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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1966 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1967]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1966
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1966.
RALPH R. LOFFMARK,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department
of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1966.
Office of the Deputy Minister,
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 DEPUTY MINISTER RETIRES
Mr. Thomas L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of the Department, retired on
September 30, 1966, after 22 years' service with the Government. Mr. Sturgess
joined the Department as Administrative Assistant in 1944 after some 20 years'
business experience in banking, accounting, and sales organization in British Columbia and California. He was appointed Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry
in 1954. In 1957 the name of the Department was changed to Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
A member of the Vancouver Board of Trade, Victoria Chamber of Commerce,
and other civic organizations, Mr. Sturgess was most active in all phases of industrial
development and trade promotion. In his close co-operation with other Provincial
Governments, he was twice elected Chairman of the Provincial Governments' Trade
and Industry Council.
In addition to his numerous administrative duties within the Department, he
was joint British Columbia representative for the four Western Provinces' pavilion
at Expo. '67,, Chairman of the Industrial Progress and Participation Sub-committee
of the Canadian Confederation Centennial Committee of British Columbia, and
served for a number of years on the Capital Improvement District Commission.
As Deputy Minister, Mr. Sturgess was active in the development of the Department's Data Processing Centre and served as a member of the Provincial Government Data Processing Committee.
The Department extends to Mr. Sturgess best wishes and good health in
his retirement.
 Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1966
FOREWORD
Economic progress continued at a record pace in British Columbia during
1966. Massive capital investment together with increased foreign and domestic
demand for our goods and services stimulated almost every sector of the Provincial
business community.
While consumer and wholesale prices rose nearly 4 per cent, incomes for the
bulk of the population more than kept pace during 1966. Per capita personal income, at $2,497, was higher by 9.5 per cent compared with 1965, and average
weekly wages and salaries climbed nearly 8 per cent. This increased income was
reflected by a rise of over 9 per cent in retail sales. Further evidence as to the
buoyancy of internal trade is provided by such indicators as gasoline consumption,
up 8.8 per cent; cheques cashed, up 18.9 per cent; and passenger motor-vehicle
registrations, up 7.4 per cent.
Employment averaged 678,000 in 1966, compared with 639,000 in 1965,
while unemployment averaged 32,000, compared with 28,000 last year. Peak
employment period in 1966 was July, with an estimated 725,000 employed, while
January's 625,000 was the lowest figure.
Tourism in 1966 was well above 1965 levels. A record number of United
States visitors entered British Columbia, as indicated by the 11-per-cent increase
in foreign vehicles entering the Province.
Capital investment in British Columbia in 1966 is estimated at $2,400 million,
up 16 per cent from last year. Much of this gain was due to industrial, government,
and commercial construction and increased purchases of machinery and equipment.
Housing construction was less than in 1965, with housing starts down 13.5 per
cent. High interest rates and Canadian fiscal policy interacted to restrict expenditures and restrain building, particularly of apartments.
Principal stimulus to the surge in industrial investment came from construction
of the huge Peace and Columbia Rivers hydro-electric power complexes and from a
$220 million expansion of the Province's pulp- and paper-mill capacity.
The fishing industry in 1966 enjoyed the best year on record. Landed values
at $57.5 million were up 25 per cent over 1965, and the final wholesale marketed
value of products is expected to amount to at least $112 million.
Farmers and other members of the agriculture industry did well in 1966.
Farm cash receipts are estimated at nearly $186 million, compared with $160
million in 1965. Excellent sales of beef cattle at higher prices combined with good
field-crop and tree-fruit production and market conditions to bring about the 1966
gains.
The British Columbia mining industry had an outstanding year in 1966.
Estimated value for 1966 was $332 million, compared with the 1965 value of $280
million. Declines in lead and zinc production were more than compensated for by
sharp increases in copper, oil, and molybdenum production.    Rising prices and
 R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
expanding world demand, coupled with the opening of new mines, boosted the
values of these metals and minerals to record levels.
All sectors of the forest industry recorded substantial gains in 1966. Buoyant
domestic and foreign markets and expanded production facilities made it possible
to surpass the near-capacity levels of 1965. The net value of forestry production
is estimated as increasing 5 per cent over 1965. Principal gains occurred in the
pulp, paper, and plywood industries. Logging and sawmilling registered more
modest increases.
All manufacturing industries (including forest products mentioned in the preceding paragraph) registered a gain of 9 per cent to bring their 1966 net value of
production to $1,400 million. Factory shipments in 1966 were valued at $3,200
million, compared with $2,900 million in 1965. Electric power generated reflected
the general increase in activity by rising 13 per cent above the 1965 total.
Trade and transportation facilities during 1966 were strained almost to capacity. Despite a drop in the value of exports to the United Kingdom, the total value
of exports through British Columbia customs ports rose to $1,850 million, a gain of
nearly 14 per cent over 1965. Huge wheat shipments to Russia and China and
record sales of lumber, minerals, metals, and other products to the United States,
Japan, the European Common Market, and other countries easily outweighed the
drop in sales to Great Britain. Rail, road, and water carriers experienced their
busiest year on record. A rail strike and longshoremen's strike created temporary
shipping and delivery bottlenecks for some industries.
The outlook for 1967 is favourable, although some uncertainties about foreign
markets developed in the closing months of 1966. Reports indicate that sales to
the United Kingdom may continue to decline in 1967. Also, there is some reason
to believe that a weakening in the demand for forest products in the United States
may affect British Columbia lumber sales in 1967. On the other hand, a heavy
programme of capital investment planned for 1967 and buoyant markets in Japan,
Europe, China, Russia, and other countries auger well for the coming year.
Following in the Report are summaries of the various divisions of the Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics; the Industrial and Trade
Office; the Data Processing Division; British Columbia House, London, England;
and British Columbia House, San Francisco, Calif. The objectives and organization
of the British Columbia Research Council are also included.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 7
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
During the year the Bureau carried out its functions of advising the Government and other public bodies regarding matters of economics and industrial development; keeping the Government and the public informed of current business conditions, trends, and the outlook; undertaking a broad range of economic research,
some of which led to the publication of regional surveys, industry studies, and trade
reports; and collecting varied statistical information on British Columbia in cooperation with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and other Provincial Government
departments.
Information on current conditions in the Provincial economy was issued regularly in the " Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity." At the end of the year, two
important publications were released—the " Annual Summary of Economic Activity," which reviews the showing made by each sector of the Provincial economy
during the past year and provides supporting statistical series in tabular and chart
form, and the "Business Outlook," in which the 1966 experience and the 1967
expectations of 300 major firms in the Province are synthesized.
Early 1966 saw the release of the 550-page "Regional Index of British Columbia," a comprehensive reference work which describes the Province on the
basis of 80 economic areas. An economic survey was carried out and a report
published on " The Peace River-Liard Region." Two other regional surveys were
made and will result in the publication of reports during 1967.
Again the Bureau published its annual publications, " Facts and Statistics,"
" Industrial Expansion in British Columbia," " Preliminary Statement of External
Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports," and the " Salary and Wage Rate
Survey." In addition to the regular trade reports, a study of American imports
entitled " Market Opportunities in Washington and Oregon for British Columbia
Businessmen " was published. A directory of products manufactured by firms in
British Columbia, the " British Columbia Manufacturers' Directory," was published
in 1966 and replaces the " Trade Index " (1962).
Apart from preparing reports and publications and replying to hundreds of
requests for economic and statistical data, the Bureau also undertook a number
of special projects. One staff member participated in and co-ordinated the preparation of a report on " The Dairy Industry in British Columbia," another assisted in
the preparation of a brief to the Standing Committee on Transport and Communications, another is assisting with research related to the Agricultural Rehabilitation
and Development Act and its application in British Columbia, and another is making a study of pricing and marketing policies in the hearing-aid industry.
Members of the staff attended and participated in various conferences. These
included the Canadian Council of Resource Ministers' Conference in Montreal on
" Pollution and Our Environment," the Subcommittee on Labour Statistics of the
Federal-Provincial Conference on Economic Statistics in Ottawa, the Western Forest
Economists' Conference in Portland on " World Markets for Forest Products," the
Mines Ministers' Conference in New Brunswick which dealt with problems related
to the revision of mining statistics, and the British Columbia Agricultural Outlook
Conference in Vancouver. A member of the staff travelled to Jamaica with the
British Columbia Prefabricated Building Mission, which was sponsored by the Provincial Government.
 R 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1964, 1965, and 1966
Unit or
Base
Period
1964
1965
1966
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—
Total value of production..
Zinc	
Copper-
Lead	
Iron concentrates	
Industrial minerals-
Structural materials	
Petroleum, crude 	
Natural gas	
Forestry—
Total value of production ..
Timber scaled	
Lumber production	
Pulp production.
Paper production	
Fisheries—
Wholesale marketed value of production-
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—Farm cash receipts	
Manufacturing—Factory shipments	
External trade—
Exports through B.C. customs ports .
