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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Minister A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS, AERIAL
TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
and ACCIDENT PREVENTION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1966
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  Victoria, B.C., January 24, 1967.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department
of Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1966.
R. W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, B.C., January 16, 1967.
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1966.
A. J. BOWERING, B.A.Sc, P.Eng.,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1966
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
INTRODUCTION
The year 1966 was one of notable activity, progress, and achievement in the
Department, in keeping with and contributing to the dynamic growth of the Provincial industrial economy.
Three major pulp-mills commenced operations during the year, and construction continues at a fast pace on several others to place British Columbia among the
leaders of the world as a supplier of pulp and paper products.
The advent of these new pulp-mills created a need for an economic means of
transporting large volumes of chips from sawmills to the pulp-mills. As always,
the versatility of the trucking industry showed its ability to cope with this situation
on a short-haul basis; however, railway transportation proved to be more economical for long-distance hauling.
As a result, a new secondary industry has developed in Vancouver, where
several hundred railway cars were built for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and
the Canadian National Railway. Many of these cars were specifically designed to
haul bulk pulp chips and logs. Others were built to carry piggy-back loads, and
special tankers were designed and built for transporting malt and chlorine.
We are well aware, of course, of the progress made to date in the development
of hydro-electric power through the construction of the mammoth dam on the Peace
River in Northern British Columbia and the Duncan, Arrow, and Mica storage
projects in the Southern Interior of the Province. These major industrial projects
speak for themselves; however, of prime consideration is the upsurge in secondary
business activity generated as a direct result of these projects. Of particular interest
to the Department was the over-all increase in transportation of large and extremely
heavy loads, which required particular attention by Departmental staff.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway continues to serve the northern reaches of
the Province by providing transportation service into the newly developed areas of
Mackenzie and Alexander, while the older-established community of Fort St. James
is to be better served by the new extension now under construction.
Recreational areas which cannot be economically served by conventional
means have gained prominence over the past several years, and during 1966,
through co-operation between the Department and the aerial-tramway industry,
great strides have been made in the standardization of ski-ing facilities and their
operation.
Two outstanding examples in this regard are the development of the vast recreational area of Mount Whistler in Garibaldi Park and the " Sky Ride " on Grouse
Mountain, on the northern shores of the City of Vancouver. Many other areas of
the Province now offer outstanding facilities, enabling not only the ski-ing fraternity
but the public at large to enjoy British Columbia's vast winter playground.
The pipe-line industry has enjoyed a steady growth during the year in the
recognized oil and natural-gas fields of the Province, where 68 miles of gathering
pipe-lines were installed.   In addition, 39 miles of crude-oil transmission-line were
 FF 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
built and 56 miles of gas distribution-lines were constructed. Increased export of
natural gas will mean additional facilities will be required in 1967, and increased
crude-oil exploration and production may mean further pipe-lines will be necessary.
New lower tariff rates on the Western Pacific Products & Crude Oil Pipelines Ltd.
line will provide an additional incentive to the crude-oil industry.
All branches of the Department have been extremely active during the past
year, and we look forward with keen interest to the assured continued expansion
in industrial and commercial aspects of the Provincial economy.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
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 FF 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
(Licensing and Operations)
R. A. Hadfield, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
F. J. Regan, Director of Operations
Licensing of commercial vehicles and commercial trailers is carried out under
the direction of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, who, through a network of
motor licence offices and Government Agents, not only issues the majority of the
licences, but also retains in the main motor licence office at Victoria the necessary
reference system for the operation of the Department.
Quarterly licences for logging-trucks are issued at weigh-stations throughout
the Province. The logging industry now makes extensive use of this type of licence,
and there is no doubt that this flexibility has been a factor that has worked to the
economic advantage of the forest industry. At some border points, weigh-stations
issue regular commercial truck and trailer licences on a renewable basis. This has
been an advantage to operators of out-of-Province based vehicles that regularly
run through and are fully licensed in the Province of British Columbia.
Our weigh-station at Chetwynd has assumed the responsibility of issuing all
types of renewable motor-vehicle licences. This task was undertaken as a convenience to the general public in the area as the nearest motor licence office is at Dawson
Creek, 65 miles away.
Additional licensing on a temporary basis and other types of permits are issued
at all weigh-stations throughout the Province. As some of these stations are operating on a 24-hour basis, this service is proving to be most helpful, not only to the
trucking industry, but to the general public.
Revenue collected from commercial-vehicle licences increased for the 1965/66
licence-year by approximately 10 per cent over the previous year. As there were
no changes in fees, this represents a larger number of new trucks on Provincial
highways. The average increase has been between 4 and 5 per cent. There is no
doubt that some of this increased number is due to a fuller utilization of forest products. Records show that there were 143,927 power units and 10,723 trailers
registered during this period, including farm vehicles but excluding vehicles operating under reciprocity agreements.
During the 1965/66 licence-year there were 675 new registrations of farm
trucks and 9,495 renewals. For the same period there were 406 new registrations
of farm tractors and 2,489 renewals.
INTERPROVINCIAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS
During the year an arrangement was finalized with the Province of Quebec
providing reciprocity for trucks operating in the movement of used household goods.
This arrangement has assisted the segment of the local industry that is engaged in
the movement of personal effects.
The prorate agreement with 16 American States has operated satisfactorily
during the period under review, and there are now 2,649 extra-provincial vehicles
registered under this agreement. This represents an increase of 30 per cent over
the previous year.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 9
OPERATIONS
One of the prime factors contributing to the sustained economic activity of the
Province of British Columbia has been the existence of a commercial trucking industry that has been able to adapt and meet the heavy demands placed on it in
recent years.
It has been the function of the Department of Commercial Transport to assist
and encourage this development by close liaison with other Government departments and industry itself, encouraging trends that will enable, with due regard to
the public safety and the proper protection of the bridge and highway system, the
trucking industry to remain competitive and healthy.
In 1966 the Department of Commercial Transport Act was brought before
the House and revised, and several amendments were made to the regulations during
the year. All were made with the view to removing ambiguity and giving statutory
authority to practices that were necessary in order to keep industry competitive and
operating in a safe and reasonable manner.
During the year a general information pamphlet was published and distributed.
It was well received by industry, especially in regard to the usual safety requirements
necessary when transporting oversize loads, which is and always will be a most
difficult area of responsibility.
On September 20, 1966, the Act and regulations were consolidated for convenience and published by the Queen's Printer. This is the first publication since
1961, and it is the intention of the Department to publish consolidations as they
become necessary. Due to the changes in industry and highway development within
the Province, it is foreseen that it will be more necessary to amend the regulations
made pursuant to the Act in the future than in the past.
One of the main responsibilities of the Weigh-scale Branch is the granting of
permits for the movement of oversize and overweight loads by commercial vehicles
on Provincial highways. The granting of these permits requires the approval of
the Department of Highways, and, in many cases, due to the safety factors involved,
the approval and assistance in traffic control of local police forces when the movement is on arterial highways within municipalities, and the assistance and approval
of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police when operations are being carried out on
other Provincial roads.
The area west of Hope presents a particularly difficult problem in the movement of this extraordinary traffic. Not only does this area contain the majority of
motor-vehicles that are registered in the Province, but it also has the two freeway
systems as well as the majority of important bridge crossings. As the usefulness
of these systems and bridges is dependent upon their ability to carry a maximum
traffic load, it follows that extraordinary traffic that tends to form bottlenecks must
be routed to alternate highways, or so restricted to time of travel so that as not to
interfere with the traffic that the facilities were primarily designed for. Extraordinarily large loads tend to disrupt the normal traffic flow; however, extraordinarily heavy loads have some effect, for as the weight of the load increases
there is a corresponding decrease in speed of movement. In the past year well in
excess of 600 such loads have been routed under conditions that have met with
the maximum demand for safety and minimum of public inconvenience.
In order to move this type of traffic, it is necessary to provide escort cars and
pilot cars to warn the general public and to effect traffic control while the loads are
executing turning movements in restricted areas. This necessity has led to the
development of a sizeable secondary industry which specializes in providing this type
of service; however, in order to achieve some uniformity of practice, it has become
 FF 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A 6,000-h.p. engine being moved from railway siding by truck to Westcoast Transmission Company compressor-station near Chetwynd. Engine dimensions: Length, 40
feet; height, 14 feet; weight, 160 tons. Special trailer (width, 12 feet; length, 59 feet)
equipped with thirty-four 1200 x 20 wheels.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 11
Typical long load being moved on the Provincial highway.   Note the pilot cars
front and back.
necessary to recommend to the Minister the standards for pilot cars and escort cars
be set out by regulation.
The industrial factors that have affected the trucking industry in the past year
are the same ones that have given the industry its main impetus over the past 10
years; that is, the unprecedented industrial development in the Province of British
Columbia.
The power projects presently being built in the Province are not only, in the
main, dependent upon the trucking industry for the actual building and servicing of
the sites, but have created a forest industry that is concerned with the harvesting of
the flood-area timber, and as this industry is also dependent upon trucks for its
development and continuation, the result has been an expansion both in the forest
hauling and in the freight hauling. It is anticipated that this level of activity will
continue not only throughout the life of the power projects, but the resultant industrial development in the forest-products field will be of a permanent nature.
The pulp and paper industry is to a large extent serviced by trucks, and its
expansion programme shows no indication of letting up. Not only does the trucking
industry benefit from the actual construction of these plants, but their establishment
has led to a regular time-tabled chip haul to supply the raw products. Experimentation in the field of portable chippers at logging sites is under way, and if this technique proves to be of economic benefit in this Province, it will lead to an increased
use of large chip-haul combinations which now travel some Provincial highways at
a gross weight of up to 99,000 pounds.
This increase in chip trucks is not expected to decrease the truck-logging haul,
as the requirements of the industry for raw products is so great that any technique
that will increase the availability of the product to the manufacturer will not affect
the present established practices.
The oil and natural-gas drilling activity for the 1966/67 season has expanded
in the north-east section of the Province. When one considers that from 6 to 15
trucks are necessary to service and haul one drilling rig, it is apparent that this
increase in exploration can do nothing other than add to the existing truck traffic.
 FF 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
• . .„•.......
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Two of the many oversize loads moved over the Provincial highways during the year.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1966 FF 13
and heavy machinery in the Peace River area.   Some of SacSrv^aTS
P00ColeqU1PmHent ^ rieCeSSary t0 fabricate the new Plan^ hZ S £L?ol
300 000 pounds and have been carried out with all of the necessary safeguarTboth
for the general public and for the highways and bridges concerned   ^^ b°th
lumbJrhh^TeH?d USC °f aSSTWy d0cks' Particul*rly in the shipment of export
lumber, has led to a corresponding build-up in the number of trucks necessarv to
haul export lumber to these stockpile areas. necessary to
Steady improvements both of the highways and bridges in the Province have
resuhed in an increased use of these facilities both in the line-haul segmem of the
ruckmg xndustry and in the transportation of oversize and overweighUoads As
he highways of the Province are the prime controlling factor in the develooment of
et ^trwCIdbThT-th;progress in const™tion -3££SEi2
e!ttw b    y, * by mduStry and ^ this Department with a view to the
establishment as soon as possible, of interprovincial routes of uniform Sards
artl'l roT" UtiUZati°n * ^ ^ maximum loads «^£
the nl^ofT^T jnd^try haS'ln the paSt year' continued experimenting with
the use of bunk scales. Their gradual acceptance in the Province willTeacT to
a maximum pay load with a minimum of inconvenience to the mdTsrv    C
momentum11 aid the^ * **« " ** *"* **"* ^ JKtSkJfc
aZ fT'T   ?  e arC n°W m excess of 70 such scales operated by industry
Apart from the advantage to be gained in this method of scalL it is Ludoated
that wrth a more accurate knowledge of the actual weight involved' operaS will
m
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New ferry connections to Alaska
increase road use.
 FF 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
be in a position to conform more closely to the standards as set out in the Act and
regulations.
One additional weigh-scale station has been added at Midway. This unit is a
one-man operation, and it is presently a control point and permanent issuing office
on the Southern Trans-Canada Highway. Stations at Cache Creek and Vanderhoof
were reopened in order to keep pace with the increased demands for permits and to
provide control points on the respective highways.
Replacement stations at Fort St. John and Rossland were constructed to provide more adequate facilities at those points. Arrangements have been made with
the Department of Highways for a weigh-scale station at Castlegar. This station is
expected to be in operation on a part-time basis in 1967.
Considerable maintenance work was carried out at the weigh-scale sites both
to the buildings themselves and to the approach roads. At the present time there
are three operating stations that require improvements to their facilities. One factor
that has caused delay in this regard is the uncertainty of the permanency of the
stations and the consequent reluctance to spend funds at points which may be
abandoned because of changes in industry or highways.
Our portable operations have been increased by one additional unit stationed
in the East Kootenay District of the Province. This unit provides for better control
and liaison between other Provincial departments and industry and supplements
the weigh-scale operations at Golden, Fernie, and Yahk. There are at the present
time 30 permanent weigh-scales and seven portable operations at work in the Province plus four stations that are operated on a part-time basis.
