 5
Occupational therapists  30 29
Recreational therapists  5 4
Industrial therapists  4 7
Psychologists  14 13
Social workers   26 21
Dietitians   3 3
Cooks   7 6
Kitchen helpers  63 70
Clerks   27 20
Clerk-stenographers  50 41
Trades   3 2
Laundry workers  56 43
Miscellaneous professional  16 8
Miscellaneous technical  12 11
Miscellaneous   184 150
Sub-totals  1,202 1,063
Temporary relief staff  387 319
Miscellaneous adjustments, transfers, etc.     55
Totals   1,589 1,437
 G 42
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table C.—Summary of Staff Turnover
By Major Classification
Classification
1965/66
1966/67
Change
Student psychiatric nurses-
Male psychiatric nurses	
Female psychiatric nurses.-
Registered nurses	
Per Cent
19.6
15.5
26.1
29.9
Per Cent
20.6
16.3
24.3
45.8
Per Cent
+1.0
+0.8
-1.8
+ 15.9
Note.—Item 1 has been calculated against the quarterly average and other items have been calculated against
the year-end staff totals.
By Pay Division
Pay Division
Temporary
Relief Staff
Excluded,
1965/66
Temporary
Relief Staff
Excluded,
1966/67
Per Cent
Per Cent
13.9
16.3
18.4
19.1
21.0
24.7
17.4
26.4
34.2
40.9
22.9
21.5
22.7
36.8
15.1
21.9
20.8
25.9
General Administration-
Department of Nursing Educationi..
Riverview HospitaL
The Woodlands SchooL
The Tranquille School—
Valleyview Hospital	
Dellview Hospital	
Skeenaview Hospital—
Mental health centres—
Over-all turnover..
20.5
28.6
i Student nurses not included.
Note.—Percentages calculated against year-end staff totals.
Table D.—Comparison of Staff Totals by Unit with Totals for the
Preceding Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 1965/66
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1_66
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
»66
Fiscal Year 1966/67
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1967
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1967
General Administration	
Department of Nursing Education-
Mental health centres	
Sub-totals	
In-patient care—
Riverview Hospital	
The Woodlands SchooL
The Tranquille School—
Valleyview Hospital	
Dellview Hospital-
Skeenaview Hospital-
Total of vote	
Total Civil Service positions-
Student psychiatric nurses	
Totals 	
44
63
140
43
60
130
44
63
160
247
233
267
1,540
856
341
440
89
71
3,337
3,584
325
3,909
1,558
869
298
436
90
71
1,569
868
358
444
92
74
3,322 3,405
3,555
263
3,672
325
3,818
3,997
43
68
135
246
1,574
886
390
446
92
73
3,461
3,7071
304
4,011
i Includes 121 part-time employees.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
G 43
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 G 44 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE CONSULTANT
Miss A. K. Carroll
The year 1966/67 has continued to afford challenge and to present opportunities for evaluative practice and creative thinking and planning for all social
workers in the facilities of the Mental Health Services Branch.
Studies in the conceptualization of the scope of skills and processes involved
in community planning and development for regional and community based health
services and of the patterns of agency co-ordination and co-operation were undertaken.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND STAFF-DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME
A total of 23 first-year and second-year students were placed for field-work
experience in facilities of the Mental Health Services during the year. Additionally,
a programme of block field-work placement was planned co-operatively by the
School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, and specific mental health
facilities. The student-training project in After-care, Riverview Hospital, was
extended to the adult clinic to integrate both case and group-work methods, thus
affording a practicum more generically based in theory and method.
The co-operation between the faculty instructors in the School of Social Work
and supervisory and senior practitioner personnel in the social service departments
in the mental health facilities continued as in the past.
In-trained social-work personnel from the Department of Social Welfare were
oriented to the programme and services of the various mental health facilities.
Additionally, welfare-aide students from Vancouver City College were afforded a
practical aide duty-level experience.
To be equipped to make an effective contribution to community health services
in the train of events such as the explosion of knowledge, advancing methodologies,
refinement of techniques, and a sharpening of skills occurring in both the behavioural
and health sciences fields, opportunities for on-going study are of prime importance.
To this end, social workers, some under the auspices of the Mental Health Services,
others on their own resources, attended relevant institutes and seminars.
PERSONNEL AND RECRUITMENT
Social-work staff stability has further declined over the past year. Every
social-work department operated with staff vacancies.
A major personnel practice gain was the institution of a psychiatric social-work
series based on basic minimal qualifications and recognizing the contribution of
the senior practitioner additional to those skills basic to the duties of supervisory,
consultant, and administrative personnel.
Whereas in the past the recruitment of social workers to the Mental Health
Services was contingent upon the availability of Federal mental health bursaries,
this year 14 social workers, including two part-time employees and three summer-
relief personnel, were recruited, some on graduation from the schools of social
work, others from the field of practice. Six social-work personnel were recruited
and awarded Federal Mental Health Grant bursaries, bringing the total of social
workers recruited through the efforts of this officer to 18. This year, 10 persons
were the recipients of this bursary (six were awarded to first-year post-graduate
social workers in the School of Social Work and four were awarded to social-worker
personnel in the Mental Health Services).
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 45
SOCIAL-WORK CONSULTATIVE SERVICE
This staff service accounted for 51 per cent of the consultant's man-hours and
was carried out by visitation to all facilities of the Mental Health Services.
BOARDING-HOME PROGRAMME
The boarding-home programme in the Lower Mainland and Upper Fraser
Valley areas of British Columbia has become stable in so far as procedures, administration, and resources are concerned. This has freed some time for boarding-
home social workers to devote to community organization, rehabilitation with
certain patients, and the development of programme in the boarding homes.
Since the start of the boarding-home programme in late 1959, some 1,000
patients have been released from the four participating institutions with a breakdown as follows (approximate figures):—
Riverview Hospital  676
Valleyview Hospital  237
The Woodlands School     62
The Tranquille School     25
1. Community Reaction.—The majority of these persons have been placed in
boarding homes in the Lower Mainland and Upper Fraser Valley areas (Regions
2 and 6 of the Department of Social Welfare). We have had excellent co-operation
with the district offices of the Department of Social Welfare, both in the placement
programme and in the development of new resources in the various districts. The
programme has also been accepted by the municipal administrations in these regions,
and during 1966 the Municipality of Surrey co-operated in the development of
further resources in that area. The Burnaby administration has continued its fine
co-operation and found it necessary to hold the line on placements in the year.
2. Community Involvement.—It should be noted that there has been an upswing in community interest and involvement in integration of the boarding-home
residents into the employment and activities streams in the communities. A branch
of Canadian Mental Health Association has been formed in one district (largely
due to the activity of the local public health unit), which has laid on a well-defined,
organized, and executed programme which includes recreational, training, employment, and socialization activities for patients, and educational activities directed
towards the community. The Coquitlam Mental Health Association group have
consistently provided a recreational programme and the Council of Women in White
Rock is active in a recreational programme that has, because of the representative
nature of the membership of this group, involved numerous other service organizations and individuals. In co-operation with and under the leadership of the occupational therapist from Riverview Hospital, the community groups in Haney and
White Rock are developing occupational-therapy centres which may well become
sheltered workshops and recreational centres, managed by the community group
and the patients, with Mental Health Services in a consultative role.
Community reaction to the boarding-home programme at The Tranquille
School has been generally good because (a) trainees are widely scattered in the
community, and (b) an intensive public-relations programme was done. Cooperation has been forthcoming from churches and the Association for Retarded
Children in a programme of integration into the community.
3. Future Expansion of Programme.—The total number of patients in the
boarding-home programme supervised by Mental Health Services increases by
approximately 45 persons per year from Riverview Hospital, and by a proportionate number from the other institutions.    This figure does not, however, describe
 G 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
increases in case loads as it does not include patient movement such as returns to
hospital and replacements, rehabilitation activity leading to discharge, and transfers
between homes. These activities increase the work load of not only the Mental
Health social workers, but also the work load of the staffs of the district offices of
the Department of Social Welfare and municipal social service departments. While
there are some areas in the Lower Mainland and Upper Fraser Valley still open
to development for this programme, other areas would seem to have reached a
point of saturation.
4. Public Health.—The demonstration project that Mental Health Services
and the Department of Social Welfare engaged in with the Central Fraser Valley
Health Unit has now been completed and a report is before the administrations of
the.participating departments for consideration as to future policy. The purpose
of the project was to discover the role (if any) of the public health unit and the
visiting public health nurse in the boarding-home programme. The project amply
demonstrated that the health unit and the nurse have valuable services to offer such
programmes and that the integration of these services with those of the other public
agencies results in an improved level of health and social services to the residents
of the boarding home.
5. Discharges from Programme.—Over the past two years 39 Riverview Hospital patients have been discharged from the boarding-home programme following
a rehabilitation plan, and only four of these people have subsequently returned to
hospital. These results have been achieved while average case loads of the boarding-
home social workers have been 125. Without going further back than the past two
years, the 337 patients on boarding-home leave from Riverview Hospital at the end
of 1966, plus the 35 still discharged, gives a total of 372 patients, which figure, in
terms of beds freed at Riverview Hospital, is much greater than the capacity of
either of the Admitting Units.
6. Training Programme.—One boarding home has for four years offered a
total training and rehabilitation programme geared to the needs of young female
schizophrenic patients. Five young women have " graduated " from this home and
are self-supporting. Previous to this experience these women had had long periods
of hospitalization or frequent admissions over a long period and had not worked
or had worked only sporadically. A second home is now being developed along
the same lines.
Additionally, on an individual basis, some patients are being trained in household or labouring skills by volunteers in the community. Expansion of this programme is planned. Other patients are attending vocational courses while in
residence in boarding homes.
The training programme for boarding-home patients at The Tranquille School
is based on exposure of the trainee to other trainees who have had success in employment in order to foster motivation. Employment opportunities are made
available once appropriate motivation is evident. All trainees are encouraged and
helped to keep on with established interests and hobbies.
SUMMARY
Throughout the year the consultant has been impressed with the high level of
motivation of social workers on the job. Also commendable has been the skill
level of social services rendered, the organization of the case load, the foci of services, and the coverage of patients referred for service. Social workers throughout
the service are to be congratulated for the purposeful, committed, and positive
contributions they have continued to make in the treatment of patients and families
during this period of extensive study, analysis, evaluation, and change in the nature,
scope, and organization of mental health programmes and services.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 47
REPORT OF NURSING CONSULTANT
Miss M. M. Lonergan, Nursing Education
The psychiatric-nursing programme showed a year-end census of 304 students
compared to 263 for 1965/66. The department sent out 1,470 bulletins and application forms and processed 489 applications for entrance into the fall and spring
classes. One hundred and ninety students enrolled in the programme; of these,
165 had earned complete high-school standing, one-third on the University Entrance
and the remainder on the General Programmes. Fifty-eight students withdrew from
the programme. Thirty-four withdrew for personal reasons, representing approximately the same percentage as that for the previous fiscal year. Twelve withdrew
because of illness and another 12 because of academic failure. Ninety-five students
completed the programme and all but five were employed by the Mental Health
Services. The final comprehensive examination, in the third year of its use, accounted for nine failures at the first sitting; one student was unable to pass the supplemental examination and was required to withdraw.
Under the direction of their senior instructor, the members of the psychiatric-
nursing programme faculty were able to improve the correlation of content among
classroom subjects and between the latter and clinical teaching. Student experience
in intensive-treatment areas emphasized learning techniques in interpersonal relationships, the use of therapeutic milieu, rehabilitation methods, and participation in
team nursing. In continued treatment areas the focus of learning was on the development of skills in group work. Special efforts were made to communicate to nursing service the objectives of student learning experiences. Courses in the care of the
mentally retarded were further defined to provide educational experiences in training,
psychiatric and pa_diatric nursing, with resultant good correlation of the academic
and clinical aspects of these courses. With the appointment of an instructor in
geriatric nursing, the emphasis of that experience was placed on learning bedside
nursing-care. Nursing staff co-operated fully with the establishment of a clinical
teaching programme and made it possible for all students to attend all clinics. The
curriculum committee devoted its meetings to preparing material for the revision of
the curriculum, defining course objectives, and identifying required learning experiences. Five thousand two hundred and eight hours of formal academic-clinical
teaching was recorded for this programme, indicating an average of 372 hours of
planned structured teaching by each instructor.
In the psychiatric-aide programme, 26 courses were conducted at the Education Centre. The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School provided one week
of instruction for a total of 230 psychiatric aides. At Dellview and Skeenaview
Hospitals, orientation for newly employed aides was available throughout the year
through in-service programmes; in addition, the majority of psychiatric aides took
part in concentrated refresher courses ranging from one to two weeks in duration.
During the year 287 aides requiring instruction were recruited into the Mental Health
Services; of these 142 enrolled in formal orientation courses. At the end of the
year it was determined that 642 of the 1,034 psychiatric aides currently employed
in the Service had had orientation and brief training in the classroom. A total of
1,084 hours of formal classes was taught by four instructors who also contributed
28 per cent of their teaching-time to other programmes in the department. A continuing challenge to these instructors has been the diversity of the aides' learning
needs, since those enrolled in any one course were either newly employed or experienced in the Service and were assigned to nursing programmes for either geriatric
 G 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
or for acutely-ill psychiatric patients. A plan to follow through at the conclusion
of courses by means of ward clinics was instituted the previous year in an effort to
provide specific and situational teaching. During the year there was a distinct increase in the number of teaching interviews, meetings with nursing services, weekly
clinics, and the number of aides attending the latter.
Two hundred and seventy students enrolled in the Affiliate Programme in Psychiatric Nursing; of these, two were instructors from general hospital schools of
nursing and 24 were public health nurses employed by the Health Branch. The
National League for Nursing Achievement Test in Psychiatric Nursing was used for
selected enrollees. The test scores when plotted showed a distribution conforming
to the " normal bell curve " and provided useful information for the programme
co-ordinator. The programme instructors held a four-day workshop in the fall, at
which curriculum outline was revised. The Director of Education Services of the
Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia met with the instructors concerned, twice in an advisory capacity. Terms of agreement for the continuation of
the programme for another year were reviewed and approved by representatives of
the Mental Health Services and the schools of nursing concerned. Bulletins providing information about the affiliate programmes for both general hospital students
and for public health nurses were compiled and made available to interested nurses
across the country.
Five students enrolled in the six-month Clinical Programme for Registered
Nurses completed their studies in July, 1966. Three of these obtained employment
in psychiatric units of general hospitals. For some time the programme had been
under review to determine whether it met the current needs of registered nurses for
psychiatric nursing experience. It became obvious that needs could best be met by
two different programmes: (a) a short course in basic concepts and principles with
appropriate selected experience for a large number of registered nurses and, (b)
a university programme designed to produce registered nurses with a competency in
psychiatric-mental health nursing. The University of British Columbia opened the
latter Diploma Programme in Psychiatric Nursing, in the fall of 1966. The Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia was giving consideration to the development of the former. The clinical programme was, therefore, discontinued. It had
made a contribution to nursing in Canada by graduating a number of nurses competent in the practice of psychiatric nursing and had provided a limited number of
staff for the Mental Health Services.
NURSING CONSULTATION
The consultative process in mental health-psychiatric nursing is carried out
generally in four major functional spheres. These are: administrative, educational,
clinical, and research. During the past year consultation responsibilities were
weighted heavily toward the first two. The amount of consultation time required
for priority matters only increased over that of the previous year by 75 per cent.
Five institutions were visited one or more times as well as three of the mental health
centres. Several meetings were held with representatives of the Health Branch and
with the Hospital Insurance Branch with a focus on standards of nursing care, categories of nursing personnel, and programmes in nursing education. The consultant
represented the Branch on various professional nursing committees concerned with
standards of nursing and nursing education. Discussion was initiated with the Vancouver City College and with the Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia
with the purpose of exploring educational opportunities for psychiatric nurses.
Attention was given to studies on the state of psychiatric nursing in the Province
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 49
and reports prepared for the Deputy Minister. The reorganization of nursing services, with subsequent recruitment and selection of nurses for Riverview Hospital,
was satisfactorily concluded with respect to the organizational structure. Orientation
programmes were arranged for selected newly employed nurses, visitors, and university field students. The consultant was privileged to participate in the first
Federal-Provincial Conference on Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing held in Ottawa
in June, 1966. It provided opportunities for senior nurses in Provincial psychiatric
services to gain information about developments in other services and to explore
solutions to common problems.
The Nursing Liaison Committee met bimonthly with the aim of promoting
liaison among nurses involved in mental health work. Services represented were
public health, nursing education, psychiatric units in general hospitals, and the Mental Health Services. Topics explored through discussion included the following:
nursing involvement in boarding-home programmes, reports of studies of nursing
time spent in mental health programmes, and new and existing programmes of common interest.
Directors of Nursing met in council monthly. Their deliberations included
assessing the safety of various medico-nursing procedures, determining the effectiveness of several personnel policies, and exploring methods of solving nursing administration problems. Each nurse administrator emphasized the need for staff education in his or her department. A high degree of priority was given to in-service
education programmes and to enabling nurses to attend educational events sponsored by other agencies. The most notable of the latter were courses on supervision, psychiatric and geriatric nursing, and methods of teaching.
A rewarding outcome of many activities this year has been a notable increase
in the degree to which Directors of Nursing were able to plan and work together
on many aspects of their responsibilities.
 G 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
REPORT OF THE CONSULTANT IN MEDICAL RECORDS
AND STATISTICS
Mrs. P. A. West
The fiscal year ended March 31, 1967, has been a busy and productive one,
particularly in the area of the development of statistical programmes for the various
facilities. A major change in personnel also occurred with the retirement on January 15, 1967, of Miss A. D. Dingle, who served in the Medical Records Department
of the Mental Health Services Branch for a period of 42 years. Miss Dingle will
long be remembered for her dedication and devoted interest in medical records,
particularly as they apply to the psychiatric facilities in British Columbia. Mrs.
P. A. West, formerly Medical Record Librarian of Riverview Hospital, was appointed as Miss Dingle's successor and assumed her duties as Consultant in Medical
Records and Statistics on January 16, 1967.
With the assistance of the Research Officer assigned from the Division of Vital
Statistics, continuing efforts were directed toward the development and improvement of the statistical programmes in all facilities and to ensure that they were
maintained at a current level. As a result of these efforts, all divisions of the Mental
Health Services now have statistical forms designed to collect data relative to the
particular type of care and treatment provided by the specific facility, thus making
available pertinent information which is valuable in clinical research and administrative planning.
The content of medical records in the various facilities has been under discussion in an effort to reduce the bulk in records of long-term cases and obtain
more satisfactory filing methods. Associated with this is the open-shelf colour-
coded numerical system of filing active cases at The Woodlands School, which has
proved most satisfactory since its introduction last year. The closed medical records
of The Woodlands School and Valleyview Hospital, formerly stored at Riverview
Hospital, have now been transferred to the storage areas of the individual facilities;
this transfer of approximately 2,800 files released valuable space for the closed
records of Riverview Hospital.
CONSULTATION TO UNITS
Riverview Hospital
A review has been made of statistics gathered on schizophrenic patients discharged from Riverview Hospital during 1965/66. These cases will be checked
for possible readmission and further studies are contemplated as research continues
into this particular form of mental illness.
In order to provide comparable statistics on patients in residence prior to the
initiation on April 1, 1965, of the original statistical forms, it was necessary that
admission data be obtained on all these patients. This large undertaking invloved
completing an admission statistical form on each of 2,200 patients; it was necessary
to retain one summer-relief clerk for one month to assist the regular staff in this
project.
In connection with the Pre-Admission Service pilot plan being developed by
Riverview Hospital and the Burnaby Mental Health Centre, consultative services
were given in the development of a record form and also with regard to the deployment of medical records staff.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION G 51
During the year consultative meetings were held with members of the medical
staff with a view to revising the statistical forms in order to meet the specific needs
of the Riverview Hospital in the collection of pertinent and detailed diagnostic and
treatment data concerning admissions to and separations from this facility. In
collaboration with the Research Officer, finalization of the revisions and the production of an accompanying manual of instructions and codes were accomplished
in time for the revised forms to be introduced on April 1, 1967.
Schools for Mentally Retarded
Steady progress has been made in the statistical programme which was put
into operation in The Woodlands School on April 1, 1966. Some minor procedural
problems were encountered initially following the programmes introduction, but
these were overcome by the staff members involved showing a genuine interest and
co-operating fully in establishing efficient routines which enable them to complete
the statistical forms with a minimum of effort. Steps are being taken to obtain
admission statistical data for the patients who were in residence prior to April 1,
1966, and who continue to reside in this facility.
Two brief visits were made to The Tranquille School. The operation of the
