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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1966 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1966
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  Victoria, B.C., March 10, 1967.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for
the year ended December 31, 1966.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 Victoria, B.C., March 10, 1967.
The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
12 months ended December 31, 1966.
E. W. BASSETT,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
   CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands.
Accounting Division	
Lands Branch—
Superintendent of Lands	
Land Inspection Division	
Surveys and Mapping Branch-
Surveyor-General 	
Legal Surveys Division.
Topographic Division.^
Geographic Division	
Air Division	
University Endowment Lands
Land Settlement Board	
Personnel Office	
Mail and File Room
Page
11
17
24
32
44
56
62
72
77
87
93
97
101
COVER PHOTO
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  Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
E. W. Bassett, B.A.Sc, B.C.R.F., Deputy Minister of Lands
The continued expansion of the economy of the Province has resulted in an
ever-increasing demand for Crown land. Almost every basic industry from agriculture to tourism is dependent in one way or another on the land resource, and
as these industries expand, competition for Crown lands becomes more and more
intense. Since the Lands Service is charged with the responsibility of administering this resource in the best interests of all of the people of the Province, important
and onerous decisions in respect to priority of use of Crown lands are now a daily
occurrence.
Over the past five years there has been a 38-per-cent increase in the number
of new applications filed for Crown land, and had it not been for technological
advances in air photography and mapping, it would have been impossible to handle
the field work associated with this increase in volume of work.
Revenue recovered under the Land Act in 1966 reached an all-time high
record of $3,207,611, or 29 per cent more than the previous year. Revenue from
the sale of maps and aerial photographs accounted for an additional sum of
$136,000.   Total revenue collections were up 29 per cent over 1965.
The Department's policy of disposing of agricultural lands on a lease-develop-
purchase basis, which was instituted in 1965, has now been extended where practical to Crown lands alienated for industrial, commercial, and residential (other than
waterfrontage) purposes. This policy has met with widespread approval from the
general public and has been extremely effective in curtailing speculative land applications for it ensures development and beneficial use.
Within the past decade, Lands Branch statistical summaries have reflected
certain broad trends. Pre-emption records and new land sales have decreased,
whereas lease applications and inquiries concerning the availability of Crown land
have risen substantially. In 1966, only 42 pre-emption records were issued, the
lowest number since 1956. Thirty-four of these were in the Peace River region,
which is almost the only part of the Province where pre-emption is still feasible.
With the amount of surveyed arable Crown land which would be satisfactory for
pre-emption continuing to decline, this method of Crown land acquisition is only
of minor importance today. Departmental policy limiting direct purchase of Crown
land has been mainly responsible for the downward trend in purchase applications
and the rise in leases. As the lease-develop-purchase system matures, however,
and purchase options are exercised, it is expected that the number of purchase
applications will again increase.
The number of certificates of purchase issued was only 694, as compared
with 819 in 1965 and an annual average of 1,108 for the past decade. The acreage
of unsurveyed and surveyed Crown lands sold was also down sharply, being only
16,868 acres in 1966 compared with 72,832 in 1965. In contrast, however, there
were 1,245 new leases issued in 1966, representing an increase of 101 over the
previous year.
The continued industrial growth of the Province has resulted in the establishment of major industrial plants, both within established communities and in unorganized areas of the Province. Crown lands have therefore been in demand to
accommodate new instant towns and to meet the growth requirements of existing
communities.   During the past year, Crown land was alienated at Gold River, Alice
11
 CC 12     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Arm, Granduc mine north of Stewart, and Granisle townsite on Babine Lake north
of Topley Landing for townsite purposes.
The Lands Branch has also co-operated closely with various municipalities
throughout the Province where title to both Crown lands and private lands must
be obtained by the municipality in order that an obsolete subdivision plan can be
cancelled and a new subdivision designed to improve the functional use of the
land. During the past year this form of co-operation was extended to Golden,
Prince George, Smithers, Houston, and Prince Rupert to facilitate modern planning
and replotting schemes of this nature.
As in past years, the Lands Branch has continued to lay out Crown subdivisions in those areas of the Province where there was sufficient interest and need to
suggest that a subdivision would be economically successful. While a number of
these subdivisions have been of a recreational nature for summer-home sites and
winter ski cabins, some subdivisions were located and laid out at certain strategic
locations along public roads in order to concentrate settlement and discourage
ribbon-type development.
During the past year a ski-cabin site subdivision was laid out on Apex Mountain near Penticton. At Garibaldi the Lands Branch designed a subdivision to
accommodate ski club lodges. Summer-home site subdivisions were laid out on
Babine Lake, Fraser Lake, Lakelse Lake, Seymour Lake, Norman Lake, Bednesti
Lake, Ness Lake, and Village Bay Lake on Quadra Island. Subdivisions adjacent
to highways were laid out north of Williams Lake, at Ryder Lake, and south of
the Prince George Airport.
Once again the Peace River District was the most active area of the Province
in respect to new applications for Crown lands. The Central Interior of the Province from Prince George to Prince Rupert along Highway No. 16 was also extremely
active. Interest in this latter area was partially caused by the increased tourist
travel along this route, following inauguration of the new Kelsey Bay to Prince
Rupert ferry run.
Private developers have shown an active interest in Crown lands having potential for ski-resort purposes. As British Columbia is favourably endowed both
climatically and topographically with the basic requirements for this type of winter
sport, these proposed ski developments span virtually the whole Province from
Dawson Creek to Vancouver and from the East Kootenay to the West Coast. The
Garibaldi district has attracted the most interest as this area is now serviced by
paved highway from Vancouver. New motels, condominium units, service-stations,
and residential subdivisions have been created in the vicinity of Whistler Mountain,
and a new townsite development is now under way at the west end of Green Lake
on Crown lands under development on a lease-develop-purchase basis.
The Land Inspection Division, augmented by 12 Deputy Land Inspectors,
completed a record number of land examinations in 1966, and subsequently reduced the number of outstanding inspections to the lowest figure since 1962. In
1966, 6,192 land examinations were made, representing an 18-per-cent increase
over the preceding year. At the close of the year there were 836 outstanding examinations, but it is anticipated this figure should be substantially reduced by the
end of next year as the Deputy Inspectors become more familiar with the field
work.
