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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1965/66 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1967]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1965/66
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1966, in compliance with the provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30, 1966.
  INDEX
Page
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Report of the Chief Architect 8-12
Report of the Supervisor, Electrical Design and Communications  13
Report of the Civil and Structural Engineer 14-15
Report of the Landscape Architect  16
Public Works in British Columbia 100 Years Ago 17-19
Report of the Mechanical Engineer 22-23
Report of the Architect Planner  24
Report of the Construction and Maintenance Architect 28-31
The Computer and the Information Block     32
Report of the Chief Inspector of Boilers and Pressure Vessels 34-35
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy 37-40
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector 41-43
Languages Spoken by Departmental Staff  44
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure 45—49
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded 50-52
  REPORT OF
THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1966.
Elsewhere in this Report will be found those of the heads of divisions. These
set out work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
Rising costs of construction, as referred to in the report for last year, have continued to give concern. The criteria used in the past for estimating building costs no
longer provide an effective means of doing so because of the erratic nature of the
cost rise in its differing components. By using patterns found reliable in the past,
the Department was underestimating contract cost.
Alternatives have been examined and studies are continuing. It is all too easy
to suggest a panacea. However, it is not easy to choose an alternative which offers
improvement. The method we are following as being most suitable to the requirements of Government service is a more exacting approach to elemental cost analysis.
Basically, this means a critical and thorough analysis of quantities and components entering into construction.
As an indication of the effectiveness of these means, an examination of the most
recent 22 projects, having a contract value of nearly $10,000,000, shows that low
bids have been 6.2 per cent less than Departmental estimates.
This method tends to produce two trends. First, if we remain persuaded that
our course is correct, then we can expect to move into full-scale estimating on a
quantity survey basis. Second, it tends to a situation where cost estimates dictate
design. We are endeavouring to minimize this effect as we feel that the sharp improvement in Government building design has received wide approval.
As the number of buildings under our control grows, so also does the importance of our maintenance section.
Further measures to co-ordinate the work of the safety divisions have been put
into effect, with the result that a 12V2-per-cent increase in permits taken out has been
covered by approximately the same number of inspections.
This has been a very busy year, and the staff have met the problems and challenges which it has brought in a most loyal and cheerful manner. I can sincerely
report high morale, and I would like to close my report to you, Sir, by placing on
record my appreciation of the service which they have rendered.
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF
THE CHIEF ARCHITECT
During the hiatus between World Wars I and II, cost estimating was a moderately straightforward procedure. Price indices were sufficiently stable to be published weekly, shifts were almost predictable, and building components were fairly
limited in comparison with the present day.
These guidelines no longer obtain. Choice of materials seems unlimited, and
there is a wide diversity of techniques available to assemble them. To increase the
burden of the estimator are the erratic, unpredictable upward costs of labour and
material.
Normalcy in equating the cost of a project is now a memory rather than an
everyday experience. The immense importance of cost and quality control thus
becomes a matter of grave concern to the design departments. Accurate extrapolation can be achieved only by a highly sophisticated cost index based on day-to-day
labour and material costs, and case histories of parallel projects.
It demands constant and acute awareness at all echelon levels and the expenditure of many man-hours on research. Quality control, likewise, must be maintained
with vigilance on each individual project to adhere to standards appropriate to the
project being designed. Cost lines must be held without negating aesthetics or constructional efficiency.
Due to the time lapse that ensues between the original budget figure and
the actual tender call, it is mandatory that the original budget be accorded the closest
study, and that strict controls be maintained throughout all phases of design.
In certain private practices a trend is developing to make the contractor a part
of the architect-client team. It is the feeling of those who are sponsoring this idea
that to have a good experienced contractor on the team in the early stages of development is of incalculable benefit to both the architect and the client, and it eliminates to a great extent the friction that occurs between the architect and the contractor. Procedures have been developed whereby the selection of the contractor
beforehand can actually be achieved on a competitive basis. The whole idea is
very well worth study where the cost of a project is of paramount concern.
Work undertaken by the Department of Public Works is set forth as follows:—
Category 1:  Contracts let during the fiscal year 1965/66.
Category 2:  Projects researched and planned during the same period.
CATEGORY 1
Thirty-two principal capital contracts were let, aggregating approximately
$8,750,000. Fifty-three per cent were classified under general projects, 22 per cent
for the Department of Education, 19 per cent for the Department of Health Services
and Hospital Insurance, and 6 per cent for the Attorney-General's Department.
Particulars of these contracts will be found at the end of the Public Works
Report, but five projects of particular interest are mentioned here.
1. Victoria—Archives and Museum Complex.—Four contracts were let during
the fiscal year for this project totalling $1,415,716.41. These phased contracts were
as follows:—
Phase 1:  Demolition and excavation.
Phase 2:  Structural steel and decking, approximately 2,000 tons.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 9
Phase 3: Footings, foundation walls, and slabs preparatory to the steel
erection.
Phase 3a: Reinforced concrete basement and retaining-walls to the Exhibit Building.
2. Tranquille—Tranquille School. — Two contracts were awarded, totalling
$1,872,531, for a new 104-bed addition to the school, and new kitchen and dining
facilities. The latter were required to accommodate the new expansion and to provide more modern facilities.
3. Dawson Creek—British Columbia Vocational School.—The R.C.A.F. sector control site acquired from Crown Assets Disposal Corporation provided 18 existing serviceable buildings. A contract was let to convert these structures into administration offices, classrooms, workshops, dormitories, a gymnasium, and a cafeteria.
In addition, two new workshops were built for automotive work and agricultural
services.   The value of the contract was $1,535,858.
4. Prince George—Addition to Men's Gaol.—An additional 33,000 square
feet of floor space was provided to accommodate 30 extra prisoners in cells and 40
in dormitories.   The contract cost of this work was $978,400.
5. Terrace—British Columbia Vocational School.—A contract was awarded
in the amount of $943,000 for a classroom and administration building. The classrooms were designed to provide courses in business training, coastal navigation, and
other programmes. Later construction phases will provide workshops, dormitories,
and a cafeteria.
CATEGORY 2
Approximately 78 projects were in various stages of planning in the fiscal year
under review, and, of these, 36 went out to tender during this period. Of the balance remaining in the planning stage, 50 per cent were for the Department of Education, 18 per cent for the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
17 per cent general, and 15 per cent for the Attorney-General's Department.
Department of Education
Planning of additional buildings and services for six of the existing vocational
schools was carried on in varying degree. A brief summary of the proposed additions to each vocational-school complex and the Institute of Technology, Burnaby,
follows.
1. British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.— (a) Vocational Classroom
and Laboratory Building: This facility was planned for five principal disciplines,
namely: (1) Electrical laboratory work; (2) draughting (architectural, civil, structural, and mechanical); (3) appliance maintenance—tuition in repair work of electrical appliances; (4) commercial, with courses in typing, business machines, and
methods, and court reporting;   (5) instrumentation.
(b) An extension to the cafeteria is necessitated by the increased student
enrolment.
(c) Multi-purpose Building: This will provide general facilities for several
disciplines and will include an assembly hall for large meetings, convocations, etc.,
as well as space for recreational purposes.
(d) Vocational Teacher Training College: This building was planned to be
basically divided into three main sections—an administration wing, a classroom
wing, and a shop wing. The total envisaged floor area planned at 78,000 square
feet, of which 50 per cent would comprise the shop space.
2. British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby. — (a) Library-Bookstore:  The gross floor area will be approximately 80,000 square feet, with provision
 U  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
for an exhibition area, an audio-visual department with a motion-picture production
area, reference and collection space, and a curriculum wing.
(b) New Wing to the Existing Institute: This new wing, with a gross floor
area of 164,000 square feet, was designed to provide approximately 20 classrooms,
30 laboratories, and 4 lecture theatres with an aggregate seating capacity for 720
persons. The addition was planned to provide such diverse facilities as wood utilization, building technology, industrial electronics, radar, and a planetarium.
3. British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna.—Cafeteria: The provision
of a cafeteria was found to be essential since eating facilities were not readily available in proximity to the vocational school.
4. British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo.—(a) An additional floor
was planned for the existing classroom block to provide more classroom space.
(b) A dormitory for women was planned.
(c) Plans were started for a new additional general-purpose workshop.
5. British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson. — (a) A general-purpose
workshop was planned.
(b) A cafeteria, again to a large extent standardized, was planned for this
school.
6. British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George.—Planned as additions
to the facilities currently in operation were the following buildings:—
(a) A general-purpose workshop.
(b) Alterations to the classroom block.
(c) A sawmill shed.
(d) A cafeteria.
7. British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace.—To provide necessary facilities for this school, which is as yet unoccupied, the following buildings were
planned:—
(a) The boiler-house.
(b) A cafeteria.
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance
1. Victoria—Lee Avenue Mental Hospital. — Planning was started on this
multi-million-dollar project.
The gross floor area was determined at approximately 190,000 square feet with
accommodation provided for an out-patients' department, a 10-bed unit day hospital,
in-patient facilities for 150 adults and for 21 children.
2. Victoria—Glendale School, Royal Oak.—Planning was commenced on this
large complex of buildings comprising a mental health facility for 450 retarded patients. The magnificent site is located north of the Colquitz Farm property. Basically, the planning requirements envisaged the following buildings:—
(a) An administration, treatment, kitchen, and ward building.
(b) Eight cottage units for patients.
(c) A classroom building.
(d) An assembly hall with indoor recreational facilities.
(e) Three cottage-type units for the emotionally disturbed, with a dining-room
attached.