The issuance of quarterly licences to logging-trucks, as well as restricted-route
permits, have increased the duties performed by members of this Department at the
weigh-scale sites. Not only are trucks weighed and measured, but permits of all
types are issued, surveys are undertaken both for this Department and for other
departments, annual licence renewals both for trucks and trailers are issued at our
border points, and inspections are carried out on behalf of the Department of Agriculture under the Stock Brands Act and on behalf of the Superintendent of Motor
Carriers under the Motor Carrier Act. A great deal of assistance is rendered the
Consumer Taxation Branch of the Finance Department in the checking of vehicles
at border points under the provisions of the Social Services Tax Act and in liaison
with members of that Department. In a similar manner, a great deal of enforcement
under the Motive-fuel Use Tax Act is carried out by members at the weigh-stations
and by the portable units. It is fair to say that the stations provide a convenient
point of contact for the trucking industry in all matters relating to road use. Five
of these stations are operated on a 24-hour basis, while others operate on a 16-hour
or 8-hour basis. As road traffic increases and the number of vehicles increases,
along with the demands of industry for more adequate service, it will become necessary to proportionately increase the weigh-scale staff.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966                  FF 15
PERMIT ISSUING OFFICES
Weigh-scales
Cache Creek.
Kamloops.
Ruskin.
Chetwynd.
Midway.
Rutland.
Dawson Creek.
Pacific.
Saanich.
Deas Island North.
Parksville.
Sicamous.
Deas Island South.
Pattullo Bridge.
Tupper Creek.
Duncan.
Port Mann East.
Vanderhoof.
Fernie.
Port Mann West.
Vernon.
Fort St. John.
Prince George North.
Victoria (term permits).
Golden.
Prince George South.
Williams Lake.
Hunter Creek.
Quesnel.
Yahk.
Kaleden.
Rossland.
Portable Patrols
Cranbrook.
Okanagan.
Prince George.
Lower Mainland.
Peace River.
Victoria.
Nelson.
Department of Finance Government Agents
Alberni.
Invermere.
Prince George.
Ashcroft.
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert.
Atlin.
Kaslo.
Princeton.
Burns Lake.
Kelowna.
Quesnel.
Clinton.
Kitimat.
Revelstoke.
Courtenay.
Lillooet.
Rossland.
Cranbrook.
Merritt.
Salmon Arm.
Creston.
Nanaimo.
Sechelt.
Duncan.
Nelson.
Smithers.
Fernie.
New Denver.
Terrace.
Fort Nelson.
New Westminster.
Vancouver.
Fort St. John.
Oliver.
Vanderhoof.
Golden.
Penticton.
Vernon.
Grand Forks.
Pouce Coupe.
Victoria.
Gulf Islands (Gang<
js).     Powell River.
Williams Lake.
Motor-vehicle Branch Office
Abbotsford.
Mission.
Vancouver (Main).
Chilliwack.
New Westminster.
Vancouver (East).
Cloverdale.
North Vancouver.
Vancouver
Dawson Creek.
Squamish.
(Point Grey).
Kamloops.
Trail.
Miscellaneous
Victoria.
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
Engineering Branch
, Department of Commercial
Transport, Vancouver.
 FF 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation )
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer
RAILWAYS
The Engineering Branch, responsible for the administration of railways, pipelines, and industrial transportation, has been exceptionally busy during the year
1966. Facilities of the Branch have been taxed to the fullest, and during the early
part of the year it was necessary to engage two additional Inspecting Engineers to
cope with the work. The work being diversified, a great deal of training was
necessary to acquaint these new men with the various facets of the Branch, including
pipe-line inspection, railway inspection, locomotive inspection, aerial-tramway inspection, as well as the training and teaching of personnel throughout industry
with respect to truck-driving, locomotive engineers' and railway conductors' duties,
and, in addition, the instruction of tramway operators for the ski areas throughout
the Province.
A few years ago it was assumed railways were on their way out; however, the
use of railways has increased, not only on the main lines, but in the port areas. The
movement of potash and sulphur from the Prairie Provinces to the seaboard at the
West Coast has prompted the installation of large dock facilities in the Lower Mainland area of British Columbia, where these bulk commodities are loaded on ships
destined for various parts of the world. Some of the wharf-sites utilize up to 12
miles of railway, while others use shorter railways, conveyer systems, and specialized
mechanized loaders. The railway personnel employed require special training, and
it is the duty of this Branch to instruct and train them, as well as to inspect and
offer constructive criticism where required.
The advent of a number of new pulp-mills throughout the Province has increased the industrial-railway installations, so that several of the pulp-mills now
use locomotives and switch their own plants with their own train crews. This has
necessitated an accelerated programme of training on the part of our engineers,
as they have been required in a number of cases to train the railway crews on the
job, especially where such dangerous commodities as chlorine and ammonia are
being handled by railway tank cars.
The movement of propane has, due to the industrial expansion, been accelerated over the past year, and a number of technical problems have been encountered.
At Squamish, liquid petroleum gas was loaded from railway tank cars to specially
designed ocean-going vessels for export to Japan. The movement and storage of
the propane tank cars presented a problem as municipalities were skeptical as to
public safety where large volumes of this commodity were being stored and handled.
In some cases it was necessary to discuss the problem with the Council of the
municipality concerned.
With regard to the handling of propane by railways, some tank cars were
shipped from Alberta where they were loaded in sub-zero weather, and when these
arrived at the Coast the tanks were filled beyond the normal capacity, causing a
hydrostatic condition. As a result, some of the tanks leaked, and it was necessary
to flare the tanks in order to minimize the public danger. As this is a complicated
procedure, meetings were held at the Fire Marshal's office, and as a result a special
 Training centre for railwaymen at the Chief Engineer's office, 636 Burrard Street
Vancouver where a complete locomotive air-brake system of two railway cars Ts set m
X th°Slby C°TeSSe? aif l° inSt™Ct railw^ l«»n,otive enguS Z^^ trainmen
d,»?J^ f°r,erUndlS a handubrake as »*d on box cars, and at the right is a ectoe
systeml Pr°JeCt°r '" the CCntre f°r teaching the various *«K*ioL of airbtk
technical committee was set up to act in any emergency where a tank car is con
btwLtT0"!- In additi°n' f°Ur dep°tS Were Set »P throughout BritishColumbia where specia equipment is stored for the handling of this equipment durine
emergency conditions when propane tank cars present a danger. The 5S selected
by the committee are Vancouver, Prince George, Kamloops, and NeSm
In co-operation with the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles and the Provincial
Fire Marshal   a second technical committee was set up to study any danTrou
condition which might arise with respect to the transportation o/dangerons com
modiues such as propane or chlorine where they are transported by tank trucks on
KlTduring^^™66 WaS fUnCti°ning by the end of 1966 and will continue
The advent of new pulp-mills throughout the Province necessitated the design
of special cars to handle pulp logs and pulp chips. Special designs were approved
by our engineers, and m most cases the cars were built in Vancouver, where they
were inspected during construction. In addition, a number of high-pressure railway
tank cars are being built m Vancouver, and these require to be inspected during
construction by our engineers as they are pressure vessels and fall within the A A R
Code used by the railways throughout North America.
 FF 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In addition to propane, the storage of oil and flammable liquids adjacent to
railways has presented many problems during the year as it was assumed in the
past that the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada handled all such installations where they were adjacent to transcontinental railways. However, during
1966 the Board pointed out to the Engineering Branch of this Department that
where such installations were not actually located on the right-of-way of an interprovincial railway, the installation was a Provincial matter and came within Provincial jurisdiction. As a result, our engineers obtained a list from the Board of
Transport Commissioners and made inspections of approximately 25 such installations at various locations in the Province. In a number of cases certain work was
required to up-grade the installations to assure public safety.
The increase in pulp-mills also increased the number of logging-trucks used,
particularly in the northern and Interior parts of the Province. This in turn increased the number of men required to be trained and the number of trucks requiring
inspection.
It should also be pointed out the inspection work of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway required to be stepped up during the year as the railway company has increased its facilities by the addition of large railway yards and industrial estates in
order to cope with the increased traffic generated by the addition of new pulp-mills
on or adjacent to the railway.
In the mountain playground areas, ski-ing has increased to the point where
there were by the end of 1966 over 40 areas in the Province where aerial tramways,
ski tows, and rope tows were in operation. A number of new facilities were built
during the year, and as a result our engineers and inspectors were kept busy in the
field and in the office approving designs and inspecting facilities as constructed.
In this regard a new Canadian Standards Association Code is being put into effect
in an effort to improve public safety in this field of transportation. A number of
new innovations were insisted upon for the 1966/67 ski-ing season to bring facilities up to the new code requirements.
While the foregoing is intended to give a general idea of the work encompassed
for the year, the following presents a broader spectrum of the work accomplished.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Chief Engineer's Report
During the first two weeks in September, the annual fall inspection of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway was made in company with the assistant manager,
the chief engineer, and other officials of the company. The trip was made by track
motors in two companies, from North Vancouver to Fort St. John and Dawson
Creek, from Summit Lake to the end of the Fort St. James extension, and from
Kennedy to the end of the Kennedy spur line to Alexander and Mackenzie.
In the second week of August, in accordance with section 179 of the Railway
Act, the newly constructed Kennedy spur line of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
was inspected and pronounced safe to haul revenue tariff, and consequently it was
officially opened for traffic by Order in Council on August 15th. This branch line
serves the two new towns of Alexander and Mackenzie, where two new pulp-mill
complexes are to be built, the sawmill portion of part of the complex being in
operation at the time of the inspection. The line is 21.7 miles in length, and it is
laid with 60- and 72-pound rail. Details of this line and the inspection are covered
in another section of this report.
The follow-up inspection revealed that the work required on the August report
had been completed and the line was being operated in a satisfactory manner.
 —
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 19
During the September inspection the Fort St. James branch line was checked
and gone over as to progress and safety. It can be reported that of the total 78
miles projected for this branch, 78 miles of grade were completed with 30 miles of
steel laid, of which 12 miles have been ballasted and surfaced. The line is being
laid with 85-pound re-lay rail, using No. 1 untreated ties with tie-plates. The
bridges on the first 30 miles are completed and were found to be installed in accordance with the plans submitted.
The first 25 miles of this line are constructed through very difficult terrain in
that drainage is difficult and the ground is, geologically speaking, not consolidated
as glaciation has left it in a plastic state. Consequently cuts and fills required flatter
slopes than are usually the practice in older geological formations. It can be reported than an excellent job of construction has been completed through the difficult
area, and the track was in good alignment at the time of the inspection.
The Dawson Creek branch (Dawson Creek Subdivision) was inspected and
found to be in satisfactory condition. This line is laid mainly with 60- and 70-
pound re-lay steel. Ballasting has been carried out extensively over the entire subdivision so that the track is in quite good alignment.
Fencing was checked, and in only one instance were cattle found on the
right-of-way.   Generally the fencing on the subdivision is well maintained.
The signals at the Alaska Highway crossing were tested and found to be in
order, as were all level crossings on the subdivision.
At Dawson Creek it is to be noted that new grain elevators have been constructed on Pacific Great Eastern Railway tracks and are now in operation. As a
result, more grain from the Peace River area is expected to move over the more
direct route of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway for export from the Port of
Vancouver.
Main Line
In making the main-line inspection from North Vancouver to Fort St. John,
the inspection party stopped at all strategic points along the 728-mile route. Following are the main points checked:—
Mile 38.85:   Inspected new signalized crossing near Squamish.
Mile 157:  Inspected Lillooet yard.
Mile 160:   Inspected Fraser River Bridge at Lillooet.
Mile 203.2:   Inspected oil-tank installations at Clinton.
Mile 283.2:  Inspected safety in yards and chip-loading.
Mile 313:   Inspected Williams Lake south yard.
Mile 373.5:   Inspected Dog Prairie signalization of Cariboo Highway.
Mile 381.5: Inspected sidings at Western Plywood, Quesnel, and mud
bank adjacent, thereto.
Mile 452.7: Inspected and checked Cale Creek Bridge for fill and culvert.
Mile 461.9: Inspected new Prince George industrial estate, trackage,
shops, yards, crossings, etc.
Mile 467:  Inspected Prince George pulp-mill tracks.
Mile 467:  Inspected Continental pulp-mill tracks.
Mile 470:   Inspected Northwood pulp-mill interchange.
Mile 485.9:  Inspected Salmon Valley crossing of Hart Highway.
Mile 497.7:  Inspected Hart Highway at Odell.
Mile 499.85: Inspected and checked Hart Highway at this point for signalization in 1967.
Mile 511.25: Inspected and checked gravel-pit tracks and assessed Hart
Highway for signalization.
 FF 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mile 548:  Inspected Parsnip River Bridge; checked new through span
completed in 1966.
Mile 579.31:  Inspected and checked Hart Highway for signalization in
1967.
Mile 660:  Inspected yards at Chetwynd.
Mile 727:  Inspected yards at Fort St. John.
Generally, the trackage and facilities over the entire railway are in a much
improved condition over former years. This railway has 2,671,200 railway ties
in total. Of these, 1,022,000 are now treated or creosoted with tie-plates, so that
38 per cent of the total has been replaced with the permanent type of tie having a
life expectancy of 30 years as against eight years for untreated ties.
One hundred and fifty-four miles of main line have been relaid with 100-pound
rail. This rail is laid on the Squamish Subdivision along Anderson and Seton
Lakes and on the Pavilion Hill to Kelly Lake. With the crushed-rock ballast and
the treated ties, this portion of the track is now up to main-line standards and, as
a result, operation has been greatly improved.