Imports through B.C. customs ports_
Internal trade—
Gasoline consumed	
Electric power generated-
Railway freight loaded and received in British
Columbia	
Sales of life insurance-
Total retail sales	
Motor-vehicle dealers	
Department stores	
Capital investment—
Capital and repair expenditure-
Building permits-
New residential units—starts.
Finance—Cheques cashed	
Employment—
Labour force _. —
Employed	
Unemployed-
Employment indices  (based on firms with  15
or more employees) —
All employment	
Manufacturing.
Primary metal industries	
Wood products 	
Paper and allied industries .
Mining-
Logging	
Transportation,
utilities	
Service 	
communication, and other
Construction	
Wages and salaries.
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
M cu. ft.
M f.b.m.
Tons
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
$000
$000
$000
Gallons
000 kwh.
Tons
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Units
$000
Number
Number
Number
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961=100
1961 = 100
1961 = 100
1961=100
$000
267,139
58,648
38,609
39,402
20,419
16,989
26,429
24,048
12,193
940,018
1,515,000
6,855,000
2,845,000
1,387,000
92,117
1,255,308
152,901
2,672,632
1,624,604
563,314
413,554,000
17,312,671
15,803,376
553,680
2,095,649
396,454
315,586
1,737,200
360,469
21,665
29,372,078
639,000
605,000
34,000
109.4
109.2
105.8
108.2
113.2
106.7
110.7
280,418
48,667
32,696
43,149
21,266
20,407
32,326
29,341
14,493
985,000
1,533,000
6,940,000
3,248,000
1,532,000
84,666
913,957
160,296
2,881,515
1,623,905
661,861
445,773,000
18,500,000
17,072,754
575,160
2,312,000
458,000
344,000
2,065,900
422,518
21,398
33,646,743
667,000
639,000
28,000
118.2
116.4
110.8
111.8
123.9
116.6
118.4
104.0 109.0
116.7 I 131.8
120.2 | 154.6
2,362,000 | 2,7311,000
331,700
47,300
61,600
33,000
19,600
22,900
37,900
37,500
17,400
1,037,000
1,602,000
7,050,000
3,650,000
1,670,000
112,000
1,825,000
185,560
3,200,000
1,850,000
710,000
485,000,000
21,000,000
18,500,000
625,000
2,525,000
460,000
380,000
2,400,000
450,000
18,500
40,000,000
711,000
678,000
32,000
127.0
124.0
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
125.0
119.0
n.a.
143.0
180.0
3,180,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966
R 9
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
BANK CLEARINGS
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES
45
44
43
42
41
40
I
i
37
l
36
I
35
Li
34
i
33
i
32
I
31
I
30
1
29
j
I
28
I
27
i
i
26
I
25
1
24
1
23
i
22
i
21
i
f
20
1
19
1
18
J
1
17
4
•
16
>
I —
/
15
.
/
14
1
13
/
4
.«*
11
/
*
10
9
y
Ir
2   «
1    5
8    4
u    3
8    2
o
3     1
E     o
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
500
480
46 0
44 0
42 0
400
380
360
340
320
300
280
26 0
240
220
200
180
160
140
2120
5 100
8 80
8   60
t   40
o
3   20
3     0
A
•TV
-.-<'
s
j>
""
.'
t*w
O          CN          -<t           O          CO          O          Ol           T          O
mioin         m        \n        o        *o        ^o        o
o         o           O           O          r>          O          O          O          O
BUILDING PERMITS
4
f
fl
/
f
J
f
1
f
J
*
,
<
I
/
mm
*
^ 1
»,
i
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1
I
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i
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t
*««
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•o
IO
o.
 R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LABOUR FORCE
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
J
r
«■*
200
100
0
c
u
0
->
t
\
CN
in
in
m
m
o
o
o
CN
•o
O
-0
RETAIL TRADE
FREIGHT LOADED
3,200
2,800
2,600
2,400
2,200
2,000
1,8 00
1.600
1,400
1,200
1 000
80 0
2   600
5
J
8    400
0
§    200
22.5
21.0
19.5
18.0
16.5
15.0
13.5
12.0
10.5
9.0
7.5
6.0
4.5
Vi
g3.0
O
"> -
3
J
3  0
t
1
i
i
1
/
,*
'
1
1
/
f
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w'
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1
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/
t
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/
%
_,
t
1
I
■*►
/
/
*•
i^
»•<
V
1
\
/
/
*
/
/
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966 R 11
FARM CASH  RECEIPTS  IN  B.C., YEARS  1931  TO  1966
?-in
?0r->
/'
f
*-*
V
1
2
MO
:
1   ■
^-
120
0£
<
O   40
Q
LL.
o
£ 20
2 *"       i
g
5     0
n n r*>
o o*        c* o-        o
 R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
VALUE OF FISHERIES PRODUCTION OF B.C., YEARS  1931  TO  1966
130
120
110  j
j
100
"7
r
/**
^
<5
=5
i
si
^
1
s
,'
s
l w
1
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-
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-
30
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-
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Q
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!5   10
Z   lu
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—I
t    0
E?        rt        rt       E*
o. o» o ON
in       m in
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 13
VALUE
i inn
:
DF
FORESTRY
PRODUCTION
OF
B.C
•
YEARS
1931
TO
1966
1 2"i0
1 200
1 150
1 100
1.050
1.000
At*
J»
950
t
.*»•>
d.
900
.*
p
'U  '
^*
850
*>
.??
800
4
k*
750
t
'S
700
J
m
"\.
9
7r
650
*s
i\
V-
.-.
^i
600
'■■■
;
••-.
V
*
i
■Ntj,
550
7
,
•
7
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^
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r*
*-<
*..
•'■•
500
t
*
,
450
400
..--
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MhSl
i.
:;,,A'
.7;
■v •-
-
350
300
% 250
O 200
Q
i 150
o
!S 100
o
_J
2     0
C
r
c
4
r
c
r
r
o
i
i
03
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NT
i
<
N
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o
C
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a
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c
r
l
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>
oo
>
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r
c
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-
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 R 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VALUE OF MINING PRODUCTION  OF  B.C., YEARS  1931  TO  1966
340
320
300
280
A
260
/
r
240
-
1
/
220
200
*
f
1
i
mm-
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60
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<
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2   ^
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966
R 15
3,300
3,200
3.100
3.000
2.900
2.800
2,700
2,600
2,500
2,400
2,300
2,200
2,100
2,000
1,900
1,800
1,700
1,600
1.500
1.400
1,300
1,200
1,100
1.000
900
800
700
600
^ 500
O 400
o
u. 300
o
</> 200
2 ioo
SELLING VALUE OF SHIPMENTS BY B.C. MANUFACTURERS,
YEARS  1931  TO  1966
,:,.,   ■
:■■■■-
:   ■
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 R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORTATION
The recommendations of the MacPherson Royal Commission on Transportation are contained in an Act known as Bill C-231. This Act has been given third
reading in the House of Commons and has been under review by the Standing
Committee on Transport and Communications during the final months of 1966.
In November, 1966, a brief opposing contentious sections of Bill C-231 was
presented to this Committee by the Government of British Columbia. Suitable
amendments were suggested.
In May, 1966, the Standing Committee on Transport and Communications
held hearings in Vancouver and other major Canadian cities as a result of the controversy which developed over the decision permitting the Canadian Pacific Railway
to discontinue the operation of its second transcontinental passenger train, " The
Dominion." As a result of these hearings, the Canadian Pacific Railway has been
ordered to reinstate this passenger train during 1967 to enable further study of the
problem. The Bureau maintained a watching brief at the Committee's hearing in
Vancouver and assisted Provincial counsel in the preparation of a submission to this
Committee.
The Great Northern Pacific and Burlington lines merger proposal is still before
the Interstate Commerce Commission. Counsel for the Government of British
Columbia submitted a reply to the Interstate Commerce Commission regarding the
petition of the merging lines for reconsideration.
In conjunction with the Department of Commercial Transport, considerable
effort was made by the Bureau to assist the Canadian Pacific Railway and Crowsnest
Industries Limited in agreeing upon an equitable freight rate for the movement
of coal from the Fernie area to tidewater in British Columbia. Although a final
rate has not yet been negotiated, progress in this direction has been made.
Conditions in the Port of Vancouver and surrounding area have been kept
under surveillance to indicate areas where improvements beneficial to the Provincial
economy can be made.
During the year the Bureau provided transportation information to other Government departments and Crown corporations, industrial concerns, and private
individuals. Transportation statistics and freight tariffs have been maintained on
a current basis.
MINING
It is the responsibility of the Bureau to collect and compile the production
statistics on all minerals, with the exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum.
The statistics which it compiles are published in detail in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The estimated value of mineral production in British Columbia is $331,700,-
000 for 1966, the highest annual total ever attained. This is an increase of $51,-
282,000 over 1965 and the largest single increase ever recorded in one year. The
most significant change occurred in copper, which now ranks first in value of all
minerals produced in the Province. The production was not only up considerably
from 1965, but the price increased by over 15 cents per pound. The value of
copper shipped is estimated at $61,600,000, followed by zinc at $47,300,000.