(/)  A boiler-house, laundry, and maintenance-shop unit.
3. Burnaby—Residential Care Centre. — Planning was started on this six-
building project, which will comprise:—
(a)  Three residential units housing a total of 45 children, units being used for
specific age-groups.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U  11
(b) A school with seven classrooms.
(c) An activity building which will house the administrative section, a training centre, a gymnasium, and a small swimming-pool.
(d) A food centre, including areas for staff and out-patients. The centre was
designed to serve the existing clinic and also to prepare meals to be served
in the residential units.
The estimated cost of the project was determined at approximately $1,750,000.
4. Vancouver—Alterations to the Willow Chest Centre.—The work involved
in this project consisted in the replanning of approximately 9,000 square feet of
existing surgical and laboratory facilities. The purpose of this was to enable the
three main operating-rooms to be used jointly by Willow Chest Centre and Vancouver General Hospital. The changes to the operating-rooms were necessitated by the
different and more stringent conditions requisite for the performance of open heart
surgery.
5. Essondale—Colony Farm.—Planning was commenced on a new patients'
and staff dining-room, kitchen, locker rooms, and central linen room. The cost is
estimated at approximately $360,000.
6. Essondale—Medical Clinic. — Research and planning continued on this
project.
General
1. Victoria—Provincial Archives and Museum. — Detailed planning of this
complicated project continued during the fiscal year.
2. Victoria—Government House.—Plans were prepared to add a conservatory
at main-floor level on the west side of the House.
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Saltair—New Men's Gaol.—Planning was continued on this new gaol, which
will accommodate approximately 224 prisoners and 75 staff.
2. Allco, Haney—Kitchen and Stores Building.—Planning also continued for
this building as the next phase of development at the institution.
3. Hutda Lake—Men's Camp. — Plans were prepared for this men's camp
located near Prince George.
4. Ruskin—Women's Camp.—Similar-type accommodation was designed for
this work camp for women.
5. Burnaby—Motor-vehicle Testing-station.—In accordance with newly established policy, planning was commenced for the first new testing-station outside downtown Vancouver. This station would be located south of the British Columbia Vocational School and Institute of Technology sites on Moscrop Street.
6. Victoria—Motor-vehicle Testing-station.—The suggested site for the first
station to be erected on Vancouver Island was in the Lake Hill district just off
Quadra Street.
GENERAL
During the fiscal year 1965/66, 25 projects for senior citizens' housing were
reviewed on behalf of the Provincial Secretary's Department, with constructive criticism offered on both design and construction.
A similar review of plans was made for the Lands Service for six buildings,
chiefly fraternity houses, to be erected on University Endowment Lands at the University of British Columbia.
 U 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In summary, it is pleasing to record pride in the work of all divisions, particularly in the long and arduous work of planning the new Museum. Praise, also, is
due to those in the field, Public Works Department superintendents and project inspectors alike, who have unfailingly given the assistance and co-operation requisite
for the successful completion of the projects entrusted to them.
W. R. H. Curtis, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., A.N.Z.I.A.,
Chief A rchitect.
Structural steelwork in British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria.
yi.      ^...
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U  13
REPORT OF
THE SUPERVISOR,  ELECTRICAL DESIGN
AND COMMUNICATIONS
During the fiscal year the Electrical Design and Communications Division has
worked to full capacity to cope with the volume of work produced by our Architectural Division and by other Government departments. A large number of
electrical designs correlated with the Architectural Division on capital projects were
completed during the year. These included such units as the Hillside Building,
Essondale; Kootenay Fish Hatchery, Bull River; 104-bed Unit, Tranquille; Trowel
Trades Building, Burnaby; Department of Public Works Building, Burnaby.
Over 100 electrical designs of various sizes were carried out for the Construction and Maintenance Division. Throughout the year we continued to supply
technical information and guidance to all maintenance electrical staffs when
required, and must compliment these staffs on the excellent manner in which this
work was carried out.
Considerable electrical designs were completed for the Department of Recreation and Conservation (Parks Division) covering the electrifying of the Mount
Seymour facilities. This included the design and installation of a 12,000-volt transformer-station and cable distribution system to serve all aspects of the ski complex,
and will allow the use of all modern electrical facilities in the Mount Seymour
recreational area.
During the latter part of the year we carried out the electrical and lighting
design for the British Columbia Centennial Fountain, Vancouver. We also supervised the installation. This was a most interesting project, and we are proud to
have been associated with it. The close co-operation which existed between the
Landscape Architect, the engineers, and ourselves contributed greatly to the success
of this project.
In communications we have made vast improvements in many phases of our
telephone system in the past year. In co-operation with the British Columbia Telephone Company, we have up-graded many installations throughout the Province to
keep abreast with the demand for better communications in our continually expanding areas. Although our telephone and communication costs have increased
approximately 48 per cent since 1962, we are now handling over three times the
amount of calls throughout the Province that were handled during that time, which,
on a per call basis, shows a substantial reduction with greatly increased efficiency.
Our " Telpak " system (direct lines) to major centres of the Province is
working very efficiently. The following number of direct lines are now in service
and available through the Parliament Buildings telephone switchboard to the following centres: Vancouver, 24; Kamloops, 4; Prince George, 3; Nanaimo, 4; Kelowna, 3; Nelson, 2.
It is interesting to note that our Parliament Buildings switchboard alone is
presently handling, on the average, about 2,700 " Telpak " calls per day, plus
approximately 6,000 incoming calls (total, 8,700). For the month of November,
1966, a total of 162,832 calls was handled through this switchboard.
It has been our pleasure to work with the various departments throughout
the Government, and the co-operation and co-ordination extended to us by the
other Departmental divisions has been excellent. ,\ _.    T„T
I.  R.  Walker,
Supervisor.
 U  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF
THE CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
Our Division has spent a very busy year, mainly on the design of mental health
facilities and vocational schools. A heavy load for the Division has been the first
four stages of the new Provincial Museum and Archives, Victoria, which were
mainly structural and civil engineering work.
Our draughting staff was augmented during the summer months by two student
technicians from the British Columbia Institute of Technology at Burnaby. We
were very impressed with these students—first, with their sound basic training and
second, with their very good work habits. The British Columbia Institute of Technology should be complimented on providing excellent staff and facilities for the
training of engineering technicians. These fill a long-felt need for a personnel step
between daughtsmen and engineers.
It is perhaps topical at this time to make some observations on the changes in
building techniques and design that have occurred during the past 100 years.
Any building structure has two distinctly different tasks to perform. The first
is that of carrying vertical and horizontal loads. The second is that of providing an
enclosure which can regulate the flow of temperature, light, sound, air, and water
between the building and its external environment. These two factors create an
age-old paradox of building in that a material suitable for one function is not adaptable to the other. Steel and concrete are excellent load-bearing materials, but they
are exceedingly poor thermal insulators. Mineral and glass wools make excellent
thermal and acoustic insulators, but they have no structural value at all. Glass is
transparent to light and heat in its pure form and is useless as an insulator. Wood
is strong in tension and compression, but vulnerable to fire and rot. There is, in
short, no such a thing as a universal building material.
The only way to escape this paradox is the way of nature; that is, through
structural specialization. However, before the appearance of steel and reinforced
concrete, the only natural material available for specialized use was wood.
Wood was, therefore, the dominant building material in the early days of
British Columbia.
The first break-through in the separation of the skeleton from the skin came
with the use of steel. A spectacular example of this was the erection of Paxton's
Crystal Palace in London (circa 1851). The consequences of structural specialization, of the separation of building construction into skeleton and skin, were
obvious.   The concept of the curtain or non-bearing wall had appeared.
From this point on the modern building was evolved: steel was used for the
load-bearing skeleton and materials such as brick, tile, terra-cotta, concrete, and
glass for the walls. Reinforced-concrete frames and floor systems came into general
use just after the turn of the century. In essence, they performed the same function
as steel, but were heavier. In addition, they had the added advantages of being
fireproof and more durable to weather.
The early non-load-bearing walls, while very much lighter than previous ones,
were still being built up of relatively small units, such as brick and tile, the assembling
of which required a lot of hand-labour. The next logical step, therefore, was to
eliminate as much hand-labour on the site as possible, by prefabricating the curtain
wall in story heights and in wide panels.    In this way the advantages of industrial
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66
U  15
- >
» *■
production, already applied to the skeleton, could be used in the walls. From these
considerations, large prefabricated panels of concrete, prestressed concrete, steel,
stainless steel, aluminum, plastics, etc., developed.
Some concept of the saving of dead weight resulting from the above can be
noted in the use of new metal panels, complete with thermal and acoustical insulation, which are only 3 inches thick and weigh 12 pounds per square foot, instead
of around 100 to 125 pounds per square foot for masonry. One large building in
New York, a 23-story skyscraper, was sheathed in a single day with such panels.
It is interesting to compare this with one of the first skyscrapers built, which had 16
stories and used load-bearing walls. The masonry walls of this building were 6 feet
thick at sidewalk level.
The future of structural engineering appears to be in the use of stronger
materials and materials that will reduce the weight of buildings. Earthquake loads
are directly proportional to dead loads, so that any reduction of dead weight reduces
the earthquake loading.
Another consideration would be to use the inherent structural strength of a
building as a whole, not a unit composed of separate elements. The invention of
the computer makes possible solution of the extremely complex and lengthy
calculations involved in this concept.
We wish to express our appreciation for the co-operation received from other
divisions in the Public Works Department. We wish, also, to thank other Government departments for their help, in particular the Department of Highways Testing
Branch and the Lands Branch, Topographic Division.