medical-records office in this facility has been disrupted by frequent change of staff;
consequently, new appointees have required instruction and support to cope with
unfamiliar routines in a single-staff office.
Geriatric Division
Valleyview Hospital staff have adjusted well to the procedures involved in
completing the statistical forms introduced on April 1, 1966. Efforts will be made
shortly to obtain statistical data on all patients who were in residence prior to April
1, 1966. In the meantime, admissions and separations are being promptly recorded
on the statistical forms. The development of a similar statistical programme for
Dellview and Skeenaview Hospitals is a future goal of this department.
Mental Health Centres
The Children's Clinic at the Burnaby Mental Health Centre has now submitted
statistical forms for all cases open as at March 31, 1967, and is completing the
forms on a routine basis.
The development of the Forensic Clinc at Burnaby and the Pre-Admission
Service of Riverview Hospital, which will be operating in part at the mental health
centre, have brought attention to the need for review of the methods of recording
movement of patients.
The Victoria Mental Health Centre's medical-records office is now operating
most efficiently, with statistical forms and reports being promptly and regularly
submitted.
Notable success was achieved during the year in bringing the statistical programme for the Okanagan Mental Health Centre to a current level. Initially,
changes of staff played a large part in the creation of a backlog. However, now
that there is more constancy of staff who have become familiar and proficient with
the codes and instructions of the statistical-forms manual, regular reporting has
been established.
The medical-records staff in the Kootenay Mental Health Centre has been more
permanent and no difficulty has been experienced in keeping the statistical programme reasonably current.
 G 52
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre at Nanaimo has been making headway in overcoming a somewhat underdeveloped approach to the statistical programme. Initial steps have been taken in a concerted effort to bring current the
statistical forms and reports for the 1966 year.
Two visits were made to the Upper Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre at
Chilliwack during January and March for the purpose of instructing and assisting
the medical-records clerk during the initial stages of organizing and establishing the
clerical department, which is functioning quite satisfactorily with a current statistical
programme.
The North Okanagan Mental Health Centre at Vernon opened in February,
1967. It is planned to visit this centre as soon as possible in order to give assistance
and guidance in establishing an efficient medical-records office.
The need for further revision and simplification of the statistical form used by
the mental health centres over the past several years was met by a concerted effort
on the part of the Research Officer assigned from the Division of Vital Statistics,
who, in close collaboration with the Director of Mental Health Services and the
Medical Records Consultant, developed and made ready for implementation on
April 1, 1967, a comprehensive and efficient form primarily designed to provide
administrative data regarding the case loads carried by the mental health centres
throughout the Province. An important benefit accruing from this revision will
be a marked reduction in the clerical work formerly necessary in maintaining
complex registers.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
G 53
PART II.—RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
B. F. Bryson, Superintendent
GENERAL COMMENTS
The following table gives a summary of the movement of population for Riverview Hospital for the 12 months ended March 31, 1967:—
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1, 1966
On extended leave—
Boarding home 	
Other	
On escape 	
Totals-
Admissions    	
Transfers from geriatric facilities	
Transfers from facilities for the mentally retarded..
Total admissions 	
Total under care 	
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died  	
Transferred to geriatric facilities  	
Transferred to facilities for the mentally retarded _
On extended leave—
Boarding home    	
Other	
On escape	
Total separations .
Increase or decrease in population .
In residence, March 31,1967	
1,440
131
80
5
1,375
170
75
3
2,815
301
155
1,656
1,623
3,279
2,028
3
5
2,234
4
1
4,262
7
6
2,036
2,239
4,275
3,692
3,862
7,554
1,685
60
22
4
156
52
4
1,815
64
11
4
186
100
3,500
124
33
8
342
152
4
1.983
2,180
4,163
16      |
1,456      |
—63
1,312
—47
2,768
In comparing the above statistical information with that of the previous year,
it is noted that there has been some decrease in both admissions and separations.
This year there were 4,275 patients, including 2,036 men and 2,239 women, admitted to Riverview as either new admissions, readmissions, or transfers from other
mental health facilities, a slight decrease of 20 compared to the previous year. Of
a total of 4,262 direct admissions, 2,059 or 48.3 per cent came as informal admissions, and 1,891 or 44.3 per cent under involuntary certification. The remaining
312 or 7.4 per cent were admitted under various legal procedures, including 77 by
Order in Council, 56 by Court orders, 16 on transfer from Federal penal institutions,
and 101 by Magistrate's warrant under the Mental Health Act. Special alcoholic
admissions numbered 62.
Separations dropped considerably compared to the previous year, by 728, and
totalled 4,163, including 1,983 men and 2,180 women. Of the separations, 3,500
were discharged to the community, a decrease of 751 over the previous year, and
represents 84 per cent of all separations.
The number of deaths again decreased slightly by 9, to a total of 124, and represents only 2.1 per cent of total separations and 1.6 per cent of the total number
of patients under care during the year.
 G 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
At the year's end there were 41 more patients in boarding-home care, totalling
342, including 156 men and 186 women.
As of March 31, 1967, the number of patients in residence at Riverview Hospital totalled 2,768 (1,456 men and 1,312 women), a decrease of 47 compared to
the same date a year ago.
NURSING SERVICES
During the year the Department of Nursing has taken further steps toward the
proposed reorganization of our nursing services as outlined early in 1966. These
changes have made it necessary for the nursing staff to make many adjustments, both
in attitude and procedure, to meet the demands which occur through administrative
changes, new concepts, and philosophies which pertain to modern methods of
patient care.
The first major step toward implementing the new organization occurred on
May 1, 1966, when the former separate men's and women's nursing divisions became
united into one nursing service under the direction and leadership of the Director
of Nursing. At the same time the former Director of the men's division became
the Assistant Director of Nursing Personnel and has concentrated on the personnel
aspects of this large department, with improved efficiency and satisfaction in this
important area. September 1, 1966, saw the appointment of the Associate Director
of Nursing and on January 1, 1967, the appointment of two Assistant Directors of
Nursing, who carry the continuity of senior nursing administration throughout the
evening and night hours. These positions are entirely new to this hospital and are
in keeping with modern concepts of nursing administration in large hospitals.
The beginning of January also saw the appointment of Unit Nursing Supervisors to each of the six units of Riverview, as well as two Assistant Unit Supervisors
to the two large units, East Lawn and West Lawn. The concept of the function of
the Unit Nursing Supervisor has broadened considerably in that these senior staff
are responsible for providing comprehensive nursing care required by the needs of
the patients in their unit and within the existing policies and philosophy of the
hospital administration.
During February, 1967, the appointment of three female psychiatric nurses
to the position of Chief Grade I marked the first opportunity for the promotion of
this group above the position of Charge Nurse. In addition, five clerk-typists have
become available to free nursing supervisors of clerical duties, thus giving them
more time for direct nursing supervision.
Since February, the former Chief Psychiatric Nurse in charge of staff rostering
for the male division has been reassigned to the position of Supervisor of Outdoor
Workers. This further innovation provides for better communication to the Unit
Nursing Supervisor of patient programmes off the wards, as well as acting as a liaison
between the Department of Nursing and the Rehabilitation Department.
During the year job descriptions have been completed on all categories of
nursing staff, which has assisted greatly in clarifying the function of each position
and in making the role of nursing more meaningful, both within the department and
in the hospital as a whole. This delineation of nursing responsibilities has also
made possible the release of 28 nursing positions toward the development of non-
nursing services, such as housekeeping and reception-desk personnel.
Because of the increasing difficulty in recruiting suitable male staff into nursing
service, female staff have been placed on most of the male wards of the hospital.
At the end of the year 34 of the 43 wards have an integrated nursing staff.
Integration of patients on wards has proceeded slowly, with close consideration
being given to the therapeutic value as well as the economy of staffing.   Five wards
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL G 55
now care for both men and women patients with both male and female staff, a
change which has been accepted well by all concerned.
Because of the many changes within the department and in an effort to effect
as many of the newer concepts in psychiatric nursing as are applicable to this
hospital, we have taken advantage of many educational programmes. During the
latter part of the year, a 10-week course in " Principles and Methods of Supervision "
was conducted at Riverview for 35 nursing supervisors under the general direction
of Miss A. Valdstyn, of the Allan Memorial Institute, Montreal. Six nurses from
our security-ward staff attended sessions of the British Columbia Corrections Institute in July, and five nurses from the geriatric wards attended an institute in
November, sponsored by the Registered Nurses' Association of British Columbia,
on " Meeting the Nursing Needs of the Elderly." In February and March, 33
nursing staff attended an Institute on Psychiatric Nursing, sponsored by the Department of Extension and the School of Nursing at the University of British Columbia.
The emphasis of this institute was on group work and was considered useful, as this
form of treatment programming is becoming increasingly prevalent in the in-patient
care of the mentally ill. In addition, 137 psychiatric aides attended orientation
classes offered at the Education Centre at Essondale and conducted by instructors
of the School of Psychiatric Nursing.
The Nursing Department has also been actively involved in contributing clinical
facilities and instruction in nursing education, both to our own psychiatric-nursing
students and to affiliate students from several major general hospitals in the Lower
Mainland, the University of British Columbia, and for the public health nurses.
Specific wards in the various units of the hospital have been established as teaching
wards and have become a normal rotation for the student programme.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Productivity and development of new programmes in the Department of
Psychology continued to increase as it has in recent years. The Riverview psychologists have been active in a wide variety of functions, including group therapy (956
hours), joint and individual interviews (782 hours), and behaviour therapy (184
sessions).
A new programme in group dynamics was instituted for the instructors of the
Rehabilitation Department, Hillside Unit.
An innovation in our After-care Clinic programme is found in the Young
Adult Group Therapy. This complements our continued after-care programme of
marital group therapy and joint interviews, totalling approximately 270 hours.
The Department administered 3,682 psychological tests and completed 392
psychological reports for patients. In addition, tests were administered to students
from the School of Psychiatric Nursing in a continuing programme of collecting
information for the prediction of success in the nursing programme.
In the field of research, a normative study is in progress, comparing, by the
use of several tests, the performance of different population samples, including
psychiatric patients, penitentiary inmates, and normal groups.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
Implicit in the programmes and activities of the Social Service Department
has been continuing recognition for more extensive integration of hospital treatment
services with those of other community health and welfare facilities. To this end,
unit Directors and social-work personnel were engaged in developing co-operative
 G 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
relationships and referral procedures with agencies which share responsibility for
the provision of services to patients and their families. The two regionalized, acute-
treatment units of Crease and Centre Lawn continued to plan and to implement,
where feasible, out-patient programmes entailing increased responsibility for community-based clinical services.
In line with such plans, one social worker from the staff of the Crease unit was
assigned full time to the Burnaby After-care Clinic to extend the coverage of
essential social and casework services for patients discharged to the Vancouver
area. In addition, social workers attached to the regional service of Burnaby and
North and West Vancouver were charged with providing both in-patient and outpatient services and for co-ordinating them with those of other health and welfare
agencies within these specific regions.
Social workers employed in the Centre Lawn unit, in addition to providing
direct services, were actively engaged in unit programmes concerned with the application at ward level of the concept of the therapeutic community, as well as with
the enhancement of treatment-oriented staff-patient relationships. Services to
adolescents and young adult patients, while significant in all units, continued in this
building to account for a large proportion of social-work time, both in relation to
individuals and to groups.
In the long-stay units, a major emphasis was again the selection and preparation of patients for community resettlement. A review of patients in long-term
treatment during the year revealed a growing number whose handicaps and degree
of disablement were such that extended-care facilities were indicated if community
resettlement were to be considered. A percentage of this group, while not suitable
for placement in boarding-home resources presently available, could nevertheless
adjust to community-living situations offering a greater degree of supervised care.
The placement of patients in boarding-home care remained an important aspect
of community resettlement. At the end of the fiscal year, 342 patients were on
leave from the hospital and resident in boarding homes under the on-going supervision of hospital services. The above figure represents an increase of 41 patients
in placement over the previous year. The boarding-home programme in the Lower
Mainland has now been well stabilized in so far as procedures, administration, and
resources are concerned. As a result, social workers attached to the programme
have had time for community organization, rehabilitation planning for selected
patients, and the development of suitable programmes within the individual boarding
homes.
The statistical summaries for the department are indicative of services rendered
during the year. In 1966/67 a total of 5,110 patients in hospital and 913 patients
in after-care were given social and casework services.
A research project concerned with a follow-up study of the social adjustment
of a sample group of mothers who had been admitted to the hospital was undertaken
and completed by a senior member of the staff. It is hoped that this will stimulate
further studies related to social work in psychiatric hospital settings.
REHABILITATION DEPARTMENT
This has been a year of considerable expansion of rehabilitation services.
More patients have been given a wider range of services related to preparation for
community living following discharge. This has involved an increase in appropriate
staff and physical facilities, and gives recognition to increased hospital concern
with preparing the patient to function adequately following hospital discharge.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL G 57
The hospital provides a wide variety of work opportunities for patients during
their stay. As patients recover from their acute symptoms, it is important that they
move on to experiences similar to those involved in community living. The work
programme provides an opportunity to observe the patient's ability to function in
the kind of situation he may have to face following discharge. Help in job placement outside of hospital can be given realistically on the basis of work performance
observed here. Approximately 1,100 patients were involved in work programmes
at any one time. A total of 1,747 patients were referred and were given individual
interviews, during which a work plan was made and implemented. Token wages
were paid and fringe benefits were given to patients on extended-work placements
in an effort to duplicate conditions in the community.
The Vocational Assessment Service was active this year, handling 171 referrals
for patients who are planning to return to employment or seek further vocational
training following discharge. These on-the-job vocational assessments were valuable
in supporting referrals for community-job placement and vocational-school training
as they supply the practical concrete information necessary for those working with
the patient following discharge.
The Department has continued to be involved with the Rehabilitation Workshop, which provides work programmes for patients who are unable to take part
in the majority of hospital activities. There has been an expansion of small work
projects onto wards and an effort has been made to obtain contracts and materials
from the community which are suitable for stimulating groups of rather limited
patients.   This is a joint venture with the Occupational Therapy Department.
The rehabilitation residences, Vista and Venture in Vancouver, have been
active. They have increased their total bed-count to 23 and are supplying a vital
link in the re-establishment of patients in the community. There has frequently
been a waiting-list for beds in these residences, which has been kept to a minimum
by an active programme. A total of 66 patients has been resident in Vista and
Venture during this year as they progressed in their rehabilitation. These residences
also provide a drop-in programme for patients who have been discharged into the
community but who still need some contact for social or vocational help.
A new service within the Rehabilitation Department this year is that provided
at Hillside unit. Hillside is a 60-bed residential unit with a staff of 20, which provides specific preparation for community living for patients who are unable to
return to the community without improving their ability to cope with the normal
demands of society. This service is designed particularly for the long-term patient
who has become very dependent on the hospital but who is no longer so ill that he
requires full-time hospital care. The programmes here teach self-care and appropriate social behaviour. For patients who will seek employment following discharge, a vocational training programme is provided, as well as help in job-finding
in the community. The Hillside unit took its first patient on August 17, 1966, and
has had 78 patients in the programme up to March 31, 1967. While this new unit
provides a significant service for its patients, it is also viewed as a pilot project to
evaluate and improve techniques of rehabilitation within the psychiatric-hospital
setting.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
Throughout the year the occupational-therapy programmes were maintained,
initially with difficulty because of some shortage of qualified staff. However, with
the appointment in October of four English occupational therapists and two recent
graduates from the University of British Columbia, the tempo of activity in the
department changed.   Under the direction of these therapists, significant progress
 G 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
was made in a number of areas. In North Lawn unit a new occupational-therapy
workshop was developed, to remotivate a group of physically disabled male patients
resident in the unit. The patients, who were previously unemployed, now work
daily on simple dismantling jobs for outside contracts. This work, combined with
physical exercises and a varied social programme conducted on a multi-disciplinary
basis, has resulted in increased mobility of the group and an improvement in general
behaviour patterns.
Building changes in Centre Lawn unit resulted in the closure of the Occupational Therapy Woodwork Department. In place of this, a heavy workshop was
set up in part of the old Public Works building. The workshop is intended to provide a more realistic work situation for male patients returning to construction jobs
and allied trades. Under these conditions an assessment of the patient's skill and
ability to perform can more readily be made. As this programme is allied to work
of the Department of Rehabilitation, referrals to the workshop are co-ordinated by
one of the Job Placement Officers.
Steady progress has been made in the boarding-home programme following
the appointment of a full-time therapist. The therapist and Co-ordinator of Boarding Homes, in conjunction with the sponsoring local groups of the Canadian Mental
Health Association, started two activity centres in White Rock and Haney. These
centres, which opened in October, have enabled the therapist to use a wider range
of techniques. Assisted by interested volunteers, a varied programme of social,
recreational, and educational activities has been well attended by patients boarding
in these areas.
As in previous years, educational commitments were fulfilled. Eleven occupational-therapy students from the Universities of Montreal, Toronto, and British
Columbia interned in the department during the summer months. It was noted
that this year the calibre of the students was particularly high and their contribution to the hospital programme most worthwhile.
Throughout the year, occupational-therapy staff in all units of the hospital
were active with 3,349 patients, an average of 620 patients daily. A total of 100,665
treatments was given during the same period.
RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
Following unitization of the hospital and the subsequent integration of nursing
services, the Recreational Therapy Department has striven to adapt programme
methods and staff coverage to meet the needs of the rapidly changing treatment
patterns. The initiative in the use of recreational therapy as a treatment modality,
as well as in meeting the general recreational needs of the patients, increasingly
rests with the nursing staffs. The total extent of the use of recreation as a treatment
medium within the hospital is not, therefore, necessarily reflected in the attendance
reports. Nevertheless, under the direction of members of the department, there
were 6,327 sessions, with a total attendance of 224,721.
Highlights of the Department's activities included activation programmes for
regularly scheduled keep-fit activities. Special vacation programmes were coordinated with the Rehabilitation Department's annual vacation policy for patient
workers. Ward parties, card-games, and afternoon teas were convened on more
than 400 occasions. The use of music in many forms showed a decided upsurge
during the year with the employment of a part-time staff music specialist. Two
periods of resident camping, using the facilities of the New Westminster Y.M.-Y.W.
Camp Garibaldi, were conducted for groups of patients from the West and East
Lawn units.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL G 59
More extensive use was made of nearby community resources and both bus
and station-wagon trips took many patients to various events or points of interest.
There were 230 such expeditions. The Department has also made available a list
of recreational resources available in the Greater Vancouver area to help patients
re-establish themselves after a period in hospital.
The patients' magazine, " The Leader," continued to be published under the
direction of the Department. Thirteen issues, including a special issue marking
the Provincial Centennial, were circulated within the hospital and to institutions
and individuals around the world. Approximately 20 patients are occupied in
writing copy, editing, and compiling each issue.
PATIENTS' SCHOOL
The school was open for 223.5 regular school-days during the past year.
Ninety-three patients (21 female, 72 male) were enrolled. This was an increase
of 24 per cent compared to the previous year. Sixty-four of these attended the
daily classes and 29 received instruction on their wards. The enrolment included
38 adolescents with an average age of 16.3 years and 55 adults with an average
age of 29.5 years. Thirty-three students or 35 per cent were discharged after an
average period of attendance per patient of 7.6 weeks.
The extensive range of the studies undertaken by the students reflected their
widely varied educational needs. Both the standard grade curricula and correspondence courses from the Department of Education were employed. Thirty-one
students were enrolled in the elementary grades, 39 in the junior-secondary grades,
and 17 in the senior-secondary grades. Two students advanced their university
studies and four new Canadians attended in order to improve their written and
spoken English. For the majority, completion of an interrupted school term and
personal advancement by means of both academic and technical subjects were the
principal goals.
Although all the hospital units were represented by the enrolment, 30 students,
approximately one-third of the total enrolment, were patients from the Riverside
Unit. This ever-increasing participation among Riverside patients led to the formation of a second class in that unit and weekly instruction was made available on
both security wards.
RADIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The Department of Radiology took 15,806 films during the year and examined 11,069 patients. There has been a slight decrease in both the number of
routine films taken and the number of patients examined, as compared to the
previous year. There was, however, a significant increase in the number of more
complex procedures such as intravenous pyelograms, femoral arteriograms, aorto-
grams, and venograms. This department has continued to provide a comprehensive
diagnostic service.
Early in the year a modern new X-ray unit, equipped with image amplification,