Forty-five miles of new ballast were put down during 1966. This was done
in various locations where deemed necessary.
One of the features of the 1966 final inspection was the use of a high-speed
camera to photograph every level grade crossing of the railway. Two hundred and
sixteen pictures were taken, which, when sorted and classified, will be of great
assistance to our engineers and to the Pacific Great Eastern Railway in improving
the level crossings on this railway.
In 1966 five level crossings were ordered to be signalized on the main line,
and at the time of the inspection three of these projects were nearing completion
and were inspected. It is probable that four signalizations will be completed by
the end of the year.
The inspection and subsequent study revealed that five main-line level crossings should be signalized in 1967—Mile 497.7 at Hart Highway, Mile 499.85 at
Hart Highway, Mile 511.25 at Hart Highway, Mile 579.31 at Hart Highway,
and Mile 658.5 at Hart Highway at Chetwynd—with the following level crossings
signalized in 1968: Dawson Creek Subdivision, Mile 11.1 at Hart Highway; Kennedy spur line, Mile 6.1 at Hart Highway; and main line, Mile 466 at Cariboo
Highway at Prince George.
All overhead wire crossings were inspected en route. The new 500-kilovolt
power-line from the Peace River dam to Kelly Lake crosses the main line in several
places. These crossings were found to be in accordance with the approved plans
for this very high voltage transmission, and the necessary precautions have been
taken. However, some of the lower-voltage crossings appeared not up to the required standard, and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority has been instructed to run a computer programme on this phase of the transmission-lines.
This was done in 1964 on a number of crossings and, as a result, larger crossarms
and hardware were required to up-grade the crossings at that time. The chief
communications officer of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway participated in this
inspection and will follow up with the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority to the completion of the project.
The new Pacific Great Eastern Railway industrial park at Prince George was
inspected, and the inspection included shop facilities, tracks, office facilities, bunk-
houses, scales, loading-ramps, and other undertakings and facilities. This yard,
or park, is a large industrial complex involving hundreds of acres and several miles
of railway trackage with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway main line traversing
the centre of the complex.    The project is well under way, and due to its size
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 21
and B^dS G™fnLCTP"!"! "7 Sh°P haS *"* bui" «° *™e locomotives
ana Budd cars.   This new shop complex incorporates pit inspection tracks, jacking
4BE3
One of the new 1,800-horsepower diesels added to the Pacific Great Eastern lice,
in the fall of 1966. TO
 FF 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
facilities, compressed air, car repair facilities, steam heating, washrooms, and
special equipment to service diesel locomotives by up-to-date methods. This shop
was approved by Department engineers in the drawing-board stage and given a final
inspection in September, 1966.
During the year three new 1,800-horsepower diesel locomotives were delivered
from the Montreal Locomotive Works, which brings the Pacific Great Eastern Railway roster of locomotives up to 57. These locomotives are standard with the transcontinental railways. It is interesting to note they were run over the Canadian
Pacific Railway from Montreal to Vancouver and hauled freight thereon to offset
delivery charges. Pacific Great Eastern Railway locomotives are at times rented
to the Canadian Pacific Railway as the power is now up to main-line standards
accepted by the Board of Transport Commissioners on Federal-controlled lines.
The microwave stations were inspected at Williams Lake and at other points
on the system. The dispatch system and the communicating system of the railway
are up to standard, and they are operating to the satisfaction of the Department.
Summary
It can be reported that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is being properly
maintained and its facilities expanded commensurate with the growth of British
Columbia, so that it is in safe operating condition and the public interest is being
properly served.—Robert E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer.
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd. Logging Railway,
Ladysmith to Nanaimo Lakes
Chief Engineer's Report
On October 17th the annual inspection was made of the Crown Zellerbach
Railway between Ladysmith and Nanaimo Lakes, a distance of 22 miles. The
inspection was made by track motor with Mr. Gordon Naylor, superintendent of
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., in attendance during the inspection.
This railway was reconstructed and extended in 1943 by Comox Logging and
Railway Company. The original line was built in 1904 from Ladysmith to Extension by the Dunsmuir coal interests. It was abandoned in 1931, but the steel bridge
over Nanaimo River was not dismantled. This bridge was the key to the 1943
reconstruction, and considerable work was required at that time to rehabilitate the
steel bridge, after which the line was extended to the Nanaimo Lakes and opened
for traffic.
Mention is made as to the history of the line and to this bridge in particular,
for during 1966 the south approach was completely renewed with heavy-timber
construction, with the north approach slated for rebuilding in 1967, and new bridge
ties at a later date.
A satisfactory job of the south approach reconstruction has been completed.
All footings and masonry were checked, and it is noted part of the 1904 masonry
has been reinforced with concrete and all footings and piers are sound and in proper
condition.
The Deadwood Creek Bridge was inspected, and it is noted new log stringers
were installed in 1962, and they are in good shape. Footings are in order and the
bridge is in alignment.
The Boulder Creek Bridge had the pilings renewed in 1959 when other work
was completed. The stringers were found to be in order at this inspection and the
footings clear and unobstructed.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 23
The Haslam Creek Bridge had given trouble by log jams. This has been
corrected by bulldozing out the river channel and removing a small island in the
river-bed. New stringers and some new bents have been recently installed and the
ties are in good condition.
The loading-works and log dump were inspected and found clean and in
proper repair.
The line is laid with 80-pound rail, using yellow cedar ties. Alignment is
good and ballast conditions are excellent, so that the fine itself can be compared
with the standards for branch lines used by the transcontinental railways.
Dispatching is done by radio-telephone in accordance with the rules and regulations, and a land line is used as a stand-by. Motive power consists of a 1,000-
horsepower General Electric diesel-electric locomotive and two steam locomotives
operated over the same line by MacMillan Bloedel Limited as the line is jointly
owned. All motive power was inspected and found to be in good order and properly
maintained.
All railway crossings were inspected and no repairs were necessary. It can
therefore be reported this railway is in good condition and it is being properly
maintained.—Robert E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 10th an inspection was made of the railway facilities owned and
operated by the above Authority in the New Westminster and Fraser Valley district.
In company with Mr. Fred Fiedel and Mr. W. Alcock, superintendent of
maintenance and roadmaster respectively, a trip was made by rail car between New
Westminster and Chilliwack, during which time buildings, bridges, yards, sidings,
and main-line trackage were inspected.
An efficient trackage-maintenance programme was carried out during the past
year, with 4,000 yards of crushed-rock ballast and 3,000 creosoted ties laid. Weed
control is contracted through an established chemical company every two years and
heavy brush control annually, with the result that weed and brush growth is kept to
a minimum. Mileage-posts, derail signs, and other markers which were of wooden
construction are being replaced by aluminum posts with distinctive letters and
figures.
Rail and wheel wear has been greatly reduced by the installation of the track
lubricators, 11 of which are in operation over the district.
Track forces working at various points were observed carrying out their duties
under the protection of standard flagging procedures.
All bridges and trestles were inspected and found to be in good condition. The
new equipment-maintenance shop in New Westminster is still in the process of being
built. It was hoped to have this completed in 1966, but contractor employee strikes
have delayed completion until the spring of 1967. When completed the shop will
have 8,000 square feet of working area and 5,400 square feet of stores, office, and
general utility area. A new yard office, dispatching office, and crew quarters will
be situated nearby for convenience.
The railway freight yard which was opened in 1965 has been extended with
the addition of 30 per cent more trackage.
Industrial development adjacent to British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority trackage has resulted in the installation of seven new spurs in 1966 in addition
to 1 mile of new trackage serving the Langley industrial subdivision.
 FF 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
At present the railway crosses the main street in Langley.    So this can be
avoided, a 21/i-mile diversion is being built and should be in service early in 1967.
Regular rolling-stock inspections were carried out during 1966, and observations indicate that the forces responsible for the maintenance of this equipment are
doing so in an excellent manner.
Accidents to persons resulting from the movement of trains were very light in
1966 and without fatalities.
In general the operation was found to be in good condition, with the exception
of the following items, which will be given immediate attention:—
Toppin Road:   Stop sign requires repositioning.
Livingstone Road:  Stop sign missing.
Jackman Road:  South side stop sign missing.
Farm crossing west of Cloverdale: Requires replanking.—W. F. Thomas,
Inspecting Engineer.
Canadian Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 1st an inspection was made of the railway facilities and equipment owned and operated by the above company at its Englewood logging division.
In the company of Railway Superintendent G. Lutz, Roadmaster M. Solecki,
and Bridge Foreman G. Collins, a trip was made by speeder between Woss Camp
and Beaver Cove and between Woss Camp and Vernon Camp, at which time the
trackage and bridges were inspected.
Since the last annual inspection, approximately 7,000 new ties and tie-plates
have been renewed. Eight miles of crushed-rock ballast were laid on " H " line and
4 miles of curve steel were laid on the Beaver Cove line.
In general the railway installation is in good condition. It would appear from
the improved condition since the last inspection that a good maintenance programme
is being carried out.
The following conditions were noted:—
Beaver Cove Yard and Dump:   Some new piles were driven and cross-
pile bracing was installed.   New caps, stringers, and decking will be
required in a year or two.   Renew crossing planks at office.
Kokish Bridge:  Steel span requires scraping and painting.
Elk River Bridge:   Shoring has been done to contain piling.    Brush-
clearing completed.
East Fork Bridge:   Ties poor due to previous derailment.   Not serious.
Siding No. 2: Paint derail sign.
Tsultan Bridge:  Watch cement foundation at Beaver Cove end for water
sloughing.   Ties rotting due to wheel cutting.
Halfway Island Bridge:  Woss end span sticks are crushing lightly.   Poor
mud-sill bearing at upstream stringer, Woss end.
Noomas Creek Bridge:  Check rail pile stringers and ties for renewal.
Mile 14.1: Clean up small rockslide.
Storey Creek Bridge: Stringers deteriorating and should be changed.
Kinman Creek Bridge:   Intermediate cap is split and crushing.    Clean
out brush.
Siding No. 3:  Straighten switch stand.
Steele Creek Bridge:  Defective stringer has been renewed.
Twin Creek Bridges: Bracing and collars poor, require attention.
 	
■   ■
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 25
Mile-post 29 and Mile-post 25:   Present rail should be replaced with
heavier rail in standard lengths.   Derailments could occur due to
rail breakage.
Gold Creek Bridge:   Shims loose on No. 1 bent, Woss end.   New span
installed in 1966.
Nimpkish Shop Tracks:  The dumping of material, rails, etc., too close
to switches and tracks must be stopped.    Rules No. 64 and 66,
Part I (c) must be adhered to in the interest of safety.
Rice Creek Bridge:  Repair walkway and handrail.   Clear out brush and
check rail stringers for rotting.
Groves Creek and Davie Creek Bridges:   Good condition.
Maquilla Creek and Fire Creek Bridges:   Good condition.
Track between Woss and Vernon Camps:   Heavy run-off on south side
requires close check of culverts; otherwise track is in good condition.
Rail Cars 121, 122, 125, 129, 130 and Locomotive 252 were inspected, reservoirs tested, and certificates issued.    Steam Locomotive 113 was hydrostatically
tested in 1964 and has not been used since that time.   It is intended to move this
locomotive from Nimpkish to Woss, where it will be placed on a spur track under
the care of an ardent steam-locomotive fan, Alex Matoski.
A number of skeleton logging-cars were inspected and Form 2 submitted with
defects noted.
The wooden-sill cars are gradually being replaced by steel cars. An efficient
maintenance programme being carried out by the car-shop forces has resulted in
the over-all good condition of the rolling-stock and the reduction in the number of
derailments.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Industrial Railways
In addition to the two common-carrier railways—namely, the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway and the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway—
there has been an increase in the number of in-plant industrial railways which come
under the jurisdiction of the Department.
In-plant railways serve a variety of industries and include pulp and paper
mills, chemical plants, oil and gas refineries, deep-sea docking, and wharves.
Log-hauling railways in the forest industry are listed in separate reports.
Construction of new pulp-mills in the Province and the extension of existing
mills has increased the railway trackage considerably. New paper-mills are under
construction at the site of the Columbia Cellulose Company Limited mill at Prince
Rupert, British Columbia Forest Products Limited mill at Crofton, MacMillan
Bloedel Limited mill at Powell River, and Elk Falls Company Limited mill at
Duncan Bay. Department engineers have approved the extension of the railway
trackage in the foregoing plants, and inspections have been made of the existing
facilities.
Department engineers made inspections in the Kamloops Pulp & Paper Company Limited plant at Kamloops. A trackmobile is employed for the switching of
chemical cars, chip cars, and other rolling-stock. Employees engaged in switching
were examined and certified according to the regulations.
Switching operations at the Celgar Limited pulp-mill at Castlegar is largely
performed by the Canadian Pacific Railway, except when chemical and other cars
require to be spotted for unloading. A rubber-tired vehicle equipped with a large
scoop on the front end was used for spotting cars. The company was advised of
the hazards involved in using a machine of this type for the switching of railway
 FF 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
cars. It was ordered that a trackmobile or a similar power-car be available for
switching within the plant area. Track inspections revealed certain close clearances which the company took steps to eliminate.