R. Simpson, B.Sc, M.I.C.E., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Civil and Structural Engineer.
 U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF
THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT
Landscape treatment of space must be played upon with skill and imagination
to bring out inherent values. It is a collaborative role and, though specialized in
application, rests on a broad footing of interrelationships. The public expects a
high standard, and it is the task of the landscape profession to guide the projects
to satisfy this requirement. Public works are, for the most part, concerned with
land which is being used by large numbers of people, and the scale of landscape
architecture must be applied appropriately with understanding and attention to
detail. The writer is of the opinion this field is no place for the " home garden "
approach. The complexities of the problems involved in the site layout must be
shaped and clipped in a manner correct for the requirements.
New-design tools are required to apply the proper scale to public works. The
crowds, the buildings, the automobile (and its roads), all reflect man's use of landscape and guide development of each open space.
Financing of public works landscape projects often extend over many years.
Development and maintenance often proceed hand in hand. Rarely is a project
delivered complete as one might accept a building. It is guided and shaped by the
public owner's controls. There is need for guidance in the continued application of
landscape design principles.
Our Government has created a position of leadership in its appreciation of
space treatment adapted to the requirements of buildings so very diverse in design
and use. This is instanced by the Vancouver Law Courts, the British Columbia
Institute of Technology, and the Courthouse at Quesnel.
This Division is proud to have been prominently associated with several major
works, such as the British Columbia Centennial Fountain, the Centennial Terrace
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, and the developing plan for the grounds of
the Museum and Archives complex.
Open space articulates activities, and the relationship to the whole may be
expressed by the careful landscape development of its parts. There is a broad range
of opportunity in public works, from the wide-open spaces demanded by recreation
to individual building-sites in an urban setting. Faced with these unparalleled opportunities, the Landscape Division and its associates should endeavour to work toward a greater understanding of each other's techniques, philosophies, and aims, for,
professionally speaking, the concept of public works in this field is only started.
The development is yet to come.
R. H. Savery, A.I.L.A., B.C.S.L.A.,
Landscape A rchitect.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U  17
PUBLIC WORKS  IN  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
TOO YEARS AGO
In 1866 the Colony of British Columbia had been in existence for less than
10 years and the senior colony on Vancouver Island for less than 20 years. Sir
James Douglas, on his retirement in 1864, had been joint Governor of both colonies.
In his place separate Governors were appointed for each—Frederick Seymour in
British Columbia and Arthur Edward Kennedy on Vancouver Island.
The period was one of intense rivalry between the two colonies, or, more correctly, between the two settlements at Victoria and New Westminster. The union
of the two colonies was imminent, and the question of the seat of government was
one of vital interest to the residents.
Editorial columns in the Daily British Colonist were, at times, spectacular in
the use of language. Referring to the contemporary British Columbian of New
Westminster: " Those parasites who hang around the garments of officialism [sic],
the ghouls who fatten on decay, the creatures who have been hounding the country
to death—degraded by falsehood, humiliated by vulgarity, and rendered contemptible by shallowness." Referring to New Westminster or " Stump City ": " Even
New Westminster will arise from its lethargic state and kneeling position, no longer
grovelling in the dust before men ' dressed up in a little brief authority.' "
The Governor of British Columbia was absent in England during part of 1866,
but on Vancouver Island there was considerable friction developing between Governor Kennedy and the House of Assembly. The local elected representatives felt
that the cost of supporting the Governor and his administration, " that expensive
burlesque of Government," was more than the public could afford, and were continually demanding reductions in administrative costs. In January, 1866, Governor
Kennedy submitted the following Works and Buildings estimates for Vancouver
Island. " General Repairs to Buildings, $1,000.00 "; " Fencing round Government
Square, $750.00 "; " Construction of a Bell Tower at Race Rocks Lighthouse,
$600.00 "; "Construction of a Fireproof Vault at the Treasury, $800.00 "; and
" Finishing the Court House at Leech River, $200.00."
The House passed the following item: "General Repairs to Buildings,
$150.00." All else was struck out! The slogan of the time was " retrenchment."
Incidents like this may have been the cause of Governor Kennedy remarking on
one occasion, " That there were but two classes on Vancouver Island—those who
are convicts, and those who ought to be convicts."
From the records it would appear that there was no way to please the gentlemen of the house. The Governor's demands were too high. There was a motion
to allow the sum of $300 for the clearing of a road or trail " to accommodate the
nine or ten settlers at Metchosin who were greatly inconvenienced by the lack of
means of communication." During the discussion it was remarked that " if the
settlers were so inconvenienced, it showed little enterprise on their part to ask the
Government for so little a sum as $300."   The settlers' request was too small!
On November 19, 1866, the union of the two colonies was proclaimed, and
Governor Seymour appointed head of the united colony. Most of the Vancouver
Islanders were anxious to rid themselves of Governor Kennedy (" Old Deportment") "who is disliked in his official capacity and his family in their domestic
capacity, in about the same ratio." Within months Seymour was as unpopular on
Vancouver Island as Kennedy had ever been.
  Plan for original Government House, Victoria, circa 1865.
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 U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In his speech to the First Legislative Council of the united Colony of British
Columbia on January 24, 1967, Governor Frederick Seymour said: " The finances
of both sections of the Colony were in a very unsatisfactory condition at the time
Union took place—without examining into the question as to which of the two late
Colonies most required the support of the other—that Union and the consequent
large reduction of expenditure came none too soon. I do not propose to undertake
any public work of magnitude during the year. The more pleasing task of improvement must be left for another year."
In spite of this statement, the various members proposed the following:
$10,000 for the purpose of completing the Metchosin Road (the settlers at Metcho-
sin appeared to have learned their lesson); $20,000 for the purpose of completing
the Sooke Road (even in 1890 it took 6V^ hours by stage to travel from Otter Point
to Victoria); $15,000 for the purpose of opening trails in the Columbia District;
$25,000 for the construction of a road from Goldstream to Cowichan and improving
the road thence to Nanaimo; $2,000 for a road through Comox; a sum not exceeding $25,000 for repairs to the bridge at Nanaimo. During the discussions on these
motions the Island and Mainland factions succeeding in proving to each other that
each item was unnecessary expenditure, and all items were postponed except the
repairs to the bridge at Nanaimo.
It is fascinating to picture the reactions of the worthy gentlemen of the 19th
century to the 1966 estimates for highways and buildings combined, which sum was
in the region of $115,000,000. A further item in the estimates of 1867 was a request
for $600 for work on the road between New Westminster and English Bay, and
a branch road over False Creek to the new sawmill on Burrard Inlet in the area
known later as Gastown, and later still as the City of Vancouver. As a matter of
interest, this road was not completed until 1877.
The construction of new roads in the colony was, of course, a major problem,
and the method employed to finance this work required the imposition of road tolls.
Civilian contractors received advances from the Government, and after these advances had been repaid through the tolls imposed on users of the road, the contractor continued to collect them for his own benefit. This resulted in numerous
petitions by merchants and other users for the reduction or addition of such tolls.
Although road tolls were generally abolished in British Columbia in 1872, the
Government of 1926 used road tolls to finance " the reopening of the old romantic
trail, i.e., the Cariboo Road through the Fraser Canyon," which toll remained in
force until 1947.
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 U 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF
THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
DESIGN SECTION
The Mechanical Design Division participated in practically all of the capital
projects listed elsewhere in this Report.   We have had a busy year.
There are two projects, however, that are worthy of further comment.
The first one was a special study of the requirements of the Mental Health
Clinic to be built in Victoria to determine (a) the most desirable type of air-conditioning system to use in this type of building from the point of view of both capital
and operating costs, and (b) the most desirable source of energy for the clinic.
Preliminary investigation reduced the number of possible suitable systems to
eight. The eight systems were studied in detail, using a spectrum of combinations
of energy source from " all electric " to " all steam."
Results indicated that for this type of building, and the use that will be made
of it, an induction air-conditioning system would best combine excellent operating
characteristics with low capital cost, and, secondly, on the same basis, that under the
conditions applicable to this hospital steam was preferable to electricity.
The study also indicated that criteria for the use of electricity for heating purposes are a well-insulated building with low air infiltration and of relatively low or
intermittent occupancy.
The second project of interest is the Centennial Museum in Victoria. It is
one of the unique features of a modern museum that good air-conditioning is needed;
in fact, it is considered a necessity by museum authorities. Exhibits deteriorate
rapidly and drastically when stored in areas which allow wide fluctuations in
ambient conditions such as occur in buildings with inadequate or no conditioning.
Wooden exhibits and fibrous material of all sorts quickly become brittle without
close humidity and temperature control to maintain oils they contain as long as
possible. All exhibits require close control of air cleanliness. Some research areas
require close control of odours.
The prime function, therefore, of the mechanical installation within a museum
is the preservation of the exhibits and stored material, and not necessarily for the
comfort of people. It is, however, convenient that the general conditions required
are also those that provide comfort to people.
MAINTENANCE SECTION
This Division had a very active year in the operation and mechanical maintenance of boiler plants and mechanical services.
With machines becoming more complex, the need for sound preventive maintenance programmes becomes more and more essential. The chief stationary engineers and mechanical maintenance foremen throughout the Province are keeping
informed on new machinery and methods of operation and in establishing sound
maintenance programmes. They are to be commended for their efforts. The
Division continued very active in providing headquarters supervision over the operation and maintenance of boiler plants and building mechanical services; 23 field
trips were made, with visits to all institutions and a majority of individual Government buildings.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 23
In addition to the mechanical designs which were carried out during the year
for new construction, the Division prepared drawings and specifications for 24
projects involving additions, alterations, or renovations to mechanical services in
Government buildings.   Some of the projects carried out are as follows:—
(1) Conversion of the heating-boilers to oil-firing in the Courthouses at
Alberni, Princeton, and Kaslo. Conversion of the heating-boiler to gas-
firing in the Forestry Building, Nelson.