was installed, which has improved both the efficiency of the department and the
quality of the work.
DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORIES
This department reports activity maintained at the same high level as during
the previous year. The total number of procedures performed is 76,730, representing 145,196 units of clinical laboratory work. Hematological, biochemical, microbiological, and histological procedures continue to constitute the greater part of this
 G 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
work load. The biochemistry department continues to provide some special services for other institutions through the performance of serum copper determinations
and quantitative urinary porphyrin estimations, and has established analytical
methods for L.S.D. analyses, utilizing the recently acquired fluorospectrophotometer.
The pathologist and technical staff continue to participate in the investigation
of melanin metabolism as it relates to the etiology of schizophrenia.
Our laboratories function as a training-school for laboratory technologists,
and again received approval from the inspection team from the Canadian Medical
Association for this purpose.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
During the year our technicians completed a total of 957 electroencephalograms, of which 704 were done at Riverview, 200 at The Woodlands School, and
53 at the mental health centre in Burnaby. Of the 704 cases examined at Riverview, 94 were referrals from either the Provincial or Federal Penal Services.
Dr. P. Bratty has continued as our part-time neurological consultant, visiting
the hospital regularly to prepare electroencephalographic reports and to provide
clinical neurological consultations, which totalled 184 this year. Dr. F. Turnbull
has also continued to provide neurological consultation, and carried out 27 neurological operations.
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT
The pharmacy has been faced with a year of marked increase in its prescription
services. The total number of prescriptions filled for the year was up one-quarter
to a total of 25,807. Most of this increase was related to the large number of outpatient prescriptions filled for patients in boarding homes. Nearly every patient
at the time of discharge receives medication to carry him through at least the initial
phase of his discharge from hospital. For those patients who continue to require
psychiatric medication, their personal physicians in the community may submit
prescriptions to the hospital. These prescriptions are for those patients who could
not ordinarily afford the rather expensive psychiatric medications and who would
probably discontinue using them.
Besides the individual prescriptions mentioned above, the pharmacy dispensed
48,500 items of ward-stock pharmaceuticals, as well as 13,500 items of surgical
sundries.
DENTAL DEPARTMENT
The Dental Officers continue to provide a comprehensive service to Riverview
patients, but report they are receiving increasing numbers of requests for dental
services to the newly admitted patients, or those who are only in hospital for a
short time. It is only possible, however, to provide basic dental service on an
emergency basis for these short-stay patients. For the longer-staying patients, who
tend to be a more elderly group, partial or full dentures are being requested in
increasing numbers. During the year 2,896 patients were seen and 9,620 dental
procedures performed.
CHAPLAIN SERVICE
The effectiveness of the chaplaincy service was greatly enhanced during the
year with the provision of improved facilities in the Crease unit. In April a new
office was provided for each of the two chaplains on the second floor of the unit,
which is much more accessible to patients and which provides a greater sense of
privacy.   In May the Public Works staff also completed the building of a small but
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL G 61
beautiful chapel adjacent to the chaplain offices. In a special and perhaps unprecedented service this chapel was consecrated by Bishop G. P. Gower of the
Anglican Church and Bishop J. Carney representing the Roman Catholic Church.
Since then there have been daily services in the chapel, which has also been used
frequently by patients as a retreat for prayer and meditation, and on several occasions by clergy from the community for a private service for a patient and his
relatives.
Regular Sunday church services have been conducted in Pennington Hall as
in past years. In addition, " Illustrated Bible Hour " programmes, using filmstrips
and recordings, have been introduced and provided for patients most weeks in
Pennington Hall, North Lawn, and on the Riverside security wards.
During the year 286 visits were made by clergy from the community to patients
in hospital. This is in addition to the weekly visits by Pastor Vinge and Pastor
Klein, the two institutional chaplains of the Lutheran Church, and by Pastor Bottlin-
ger, the chaplain to the deaf.
LIBRARY
Activity in the Patients' Library has been concentrated on keeping abreast
with current best sellers, expanding the reference section, and purchasing a wider
selection of non-fiction. Almost 6,000 books were borrowed during the year. In
addition, the small collections at North Lawn and Riverside were used extensively.
Patients have continued to help in the library, and have also continued to contribute
book reviews to the hospital's magazine. Thirty-two popular journals are now
subscribed to, several of these subscriptions were donated as Christmas gifs from
charitable organizations.
In the Medical Library, 1,606 books and 1,849 journals were circulated. These
figures are considerably higher than in any previous year and emphasize the heavy
use made of the library's collection. One hundred and fifty-three inter-library loans
were received. This, too, is a record and reflects the increased use made of
periodical literature. The library's collection was augmented by 206 new volumes,
bringing the total bookstock to 3,737. Literature searches continued to be made
not only in response to questions from Riverview staff but also in answer to queries
from other Provincial mental health institutions. Acquisition lists of pamphlets
and new bookstock have been circulated regularly to Provincial mental health
centres notifying them of the library's expanding resources.
MEDICAL RECORDS DEPARTMENT
The Medical Records Department was extremely active throughout the year
in its function of maintaining the large volume of medical records for which it is
responsible and in its continuing endeavour to improve procedures and forms.
The new admitting office in the Centre Lawn unit was opened in May, 1966.
This admitting area is the main centre for recording of admissions and discharges
to and from the Riverview Hospital and is in operation from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.,
seven days per week. This extended coverage necessitated an increase in clerical
staff. The senior admitting clerk conducted several formal classes to acquaint the
new staff members with admission procedures, hospital policies, and the regulations
of the Mental Health Act, 1964.
Considerable time was devoted to the completion of 2,270 admission statistical
sheets on in-resident patients admitted prior to April 1, 1965. This special project
was carried out in order to enable the Division of Vital Statistics to compile data
for the annual report in reference to the in-resident population.
 G 62 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
VOLUNTEER SERVICES
The Volunteer Service of the Canadian Mental Health Association at Riverview has completed a busy and active year. A total of 128 volunteers gave 16,044
hours of voluntary time to the patients and staff of this hospital.
The apparel shop was again a hub of activity. This facility served a total of
2,355 patients individually and a grand total of 14,365 articles were given out from
the shop. Our patients in boarding homes of the Lower Mainland were accommodated fully from apparel-shop supplies and with new clothing issued through it from
the hospital Stores Department.
Since June, three volunteers have provided a new service in the admitting suite
at Centre Lawn. Volunteers extend hospitality to the relatives, and generally assist
the staff in accepting the new patient into the hospital. During slack hours these
volunteers spend their time visiting the wards.
In June, the volunteers organized a group of professional hairdressers who
completed a programme of beauty culture in the East Lawn Building, involving 40
patients and 10 student nurses. Following the programme, 40 boarding-home patients were also invited to a professional shop for beauty treatments. This first
attempt to involve this group on a community level was most encouraging.
Tours through this mental health facility saw approximately 738 people accommodated from various units.
A new programme inaugurated during the year and referred to as the " Volunteers Luncheon Programme " provided an opportunity for 158 patients to visit the
homes of volunteers for luncheons. These special visits have been much enjoyed
by all patients involved.
During the year the seamstress from the tailor shop was transferred to the
supervision of the volunteers in the apparel shop, where 1,482 articles of clothing
were repaired, mended, fitted, or altered for patients' use.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
During the year there has been considerable effort expended in several areas
of the hospital to improve or to project future improvements to our facilities, services, and methods.
Structural improvements completed during the year included the installation
of new X-ray equipment and renovation of the main X-ray room housing this equipment in the Crease unit, as well as the installation of carpeting throughout Ward
West 3 as a trial project. West Lawn unit received a complete interior decoration,
and a complete renovation of the C 4 dining-room. In Centre Lawn the main
entrance foyer and the main dining-room and kitchens were completely renovated
and modernized, and a start made on the development of Ward D 5. East Lawn
was also redecorated throughout and supplied with a central linen-supply area.
Other improvements included the provision of cablevision and a sound system for
the Hillside unit, improved hot-water storage for the laundry, and a new road and
drainage in front of the staff residences.
Specific studies and reports have been prepared on the requirements of the
Riverside Building, the swimming-pool building, and renovation of the former Public
Works building to provide for expansion of the rehabilitation workshops, as well as
renovation and relocation of the H 1 dining-room facilities in East Lawn.
An evaluation of hospital housekeeping requirements was conducted during
the year and a comprehensive report prepared which indicates a need for improved
and expanded housekeeping services throughout the hospital.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL G 63
On October 1, 1966, Mr. W. O. Booth, formerly of The Woodlands School,
was appointed as Business Administrator of Riverview Hospital, replacing Mr. N. K.
Barr, who left the Service to become Hospital Administrator for the Royal Inland
Hospital, Kamloops.
DIETARY DEPARTMENT
During the year the dietary staff planned and prepared a total of 2,900,036
meals for patients, of which nearly a quarter were special therapeutic diets of all
types required in medical care, for reducing, or to meet the needs of an increasing
geriatric population.
In addition, a total of 161,921 meals was served to staff, of which 4,351 were
special diets.
Dietary staff also provided catering services for many Recreational Department
social activities and other special occasions, involving activities for 3,786 staff and
73,293 patients.
HOUSEKEEPING DEPARTMENT
This newly formed department expanded in July with the appointment of four
new staff from reclassified nursing positions. At the same time, the first training
syllabus for housekeeping staff was prepared for the orderly development and training of present and future housekeeping and cleaning staff.
This Department has now taken from Nursing Services the responsibility for
operating the central linen rooms now established and functioning in the Crease
unit, Centre Lawn, and the North Lawn units.
INDUSTRIAL THERAPY
During the year more than 2,500 patients were enrolled in the industrial programmes, which have offered many media of interesting employment in manufacturing and repair. Opportunities have been offered to patients in the pursuit of advanced technology, inventive and experimental outlets, electronics, photography,
public address system, machine shop, welding, and metalsmithing.
The mattress-manufacturing department is now making urethane-filled mattresses which are light to handle and ideal for emergency transportation, and which
will eventually replace the felt mattress. A bed-renovation programme has been in
progress throughout the year. Three thousand beds have been stripped, refinished,
and provided with new springs.
A personalized service has been offered to patients in the way of a " While-
You-Wait " service on shoe repair, hearing aids, electronic items, radios, and small
personal items.
Through the 12-month period, the Flm Library shipped 1,667 films to borrowers who comprised an audience of 49,000 viewers. Of these totals, 46 per cent
of the shipments and 38 per cent of the viewers received service during the final four
months of the year, an indication of the increasing use of this facility.
A new programme inaugurated on February 1, 1966, is one in which film is
used to stimulate patient groups or activities. For this purpose films are borrowed
from community film libraries. This service has provided 107 showings for 5,270
patients.
LAUNDRY
The Riverview laundry, which also services Valleyview Hospital and The
Woodlands School, processed a total volume of 10,464,444 pounds of linen during
the year, an increase of 179,448 pounds over the previous 12-month period. The
average volume per month also increased proportionately to 872,037 pounds.
 G 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
BARBER AND BEAUTICIAN SERVICE
The beauticians continue quietly to carry out their efficient hair-dressing functions and are responsible, very frequently, for the improvement, not only in appearance but in spirit, of the patients they serve. They have effected 47,707 treatments
during the year.
The barbers have also been busy, particularly in an effort to meet the changing
coiffure demands of the male population. Personalized service is rendered as often
as staff and facilities allow. There has been a great increase in the number of patients being sent to boarding homes, on leaves, and on discharge, which has increased
the demands on the personal services of the barber department.
The barbers were involved in their first job-assessment placement this past year,
assisting a patient who was a barber to become re-established into the community.
The patient is now gainfully employed in a Vancouver barber shop.
PODIATRY SERVICE
The Podiatry Department provides service to the Riverview Hospital for three
days per week and to the Valleyview Hospital two days per week. The Woodlands
School has received service on a referral basis.
Regular consultation with the Surgical Resident and Consultant Orthopaedic
Surgeon has been established and as a result cross-referrals ensure a better follow-up
of those patients requiring surgical treatment and appliances.
TRANSPORT SERVICE
Our Transport Division has rendered consistently dependable service to Riverview Hospital, The Woodlands School, Valleyview, boarding homes, Venture, Vista,
and the community during the past year. The mechanics have serviced, on a regular
basis, 64 vehicles and 10 trailers. Thirty units have worked directly out of the
Riverview garage. In addition to the thousands of passenger miles, transport have
moved over 20,000,000 pounds of laundry, together with many million pounds of
foodstuffs, stores supplies, and hospital equipment. The department is radio-
equipped and is on constant alert for emergency services.
ESSONDALE CIVIL DEFENCE DISASTER ORGANIZATION
Although general interest has waned considerably during the year in Civil
Defence planning, the Essondale Disaster Planning Committee has remained active
and met on several occasions to further review our facilities and organization to meet
emergency situations.
On two occasions the Riverview Civil Defence Communications personnel were
involved in a communications exercise with the Vancouver Target Zone and sector
organizations.
Regular instruction has been provided to the new students of the School of
Nursing regarding Essondale disaster planning and the role of nursing staff in the
event of a Civil Defence emergency.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
STATISTICAL TABLES
G 65
Table 1.
-Movement of Population, Riverview Hospital, Essondale,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Male
Female
Total
1,440
131
80
5
1,375
170
75
3
2,815
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
301
Other
155
8
1,656
1,623
3,279
Admissions—■
980
9
1,047
984
5
1,250
1,964
14
2,297
2,036
2,239
4,275
3,692
3,862
7,554
Separations—
1,937
61
22
4
156
52
4
2,181
68
11
4
186
100
4,118
ni.rl
129
33
8
On extended leave and still out—
342
Other                         ...                  	
152
4
2,236
2,550
4,786
+ 16
1,456
-63
1,312
—47
2,768
i Includes 3 male and 4 female transfers from geriatric facilities, 5 male and 1 female transfers from facilities for the mentally retarded.
 G 66
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 2.—First Admissions to Riverview Hospital, Essondale, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1   	
1
4
4
1
4
3
4
3
1
8
2
3
3
2
4
3
3
7
1
1
4
2
9
6
9
1
6
7
2
5
5
6
3
4
16
3
5
6
2
6
4
4
14
1
1
7
2
15
7
15
2
10
34
23
5
29
22
14
127
13
57
51
13
11
11
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65	
5
2
7
7
4
„   ?■
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
8
1
2
3
2
1
1
7
9
„   3    -
„   66	
2
„   4
„        „   67-
6
11
3
9
1
2
4
4
7
8
1
4
1
1
7
3
2
12
1
22
2
5
37
390
62
50
22
13
„   5
„   68	
18
„   18
„           „       „   69 	
3
„       „   70	
8
1
5
6
5
7
12
6
2
14
7
3
3
5
7
1
1
5
14
1
44
5
3
1
26
336
49
30
10
5
1
6
17
School District No. 7
„   79....   	
2
„   8	
Upper Islands, Courtenay—
School District No. 71	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9
7
„        „   72  .
10
„           „       „   11
„   85    ..
9
„   12	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
School District No. 27	
14
„           „       „   28 	
20
„   20    .....
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
„   21
7
„   22	
„   51	
2
„           ■>        „   78
„   52
21
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14
„   53	
11
„        „   54	
4
„        „   15
„   80      .
4
„   16 	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59 	
 ,   60 	
„   83	
Northern  Interior,   Prince
George—
School District No. 55	
„   17	
12
„   23 	
„   77	
3
7
1
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24.	
„           „        „   29
6
1
6
2
7
17
12
3
20
8
7
73
8
31
27
7
6
4
4
„           „       „   30
„   56	
7
 ,   31 	
 57	
„   58	
Greater Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health-
School District No. 61 	
26
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilliwack—■
School District No. 32  	
3
17
11
2
9
14
7
54
5
26
24
6
5
7
2
66
„        „   34
„   62   . ..
7
..   76
Central Fraser Valley, Mission
City—
School District No. 35	
„        „   42	
„   75
 63	
„   64    .
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
„   39 	
8
1
63
726
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 36 	
„   37       _
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster—
 ,   41	
„            „        „   44 	
„   45	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 49	
111
80
32
5
„   43
 ,   87  	
1
3
9
School District No. 46 _.
„  47      	
Totals     	
932
978
1,910
 48 ..._
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
G 67
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
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Q
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL G 81
PART HI.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL,
NEW WESTMINSTER
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
J. S. Bland, Superintendent
This has been our first full year for unitization, and programming has benefited
in all internal areas. Treatment and training have been more individualized and
each patient now has an accepted programme based on his or her needs. This desirable goal has been achieved by the enthusiasm of the multi-disciplinary teams involved in each unit.
During the year two of our senior administrative positions were vacant for a
number of months. In October we welcomed Dr. H. Brooks to be the new Deputy
Superintendent, the vacancy having been created by Dr. Foulkes' resignation in February, 1966. Mr. W. O. Booth, our Business Administrator for many years, left
in September on being appointed to the more senior position at Riverview Hospital.
We thank him for his many years of devoted service to The Woodlands School and
wish him well in his new position. In January we welcomed Mr. H. F. Hayes to
the position of Business Administrator.
The completion of the Sage Building at The Tranquille School enabled us to
transfer 100 patients there in the fall. However, the essential renovations to our
old buildings prevented our using more than half of these beds for new admissions.
Total admissions were approximately the same as last year. Of these, 60 were temporary summer admissions to provide family relief, as well as assessment of the
individual patient if this had not previously been carried out.
In the middle of the year the Out-patient Department was reorganized. Instead
of a separate establishment, each clinical team now spends one day a week in outpatients, seeing appropriate referrals. Cases are screened and allocated to one of
the three units, hospital, training, or psychiatric. More emphasis is placed on complete assessments, with inter-disciplinary conferencing, discussion with the parents,
and follow-up where indicated. A total of 160 new patients was seen. The majority
was referred by private physicians and public health officers, but one-quarter were
from family and welfare agencies.
In the Hospital Unit, the principal advance during the year was the closer liaison
gained with the University Department of Paediatrics. From January 1, it was
arranged that each University Pediatric Resident would spend a two months' rotation at The Woodlands School. So far this has proved to be mutually satisfactory,
and we are looking forward to its continuance. Close contact was also maintained
with the Department of Genetics, and in addition to a genetic-counselling clinic we
received guidance in our search for chromosomal abnormalities. The Chromosomal
Laboratory was transferred to our jurisdiction. During the year, 34 abnormal
karyotypes were discovered. Once again we were fortunate in having no major
epidemics. Our full-time health nurse was able to bring all immunizations up to a
satisfactory standard. A small pilot project was completed with a number of blind
children. The individual learning programme offered these severely retarded children produced a marked increase in their abilities, as measured over an eight-month
period.
 G 82
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
In the Training Unit, the change from a custodial to an educational programme
gained momentum. A series of ward activity training programmes was initiated, and
curriculum guidelines were prepared and distributed. The programmes are intended
to produce a meaningful set of steps in training so that patients can be assessed
developmentally and introduced at their present functional level. The staff in this
unit, most of whom are psychiatric nurses, have made an excellent start in this reorientation. Sheltered workshop activities increased, but a formal vocational-
training department remains to be organized.
In the Psychiatric and Rehabilitation Unit, emphasis has been two-fold. First,
more individual attention has been possible for some of the mildly retarded with
behaviour problems. Secondly, the separate Autistic Unit has allowed more specialized treatment and research with this group of patients.
The various departments all functioned satisfactorily during the year. In the
Psychology Department more patients were seen and assessed. During part of the
year the Physiotherapy Department had two staff members, achievement therefore
being greater. The Laboratory staff continued to provide an excellent service, as
did our Medical Records Department. New statistical reporting procedures increased the work load in the latter area by 30 per cent.
The Dental Department was stabilized by the appointment of a full-time dental
surgeon.   Preventive work has been increased.
The Recreational and Occupational Therapy Departments expanded their
activities, and together with the academic school, reached a new understanding in
scheduling of patients.   Co-ordination and co-operation have increased.
As stated last year, the integrated nursing staff has now completely unitized.
The Director of Nursing, therefore, has been able to spend more time in operational
research. In particular, a survey was carried out indicating actual nursing hours
available for patient care. From this survey it is hoped to aim at agreed staff-patient
ratios for different types of problems. In-service education continued to be a major
responsibility of the Nursing Department.
The various service departments have continued to provide an excellent matrix
upon which to build clinical and educational programmes. In addition to renovation of our old buildings, a start was made on a new industrial therapy complex,
and a new central sterile supply was provided in the Fraserview Building.
Once again I would give sincere thanks to our volunteers. Over 200 people
gave us 6,740 hours of their time, and enabled a great number of " extra " programmes to take place.
General morale was high, and various attempts were made to make all levels
of staff feel that they had an active role to play in the institution. A multi-disciplinary
orientation tour was held each month for all new personnel, with encouragement to
them to take an active and critical role in programming.
During the year we have been grateful for co-operation with many community
agencies. We are all attempting to provide the best service for the mentally retarded,
and with increasing co-ordination of effort I am sure that a satisfactory network of
facilities can be provided.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
G 83
i
Male
Female
Total
766
37
10
563
60
3
1,329
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
97
Othpr
13
Total on hooks as at April 1,1966                                             	
813
626
1,439
Admissions—
69
8
39
46
7
24
115
15
63
116
77
193
929
703
1,632
Separations—
57
12
60
2
41
11
30
4
67
1
67
3
87
Pied
16
127
3
On extended leave and still out—
108
<">ther
14
183
172
355
-20
746
-32
531
—52
1,277
i Includes 2 male and 4 female transfers from The Tranquille School, 2 male and 4 female transfers from
Riverview Hospital.
 G 84                         MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 2.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Central Vancouver Island, Na-
School District No. 5     	
1
1
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 68 ~
2
2
School District No. 6 	
	