Switching operations at the Elk Falls Company Limited pulp-mill is performed
entirely by the company's own motive power. A Shay steam locomotive is used
for handling barge slip movements, while a 25-ton diesel locomotive is used for
light switching. As in all plants where railway tank cars containing chemicals or
other dangerous liquids are being handled as part of a railway, emphasis is placed
on safe switching procedures and on precautionary measures being taken to see that
cars are not moved while unloading is in progress.
MacMillan Bloedel Limited mills at Port Alberni are served by the Esquimalt
& Nanaimo division of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and the in-plant switching is
done by a company-owned 45-ton diesel-electric locomotive. The locomotive was
inspected, as well as the trackage and other railway facilities. The foregoing company's plant at Harmac is not serviced by a common-carrier railway. A 65-ton
diesel-electric locomotive is used to switch a connecting barge service and to spot
company-owned flat cars loading pulp at a deep-sea dock. Regular inspections have
been made at this operation with respect to trackage, clearances, and railway
personnel.
The British Columbia Forest Products Limited operation at Crofton is being
enlarged by the addition of a paper-mill, which will be in operation by early summer
of 1967. A 65-ton diesel-electric locomotive working one day shift is used for
in-plant switching of railway cars at the deep-sea docks, chemical-unloading spurs,
and warehouses. When the paper-mill is in operation, it will be necessary to work
the locomotive an afternoon shift as well as a day shift. This will necessitate the
training of additional train and locomotive crews under the supervision of the
Department engineers. Recent inspections disclosed a well-conducted operation at
Crofton.
The pulp and paper industry in the Prince George area is growing with the
addition of Intercontinental Pulp Company Limited mill adjacent to the Prince
George Pulp & Paper Limited operation. At present wood-chip cars, chemical cars,
pulp cars, and other cars on railway spurs within the plant are switched by a
company-owned trackmobile, the operators of which are certified by the Department. The plant is served by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and it is necessary
that its switching units enter the company property. So that there would be no
conflict of operations between Pacific Great Eastern Railway crews and company
crews, meetings were held between the Department, Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company, and Prince George Pulp & Paper Limited officials for the purpose of
setting up safe practical procedures to be followed when switching is in progress.
Northwood Pulp Limited in Prince George is also served by the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway. In-plant switching is performed by company personnel using a
400-horsepower diesel-electric locomotive. Inspections made of the operation in
1966 disclosed that contractors working within the plant area were using unauthorized vehicles to move railway cars, with resultant damage to same. The Department
ordered the discontinuance of this type of movement in the interest of safety. Company railway personnel were examined as to their proficiency and duly certified in
their respective categories.
The industrial railway at Taylor is certified under joint ownership by Phillips
Petroleum Limited, Pacific Petroleums Limited, Westcoast Transmission Company
Limited, and Jefferson Lake Petrochemicals Limited. A recent inspection at the
Jefferson Lake plant disclosed that restricted clearances existed in the trackage
area.   It was ordered by the Department engineer that steps be taken to bring the
 	
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 27
Pacific Coast Terminals Limited, Port Moody. At this operation, bulk commodities
are handled from railway cars to ships by the use of bulk conveyers. The railway in the
left background is the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
clearances within the regulations. It is operated by the above companies with
siding, cross-over, and interchange agreements with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. Switching of cars to and within the plant area is performed by the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway.
Pacific Coast Terminals Limited operates two bulk terminals, one at New
Westminster and one at Port Moody. Both are certified by Orders in Council as
industrial railways under the Railway Act. Facilities at New Westminster have been
extended by the erection of a heated shed which will be used to thaw frozen concentrates in railway cars so they may be unloaded. Switching operations are performed with the use of a rubber-tired vehicle which engages the rolling-stock
coupler. A properly trained crew, certified by the Department, performs the
switching in a safe and efficient manner.
The Port Moody operation of Pacific Coast Terminals Company Limited is
served by the Canadian Pacific Railway. Heavy tonnage is handled and three
dumpers are used for the dumping of materials. Any commodity can be handled
by the dumpers, but one is used specifically for coal from Michel. Five million tons
of coal may be handled annually through this terminal.
Conveyers are used for stockpiling and storage with front-end loaders used
for loading out. The hoppers are designed to be roofed in if storage is required for
commodities other than coal. The entire area is black-topped and maintained for
a safe movement of all vehicles. The Department has approved safety rules and
regulations with regard to in-plant switching operations, and switching personnel
have been certified and registered with the Department.   Several safety and track
 FF 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
inspections were made during the past year, and it was found that the establishment
was in order according to the rules and regulations.
Vancouver Wharves Limited, situated on the north shore of Burrard Inlet, is
interchangeable with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. During the past year 4
miles of new track have been added to the railway operation and in addition new
motive power has been added. Two steam Shay locomotives, two diesel locomotives, and one diesel-electric locomotive comprise the fleet required to switch railway cars being unloaded for storage before being transferred to deep-sea ships
destined to all ports of the world. Several inspections have been made throughout
the year and recommendations made in the interest of safety.
Fraser Surrey Dock is operated by Johnston Terminals Limited for the purpose
of loading and unloading a 5,000-ton train ship with railway cars shuttling between
Alaska and Surrey. Inspections conducted in 1966 have revealed no cause for
complaint.
Weldwood Transportation Limited of Weldwood of Canada Limited and the
river sawmills division of MacMillan Bloedel Limited have interchanges with the
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority railway in the Vancouver area. Both
companies have barging facilities with the Canadian National Railway on the north
arm of the Fraser River. In-plant switching is performed with trackmobiles operated by company employees properly trained and certified by the Department.
Steel-fabricating plants, scrap-iron yards, steel-mills, and wood-processing
plants in the Lower Mainland continue to use in-plant railways and locomotive
cranes for the handling of materials. Two diesel cranes of 100 tons capacity have
been imported in 1966. Department engineers have supervised the overhaul of
steam crane boilers used in industry and have conducted hydrostatic tests upon
completion.
The growth of the pulp and paper industry in the Province has required an
increase in the manufacture of chemicals which are allied to the industry. F.M.C.
Chemicals established a plant at Squamish, with railway trackage within the plant
area and interchange with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. Barging facilities
are also available to the company for the transport of chemical tank cars by water.
General layout and construction details were checked by Department engineers and,
after construction, inspections were made to see that the regulations were complied
with. The company has leased a trackmobile for railway car-switching duties on
plant trackage. Operators of the trackmobile have been instructed in safe procedures and certified according to the regulations.
Hooker Chemicals Limited, situated in the North Vancouver area, has been
in operation since 1957 and has interchange with the Canadian National Railway.
Switch crews at this operation are competent in their duties, and the equipment is
being well maintained. Procedures with respect to tank-car testing have been
observed, and the company submits test forms to the Department for perusal.
The major shipyards in the Province make use of the connection to common-
carrier railways in that materials are brought in by rail. It is advantageous that
standard railway trackage is laid within the yards. Locomotive cranes are used for
hoisting purposes and also for switching of standard railway equipment. Burrard
Dry Dock Company Limited, of North Vancouver, and Victoria Machinery Depot
Company Limited, of Victoria, operate diesel locomotive cranes in their yards.
These were inspected, appliances tested, and operators examined as to their proficiency. The 50-ton-capacity electric crane in Yarrows Limited shipyard in Victoria was inspected and tested by Department engineers.
 	
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 29
Island Tug & Barge Limited, has railway yards and barge facilities in Vancouver and Victoria with connections with the Milwaukee railway system of the United
States.
The explosives division of Canadian Industries Limited is located on James
Island, a short boat ride from Saanichton wharf. A barge slip and connecting trackage is located at the east spit. Materials are brought in through this location and
the finished product is dispatched out this direction. A 25-ton diesel locomotive is
used to load and unload cars from the barge slip and for switching cars around the
magazines. This operation was inspected, the locomotive tested, and the locomotive
operator certified with the Department.
MacMillan Bloedel Limited's Chemainus sawmill division is supplied with logs
by truck and by rail. Logs are loaded on railway skeleton cars at the company's
Nanaimo River camp and then hauled by a steam locomotive to a marshalling yard
at Ladysmith, which is interchanged with the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Company division of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Canadian Pacific Railway crews
pick up the loads at Ladysmith and take them to the MacMillan Bloedel rail yard at
Chemainus. A Porter steam locomotive built in 1924 is used as a switch engine to
switch loaded logging-cars to the dump. This locomotive was recently overhauled
and the boiler given an internal inspection under the supervision of Department
inspectors. The mill yard rail operation at Chemainus and the rail yard at Nanaimo
River were inspected and found to be in order.
The industrial railway at Kitimat operates within the Aluminum Company of
Canada Limited's smelter area. It is situated on tidewater with connection to a
deep-sea dock. The company operates its own motive power for loaded and empty
railway cars delivered to and from the Canadian National Railway interchange.
Department inspections were made during the year, and conditions found were very
good. Track maintenance included the renewal of ties and ballast on the east line.
The locomotive was tested and a certificate issued to cover the inspection.
The Cominco Ltd. surface-haul railway operation at Kimberley was inspected.
Three electric locomotives were inspected in service and company records checked
with respect to running repairs and maintenance. The track, clearances, buildings,
derail indicators, and signals were found to be in order. It can be reported that the
remote-control system for the dumping and switching of one train at the concentrator dumper is 90 per cent complete, but work is progressing to bring the dumping
and switching of ore trains at the concentrator dumper completely operative with
push-button control by 1967. The operation in general is being conducted in a
safe and efficient manner, with no accidents reported.
The Stanley Park railway operated by the Vancouver City Board of Parks and
Public Recreation increased its popularity since it was reopened in 1964, and it was
found necessary to add another train. A new gasoline-powered locomotive with
steam-engine design, together with passenger cars, was built in 1966 and put into
service. The Department approved and supervised the construction of the new
equipment, and tests were made before it was placed in service.
The Cowichan Valley Forest Museum at Duncan was officially opened in
June, 1966, after a building programme which saw 15 or more acres of land transformed into a museum designed to preserve the relics of bygone days of logging.
An appropriate display building constructed entirely of logs, as well as parking
facilities, was constructed and ready for the opening day. Civic and government
officials, as well as prominent people in the forest industry, were present at the
ceremonies. The steam locomotives and other motive power hauling passenger cars
 FF 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
were inspected by the Department engineers prior to being put into service, test runs
were made, and the equipment approved for service. The railway track, bridges,
crossings, and installations were inspected and found to be in good condition.
Equipment Inspections During 1966 Under the Railway Act
Following is a list of individual inspections carried out by Department engi
neers :
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers	
Electric locomotives inspected and certified _
Self-powered rail cars inspected and certified.
Diesel-electric locomotives and cranes inspected.
  36
  6
  15
  79
Air reservoirs tested and inspected—                     250
Railway cars inspected on industrial railways  200
Railway cars inspected on common-carrier railways  400
Miles of track inspected  3,200
  80
  10
  2
  6
  4
  11
Aerial tramways inspected and certified	
Railway conductors examined and certified	
Power-car operators examined and certified	
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified .
Steam-locomotive engineers examined and certified .
Motormen examined and certified (Cominco Ltd.)..
Accidents on logging and industrial railways	
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage
Industrial Railways
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Gauge
Main
Sidings,
Etc.
Total
1. Aluminum Company of Canada
Ltd.
Montreal	
Revelstoke
Vancouver
Montreal	
Vancouver
Vancouver
Montreal	
Montreal    	
Trail 	
Trail	
Vancouver
Fernie	
Vancouver
Squamish	
Mesachie Lake
North Vancouver
Prince George
Victoria	
Victoria	
Kamloops
Vancouver
Kitimat 	
Revelstoke	
Crofton 	
New Westminster
Nimpkish Valley-
Port Mellon     . ....
2.90
0.92
1.50
3.00
91.00
0.50
6,25
3.19
6.09
0.92
4.00
6.00
110.10
1.00
7.50
7.01
19.00
42.01
25.82
1.53
3.00
.30
7.50
2.00
3.50
0.20
0.30
2.70
5.39
Standard.
3. British Columbia Forest Products
Ltd.
4. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd.
5. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.    —
2.50
3.00
19.10
0.50
1.25
7.01
Standard.
30" and
standard.
Standard.
30" and
Watson Island
Trail	
Kimberley. 	
Ladysmith	
Michel 	
standard.
19.00
9.00
21.80
1.53
18".
33.01
4.02
18", 36".
11. Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd.
12. Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd..  ..
Standard.
30".
13   Elk Falls Co. Ltd.
3.00
.30
1.50
1.90
3.50
0.20
0.30
2.70
3.81
14. F.M C. Chemicals Ltd.
Squamish	
Mesachie Lake
North Vancouver
Prince George
Vancouver..	
Victoria	
Kamloops	
Chemainus	
15. Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd	
16. Hooker Chemicals Ltd	
6.00
0.10
Standard.
Standard.
18. Island Tug & Barge Ltd.
19. Island Tug & Barge Ltd.
21. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
1.58
Standard.
B
 	
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 31
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage—Continued
Industrial Railways—Continued
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Gauge
Main
Sidings,
Etc.
Total
22. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
23. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd _.	
24. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Mesachie Lake
New Westminster
NewWestmin-
ster
Calgary, Alta.