(2) Complete new heating systems in the Courthouses at Nelson and Salmon
Arm.
(3) Air-conditioning systems for three computer centres in Victoria.
(4) New deaerating heater and feed-water system for the steam-boiler plant
at Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital.
(5) New dust-collection system for woodworking shops at the Haney Correctional Institution.
(6) Additional ventilation systems for the Stores Building and Administration
Wing, Dellview Hospital, Vernon.
(7) Ventilation systems for additional welding booths at vocational schools
at Nanaimo and Prince George.
In concluding this report, I would like to record my appreciation to all the
divisions in the Department and to the superintendents of works and project inspectors for the co-operation and assistance they have given us during the year.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Mechanical Engineer.
 U 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
^F — " °" 'W REPORT OF
THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
The work of this Division is concerned primarily with the use of land in all its
deviations, from buildings situated on it to the purchase or sale of land.
Long-term projects involving exchange of properties between different tiers of
government have been successfully completed in Vernon, Burnaby, and Victoria.
The pressure for leased space continues to mount. As departments enlarge
their activities, the demand for office and storage space grows. This unimpressive
part of our work occupies a great deal of time.
The costs of existing and new rentals continue to increase as accommodation
becomes more difficult to obtain.
In this regard, and as pointed out in the Department's Precinct Report, space
allocation for all Civil Servants should be standardized, and not set within the preserve of each departmental head.
This Division has enjoyed very good relations with those other departments
concerned with the setting-up of surveys, the search for suitable sites (Crown or
otherwise), and the formulation of agreements and other pertinent matters.
A survey is in process of Governmental accommodation on the Lower Mainland, with particular bearing upon parking conditions.
Master plans are in the course of preparation for Abbotsford, Colquitz, Kamloops, and Tranquille, while others such as Burnaby, Jericho Hill, and the Legislative Precinct are in the process of being revised in order to keep up with changes.
A special committee has been formed for the purpose of setting out recommendations on possible gaol-sites. These are now being suggested and will be
framed on those that offer the most promise. When this work has been completed,
it will be put forward for policy consideration.
With the opening of Bastion Square and the decoration of the old Courthouse,
it is gratifying to recall that Department officials instigated the original committee
which formulated policies. The sketch-plans were drafted in this Division, many
of the ideas then put forward being incorporated in the finished design.
The continuing and orderly growth of urban Canada demands co-ordinated
action at the Federal, Provincial, and municipal levels. It is not a question of whose
responsibility is which, so much as it is clearly a joint and multiple responsibility.
Nothing short of the complete range of fiscal, political, and administrative resources
of the three levels of government will be effective in dealing with the interlocking
problems of Canadian urban centres. The growing complexities of urban life are
particularly evident in metropolitan areas.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C., M.I.F.L.A.,
F.I.L.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.L.I.Struct.E.,
A rchitect-Planner.
 —
Original town plan, City of New Westminster, 1861.
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 U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION AND
MAINTENANCE ARCHITECT
The volume of buildings under construction during this fiscal year necessitated,
at one period, the employment of 11 project inspectors. These personnel were
stationed throughout the Province and provided supervision of construction on one
or more projects in an area.
Recruitment of this group of employees was progressively undertaken to
ensure trained inspectors were available to fill vacancies arising from retirements in
addition to providing relief for persons on sick and other leave. To enable the
new entrants to familiarize themselves with Departmental procedures, prior to
assuming responsibility on site, an orientation course was organized, and included
a period in headquarters together with subsequent service on site with an experienced
project inspector.
We have, by engaging only men with a background of practical experience in
construction, with potential for future development, provided means to ensure the
high standard of quality, workmanship, and economy required in the construction
of Provincial buildings.
Project inspectors were appointed to the following works under construction
during this period:—
(1) Victoria Museum and Archives Building.
(2) Terrace Vocational School.
(3) Prince George Gaol addition.
(4) Dawson Creek Vocational School.
(5) Vancouver Institute of Technology.
(6) Burnaby Vocational School Trowel Trades Building.
(7) Burnaby Public Works Building.
(8) Tranquille 104-bed unit.
(9) Ruskin camp for women prisoners.
(10) Vancouver Liquor Control Board bottling plant.
(11) Sundry buildings and works throughout the Province.
Major projects accepted from the contractors as substantially complete during
this period include the following:—
(a) Ganges Provincial Building, Phase I.
(b) Ganges Provincial Building, completion of Phase II.
(c) Vancouver Pearson Hospital (day rooms).
(d) Fort Nelson Provincial Building.
(e) Quesnel Courthouse.
(/)  Riverside Hospital Hillside Building.
(g) Kootenay Fish Hatchery.
(h) Haney Allco, Dormitories 2 and 3.
(/) Riverside Hospital garbage-handling, East Lawn Building.
(/.) Vernon Dellview Hospital boiler-house.
The completion of these and other buildings necessitated participation by this
Division in obtaining suitable personnel for building maintenance, and considerable
work by the zone superintendents in fabricating small fitments, and implementing
minor work to facilitate the early occupancy by the Province.
Throughout this fiscal period, we have continued to maintain active liaison with
all the design divisions of this Department, and with their co-operation have man-
 fRONT  ELEVATION.
Elevation of proposed museum for Victoria, 1861.
MUSEUM  FOR THE   EXHIBITION
BRITISH    COLUMBIAN
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 U 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
aged to resolve many of the day-to-day problems which arise during and after the
construction of buildings.
In addition to this work, this Division's headquarters component prepared
drawings, specifications, and supervised the following projects which utilized capital
funds:—
(1) Oakalla Prison Farm:  Alterations and redesign of kitchen facilities.
(2) Oakalla Prison Farm: Redecking and reroofing of Westgate Unit, including the design of new sliding roof domes to permit adequate ventilation.
(3) New Denver: Redesign and alterations to existing buildings to make
suitable accommodation available for the Department of Social Welfare
youth centre project. In respect to item (3), as these facilities were
immediately required for occupancy and the nature of the work and its
location were not conducive to obtaining competitive bids, a skilled labour
force was engaged on a casual basis under the direction of one of this
Division's project inspectors.
(4) Victoria Data Processing Centre: The relocation of the Textbook Branch
of the Department of Education made available space in the precinct for
the expansion of these facilities. With the co-operation of this Department's Engineering Division, I.B.M. Company, and the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, the area was completely
redesigned to accommodate computers and business machines. Completion of this work now provides a more adequate and suitable environment
for the performance of this important Government process.
(5) Riverside Hospital Centre Lawn Building: Major renovations were made
to the area adjoining the main entrance to provide a new admitting suite.
Implementation of this work provided improved facilities in keeping with
prevailing hospital design criteria.
(6) Woodlands School, Fraserview Hospital: The central sterile supply area
was remodelled and work implemented by the superintendent of works
crews.
(7) Residences were erected in the following areas: Lillooet (two), Dease
Lake (two), and Smithers.
(8) Plans and specifications were also prepared for a pump-house at Penticton,
at the request of the Water Resources Service of the Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources.
MAINTENANCE AND BUILDING MANAGEMENT
The number of premises leased to accommodate Government departments has
increased and was reflected in the volume of design, draughting, and negotiation
work carried out by this Division during the period under review. Departmental
procedures entailed participation by the Division in the inspection of proposed, new
rentals to ascertain their suitability for use by the department initiating the rental.
In the majority of instances it was also necessary to prepare plans and specifications
for the subdivision of the space, negotiate with the landlord to undertake the construction work, and inspect same on completion. As initial field inspection was
often made by our superintendent of works, and subsequent design and draughting
carried out by the headquarters component, this work made a sizeable increase to
the work load of this and other divisions of the Department.
Throughout the year periodic visits have been made to all superintendents of
works zones, and it is gratifying to record the success we have achieved by providing
supervision of normal maintenance in the field by the formation of works zones.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 31
Plans and specifications for major renovations and numerous maintenance
projects were prepared in headquarters for issue and implementation by our superintendents in the works zones. In some instances the work was carried out by the
maintenance crews, and in others by the award of local contracts. It is also interesting to note in the remote regions of this Province it was found impossible to interest
anyone to submit a tender on work required. In zones where a superintendent has
been established, this problem is often surmounted by using our own works force,
but in areas with inadequate or non-existent labour forces, we are faced with a very
difficult problem.
The following list, with a concise description of the work, includes some of the
larger maintenance and renewal work undertaken in this period:—
(1) New Westminster Courthouse: Repair of cornices, parapet, and exterior
building fabric to eliminate hazards to the public.
(2) Revelstoke Courthouse:   Refinishing and preservation of dome.
(3) Burnaby Mental Health Hospital:   Reroofing and new flashings.
(4) Nelson Gaol:   Exterior decoration and repairs.
(5) Nanaimo Courthouse:   Interior decorations and repairs.
(6) Courtenay Courthouse: Alterations to the windows in R.C.M.P. cell unit
to provide satisfactory security.
(7) Nelson Courthouse: Deterioration of plaster wall surfaces necessitated the
installation of new panelling in the courtroom, also the artificial illumination intensity was increased to comply with current acceptable standards.