1
1
1
7
2
3
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 71-	
West Kootenay, Trail-
1
1
2
School District No. 9  	
2
2
»           „       ii   72
1
1
„          „       „   11   .
1
2
„           „       „   12   	
1
School District No. 27
1
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
„   28	
1
2
3
School District No. 20 	
1
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
22
2
3
2
2
„          „       „  54	
1
1
School District No. 15	
1
1
 17     	
1
.
1
School District No. 59 	
1
1
„           „       „   23     	
2
2
„           „       „   60	
1
1
South Central, Kamloops—
ii             ii         ii   83	
	
1
1
School District No. 24...	
3
1
4
Northern   Interior,   Prince
1
„          „       „  26	
1
1
„   29	
1
1
School District No. 55.. 	
1
1
„           „       „   30	
1
1
2
1
1
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilli
 57	
2
1
3
wack—
Greater   Victoria   Metropolitan
School District No. 33   .    ...
2
1
3
Board of Health-
^4
1
1
School District No. 61	
2
4
6
„          „       „  63	
1
1
2
City-
Metropolitan Health Committee,
School District No. 35 	
	
1
1
Vancouver—
„           „       „   42 	
3
3
School District No. 38
1
2
3
39
18
10
28
7
3
10
„           „       „   41 	
2
1
3
4
1
5
ster—
ii           ii       „   ^J	
1
1
School District No. 40	
2
4
6
School district not covered by
„       „  43
4
2
6
health units—
Coast Garibaldi, Powell River—
School District No. 49  	
1
1
2
School District No. 48
1
1
1
1
Central Vancouver Island, Na-
Totals    	
77
53
130
School District No. 65
1
	
1
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
G 85
Table 3.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School by
Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31,1967
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
9
4
1
7
10
6
3
H
4
1
7
2
5
1
5
3
1
4
1
1
2
3
4
1
44
32
2
33
18
3
Involuntary
Temporary   	
1
4
2
2
2
9
6
4
5
9
77
50
Totals	
1
......
6
4
15
9
5
17|    9
15
10
6|    8|    5
4
3|    4[ 77
53
130
Readmissions
	
	
1
2
~3
2
1
~3
3
5
8
2
3
~5
4
4
8
2
4
6
8
3
11
1
2
~~ 3
2
1
4
^7
4
1
5
	
1
1
"2
1
~_
	
1
	
3
18
18
12
12
3
Involuntary
Temporary                ..   .
30
30
Tntalsl
	
	
	
1
......
39
24
63
Table 4.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
lotai
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
Mental deficiency!—
Profound	
1
	
5
1
4
~4
7
5
2
1
15
3
3
2
1
~9
3
4
1
1
2
1
2
2
7
4
4
1
2
5
1
3
1
7
4
1
2
2
5
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
23
22
20
11
1
13
11
18
10
1
36
33
38
Mild
21
Other   and   unspecified
character,   behaviour,
and   intelligence   disorders	
No mental retardation.....
1
1
Totals	
1|......|    6
9|    5| 17|    9| 15| 10
6     8
5
4
3|    4| 77| 53
130
Readmissions
Mental deficiency^—
	
	
2
1
3
1
6
1
3
1
1
4
3
1
5
1
5
4
2
1
2
1
5
1
1
3
1
	
1
1
" 1
	
1
	
3
17
14
5
12
3
8
1
15
20
22
Mild
6
Totals	
	
3
3
8
5
8
6
11
3
7
5
2
1
	
1
......
39
24
63
1 Includes 3 males and 5 females with mongolism.
2 Includes 7 males and 3 females with mongolism.
Table 5.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Religion
and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 G 86
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
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 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
G 87
Table 8.—Patients of The Woodlands School Out on Extended Leave by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1966
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency!—
1
1
1
~1
	
1
	
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
......
2
7
2
" 2
1
2
2
7
Mild  	
3
Totals	
1
1
1
1
—
6
1
2
1
—
11
3
14
i Includes 1 male and 1 female with mongolism.
Table 9.—Total Population on Books of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31, 1966
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
over
roiai
Grand
Total
M.
t
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
Mental deficiency1—
2
2
1
1
3
6
2
2
1
1
4
2
1
4
2
3
6
6
2
i
1
6
3
5
1
5
8
3
15
4
7
2
12
18
5
4
1
16
6
6
2
11
6
1
i
4
4
2
1!
1
3
 1
1
2
34
48
25
11
1
49
83
I
181      66
Moderate
Mild
	
	
2
	
25
5
1
50
16
Schizophrenic disorders
No mental retardation ~.
	
	
	
—
	
1
1
1
Totals	
.......|_....
4
21 11|    4
8|    6| 17| 14| 17| 28
40| 30| 1S| 11|    4|    3
119| 98|   217
Deaths
Mental deficiency2—
Profound	
2
li
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
—
	
1
1
1
1
1
1
	
5
4
1
1
1
4
9
4
Moderate	
Mild  	
—;
	
___..
	
1
 ;
1
1
Schizophrenic disorders
—
	
	
—
	
	
—
	
—
	
 J
—-
—
1
Totals	
2
Ii
2
1
—
1
2
3
1
1
1
	
	
1
1
2
	
12
4
16
i Includes 11 males and 12 females with mongolism.
2 Includes 2 males and 1 female with mongolism.
 G 88
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 11.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1966,
to March 31, 1967.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Diseases attributable to
viruses...     	
1
	
 I
	
1
1
1
	
	
	
1
1
1
	
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
~2
1
1
Diseases of the central
1
	
Arteriosclerotic   heart
Diseases of the arteries
......
	
	
	
1
1
1
	
	
1
1
~T
1
Diseases of the genito-
Accidental deaths. .   .
	