In 1966 a lease arrangement was entered into with the Fraser River Harbour
Board whereby administration of Crown foreshore in the South Arm of the Fraser
River was turned over to that agency on a percentage-of-rental basis. It was considered that the development of this important stretch of river foreshore could be
handled to best advantage by an agency that could devote full time to the intensive
 LANDS SERVICE REPORT CC 13
administration required. This arrangement is in parallel with that obtaining between the Province and the North Fraser Harbour Commission in respect to the
foreshore in the North Arm of the river.
Under the direction of the Surveyor-General, the Legal Surveys, Topographic,
Geographic, and Air Divisions of the Surveys and Mapping Branch supply the
official surveys and cartographic detail which are basic to Provincial development.
With the processing of 654 sets of survey plans and field-notes, the Legal
Surveys Division brought the total number of field-notes on file close to 100,000.
Other office work completed by the Division (with comparable 1965 figures in
parentheses) included applications for purchase, lease, and pre-emption clearances,
6,302 (6,230); timber sales cleared, 4,105 (3,910); land examination plans
drawn, 2,808 (2,212); and photostats, blueprints, and offset prints 899,786 (759,-
289). The Division required 57 of the 342 hours of computer time logged by the
Surveys and Mapping Branch.
Included in field work recorded by the Legal Surveys Division were surveys
of 298 waterfront lots for home-site leases, 144 rural roadside lots, 148 lots for
the Land Settlement Board, and 51.2 miles of highway.
The Topographic Division was particularly active in Northern British Columbia. To meet requirements of the Water Resources Service, survey control for
pondage mapping was done on the Stikine, Iskut, Liard, Kechika, and Fort Nelson
Rivers. Ground control for a block of seven National Topographic map-sheets
was also completed on both sides of the Lower Stikine River, while additional survey
monuments were placed in and around four petroleum and natural-gas fields near
Fort Nelson.
The programme for establishing an integrated survey network continued in
Metropolitan Vancouver, Delta and Surrey Municipalities, Kelowna, and Penticton.
A total of 23 large-scale projects and 11 National Topographic map-sheets
were processed by the photogrammetric section of the Topographic Division, while
38 National Topographic manuscripts were draughted.
The Geographic Division prepared and published 14 Provincial maps, of
which six were entirely new. The latter included National Topographic Maps 93 B
(Quesnel), 93 G (Prince George), 82 K/NW (Beaton), and 82 K/NE (Inver-
mere), General Map Ijf (British Columbia electoral districts), and Park Series
(P.S.) B2 (Bowron Lake Park). The remaining eight sheets were reprints of
existing maps, of which three were completely revised and five were reprints without revision due to depleted stocks.
Number of maps distributed to the public and other departments numbered
95,540, approximately 10 per cent above the total for the previous year.
For use of the Provincial Redistribution Commission, 52 sets of maps and
legal descriptions of the revised boundaries of Provincial electoral districts were
prepared by staff of the Geographic Division.
The Air Division photographic units achieved an all-time high of 641.1 flying-
hours during 1966 and obtained 29,350 aerial photographs, mainly for forest and
land inventory purposes but also for a diversity of uses such as water resources'
investigation, land inspections, public works, and forest engineering. A small
amount of colour film was exposed again in 1966. Where cost-benefit factors are
favourable, greater production of colour photos may be foreseen.
Loans and reprints of aerial photographs numbered 337,132, which was more
than double the number handled 10 years ago and up 31 per cent from 1965. The
Forest Service continued to be the largest single Governmental user, and the mining
industry the largest private user.   Interim map-sheets at scales of 2 and 4 inches to
 CC 14     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1 mile were prepared, mainly for the forest inventory programme, but supplementary uses accounted for nearly 10,000 Ozalid prints of the interim maps.
The University Endowment Lands recorded revenues of $178,439. Building
permits to a value of $287,637 were issued.
Activities of the Land Settlement Board continued to concentrate on the subdivision and sale of Doukhobor lands.   Title deeds were issued to 155 purchasers.
Though the basic organization and establishment of the Lands Service remained
unchanged, staff recruitments, reclassifications, transfers, retirements, and terminations were all well above the previous year.
The following pages describe, in greater detail, the operations of the Lands
Service during 1966.
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
CC 17
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, B.Com., Departmental Comptroller
Revenue collections in Lands Service continued to increase substantially
through 1966. Total collections were up 29 per cent, with the largest increase in
land sales at 66.3 per cent. Land requirements by the City of Prince George contributed greatly to the increase shown in land sales by reason of the fact that during
1966 collections from that city amounted to $718,733. Revenue from land leases,
rentals, and fees increased 3.6 per cent.
Lease Accounts
December 31, 1965  8,194
December 31, 1966  8,861
Increase, 667 or 8 per cent.
Purchase Accounts
December 31, 1965  1,482
December 31, 1966  1,227
Decrease, 255 or 17 per cent.
Sale of maps and air-photo revenue increased 19 per cent over 1965. Air
Division revenue was up approximately $23,000 through a very much increased
demand for air photos by the mining and oil industry. Legal Surveys Division
revenue was up approximately $13,000, most of which was due to increased sale
of survey-posts through Government Agents' offices.
Statistical Tables
Table 1.—Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the
Year Ended December 31, 1966
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.
Land sales	
Sale of maps and air photos	
$1,514,749.69
1,692,861.14
136,061.63
Net revenue collections  $3,343,672.46
Table 2.—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year
Period 1957—66, Inclusive
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
$1,302,065.35
1,340,045.76
1,323,877.29
1,714,220.41
1,765,207.54
1,847,457.83
2,034,841.80
2,587,110.34
2,594,341.321
3,343,672.46!
1 Net revenue, 1965 and 1966.
 CC  18     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3.-—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31, 1966
Land sales—
Country lands  $787,241.02
Town lots     912,686.03
Surface rights, mineral claims         1,192.05
Indian reserve cut-off lands   116.91
  $1,701,236.01
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases—•
Booming and log storage  $386,516.67
Commercial (marinas, etc.)      394,664.99
Oyster        12,167.79
Miscellaneous   (foreshore  protection, etc.)          1,014.64
  $794,364.09
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture   $136,008.12
Quarrying   (limestone,   sand   and
gravel)        37,801.00
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)          3,403.60
Home-site   1,599.08
Miscellaneous (residential, etc.)      200,191.61
 ■    379,003.41
Land-use permits         2,169.93
Licences of occupation          8,435.76
Royalty collections      165,980.50
Easement collections—
Annual rentals       $2,084.40
Outright considerations        50,962.34
— ■      53,046.74
Fees—
Crown grant  $9,780.00
Assignment   3,500.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.) _ 8,707.94
21,987.94
Sundry  collections   (occupational  rental,   survey
charges, etc.)        92,543.08
Sale of maps and air photos—
Legal Division   $50,787.31
Geographic Division   47,108.06
Air Division   69,172.86
1,517,531.45
167,068.23
Gross revenue for year  $3,385,835.69
Less refunds and taxes  42,163.23
Net revenue for year  $3,343,672.46
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
CC  19
Table 4.—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period 1957-66, Inclusive
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
$472,415.55
605,229.73
668,367.70
842,413.17
1,001,071.13
933,607.66
1,149,650.45
1,485,539.13
1,462,024.93!