In addition to the above work, a consistent programme of expanding existing
accommodation and facilities was carried out by all the superintendents in their
respective areas, which has contributed to the most effective use of all existing
accommodation.
In conclusion, I would like to thank all Government Agents and others in the
field and at headquarters for the help and co-operation they have extended to myself
and members of this Division.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Construction and Maintenance Architect.
 U 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE COMPUTER AND
THE INFORMATION  BLOCK
The society which first has the accumulated information of the world at its command
will have a tremendous advantage in any field of endeavour. The construction industry lives
on information. Information on building design, cost, materials, equipment, and maintenance
is essential to its operation. No person or group in our modern society can operate on its own
experience. Information on the work that others are doing must be received, stored, and
retrieved at will. Businessmen, contractors, industrialists, professionals, scientists, and tradesmen, all spend increasing numbers of years in assimilating the accumulating knowledge of their
occupations. As the store of knowledge increases, the divisions of labour are subdivided into
specialties and sub-specialties. With this division comes more information, until we now have an
avalanche of information. Total world production of technical documents in 1961 was 658,000;
in 1965 it rose to 900,500. No man has time to read all the information that is published in his
own specialty, nor even time to find in this avalanche what is pertinent to a current problem.
There can be little wonder that disasters typified by the recent thalidomide cases do occur.
Each specialist is aware that pertinent information is stored somewhere. He is also
depressingly aware that no one place has it all, and that each place that stores information
stores garbage with food, out of date with up to date, and duplicate with unique. The Library
of Congress, which attempts to catalogue every United States publication, now has some
44,000,000 items, yet it is estimated that only one-fourth of the available scientific information
in the United States is catalogued. Universities and scientific foundations store and catalogue; industries and professions contribute. Private abstracting and indexing services are
available. A directory of specialized information services in the physical and biological
sciences contains 427 organizations which has been winnowed from an original list of 10,000.
There are gaps and overlaps in this array of services. The time spent in searching for
information that may be catalogued can be prohibitive. 'The publication " Machine Design "
states that " a large steel company insists that it is cheaper to repeat an experiment if the cost
does not exceed $ 100,000 than to pay for a search to determine whether it has been done before."
A study of the existing cataloguing in the United States led the Senate Committee on
Government Operations in 1961 to the conclusion that unwitting and needless duplication in
Federally supported electronics research may cost the taxpayer $200,000,000 per year. The
American Chemical Society estimated in 1963 that 10 per cent of the money spent in the
United States on research and development was wasted and that this waste would be in the
neighbourhood of $2 billion per year. There was no estimate of the expenditure in cataloguing
and continued reading of this duplicated information.
This frustrating heap of information will continue to grow until some orderly and complete
system of sorting, filing, and discarding is put into operation. It will take years to devise a
system, and years more to programme and implement the system. Every year's delay will add
to the heap. Some sections of different societies have started work on this accumulation. New
York State is developing a State-wide information system and a reference and research library
resources programme. The City of Houston is considering a municipal technical data centre
for scientists and technicians. The Engineers' loint Council is planning a united engineering
information system in New York City. The American Chemical Society is developing a
national chemical information system. Canadian Case Law Research Limited of Edmonton,
has implemented a search and retrieval system of Canadian law. Ten universities are attempting
to unite the literature of their campuses through computers. They envisage a network* of
bookless libraries composed of study booths, electric typewriters, and television screens in
which the small college would have a better library than any now in existence.
The Public Works Department has a small part of this problem, that part in the field of
building construction, materials, and equipment. The architects of the Plovince share this
problem together with the engineers, contractors, and the whole construction industry. A feasibility study is being made to put the Department's catalogues on tape. More and more
individuals and groups are recognizing the problem and doing something about it, but who is
co-ordinating, who is sorting out the overlaps, who is assigning areas that are neglected, who
will pay, and who will say how much? Some authority must take on this responsibility or
there will be a new deluge of incomplete and redundant information.
W. W. Ekins,
Supervising Architect.
 *• /
Exterior view of first hydro-electric plant in British Columbia at Goldstream, near Victoria.
. -km ■ • ;• • i IMS
 U 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF
THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF BOILERS
AND  PRESSURE VESSELS
GENERAL
The rapid growth of industry throughout the Province is reflected in every
phase of our operations. The work load in the design office, shop inspection, engineers' examinations, and welding tests is consistently high. Work in this field shows
an increase of 43 per cent.
OPERATIONS
Welders will always be the key men in our heavy-construction industry. In
spite of the fact that our vocational schools are working to capacity in welder training, and there is also a steady influx of welders from other Provinces, neither source
satisfies demand. This year the welders' tests have increased 26.5 per cent. It is
to be noted that welders engaged on pressure equipment within the scope of the
Gas Act and the Pipe-lines Act are also required to hold certificates issued by this
Division.
Designs surveyed show an increase of 12.5 per cent. An interesting fact is the
increase of engineers who have written first-class examinations (72.5 per cent),
which shows the keen competition for positions in our large plants.
There are now 56 first-class steam plants as against 29 in 1945.
The new technical programme introduced five years ago by the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, designed to train capable young engineers for the superior
positions in the large steam plants, is showing excellent results. The successful
graduates of this programme are in demand by the large companies.
There are now 23 black-liquor recovery boilers in the Province. This will
increase to 30 by 1968. Since boilers of this type are a hazard peculiar to themselves, a professional engineer was added to the staff to give special attention to their
design, construction, and operation and repair. He has proved most valuable to us.
This is true, also, of the owners, who co-operate well with him and appreciate his
attention, advice, and assistance.
THE ACT AND REGULATIONS
Section 9 of the Act was amended at the 1965 Session of the Legislature to
extend the requirement of an installation permit to all boilers.
The draft of Part III regulations, Safety Code for Mechanical Refrigeration,
will be completed shortly.
The revised Part VI regulations, Stationary Engineers, approved last year, has
been well received both by the public and the engineers' union.
ACCIDENTS
One steam boiler and one pressure vessel were involved in accidents as follows
(no person was killed or injured):—
May 7, 1965, at Vancouver: Damage sustained by water-tube boiler No.
45462-BC, due to low water condition, brought on by failure of controls. Water
wall tubes and circulating tubes were distorted and had to be replaced.
 Early 150-horsepower Corlliss steam engine, circa 1894.
 U 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
March 16, 1966, at Heffley Creek: A propane transport tank was completely
destroyed by explosion. A leakage at a damaged hose coupling released gas which
became ignited and overheated the tank.
Complete investigations were made of all these accidents, and full reports with
recommendations are on file.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1965/66
1964/65
1963/64
945
843
872
66
91
131
2,156
1,503
1,433
4,162
4,120
4,378
3,068
2,182
2,531
478
399
443
732
798
570
1,647
1,301
1,201
139,547.56
$131,178.21
$113,391.75
Designs registered	
Boilers built under inspection	
Pressure vessels built under inspection..
Total boilers inspected  	
Total pressure vessels inspected	
New boiler installations	
Engineers examined _ 	
Welders examined  	
Total revenue	
ENGINEERS' EXAMINATIONS
Class
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
First, A..
First, B..
Second-
Third—..
Fourth-
Boiler operator, A..
Boiler operator, L.P.B...
Boiler operator, H.P.B..
Totals 	
41
9
116
171
311
31
48
5
732
20
8
62
147
252
27
41
4
561
21
1
54
24
59
4
7
1
WELDERS' TESTS
Grade
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
A                                                                       - '
337
487
187
122
270
112
140
310
359
159
104
257
105
133
27
B                          ....                          -    -
128
C -	
28
D                             -  —     ...
18
a 3
7
7
1,655
1,427
228
Renewals, 735.
S. Smith,
Chief Inspector.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66
U 37
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REPORT OF
THE  INSPECTOR OF  ELECTRICAL ENERGY
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
The Honourable Minister of Public Works has been pleased to appoint the
following members to the Board, effective lanuary 1, 1966: Mr. J. Grumey, electrical contractor, representing the Vancouver Electrical Association; Mr. D. Topp,
electrical contractor, representing the Electrical Contractors' Association of British
Columbia; Mr. W. A. Woodill, electrical contractor, representing the Associated
Electrical Contractors of British Columbia; Mr. E. Hammersmark, electrical inspector for the municipality of the District of North Vancouver, representing cities and
municipalities. Other members of the Board are Mr. L. Robson (Chairman), Chief
Inspector of Electrical Energy, and Mr. G. A. Harrower, Assistant Inspector of
Electrical Energy.   Nine meetings were held throughout the year.
The total number of certificates of competency in effect during the year was
as follows:—
Class A  244 Class PC       160
Class B   533 C]ass TB  1
Class C  539
Class PA _      40
Class PB  118 Total  1,635
This represents an approximate increase of 12 per cent over the number of
certificates in effect for the previous year.
Three hundred and sixty-one candidates for electrical contractors' certificates
of competency were examined during the year, with the following results:—
Class
Number of
Candidates
Examined
Passed
Failed
A  	
46
149
166
20
92
89
26
B	
57
C 	
77
361
201
160
This represents an approximate increase of 19.3 per cent over the number of
candidates examined during the previous year.
PERMITS
The system whereby electrical permits may be issued for single-family and
duplex dwellings through Government Agencies continues to provide a very satisfactory service. Studies are under way to determine the feasibility of extending this
plan to larger installations.