This is a slight decline in the value of zinc from 1965. The third ranking mineral,
by value, is crude petroleum at $37,500,000. Petroleum now ranks ahead of lead
and constitutes 11.3 per cent of the total value of mineral production. The value of
lead is estimated to be $33,000,000, the lowest annual amount for this metal
since 1946. The production of lead and zinc is down primarily because the Trail
smelter continues to receive shipments from Pine Point.   The value of molybdenum,
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 17
at $27,700,000, increased more than 100 per cent over 1965. This reflects the first
complete year of production by Endako Mines Limited. The value of other major
minerals and products is iron concentrates, $19,600,000; natural gas, $17,400,000;
asbestos, $15,800,000;  sand and gravel, $14,800,000;  and cement, $14,700,000.
EXTERNAL TRADE
Numerous requests for external trade statistics were received from other
Provincial Government departments and from agencies, businesses, libraries, universities, and other organizations and individuals. Included in these requests were
special compilations of data for a number of trade missions which visited British
Columbia and others which went overseas seeking to expand our export markets.
A new publication in the " Pacific Rim " series was completed during the year.
The report provides a summary of major items which are produced or could be
produced in British Columbia and which are imported by Washington and Oregon.
A similar study of exports to California has been undertaken and will be published
in 1967. In addition, more than 900 copies of the annual " Preliminary Statement
of External Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports, 1965," were distributed.
The first of the following two tables shows exports of products of British
Columbia origin through all Canadian customs ports, and the second shows imports
through British Columbia customs ports. The export statistics involve estimates and
differ from regularly published export statistics. The special tabulation shown
excludes products originating in other Provinces and makes allowance for British
Columbia products exported via customs ports in other Provinces. Import statistics
give the value of all commodities entering Canada through British Columbia customs
ports irrespective of their ultimate destination. At the present time there are not
sufficient data available to estimate the Province's consumption of imported goods.
It will be noted that the commodity group descriptions in the import table have
been changed from the classification in use prior to 1964. This was done in order
to conform with a new classification of imports instituted by the Canadian Government in 1964. The groups listed were selected from the new classification so as
to show those imports most significant to British Columbia's economy.
 R 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 R 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FORESTRY
The Bureau, in co-operation with Federal and Provincial Government agencies
and manufacturers' associations, is actively engaged in the collection of forestry
statistics. The subsequent analysis and dissemination of data pertaining to the
forest economy forms an integral part of the Bureau's activity. During the year,
assistance was given to other Government departments, trade delegations, industrial
associations, and business firms. In addition, numerous requests from private individuals were answered.
The forest-based industrial complex is by far the most important segment of
the Provincial economy. The net value of forest-industry production during 1966
has been estimated at $1,037 million, the first time net value has exceeded the
billion-dollar mark. Direct employment was provided for over 79,000 people.
Indirectly, many more jobs are dependent upon the forests. British Columbia
produces 69 per cent of Canada's lumber, 83 per cent of its plywood, 22 per cent
of its pulp, and 14 per cent of its paper and paperboard.
Log production during 1966 was estimated at 1,602 million cubic feet (9.4
billion board-feet), 69 million cubic feet more than last year's record. According
to data available to the end of December, Coast log scale was up 6 per cent over
1965, while the scale of Interior logs increased by 2.6 per cent. The Vancouver
log market remained relatively firm during the first three quarters of 1966. Prices
declined and oversupply occurred later in the year. The price level was somewhat
below last year's.
The sawmill industry was expected to produce 7,050 million board-feet of
lumber in 1966 or about 1.5 per cent more than last year. The greatest portion of
the small gains in production and shipments came from Coastal mills. Following
an exceptionally good first half, lumber shipments dropped sharply, especially during September and October. A marked decline in North American housing starts
and an austerity programme in the United Kingdom inhibited major production
gains.
Plywood-industry production at an expected 1,700 million square feet (%-inch
basis) topped last year's record output by 5 per cent. To July 31st, exports of
softwood plywood through British Columbia customs ports increased 24 per cent
in volume and 21 per cent in value. During the same period, shipments to Canadian markets (which account for approximately 80 per cent of production) increased
by nearly 20 per cent. During the fourth quarter, production and demand declined
somewhat from their earlier high levels.
British Columbia's pulp-mills, operating at between 90 and 95 per cent of
rated capacity, produced an estimated 3,650,000 tons of chemical and groundwood
pulps. This represented a one-year increase of over 12 per cent and a 10-year
jump of 156 per cent. Pulp sales were expected to exceed 2,000,000 tons, nearly
300,000 tons more than in 1965. The remaining production went into paper and
paperboard, which increased an estimated 9 per cent to 1,670,000 tons. During
1966 sulphate (kraft) pulp capacity was increased by 710,000 tons per year and
kraft paper capacity by 185,000 tons per year.
New capital invested in the forest industries during 1966 totalled an estimated
$311,000,000. The pulp and paper industry led the list with $220,000,000, followed by logging at $57,000,000 and the wood industries at $34,00,000. The
year was further highlighted by the coming on line of two new pulp-mills and one
new pulp and paper mill. Other projects currently under way and valued at approximately $270,000,000 will add 830,000 tons to annual pulp capacity and 280,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 21
tons to newsprint capacity in the period 1967-68. This development is an impressive stride toward a fuller utilization of British Columbia's forest resource and will,
in the long run, be of direct benefit to the entire economy.
LABOUR
The systematic revision of labour statistics continued as a major work in this
section during 1966. The development of labour data on the basis of new statistical series recently completed at the Federal level has brought many changes in the
annual presentation of this material. Replacing historical annual employment and
payroll data based on bench-marks for earlier years, a new series is now provided
which up-dates the information on the basis of revised population estimates for 1961.
During the year the Bureau was again responsible for the completion of the
main statistical section of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour. The
1966 material provided by the Bureau appears in that publication under headings
of "Highlights of the 1966 Statistical Report on Trades and Industries" and
"Annual Survey of Organized Labour in British Columbia, 1966."
With the growing demand for occupational salary and wage-rate information,
results of the annual wage surveys have become of increasing importance, and intensive study was again given to the July returns received from some 600 employers
who participated in the 1966 survey from various sections of the Province. This
survey was again used as a basis for specialized wage and salary information required
for the Civil Service Commission.
In reference to the annual survey of organized labour, the co-operative arrangement was continued with the Federal Department of Labour, under which a follow-
up survey of trade-union organizations was completed in British Columbia as a
complementary service in return for the primary source material provided each year
by Ottawa. The information obtained jointly by the Federal and Provincial authorities is used to compile a current directory of trade unions for the British Columbia
Department of Labour.
In addition to the provision of labour statistics in use by the Bureau on a current basis, the labour section completed the following projects during the year:—
(1) The 1966 survey of British Columbia salary and wage rates:
(2) Statistical sections and supplementary tables for the Annual Report of
the British Columbia Department of Labour:
(3) An annual survey of organized-labour membership in British Columbia,
together with a directory of trade unions and labour organizations, prepared for the Department of Labour:
(4) The tabulation and compilation of a clerical salary survey covering the
metropolitan area of Vancouver, completed for the Vancouver Board of
Trade; and
(5) Occupational salary data required in wage studies conducted by the
Bureau for the Civil Service Commission.
Revised totals representing the wages and salary portion of labour income in
British Columbia are shown in the following table for the years 1954 to 1966:—
 R 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Estimated Annual Wages and Salaries in British Columbia
Total Wages Total Wages
Year and Salaries Year and Salaries
1954  $1,246,000,000 1961   $1,894,000,000
1955  1,365,000,000 1962  2,008,000,000
1956  1,579,000,000 1963  2,159,000,000
1957  1,687,000,000 1964  2,362,000,000
1958  1,683,000,000 1965  2,731,000,000
1959  1,790,000,000 1966  3,200,000,000!
1960  1,858,000,000
1 Preliminary estimate.
Source:  Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, Ont.
PUBLICATIONS
Periodical
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication contains articles of
current interest and incorporates a monthly review of current changes in the principal segments of the Provincial economy.
Summary of Economic Activity in British Columbia.—This is a companion
to the Monthly Bulletin and is issued annually. It summarizes the current year's
economic picture and presents historical series relating to economic activity in the
Province.
Business Outlook.—This publication is issued at the end of the current year
and indicates business conditions during the past year and the outlook for the coming
year. It covers the following economic factors: Sales, prices, employment, wages,
profits, and capital expenditure. It is based, in part, on a survey of 300 of the
major companies in British Columbia.
Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs
Ports.—Provides statistics covering in detail all commodities imported or exported
through British Columbia customs ports having an aggregate value of $75,000 and
over.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—Portrays graphically some of the salient
features of British Columbia's economy and describes its geography, government,
judiciary, and educational systems.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey.—This annual publication summarizes salary
and wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations, in business
and industrial establishments, for Metropolitan Vancouver and Victoria, Southern
Interior centres, and Northern centres.
Occasional
A Manual of Resources and Development.—This publication contains up-to-
date information on the location and development of British Columbia's resources.