	
	
3
Totals       	
	
2
1
2
	
1
2
3
1
1
	
—
1
2
......
12
4
16
Table 13.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL G 89
PART IV.—THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL, TRANQUILLE
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
F. G. Tucker, Acting Superintendent
A school for retardates is set up to serve a specific group of persons who,
because of a lack of social skills and an inteligence below normal, require care and
training. The Tranquille School is the major centre in the interior of British Columbia in the performance of these functions.
STUDENT POPULATION
All admissions to Tranquille continue to be processed through The Woodlands
School. On July 21, 1966, the new residential unit, the Sage Building, was opened
by the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, the Honourable Eric
Martin. Occupancy took place during the autumn. By December, 1966, the total
residential count was 676; in the seven years since the opening of the school, the
student-count has increased 1,129.5 per cent.
The health of the students was at a high level as reflected in an average
occupancy of 5.4 of the 10-bed infirmary. However, the new residents of the Sage
Building had a very high incidence of illness, particularly staphylococcal infections,
and the infirmary, from December, had full occupancy. There have been no epidemics and no cases of dysentery. There were two deaths during the year. An
oxygen tent with calibrated machine was installed in the infirmary ward in December. All medical cases have been retained for medical and nursing care in the
infirmary; all surgical cases were admitted to the Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops,
for their operation. X-rays are performed at the school, with the exception of
those requiring a radiologist in attendance, the student is then transferred to the
Royal Inland Hospital.
With three dentists on staff, it is possible for each student to be seen every six
months.   Much preventive dentistry can be performed.
TRAINING PROGRAMME
The intramural employment programme is the basis of the vocational training
of our students. No academic classes are held. An average of 312 students are
employed in 15 areas, with conditions closely simulating employment in the community. To maintain this labour force, two job placement officers and 10 instructors
are on staff. With the opening of Sage Building, training crews under instructors
were assigned there to perform bed-making and domestic cleaning duties. Downtown training prior to the granting of downtown shopping privileges is under a
separate instructor.
A new training programme has been instituted of placing a trainee in an employment situation under a specially selected trainer, with reports made monthly
by the trainer. This programme is expanding; it involves a member of the community as part of the habilitation team, and it prepares the trainee for living in the
community.
Hobby rooms were established on five wards with a generous financial gift
from the Auxiliary to the School.   The objective has been to provide meaningful
 G 90 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
occupation for the trainees in their spare time as well as to teach and develop an
interest in hobbies that could be used by trainees when they are placed in the
community. Six wards had their own gardens. Eight wards at Christmas sold
their own handicraft to develop further projects. Ward-originated projects for
student training are encouraged and include picnics on the beach, skating on the
lake, cook-outs, barbecues, etc. Undoubtedly, the major ward-originated project
was that of Pine Crest, a ward of profoundly retarded boys who are developing
Pine Park, an area 2 miles from the school on Tranquille Creek. It was here in
September, 1966, that Pine Crest held their first annual barbecue, the steer had been
fed and watered by the boys themselves, and nearly 500 persons attended on the
day we ate Ralph (the steer).
RECREATIONAL THERAPY
Activities were slightly curtailed due to the necessity of using the recreation
hall for feeding, with the temporary closure of the cafeteria. By using a play area
in Sage Building, the average monthly attendance was 4,134. Seventy-five students
are participating in the Centennial Athletic Programme of the C.A.R.C.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Occupational therapy continues to teach male and female handicraft, and
woodworking to a senior group of boys. Sense training for junior girls and lapidary
craft are also included. Average monthly attendance was 1,252 for girls and 813
for boys.
SCHOOL EVENTS
May Day was held on May 14 with the crowning of the Queen and two
Princesses, and in conjunction with a Sports Day.
The Fifth Annual Carnival Day was attended by 600 persons with floats made
mainly by the students, and the midway a huge success.
The sale of work made in the handicraft areas was held in May and realized
$800; one day later the annual Visitors' Day took place during which 250 persons
registered, were taken on conducted tours of the school, and were served tea by
the Deerholme girls in their residence.
Kamp Kiwanis in the Tranquille hills provided a week's holiday for 220 students
during June to August, inclusive. Camp Blackthorn was occupied most summer
week-ends by members of the 1st Tranquille Boy Scouts.
STUDENT RESETTLEMENT
A vigorous " selling " campaign has been waged during the year by the Director
of the Social Service Department, Mr. R. Atkinson, throughout Greater Kamloops,
the Okanagan, and Cariboo areas. This brought the school into the community,
with definite results. There are now 17 students employed in the community.
There are two students employed in the community and living in a boarding home.
Because of the increased offers of boarding homes, after consultation with the
Department of Social Welfare, our boarding-home quota was increased from 10
to 40 beds. There are now 31 students residing in boarding homes in Vernon and
Greater Kamloops. The resettlement of students in their homes has increased to
six. A new programme of placement of students at Venture Training Centre,
Vernon, for a six-month period of assessment and training was inaugurated in
March with two students.
 THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
G 91
In a church parish hall in Kamloops, a club for our boarding-home placements was commenced in February. Weekly meetings have been held with table
games, record-playing, and a light snack, the mainstay of the programme.
Because of the increasing involvement of our students in part-time as well as
full-time employment, our school now operates a daily bus service into the community.
MEDICAL RECORDS DEPARTMENT
All the files have been brought up to date. A diagnostic register has been
established on all students, using the A.A.M.D. Heber classification.
CHAPLAINCY
Our two chaplains, the Very Rev. J. C. Jolley, M.A., D.D., Dean of St. Paul's
Cathedral, and the Most Rev. M. A. Harrington, Bishop of Kamloops Diocese,
continue to minister to our students.
LIBRARY
A library has been established with emphasis on journals with a content of
50 per cent or more of articles on mental subnormality. It is open for usage by all
members of the staff.
CONSTRUCTION
The Sage Building and the new kitchen were completed in July, 1966. The new
cafeteria was completed in March, 1967. Air-conditioning in the Greaves Building
is being installed.
No report from The Tranquille School would be complete without recording
the resignation of Mr. H. F. Hayes, on December 31, 1966. Mr. Hayes had been
senior nurse at the inception of the school, and then Co-Ordinator of Habilitation
and, as such, had been the chief architect of the training programme.
 G 92 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Tranquille School,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Male
Female
Total
319
13
1
236
3
3
1
555
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
16
nther
4
1
333
243
576
Admissions—
4
61
3
1
65
6
5
126
9
68
401
72
315
140
716
Separations—
5
1
2
3
18
4
7
1
4
11
2
12
TMtfd
2
6
3
On extended leave and still out—
29
r_ttipr
6
33
25
58
+49
368
+54
290
+103
658
i Includes 60 male and 67 female transfers from The Woodlands School, 2 male transfers from Riverview
Hospital.
Table 2.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Tranquille School
by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March
31, 1967.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
Mental deficiency-
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
3
2
6
1
1
~8
2
5
1
1
~9
13
2
2
1
3
1
1
23
14
9
4
1
4
1
1
12
3
2
5
4
1
8
3
1
3
5
1
1
24
21
6
1
10
1
2
36
8
4
6
9
1
1
1
60
1
1
1
29
10
Border-line intelli-
7
19
Other and unspecified
Schizophrenic disorders
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology—
Chronic   brain   syn-
	
	
2
2
1
1
Totals	
	
	
	
	
	
-—
5
34
27
15
7
2
1
65
66
131
Readmissions
Mental deficiency—
	
	
	
	
	
~T
i
	
~~ 1
2
	
1
1
	
" 2
1
T
1
1
2
3
2
2
4
Schizophrenic disorders.
1
Totals	
—
......
—
	
	
	
1|    X J 1    1
2
	
—
1
1
	
2
3|    6
9
 THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
G 93
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H
 G 94 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
J. Walsh, Superintendent
The Geriatric Division consists of three hospitals, Valleyview Hospital with
791 beds; Dellview Hospital, Vernon, with 239 beds; and Skeenaview Hospital,
Terrace, with 300 beds (all male).
During the year a total of 1,973 patients received special care and treatment
in the three hospitals of the Geriatric Division.
Applications for admission totalled 883, an increase of 278 over the previous
year. Of this number, 755 were for Valleyview Hospital, 117 were for Dellview
Hospital, and 11 were for Skeenaview Hospital.
Actual admissions to the three hospitals totalled 568, a decrease of 44. Of
this number, 548 were admitted directly from the community and 20 were received
on transfer from other mental health facilities.
Separations due to death totalled 430, a decrease of 52. Two hundred and ten
patients were returned to the community, a decrease of 19.
The resident population of the three hospitals as of March 31, 1967, numbered
1,256, a decrease of six.
To this number may be added 262 patients who, though resident in the community, are still on the hospital register, making a total of 1,518, an increase of 42
over the previous year.
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
This is the largest of the three hospitals of the Geriatric Division and the
majority of patients admitted are from the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island.
A total of 755 applications for admission were received, an increase of 268
over the previous year. The demand for beds has shown a persistent increase in
the past few years, from an average number of applications of 28 per month in 1963
to an average of 63 per month in the past year.
Four hundred and twenty patients were admitted directly from the community,
20 patients were received on transfer from Riverview Hospital, and four patients
were received on transfer from other geriatric units. The hospital's social service
pre-admission service was successful in finding suitable alternate placement for 104
persons, obviating the need for admission at that time.
Separations due to death totalled 254, a decrease of 41.
One hundred and eighty-one patients were returned to the community. Of
this number 24 were discharged in full and 157 were released on leave. Of the
group of patients who were released on leave to the community during the past year
and previous years, 34 died and 55 were returned to hospital. Of those patients
returned to hospital, a few were returned because of financial problems and social
factors caused the return of some more. Of the 55 patients who returned to hospital,
22 were again placed in the community during the year.
Twenty-eight patients were discharged in full from leave status. As of March
31, 1967, there were 243 patients on leave in the community.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION G 95
Fifty-four patients were transferred to Dellview Hospital and 36 patients were
transferred to Skeenaview Hospital.
In the hospital an active treatment and rehabilitation programme, utilizing
modern techniques, has been maintained. Correcting dietary and other deficiencies,
stabilizing physical treatments, and eliminating toxic factors are important early
therapeutic measures. Psychologically the sympathetic, interested approach to the
patient and his problems is of the utmost importance. The aged patient's greatest
need is the re-establishment of interest and self-confidence and the response to the
correct approach is frequently most rewarding.
A high standard of medical care is provided for the patients. Physical illness,
either acute or sub-acute, is not uncommon on admission and the course of the
mental illness is most often related to the outcome.
The services of consultants are available from Riverview Hospital and all surgical procedures are performed there.
The X-Ray Department, under the supervision of a visiting radiologist, has provided the necessary diagnostic services. In addition to service to patients, staff chest
X-rays are taken annually.
The Pathological Laboratory, under the supervision of the pathologist at Riverview Hospital, has provided satisfactory service. Bacteriology continues to be done
at Riverview Hospital.
The Dental Department has had an active year with some significant changes
and new trends in treatment. Denture work is now done by contract with a dental
laboratory in New Westminster. This arrangement is very satisfactory. There has
been an increase in denture work in the past year.
The nursing staff have continued to provide a very good standard of nursing
care for patients.   Educational opportunities have been availed of where possible.
The Assistant Director of Nursing completed one year's postgraduate training
at the University of British Columbia and a nursing supervisor commenced an extension course in Nursing Unit Administration.
Five supervisors and 24 nurses in all were able to attend various institutes concerned with geriatric nursing.
A clinical instructor for student nurses was appointed in August, filling a great
need in student training at the hospital.
A " Friendship Day " was held in May, during which the hospital's facilities
and programme were presented to visitors.   One hundred and twenty-five attended.
A member of the nursing staff won the Marjorie Hiscott Keyes Award presented by the Canadian Mental Health Association for the psychiatric nurse who
contributes most to patient care in the Province of British Columbia.
The Social Service staff report a busy year. Due to the increased demands for
admission, the emphasis was of necessity shifted toward the pre-admission service.
As a result of this change, alternate placements were found for 104 persons, obviating admission to Valleyview Hospital.   Such placements are generally successful.
The establishment of a service in the admission area in the previous year has
been valuable especially in obtaining information concerning newly admitted patients.
The service, however, has extended to the provision of support for spouses or other
family members still living in the community to such an extent that nearly half the
time of the Social Service staff has been devoted to this problem.
The remaining time was mainly devoted to the discharge programme. One
hundred and eighty-one patients were placed in the community and follow-up services
were provided to these patients.   This represents a decrease of 14 compared with
 G 96 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
the previous year. This flow of patients out of hospital has been maintained despite
heavy demands on community resources such as private hospitals and boarding
homes.
The Department was responsible for orienting 191 visitors to the hospital's
programme and facilities. Visitors included physicians, social workers and trainees,
nurses, and relatives of prospective patients. While this work may be time consuming, it makes a valuable contribution toward better understanding and awareness
in the community of the function, programmes, philosophy, and policies of the
hospital.
The Physiotherapy Department has been operating successfully since October
when a replacement was found for the Director who had resigned some months
before. The majority of treatments are done on the ward. Over 50 per cent of
patients are orthopedic and most are returned to pre-accident level of functioning.
Weakness and paralyses due to cerebrovascular accidents form a large part of the
remaining patients under treatment.
A part-time podiatry service has been maintained.
The Occupational Therapy Department plays an important part in the total
treatment programme. Individual attention in the early stages reactivates interest
and initiative and patients soon regain skills which they had all but forgotten for
want of opportunity and the necessary encouragement. A total of 243 patients
were treated.
Three second-year students and eight first-year students from the School of
Rehabilitation Medicine, University of British Columbia, were attached to the
Department for clinical work during the summer.
Two volunteers from the Canadian Mental Health Association help in this
department.
The annual sale of work was held in November and was quite successful.
The Vancouver Dahlia Society continues to devote much time and effort to
helping the patients and its programme is highly regarded by patients and staff.
Protestant and Roman Catholic chaplains provide satisfactory religious services
for patients.
Dr. H. W. Bridge, Assistant Director of Mental Health Services, spent two
days at the hospital during February inspecting its facilities and functioning and
making himself acquainted with the activities of the various departments.
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL, VERNON
This hospital, with a complement of 239 beds, provided special care and treatment for 365 patients during the year.
One hundred and seventeen patients were admitted from the community, an
increase of 18 over the previous year.
Thirty-one patients were received on transfers from other geriatric units.
One hundred and twenty-three patients died. One patient was transferred to
another mental health facility.
Twenty-six patients were returned to the community—5 discharged in full, and
21 released on leave.
The resident population at March 31, 1967, was 215 (consisting of 89 men
and 126 women).   In addition, 19 patients were on leave status in the community.
Five patients were returned to hospital from leave and three died while on
leave status.
To meet the need for more female beds, a readjustment of accommodation
was made which made 14 beds available for female patients.   The total of female
 GERIATRIC DIVISION G 97
beds now stands at 143, an increase of 14, while the total of male beds is 96, a
reduction of the same amount.
Satisfactory medical services are provided for the patients by a local physician
on a part-time basis. The facilities of the adjacent Vernon Jubilee Hospital are
available for surgery and other special procedures.
During February a psychiatric consultation service became available. Dr.
Bennee of the North Okanagan Mental Health Centre attends the hospital on a
regular weekly basis.
Considerable progress has been made in all areas in developing an active treatment and rehabilitation programme.
X-ray and laboratory facilities are available at the Vernon Jubilee Hospital.
Dental services are supplied by a visiting dentist as needed.
Podiatry services are available in the community as requested.
A mobile unit of the Division of Tuberculosis Control conducted two chest
X-ray surveys for both patients and staff, the second annual survey having been
moved forward a few months.
A good standard of nursing care has been provided for patients. There has
been a marked improvement in the ratio of nurses to aides. Toward the end of
the year it was possible to initiate a housekeeping service, and three staff positions
were allotted to this service.
Miss H. O. Lipsey, Director of Nursing, resigned and was replaced by Mr.
W. Wharton, formerly Assistant Director of Nursing at Valleyview Hospital.
Advantage has been taken of educational opportunities where possible.
The Director of Nursing attended a three-day institute for nursing supervisors
in Vancouver.
Several senior psychiatric nurses attended a seminar in Kelowna in May and
another at Kamloops in September.
Miss Enser, Senior Instructor of Psychiatric Aide Training conducted classes
at the hospital on two occassions of one week each.
Mrs. Hill, Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nurse, successfully completed the
Civil Service Basic Course in Public Administration by correspondence.
The Occupational Therapy Department has provided a variety of handicrafts
for patients.   This is a very useful form of therapy for those patients who can attend.
An extensive programme of recreation and entertainment is provided through
the combined efforts of staff and volunteer agencies such as the Canadian Mental
Health Association as well as fraternal and service organizations in the Vernon area.
Visitors to the hospital included Dr. H. M. Morrison, Chairman of the Civil
Service Commission, Dr. Tucker, Dr. Bridge, Mr. Matheson, and Mr. Dowling of
Mental Health Services Branch headquarters.
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL, TERRACE
This hospital has a complement of 300 beds, all male, and a staff complement
of 71.
Eleven patients were admitted directly from the community, 12 patients were
received on transfer from other mental health facilities, and 36 were received from
other geriatric units.
Fifty-three patients died, three were discharged from hospital, and four patients
were transferred to other mental health facilities.
Satisfactory medical services continue to be supplied by a local physician on
a part-time basis.
 G 98
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
The Travelling Clinic of the Division of Tuberculosis Control has conducted
X-ray surveys of staff and patients.
A satisfactory standard of nursing care has been provided. The interest and
initiative of the staff have accomplished much in the way of improving the standards
of care and comfort for patients. Large dormitories and day-rooms are being
divided by wardrobe-type partitions allowing for smaller groupings and better
classification of patients.
The Occupational Therapy programme has been extremely useful to those
patients who can avail themselves of the facilities provided. The woodwork shop
is particularly attractive to men and much useful work is accomplished there.
A varied and interesting recreational programme has been provided by the
staff with the help of volunteer groups from the community.
Satisfactory dietary and laundry services contribute much to the general health
and comfort of the patients.
The Public Works Department has completed the project of joining the hospital's sewerage system to that of the municipality. A standby electric generating
unit has been installed for continuous operation of stokers on a heating plant.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
STATISTICAL TABLES
G 99
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1, 1966  	
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
259
79
497
124
756
203
Other               	
338
621
959
Admissions—
173
31
9
198
26
7
371
57
16
213
231
444
551
852
1,403
Separations—
25
130
44
2
96
27
158
23
3
147
52
Died             	
288
67
5
On extended leave and still out—
243
Other                	
297
358
655
-5
254
-3
494
— 8
In residence, March 31, 1967    	
748
1 Includes 3 male transfers from other geriatric facilities, 10 male and 11 female transfers from Riverview
Hospital.
 G 100
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
Table 2.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 2	
1
1
naimo—•
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 65  	
2
2
4
School District No. 14	
1
1
„   68	
4
4
South Central, Kamloops—
„   70	
3
1
4
School District No. 30	
2
2
Upper Island, Courtenay—
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
School District No. 72	
1
1
2
wack—
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
School District No. 32 ...
2
2
School District No. 27	
	