The total number of permits issued during the year was as follows:—
April, 1965  3,380 November, 1965      4,731
May, 1965   4,376 December, 1965     4,303
June, 1965  5,146 January, 1966     3,546
July, 1965  4,402 February, 1966      4,167
August, 1965  4,728 March, 1966      4,309
September, 1965  5,369 	
October, 1965  4,878 Total  53,335
 1-
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Electric generating plant, New Westminster, circa 1894.
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 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 39
This represents an increase over the previous year of over 12Vi per cent and
continues to reflect the economic growth of the Province, particularly in the construction industry.
DISTRICT OFFICES AND INSPECTIONS
The number of inspections undertaken by our staff is approximately the same
as last year. During the year, and because of the large increase in applications for
permits, it was necessary to put into effect a system whereby certain types of installations would be cleared for electric service upon receipt of a signed declaration from
the contractor that the installation met the minimum requirements. Regulations
71/65 and 57/65 were introduced and approved to facilitate this programme. In
essence, more responsibility was placed on the installing contractor. A spot-check
system was devised for domestic installations, and this seems to be effective.
An indication of the growth of the work of this Division may be gained from
a comparison of inspections made and permits issued over the last 10 years, as
lOllOWS: Inspections Permits
1956/57   53,265      32,748
1957/58   60,109      37,662
1958/59     69,324      42,618
1959/60   73,651      44,006
1960/61   65,943      41,252
1961/62  64,153      40,630
1962/63   65,846      42,374
1963/64   70,881      44,872
1964/65   70,989      47,403
1965/66   70,258      53,335
Considerable difficulty was being experienced in providing proper service in
the north central area of the Province due to staff limitations. As a result of sympathetic response for additional staff, new offices were opened at Smithers and Clinton.
This, together with a rearrangement of district boundaries, has brought about a
definite improvement as well as making possible a more efficient operation.
The northern part of Vancouver Island is presenting a serious problem due to
our inability to obtain suitable staff.   This is receiving our continued attention.
It should be noted that the number of inspections now being undertaken is
a maximum for the staff presently available.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
Meeting of the Approvals Council (Electrical) and the Canadian Electrical
Code, Part I, were attended by the Chief Inspector. These were held in June at
Banff, Alta., and in November in Toronto.
EQUIPMENT INSPECTION
Applications for acceptance of electrical equipment not listed by the national
laboratory service have increased again this year. The total number was 471, as
compared to 435 for the preceding year, an increase of over 8 per cent.
This service continues to be beneficial to industry and makes possible the use
of this type of equipment with a minimum of delay, while at the same time ensuring
satisfactory standard of safety.
 U 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXAMINATION OF MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS
The Branch assisted the Provincial Fire Marshal in conducting 12 examinations
for projectionists. The regulations covering such examinations provide that the
Inspector of Electrical Energy be a member of this Examining Board in company
with the Fire Marshal. In this connection, all fees arising from these examinations
accrue to the credit of the Fire Marshal's department.
POLE-LINE PERMITS
During the year the Branch checked 1,196 applications for the erection of
pole-lines on Crown lands or Provincial highways. Recommendations on each
application were forwarded to the Regional Engineer of the Department of Highways.   This is approximately just under 12 per cent higher than last year.
ACCIDENTS
There were 18 accidents recorded during the year, and nine of these were fatal.
June 30, 1965: One person was electrocuted while using welding apparatus at
his place of employment.
July 7, 1965: One person was electrocuted when a crane cable came into
contact with an overhead line.
July 30, 1965: One person, a child, was electrocuted while playing with a
hose adjacent to a water pump.
August 17, 1965: One person was electrocuted when a metal clothes-line being
strung from a trailer home came into contact with a power source.
September 21, 1965: One person was electrocuted when he accidentally or
otherwise removed a clamping-ring on a push-button device.
December 5, 1965: One person died from suffocation due to smoke from a
deficient heating-pad.
January 27, 1966: One person was electrocuted when climbing a distribution
power pole to rescue a cat.
February 7, 1966: One person was electrocuted after accidentally touching a
sump pump motor which was alive to the ground.
March 11, 1966: One person was electrocuted when a crane cable came into
contact with a 12-kilovolt power-line.
May I again express my appreciation for your splendid co-operation and
continued interest in our problems, and to your Departmental staff for valuable
assistance rendered during the year.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 41
REPORT OF
THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
There was an amendment made to the Gas Act, known as the Gas Act Amendment Act, 1966. This Act shall come into force and effect on a date to be fixed
by the Lieutenant-Governor by his Proclamation.
THE DIVISION
The offices of the three Safety Engineering Services branches were amalgamated
in Prince George, and the issuing of permits was transferred from the Government
Agent's office to the new office.
The Government Agents in Oliver, Fernie, Fort St. John, and Fort Nelson now
issue single-family dwelling permits.
A total of 17 Government Agents' offices now issue single-family dwelling
permits.
Night schools for Grade I gasfitters were held in Vancouver, Burnaby, Abbotsford, and Prince George, and night-school courses for Grade II fitters were held in
Burnaby and Prince George.
The engineering drawings for the first liquefied natural-gas installation in Canada have been reviewed by this Branch. The liquefying of the gas and the primary
storage will be done in The Corporation of the Township of Richmond. The gas
will then be transported at atmospheric pressures and a temperature of minus 260° F.
to Squamish.   At Squamish it will be stored until it is required by the gas utility.
The Chief Inspector continues to represent the Province on the following Canadian Standards Association committees:
(1) The B149 Installation Code for Gas Burning Appliances and Equipment.
(2) The B200 Canadian Standards Association Sectional Committee on
Specifications for Certification of Gas Burning Appliances.
(3) The Subcommittee for the Design, Installation and Testing Section of the
Z184 Installation Code for Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping
Systems.
(4) The Task Force Committee of the B137.4 Plastic Piping for Gas Services,
and the B137.14 Recommended Practice for the Installation of Plastic
Pipe for Gas Service.
The B149 Committee meeting and the B200 Sectional Committee meeting
were held in April in Montreal and November in Winnipeg. The work of the B149
Committee in Montreal was to up-date the standards to keep abreast of the many
technological advances in the gas industry. The Winnipeg meeting was a special
meeting where the Committee, at the request of the liquefied petroleum-gas industry,
started the task of separating the liquefied petroleum-gas portion of the code from
the natural-gas portion. The Sectional Committee reviewed the proposed changes
in the Specifications for Certification of Gas Appliances.
As the industrial growth of the Province increased, more specialized gas-fired
equipment is required by industry. The three major testing laboratories—Canadian
Standards Association, Canadian Gas Association, and Underwriters' Laboratories
of Canada—do not have facilities to test specialized equipment, therefore field testing and certification of gas-fired equipment is done by this Branch.   Last year 1,319
  PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66
U 43
applications were made to this Branch for field certification of commercial and
industrial equipment. Seven hundred and twenty-three were certified without any
modification, 592 were required to modify the design in the field before being certified, and four pieces of equipment were rejected.
ACCIDENTS
Thirteen accidents and fires were investigated by this Branch where there were
no injuries and only minor fire losses.
Pilot lights on gas water-heaters and furnaces ignited gasoline or solvent
vapours in four cases. In one case an electrical extension cord shorted, burning
through the flexible metal range connector and lighting the escaping gas. In another
case a bed was placed against a room heater and the bed clothes caught fire. In
two cases malfunction of an automatic control caused the fire. In five cases the final
conclusions were that gas had not been involved. In Kelowna a major accident
occurred in which four persons were injured. This accident was caused by a defective pipe, and the ignition ,source was a relay controlling the refrigeration equipment.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1965/66
1964/65
1963/64
1,319
970
881
1,570
553
486
155
43
150
10,048
13,898
398
1,003
901
580
1,608
528
521
159
S4
1,010
834
2,021
1,661
516
513
Gasfitters' examinations	
169
46
116                   147
10,499        |      10,153
14,303                14,558
377                   688
1
A
. G. Kanee
n, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
 U 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LANGUAGES SPOKEN  BY MEMBERS
OF THE STAFF OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
Arabic (1).
Bosmian (1).
Chinese (1).
Croatian (2).
Danish (7).
Dutch (11).
Estonian (1).
Finnish (1).
Flemish (1).
French (15).
German (26).
Greek (1).
Hindi (2).
Hungarian (5).
Indonesian (1).
Icelandic (1).
Italian (3).
Japanese (1).
Norwegian (4).
Pakistani (1).
Polish (1).
Russian (1).
Serbian (1).
Slovenian (1).
Spanish (1).
Swedish (5).
Swiss (1).
Ukrainian (2).
Urdu (1).
Yiddish (1).
Yugoslavian (2).
The figures in parentheses are the number of staff members who speak the language indicated.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66
U 45
m
XW*'
:,m-&
X
*N?2viyillI
■■■'   ™£T3; ..
Jcc!
J&VSE&&
Facsimile of first dollar bills printed in British Columbia, December 1, 1859.
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alteration, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions, etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of
Public Works.
A. E. Rhodes,
Comptroller of Expenditure.