Vancouver
Vancouver	
Vancouver.....
Vancouver....
Honeymoon
Bay
Quesnel
Dunsmuir District
Harmac Pulp Div.
1.00
2.20
3.10
1.00
1.30
3.16
4.70
4.10
2.20
1.00
1.50
1.30
3.16
0.33
4.70
5.20
3.76
3.51
Standard.
Standard.
25. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.
1.50
26. MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
27. Northwood Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd.
28. Osborne Bay Wharf Co. Ltd.
Vancouver	
Prince George
Crofton	
Port Coquitlam
New Westminster
Taylor	
Prince George
Woodfibre	
Twigg Island	
North Vancouver..
Honeymoon Bay...
Quesnel	
Standard.
0.33
Standard.
30. Pacific Coast Terminals Co. Ltd.
5.20
3.05
31. Pacific, Jefferson Lake, Westcoast
(Pacific Petroleums Ltd.)
32. Prince George Pulp & Paper Ltd....
33. Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd.
0.71
3.51
(!)
Standard.
	
1.25
6.00
7.00
0.95
1.25
6.00
7.60
0.95
36. Western Forest Industries Ltd.
37. Western Plywood (Cariboo) Ltd..
0.60
Standard.
1 Ferry slip.
Common-carrier Railways
38. British   Columbia   Hydro   and
Power Authority
39. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
40. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
Vancouver
Vancouver.
Vancouver-
New Westminster-
Huntingdon-
Chilliwack
Vancouver to Fort
St. John and
Dawson Creek
Mackenzie spur
76.58
788.60
35.29
172.22
111.87
960.82
I I
21.70 |      5.20 !    26.90
Standard.
Standard.
Standard.
Recreational Railways
41. Cowichan Valley Forest Museum...
42. Stanley Park Miniature Railway	
Duncan    _
Vancouver
Duncan „__ _„_
Vancouver 	
Saanich..	
0.875|
0.42 1
0.20  |
1
0.125
1.00
0.42
0.20
36".
18".
10".
CENTENNIAL TRAIN PROJECT
The British Columbia Centennial Committee acquired a 70-year-old Scottish
steam locomotive and coach which was owned by the third Duke of Sutherland and
run on a private line in the north of Scotland. The locomotive was built in 1895
and weighed approximately 35 tons. It was idle from 1949 until it was put into
service as a Centennial project by the Centennial Committee.
The Department was given the task of putting the locomotive in working order.
Due to the age of the boiler, Department engineers considered a complete overhaul
would be necessary. It was also decided that the running-gear should be refurbished. Boiler-makers with locomotive experience were brought out of retirement
to rebuild the boiler and to make air-brake repairs. A Vancouver company experienced in locomotive machine work put the " Dunrobin " in first-class running
condition.
 FF 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
When the boiler repairs were completed, tests were conducted by the Department engineers in the presence of officials of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the
Canadian National Railway, and the Board of Transport Commissioners, and it
was agreed that the locomotive was fit to run on any railway line in Canada.
A retired Canadian Pacific Railway locomotive painter was engaged to repaint
the locomotive and coach to original colours.
Through the co-operation of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, schedules were drawn up so that the
" Dunrobin " and coach could be displayed throughout the Lower Mainland, Fraser
Valley, and Vancouver Island. Consequently the little train was run under its own
power from Vancouver to Chilliwack, from Vancouver to Mission, and thence to
Vancouver Island via the Canadian Pacific " Princess of Vancouver," where it was
displayed at all railway stations between Victoria, Courtenay, and Port Alberni.
Upon completion of the Vancouver Island trip, the " Dunrobin " and coach were
returned to the Mainland and tied up for the winter in the British Columbia Hydro
and Power Authority shed in New Westminster.
History of the " Dunrobin "
With the nationalization of the British railways, the agreement between the
Duke of Sutherland and the London, Midland and Scottish Railway, whereby the
Duke had running powers for his rolling-stock over that company's lines, ceased.
Thus came to an end a rich nobleman's hobby of owning and running his own train.
The Duke was the only owner of a private railway carriage in the British Isles, but
in America several millionaires owned private railway cars.
The railway through Sutherland from Golspie to Helmsdale (17V4 miles) was
projected by the third Duke and built at his own expense after a local undertaking,
the Sutherland Railway, had succeeded only in completing its line from Bonar
Bridge to Golspie, 6 miles short of Brora, the intended terminus. The line was
authorized on June 20, 1870, but construction already had begun and the railway
was completed on June 19, 1871. A private section was provided 2 miles north
of Golspie to serve Dunrobin Castle, the seat of the Duke. The railway from
Golspie to Helmsdale was worked by the Highland Railway, but it was not until
July 28, 1884, that the Duke sold his undertaking to that company, of which he
was already a director. He was also a director of the London and North Western
Railway.
To enable his railway to be opened before the connection with the Sutherland
Railway at Golspie was completed, the Duke had purchased a locomotive and some
coaches. After the Highland Railway took over the working of the line, the engine
was used to haul the Duke's private saloon between Inverness and Dunrobin, but
south of Inverness the saloon was attached to the main-line trains. These arrangements were continued after the railways north of Inverness were amalgamated with
the Highland Railway and persisted after the grouping in 1923.
The locomotive was a small 2-4-0 tank engine built by Kitson and Company,
Leeds, and named "Dunrobin." It had outside cylinders 10 inches in diameter
with 18-inch stroke and coupled wheels 4 feet in diameter. The weight in working
order was 21 tons.
After the death of the third Duke in 1892, his son decided to have a more
powerful engine, and David Jones, locomotive superintendent of the Highland
Railway, designed a 0-4-4 side-tank engine with 13-inch by 18-inch inside cylinders
and a boiler carrying a working pressure of 120 pounds per square inch. The
diameter of the coupled wheels was 4 feet 6 inches and of the trailing wheels 2 feet
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 33
6 inches. This engine was built at the Atlas Works, Glasgow, in 1895. Like its
predecessor, it was named " Dunrobin " and was painted dark green with black
bands and yellow lining. A seat with leather cushions extending the full width of
the cab was provided over the coal bunker for passengers riding on the footplate.
The front weather-board was autographed by several illustrious travellers who inspected the engine while they were guests of the Duke.
The original " Dunrobin " was acquired by the Highland Railway and rebuilt
at the Atlas Works with a larger boiler and new cylinders. It was numbered 118,
named " Gordon Castle," and put to work on the branch from Orbliston Junction
to Fochabers. Some years later it was renamed " Invergordon " and used for shunting at Invergordon Harbour. During the First World War it was loaned to the
Great North of Scotland Railway, and was scrapped in 1923. The second " Dunrobin " performed shunting duties at Invergordon and at Rosyth during the recent
war.
In 1899 a large saloon was built for the Duke at Wolverton Carriage Works,
London & North Western Railway. It was designed by Mr. C. A. Park, carriage
and wagon superintendent, L.N.W.R., who used it as the prototype for the Royal
train built in 1903 for King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, an example of
railway-coach building, decoration, and furnishing unequalled during the past 50
years. This train was used subsequently by King George V and Queen Mary, and
by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth until 1941. King Edward VIII never
used it as he preferred the late Lord Stamp's " President's Car," which also has
been used by Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret.
In February, 1949, the Duke of Sutherland advertised his saloon for sale for
conversion into a bungalow, but a Lincolnshire firm of coach-builders recognized
the vehicle from its description and purchased it. The new owner, the Lincolnshire
Trailer Company, Scunthorpe, preserved the saloon as an example of the finest
British coach work in existence. It also acquired the Duke's locomotive and smaller
saloon. Arrangements were made with Capt. J. E. P. Howey, chairman of the
Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, for the engine and the saloons to be
exhibited at New Romney.
The large saloon is 57 feet long over headstocks and 61 feet over the buffers,
the width is 8 feet 6 inches, and height from rail level to the top of the roof 12 feet
IV2 inches, and to the side cornices 10 feet 9Vi inches. The saloon is carried on
four-wheel bogies with a wheelbase of 8 feet, and spaced at 39-foot centres. It is
fitted with the vacuum and Westinghouse brakes.
The saloon is divided into a large lounge 13 feet 10 inches long and extending
over the full width of the vehicle, a smoking-room 7 feet long, three single-berth
sleeping compartments, a pantry, and a luggage and attendant's compartment. Two
of the sleeping-berths have separate toilets, and a third toilet adjoins the smoking-
room. The lounge is furnished with two movable settees, a round table, and four
dining chairs; the smoking-room has four fixed armchair seats convertible into
two beds and two folding tables. The vestibules at each end of the saloon have
end observation windows but no gangways to connect with other vehicles on the
train.   Complete privacy for the occupants is thus assured.
Stone's system of electric lighting is installed, and there are electric bells to
the attendant's compartments and electric fans for ventilation in hot weather. The
fittings of the pantry include an oil cooker, a sink, and a dresser. Steam heating
apparatus and a self-contained high-pressure hot-water system are provided for
warming the vehicle.
The interior decorations of the saloons and berths are of Spanish mahogany,
white enamelled and picked out in gold leaf, with solid-silver lighting fittings.   The
 FF 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ceilings are in figured lincrusta, finished in white and gold leaf. The couches and
easy chairs are upholstered in green figured tapestry with loose chintz covers, and
the pelmets and curtains are of green silk and chintz to match. Turkish carpets
are laid in the lounge and the smoking-room, but elsewhere Wilton pile carpets,
underlaid with thick grey felt, are laid. The external finishings of the saloon are
dark Sutherland green on the lower panels and white picked out with gold leaf on
the upper panels.   The roof and the tires are painted white.
The smaller saloon runs on four wheels and is 25 feet long and 8 feet 6 inches
wide. It is divided into a saloon 14 feet 3 inches long with side and end windows,
and a brake van 10 feet long. The saloon is furnished with six armchairs and a
table, and there are three fixed seats in the brake van. The interior decorations
are of mahogany and maple, and the external finish resembles that of the larger
saloon. When the Duke was travelling by special train north of Inverness, the
large saloon was steadied by having the smaller vehicle attached behind it.
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
It has been obvious to resident and visitor alike that industry in the Province
of British Columbia has, in recent times, been surging ahead. However, what the
general public has failed to recognize has been the phenomenal growth of outdoor
activity and especially that of ski-ing.
The impact of this expansion has been felt within the Department to a marked
degree. Five years ago the time required for annual inspections of existing aerial
tramways and ski-ing facilities was a minor part of the over-all function of the
Inspecting Engineers' work. Since then, however, due to the increased tempo in
development of the ski-ing areas, the work and time involved in the checking of
plans, profiles, and preliminary and final inspections of all types of lifts have increased tenfold, and as a consequence have become a major part of the Department's schedule.
Ski-ing facilities now exist in almost every corner of the Province. Excellent
ski lifts of all types can now be found on Vancouver Island, where recent developments at Mount Becher near Courtenay and at Green Mountain west of Ladysmith are operational. Installations on Grouse Mountain and Mount Seymour have
increased in number and will provide more skiers with greater reaches for ski-ing.
Another chair-lift constructed on Whistler Mountain at Garibaldi will further
implement the fine complex now existing on the mountain. This mountain is
unique in that alpine conditions are now available at the conclusion of a 2V2
hour's drive from the heart of Vancouver.
Should one wish to find varying snow conditions and new runs to conquer, a
week-end trip to the Interior of the Province will reveal a skier's bonanza. Journeying by automobile over the Hope-Princeton Highway, skiers can avail themselves
of several ski tows in Manning Park, two of which were designed and constructed
by the Department of Recreation and Conservation Parks Branch. Eastward at
Princeton there are two rope tows which operate just outside the city, just a long
step south of the Southern Trans-Canada Highway.
The Okanagan is also well served by excellent well-controlled areas at Apex
Mountain at Penticton, Big White east of Kelowna, and Silver Star at Vernon.
Some of the finest ski-ing conditions exist in this locale.
Farther east, once more, small operations exist at Bridesville and Phoenix.
While these sites have only recently been in existence, plans are already afoot to
begin expansion.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 35
The upper bullwheel at
Mount Seymour. Note
the arrangement to prevent the bullwheel from
jumping out of the frame
in the event of a broken
shaft or bearing.
The lower terminal at Mount Seymour.   The motive power at the operation
is diesel-electric.
 FF 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A typical T-bar operation with pylon towers.
Red Mountain at Rossland, a long-time ski Mecca, introduced an 8,400-foot
double chair-lift to augment its established lifts. This area is noted for the development of Miss Nancy Greene, who has gone on to achieve international acclaim on
the world's ski slopes.
Nelson and Salmo, also in this general locality, provide tows of the T-bar type
for residents of their respective communities.
In the East Kootenay at Kimberley, the highest city in Canada, two T-bars are
at present handling many skiers from the surrounding district, and a double chair-
lift planned for 1967 will increase the capacity at North Star Mountain.
The Snow Valley T-bar at Fernie, since its beginning three years ago, has
developed many skiers who would otherwise have had to journey elsewhere to enjoy
the sport.
The North Okanagan is serviced by Lac le Jeune and Tod Mountain, the latter
having the longest double-seat chair-lift in Canada, a length of some 9,400 feet.
At Revelstoke a T-bar is beginning its second season. This has proved to be
a welcome addition to the poma-lift which has been in use in Mount Revelstoke
National Park for several years.