It is well documented with maps and diagrams.
British Columbia Directory of Wholesalers and Distributors, Importers, Exporters, and Manufacturers' Agents.—Revised edition, 1964.
British Columbia Manufacturers' Directory (Formerly the British Columbia
Trade Index).—This publication includes names and addresses of manufacturers
in British Columbia and a directory of products manufactured in British Columbia.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966
R 23
Industry Studies.—A series of studies analysing particular industries which
are located, or might be encouraged to locate, in British Columbia. These include
Commercial Fisheries of British Columbia, Petrochemicals, Glass and Glass Products, and the Tire Industry.
Area Surveys.—These are detailed studies of economic areas in British Columbia. A report on the Peace River-Liard region, published in 1966, is the most
recent study.
Import Items Meriting Further Investigation for Domestic Production or Substitution.—This report is intended to aid those entrepreneurs in the Province who
are considering establishing industries to supply the domestic markets.
Trade Studies.—The latest study, " Market Opportunities in Washington and
Oregon for British Columbia Businessmen," was released in December, 1966. The
report is part of a series of studies on market opportunities in " Pacific Rim " countries.
Regional Index of British Columbia, January, 1966.—In this 550-page publication the Province is divided into 80 areas, each of which is described in detail.
There is a description of each area's economic base and component sectors, together
with relevant supporting statistics and economic indicators. Following this, there
is a description of the area's facilities, utilities, and other local considerations. Details are also provided on municipal taxes, services, utilities, and amenities in the
principal community within each area. The charge for this publication is $1.90
plus 10 cents tax.   A statistical supplement is supplied up-dating the Index.
(Note.—A complete listing of Bureau publications is contained in the Department's List of Publications, obtainable free of charge.)
 R 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
Activity of this office centres on the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses
when required, and development of the domestic and export trade. The office also
provides industry with data on location-sites, land-use maps, availability of raw
materials, and information on the services offered by the British Columbia Research
Council on matters concerning industrial and scientific research.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of
Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER
LICENCE INQUIRIES
During the year under review, there was considerable activity in branch plant
and manufacturing under licence inquiries. The Department's direct mailing campaign resulted in several branch plants being established in the Province. Considerable interest was again shown in Interior locations, indicating that a greater
decentralization of industry is taking place in British Columbia. For example,
officials of a carpet-manufacturing concern and a bookbinding firm were contacted
in Eastern Canada, and both companies have now established plants in the Okanagan area.
A concerted effort was maintained by the Department to encourage manufacturing under licence, and during the year British Columbia firms examined many
items. Some of these included a French-type vacuum cleaner; a special device
for loose-leaf volumes and notebooks; special line of metal doors and frames with
91 basic door designs available; new type of air-operated pump; special machine
tools, such as collet chucks and accessories, also cutting and peeling machines;
new combination convertible boat-boarding stairs and spring mooring device;
special designed machine for cutting expansion joints in freshly laid concrete; and
a new type of an arc-welding plant. These and other item suggestions were sent
to the Department from many countries of the world, including the Soviet Union.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAPS OF THE METROPOLITAN
LOWER MAINLAND AND FRASER VALLEY AREAS
A new edition of the Metropolitan Lower Mainland map was published during
the year. The new map covers an area extending from Burrard Inlet and the mouth
of the Fraser River to Langley Municipality, and indicates the zoned and potential
heavy and light industrial areas, main highways, railway lines, natural-gas line, oil
pipe-line, and other facilities serving the area. The demand for this map has been
extremely heavy, and several hundred copies were sold during the year. The Fraser
Valley map, which illustrates similar information for an area extending from Langley
Municipality to Hope, was also in demand. Each of these maps may be purchased
for $1 a copy (which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax).
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 25
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE OKANAGAN, KETTLE,
SHUSWAP, AND SIMILKAMEEN VALLEY AREA
Due to the industrial activity taking place in this area, the Department decided
to publish a map of the entire area showing the identical information as that appearing on the Metropolitan Lower Mainland map. The area extends from Princeton
in the west to Grand Forks in the east, and from Osoyoos in the south to Salmon
Arm in the north. Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon, and 10 smaller municipalities
appear on the map. The map should be very popular and will be most useful to
the Okanagan Regional Industrial Development Council when answering inquiries
on zoned industrial areas. This map can be purchased for the same price as the
Fraser Valley and Metropolitan Lower Mainland maps.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
During the year, copies of the 15th edition of this directory were distributed
to retail and wholesale firms, motels, resorts, and other outlets. The directory lists
producers in British Columbia who are interested in finding a market and who are
in a position to supply reasonable demands. Four showcases are still on display in
the Empress Hotel, and numerous inquiries have been received from tourists for
names of retail outlets handling the items on display. The Department thanks the
management of the hotel for its continued kindness in permitting the use of its
facilities for exhibition purposes.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
The Committee includes representation from the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce; Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian
Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver Board of Trade; Vancouver School of
Art; British Columbia Research Council; Association of Professional Engineers of
British Columbia; Canadian Association of Consumers; Architectural Institute of
British Columbia;  and the Community Arts Council of Vancouver.
The aims and objectives of the Committee are to encourage appreciation of
industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of
British Columbia products.
Some of the Committee's activities during the year included organizing the
Fifth British Columbia Schools Industrial Design Competition and compiling
a booklet illustrating school-designed products; development of a photographic
exhibition displaying B.C.-designed and manufactured products (the exhibit was
displayed during the year at the Hudson's Bay Company, Vancouver, and at the
Design Centre in Toronto); compilation of a booklet illustrating B.C.-designed
products; and development of a photographic design exhibition for display in British
Columbia House, San Francisco.
REGIONAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Requests for this survey were so numerous during the year that it was necessary to publish a new edition. The survey covers 10 regional areas of the Province,
and the suggestions for investment opportunities in the communities within these
areas are submitted by members of the Chambers of Commerce and Boards of
Trade throughout the Province. Many of the suggestions listed in the fields of
hotel, motel, housing, warehousing, and retail outlet requirements have resulted in
encouraging capital investment in such commercial enterprises.
 R 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION SHARING
The continuing development of British Columbia's industrial manufacturing
capability has greatly assisted the Industrial and Trade Office's efforts in this important programme. Despite keen competition offered by United States firms, a
number of British Columbia companies have been able to bid successfully on
United States defence contracts. Officials at British Columbia House in San Francisco have continued to work closely with the Federal Government representatives
in Los Angeles to ensure that companies in British Columbia are notified about all
opportunities to tender.
BUSINESS CLOSING DAYS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
A new edition of this booklet was published because of the many inquiries
received from businessmen, salesmen, and tourists requesting information on the
closing days for retail and wholesale establishments in centres throughout British
Columbia. The closing days shown indicate the days observed by the majority of
the establishments for each centre.
Appreciation is expressed to the many Municipal Clerks and others who so
readily furnished the basic data from which this listing was compiled.
INVITATION TO INDUSTRY
In co-operation with the British Columbia Centennial Committee, a special
edition of this publication was prepared early in 1966. All aspects of British Columbia's primary and secondary industrial complex are featured, together with other
facets of life in this Province. Thirty thousand copies were printed and widely
distributed both within the Province and at industrial and trade events in other parts
of Canada and the United States.
UNITED STATES WORLD TRADE FAIR IN SAN FRANCISCO
During the month of May, British Columbia was represented by an industrial
exhibit at the Eighth United States World Trade Fair held in the Civic Auditorium-
Brooks Hall, San Francisco. This Department's exhibit told the story of the industrial expansion taking place in the Province. The World Trade Fair attracted more
than 250,000 buyers, importers, and other businessmen. It featured 1,000
exhibitors from 45 countries with 25,000 products on display. Numerous inquiries
on travel, settlement, licence manufacturing, investment and industrial opportunities
were received by the Department's Industrial Commissioner and Commercial
Representative, who were in charge of the Government exhibit. A licence arrangement has already been concluded between a California firm and a firm in Kelowna,
and the product is now being made under licence in Kelowna. Other similar arrangements are being followed up, together with branch plant inquiries. Other participants
from British Columbia included Mr. K. Brown, manager of the British Columbia
International Trade Fair, and two representatives from the Penticton Industrial
Development Bureau.
INDUSTRY MISSION TO THE BOEING COMPANY, SEATTLE
During the year the Department sponsored an industry mission in co-operation
with the Canadian Manufacturers' Association (British Columbia Division) which
visited the Seattle firm to ascertain the possibilities of obtaining subcontract work
in the field of aeroplane hardware manufacturing.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966 R 27
Members of the Boeing mission prior to their departure from Vancouver.
Representatives from 65 manufacturing firms participated in this mission. Also
in attendance were Mr. Robinson, Canadian Defence Production representative in
California; Canadian Trade and Commerce officers; Mr. King, industrial engineer
with the British Columbia Research Council; and an American customs broker.
Of special interest was the participation by representatives of two British Columbia
firms engaged in ship-building.