1,514,749.69!
1 Net revenue, 1965 and 1966.
Table 5.—Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period 1957-66,
Inclusive
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
$522,825.65
677,036.15
589,975.24
806,723.54
703,705.71
836,270.32
787,184.11
982,137.88
1,017,893.16!
1,692,861.141
1 Net revenue, 1965 and 1966.
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed
in 1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real-
estate business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that
constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next thirty years the land-settler (and the promoter) succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants
passed, cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core
of all developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation
of a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises
control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with so administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province must be protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Superintendent of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority governs the following matters:—
Sale, lease, and pre-emption of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural,
industrial, commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipe
lines, etc.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research
work, highways, etc.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites, cattle-ranching, trappers' cabins, ship-building, and aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and city administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, and Agriculture.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Veterans' Land Settlement
Act administration, the Public Works Department, and the Indian Affairs Branch of the
Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface of the Province.
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Flown September 13, 1966; altitude, 10,500 feet above sea-level.
 CC 24     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LANDS BRANCH
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Superintendent of Lands
During 1966 there was a drop of 10 per cent in the number of land applications filed with the Department. However, Land Act revenue reached an all-time
high of $3,207,611, and the increase in revenue, which amounted to $727,693, can
be largely attributed to the fact that the Land Inspection Division, augmented by
an increase in staff, was able to complete a large number of outstanding applications from previous years. The continued active interest in Crown land is mainly
centred in the central and northern part of the Province, where major forestry,
mining, and power developments are taking place.
The industrial expansion within the Province has resulted in the establishment
of major industries both within established communities and in unorganized areas
of the Province. As a result, Crown land has been in demand where new instant
towns were established and where existing communities found it necessary to expand their corporate boundaries to accommodate the new labour force. During
the past year, Crown land has been disposed of for instant towns at Gold River,
Port Alice, MacKenzie, Granisle (north of Topley Landing), and at the Granduc
mine (north of Stewart).
The Lands Branch has also co-operated closely with various municipalities
throughout the Province where title to both Crown lands and private lands had to
be obtained by the municipality in order that an obsolete subdivision plan could
be cancelled and a new subdivision designed to improve the functional use of the
land. During the past year, replotting schemes of this nature in which Crown lands
were involved were undertaken at Golden, Prince George, Smithers, Houston, and
Prince Rupert.
The bulk of applications for Crown land for agricultural purposes has been
filed in the Peace River District. However, with the inauguration of the Government ferry service to Prince Rupert and the constant improvement of Highway
No. 16 between Prince George and that city, there has been a steady demand for
Crown land in this region of the Province. In the Peace River District it is interesting to note that some private holdings are being consolidated to create large farming units, but this practice at present is rather the exception than the rule.
The policy of disposing of arable agricultural lands on a lease-develop-purchase
basis, which was instituted in 1965, is now fully effective. This policy has resulted
in an increase in the administrative work load of the Branch. However, the
policy has been well received by the farmer applicants of the Province and has
been effective in curbing speculative applications. The immediate effect, of course,
has been to decrease the number of purchase applications handled by the Department and increase the number of lease applications. However, as lessees meet
Departmental requirements in respect to clearing and cultivating the arable acreage
in the leasehold, many lessees will convert their leases to purchases.
The Lands Branch continued its policy of laying out Crown subdivisions in
those areas of the Province where sufficient interest was manifest to suggest that a
subdivision would be economically successful. While most of these subdivisions
have been of a recreational nature for summer-home site or winter ski-cabin use,
some subdivisions have been laid out along public roads in order to concentrate
settlement and discourage ribbon-type development. All of these subdivisions are
worked out in close co-operation with Department of Highways officials, and in
 —
LANDS BRANCH CC 25
most cases where roads are required the Department of Highways has contracted
to construct the necessary access.
During the past year a ski-cabin site subdivision was laid out on Apex Mountain. At Garibaldi the Lands Branch designed a subdivision to accommodate ski
club lodges. Summer-home site subdivisions were laid out on Babine Lake, Fraser
Lake, Lakelse Lake, Seymour Lake, Ness Lake, Norman Lake, and Bednesti Lake.
Aside from the Crown subdivisions, 107 reserves for the use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public were established on the various lakes and rivers throughout the
Province.
In addition to the public reserves for recreational use referred to above, it
should be pointed out that there has been a considerable investment by private
enterprise in developing both private and Crown lands for recreational use on a
commercial basis. During the past year the Lands Branch has processed many
inquiries with respect to the acquisition of Crown land for ski-resort purposes.
Since British Columbia has been favourably endowed both climatically and topographically with the basic requirements for this type of winter sport, these proposed
ski developments span virtually the entire Province from Dawson Creek to Vancouver and from the East Kootenay to the West Coast. The most outstanding
development in the last year has been in the Garibaldi area, but other developments of major importance have taken place in the Interior of the Province. Some
developments are still on the drawing-boards, but no doubt British Columbia can
anticipate additional major ski developments in the coming years.
During the year two members of the Lands Branch with outstanding service
records retired. Mr. E. A. Walls, Adjudications Officer, commenced his employment with the Government on May 22, 1918, and retired May 31, 1966, a term
representing 48 years of uninterrupted service. Mr. W. J. Holman, officer in charge
of the Lease Section of the Lands Branch, entered Government employ on November 19, 1919, and retired June 30, 1966, after a period of 46 years and 7 months
of continuous service.
A brief summary of the activities of the various sections of the Administration
Division of the Lands Branch is set out hereunder:—
Lease Section.—The number of new lease applications increased from 2,631
to 2,690 in 1966. The number of applications under this heading is a
reflection of the continuing interest in agricultural lease applications under
the new lease policy instituted last year.