3
3
33
1
4
5
„            „        „   28	
1
1
 34	
3
1
4
Skeena, Prince Rupert—■
„   76	
1
1
School District No. 52	
1
1
Central Fraser Valley, Mission
Northern    Interior,     Prince
City-
George—
School District No. 35.	
4
1
5
School District No. 56 —
1
1
„   42	
4
6
10
„   57	
	
1
1
„   75	
3
3
6
Greater   Victoria   Metropolitan
Boundary, Cloverdale—
Board of Health-
School District No. 36	
13
4
6
1
19
5
School District No. 61	
„            „        „   63	
18
1
9
27
„   37	
1
Simon   Fraser,   New   Westmin
„   64 	
1
1
ster—
Metropolitan Health Committee,
School District No. 40	
17
12
29
Vancouver—
„   43	
5
10
15
School District No. 38	
4
5
9
Coast Garibaldi, Powell River—
 39	
82
117
199
School District No. 46	
1
1
„   41	
11
15
26
„   47—	
3
3
6
„   44	
9
15
24
„   48.	
1
1
„   45   	
2
4
6
—
1
1
Totals.  	
204
224
428
Table 3.—First Admissions and Readmissions to Valleyview Hospital,
Essondale, by Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1,
1966, to March 31, 1967.
Method of Admission
Age-group (Years)
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
1
M.IF.
1
M.IF.   M.
1
F.
M.
F.
1
M.IF.
1
First Admissions
1
l'l    1
5|    1
7
79
1
5     2
90   96
5
109
m
11
21
Involuntary	
14
13
194
213j   407
Totals ....
61    2'| 861 951 98(114
14]  13|204[224|   428
Readmissions
1.
1
 1    1
....... 1—
1      1
1      1
21    31 .__
2]    2J    4
1
1       1       1
1            31    4
 II 1    6!    3
7
Involuntary      	
9
Totals	
 !   i
1
41    51    4
1
1
1    9!    7
16
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
G 101
Table 4.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Age_group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
1
M.IF.
M.| F.
'1
M.IF.
1
M.   F.   M.l F.
■1      1      1
Schizophrenic disorders   	
Manic-depressive reaction ...     	
 j
1
 1
4
5
~~1
3
6
_J
7
~1
4
3
1
3
9
1
2
44
9
2
1
1
2
4
3
1
~6
74
4
2
1
1
~~3
3
4
1
1
3
1
1
77
15
1
1
1
 J
1
9
2
1
i
6
5
5
5
1
4
7
10
1
9
7
1
2
129
18
5
5
9
 1
11
7
7
2
3
13
4
1
3
127
29
3
10
14
1
15
14
17
3
3
Neurotic-depressive reaction   .
1
t
1
3
5
1
2
45
9
2
22
11
Alcoholism        	
2
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence dis-
1
5
1
3
1
1
256
47
8
6
2
86
95
98
114
14
13
204
224
428
Table 5.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Table 6.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Religion and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 G  102
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
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 G 104                       MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 9.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April
1, 1966, to March 31, 1967.
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
1
1
1
3
5
4
1
?
9
7
16
?.
5
?
4
5
9
3
1
1
1
1
?
S
7
?
6
1
3
6
9
3
?
3
5
3
g
1
1
1
?,
7
2
1
t
?,
3
7
6
5
11
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reaction 	
	
	
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
7.
2
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelli
gence disorders - - -	
	
1
	
1
	
	
1
1
2
?
N
6
1ft
11
?,
1
?,i
18
43
1
4
2
4
9
2
11
Totals...	
 |    lj    6]    1| 31| 22
30
27
4
2
711 531    124
Deaths
I
?
1
1
6
1
■1
8
11
1
?
1
?
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
5
1
?
8
3
4
6
17
18
1
4
3
5
5
1
1
11
9
20
1
1
?
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
Alcoholism —  . - .
1
1
1
?
1
3
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelli-
1
1
1
1
2
1
73
75
59
67
in
11
PI
103
196
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S. ,     —
	
	
	
1
5
4
7
l
5
6
17
23
Totals   	
~
5
33
40
74
96
18| 22|130jl58|    288
1      1      1      1
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
G 105
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Cause of Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
i
11
121
~~2
6
7
5
1
1
S
	
	
1
1
2
31
1
1
3
2
5
22
12
56
9
74
1
13
1
1
1
"l6
2
2
1
21
93
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
3
32
214
1
1
2
1
2
1
~~1
2
1
1
~2
4
2
1
1
3
	
—
1
1
1
9
9
1
1
1
6
2
4
Totals
5
33
40
74
96
18
22
130
158
288
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Cause
of Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 G 106
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Dellview Hospital, Vernon,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1,1966	
On extended leave, carried forward from 1965/66—
Boarding home	
Other	
Total on books as at April 1,1966	
Admissions—
First admissions to Mental Health Services..
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services-
Readmissions to the same institution	
Total admissions!	
Total under care	
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died	
Transferred to other geriatric facilities-.
Transferred to psychiatric facility _
On extended leave and still out—
Boarding home	
Other	
Total separations-
Net increase or decrease-
In residence, March 31,1967-
99
3
102
54
10
1
65
T67~
4
69
78
-10
113
212
11
121
223
50
32
1
104
42
2
83
~704~
148
~371~
6
57
~1
14
~78~
10
126
~~I
19
T5(T
+13
126
+3
215
- Includes 8 male transfers and 23 female transfers from other geriatric facilities.
 geriatric division
G 107
Table 2.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Health Unit
Male   Female Total
Health Unit
Male    Female Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
„ „        „  o	
tt tt tt   4	
„ „        „   18	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 7	
„   10-
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9	
 11—
North Okanagan, Vernon-
School District No. 19—
 ,  20._
 21-
„   78...
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
„   15	
„   16	
tt tt        »   —3	
>t tt        tt   . i	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
 26	
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilliwack—
School District No. 33	
Central Fraser Valley, Mission
City—
School District No. 75	
2
6
1
13
1
5
13
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
5
3
9
2
21
2
7
21
1
11
6
7
1
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster—
School District No. 40	
 43	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 68	
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
School District No. 27	
„  28	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 52	
„   53..
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 60	
Northern    Interior,    Prince
George—
School District No. 57.	
Greater  Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health-
School District No. 61	
 63	
„   64	
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 39	
 41	
it tt tt    4*f	
Totals	
64
12
2
82
14
1
2
146
 G 108
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 3. — First Admissions and Readmissions to Dellview Hospital,
Vernon, by Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966,
to March 31, 1967.
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
_..
1
5
9
20
28
36
1
42
1
3
2
64
1
82
1
146
Readmissions
2
Table 4.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Under
60
M.    F
60-69
M.
70-79
80-89
M.    F.
M.
90 and
Over
M.
Total
M.    F.
Grand
Total
Schizophrenic disorders-
Manic-depressive reaction-
Paranoia and paranoid states-
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..
Other and unspecified psychosis	
Neurotic-depressive reaction 	
Pathological personality-
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S..
Totals	
20
28
35
29
36
42
64
82
7
1
1
7
3
1
1
1
122
 2
~146~
Table 5.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Table 6.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Religion
and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION                                             G 109
Table 7.—Total Number of Patients on Books1 of Dellview Hospital,
Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1966
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Under
60
60-64 I 65-69
1
70-74
75-79
80-84
85-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
9
1
1
	
4
ll
1
8
7
 I
1 .
71
7
1
3
18
1
4
12
1
17
30
2
16
Psychosis with cerebral arterio
sclerosis	
i
1
1
2
3
1
4
Psychosis of other demonstrable
etiology
	
	
_J
	
}
1
	
J
1
Neurotic-depressive reaction	
	
	
	
	
	
 ._
1
	
I	
	
1
	
1
Immature personality	
	
	
	
	
 >
	
	
1
 •
__-
|_
	
 .
	