Early reports from the members of this industry mission indicate that a number
of firm contracts (with attending benefits to the prosperity of this Province) will
result.
TRADE MISSION TO JAMAICA (PREFABRICATED HOUSE
CONSTRUCTION)
In April, as part of its programme to encourage British Columbia's secondary
industry to develop export markets, the Department sponsored an eight-man mission
to explore the market in Jamaica for prefabricated houses and other structures. The
mission was composed of seven members of the British Columbia prefabricated-
building industry and one representative of the Department. Despite a widespread
shortage of long-term financing and high ocean freight costs, opportunities do exist
for sale of summer homes, tourist cabins, rural homes for teachers, and rural schools.
A complete report of the mission is available on a loan basis.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The 18th annual conference of this Council was held in Victoria from September 19 to September 21, 1966, with British Columbia acting as the host Province.
Topics discussed during the conference included industry studies; organization and
effectiveness; import replacement techniques; the area development agency; computers as a tool in statistical surveys; activities of the Industrial Development Bank;
L
 R 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
activities of the Federal Department of Citizenship and Immigration; activities of
the Federal Department of Industry; and activities of the Federal Department of
Trade and Commerce. The aims of the Council are to provide interprovincial
consultation and co-operation on matters of trade and industrial development, to
supply traders and manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nation-wide
Provincial service in these fields, and to promote greater understanding throughout
Canada of the economic conditions affecting the development of each of the
Provinces and all of Canada.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During 1966 the Bulletin completed 17 years of continuous publication listing
trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under licence agreements available
to British Columbia firms, notices of tender, and news of general commercial interest.
The Bulletin includes special features covering participation in trade fairs, market
reports on selected regions, and details of trade missions.
The increased use of the Bulletin by the trade representatives of other nations
bears out the importance of this publication to commercial and industrial organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the Bulletin has increased to 1,700
copies a month.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The regional development work of the Department was carried on extensively
during 1966. This office continued to work closely with industrial establishments,
Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, research organizations, and all other
groups interested in or actively engaged in the industrial development of the Province
of British Columbia. The close co-operation between the Department and these
groups is a vital factor in the continued expansion of our existing industries and the
promotion of new industries.
Many Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce were visited by members
of the Department and assisted in their efforts to locate new industries and commercial enterprises for their respective areas. Periodic field trips were made by the
Industrial Commissioner and the field representative, in the course of which a close
liaison has been maintained with regional groups engaged in the general field of
industrial development.
Many inquiries received from companies and individuals were dealt with by
this office, and a great deal of general and specific information about the industrial
opportunities in British Columbia was distributed. Close contact was maintained
with the British Columbia Research Council, and numerous inquiries and problems
were referred to that organization.
CONSTRUCTION OF PORTABLE EXHIBIT
During the year a new portable exhibit was constructed. This display provides
a medium for effectively telling the story of industrial expansion taking place in the
Province. This exhibit will be used at the forthcoming British Columbia International Trade Fair to be held in Vancouver P.N.E. grounds from May 17 to 27, 1967.
Until that time the exhibit may be seen in the rotunda of the Parliament Buildings.
The same exhibit will also be used in trade fairs in the United States and in other
parts of Canada.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 29
A section of the portable exhibit.
DEVELOPMENT OF EXTERNAL TRADE
Members of the Industrial and Trade Office maintain a programme of visits
to secondary industries with a view to stimulating Provincial export trade. This
co-operative effort has resulted in 60 British Columbia firms being added to the
Canadian Exporters Directory.
The Trade Office has continued a vigorous campaign to help foreign manufacturers establish representatives in British Columbia. The Trade Office works closely
with representatives of the Vancouver consular corps in the establishing of new
trading areas of Canada. This programme has been highly successful, and an
increasing number of B.C.-based distributors have been established to serve the
Western Canadian market.
PUBLIC RELATIONS, ITINERARIES, AND INTRODUCTIONS
The services of this section of the Industrial and Trade Office continue to grow
and have proven to be of major importance to government representatives and
businessmen from foreign countries who visit this Province. Assistance has been
given under six main headings, as follows:—
(1) Itineraries and other arrangements for visiting businessmen, including
members of the press and other news media from outside the Province:
(2) Arrangements for visits of commodity officers from the Department of
Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, and for tours of Federal and foreign Trade
Commissioners and Assistant Trade Commissioners:
(3) Conferences with officers of the Overseas Service, Department of Citizenship and Immigration, prior to their being posted abroad, for briefings on
the economic development in British Columbia:
(4) Co-operative projects with Commonwealth and foreign trade missions
(economic surveys and itineraries):
 R 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(5) Exchanges of information with diplomatic representatives and Commissioners of Commonwealth countries; and
(6) Liaison with the Vancouver consular corps and with offices of Commonwealth and foreign governments.
During the year, members of the Department have participated with Expo. '67
officials and Vancouver businessmen in planning itineraries for senior executives
from foreign countries who have indicated a desire to visit British Columbia after
attending the Canada World Fair. It is expected that between 3,000 and 5,000
businessmen from foreign countries will avail themselves of this service.
1967 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR,
MAY 17th TO 27th
The British Columbia International Trade Fair, scheduled for May 17 to 27,
1967, has been assured of unprecedented success.
Exhibit area has been enlarged to 85,000 square feet, an increase of 20 per
cent over the 1964 Trade Fair. There will be more exhibitors and an increase in
the number of nations sponsoring exhibits.
Canada's largest trade fair, the British Columbia International Trade Fair, first
opened in 1958 and has been held at three-year intervals since that beginning.
The Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce
sponsors the fair, which is managed by representatives from the British Columbia
business community and a Government nominee.
Mr. William J. Burnett, of Vancouver, B.C., is president of the 1967 Trade
Fair and chairman of the board of directors. General manager is Mr. D. Kenneth
Brown, who directs the Trade Fair staff from executive offices at 207 West Hastings
Street in Vancouver, B.C.
Important exhibits for the 1967 Trade Fair are being developed by Great
Britain, Austria, Belgium, The Netherlands, Sweden, West Germany, Italy, France,
Czechoslovakia, Canada, The Republic of China, Japan, New Zealand, and the U.S.
States of Alaska and Hawaii.
In addition to government exhibits, more than 200 industrial and commercial
enterprises from Canada and around the world are supporting displays involving
thousands of different products.
Featured in the 1967 Trade Fair will be a show of major industrial machinery
occupying almost all space available in the Hall of Industry.
A vigorous programme is under development to encourage buyers and businessmen from Western Canada and the Western United States to attend the fair. Special
arrangements, including breakfast and luncheon meetings, and special viewing hours
for buyers and businessmen are being developed.
Now under contraction on the Pacific National Exhibition grounds, a $6 million
Exhibition and Sports Building, scheduled to be completed in December, 1967, will
provide new facilities and better display areas for future trade fairs.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966 R 31
DATA PROCESSING CENTRE
Because the Data Processing Centre is scheduled to install more advanced
equipment early in 1967, new projects have been confined to those serving the
Motor-vehicle Branch in the Department of the Attorney-General. The efforts of
the Centre have been concentrated on the reorganization of both staff and work
methods, so that full advantage can be taken of the facilities of more powerful data-
processing equipment. Expansion of new systems will eventually permit the
amalgamation of all data-processing and computing operations in a single organization. To accomplish this, and to take advantage of the capabilities of new equipment,
much time has been spent on the preparation of standard methods of programming
and job documentation. This policy, in turn, has created a need for planning and
development of an expanded training programme for both the staff of the Centre
and staff in other departments involved in the use of the computers.
All data-processing job classifications have been reviewed, and a new classification schedule has been approved. These new job specifications more adequately
reflect the rapidly changing needs in the data-processing field brought about by new
concepts and techniques.
To meet the varied demands of the Government service, the following rental
equipment is currently installed in the Centre:—
Number
Machine Type of Units
Key-punches  34
Verifiers  25
Sorters      6
Collators     2
Reproducer     1
Interpreter      1
Facsimile poster     1
1401 computer systems     2
1620 computer system     1
In addition to the equipment listed in the above table, the British Columbia
Forest Service and the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service maintain small
key-punch sections, and the card output from these sections is directed to the
Centre for computer processing. There is also a 1440 system in the Vancouver
District office of the Forest Service. The rental for this system is paid by this Department but is recoverable from the British Columbia Scaling Fund. This disk-oriented
system is used mainly for handling scaling and royalty accounts for the Vancouver
Forest District.
It is anticipated that in 1967 the 1401 and 1620 systems will be replaced by
I.B.M. systems /360 computers. It is also expected that the new equipment will
enable the Centre to reduce further the complement of unit record equipment
presently installed.
Although no direct charges are made to other departments for work done,
accurate job costs are kept through a time-card system. These cards also provide
a basis for establishing machine utilization and a check on the efficiency of the
operation of the Centre.
The Centre is currently handling 135 projects for 17 departments and Government agencies. A summary of work done for each department is shown in
Table I, which sets forth comparative statements of the cost of work done over a five-
 R 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
year period. The growth of the Centre during this period is clearly illustrated in
this table.