Purchase Section.—During 1966 there was a sharp decrease in the number
of purchase applications filed with the Branch. However, this was
anticipated in view of the emphasis being placed on acquiring Crown
land initially on a leasehold basis. The work load of this Section will
increase in future years, as the purchase options in the present leases are
exercised.
Crown Grants.—The volume of work in the Crown Grants Section decreased
from 1,087 to 1,020 in 1966. This was mainly due to the change in
Departmental policy requiring lands held under leasehold tenure to be
developed before the lessee could exercise his option to purchase. It is
anticipated that as lessees meet Departmental requirements in respect to
development of the land and exercise their purchase options, the work
of this Section will increase.
Pre-emption and Reserve Section.—The number of applications in both cases
increased from 522 in 1965 to 584 this year. Although there was an
over-all increase in the number of applications, in actual fact the number
of pre-emption records issued decreased.    The importance of the pre-
 CC 26     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
emption as a means of acquiring land has been gradually diminishing
over the years, and the number of pre-emption records issued was down
to 42 in 1966, a decrease of 8 from 1965, which in turn was a decrease
of 33 from the previous year. Inquiries concerning the availability of
Crown lands, which are handled by this Section, increased by 30.7 per
cent, from 3,279 in 1965 to 4,286 in 1966.
Status Section.—The number of statuses completed decreased from 32,913 in
1965 to 21,856 in 1966. The decrease was a result of there being more
inquiries for acreage parcels of Crown land during the past year rather
than for town lot parcels.
Easement Section.—During 1966, 143 easements were granted, compared to
131 in 1965. The additional easements issued this year are mainly for
power- and telephone-line purposes.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
During 1966 a total of 17 parcels was tendered for sale, and 13 sold for a
price of $23,155. One hundred and eighteen parcels were offered by public auction,
and 73 of these sold for $115,580 at the auction date. Subsequently, 20 parcels
were disposed of by direct application.
Lease tenders offered during 1966 numbered 17 and comprised 1,858 acres.
Two hundred and seven lots were offered for lease by public competition, and 112
of these were leased at the time of auction. Fortv-nine of the 112 lots leased were
waterfront parcels.
During 1966, 1,403 town lots were sold, realizing the sum of $301,285.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various
sections of the Lands Service in 1966.
Table 1.—Country Land Sales, 1966
Acres
Surveyed      6,179.969
Unsurveyed   10,688.300
Total  16,868.269
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 2.—Certificates of Purchase Issued,
Land Recording District
Alberni     _
CC 27
1966
Total
     42
Atlin	
       2
Cranbrook 	
      17
Fernie       _
     17
Fort Fraser                 	
     42
Fort George 	
     65
Fort St. John ___                          	
     73
Golden     	
     12
Kamloops	
     20
Kaslo        	
     14
Lillooet   	
     31
Nanaimo        .
     24
Nelson 	
     17
New Westminster   _ _
     43
Osoyoos     	
       4
Pouce Coupe  	
     41
Prince Rupert ;    	
     31
Quesnel 	
     32
Revelstoke     __ _
       6
Similkameen       	
     43
Smithers	
     31
Telegraph Creek      _
          .   Nil
Vancouver     	
     42
Victoria   •	
       1
Williams Lake  	
               44
Total 	
  694
Table 3.—New Leases Issued
Land—
Agriculture 	
, 1966
Number
462
238
8
6
285
76
76
20
13
3
36
22
Acreage
158,889.89
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting)
Quarying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.) __
Home-site (section 78, Land Act) 	
Residential 	
70,479.14
403.60
66.03
475.61
Miscellaneous  (resorts, service-stations,
camp-sites, mill-sites, etc.) 	
1,445.48
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc. __
Oyster and shellfish 	
1,675.84
423.77
Industrial (canneries, mill-sites, wharves,
etc.) 	
Quarrying (sand, gravel, from river-beds)
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.) 	
Miscellaneous (private wharves and boat-
houses, etc.)  	
122.26
297.82
69.60
71.16
Totals 	
\
1,245
234,420.20
 CC 28     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 4.—Temporary Tenure Leases Renewed, 1966
Number  376
Acreage   94,635.14
Number
Acreage
Table 5.—Land-use Permits Issued, 1966
26
78.26
Table 6.—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1966
Number
Acreage
8
122.12
Table 7.—Assignments Approved, 1966
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation  630
Table 8.—Easements Granted, 1966
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
Submarine power cables	
Submarine telephone cables..
Overhead power-IineS-
Overhead telephone cables-
Water pipe-lines	
Gas pipe-lines	
Effluent pipe-lines 	
Sewer outfalls	
Totals..
Land
Oil and gas pipe-lines and well-sites..
Oil and gas pipe-lines  _
Compressor-sites-
Cathodic protection bed and pole-line~
Cathodic protection sites	
Water pipe-lines	
Drainage ditch	
Power-lines	
Telephone-lines	
Radio transmitter sites..
M'icrowave site and power-lines	
Microwave site, power-line, and access road-
Microwave site and access road	
Microwave sites	
Television antenna and power-lines-
Television antenna site	
Television antenna sites and cables..
Communication line	
Television cable	
Radio-telephone site, telephone-line, power-line..
Skilift	
Totals..
Licences of Occupation
Power-lines ~
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
Water pipe-lines..
Grand totals..
9
9
13
2
3
2
1
1
145
8.825
11.490
3.323
0.270
0.397
0.120
2.160
0.104
3      I
1.260
0.280
204.293
73.840
69.156
35.291
0.340
1.580
0.800
15.364
0.415
40
26.689
196.785
14
12.740
155.800
4
13.413
55.970
5
14.240
1
0.110
1.862
3
0.342
3.030
1
1.000
13.000
1
0.250
0.608
43
129.594
1,641.912
7
1.281
2.835
2
31.600
2
0.458
3.710
1
7.130
103.370
1
1.030
13.980
7
24.030
2
2.418
8.999
1
0.150
1
2.660
3.740
1
0.070
0.252
1
2.430
7.640
1
0.598
1.486
1
0.540
1.322
100
176.064
2,089.536
21.500
0.686
2,308.508
In line with current Departmental policy, 53 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were
issued during the year.