1
	
1
Chronic  brain  syndrome  with
1
1i
1
1
?
f
i
10
10
1Q
T
77
16
30
4
5
fii
101
164
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.
Totals   _      .   	
1
 1
2
2
1
 1
4
6
e
12
1
1
6
1
2
8
15
11
18
22
32
45
17
33
6
13
97
134
231
i Of this total, 3 males and 14 females were in boarding homes at December 31, 1966.
Table 8. — Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview
Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1,
1966, to March 31, 1967.
Age-group (Years)
IT                                                                     i
Mental Diagnosis
Un^er    |   60-69        70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
1
1
4
3
7,
4
7
11
Deaths
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
—
—
3
2
5
12
2
12
3
35
10
24
8
4
1
5
54
15
46
11
100
26
126
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.
Totals                              ..............
—
—
5
5
14
15
45
32
5
5
69
57
Table 9. — Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview
Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 G 110
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
Table 10.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Vascular lesion affecting the central nervous system	
5
5
1
12
~1
1
14
45
2
29
1
5
5
1
67
1
3
53
1
4
120
1
1
Totals     	
5
5
14
15
45
32
5
5
69
57
126
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL i
G 111
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
In residence, April 1, 1966	
Total on books as at April 1, 1966 .
Admissions—
First admissions to Mental Health Services
  294
  294
  10
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services 48
Readmissions to the same institution  1
Total admissions2  59
Total under care  353
Separations—
Discharged in full
Died	
Transferred to other geriatric facilities
Transferred to psychiatric facility	
Total separations	
Net decrease	
In residence, March 31, 1967
i This institution cares for male patients only.
2 Includes 36 transfers from other geriatric facilities and 12 transfers from Riverview Hospital.
3
53
3
1
60
-1
293
Table 2.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1,1966, to March 31, 1967
Health Unit
No.
Health Unit
No.
Selkirk, Nelson—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 7	
1
School District No. 52     	
4
Boundary, Cloverdale—
 53      	
4
School District Nn. 36
.   1
Northern Interior, Prince George—
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 57
3
School District No. 40
2
Greater Victoria Metropolitan Board of Health-
Coast Garibaldi, Powell River—
School District No. 61   .. .
7,
School District No. 46
1
„             „            „   63
1
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 65   	
1
School District No. 39
School district not covered by health units—
34
„   68        .    .
1
„   70	
1
School District No. 49
1
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
—
School District No. 28 	
     1
Totals 	
58
 G 112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 3. — First Admissions and Readmissions to Skeenaview Hospital,
Terrace, by Method of Admission and Age-group, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Method of Admission
Age-group (Years)
Total
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
First Admissions
1
12
1
22
20
2
1
Involuntary..                      	
57
Totals
1
12
23
20
2
58
Readmissions
-
—
—
1
—
1
Table 4.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Schizophrenic reactions-
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis	
Psychosis of demonstrable etiology-
Syphilis and its sequelae	
Pathological personality	
Alcoholism	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.	
Diagnosis deferred	
Totals-
12
23
11
5
1
20
16
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
18
12
_2_
58
Table 5.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Table 6.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Religion,
April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
G 113
Table 7.—Total Number of Patients on Books of Skeenaview Hospital,
Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, December 31, 1966
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
Under
60
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80-84
85-89
90 and
Over
Schizophrenic disorders	
10
I
2
i
17
"I
2
3
I
1
33
1
3
3
1
5
1
2
29
1
4
1
~2
1
5
1
34
2
—
9
2
1
2
2
1
7
7
2
24
2
1
9
5
i
1
14
3
1         :
4   i
8
2   ■
1    i
5
5
1
1
._   1
2
1
152
5
Paranoia and paranoid states _
1
29
16
Alcoholic psychosis	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
4
2
2
12
3
6
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural re-
35
18
4
Totals	
13
24
49
44
69
60
25   i
5
289
Table 8. — Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1966,
to March 31, 1967.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic reactions-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Alcoholism	
Mental deficiency  	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S .	
Totals	
Deaths
Schizophrenic reactions..
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Other and unspecified psychoses	
Syphilis and its sequela; .___
Pathological personality-
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.	
Totals	
1
2
1
"io"
3
15
"31"
IS
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
6
19_
53
 G 114
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Table 9. — Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, April 1,
1966, to March 31, 1967.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 10.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Age-group, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Under
60
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Malignant neoplasms-
Vascular lesions affecting central nervous system-
Rheumatic heart disease	
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease-
Other diseases of the heart	
Influenza with pneumonia-
Diseases of the digestive system-
Accidental deaths	
Totals-
1
5
~i
i
l
~T_
10
2
13
10
1
3
1
_1_
31
6
20
1
15
2
5
2
2
53
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Length of Stay, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 115
PART VI.—COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, BURNABY
A. D. Sleigh, Director
During the year under review this clinic has intensified its efforts to provide
improved patient care. This has meant that the clinic as a whole has looked to a
closer community liaison and involvement and stressed comprehensiveness and
continuity of treatment. Every encouragement has been given to staff to bring this
about and there have been many organizational changes made to effect this. However, there were certain major difficulties encountered and the major one was the
fact that this is still not a regional clinic with a regional commitment.
Another difficulty has been the matter of staffing generally and the particular
problem of staff continuity which is so vital to carrying on any efficient treatment
programme. The staff turnover was 25 per cent and did involve senior members
of the psychiatric staff, including the Director. The same problem existed in the
Psychology Department, but fortunately for the clinic there was not quite the same
turnover in social work and nursing. In social work there was no problem in recruitment and excellent replacements were obtained, but the same could not be said
for the other disciplines. However, despite these problems, the staff morale was
generally high and there was enthusiasm seen for the general trend towards the
principles of community psychiatry.
The clinic has once again shown an increase in the over-all patient load and
there continued to be the increase in family involvement as seen in the last two
years. Besides increased therapy time being given to the community at large,
there was also a major increase in indirect service and education. This involved
lectures and talks, public forums, professional workshops, involvement in a variety
of community organizations, as well as the usual commitment to consultation service
and travelling clinics.
ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
There were major organizational and policy changes during this year and many
of the changes were made in readiness for this further community involvement and
regionalization that is envisaged for the coming year. There was a major shift in
policy in changing the referral system from a medical referral system to an open
referral system. The clinic saw this as a move toward closer community liaison
and a recognition of the many other help-giving agencies and groups that exist in
modern society. However, there continued to be definite efforts made to involve
the family physician.
Changes were effected to make each health team in the clinic more autonomous
and directly responsible for its own work. This involved a change in the intake
procedure so that all disciplines shared in this work and responsibility and also
involved important, but simple, organizational changes such as having each team
as far as possible have its own clerk-stenographer. This has meant a streamlining
of team functioning generally.
The clinic still is structured so that there is an Adult Clinic caring for patients
of 17 years of age and over, and a Children's Clinic looking after patients 16 years
of age and under, but liaison has been improved so that there is better communica-
 G 116 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
tion between the two clinics and so that a sharing of responsibility can occur when
needed. It is unofficial policy that family members will be treated by one team,
but there is access to consultations from more specialized therapists whenever
needed.
More specifically, there were the following changes:—
1. Adult Clinic.—In the Out-patient Department there was a reorganization
of the teams so that one team acted as a regional team for the area of the North
Shore and Burnaby. At the time of this report this out-patient team still is working
toward a very close liaison with an in-patient ward at the Riverview Hospital. This
is regarded as a special project with the advantages of giving the patients from this
area more comprehensive treatment and definite continuity of care. Too, there are
other advantages such as a lessening of the need for 24-hour care in the Riverview
Hospital and generally making for early discharge of patients from that hospital
with improved follow-up care.
2. Children's Clinic.—There were further organizational changes made in the
functioning of the intake team in the Children's Clinic. Unlike the Adult Clinic,
the Children's Clinic utilizes this special team to handle the heavy demands in regard
to the intake work with children and their families and in giving brief psychotherapy
and consultation to community agencies.
In regard to the Day Centre, Children's Clinic, a psychiatrist was designated
to work part time as Director of the Day Centre and in this way a special day centre
team was created. With this change it was possible to open admission to referrals
from all the mental health centre teams and case conferences were conducted in
the day centre. This resulted in improved communication and afforded this special
type of care for more children.
3. Forensic Clinic.—This clinic was established in the fall of 1966 at the
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, and was organized to meet the special forensic
psychiatry needs of the Province. During the year under review a psychiatrist and
clerk-stenographer were hired.
4. Travelling Clinics.—These clinics were reorganized as to their scheduling of
visits to various centres in the Province and the travelling clinic at Chilliwack ceased
operation in the fall of 1966 when the Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre was
established at Chilliwack. Increased service was given during the year to the
Skeena area (Prince Rupert, Terrace, Kitimat) and to the Powell River-Sechelt
area.   In other areas the service was continued as before.
5. Residential Treatment Centre for Children and Adolescents.—The building
of this treatment complex began in early 1967 and at the time of this report this is
still under way. The Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, will be required to do a great
deal of planning and reorganization to integrate efficiently with the new Treatment
Centre for Children and Adolescents. This will lead to major organizational changes
in the next year.
SERVICE
1. Direct Services:
(a) Adult Clinic.—Throughout the Adult Clinic there were increased numbers of patients seen, with more family members involved also. The work with the
sustaining clinics has increased proportionately with the requirement for this service
and in the past year the sustaining clinic case load increased from 34 per cent of
total cases treated. This reflects the fact that many of our patients need long-term
assistance, support, and medications.
To handle the increased number of referrals and cases carried, the Adult Clinic
staff have been utilizing more and more group psychotherapy and also use this
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 117
because of the high proportion of young adults and adolescents seen. Often this
is the preferred treatment modality. Family group therapy continues to show an
increase in use and this reflects the over-all clinic concern with not only the identified
patient but also the family members who often, too, have emotional disturbances.
The Regional Services team (serving the North Shore and Burnaby) followed
their patients through the Riverview Hospital when they were admitted there. This
offered the valued continuity of service and enhanced greatly the after-care and
rehabilitative efforts of the team. Two physicians and one social worker from the
Crease unit ward were considered a part of this Regional Services team and they
followed their patients on an out-patient basis at the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby.
The other out-patient team in the Adult Clinic continued to work extremely
hard and they continued to draw patients from all other areas that were not covered
by a mental health facility.
In the operation of the day hospital programme there was an over-all increase
of 22.7 per cent in the number of patients over the previous fiscal year. This was
brought about without any significant change in length of stay, which averaged 24
days.
(b) Children's Clinic.—The Children's Clinic operated with a separate intake
team doing the more short-term work and more of the consultative work, but the
other teams participated a great deal in this too. There are four care-giving teams
in the Children's Clinic and one of these teams tend to specialize in individual care
for children and another in family treatment and another in family and group treatment and the fourth team was the intake team. In addition to these treatment
modalities being used there was introduction of more conditioning methods of therapy under our psychology department.
In our day centre operation the type of service offered remained essentially the
same as the year before with programmes for autistic children; a programme for
pre-school children requiring guided social learning and peer-group experiences;
assessment of pre-school children of mothers attending the day hospital in the Adult
Clinic, and an observation and assessment programme for a large group of children
during the months of July and August. Too, a member of the psychology staff
during the year enriched the day centre programme by conducting operant-condition-
ing with several autistic children. More recently this involvement was extended to
teaching the parents of the children to conduct the treatment.
(c) Forensic Clinic.—This special clinic was organized in the latter part of
the year and at the time of this report has just commenced operation. Thus far it
has had to restrict the amount of direct treatment work and it has been involved
more in consultations with various agencies throughout the Province.
(d) Travelling Clinics.—The service of the travelling clinics was discussed
under the organizational changes in the clinic, but stress needs to be laid on the fact
that these clinics, using Burnaby Mental Health Centre staff, serviced a large
number of towns throughout the Province during the year. In all of these towns
this was the only psychiatric service available to the professional groups there and
a great burden of responsibility was placed on our psychiatric teams. Because of
the limited time available and because of the large number of people serviced it
was not possible to give more than consultations to the local professionals. However, considerable emphasis once again was placed on efforts to co-ordinate these
community professionals. Visits were increased to the Powell River area during
this year and this resulted in the doubling of the number of clinics held there. In
the Skeena area, likewise, there has been an increased service with a psychologist
now going on every trip whereas before, psychologists used to go out every second
trip.   Many other areas were given this travelling clinic service and in effect this
 G 118 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
meant our clinic trying to cover all areas of the Province that were not able to obtain
treatment or consultation services from a local mental health facility.
2. Indirect Services:
As in the last few years, our clinic has been very much involved in indirect
services to the community. Consultation and psychiatric treatment, when appropriate, have been given by a child psychiatrist from this centre to such local agencies
as the Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society, Juvenile Courts of
Vancouver and Burnaby, and the Willingdon School for Girls. A limited consultation service was offered to the Brannan Lake School for Boys, but this was
regarded as a temporary arrangement until they could obtain other service.
Certain group-living homes in the Burnaby, Surrey, Kamloops, Prince George,
and Prince Rupert areas were once again given a screening and consultation service
when required. Too, the unit at New Denver operated by the Department of Social
Welfare has been given a screening and consultation service by our senior child
psychiatrist. Once again this type of work and the general community needs has
brought about a closer liaison between our clinic and the Special Placement Division
of the Child Welfare Department and it once again has been very useful to have
that Division have its offices within our building.
Many of our staff have been involved in giving lectures and talks to local
community groups, such as the Canadian Mental Health Association organization,
the Parent-Teacher Association, and various educational groups and kindergarten
and school groups, etc., and this is regarded as an important part of the clinic
function. Organizations that have a particular interest in the field of mental health
are encouraged to use our auditorium and small meeting-rooms. Too, staff members were more involved during this last year in membership and leadership in a
number of community organizations. This has improved our liaison with the community at large.
TRAINING AND EDUCATION
This clinic has continued to show leadership in the area of staff education and
development. In this type of in-service training, experienced therapists were enabled
to share ideas and improve further their professional skills.
The Psychology Department ran a very effective ongoing staff development
schedule and invited a number of guest speakers to discuss issues ranging from
neuropsychology, drug addiction, alcoholism, family group diagnostics, to more
recent developments such as psycholinguistics and multi-model sensory perception
and electronic model of visual perception, etc. Psychologists from outside the
clinic also attended regularly and seemed to benefit from this schedule.
The clinic continued to be very much involved with the education of social
workers, psychologists, and nurses. Social work students at the postgraduate level
had a field placement at the mental health centre and they were offered the close
co-operation of our staff.
The internship programme for the training of clinical psychologists continued
during the year and this centre provided one of the few places where students could
obtain clinical experience and supervision.
Too, the clinic staff have been vitally involved in field experience of occupational therapists from the School of Rehabilitative Medicine and also with nursing
students from the University of British Columbia and elsewhere. Again, as with
the other training programmes, these students obtain practical experience in dealing
with patients and clients.
Besides this part the clinic staff have played in these programmes, a number
of orientation lectures and courses have been given by the senior staff.   School
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 119
counsellors, probation officers, and others have benefited from this type of education. Many visitors have been through the centre during the year and whenever
possible they have been provided with a full orientation to the clinic and its functions. These people have been from all disciplines involved in mental health work
and also have included personnel from other mental health centres in the Province.
It is not too much to say that this can be regarded as a major training centre in
British Columbia for mental health personnel.
The past several years the clinic has emphasized, first, family group treatment
and then group psychotherapy, generally, and now the emphasis seems to be slowly
moving toward leadership in the area of community psychiatry.
RESEARCH
During the year there has been some increase in the energies devoted to research. The Psychology Department has continued to produce research studies and
the anamnestic variables and social interaction among Day Hospital patients has been
written up and will appear in a coming issue of the International Mental Health
Research Newsletter. Another study has been submitted to Canada's Mental Health
on the relationship between referral and admission population characteristics of an
adult mental health centre. A paper on " Marathon Group Psychotherapy " is in
the process of organization and, too, a study has been started investigating the effects
of parental attitudes and child-rearing practices on discrimination learning and
philanthropic behaviour in children.
The special project in the Learning Clinic was dropped during the year due
to a general staff shortage in this area of clinical investigation. The project showed
its value to the Burnaby School Board the previous year and a teacher employed in
our clinic moved over to work with the Burnaby School Board. In other words,
this project did prove the usefulness of a learning clinic and special educational
procedures. It is envisaged that in the next year, with the establishment of the
Residential Treatment Centre, there will be facilities and staff available to renew a
learning clinic project. Too, it should be stressed that in the coming year all of
the clinic staff will have a great opportunity to be involved in residential and group-
living home treatment, day care of all types, and also see the effective use of community psychiatry in this clinic.
CONCLUDING REMARKS
During the year the clinic underwent a number of organizational and staff
changes and over-all this could be thought of as preparation for the year to come
when the clinic will almost certainly be involved in some new and exciting developments. These developments will include the establishment of a residential treatment
unit and an over-all children's treatment complex (including the residential treatment, group-living home treatment, day care facilities, and special educational
facilities) and the establishment of a comprehensive community mental health
centre on a regional basis. Further organizational changes will probably be
needed, but the clinic in the coming year should be in a position to make an even
greater contribution to the mental health of the people of this Province.
 G 120
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Mental Health Centres' Case Load by Clinic, Adults and
Children, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Location of
Mental Health
Active Cases,
Apr. 1,1966
First
Activations
Reactivations
Total Case
Load
Total
Terminated
Active Cases,
Mar. 31,1967
Centre
Adult*
Child 2
Adult
Child
Adult
Child
Adult
Child
Adult
Child
Adult
Child
662
290
184
225
18
570
124
93
142
27
631
202
191
122 i
114
30
47
780
157
112
101
208
43
18
220 I
68 i
68
13
31
14
19
206
48
26
6
49
10
8
1,513
560 '
443
360
163
44
66
1,556
329
231
249
284
53
26
822
245 *
242
23
147
10
4 1
977
219
168
30
254
5
2
691
315
201
337
16
34 1
62
579
110
63
Nanaimo^.     .. .
Trail.          ..
219
30
48
24
Totals, all
centres-
1,379
956
1,337
1,419
433
353
3,149
2,728
1,493
1,655 1
1,656 1
1,073
i Seventeen years of age and over.
2 Sixteen years of age and under.
3 Approximate figures.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
G 121
Table 2.—Activations to Mental Health Centres by Health Unit and
School District of Residence, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Health Unit
First
Activations
Reactivations
Total
Activations
Health Unit
First
Activations
Reactivations
Total
Activations
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1 	
8
22
47
1
30
8
42
13
6
31
112
7
4
15
29
4
77
2
21
49
4
8
137
6
11
1
2
4
2
67
33
17
29
11
108
16
56
78
9
29
11
10
10
1
2
4
12
5
1
8
30
1
7
9
1
18
1
4
26
2
3
46
3
1
1
1
24
6
2
12
5
40
3
16
16
2
2
8
32
57
2
32
12
54
18
7
39
142
8
4
22
38
5
95
3
25
75
6
11
183
9
12
1
1
2
5
3
91
39
19
41
16
148
19
72
94
11
31
11
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65  	
„   66	
 67 	
 ,   68.	
, 69	
„   70—	
„   79.	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 71	
„   72....	
„   85...	
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
School District No. 27	
 28	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
 51 	
tt                      »»                 tt      ^^	
, 53	
„   54	
„   80	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59    .
„   60...	
„   81 	
 83.	
Northern  Interior,   Prince
George—
School District No. 55	
„          „        „   56   .
27
3
12
92
4
36
2
36
23
2
7
13
2
1
25
27
4
19
11
13
1
2
1
28
296
24
25
2
26
444
287
63
14
2
14
1
2
28
2
5
2
1
1
2
3
i
8
4
~3
1
11
94
7
9
7
155
82
10
4
~~1
„             ,,          „   2	
tt            tt         tt   3	
„           „        „   4   . ..
29
3
12
„        „   5	
120
Selkirk, Nelson—
6
41
„  7	
„        „   8	
2
 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9	
„          „        „   11 	
38
24
3
 12	
„   13...	
9
16
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
2
„   20
„   21 	
tt            »»          tt   2Z	
„   78	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14..	
1
33
35
4
23
tt            ,,          tt   15	
 ,   16	
 17	
„           „        „   23	
11
16
1
1
„   77	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24 	
2
25
1
, 29 	
 30	
„   31	
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilliwack—
School District No. 32 	
tt           it        tt   ■"—	
 34. 	
Central Fraser Valley, Mission