In the Cariboo country, interest in ski-ing has promoted lifts at Wells, Quesnel,
and Williams Lake, the latter being in the process of erecting a new T-bar.
Prince George and Dawson Creek experienced successful seasons last year
with the opening of T-bar lifts in each city.
Lakelse Hot Springs, adjacent to Kitimat, until last year notable only for its
waters, introduced ski-ing as an added attraction in the form of a Hall T-bar, which
received permission to operate just in time for the winter season.
 	
■   .
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 37
The foregoing, of course, does not represent a complete coverage of all ski
lifts in the Province, but merely serves to illustrate to what extent the facilities have
grown.
The largest single project completed in 1966 was that of the Grouse Mountain
Resorts jig-back aerial tramway stretching from Cleveland Dam in the North Vancouver watershed to the new chalet on Grouse Mountain. The construction on
this tramway was commenced in 1965, and after being subjected to seven days of
tests and inspections by engineers of the Department, it was approved for operation
and was put into service in late February of this year. Because of its size and
complexity, this tramway has been inspected periodically since its inception to
ensure that the public may travel in complete safety.
Problems have arisen with the two large locked coil cables on which the 50-
passenger cabins are carried. Again to be positive about the safety of this tramway, a wire-rope expert was flown over from Germany to assure the Department
that the condition of the track cables could not give rise to an accident.
A subsequent meeting called by the Chief Engineer of the Department with
the owners of the tramway and the German cable expert resulted in a written statement by the latter that he had found the track cables to be of such strength and
condition as to preclude their contributing to an accident.
While in some quarters the insistence on this type of inspection may seem
extreme, it is too late in the event of an accident on a tramway of this design to do
what obviously should have been done in the first place.
The other major installation in 1966 was at Whistler Mountain, where a
double-seat chair-lift of local design and manufacture was erected in November.
This chair-lift will serve to open up new ski-ing slopes to the north of the original
chair-lift, thus contributing to the added enjoyment of the skier.
At Mount Becher on Forbidden Plateau near Courtenay, an extension of 1,800
feet has been added to the original T-bar and a new 1,500-foot T-bar was erected
uphill from the first lift.   This will provide for an earlier ski-ing season.
A further project was undertaken at Williams Lake, where an old chair-lift of
European design was purchased in Alberta. When the plans for this lift were presented to the Department for approval of installation, it was found that the design
would not be able to comply with the new aerial-tramway code. Since the cost of
making the necessary alterations in construction would be prohibitive, on the advice
of Department engineers this chair-lift was converted to a satisfactory surface lift.
Annual inspections were conducted in 41 ski areas in the Province, which
resulted in a coverage of 77 ski lifts during 1966. At the present rate of growth,
this number will be greatly surpassed within the very near future.
In addition to the ski lifts, three industrial tramways are subject to annual
inspection by the Department. These are located at Kemano, Dog Mountain, and
Mount Jarvis. They are used mainly to transport men and equipment to mountain
areas for maintenance of equipment on microwave stations and, in the case of
Kemano, to service the water tunnel and penstocks which supply the power-station.
All three of these tramways were inspected in 1966 and found to be well maintained and operated.
In the matter of accidents, unfortunately one area did experience an accident
in which a number of passengers were injured. Upon investigation it was found
that a large portion of the blame lay at the door of the man operating the chair-lift.
It has since been proposed by the Department that tramway operators be compelled
to pass an examination on the operation and maintenance of tramways and thus be
properly certified.    The chair-lift on which this accident occurred has since been
 FF 38                                                  BRITISH COLUMBIA
modified so that an accident of this particular nature could not happen again.   Other
accidents reported were fortunately few in number and, for the most part, minor
in nature.
A meeting was held in Vancouver in October with the ski area operators of
British Columbia, at which time some of the new regulations pertaining to aerial
tramways were discussed, followed by a visit to the Grouse Mountain complex.   It
is the intention of the Department to conduct more of these sessions in the future
to establish a closer relationship between government and industry, which should
be of benefit to all concerned.
The fifth draft of the Canadian safety code for aerial tramways has been
completed and will now be presented to the voting members of the committee which
was formed in 1963 at the request of the Canadian Standards Association.   This
draft is expected to be approved early in 1967, and will then govern the construction
and operation of passenger-carrying aerial tramways across Canada.   In prepara
tion, the ski lifts in British Columbia have all been up-graded so that only minor
alterations will be required to comply with the new Canadian Standards Association
Code Z98 when it is introduced.
Aerial Tramways Registered with the Department of Commercial
Transport to December 31, 1966
Location No. and Name
Location
Gon-   Chair-
dola      lift
T-bar
J-bar
Rope
Tow
Industrial
Freight
1
2
1
2
2
3
3. Garibaldi                         .   '■ 	
1
2
2
2
....
2
1
1
1
7. Kemano (Alcan)  	
Kemano 	
_
1
Dawson Creek _	
1
I
1
|
10. Wells..	
Wells   	
1    |      ....
11. Dog Mountain (B.C. Telephone)	
South-west of Hope	
....    |         1
12. Mount Jarvis (C.N.R.) 	
13. Tod Mountain   ~	
North of Kamloops	
1
1
South of Kamloops 	
2
|
Revelstoke 	
Revelstoke	
Vernon  ,
....
....
1
2
....
1
1
"i j   z
17. Silver Star  ..
18. Big White                           	
2
1
-
....
....
1
1
2    i
Princeton	
....
....
1
1
2   :
i
1
i
24. Phoenix Alpine _  	
West of Grand Forks	
__
_
....
....
i
25. North Star 	
Kimberley. 	
	
	
2
26. Fernie (Snow Valley)	
Fernie	
	
	
1
	
l
27. Silver King	
Nelson  	
	
-
1
	
l
28. Salmo    	
Salmo	
....
1
29. Red Mountain	
Rossland	
2
1
1
l   I    ....
- -   1        !
..
1       1     !
32. Kamloops	
Kamloops.	
_
l   |    .._
2    !
34. Smithers   	
Smithers 	
1    |      _..
35. Bornite  	
Terrace	
....
1    I      ....
1    !
37. Glacier   	
Glacier  —
....
1    |      _..
38. Blue River  	
Blue River  	
1    |      ....
39. Burns Lake                  -
....
....
1
—
1 |      _
2 i      ....
40. Little Squaw	
North of Williams Lake ..
....
1    |
42. Silver Tip	
Sumallo Area	
....
_..
....   '
_..
1    |      ....
Totals	
2    I      9    |    26    !       5    !    35    1        3
 —
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1966
FF 39
To supplement the above, Provincial regulations have been passed by Order
in Council to cover any eventuality not covered in the aforementioned code.
In view of the number of tramways constructed and areas improved over the
past year and the support given by the public to these enterprises, it is safe to
assume that this field has only one direction to go—forward!
 FF 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANADIAN STANDARDS
The Department is a sustaining member of the Canadian Standards Association, and the Chief Engineer of the Engineering Branch is an active member of
several Canadian Standards Association committees, including oil pipe-lines, gas
pipe-lines, and passenger-carrying aerial tramways.
During the year, meetings were held in Calgary, Vancouver, and Victoria. The
meeting in Victoria was to consider the fifth draft of the Z98 Passenger Carrying
Aerial Tramway Code. As a result, a new aerial-tramway code is now completed
to the ballot stage, and already it is being used throughout the industry in both
Canada and the United States as a standard to which new aerial tramways are being
designed and constructed.
A second meeting was held in Vancouver with members of the aerial-tramway
industry in October, 1966, at which safety was discussed and the industry instructed
as to the new Canadian Standards Association standards to be adopted by the
Department.
The meetings in Calgary were in respect to the gas and oil codes, which are
reaching final stages after four years of meetings with the gas and oil industry
throughout Canada.
PROPANE
The use of propane for domestic use and industry has increased throughout
British Columbia. In addition, facilities have been provided adjacent to Vancouver
for the export of large shipments to Japan and the Far East. The Trans Mountain
Oil Pipe Line Company has installed extensive facilities at the Port of Coquitlam
for the handling of propane from jumbo tank cars, storing and refrigerating it for
shipment overseas in specially equipped ships. This installation, together with
the trackage involved, has been inspected and approved by engineers from the
Department.
It was assumed until 1965 that the Board of Transport Commissioners for
Canada inspected and regulated all propane-unloading facilities in connection with
the Canadian Pacific Railway, the Canadian National Railway, and the Great
Northern Railway. However, in 1965 this Board made it known its current regulations applied only on the railway right-of-way of any railway under the Federal
jurisdiction, and any portions or parts of such installations that were outside of the
Board's jurisdiction became a Provincial matter.
Inasmuch as the Department had rules which precisely governed these types
of installations on railways under Provincial jurisdiction, such as the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway and the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway,
inspections were made on all existing installations located on all railways in British
Columbia.   The following is a list of the installations as of December, 1966:—
Location of Propane Bulk Storage and Handling Facilities
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority:  Pattullo Gate, New Westminster, Victoria.
Bibby Propane Ltd:  Vernon.
British American Oil Co. Ltd.:  Fort St. John, Quesnel, Sumas.
Canadian Propane Consolidated Ltd.:   Burns Lake, Castlegar, Golden.
Canadian Propane Equipment Co.:   Cedarside.
Cigas Products Ltd.:  Langley, Prince George, Topley, Vernon.
F.M.C. Chemicals:   Squamish.
Home Oil Distributors Ltd.:  Clinton, Quesnel, Shalalth, Williams Lake.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 41
Imperial Oil Ltd.:   Chetwynd, loco, Lillooet, Pemberton, Quesnel, Williams Lake.
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd.:  Nelson, Trail.
Kamloops Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd.:   Avola.
Mountain Gas Ltd.:   Cranbrook, Galloway.
Pacific Coast Hydrocarbons:   Squamish.
Pacific Petroleums Ltd.:   Taylor.
Rockgas Propane Ltd.: Nelson, Penticton, Revelstoke, Smithers, Terrace,
Williams Lake.
Seventy-seven Oil Co.:  Cranbrook.
Shell Canada Ltd.:  Exeter, Quesnel, Squamish, Williams Lake.
Texaco Canada Ltd.:  New Westminster, Quesnel, Williams Lake.
Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Co.:  Westridge, Burnaby.
Western Propane Ltd.: Topley.
In making inspections under Part XII of the regulations, it was found that
liaison was required between the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspection Branch, the
Fire Marshal's Office, the Motor-vehicle Branch, and the propane industry itself.
A committee was consequently set up chaired by the Chief Engineer of the Department with a second committee encompassing the five major railways.
Propane has presented a number of problems, especially where the product is
transferred from a container such as a tank car to a tank installed on a motor-vehicle.
A further public hazard is presented in transferring propane or butane from a tank
truck to a stationary storage tank. Hoses under refrigerated conditions are subject
to failure, and training became necessary so that people handling this product on
the railways, in the trucks, and transferring it to ship-side loading would be properly
trained.
The production manager of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority's
gas division was loaned to the Department to serve on committees and to train
personnel. Lectures were conducted at the Bayshore Inn in Vancouver, the Engineering Branch office of the Department in Vancouver, the Fire Marshal's Office in
Vancouver and in Prince George.
Meetings have been held in the Fire Marshal's Office from time to time with
the industry, the railways, and representatives from the Board of Transport Commissioners of Canada. In addition, legal representatives from the Propane Association of Canada have met with Department officials in an effort to bring this involved
matter to a safe and equitable solution.
PIPE-LINES
The petroleum industry continued to be quite active during 1966 in the construction of gas- and oil-gathering systems, mostly in the field of pipe-line connections into the major transmission-lines. There were more than 60 pipe-line projects
approved, tested, and certified for operation during the year. The approval of
plans, specifications, and installations for these projects is one of the major functions
of the Engineering Branch of this Department.
In the Lower Mainland area the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
gas transmission-lines were inspected and extensions to the system, including the
up-grading of operating pressures, were tested and approved. A number of extensions to the distribution system of the Inland Natural Gas Company Limited were
carried out during the year and were inspected and tested.
Nine additional water- and gas-injection recovery systems were installed in the
Peejay, Boundary Lake, Milligan, and Wildmint fields and approved for operation.
 FF 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Water-flood- and gas-injection recovery has proven to be very effective, and the
principle of proceeding with gas and oil recovery before the field pressure has
dropped to any extent has proven the advantage of this procedure.
The annual inspection of compressor and pumping stations was carried out
during the year by Department inspectors. Each station was certified, after the
inspection, that the requirements of the Pipe-lines Act and Fire Marshal's regulations
had been complied with. This included the stations of Westcoast Transmission
Company Limited, which is under Federal jurisdiction, but the pressure vessels and
safety with regard to workmen are under Provincial jurisdiction.
An application by Pacific Diatomite Limited, Edmonton, Alta., for leave to
construct a slurry pipe-line in the district of Quesnel was received by the Department. The engineering data and aspects were studied by engineers of this branch
and the project was found to be sound, and an Order in Council was recommended
and passed approving the construction of this pipe-line. This is British Columbia's
first pipe-line for hauling solid materials. It was felt that this could pioneer the
construction of other pipe-lines to be used for hauling solid materials long distances
in British Columbia. The 4-inch pipe-line will be approximately 8 miles in length
and will be used to transport fossilized earth, which is used in the manufacture of
fertilizer. The material is ground into small particles at the mine-site and then
pumped in water to the railway siding at Barlow Station on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.   Up to 120 tons of material a day can be hauled through this line.