 LANDS BRANCH
CC 29
Table 9.—Crown Grants Issued, 1966
Purchases (country lands) 	
Purchases (town lots) 	
Pre-emptions	
Surface rights (Mineral Act) 	
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act	
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company	
Supplementary timber grants	
Miscellaneous 	
Total	
Certified copies of Crown grants issued	
Table 10.—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
1957 wmm—mmmmmmmmmmmmMmm
1958 ■MBMMhMMK
1959 MBMMHJMBWMiMM
1960 wmmm%wmtm%%wmmmmmKmmm
1961 .■_■_■_■_■_■_■_■■_■_■
1962 MHMMW
1963 M___H>M»
1964 mmmmt**%wme%%%%%%-mm
1965 BHMMHI
1966 -HBMMi
Total	
Ten-year average, 1,180.
662
219
43
17
15
1
6
13
1
43
1,020
  5
1,426
1,043
1,471
1,399
1,074
1,081
1,042
1,163
1,087
1,020
11,806
Table 11.—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1966
Acres
Purchases (country lands)   104,428.57
Pre-emptions  6,738.57
Surface rights (Mineral Act)   267.36
Public Schools Act  38.51
Veterans' Land Settlement Act  160.00
Home-site leases  80.97
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company  2,234.29
Supplementary timber grants  1,002.90
Miscellaneous   965.61
Total
115,916.78
 CC 30     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 12.—Pre-emption Records, 1966
Pre-emptions
Applications
Received
Applications
Allowed
Cancelled
C of I.
Issued
Alberni..
Atlin.	
Cranbrook.
Fernie	
Fort Fraser (Burns Lake)	
Fort George (Prince George)..
Fort St. John	
Golden	
Kamloops..
Kaslo —-
Lillooet (Clinton) -
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster ._
Osoyoos (Vernon)..
Pouce Coupe	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel.
Revelstoke	
Similkameen (Penticton)..
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek (Prince Rupert) _
Vancouver	
Victoria  _ 	
Williams Lake — -	
Totals..
5
10
30
16
1
64
3
2
17
17
3
12
30
17
31
3
42 | 60
I
48
Table 13.—Reserves, 1966
Reserves
Established
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public  107
British Columbia Department of Highways  (rights-of-way, gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites, etc.) 	
British Columbia Forest Service (Ranger stations, grazing, radio-
sites, reforestation, etc.) 	
Miscellaneous (Fish and Wildlife Branch, water-power projects, garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.) 	
80
15
54
48
Total
304
 LANDS BRANCH
CC 31
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 CC 32     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
L. D. Fraser, B.Sc.A., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief Land Inspector
The trend established in past years toward an increasing volume of work processed by this Division continued during 1966. Reference is made to the attached
Table 3, which represents an anlysis of requests for land examinations handled by
this Division during the years 1962 to 1966, inclusive, for the various inspection
districts. The increase in volume over 1965 is only 1 per cent, but over 1962 it
amounted to 38 per cent.
Table 2 represents an analysis of inspections completed and those outstanding
at the end of the year for each district for the past five years. The total number of
inspections completed for the past year was 6,192, up 18 per cent over 1965. This
is at variance with the 1-per-cent increase in volume of requests, but this is due to
the fact that a large portion of the outstanding backlog of inspections has been
completed. For the first time in many years, this backlog is at a reasonable and
controllable level.
The employment of 12 Deputy Land Inspectors last year has been decidedly
effective in bringing the outstanding backlog of work down to this level, as well as
keeping pace with the constantly increasing volume of work. Although some of the
original Deputies have left this Division as noted under the heading " Staff," most
have found the work to be a challenge, which they have met with both enthusiasm
and vigour. It is considered that the present staff complement should be sufficient
to cope with the anticipated work load for several years to come.
The change in Departmental policy, implemented in 1965, to a lease-develop-
purchase method of land acquisition has had a noticeable effect on the type and
volume of work relating to lease tenure alienation. Of a total of 6,192 inspections
completed this past year, 3,310 entailed the examination of areas under application
to lease or lease reviews, which number represented 53 per cent of the completed
inspections. This is in contrast to 44 per cent for the same type of work at the end
of 1965 and 38 per cent at the end of 1964.
The Inspection Division again examined properties and submitted appraisal
reports for many Government departments and agencies. Specifically, appraisals
were completed for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, Land Settlement Board,
Veterans' Land Act, Southern Okanagan Lands Project, Department of Social Welfare, British Columbia Forest Service, Indian Affairs Branch, Department of Recreation and Conservation, and the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.
Applications to lease and lease reviews still represent the major portion of the
work load in the Fort St. John area, and some 64 per cent of the total work was of
this nature. New requests for land increased 32 per cent, representing in part a
total of 155,000 acres of new land being examined and alienated. Sixty per cent of
all new applications were of a local nature, 21 per cent were of Canadian origin, 18
per cent were of American origin, and 1 per cent were of a miscellaneous origin.
New applications for agricultural settlement were received in the Hudson Hope area
to the west of Fort St. John and the Milligan Creek area to the north of Fort St. John.
In the South Peace River District, considerable interest has been shown in lands
that were formerly considered to be of a marginal nature. The soil is sandy in
texture, but through research and technology these soils have proven to be capable
of producing fair to good crops and have excellent possibilities for feed-growing.
It is foreseen that these lands will be rapidly alienated within the next few years.
 LANDS BRANCH
CC 33
Fresh-water marine lease, Campbell River, 1966.
No appreciable change has occurred in the work-load situation in the Prince
George district, except as to the type of inspection. Applications to purchase land
for agricultural purposes dropped from 107 in 1965 to 10 in 1966, and agricultural
lease applications rose in direct proportion from 25 to 129. Approximately 20
per cent of the work was within the boundaries of Community Planning Area Number 7, while 43 per cent was within Ranger Districts 4 and 14, lying north and west
of Prince George. The balance of the work was distributed over the remainder of
the district. The interest in land in the Prince George district is still active, particularly in the private sector, and land values are still increasing. However, it
would appear that a levelling-off is probable this year, due to an apparent equilibrium
being reached in the supply and demand position for housing and rental units.
There has been a continuing change in the status from Provincial forests and
sustained-yield units to pulp harvesting forests. TThis is particularly apparent in the
Prince George area, and will undoubtedly result in an increase in work for this
Division as land alienation within a pulp harvesting forest will be largely the
responsibility of the Lands Branch.
Land alienation for agricultural purposes still represents the major interest
in the Vanderhoof and Prince George areas. In the former district, such applications are divided as to the expansion of present holdings or the acquisition of new
holdings.