Table I indicates a 47-per-cent increase in the total value of work done during
1965/66. Work done for the Department of the Attorney-General increased 195
per cent. Work for the British Columbia Forest Service, British Columbia Hospital
Insurance Service, and Department of Highways all showed increases of about 33
per cent. The value of work done for the Provincial Secretary increased by about
42 per cent, mainly owing to an increase in the work for the Superannuation Branch,
where pension cheques are now being prepared on the 1401 system. Because of
the close connection with the Civil Service payroll, personnel records for the Civil
Service Commission have been transferred to the equipment in the Department of
Finance, where the payroll is prepared.
Table II is a comparative statement showing the number of hours spent in the
operation of the major machine types for each department with a comparison of the
work done during the previous year. An over-all reduction in the number of hours
spent in key-punching over that of the previous year arises out of the amalgamation
of the Motor-vehicle Branch's and this Department's key-punch sections.
There has been a steady phasing-out in the number of hours spent on the unit
record equipment, with the work being reprogrammed for the 1401 computer system.
The major exception has been the Motor-vehicle Branch in the Department of the
Attorney-General, which has had several large unit record sorting operations. These
operations, however have now been converted to magnetic-tape computer sorting.
The decrease in the unit record time is offset by an increase in the time on the 1401
systems. A second 1401 system was added during the year to meet the heavy
demands brought about by additional work done for the Motor-vehicle Branch.
There has been a noticeable decrease in the number of hours recorded on the 1620
system, mainly due to the installation of the much faster 1620 Model II system
with disk packs and an on-line printer. The completion of the conversion of a major
forestry application from the 1620 to the 1401 has also reduced utilization of the
1620.
Tables II and III are similar in design, except that Table III reflects the distribution of systems, programming, and clerical costs. A large increase in the amount
of time spent on systems development has occurred with the introduction of magnetic
tapes and disks to the systems. The complete revision of the Liquor Control Board
payroll is also reflected in this table.
The major portion of the programming for the 1620 system is done by programmers in the departments concerned, with assistance being given by the Centre
to cover the conversion to the Model II disk system. As this programme is completed, demand for assistance from the staff of this Centre is reduced.
WORK DISTRIBUTION
A series of charts attached show distribution of work by departments.
Fig. I is a percentage distribution of the total value of work done by the
Centre.
Fig. II, on the same base as Fig. I, relates to the 1401 data-processing systems.
Fig. Ill covers the 1620 computer operations with applications of an engineering nature.
Fig. IV records the work on the unit record equipment. These amounts will
be reduced progressively as applications are converted to tape and disk storage
methods.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 33
The key-punching service as shown by Fig. V has a more even distribution
among departments. The British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and the
British Columbia Forest Service have key-punch sections in their offices.
Fig. VI shows the distribution of work on systems development. Because of
the nature of this operation and the planning and supervision carried on, the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is recorded as the
major user of this service.
Fig. VII shows the distribution of work in the programming division. Those
taking advantage of this service are the major users of the 1401 system. Most of
the 1620 programming is done by the staff of the departments concerned.
The greater part of the file maintenance and clerical work depicted in Fig. VIII
is for the Data Processing Division. The only other user requiring a substantial
service is the Liquor Control Board.
Table I.—Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
Agriculture—
$124.11
5,795.59
$2,212.71
5,829.06
1,223.85
$124.58
$3,948.16
$4,850.32
5,429.59
7,667.53
Soils Survey Branch	
239.24
Totals              	
$3,948.16
$4,850.32
$5,919.70
$9,265.62
$13,460.94
Attorney-General—
$1,061.39
892.07
26.63
7,288.62
30,414.67
$3,030.10
1,346.05
$1,010.15
1,270.95
$1,644.38
$1,485.72
597.11
19.46
6,635.28
10,058.78
49,164.22
145,202.29
896.24
38,487.67
39,275.09
41,927.27
57,813.01
Totals    	
$39,683.38
$49,518.56
$51,614.97
$92,735 J8T7
$205,994.37
Commercial Transport—
1
  |      $1,700.55
$1,130.73
Education—
$1,236.75
10,914.06
1,060.66
2,942.81
$1,901.38
20,244.56
2,221.62
1,254.05
1,525.40
$2,206.87
7,760.90
1,228.88
1,526.22
3,653.53
$2,802.25
10,073.91
$2,159.67
4,761.70
High School Correspondence	
Inspector of Schools and School Services-
1,221.48
9.05
1,253.37
4,809.24
Totals               	
$16,154.28
$27,147.01
$16,376.40
$14,106.69
$12,983.98
Finance—■
1
$3.91
$63.32
.   _    ....
$208.61
 ~~ 1      -- .
251.56
Totals
$3,911
$63.3(2
$460.17
Forest Service—
$1,479.73
60,932.19
1,056.01
685.90
$2,371.63
31,903.67
4,182.21
1,442.06
660.62
$4,873.95
53,033.13
4,933.03
4,819.20
26.84
$12,747.74
43,399.65
3,180.57
3,554.80
$10,396.34
64,594.67
3 062 81
4,845.31
Scaling Fund ...	
Tntals
$64,153.83
$40,560.19
$67,686.15
$62,882.76
$82,899.13
Health Services and Hospital Insurance—
Vital Statistic
$8.39
22,518.09
$51.45
24,940.93
$29.98
25,639.08
$14.06
35,503.31
$1,867.15
44,570.06
Totals
$22,526.48
$24,992.38
$25,669.06
$35,517.37
$46,437.21
Highways—
$2,030.14
15,103.09
37.12
$14,351.00
13,491.97
2,851.34
$4,517.01
10,724.00
2,177.09
$2,340.63
12,730.02
2,682.68
$696.70
20,423.44
3,263.23
Totals
$17,170.35
$30,694.31
$17,418.10
$17,753.33
$24,383.37
 R 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Comparative Cost Statement—Continued
Department and Branch
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—
$7,032.74
$8,214.84
12,141.13
$8,653.48
21,540.94
$4,734.17
33,747.21
$6,428.71
41,522.81
Totals 	
$7,032.74
$20,355.97
$30,1194.412
$38,4«1J38
$47,9511.52
Labour—
General Administration	
$452.88
$1,227.51
$535.62
$672.78
$410.31
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys	
Geographic Division	
$16,954.04
6,635.54
3,427.11
$18,698.78
12.49
7,124.68
2,890.02
$21,644.58
12.49
10,532.44
$21,826.21
9,560.23
,   $22,483 Jill
Water Rights Branch Administration.
Hydraulic Investigation  	
8,252.77
Totals
$27,016.69
$28,725.97
$32,189.51
$31,386.44
$30,735.88
Mines and Petroleum Resources—
$2,720.93
$705.04
$1,354.64
Provincial Secretary—
Queen's Printer	
Superannuation Branch—	
$8,821.04
2,513.35
3,452.38
10.84
$8,674.62
1,779.58
3,608.22
86.47
$9,048.93
6,993.32
5,092.06
	
$6,960.05
5,944.14
4,732.85
	
$7,943.81
15,250.72
Civil Service Commission	
1,903.07
P.S. Medical Plan.     ..
  	
Totals	
$14,797.61
$14,148.89
$21,134.31
$17,637.04
$25,097.60
Recreation and Conservation—
Fish and Game Branch	
Parks Branch	
$4,583.06
$1,802.84
63.71
$1,757.00
79.31
$7,968.17
$6,017.83
Totals -..-	
$4,583.06
$1,866.55
$1,836.31
$7,968.17
$6,017.83
Social Welfare-
Accounts Division. _ 	
$17,277.51
$24,577.70
$23,809.54
$29,522.44
$34,615.07
Water Resources—
$669.90
$6,759.45
	
$7,607.02
$3,345.78
Water Investigation 	
2,594.53
Totals -	
$669.90
$6,759.45
$7,607.02
$5,940.31
Other-
$1,012.10
$1,213.73
110.37
$1,424.25
$98.89
University of Victoria.	
	
8.02
Totals	
$1,012.10
	
$98.89
$1,324.10
$1,432.27
$235,809.07
$269,335.26
$303,967.36  | $369,329.92
1
$541,305.33
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 35
Table II.—Showing the Number of Hours Spent in Machine Operations during
the 12-month Period Ended September 30, 1966, Compared to a Similar
Period of the Previous Year.
Department
Key-punching
Unit Record
Equipment
1401 Systems
1620 Systems
1:
1964/65 ! 19165/66
v               '
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
1,034.5
2,170.7
3,238.4
1216.2
2,475.1
1,664.4
2,399,2
232.4
11,293.0
3,099.0
71/2
14,8
2,309.1
448.3
6,017.5
427.3
348.3
883.9
2,523.0
3,786.7
267.7
1,8111.9
38.5
2,089.6
2,211.6
254.6
1,178.1
1,097.2
8.6
8.6
2,784.4
379.9
5,7911.0
401.2
186.8
139.4
208 Jl
2,018.6
228.5
1,528.8
85!8.ff
.    635.2
29)8.0
449.6
1.7.2
25.6
650.1'
37.0
.    428.2
164.7
30.5
1119.9
1,325.7
1,606.4
27.3
179.3
530.4
526.8
227.2
25.2
451.6
i      12.5
112.9
59B.9
8.6
3167 J2
15.2
2.0
75.6
1,014.2
353.2
7.0
1411.8
66.6
3,066.1
512.2
4.3
148.5
5.5
800.6
87.2
793.7
25.6
110)1.4
3.3
910.7
482.9
2.3
British Columbia Forest Service-
British Columbia Lands Service	
402.7
•86.0
653.9
4,8
107.7
6.2
6.7 .