City-
School District No. 35  	
 57—	
Greater   Victoria   Metropolitan
Board of Health-
School District No. 61	
 62... 	
 63	
»»            tt         tt   o4	
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
»»             »»          »»   »V	
 ,   41
„   44 	
„   45	
School district not covered by
health units—
School District No. 49	
Unknown    	
39
390
31
34
2
33
599
„             „          „   4?.
369
 75	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 36	
„   37  	
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster-
School District No. 40     	
73
18
2
15
1
Totals   .....
Coast Garibaldi, Powell River—
2,756
786
3,542
School District No. 46	
„   47   .   ..  ..
„             „                4R
 G 122
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
Table 3.—Total Activations to Mental Health Centres by Clinic,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Clinic and Sex
Total
Activations
Age-group (Years)
0-9
10-16
17-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60 and
Over
Burnaby—
1,045
792
272
88
427
199
71
77
115
142
59
122
61
99
21
52
19
Female..     —          . ...
13
Totals
1,837
360
626
148
257    |    181
160
73
32
Victoria—
267
208
50
24
91
40
29
15
36
46
24
34
15
24
16
15
6
10
Totals—   .
475
74
131
44
82   )|      58
39
31
16
Kelowna—
201
196
42
15
62
19
13
25
II
20          24
30    1      40
16
34
11
21
13
12
Totals
397
57
81
38
50    |      64
50
32
25
Nanaimo'—
126
116
27
7
45
28
9
8
15
29
13
17
10
20
6
6
1
1
Totals
242
34   1
73
17
44    |      30
30
12   1
2
Trail-
249
153   I
68
18
116
55
20
19
1
15
15
12
17
11
16
4
10
3
3
Totals	
402
86
171
39
30    |      29
27
14   ,
6
Chilliwack—
55
42
11
2
24
16
3    i
2
1
6
3
5
7
4
9
2
1
2
Totals	
97
13
40
5
9   l|      12
13
3
2
Vernon—
42
50
6
4
11
5
5
2
7
7    1      14
8
12
2
3    i
3
3
Totals	
92
10
16
7
14    |      14
20
5
6
Totals—
1,985
1,557
476
158
776
362
150
148
1
214
272
137
251
125
214
62
108
45
44
3,542
634
1,138
298
486
388
339
    1
170   i
89
i Approximate figures.
Table 4.—Mental Health Centres' Terminations by Type of Service, Age
at Termination, and Clinic, April 1, 1966, to March 31, 1967
Location of
Mental Health Centre
Total Terminations
Assessment without
Treatment
Assessment with
Treatment
Adults
Children
Adults
Children
Adults
Children
822
245
242
23
147
10
4
977
219
168
30
254
5
2
325
115
101
9
111
10
4
721
102
93
10
185
5
2
497     1
130
141
14
36
256
117
75
20
Trail
69
1,493
1,655
675
1,118
818
537
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
G 123
Table 5. — Total Cases Terminated from Mental Health Centres by
Psychiatric Diagnosis and Age at Termination, April 1, 1966, to
March 31, 1967.
Psychiatric Diagnosis
Adultsi
Children2
Total
Number
Percentage
Brain syndromes—
3
22
3
26
6
48
0.2
1.5
Totals
25
29
54     I
1.7
Psychoses—
284     i
22
11
9
3
13
91
5     1
375
22
11
9
3
18     1
11.9
0.7
0.3
0.3
0.1
0.6
Totals
342
96
438
13.9
Psychoneuroses—
133
296
90
32
13
24
165
309
114
5.3
9.8
3.6
Totals
519
69
588
18.7
25
-
25     1
0.8
Disorders of character, intelligence, and behaviour—
121     i
142
14
3
145
16
54
7
39
51
587
390
84
142
22
160
193
14
3
587
535
100
142
54
29
5.1
6.1
0.4
0.1
18.7
17.0
3.2
4.5
1.7
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence
disorders
0.9
Totals   .       _	
502
1,315
1,817
57.7
2
2
11
65
2
69
75
4
2
80
140
0.1
0.1
2.5
Observation without further need for psychiatric care   	
4.5
1,493
1,655
3,148
100.0
i Seventeen years of age and over.
2 Sixteen years of age and under.
Table 6.—Cases Active in Mental Health Centres as at March 31, 1967,
by Length of Treatment Period and Clinic
Location of Mental Health Centre
Total, AU
Cases
Number of Months
Under 3
3-5
6-11
12-23
24 and
Over
1,270
425
264
556
46
82
86
445
61
49
69
23
66
86
262
50
48
58
8
16
253
94
60
100
6
152
133
70
132
7
158
87
37
197
Trail
2
2,729
799
442
513
494
481
 G 124 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, VICTORIA
A. L. Aranas, Acting Director
ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION
The organization and function of this mental health centre continued along the
lines and philosophy established during previous years. In spite of the professional
staff changes, these functions were adjusted and maintained to meet the increasing
demands for psychiatric services by the community.
The after-care programme, which is one of the main functions of the centre,
has been operating in its full capacity. A great number of the patients are discharged
from the Riverview Hospital. Most of these patients, diagnosed as chronic schizophrenics, reside in boarding homes in the Greater Victoria area. The boarding
homes are well supervised by a team comprised of a psychiatrist, nurse, and social
worker. The team meets weekly to discuss administrative and clinical problems
that arise in the boarding homes. These meetings, a crucial means of therapeutic
communication between the clinic staff, patients, boarding-home operators, and
social welfare agencies involved, proved to be a valuable tool in the rehabilitation
of the patients and the education of the paramedical personnel. The majority of
the after-care patients are maintained on one or on a combination of two or more
psychopharmacological agents, thus the increasing use of drugs parallels the increasing number of after-care patients. Pharmacotherapy has maintained most of the
patients at a level of adequate social and functional efficiency outside of hospitals.
In December, 1966, a Christmas party for the after-care patients was held at
the White Cross Centre of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Victoria Branch.
This party was organized by the staff of the mental health centre. It was well attended by the patients and staff.
Psychotherapy, whether individual, group, or family, continued to an increasing number of sessions as the techniques and experience of the staff reached a level
of sophistication and specialization.
Education as a preventive measure in psychiatry is carried out by the professional staff through lectures, talks, meetings, and conferences with different community organizations. These minimized direct therapeutic services to some cases
and we focused on consultative work with the majority of cases that were referred
to the centre. Co-operation and better working relationships with the medical practitioners, welfare agencies, school boards, Courts, etc., prevailed during the course
of the year, thus promoting a much better insight into the needs of the community
in general.
The second workshop on " The Development of a Mental Health Programme
for Greater Victoria " was held in September, 1966.
STAFF
During the year the following staff members resigned from the mental health
centre:—
Miss Ann Burridge, Staff Nurse, resigned June 15, 1966, to be married.
Mr. A. W. Rippon, Social Worker, resigned October 14, 1966, to accept a position as Research Assistant with the Department of Social Welfare, Victoria.
Dr. Charles Gregory, Psychiatrist and Director of the centre, resigned November 30, 1966, to take up private practice.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
G 125
Dr. Pierre F. d'Estrube, Psychiatrist, resigned from his full-time position in
December, 1966, to enter private practice.   He is now with the centre on
a sessional basis.
Appointments were made as follows:—
Dr. A. L. Aranas, Psychiatrist, was appointed Acting Director of the centre as
of December 1, 1966.
Mrs. R. Hoodless, Staff Nurse, was appointed November 22, 1966.
Mrs. J. M. de Cunha, Social Worker, was appointed January 3, 1967.
The clerical staff continue to provide their devoted services in maintaining up-
to-date statistical data, case records, typewritten psychological reports, correspondence, etc.   Their services provide the open network of communication between the
professional staff and their patients, and the centre and the community.
STATISTICS
Cases brought forward at April 1, 1966	
Cases opened	
415
475
Total under treatment
Cases closed	
890
454
Cases carried forward at March 31, 1967
Total Patient Interviews
436
Psychiatric 	
Psychological
Social work __.
Nursing	
2,933
346
2,045
1,468
 G 126
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
OKANAGAN MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, KELOWNA
F. E. McNair, Director
The Okanagan Mental Health Centre is staffed by one psychiatric team consisting of psychiatrist, social worker, clinical psychologist, and mental health nurse.
One would envisage this team being the nucleus of a mental health service which
would provide case consultation and treatment to sick persons but also provide a
preventive service. It is desirable that a community grow in its awareness of mental
health principles and provide sufficient resources both to care for the sick within its
own boundaries and to have a comprehensive programme of prevention to reduce
the incidence of disorder or at least reduce the degree of handicap suffered by persons with illness. Up until June, 1966, Dr. A. J. Bennee, practising psychiatry in
Vernon, was devoting half his time to the work of the clinic in the North Okanagan
at the public health units at Vernon, Salmon Arm, and Revelstoke. The efforts of
citizens in Vernon to establish their own mental health centre for the North Okanagan
were rewarded in January, 1967, with the establishment of a unit there.
The population of the South Okanagan is 60,000 people and the North Okanagan 40,000 people. According to the best advice we have available, one psychiatric team can give service to 15,000 people. In consequence we have not been able,
in this mental health centre, to reduce further the number of first admissions to the
Provincial mental health facilities at the Coast, though the 50-per-cent reduction
noted earlier has not been lost.
We have been happy to have the consultative services of Headquarters staff
during the year and to work closely with other community agencies who have the
responsibility for mental health as well as ourselves, including the Public Health
Branch, the Department of Social Welfare, the Probation Service, the school districts,
and the physicians.
Although we have regular office hours from 8.30 a.m. to 5 p.m., there are frequent demands for participation in public education through evening meetings and
for emergency care either by direct appeal or through the police or through the
hospital emergency department.
The statistical tables show the amount of actual service rendered. All of the
staff function both out of the mental health centre offices at the health unit in Kelowna and also serve patients in the travelling clinics and at the hospital.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 127
VANCOUVER ISLAND MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
NANAIMO
S. E. Jensen, Director
ORGANIZATION AND STAFF
The Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre is a community-oriented and
family-oriented centre for the control of mental illness through prevention, education, and treatment. The mental health centre began operation in April, 1964, in a
hereto-unserviced area of British Columbia, namely that part of Vancouver Island
north of the Malahat and constituted by the combined Central Vancouver Island
Health Unit and Upper Vancouver Island Health Unit. In this area with a population of approximately 150,000 there is only one psychiatrist in private practice.
The clinic is located at the Public Health Centre in Nanaimo and travelling
clinics serving Duncan, Alberni, Courtenay, and Campbell River work out of offices
in the local public health units. Each member of the professional staff has spent one
day a month in each of these centres. Beds in the Nanaimo Regional General Hospital have been available for those patients who require hospital care, and as a result
few patients have needed to be certified to the Riverview Hospital at Essondale.
The objective has been to provide as comprehensive a service as possible in Nanaimo
and to extend the scope and usefulness of the centre by travelling each month to
other principal centres in the district.
While selected patients have been accepted in treatment, this is basically seen
as a function belonging with the privately practising psychiatrist, the family doctors,
and other professionals skilled in counselling (welfare workers, nurses, school counsellors, clergy, etc.) and our aim has been to guide these groups in their management
of the patients.
During the year the staff consisted of a receptionist, a typist, a psychiatric nurse,
a psychiatric social worker, and a psychiatric director. The position of clinical psychologist was vacant during most of the period but was filled as of January 1, 1967.
EDUCATION
The staff has spoken at more than 150 meetings of service clubs and other
community organizations, and only some of the more noteworthy educational events
can be mentioned here. Courses in counselling involving 10 sessions each have
been given to the Ministerial Association in Duncan, Nanaimo, Alberni, and Campbell River. Dr. Jensen provided a refresher course in psychiatry to the medical staff
at St. Joseph's Hospital in Comox. The staff has participated in the Marriage
Preparation Course sponsored in Nanaimo by the Canadian Mental Health Association and the Ministerial Association. Plans for the coming year include a full
day workshop for teachers and a full day workshop for parents of children with
nervous handicaps.
The clinic staff was also involved in bringing into Nanaimo three important
rehabilitation facilities—the Goodwill Enterprises, the Sheltered Workshop for the
Handicapped, and a group-living home for retarded children. The Director has on
three occasions answered questions from the public over the so-called " Hot Line "
programme on local radio stations in Alberni and Nanaimo and this we consider
an important contribution to community education.
 G 128 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
REHABILITATION COMMITTEE
Rehabilitation committees now function in all the centres served by the full-
time or the travelling clinics, and an important part of the social worker's time has
been taken up in liaison with this committee. This is a new endeavour which we
feel is important and which has provided an excellent service to the community.
CAMP
The idea of a camp for emotionally disturbed children developed as an attempt
to overcome the serious lack of facilities for psychiatric in-hospital treatment of children which exists, not only in British Columbia, but in all of Canada. The camp
was in a sense an open-air hospital providing all the facilities and types of treatment
which would ordinarily be available in such a hospital. At the same time, we felt
that the children would benefit from the emphasis on learning and growing up rather
than illness and treatment, which was possible in the camp situation. Because almost
all of the children had been referred primarily as school-adjustment problems, it was
natural to emphasize school assessment, and with the co-operation received from the
Department of Special Education at the University of British Columbia, we were
able to make an extensive study of the child's school development. This later proved
to be of great benefit to the schools and to the children upon their returning home.
Twenty-two children from the area served by our clinic attended the camp for two
weeks and we are planning to repeat this programme during the summer of 1967.
SERVICE
During the year a total of 511 patients was seen, and 4,796 interviews were
conducted either with the patients or their various relatives. The interviews were
distributed among the staff as follows:—
Psychiatrist   2,350
Social worker  1,195
Nurse   1,251
Conferences with school officials are conducted weekly during the school year in
Nanaimo and monthly in each of the centres to which the clinic travels. Close liaison
is also maintained with the Department of Social Welfare and with the Probation
Services and also with the Courts and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Approximately 150 patients spent an average of just over 10 days each in the
Nanaimo Regional General Hospital where, although no special psychiatric ward is
available, a wide range of psychiatric treatment is possible, including occupational
therapy and electrotherapy.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 129
KOOTENAY MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, TRAIL
G. R. Mansfield, Director
This, the third annual report on the activities of the Kootenay Mental Health
Centre, records a year characterized by heavy emphasis on service. The goal of
providing a comprehensive regional mental health service to the East and West
Kootenay regions, representing a widespread and rapidly growing population of
approximately 120,000 people, has gone steadily if slowly forward. No dramatic
growth has occurred, but the foundations are firm for future expansion.
Although the Kootenay centre is referred to as a regional one, it is necessary
to think in terms of both community and regional services as integration, communication, and the type of service possible varies between Trail and vicinity and the
more remote areas. Clearly, the quality and effectiveness of out-patient treatment
service decreases with distance from the treatment centre.
FACILITIES
The mental health centre occupies the upper floor of the Public Health Building. The present staff consists of two stenographers, a psychologist-in-training, one
social worker, and a psychiatrist-director. The psychiatrist has been active in
formulating plans for building a psychiatric unit to the general hospital.
PROGRAMMES IN THE COMMUNITY OF TRAIL
The Foster-Parent Training Programme continues to improve and fill a need
for a resource which can handle the more disturbed child that in most places would
be handled in an in-patient treatment centre. Expansion of this programme with
continued follow-up support is necessary. It has been found unnecessary to establish
a special class for the emotionally disturbed child in the school. Medication and
understanding of the child by the teacher is the key to success here. It is probably
not desirable to separate the emotionally disturbed into a separate class and make
him feel different.
Development of programmes in collaboration with the schools to fill the teaching needs of the perceptually handicapped is progressing satisfactorily. We have
identified over 100 congenitalfy dysphasic children. Classes with special equipment
and teachers trained in this field have been established in Trail and Kimberley.
Cranbrook is preparing to open a class next fall and Nelson is showing interest.
The Trail Youth Liaison Committee is an indispensible means of communication, sharing of knowledge, and planning programmes for youth who are presenting
problems in multiple areas. It represents all agencies working with youth and is
a symbol of our solidarity and ability to work harmoniously together.
EDUCATION AND PREVENTION
Education and prevention go together. Knowledge of mental hygiene by
professional and lay people means early referral and better results with less effort.
Working with the clergy has emphasized their role as first-aid posts in mental health,
utilizing their counselling training. Our contacts with school personnel in conferences and workshops has created an awareness of their role in helping children
adjust socially and the indications for referral. Most of our education this year
has been directed toward professional groups. The family doctors have gained a
better knowledge of psychiatry through participation in care of patients and reports
 G 130
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1966/67
free from psychiatric jargon and geared to their understanding. Their increased
interest is reflected in the flood of referrals and requests for discussions on drugs.
The public health nurses receive ongoing training by formal and informal
conferences, group discussions on specific psychiatric subjects, films, and the opportunity to discuss at regular intervals cases in which they are involved.
TRAVELLING CLINIC
Three days each month are spent in Cranbrook. Everyone is looking forward
to the day when a permanent service will be established in Cranbrook. It will go
a long way toward taking the pressure off the Trail centre as well as providing more
adequately for the large and growing East Kootenays.
REGIONAL SERVICE
The social worker saw 1,354 people during the year. There were 1,233 interviews by the psychiatrist and psychological testing by the psychiatrist was carried
out on 162 children.
Service was rendered to various agencies and regions and can readily be determined from the tables that follow:—
Referrals
Source
Total
Area
Adults
Children
174
119
50
24
34
Trail
87
15
5
2
13
7
4
1
17
1
57
Cranbrook 	
15
Trail.	
85
Cranbrook  	
27
Trail.	
24
6
Trail .....    	
12
Cranbrook
Trail
7
13
Cranbrook
3
401
152
249
Service
Adults
Children
Patients
Consultations
Mental Health Centre, Trail	
31
29
16
33
51
55
24
44
82
1   124
77
109
174
283
Treatment
Mental Wealth fentrp  Trail
47
71
118
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 131
FRASER VALLEY MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
CHILLIWACK
W. G. Jilek, Director
The Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre started operation in November, 1966,
as a regional facility with an area of responsibility extending from Boston Bar to
Langley. This includes the Upper Fraser Valley and the Central Fraser Valley
Public Health areas with a total population of 114,700.
The centre is designed:—
(1) To render diagnostic assessment and ongoing consultative and educational
services to medical practitioners, public health units, social agencies, pedagogic institutions, correctional officers, and to community organizations
concerned with the promotion of mental health:
(2) To render treatment services to selected cases constituting difficult therapeutic problems and requiring a multi-disciplinary approach and (or)
family-, group-, and play-therapeutic techniques:
(3) To direct future planning toward a public mental health orientation with
projects in the fields of psychiatric epidemiology and primary prevention
of mental ill health.
STAFF
During the report period the staff consisted of a psychiatrist-director and one
clerk-stenographer. A part-time psychologist has been available on a five-days-per-
month basis since beginning of March, 1967. Efforts are being made to recruit
suitable candidates for the open positions of full-time psychologist, psychiatric social
worker, and mental health nurse.
CLINICAL SERVICES
The permanent clinic is located at the Chilliwack Health Centre; travelling
clinics provide a regular service to Abbotsford, Mission City, Langley, and, in the
future, also to Hope.
Case referral to the centre is as a rule made through the family physician, however, referrals may be initiated by various agencies. Screening committees have been
set up in Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Mission City, and Langley to decide upon priorities.
Clinical assessment in interviews with the patients and their relatives is supplemented by case conferences where the psychiatrist, family physician, and the delegates of agencies concerned with the patient's welfare convene to offer their advice
and to arrive at a detailed recommendation on management of the case.
From November 7, 1966, to March 31, 1967, the following clinical services
were rendered by the Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre:—
Chilliwack Clinic—
Cases seen in psychiatric assessment  69
Interview sessions held with relatives  51
Mental health case conferences  65
Follow-up treatment sessions  16
Travelling Clinic, Abbotsford—
Cases seen in psychiatric assessment  16
Interview sessions with relatives  12
Mental health case conferences  14
 G 132
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1966/67
Travelling Clinic, Mission City—
Cases seen in psychiatric assessment -
Interview sessions held with relatives
Mental health case conferences	
7
5
7
Travelling Clinic, Langley—
Cases seen in psychiatric assessment.
Interview sessions with relatives	
Mental health case conferences	
Altogether a total of 100 patients was assessed by the Fraser Valley Mental
Health Centre psychiatrist. Only 16 sessions were devoted to the follow-up treatment of cases selected according to the criteria mentioned above. It was possible
to refer the bulk of the case load for further management by medical practitioners,
private psychiatrist, health, welfare, and probation officers maintaining a close consultative contact with the centre.
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES AND COMMUNITY CONTACTS
Agencies and professional groups, the co-operation of which is indispensable
for the centre's work, were addressed in orientation meetings and informed on objectives and activities of the Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre, with particular
reference to the mental health aspect relevant to their respective fields. This included meetings with the medical professional groups in Chilliwack, Hope, Abbotsford, and Langley; the public health units of the Upper and Central Fraser Valley
Health Departments; the Social Welfare Departments in Abbotsford and Chilliwack;
the Salvation Army Rehabilitation Centre, Miracle Valley at Deroche; the school
authorities at Langley; the Parent-Teacher Association groups at Agassiz and Harrison Hot Springs; the Association for Retarded Children school at Sardis, and the
newly founded Chilliwack Homemaker Service. Upon initiative of the centre, a
steering committee was formed with the purpose of organizing a local branch of the
Canadian Mental Health Association.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES G 133
NORTH OKANAGAN MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
VERNON
A. J. Bennee, Director
The North Okanagan Mental Health Centre commenced operating on January
23, 1967, with the appointment of Dr. A. J. Bennee, Director. The psychologist,
J. MacGillivray, was appointed on January 24, 1967, and the stenographer, Mrs.
K. Hawking, on February 1, 1967. Accommodation has been provided in the
North Okanagan Health Unit building.
Because of the fact that mental health services had previously been provided
in Vernon and district (until September, 1966, by the Okanagan Mental Health
Centre in Kelowna), the local doctors immediately resumed the referring of patients.
There was some degree of backlog and referrals came in fast right from the start.
Travelling clinics have been held in Salmon Arm and Revelstoke as from
March 1st. Both centres are visited two days per month and clinics are held in
the local health unit buildings. Public health unit staff maintain duplicate files
locally while master files are kept in the Vernon mental health centre.
Dellview Hospital is being visited one day a week for an hour or more, depending on the number of patients for whom consultation is requested.
Mental health services drugs are dispensed by the pharmacist at the Vernon
Jubilee Hospital. A supply of drugs is also kept at the mental health centre for
emergency use.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1968
580-1167-9111
   

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