 U 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1965/66
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 286—Minister's Office   $27,648.33
Vote 287—Administration     217,549.36
Vote 288—Government Buildings (Maintenance)   6,417,069.96
Vote 290—Rentals   (Gross) 992,738.15
Vote 291—Safety  Inspection  Division,  Vancouver   (includes  Gas  Inspection
Steam Boiler Inspection, and Electrical Energy Inspection Branches)   777,555.44
(Gross) $8,432,561.24
Less credits—
Rentals and recoverable items, Government buildings, etc.   177,568.39
Repayable by commissions, boards, etc.—Rental Vote    77,759.59
$8,177,233.26
CAPITAL
Vote 289—Construction of Provincial Buildings (see expenditure by building,
listed below)  (Gross)  $10,512,563.58
Less Parliament Buildings parking-lot fees, etc.     49,170.50
Less Federal Government contributions—
Project No. 486-B—Museum and Archives Building, Victoria     $687,899.35
(Health Grants)  Project No. 31-B-10—Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital          59,713.33
Project No. 5-B-108—
Hillside Building, Essondale          69,277.50
Tranquille            156,000.00
972,890.18
$9,490,502.90
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance      $8,432,561.24
Capital -          10,512,563.58
$18,945,124.82
Less credits—
Maintenance       255,327.98
Capital           1,022,060.68
Net expenditure     $17,667,736.16
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Project No.                                                 Description Expenditure
453-B          Allco Infirmary, Haney    $124,730.00
517-B          Allison Pass Highways establishment—reroofing   12,877.00
458-B          Abbotsford Animal Pathology Building  91,857.51
421-B          Bull River Fish Hatchery    1,144,139.03
484-B          Burnaby Mental Health Centre—repairs to roofs and paved courts.... 9,972.11
299-B-2       Burnaby Vocational Training School—Public Works building  210,740.68
495-B         Cedarvale ferryman's residence  7,041.26
497-B          Chetwynd Weigh-scale Station, Department of Commercial Transport 26,980.19
Colony Farm—
6-B-34            Repairs to piggery        11,652.37
6-B-35            Silo and barn     43,100.08
6-B-36            Scullery and can-washing   95,703.46
6-B-37             Coquitlam River Bridge—repairs     5,125.05
457-B  Creston—Highways establishment  3,207.81
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66
U 47
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
25-B-12
25-B-13
151-B
468-B-l
5-B-102
5-B-108
5-B-116
5-B-119
5-B-121
5-B-123
5-B-131
5-B-132
5-B-133
5-B-350
451-B
512-B
482-B
485-B
289-B
467-B
384-B
123-B-5
123-B-12
450-B
499-B
426-B
79-B-10
79-B-ll
508-B
509-B
Description
Dellview Hospital—
Addition to boiler-house __
Roads, paths, and drainage	
Douglas Building, Victoria—cafeteria equipment	
Duncan—Government office building	
Essondale—
Alterations and renovations to kitchen and staff rooms,
477-B
528-B
464-B
494-B
501-B
518-B
492-B
414-B
496-B
49 8-B
519-B
534-B
39-B-18
39-B-62
39-B-63
39-B-65
39-B-66
39-B-69
382-B
487-B
385-B
500-B
31-B-9
31-B-10
31-B-12
dining-
room areas
Hillside Building 	
Landscaping, roads, parking, etc 	
Garbage-handling incinerator  	
Structural alterations 	
Renovations, Valleyview, Units 1, 2, and 3  —
Laundry equipment      —
Emergency electric power, boiler-house	
Admitting suite, Centre Lawn Building 	
Public Works building	
Fernie Courthouse—exterior restoration	
Department of  Finance — alterations  for   Mechanical  Tabulation
Branch    	
Fort Nelson—Government office building and residence	
Ganges—Government office building .._   	
General expenses (planning, surveys, supplies, etc.)   _
Golden—residence for Government Agent  	
Grounds improvement, various Government buildings (Provincial)..
Haney—
Development of grounds and irrigation	
Alterations, workshop area _ 	
Hope—additional lockup facilities	
Hutda Lake—prefabricated camp for use as a correction institution
Invermere—Provincial Government building    	
Jericho Hill School—
Dormitory unit and development 	
Classroom and Industrial Arts Building	
Kamloops—remodel certain buildings on the Department of National Defence site (for Attorney-General's Department)	
Kamloops—acquisition of former Royal Canadian Navy ammunition depot (including watchman's services and special maintenance services)   	
Kaslo—purchase of property for Government Agent's residence	
Air Lands Service (water services to process laboratory).
Lee Avenue, Victoria—mental hospital (includes purchase of property and preliminary design	
Lillooet—Government Agent's residence	
Lillooet—Department of Highways house	
Liquor Warehouse, Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria—purchase
and remodelling	
Motor-vehicle Building, Victoria—Data Processing Centre	
Nelson Courthouse—renewal of heating system	
Nelson—renovations to Highways district office  __
Nelson—Highways residence   	
New Denver Dormitory—alterations  	
New Westminster Courthouse—external renovations  	
Oakalla—
Security fence ~   	
Roads (drainage and parking)  	
Additional gaol facilities (Westgate)  	
Renovations to kitchen   	
Conversion to gas    	
Roofing (Westgate)   	
Oliver Courthouse   	
Parliament Buildings Precinct—acquisition of property	
Parliament Buildings—parking facilities
Parliament Buildings Area—purchase of certain property and preparing it for parking  	
Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital—
Modifications     	
Activity room	
Boiler plant  .  	
Expenditure
$18,282.36
11,000.00
5,504.63
108,485.95
22,293.37
241,843.32
43,242.16
176,450.77
46,015.01
131.00
16,906.74
526.79
41,343.63
10,881.86
6,954.60
12,251.50
314,103.39
186,271.95
348,021.32
2,769.00
50,410.93
7,321.63
1,496.71
6,619.70
532.16
19,272.78
94,546.94
96,116.44
10,155.33
414,082.81
3,752.35
1,723.74
77,594.20
14,425.20
14,575.18
191,154.95
111,805.61
39,893.82
5,691.50
10,294.95
80,785.29
1,183.56
2,249.49
7,988.73
19,328.61
30,027.22
5,578.59
122,248.11
8,039.38
7,645.00
38,253.97
304,379.62
5,137.63
251,260.09
1,175.85
 U 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
471-B
479-B
418-B
470-B
505-B
491-B
437-B
455-B
452-B
504-B
24-B-6
24-B-8
24-B-10
427-B
10-B-12
10-B-41
10-B 44
10-B-49
10-B-50
10-B-51
10-B-52
408-B
488-B
537-B
476-B
489-B
438-B
292-B
486-B
7-B-40
7-B-46
7-B-47
369-B
401-B
507-B
299-B
299-B-3
481-B
412-B
429-B
407-B
511-B
513-B
530-B
415-B
419-B
526-B
428-B
405-B
420-B
523-B
370-B
393-B
Description
Penticton—Department of Highways garage and yard site	
Prince George area, Zone No. 5—structural alterations	
Prince George Courthouse—sun screens 	
Prince George—addition to men's gaol	
Prince George—Department of Highways, office manager's residence
Prince George—weigh-scale station	
Prince Rupert—exterior restoration 	
Quesnel Courthouse 	
Revelstoke Courthouse—exterior restoration 	
Ruskin Women's Prison (Twin Maples Farm) 	
Skeenaview Hospital—
Laundry equipment    	
Water supply 	
Alterations and renovations 	
Smithers Government Agent's residence   	
Tranquille School—
Water supply and sewage disposal	
Alterations to main building    	
Renovations to boiler-house	
Playground	
Conversion of additional facilities	
104-bed unit 	
Extension to kitchen facilities 	
Vancouver area—structural alterations	
Vancouver Civic Square—acquisition of property	
Vancouver Courthouse—Centennial Terrace 	
Vancouver Island Gaol   	
Vancouver—Pesticide Laboratory 	
Vernon Courthouse—exterior restoration	
Victoria area—structural alterations 	
Victoria—Museum and Archives  	
Woodlands School—
Landscaping, fencing, paving, etc.  	
Structural alterations   	
Sound system  (Credit)
Education—College of Education, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver  	
Vocational—
Institute of Technology, Burnaby 	
Vocational Teacher College,  Burnaby  (completely recovered
from Department of Education) 	
Burnaby Vocational School (completely recovered from Department of Education)   	
Burnaby Vocational School—trowel trades and painting shop
(to be recovered from Department of Education in 1966/67)
Dawson Creek Vocational School (to be recovered from Department of Education in 1966/67) 	
Kelowna Vocational School (to be recovered from Department
of Education in 1966/67)     	
Nelson Vocational School (to be recovered from Department of
Education in 1966/67) 	
Terrace Vocational School (to be recovered from Department
of Education in 1966/67) 	
Terrace Vocational School—sewer and water (completely recovered from Department of Education)   	
Victoria Vocational School (completely recovered from Department of Education)   	
Highways, garages, etc.—
Aleza Lake—two-bay shed  	
Albert Canyon—equipment and fuel sheds 	
Beaverdell—oil-house and pumps 	
Bowen Island—one-bay storage shed  	
Cedarvale—three-bay shed and oil-house	
Cloverdale—centre lining storage building 	
Maintenance depot at Dease Lake 	
Denman Island—one-bay storage shed 	
Gabriola Island—one-bay storage shed	
Galiano Island—one-bay storage shed	
Expenditure
$1,941.60
15,714.80
23,060.16
350,902.64
21,104.11
9,334.93
6,363.74
514,297.93
942.50
37,121.74
315.29
17,687.57
15,140.77
14,203.55
10,000.00
50,028.15
10,000.00
9,965.03
8,000.00
841,533.68
348,067.65
49,411.14
49,786.40
14,665.98
4,484.68
5,807.28
25,000.00
73,177.09
1,837,843.70
9,555.43
27,755.39
850.00
215,359.82
383.03
Nil
Nil
19,212.11
2,961.82
39.50
498.49
30,072.30
Nil .