The majority of new settlers to the Vanderhoof area are from the United States.
Unfortunately, many of these settlers acquire land, move into the area, and commence farming on a pioneering basis without first acquiring a complete knowledge of
the many problems inherent to farming in this district. This lack of knowledge,
together with lack of experience and capital, has resulted in many returning to the
States.
2
 CC 34     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
A new road is presently under construction between Fort St. James and Tachie
village, on the north side of Stuart Lake. It is anticipated that the opening of this
access route will precipitate considerable interest in the acquisition of the arable land
in that vicinity.
Generally, area development and population growth in the Vanderhoof area
have been moderate to slow. Real-estate sales are down. Vanderhoof and Fort
Fraser have shown little progress in the form of expansion, and they will probably
be overshadowed in this respect by Fort St. James and Fraser Lake, which are
steadily growing.
The influx of Americans was also noticeable in the Burns Lake district and
accounted for a considerable number of the new applications for land. There was
a very pronounced increase in the number of applications for grazing leases, which
was occasioned by existing ranchers undertaking expansion programmes. There
was also an increase in applications for home-sites, which trend is expected to
continue due to increasing agricultural and mining development in the area.
In the Smithers area. 65 per cent of all applications were for agricultural
purposes and 90 per cent of all applications were from local residents. It is anticipated that future applications will be at a reduced rate due to lack of access and
adverse topography relative to available Crown land, both of which prohibit
development.
In the Prince Rupert district there is a preponderance of applications for
commercial and industrial waterfront lands and foreshore areas. The majority of
the interest is local in nature, caused by existing enterprises wishing to expand or
new ones starting. Vehicular access, for the most part, is limited to just a few main
roads, resulting in the reliance on boat or aeroplane for access to much of the
district. This imposes very severe restrictions on the ease of examining such areas.
Interest in land acquisition has noticeably decreased in the Stewart area but has
remained active in the vicinity of Prince Rupert, Terrace, Ocean Falls, and the
Lower Skeena River.
It is anticipated that the number of land applications will increase next year
in the Quesnel district. This is due to the conversion of Provincial forests in the
district to pulp harvesting areas and the repeal of Order in Council No. 2382, which
established the special sale area. The majority of applications are local in origin
and for the purpose of agriculture.
In the Central Interior part of British Columbia, the conflict between established
rancher land use and any outside interests still presents the greatest problem to land
alienation. The enforcement of the fencing proviso in grazing lease indentures has
caused considerable consternation to some ranchers, but the total effect is believed
to be more beneficial than detrimental.
Cattle sales for 1966 are estimated to be 25,000 head through the Williams
Lake yards. In addition, 342 horses were sold. Cattle prices were much higher
than in 1965. Summer range was above average, and the winter feed situation
is fair to good.
The number of carloadings of lumber via the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
was 6,000, as compared to 5,000 in 1965. In addition, 2,700 carloads of chips and
1,200 carloads of veneer were shipped, compared to 2,200 carloads of chips and
674 carloads of veneer in 1965. At present lumber prices are depressed, due
mainly to the decrease in housing starts in the United States.
There has been a noticeable increase in the number of applications for summer-
home sites on the lakes in the Williams Lake district. This was brought about by
the rapid increase in tourism together with the improvement of roads. The Chilcotin
 LANDS BRANCH
CC 35
area is fast becoming one of the most popular camping and fishing Meccas in the
Province.
The demand for permanent home-sites in the vicinity of 100 Mile House
remains strong. Applications for summer-home sites are also strong throughout the
Clinton district. The recent completion of a 99-lot Crown subdivision on the south
shore of Green Lake should satisfy some of this demand. The completion of the
Pemberton-Squamish Highway has resulted in applicants seeking waterfront lots on
Anderson Lake, which was formerly inaccessible from Vancouver.
Several applications were received for quarrying purposes covering limestone
deposits west of Clinton, but it is not known at this time whether or not economic
conditions will justify the development of these deposits.
There has been an 18-per-cent increase in the number of new requests for
examinations of land in the Kamloops district. Approximately 53 per cent of the
work load represented lease rental reviews, and the trend has been definitely established toward acquisition of lands for all purposes by lease tenure rather than
purchase.
A noticeable increase in lake-front values has occurred during the past year
in the Okanagan-Boundary District. This has resulted in a proportionate increase
in lease rentals, which has invoked considerable concern from the lessees involved,
It is anticipated that prices for such land may become stabilized and thereby alleviate
the problem of continuing to increase both price and rental and still make such lands
available to all.
A large subdivision on Apex Mountain designed to accommodate skier use was
completed and appraised during the year. In the latter part of the year, some 90
parcels of land were examined and appraised for the Southern Okanagan Lands
Project.
It is anticipated that considerable activity in land acquisition will occur in the
vicinity of the Brenda Lake mine operation through to Pennask Lake. This activity
will result from improved roads and new roads having been built by mining and
logging operators, as well as the British Columbia Forest Service.
The amount and type of work received and completed in the Nelson area are
remaining constant. Farmers and ranchers are consolidating their holdings, and
more and more marginal lands are being brought into use for residential and smallholding use.
Improved road conditions throughout the Kootenays should continue to increase
the tourist traffic through that area. The trend for the coming year is for a continued
demand for Crown lands.
In the Vancouver district there has been an increase in both interest in and
development of facilities to meet the demand of skiers and other winter-sport enthusiasts. This development has, in the past, centred around Whistler Mountain
but is now spreading out to the Callaghan Creek and Green Lake areas. In the
latter area a large well-balanced recreational complex is being developed, with the
Crown participating by supplying to the developer a part of the land requirements
on a lease-develop-purchase basis.
There has been a noticeable trend during the past year for towboat companies
to seek fresh water for log-storage purposes. Nine applications for this purpose have
been received in Pitt Lake to provide teredo-free storage for slow-moving forest
products such as hemlock and cedar.
Public demand for summer-home sites has initiated a development study of
two areas that were formerly within a forest reserve. One is at Lost Creek on
Stave Lake and the other in the vicinity of Chilliwack Lake.
 CC 36     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Also in the New Westminster district this year, administration of the foreshore
in the South Arm of the Fraser River between Annacis Island and Steveston was
transferred to the Fraser River Harbour Commission.