116.3
9.1
79.4
18.8
2.9
588.7
342.6
4.2
3711.3.
30.0
373.2
Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce   ".	
159.6
4.1
H8.9
251.2
3.6
191,6
2.1
25.1
35.8
8.7
129.4
26.5
146.6
81.2
2.8
88.1
Other          	
27.459.4 125.683.3
7,717.8
6,032.1
3,086.3
6,140.9
2,131.7
1,643.6
Table III.—Showing the Number of Hours Spent on Systems, Programming, and
Clerical Work for Each Department for the 12-month Period Ended September
30, 1966, Compared to the Similar Period of the Previous Year.
Systems
Development
Programming
Other Clerical
Department
1401 Systems
1620 Systems
Work
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
4.0
147.8
6.8
.    224.6
63.3
752.9
1     184.0
126.8
297.7
100.9
2.6
792.1 I
94.5
495.5
17.4
451.9
18.1 I
37.5
166.2
68.6
505.9
16.6
943.6
1,677.1
57.3
3.0
70.2
82.4
1,354.2
8 9
37.2
237.0
8.5
1,111.5
34fi
6.7
528.1
35.8
500.1
170.1
901.6
28.7
56.9
218.7
5.2
254.9
12.0
1,651.2
43.8
1,242.4
42.4 |       53.6
30.6
18.0
171.7 |         6.9
184 fi   I       1lfi 1
73.0'
215.4
3.9
2,884.4
4.5
4.8
495.7
81.4
551.1
53 9
2.5
Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce  	
394.4
	
687.7
99.9
41.0
7,974.8
2.3
9.0
11.1
8.5
76.0
21.3
323.0
6.1
1,059.6
1.0
3.0
295.8
Recreation and Conservation	
Social Welfare	
251.7
118.0
337.4
2.5
3.5
3.3
2.0
Other.- - - -
  .
Total hours _	
761.2
3,747.6 i
3,359.7
7,684.4
429.4
171.5
6,162.4
10,268.6
  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 37
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 R 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 39
REPORT OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FROM
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
Economic action taken by the Government of the United Kingdom to counteract adverse conditions prevailing in Great Britain during 1965 have had a major
influence on the activities of the staff of British Columbia House, London. Restriction on the availability of credit, high interest rates, control of wages, salaries,
and dividends, and the redeployment of a large part of the labour force have resulted
in a virtual stoppage of overseas investment by British investors. Such investments
as are mentioned in this report represent amounts transferred before the present
restrictions were applied. Other regulations have severely restricted the privileges
of British emigrants to transfer capital to the place of immigration.
At the same time Great Britain has launched a major campaign to promote
the sale abroad of British goods.
Sir Lionel Denny, M.C., Lord Mayor of London, meeting the Honourable W. A. C.
Bennett, Premier of British Columbia, accompanied by Mr. Earle C. Westwood, Agent-
General, at British Columbia House reception.
RECEPTIONS
A number of receptions were held throughout the year. Important amongst
these was one held by the British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association in
the reception room at British Columbia House in honour of the new president of
the association, Mr. S. Heller, who was accompanied by Mr. Norman Dusting, the
general manager of the association. This type of reception is a useful contribution
to industry in the Province, and the identification of this office with such receptions
is helpful to all concerned. The reception room is also an exhibition hall for the
use of British Columbia industry in displaying goods free of charge in the heart of
London.
IMMIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT
The number of immigration inquiries has increased considerably over previous
years.   Some 1,500 personal interviews were held with prospective immigrants, and
 R 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
some 830 letters about this subject were answered. This office confines itself to
disseminating information about the Province and advises on the matter of settling
in and on problems which are likely to affect immigrants when they arrive in the
Province. Actual immigration procedures are handled by the Federal Government
Department of Immigration, which maintains offices in most of the principal cities
in the United Kingdom. Until recently, immigrants were allowed to take to Canada
a settling-in allowance of £5,000. Their remaining funds were blocked, but immediately upon arrival in Canada they could arrange to have these funds transferred
at a small premium of 1 or 2 per cent. As a consequence of recent legislation, these
blocked funds can only be transferred to Canada by the immigrant purchasing dollars in the investment currency market. At the end of 1965 the premium was 20
to 25 per cent.
British Columbia House, London, has also been actively engaged in recruiting
doctors, museum curators, town planners, and people for industry.
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
This office continues to work closely with Provincial representatives travelling
to the United Kingdom for the purpose of engaging teachers for employment in the
Province. During the year an advertising campaign resulted in 320 inquiries, from
which 104 appointments to teaching posts in the Province were made. Many of
the teachers so appointed were married with dependent children. Consequently,
the number of persons immigrating to Canada under this teacher recruiting programme exceeds the number of appointments. Notwithstanding that the advertising
campaign for the recruiting of teachers takes place once a year, British Columbia
House continues throughout the year to receive inquiries respecting employment
opportunities for teachers.
VISITORS
A total of 3,250 visitors from British Columbia registered at British Columbia
House. During the year the staff handled 19,000 pieces of mail on their behalf.
In addition to other routine services provided for visitors from British Columbia,
the staff at British Columbia House, London, has from time to time been called upon
to render special assistance to visitors where unexpected difficulties have arisen as a
consequence of sickness, death, lack of funds, work permit regulations, violation of
laws, passport regulations, and so on.
FILMS AND PUBLICITY
British Columbia films, both government and industrial, were shown to an
audience totalling 25,000, which represented some 260 screenings. A useful arrangement has been made with the National Film Board to handle British Columbia
films, thereby ensuring a much enlarged distribution of British Columbia films.
The Agent-General's newsletter continues to offer business, economic, and cultural information concerning the Province.
This office would welcome more window displays for the Regent Street window
depicting products of British Columbia having sales possibilities in the United Kingdom. During the year this office arranged displays of British Columbia apples,
canned goods, wooden furniture, and timber-frame construction for housing.
TOURISM
This office continues to disseminate information about the attractions of the
Province.   The magazine " Beautiful British Columbia," which is distributed free
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1966
R 41
to a cross-section of the British community, invariably draws highly complimentary
remarks.
REPORT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR
During 1966 the following inquiries were received from the United Kingdom
and countries of Western Europe:—
United Kingdom	
Austria 	
Belgium 	
Denmark 	
France 	
Germany 	
Italy	
The Netherlands
Norway	
Sweden 	
Switzerland	
Other countries __
Total __
316
6
5
4
6
31
10
15
5
6
4
12
420
PROMOTION OF TRADE
During the year 85 inquiries were received at this office from British Columbia
producers, the majority of which had to do with the sale of British Columbia products in the United Kingdom and Western Europe. Suitable contacts were arranged
for many of these inquiries, and buyers and distributors were found.
BRITISH COLUMBIA COMPANIES ESTABLISHING IN THE
UNITED KINGDOM AND EUROPE
The year 1966 revealed the emerging of a pattern in marketing goods and
services from the Province in that 15 B.C.-based companies established subsidiaries
in or concluded working arrangements with British or Common Market countries.
This aggressive programme to bring British Columbia goods and services to
the attention of prospective customers abroad is welcomed. Experience has indicated that continuing sales programmes are best maintained by means of direct
control over the selling function.
It was announced during 1966 by a large integrated British Columbia firm that
it had incorporated a United Kingdom company to warehouse, sell, and distribute
lumber, plywood, and pulp. Previously this firm had used British companies as its
agents. This policy change should be of great interest to all British Columbia producers as a pattern for export growth.
DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRY
Developing the industrial potential and scope of industry in British Columbia
either by foreign investment or the setting-up of subsidiary companies in the Province is the first object of this office.
From the United Kingdom
During 1966, 10 British firms commenced new industries or invested in
already-established companies in British Columbia.    Increased participation by
 R 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
these firms in the economy of the Province will mean an eventual investment of over
$100,000,000. Some of these projects, such as a mill being built in the Interior, will
not be completed for two or three years. Others, such as a Vancouver-based company, are of immediate benefit.
From European Countries
During 1966, 10 European firms established themselves in the Province, either
by direct investment or by the establishment of sales offices. These moves originated
from Germany, from The Netherlands, from France, and one each from Austria,
Italy, Sweden, and Switzerland.