Nil
12,073.75
9,436.65
3,005.00
4,000.00
16,439.69
28,000.00
99,712.62
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66 U 49
VOTE 289—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                  Description Expenditure
Highways, garages, etc.—Continued
533-B Good Hope Lake—three-bay shed  _. $44,036.52
402-B Greenwood—oil-house   2,995.00
493-B Hazelton—foreman mechanic's residence   10,500.00
516-B Hixon—two-bay equipment-shed  12,000.00
531-B Honeymoon Camp—oil-shed   3,812.05
522-B Hornby Island—one-bay storage shed  4,000.00
521-B Jordan River—two-bay storage shed, oil-shed, and fuel pumps  1,332.03
525-B Lasqueti Island—one-bay storage shed  4,000.00
527-B Madeira Park—three-bay storage shed  11,829.45
529-B New Hazelton—two-bay storage shed  10,107.59
510-B Pattullo Bridge buildings    22,000.00
377-B Pender Island—one-bay storage shed  4,000.00
490-B Port Hardy—road maintenance foreman accommodation  4,500.00
524-B Quadra Island—one-bay storage shed  4,000.00
532-B Rolla—oil-shed     3,831.71
349-B Salmo—three-bay shed and oil-house  27,737.22
378-B Saturna Island—one-bay storage shed   4,000.00
520-B Texada Island—two-bay storage shed, oil-shed, and fuel pumps 13,170.55
515-B Wells—one-bay extension and oil-shed and new garage doors.— 11,999.78
$10,512,563.58
 U 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
FOR BUILDINGS
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
Tranquille School, 104-bed unit, Tranquille:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd..
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd 	
Bennett & White Construction (1962) Ltd..
Narod Construction Ltd..
Irrigation System, Animal Pathology Laboratory, Abbotsford:
Pacific Pipe & Flume Ltd  _.	
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd	
Terra Irrigation Ltd.	
Irrigation System, Jericho Hill School, Vancouver:
Terra Irrigation Ltd  —	
Pacific Pipe & Flume Ltd	
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd.. ~. -	
British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek:
Dyke Construction Ltd.	
British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase I:
Wakeman & Trimble Contractors Ltd _	
Chew Excavating Ltd... — -	
Landscaping Boulevard Area, College of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver:
Jensen & Johnsen	
Holland Landscapers Ltd	
Silo and Barn, Colony Farm, Essondale:
Western Building Ltd _.	
Newland Construction & Development Ltd..
Hall Construction Ltd	
Cain Truscott Contractors.	
Weigh-scale Station, Chetwynd:
Lawrick Construction Ltd..—	
Dyke Construction Ltd..
Centre Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
Lickley, Johnson, Palmer Construction Ltd	
Kennett Construction Ltd	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Hall Construction Ltd ...	
Western Building Ltd.. —
Renovations to Heating Systems, Courthouse and Land Registry Building,
Nelson:
Whitticks Mechan'cal Contractors Ltd _	
British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase 11 (Supplying and
Erection of Steel):
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd..    	
Canada Iron Foundries Ltd. (Western Bridge Division)	
A.I.M. Steel Ltd	
Addition to Men's Gaol, Prince George:
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd ..	
Marpole Construction Co	
Heart Construction Ltd	
Poole Construction Ltd	
Alterations and Renovations, R.C.M.P. Building, Invermere:
G. Hirschfield	
Windvall Builders Ltd	
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Site Extension (1965), Burnaby:.	
G. W. Led ngham & Co. Ltd. 	
H.B. Contracting Ltd   	
Exterior Restorations, North-west and South Elevators, Courthouse, Prince
Rupert:
B.C. Tuckpointing Ltd.     	
Exterior Renovations, Courthouse, Vernon:
Gustavos Construction Ltd	
B.C. Tuckpointing Ltd 	
Scullery, Colony Farm, Essondale:
Hall Construction Ltd	
Lickley, Johnson, Palmer Construction Ltd  	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Western Building Ltd     	
$995,000.00
983,400.00
978,923.00
928.817.00
926,851.00
Awarded.
8,769.00
5,359.00    j Awarded.
7,120.00    ;
14,843.20
17,405.00
18,497.00
Awarded.
768,200.00    ; Not awarded.
188.219.00
169,328.81
6,724.00
8,934.00
41,000.00
52,840.00
42,220.00
42,873.00
26,842.00
22,880.00
159,622.00
163,200.00
152,673.00
144,230.00
154,453.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
'. Awarded.
I
I
39,700.00    | Awarded.
I
I
1,093,694.40 |
1,095,086.70 j
1,079,813.60    j Awarded.
I Awarded.
978,400.00
993,092.00 j
1,088,447.00 j
1,039,900.00 |
16,443.00 ! Awarded.
20,975.00 |
I
515,000.00 ;
459,885.00 Awarded.
19,878.00    ! Awarded.
33,971.00
21,782.00
123,135.00
123,694.00
129,894.00
128,581.00
! Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1965/66                                       U 51
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase III:
R. A. Hall Ltd.	
$107,770.85
123,986.75
110,929.33
107,574.00
415,000.00
432,000.00
418,900.00
43,909.00
63,892.00
57,750.00
990,879.00
943,000.00
218,000.00
221,600.00
214,000.00
213,810.00
33,471.60
24,085.00
957,000.00
945,680.00
107,418.00
110,964.00
108,350.00
95,757.91
102,555.00
102,486.00
109,675.00
224,962.00
224,700.00
114,170.65
322,922.00
208,276.00
186,488.00
183,635.00
123,133.00
271,882.00
173,054.00
37,493.00
30,439.00
49,793.00
48,423.00
356,980.00
389,463.00
1,535,858.00
1,69,6,822.00
1,364,000.00
1,495,000.00
1,460,152.00
1,457,156.00
72,969.15
59,900.00
91,673.55
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.                                  	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
Trowel Trades Building, British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby:
Modifications, Forest Products Laboratory, B.C.I.T., Burnaby:
Mechanical Installations Co. Ltd	
Classroom and Administration Building, British Columbia  Vocational School,
Terrace:
Public Works Maintenance Building, Burnaby:
A. W. Gillis Ltd.                                                             	
Improvements to Sewers and Water Mains (1965), Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace:
New Kitchen and Dining Facilities, Tranquille School, Tranquille:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.               	
Data Processing Centre, Menzies Street, Victoria:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd             	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
M. P. Paine Co.
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.
R. A. Hall Ltd	
Men's Camp, Hutda Lake, Prince George, and Women's Camp, Raskin:
Men's Camp:
Apex Holdings Ltd. and State Construction & Engineering Ltd	
Bennett & White Construction (1962) Ltd                   	
Women's Camp:
Bennett & White Construction (1962) Ltd	
Atco Industries Ltd	
Sawmill, British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George:
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd	
Highways Establishment, Vanderhoof:
British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek:
Provincial Government Offices, Duncan, Phase II:
D. Robinson Construction (1952) Ltd.           	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.                       	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd	
British Columbia Museum and Archives, Phase ///A.Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.
C. J. Oliver Ltd	
R. A. Hall Ltd....
 U 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
Confederation Gardens, Victoria:
Ornamental Bronze Co.....  	
Birmingham Guild	
Bernhard Zackerman 	
Smith Bros. Foundry & Machine Works..
Jas. E. Saull	
Morris Singer Co..
Landscape Development and Plant Material for Centennial Terrace, Courthouse, Vancouver:
Holland Landscapers Ltd	
Jensen & Johnsen Landscape Contractors Ltd	
Demolition of Houses on Lee Avenue:
Mattison & Patterson Ltd _	
Chew Excavating Ltd..	
Gordon Smith and Douglas Carvell	
Oliver Equipment Service & Supply Ltd  	
Jenson Bulldozing Ltd.....	
Jim Dandy Cleanup Service	
Apex Demolition 	
O.K. Trucking Co. Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd ._	
Clearing, Grubbing, and Rough Grading, Vancouver Courthouse Grounds,
Vancouver:
Holland Landscapers Ltd.
Jensen & Johnsen Landscape Contractors Ltd	
Casano & Sons Bulldozing Nanaimo Ltd	
Alterations to Main Kitchen, Oakalla Prison Farm, Phase II1:
Cain Truscott Contractors Ltd	
Kelsey Construction Ltd..
Royal City Construction Co. Ltd..
Highland Construction..
Maintenance of Grounds, Provincial Government Properties, Mission:
H. G. Fehst	
Valley Landscapers.
Jensen & Johnsen Landscape Contractors Ltd	
Bakerview Gardens  _
Maintenance   of   Grounds,   Provincial   Government   Properties,    Courthouse,
Quesnel:
Richbar Nursery 	
Holland Landscapers Ltd -.
Maintenance   of   Grounds,   Provincial   Government   Properties,
Oliver:
F. W. Hack & Sons Ltd  ...
Holland Landscapers Ltd..
Courthouse,
Maintenance of Grounds, Provincial Government Properties, Animal Pathology
Laboratory, Abbotsford:
H. G. Fehst	
Jensen & Johnsen Landscape Contractors Ltd _	
Bakerview Gardens 	
Valley Landscapers	
$17,936.00
22,668.71
25,500.00
22,671.12
21,725.19
46,926.26
11,652.00
17,927.00
2,434.00
2,972.00
1.400.00
5,980.00
4,412.00
3,200.00
.50
1,250.00
3,226.00
6,970.00
5,985.00
10,990.00
45,700.00
41,650.00
29,878.00
43,040.00
2,640.00
9,450.00
6,776.00
9,194.36
7,000.00
8,475.60
8,200.00
14,850.00
10,773.40
8,305.00
Incomplete bid.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
No bond.
No bond.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
No bond.
No bond.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
410-167-1371

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