All tank-farms were inspected to make certain that they conformed with the
Fire Marshal's regulations. All tank-farms, in addition to being approved by the
Department, are also approved by the Fire Marshal. Inspectors of this Department,
however, have made all field inspections.
During the year three pipe-line companies were granted certificates for the
construction of pipe-lines in British Columbia. They include the Fort Nelson Transmission Company Limited, Pacific Diatomite Limited, and Jefferson Lake Petrochemicals of Canada Limited. The Trans-Prairie Pipelines Limited looped the
12-inch oil-line from the Peejay area during the year, made necessary by the increased oil production from this field. Inland Natural Gas Company Limited has
completed 23 miles of distribution-line to serve the townsite of Mackenzie and
related pulp-mills in the Pine Pass area, the source of supply being taken from the
Westcoast Transmission metering-station.
Cryogenic Enterprises Limited is constructing a methane liquefication plant in
the Richmond area. A pipe-line distribution system is being planned for Squamish
and several communities on Vancouver Island. The product is to be carried to the
distribution points in a specially designed 11,880-gallon liquid-methane trailer at
minus 259° F., where it will be re-evaporated and supplied to the distribution
systems. The specifications of this trailer were checked by this Department and
forwarded to Victoria for approval.
In July of this year a hearing before the Public Utilities Commission at
Terrace was attended by officials of this Department. The purpose of the hearing
was to consider an application by Pacific Northern Gas Limited to construct a
natural-gas transmission system from a point between Summit Lake in Northern
British Columbia and Prince Rupert. This would entail the construction of
approximately 431 miles of pipe-line at a cost of $24,000,000 and be completed by
November, 1967. A certificate of public convenience and necessity was issued to
the company on December 8th by the Public Utilities Commission, and an application has been received under the Pipe-lines Act by this Department.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 43
Westcoast Transmission Company is at present constructing five additional
compressor-stations on the transmission-line from Taylor. The increase in production and consumption of natural gas has resulted in the necessity of increasing the
capacity of the present line by adding to the number of compressor-stations at
present in operation. Specifications of these stations were checked by this Branch,
and on-site preliminary inspections have been made.
The status of pipe-lines constructed, tested, and approved is contained in the
appendix of this report.
Annual Inspections Under the Pipe-lines Act, 1966
Miles of new pipe-line inspected and tested  162
Compressor-stations inspected  34
Pumping-stations inspected  18
Gas distribution and metering stations inspected  13
Number of tank-farms inspected  5
Approval of plans and specifications for pipe-line projects  60
Number of new extensions to pipe-line projects approved  59
Certificates of inspection issued under the Pipe-lines Act authorizing
the operation of new extensions to pipe-line projects  58
Number of pipe-line crossings of railways inspected  3
Number of pipe-line crossings of highways inspected  2
Number of pipe-line crossings of other pipe-lines approved  31
Power-line crossings over pipe-line right-of-way approved  13
 FF 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Pipe-lines Approved, Inspected, and Tested, 1966
Name of Company
Oil or
Gas
Project
No.
Pipe-line Location
Mileage
British   Columbia   Hydro   and   Power
Gas
1345
Coquitlam 	
1.80
1356
1.00
,.
1364
Surrey 	
6.95
1365
7.59
It
1366
Cloverdale	
1.00
1367
Surrey  	
1.00
„
1370
North Vancouver	
4.40
1371
1.00
1381
3.37
1391
Richmond	
0.27
1352
1.40
1355
8.18
"
1395
1401
0.28
Rigel	
1.50
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd 	
1248
Pine Pass-Mackenzie townsite..
23.00
1350
0.02
1358
0.07
,,
1369
Castlegar 	
0.94
1373
0.73
1374
0.81
1382
Kamloops	
0.20
,,
1384
Prince George	
0.07
1390
2.10
1383
Stoddard	
6.67
Slurrv   !      1378
8.50
Gas
1346
1347
1.20
Fort St. John 	
5.17
»
1354
1392
3.50
9.10
"
1399
1372
1.50
Fort St. John  ....
1.06
1385
Fort St. John  	
0.70
1348
Nig Creek	
0.60
1394
9.10
Trans-Prairie Pipelines Ltd	
Oil
1357
Taylor North        	
15.50
1359
1.80
1361
Taylor North	
23.50
„
1363
Nancy   —
3.20
Union Oil Co.           	
"
1396
1397
Weasel	
Bullrush	
0.76
1.04
Total 	
„
1398
1.40
161.98
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 45
CRUDE OIL
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
■ TRANS-MOUNTAIN
OIL  PIPE-LINE
 FF 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
NATURAL GAS
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
WESTCOAST
TRANSMISSION
'    GAS TRUNK LINE
OF B.C.
INLAND NATURAL
GAS
— —COLUMBIA NATURAL
GAS LIMITED
.--.«««. ALBERTA NATURAL
GAS TRANSMISSION
LINE
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 47
INDUSTRIAL ROADS
Despite a decline in log production in the latter part of 1966, logging-trucks
have again increased in numbers and size. Units fitted with 15-foot bunks, 8-foot
stakes, and powered by engines of 500 horsepower are no longer a sight to inspire
awe in the casual observed. While the vehicle size and proportionate load would
appear to present more problems safety-wise, such is not the case. These trucks,
which are being supplied to the logging industry by local manufacturers, represent
the ultimate in safety as it is known today. The braking systems contain all the
latest safety refinements, as well as those which have been successfully used over the
past years. The measure of safety afforded by this arrangement has been recognized
by the Motor-vehicle Branch and is now mandatory on the large air-equipped school
buses in the Province. The adoption of this braking system will provide our schoolchildren with far greater protection than is enjoyed anywhere else in the world.
While the installation of safety equipment is one thing, the training of drivers
in the operation of this same equipment gives rise to more problems. To this end,
inspectors of the Department travel often to remote areas of the Province to conduct
vehicle inspections, lectures, and examinations to ensure that only competent personnel are employed as air-equipped vehicle operators, and that the vehicles themselves are maintained in a proper manner. Despite this training, accidents are still
being experienced on our industrial roads, but it has been found that the incidence
of accidents is decreasing while the number of vehicles employed is increasing.
Comparing this with the increase in accidents involving highway transport trucks,
one can only assume that insistence on safety equipment, proper inspection, and
driver-training is paying dividends for the logging industry.
Industrial-road complexes, while originally constructed to obtain access to rich
timber stands or mineral deposits, have become highways to the outside world for
numbers of formerly isolated communities. A case in point is the link-up of industrial roads which connect Campbell River and the Port Hardy area as well as the
west coast of Vancouver Island. People residing in these areas are now allowed to
use these roads after normal working-hours.
The prospect of being able to get out for a week-end once in a while has
encouraged more people to move into this section of Vancouver Island, thereby
creating instant towns as well as establishing a reliable working force for the logging
concerns in the area.
Columbia Cellulose Company Limited, operating in the Terrace district, is
opening up a vast area on the Nass River. This river is some 70 miles north of
Terrace and is reached by a first-class industrial road owned and operated by this
company. Again, while providing a means of logging the forest, it also serves the
Indian communities along the river and provides for easy access to considerable
mining development north of the logging limits.
Winter operations have in the past been curtailed due to the freezing over of
the river, thus causing seasonal unemployment. However, the company is in the
process of extending its logging-road west along the river to reach the salt water.
When this is completed, year-round logging operation will be possible. This, of
course, is most desirable for both the employer and the employee as well as the
business life of Terrace and surrounding communities.
The extension of the logging-road to an ice-free booming-ground has tripled
the distance for log haulage. The cost of hauling a single load of logs for this many
miles is considerable, so, taking a leaf from the book of the Vancouver Island logger,
truck trains are being introduced to this haul. Truck tractors capable of pulling up
to four trailer loads of logs are being purchased for this project.   The use of these
 FF 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
trains has presented problems with the braking systems and trailer hook-ups, which,
however, have been overcome by engineers of the Department working closely with
the truck and trailer manufacturers.
Another industrial road which bears mention at this time is the one operated
by Trautman-Garroway Limited at Peachland. The first 8 miles of this road were
originally constructed as access to the Peachland water reservoir system, and they
were maintained by the Department of Highways. As time went by, Trautman-
Garroway Limited developed its logging operations in the area and, to facilitate
movement of its heavy logging-trucks, widened and improved this stretch of road
to the point that very few traces of the original road remained. However, since
this was still gazetted as a public road, the Department of Highways was still responsible for snow removal and general road maintenance, which was proving to be quite
costly and resulted in machinery being allocated to this road when it could have
been used more advantageously elsewhere.
Upon receiving a request from the company that this be declared an industrial
road, an Inspecting Engineer from the Department was dispatched to conduct a
survey of the road. As a result of his inspection, an agreement was reached with
the Department of Highways resulting in a change of status so that Trautman-
Garroway Limited maintains this road under the Industrial Transportation Act,
having full jurisdiction under regulations approved by this Department.
Since the Trautman-Garroway road is adjacent to the company's other logging-
roads in the area, opportunity for the public to enjoy the excellent hunting and
fishing to be found in the district is now possible, providing it respects the road regulations as posted by the company.
In general, hunters, fishermen, hikers, and tourists have welcomed the opening-
up of new vistas as provided by those companies operating industrial roads. While
there have been isolated acts of vandalism and theft in some localities, the public as
a whole has been very co-operative, and it is to be hoped that the present good
relationship will continue as new areas develop.
Accident reports have been gratifying in 1966, inasmuch as there were no
driver fatalities. However, reports filed do indicate a number of near misses.
Investigation of these accidents reveals in all cases that drivers had become inured
to the danger of overspeeding or had overestimated their ability to control their
vehicle. One of the greatest difficulties encountered by the Department engineers
has been to attempt to overcome the complacent attitude found in some truck-
drivers. Success in this endeavour is difficult to achieve and may be best overcome
by more frequent trips to logging operations where this unfortunate attitude exists.
A total of six investigations by members of the Department into accidents
involving highway tractor trailers was conducted in 1966. These investigations
were made at the request of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police highway patrol
and the New Westminster City Police when air-brake failure was suspected as the
cause of an accident.
It is expected that requests of this type of investigation will lessen in the future
as a semi-annual traffic course conducted for the police at Victoria now consists in
part of three to four days' training on air brakes and truck inspection taught by staff
of the Department. All persons benefit as a result of this instruction, as the police
are now able to make more comprehensive safety checks of these large highway
transports.
While on the subject of highway traffic, it is surprising to note the interest of
transport-drivers in the courses conducted during the past year at the Burnaby
Vocational School. The men attending these courses were experienced truck-drivers
who wished to further their knowledge of diesel engines and air brakes.   The Auto-
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 49
C^CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCH.^CC'C^CC'CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC^.CCC
Unloading logs with a grapple at a Crown Zellerbach pulp-mill operation.
motive Transport Association of British Columbia, the driving force behind these
classes, found the response to be far greater than it had anticipated, especially to
the air-brake programme.
Students in training at the British Columbia Vocational Schools were, as in
previous years, given air-brake training, and working models of the air systems were
installed at the Prince George and Nelson schools under the guidance of the
Department.
Technical information pertaining to stopping ability and distances was produced in Court for the benefit of the police, where this information was used to
determine the outcome of the Court's judgment.
New air-brake valves and associated equipment have been presented for testing
and approval, and, as in the past, only that equipment which could meet the standards as determined by the Department was given recognition for the Province of
British Columbia.
With new types of vehicles entering the field of industrial transportation, it is
important that the safety of these units be assured. To that end, the Department was
forced in some instances to cause the manufacturers to alter the braking systems to
provide a maximum of safety for the operator.
While the lumbering industry continues to grow year by year, resulting in
rapid changes in transportation methods and a fantastic increase in the number of
vehicles travelling on industrial roads, accidents have been held to a minimum.
Without the co-operation of the logging companies, the truck-manufacturers, and in
 FF 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
many cases the drivers themselves, the foregoing would not be true as it would be
extremely difficult for inspectors of the Department to keep a 24-hour watch on all
facets of industrial transportation.
With continued support from within the lumbering industry, it appears that
the year 1967 should produce even better results safety-wise than have yet been
achieved, despite a record number of men and machines involved.
Annual Inspections under the Industrial Transportation Act
1964
1965
1966
Logging-trucks inspected-
Gravel trucks inspected..
Crummies (workmen's buses)  	
Miscellaneous vehicles (including highway vehicles)..
Air-brake lectures	
Lecture attendance..
Logging-truck operators certified-
British Columbia Vocational Schools and other institutes (air-brake examinations).