TRADE MISSIONS TO BRITISH COLUMBIA
There were several important trade mission visits to the Province during the
year, as follows: Italian Construction Association Mission, September 6 to 15, 1966
(representing three large groups); the Welsh Trade Mission, in Vancouver, October
2 to 5, 1966 (16 members); British Ship and Boat Builders' National Federation
Mission, in Vancouver, October 3 to 5, 1966 (13 members); "Meet Modern
Sweden Delegation," headed by Prince Bertil of Sweden, in Vancouver, November
18 to 22, 1966 (16 members); French Economic Study Mission, October 2 to
9, 1966.
Because of the British Government's drive to increase trade with Canada, more
than the usual number of sales representatives came to British Columbia. Many
of these visitors were supplied with letters of introduction, itineraries, and trade
information.
TENDERS
This office continues to contact British and European firms who are in a position to tender for large construction works and for the supply of capital equipment.
During 1966, notices of 28 such tenders were sent to the Board of Trade in London
for inclusion in its Export Services Bulletin and to the Federation of German Industries in Cologne for circulation to its members.
MORE FOOD EXPORTS SOUGHT
This office continues to receive requests from food brokers, wholesalers, and
chain stores for British Columbia food products. One company presently selling
frozen vegetables from British Columbia feels confident it could sell at least three
times the amount presently being imported if such were available. This is evidence
of the increased demand for both basic foodstuffs and for specialty products, due to
the increasing customer potential in all countries in Western Europe.
This office again points out the tremendous potential for the export of food
products from British Columbia, and draws to the attention of orchardists, fishermen,
farmers, and ranchers in the Province the heavy demand for fresh, frozen, and
canned foods. .   .
> . BUSINESS EMIGRATION
The stringent measures taken by the British Government to restore the economy of the country have resulted in some uneasiness in the business and financial
community. As a result, this office has dealt with a much-increased number of
inquiries from professional, managerial, and administrative people now considering
emigration.     -.,--  ■,    - - : ;
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966
R 43
VISIT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR TO
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Industral and Trade Counsellor visited British Columbia during the year
and spent some time on Vancouver Island, in the Lower Mainland, and the
Okanagan.
VISITS TO EUROPE
The Industrial and Trade Counsellor keeps in close touch with the important
commercial centres, and during the year visited Holland, Belgium, and Western
Germany. As a representative of the Province, he was present at the annual meeting
of the Canada-Netherlands Chamber of Commerce, held at Rotterdam.
NOTES ON TRADE WITH EUROPE
The 1965 figures for trade with Western Europe are published by the Department's Bureau of Economics and Statistics. The following are British Columbia's
European markets in order of importance, showing the value of exports to each
country:—
United Kingdom	
West Germany 	
The Netherlands	
Italy 	
France 	
Belgium-Luxembourg
Switzerland 	
Spain 	
Sweden	
Austria 	
Greece 	
Ireland 	
Others 	
Total
$219,140,000
35,264,000
34,474,000
18,929,000
14,474,000
13,743,000
2,824,000
2,792,000
2,723,000
1,958,000
1,150,000
1,094,000
1,348,000
$349,913,000
It should be observed British Columbia's exports to Europe increased by over
$23,000,000 over the previous year. Exports to the United Kingdom were down
by $1,000,000.
Considering the current adjustments in the economy in the United Kingdom
and the slowing-down of business in Common Market and E.F.T.A. countries, the
results during 1966 have been most gratifying for British Columbia.
 R 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO
Interest in the Province of British Columbia continues at a very high level
among industrialists and investors of the United States. Operators in secondary
industries especially are looking to British Columbia as a potential market and continue to display a keen interest in discussing manufacturers' licensed agencies.
The vast natural resources of British Columbia, the hydro developments on
the Peace and Columbia River systems, the expansion of the Provincial forest industry, the rate of exploration and discovery in the mining, petroleum, and natural-
gas industry, and the continued economic growth and industrial development of
the Province have attracted the attention of the American businessmen.
PROMOTIONAL AND REPRESENTATIONAL ACTIVITIES
The effects of two missions which have visited the area in October and November of 1965 continue to be felt in the current year. Inquiries from British Columbia
manufacturers and California firms which they visited are being received by this
office.
In co-operation with Departmental officers stationed in Victoria, British Columbia House, San Francisco, participated in the Eighth United States World Fair
held in San Francisco from May 12th to 22nd. The British Columbia exhibit
attracted wide attention and provoked a substantial volume of inquiries, both at
the fair and subsequently. All such inquiries were dealt with in detail by the Commercial Representative. The staff at British Columbia House also had the benefit
at the time of the fair of visits by representatives from a number of British Columbia
regional and municipal industrial development commissions and the general manager of the 1967 British Columbia International Trade Fair.
During the year the Commissioner and the Commercial Representative maintained continuous liaison with representatives of Canadian Government offices in
California and with the local representatives of Canadian companies active in the
Western United States. A regular programme of contact and promotional calls
was carried out with American companies engaged in manufacturing and resource
development in the United States.
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
The year 1966 marked a substantial increase in the number of inquiries
received from American business concerns investigating the British Columbia
market and conversely from British Columbia manufacturers interested in establishing representatives and distributors for a wide range of consumer products in
the California market. A number of American import-export firms indicated
interest in establishing British Columbia offices with the expectation of participating
in the increased trade between Canada and the United States. At the year's end,
several major California industrial firms were actively investigating British Columbia
as a site for expansion of their production facilities. A number of other business
enterprises have indicated their intention of establishing manufacturing and service
operations in the Province.
IMMIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT
As in past years, British Columbia House has co-operated with the California
offices of the Canadian Immigration Service in providing literature and general infor-
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 45
mation on British Columbia to the many United States nationals interested in moving to this Province. In many instances the Canadian Immigration Service forwards
to British Columbia House inquiries for greater detail and general information required by prospective immigrants to British Columbia. The subjects of inquiries
include farm and ranch settlement, establishing family businesses, professional employment opportunities, and retirement residence.
VISITORS
British Columbia House continues to be a headquarters and a source of information for many British Columbians who visit California and the Western States,
whether on business or pleasure.
 R 46                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The British Columbia Research Council was incorporated in 1944 under the
Societies Act.
The broad objectives of the Council are to provide scientific and technical services to the industry of the Province, and to conduct research leading to the establishment of new industries and the development of the natural resources of British
Columbia.
From a very modest beginning, the Council has grown with the development of
the Province.   It now employs a staff of 89, and operates from its own laboratory,
located on the campus of the University of British Columbia.
Financial support comes from a Provincial grant through the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce and from earned income from contract research for industry and Government agencies.    It also receives a limited
amount of financial assistance from the National Research Council and other organizations.
INCOME
1,200
1,100
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
Ph
g.
yA
O  300
Q
9 200
g  100
M
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—
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N                   O.
OO              O               tM
->$■           m            m
0«                    O*                      Or
-*                      O                      CO                      O                     ^                     <*                       vft£C
m           m            m            ^>           *o ■          *o            so           ^           r*
CN                 Q\                 Ov                 OS                 °»                 O*                 o^o
FROM B.  C.  GOVERNMENT
FROM RESEARCH CONTRACTS
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1966 R 47
Each year the British Columbia Research Council publishes an annual report
on its financial affairs and the results of its operations. The annual report may be
obtained upon request from the Director of the British Columbia Research Council.
The Council is supervised by a board of management, who met and reviewed
the activities of the Council on April 5, July 12, and October 19, 1966. Membership consisted of the following:—
Dean W. M. Armstrong, Faculty of Applied Science, University of British
Columbia.
Mr. John Bene, President, Weldwood of Canada Limited, 900 East Kent Street,
Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mr. Edward Benson, Vice-President and General Manager, Pacific Press Limited, 2250 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Head, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology,
University of British Columbia.
Mr. A. Fouks, 6637 Cartier Street, Vancouver, 14, B.C.
Dr. John A. Gower, Exploration District Manager, Kennco Explorations Western Limited, 1030 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Mr. G. H. Gwyn, Manager, Kitimat Works, Aluminum Company of Canada
Limited, P.O. Box 1800, Kitimat, B.C.
Mr. G. H. D. Hobbs, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, 450 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Dr. Peter Larkin, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research Board
of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
Mr. J. E. Liersch, Vice-President, Canadian Forest Products Limited, 999
West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. Harold Madsen, Head of Entomology Section, Research Station, Canada
Department of Agriculture, Summerland, B.C.
Mr. F. D. Mathers, Chairman of the Board, Royal City Foods Limited, P.O.
Box 159, New Westminster, B.C.
Mr. H. T. Miard, Deputy Minister, Department of Highways, Victoria, B.C.
Mr. C. Nash, Manager, Load and Development, British Columbia Hydro and
Power Authority, 970 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Mr. E. P. O'Neal, Director of Organization for Western Canada, International
Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Workers, Local No. 132, 636
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Mr. A. F. Paget, Deputy Minister, Water Resources, Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mr. E. G. Shorter, Vice-Chairman, Board of Directors, MacMillan Bloedel
Limited, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Mr. T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister, Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. G. M. Volkoff, Head of Department of Physics, University of British
Columbia.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right ol the Province of British Columbia.
1967
2M-167-9798
 

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