The work load in the Courtenay district is remaining constant. The logging
economy of the north end of Vancouver Island was somewhat slower in 1966 than
in previous years due to an oversupply of logs caused by a curtailment of lumber
sales.
The townsite and pulp-mill at Gold River are progressing, and a public road
was completed into this area during the year.
The inspection of foreshore areas still represents the major part of the work
load in the Courtenay district, and it is anticipated that this situation will continue.
STAFF
During the past year, several changes were made in the location and employment of field staff.
Mr. L. Paynton was appointed as Land Inspector 1 at Burns Lake, effective
March 21, 1966, to replace Mr. H. Gavin, who left the Division to work for the
Federal Government.
Mr. D. M. Thom was transferred from Kamloops to Prince George, effective
September 1, 1966, to become Land Inspector 4 in charge of that office. Mr.
Rhoades was transferred from Prince George to Vancouver, effective August 15,
1966, as Land Inspector 4. This transfer was necessitated by Mr. H. D. Kent leaving the Division to return to work in industry.
Mr. F. Walchli resigned from his position as Land Inspector in the Prince
George office in April and was replaced by Mr. F. Edgell, who was appointed Land
Inspector 1, effective April 21, 1966.
Mr. H. Wenschlag was hired on staff as Land Inspector 1, effective November
1, 1966, to replace Mr. Thom. Mr. G. Huva transferred to this Division from the
British Columbia Forest Service as Land Inspector 2, effective June 2, 1966, to take
charge of the Quesnel office, which was left vacant by the transfer of Mr. Havard
to the Department of Agriculture.
Mr. J. Prosser was appointed Land Inspector 1, effective July 18, 1966, and
assigned to the Williams Lake office to replace Mr. W. B. Stewart, who left the
Department to return to university.
Mr. M. Robson also left the Department to return to university and was replaced by Mr. R. Bose, who transferred to Clinton from Fort St. John, effective
February 15, 1966. Mr. Bose was replaced by Mr. M. McConnell, who was appointed Land Inspector 1, effective March 21, 1966.
Some losses occurred in the ranks of the Deputy Land Inspectors. Messrs.
E. E. Peterson, W. Pistak, and R. Drew left this Division, effective October 1, 1966,
to transfer back to the Forest Service. Mr. M. H. Barton left the Division in July
to work for industry and was replaced by Mr. S. Schacke, who transferred from the
British Columbia Forest Service, effective August 1, 1966, and was appointed Deputy Land Inspector 1 at Prince George. Mr. Peterson was replaced at Fort St. John,
effective November 18, 1966, by Mr. M. K. Wilson, who was appointed Deputy
Land Inspector 1.
The complement of field staff as of December 31, 1966, is 21 Land Inspectors
and 10 Deputy Land Inspectors, with one Deputy appointed as of January, 1967.
The one remaining Deputy position is still to be filled.
 —
LANDS BRANCH CC 37
TRAINING
Nine Land Inspectors, together with the Chief and Assistant Chief Land Inspector, are now accredited as appraisers with the Appraisal Institute of Canada. One
Land Inspector and one Deputy Land Inspector, who have successfully completed
the Appraisal 1 and 2 courses, are now writing the necessary demonstration appraisals which lead to accreditation.
Seven Land Inspectors and six Deputy Land Inspectors have successfully completed Part 1 of the Appraisal Course and are now enrolled in Part 2. Three Land
Inspectors and three Deputy Land Inspectors are taking both Part 1 and Part 2 of
the Appraisal Course this winter with a view to writing both examinations in the
spring. These courses involve a home study course during the winter months followed by a lecture and study programme during the last two weeks of March, following which examinations are then written.
Two Land Inspectors and the Assistant Chief Land Inspector have completed
the Executive Administration Course, and at the present time one Land Inspector
is enrolled in the second year of this course.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed
in the Province by this Division during 1966. Table 2 represents a comparison,
on a year-to-year basis, of the volume of field work completed and requests outstanding at the end of each year for the period 1962 to 1966, inclusive.
Table 3 represents an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this
Division for the years 1961 to 1966, inclusive.
 CC 38     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 1.—Types of Inspections, 1966
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   135
Access (roads, etc.)   8
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.)__. 51
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.)  25
Grazing (pasture, range)   71
Home-sites (permanent)   396
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 49
Summer-home or camp sites  46
Wood-lots or tree-farms  1
Others  7
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   1,122
Commercial  (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields,
etc.)  63
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)   36
Fur-farming  2
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.)   516
Home-sites (section 78 of the Land Act)   16
Home-sites (permanent, other than section 78 of the
Land Act)   37
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants,
etc.)  32
Summer-home or camp sites  305
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, diatomaceous earth,
etc.)   61
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use)   1,111
Others  9
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping  155
Commercial (boat rentals, marine service-stations,
wharves, etc.)   67
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves,
etc.)  27
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river-beds)   11
Oyster and shellfish  13
Private (floats, boathouses)   9
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)   213
Others  7
Land-use permits  3 0
Licence of occupation  38
Easements and (or) rights-of-way  8
Pre-emptions—
Applications  3 5
Annual inspections (including applications for Crown grant) 245
 LANDS BRANCH
CC 39
Table 1.—Types of Inspections, 1966—Continued
Subdivisions—
Valuations
Survey inspection .
Plans cancellation
Proposals (lake-shore, residential, etc.)
Others	
Reserves—■
Grazing	
Gravel pits __
Recreational
Others (state purpose)
Veterans' Land Act	
Land Settlement Board—
Classification	
Valuations 	
Doukhobor lands	
Southern Okanagan Lands Project	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
Department of Social Welfare	
Other agencies (British Columbia Forest Service, Indian Affairs
Branch, Department of Recreation and Conservation, British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority) 	
Miscellaneous inspections—■
Assignments	
Delinquent accounts	
Escheats Act	
Lake reconnaissance 	
Land-use surveys	
Land revaluations of special nature	
Protests	
Section 53 (2), Land Act (verifying improvements)
Section 65, Land Act (free grants)
Section 78, Land Act (re compliance with provisions of)	
Section 130, Land Act (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act) 	
Section 13 1b, Land Act (cases of doubt regarding inclusion
of body of water in Crown grant) 	
Trespass (land) 	
Trespass (water) 	
Quieting Titles Act	
Others	
31
4
2
13
3
4
5
78
5
2
14
7
1
12
6
6
2
53
18
86
39
577
19
9
24
103
7
82
Total
6,192
 CC 40     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 2.—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1962 to 1966, Inclusive
Examinations Made during-
Outstanding at End of—
Land Inspection
District
1962
1    1963
1
1964
1965
1966
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
Burns Lake	
1
136
318
151
27
186
187
139
212
269
283
235
293
226
303
16
33
48
30
29
33
35
32
40
Courtenay
15
Fort St. John
584
|     593
853
582
1,129
100
156
104
230
146
Kamloops
277
329    '
460
482
515
22
78
75
50
72
Kelowna
160
166
202
201
185
13
28
36
26
15
Nelson
211
252
249
278
307
42
43
38
63
37
New Westminster . . .