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (air-brake examinations)	
573
44
244
303
23
534
528
108
20
295
68
158
110
21
450
350
158
28
245
46
161
98
25
730
494
140
56
Air-brake Lectures Conducted during 1966
Attendance
at Lectures
Date Place
January 12—Prince George Vocational School  21
January 19—Department of Highways, Cloverdale.  22
February 16—Nanaimo Vocational School  51
March 1—Diesel transport operators, Burnaby  30
March 3—Diesel transport operators, Burnaby  30
March 4—Crown Zellerbach truck-drivers, Nitinat  18
March 17—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  24
March 18—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  24
March 19—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  24
March 20—Nanaimo Vocational School  9
May 5—Haney Correctional Institution  30
May 10—Diesel transport operators, Burnaby  60
May 11—Diesel transport operators, Burnaby  60
May 30—Crown Zellerbach, Beaver Cove  24
July 13—Crowsnest Industries truck-drivers, Fernie  20
July 20—Kootenay Forest Products, Nelson  25
September 16—Terrace logging-truck drivers  60
September 19—Nass River logging-truck drivers  30
September 20—Burnaby Vocational School  24
October 20—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  32
October 21—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria  32
November 14—Crown Zellerbach, Nanaimo Lakes  26
November 28—Haney Correctional Institution  32
December 5—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Vancouver.  12
December 7—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Vancouver.  12
Total
730
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 51
ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAMME
In line with Government policy, a programme of safety in the Department and
in co-operation with industry has been carried out. Safety has been a prime consideration in the operation of all branches of the Department, and during the past
year supervisory staff have been alert to dangerous practices and have recommended
and required alternate more safe methods of operation by industry.
Equipment such as hard hats and reflectorized raincoats have been provided
for members of the staff of the Weigh Scale Branch who are required to perform their duties on the open highway amidst heavy and fast-moving traffic. It is
reported that this equipment not only provided better visibility to oncoming traffic,
but afforded greater confidence to the operators working under these dangerous
conditions.
In addition, the use of reflectorized traffic cones in areas where traffic direction
is necessary both on the highway and within the operating confines of the permanent
weigh-scales has contributed considerably to the standard of safety of these operations. At the permanent weigh-scales throughout the Province, additional illumination has been provided where it was considered necessary to eliminate hazardous
conditions of operation.
New-type portable scales have been obtained, which reduce the actual weighing
hazard and, due to their simplified operation, the time involved in turn contributes
to the actual highway safety factor. It is anticipated that all portable units will be
equipped with the new-type scale in the next two years.
A study has been made by the Engineering Branch into the feasibility of using
the reflectorization principle on switch-stand targets of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, including the use of this principle on all types of flags such as " Slow,"
" Stop," " Caution," etc., used for the protection of trains and crews.
It was found that the use of this principle on switch targets was very successful,
and it was possible to do away with switch lamps as the reflectorized targets were
far superior at night when energized by the locomotive headlights, especially in bad
weather conditions. Preparations for testing out this principle on flags, yard-limit
signs, and order boards are at present under way.
A number of safety devices have been devised and tested with regard to the
safe operation of aerial tramways. These have been approved for operation, and
when installed will be tested by the Department engineers. These include automatic
braking, anti-roll-back, and bullwheel safety devices. Several chair-lifts were re-
tested during the year to ensure that a satisfactory standard of safe operation was
being maintained and further safety devices were not required.
As in previous years, new air-brake equipment being produced by manufacturers has been submitted to the Engineering Branch and tested before being approved for use on industrial roads in the Province. An installation of a braking
system to provide greater safety in the operation of school buses where spring-
activated emergency brakes are installed was designed and approved. This system
was adopted and approved for operation on highways of the Province by the Motor-
vehicle Branch.
The staff of the Department of Commercial Transport are ever cognizant of
the need for safety in their daily operations, and we recognize their achievements
in this programme. During the year a second silver safety award was presented to
the Department for an accident-free period of operation extending over 19 months.
We are pleased that this safety-conscious Department has been able to attain this
record.
 FF 52                                               BRITISH COLUMBIA
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1966 FF 53
ACCOUNTS BRANCH
D. I. Ewen, C.O.A., Senior Clerk
Accounting procedures were not changed to any extent during 1966, with the
exception of a revision in payroll preparation, which was required to meet new
policies of the Department of Finance.
Personnel records were maintained in the prescribed manner, although during
the year an improved method of recording this information was implemented. This
has been an asset to both the accounting office and to the personnel officer.
Relaxation by the Purchasing Commission in the level of purchases requiring
purchase orders has resulted in greater flexibility in the field and has lessened administrative problems at headquarters.
Mileage charts, which are used to prepare permits for the movement of heavy
loads and in computing pertinent fees, were revised in line with changes in highway
routes and varying mileages.
An increase of 8 per cent in the issuance of oversize and overweight permits
during the past year indicates the continued growth of the trucking industry within
the Province. This trend is further evidenced by a rise of 8 per cent in the number
of temporary operating permits issued. This, together with the additional number
of commercial vehicles and trailers licensed, accounts for an over-all increase in
gross revenue of 10 per cent.
Block load permits and restricted-route permits available to primary industries
of the Province account for the greater portion of an 18-per-cent gain in oversize
and overweight revenue, although the continuation of the major construction of the
various power projects is still responsible for a minor increase in overweight revenue.
Revenue derived from the operation of oversize vehicles has been supported by the
use of trailers over 40 feet and the issuance of short-term permits to cover their
operation.
The number of active company accounts has remained constant, with the
addition of 20 new companies and the cancellation of 21 old ones. The number of
oversize and overweight permits audited by this office has again increased and now
averages approximately 3,000 per month, with the highest single month's operation
in July when 3,847 permits were received, audited, and billed. The fact that this
was accomplished with no interruption in the other duties points out the invaluable
benefit derived from the change-over from manual accounting to data processing.
There has been a considerable increase of 27 per cent in the number of commercial vehicles registered under the Western Compact Prorate Agreement and, to
a lesser degree, 18 per cent in prorate trailer registration. This gives an indication
of the benefit derived by the operator as well as by the Province in the implementation of this agreement. The same appears to be true of the reciprocal agreement
between the Province of British Columbia and several of the other Canadian Provinces in respect to the movement of used household goods. The increase in the
east-west flow of commercial traffic is particularly noticeable when, in addition to
movement of trucks under these various reciprocal agreements, the number of nonresident permits issued shows an increase of 10 per cent. By far the greater number
of these permits are written at the Golden weigh-scale. However, the volume at
this scale is expected to decrease to some extent when the Yellowhead Pass route
is opened next year.
A programme of up-dating and modernizing office equipment in the various
weigh-scale stations has been initiated, and it is anticipated that this will further
 FF 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
increase the efficiency of the field offices and, in particular, those serving as regional
offices.
The following tables show results of the activities of the Weigh Scale Branch
during the past year. Other tables relating to the Engineering Branch are included
elsewhere in this report.
Table 1.—Revenue from Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes
for Passenger and Commercial Vehicles1
Fiscal Year Amount
1954/55   $17,455,000
1955/56   19,820,000
1956/57   22,593,000
1957/58   24,500,000
1958/59   26,100,000
1959/60   28,582,000
Fiscal Year Amount
1960/61   $30,093,000
1961/62   39,262,000
1962/63   43,129,000
1963/64   46,420,000
1964/65   50,865,000
1965/66   56,441,000
i Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
Table 2.—Summary of Commercial-vehicle Licences and Permits Issued,
January 1, 1966, to December 31, 1966
Month
Number of
Commercial
Vehicles Registered and
Licensed!
Number of
Commercial
Trailers Registered and
Licensed1
Number of
Non-resident
Permits
Issued
Number of
Temporary
Operation
Permits
Issued
Number of
Oversize and
Overweight
Permits
Issued
Number of
Vehicles
Checked
at Weigh-
stations
January. _
February	
March 	
April	
May	
June	
July... 	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December.	
Totals.
22,503
78,398
20,009
7,856
6,161
5,140
3,647
3,494
3,137
2,509
2,1:14
2,100
6,088
6,639
1,250
490
683
380
235
261
338
153
143
125
157,068
16,785
1,131
1,006
1,955
1,062
1,174
2,091
1,391
1,604
1,943
1,534
1,089
1,275
2,097
1,947
4,244
3,510
3,943
3,908
3,266
3,241
2,922
2,989
2,847
2,750
2,507
2,746
2,764
2,328
2,846
3,060
3,847
2,891
3,030
3,225
2,861
2,500
17,255
37,664
34,605
79,845
97,086
122,893
90,017
98,235
124,672
104,389
110,497
146,806
107,573
101,640
108,000
1,291,653
1 Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
Table 3.—Summary of Prorate Operation, 1966
Companies
Prorated
Tractor
Units
Trailer
Units
55
215
249
2,649
169
5,077
Totals
270
2,898
5,246
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966
FF 55
Table 4.—Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections from Commercial
Licence and Permit Fees for Five-year Period 1961/62 to 1965/66,
Inclusive.
Source
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
Commercial motor-vehicle licences
Non-resident commercial permits...
$7,938,605.82
478,156.17
57,452.34
58,442.51
321,730.55
$8,253,251.46
381,673.01
61,408.52
62,909.21
368,715.57
$8,910,152.29
404,410.49
74,298.71
66,001.38
447,680.61
$9,706,485.52
410,645.40
81.223.22
$10,674,538.55
429,067.05
91.177.10
Temporary operation permits	
Oversize and overweight permits.	
80,692.20 |         98,006.54
530,171.28 |       629,453.01
Totals 	
S8.854.387.39  1  S9.127.957.77  I  S9.902.543.48
$10,809,217.62
$11,922,242.05
Table 5.—Summary of Violations Issued, January 1,
to December 31, 1966
Licence and Permit Violations
Gross vehicle weight	
Motor-vehicle registration	
Licence-plates	
Trailer plates.
1966,
Quarterly licence	
Non-resident permit	
Temporary operation permit
Motive-fuel emblem	
Overweight permit required _
Oversize permit required	
Restricted-route permit	
Highway-crossing permit	
Proration 	
Other 	
Total violations	
Total number of vehicles checked
1,442
722
608
154
22
63
12
81
23
58
32
13
3
6
3,239
1,291,653
Motor-carrier Violations
Motor-carrier plates not displayed
Motor-carrier licence not carried _
Conditions of licence not carried	
Operating otherwise than permitted by licence
Total violations	
Total number of vehicles checked ___
436
295
286
309
1,326
18,783
Oversize and Overweight Violations
Oversize and overweight violations issued .
Oversize and overweight prosecutions, including those through
Royal Canadian Mounted Police	
1,236
1,078
 FF 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERSONNEL
A. Shaw, C.O.A., Administrative Officer
During the year a considerable number of personnel changes were made as a
result of retirements and increased establishment, as follows:—
Retirements 	
Resignations 	
New appointments—
Permanent 	
Temporary	
Transfers	
Promotions 	
Number of competitions held
Field
Headquarters
1
1
8
2
10
6
5
1
3
1
2
1
20
4
To fill the vacancies occasioned by the above-noted resignations and retirements, interviews were held in Vancouver, Pattullo Bridge, Hunter Creek, Cache
Creek, Prince George, Dawson Creek, Fernie, Vanderhoof, Cranbrook, and Victoria.
Transfers were made to meet Departmental requirements and at the request of
the individual staff members concerned.
The increased industrial activity throughout the Province reflects to some
degree the slight decrease in interest displayed in the competitions for weighmaster
positions. This is not a general condition, however, and only prevails in areas of
intense industrial activity such as Prince George and Peace River centres.
The loss to the Department through retirement of Mr. J. G. M. (" Monty ")
Lock, Director of Operations of the Weigh Scale Branch, and of Mr. T. U.
(" Benny ") Lassalle, weighmaster at Fernie, is of noteworthy mention. Mr. Lock
came to the Department of Commercial Transport at its inception from the Weigh
Scale Branch of the Department of Highways, after spending some 25 years in the
British Columbia Provincial Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
The Department was fortunate to obtain the services of Mr. F. J. Regan to
replace Mr. Lock. Mr. Regan came to this Department with considerable background in enforcement, traffic control, and general administrative duties related to
the commercial-vehicle industry in British Columbia.
Similarly, Mr. Lassalle upon his retirement climaxed a distinguished career in
the service of the people of British Columbia, which commenced in April, 1927, as
an equipment operator with the Department of Highways, where he served faithfully
until he transferred to the Department of Commercial Transport in 1959. In 1966
Mr. Lassalle—" Benny " to his many friends in the Service—retired after 39 years
and 2 months in the employ of the Province of British Columbia.
The increase in volume of commercial-vehicle movement within the Province
necessitated a considerable increase in work load at many of the weigh-scales. In
addition, it was necessary to provide permanent facilities in areas otherwise dependent upon the services of a portable-type operation. To keep pace with this
influx of work load, increases in staff were requested and granted in the 1966
establishment.
The change-over from casual to permanent status of the weighmasters was
completed early in the year, and a study is being undertaken at the present time
with a view to recommending an up-grading of the position of weighmaster to reflect
the increased duties now being assumed by the men in these positions.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1966 FF 57
The staff of the Engineering Branch was increased during the year by the
addition of two new inspectors and one clerk. Despite the complexities of the
work and the many and varied classes of engineering entailed in the sphere of
Departmental operation, the new men appear to be adapting themselves quite
adequately at this early stage of their training. To fill the position of Clerk 1 in
the Engineering Branch, Miss S. J. E. Reuss joined the staff in August this year.
Miss Reuss is a welcome addition to the small but capable clerical staff of this
Branch.
The year 1966 has been one of growth and development, and the personnel
of the Department of Commercial Transport have kept pace with the demands of
service from all industries within its jurisdiction.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
530-567-4201
           

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