177
|     110   '
87
242
274
12
7
36
61
34
Pouce Coupe
512
I     513
450
454
609
30
87   '
81
121
92
474
480
668
551
423
73
183
262
52
68
|
67
194
85
34
Quesnel
218
|     213
282
173
191
43
58
56
51
38
Smithers
290
1     279
401
317
351
116
279
418
178
14
Vancouver
219
1     240   '
245
250
233
19
9
46
30
57
Vanderhoof
I
...._
236
330
...-.
35
49
Victoria
100
216
172
156
156
3
17
18
32
46
457
421
438
530
49
61
58
33
38
Headquarters
1     -	
19
13
13
......
B.C. Forest Service and
'1
33
29
16
14
98
|        72
96
70
20
Totals.
4,150
J 4,235
5,174
5,266
6,192
571
1,117
1,319
1,281
836
Note.—These figures include pre-emptions.
Table 3.—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1962 to 1966, Inclusive
District
New Requests Received during—
Per Cent
Change,
1966 over
1965
Per Cent
Change,
1962 1   1963 '
|
1964
1965
1966
1966 over
1962
169
202
542
286
147
235
188
402
455
220
339
227
101
434
56
......
170
209
629 '
380
179
253 '
104
466
570 '
214
442 '
230
212
430
98
249
286
761
452
209
244
116
398
730
263
540
282
176
433
19
105
287
241
292
708
457
190
312
267
450
457
108
162
366
256
168
172
503
13
57
194
230
286
929
532
173
281
246
506
426
143
172
187
260
320
170
420
13
27
+2
—4
-2
+ 31
+ 16
—9
— 10
— 8
+ 12
—7
+ 32
+6
-49
+2
+90
— 1
-16
0
—52
0
Clinton 	
Courtenay .                 	
+36
+42
+71
+86
+ 18
+20
+31
+26
Kelowna   	
Nelson           —    - 	
Prince George
-6
+32
—22
—45
Quesnel.. —     	
Vancouver.     —
Vanderhoof                                  ...	
Victoria                                      .                 .....
+ 15
0
+68
—3
0
52
Totals
o. Of)7   !   A SSfi 'I   S 7f\T.
5,466
5,515
Average change for 1966 over 1965 for Province is +1 per cent.
Average change for 1966 over 1962 for Province is +38 per cent.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING
BRANCH
 THE   SURVEYS   AND   MAPPING   BRANCH
The framework of maps and surveys so necessary for the orderly development and
settlement of British Columbia is provided through the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
That such scientific foundations were necessary even in the earliest days is shown by the
fact that in 1851 the position of Colonial Surveyor for the young Crown Colony of
Vancouver Island was created. In more than 100 years which have passed since Joseph
Despard Pemberton was appointed first Surveyor-General, British Columbia has expanded
immensely in all spheres of human endeavour. Much of the foundation for the way of
life we have in British Columbia today rests on the reliability of our basic surveys. As
British Columbia has progressed through time, so the surveys and maps of the Province
have increased in magnitude and complexity.
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent Provinces and Territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is ever extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which are fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch:—
/. Administration.—General co-ordination of the four divisions of the Branch, being
Legal Surveys, Geographic, Topographic, and Air; delineation and maintenance of
boundaries under the Provincial Boundary Commissioner—namely, (a) Alberta-British
Columbia Boundary and (b) British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary;
interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison.
//. Legal Surveys Division.—Regulations for surveys under the various Provincial
Acts, such as Land, Land Registry, Mineral, Petroleum and Natural Gas; instructions to
British Columbia land surveyors regarding surveys of Crown lands and subsequent check
of field-notes and plans of same; preparation and custody of official plans; preparation
and maintenance of Departmental reference maps, mineral reference maps, and composite
(cadastral) maps; processing for status of all applications concerning Crown lands; field
surveys of Crown lands, highway rights-of-way, etc.; preparation of legal descriptions;
operation of blue-print and photostat sections; computational scrutiny of certain land
registry subdivision plans; inspection surveys; restoration surveys.
///. Geographic Division.—Map compilation, drawing and negative engraving, editing, and reproduction; map checking, distribution, geographical naming—Gazetteer of
British Columbia; field and culture surveys for preparation of land bulletins and maps;
preparation of legal descriptions for and delineation of administrative boundaries; compilation and distribution of annual Lands Service Report; trigonometric computation and
recording of geographic co-ordinates; general liaison between this Department and Federal and other mapping agencies on exchange of survey and mapping data; checking well-
site survey plans under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
IV. Topographic Division.—Propagation of field survey control—namely, triangulation, traverses, and photo-topographic control; operation of Otter float-plane; helicopters
on charter; compilation and fair drawing of manuscripts for standard topographic mapping; special field control for composite and photogrammetric mapping and other special
projects; precise mapping from aerial photographs through the use of the most modern
plotting-machines.
V. Air Division.—Aerial photographic operations involving maintenance and operation of two aircraft; photographic processing, air-photo distribution, and Provincial airphoto library; compilation of interim base maps, primarily for the forest inventory;
air-photo control propagation; instrument-shop for the repair, maintenance, and development of technical equipment.
 IP* -
Vertical view, flown on September 16, 1966, at 7,500 feet above sea-level, of construction
on Portage Mountain Dam, Peace River.
 CC 44     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
G. S. Andrews, M.B.E., B.Sc.F., P.Eng., B.C.R.F., B.C.L.S., F.R.G.S.,
Director, Surveyor-General, and Boundaries Commissioner
THE YEAR 1966
A perusal of the four divisional reports in following pages will reveal another
year of worth-while accomplishment, with several all-time records. Some items of
special interest may be mentioned here without undue repetition of facts and figures
selected by the Deputy Minister for his over-all review in preceding pages.
In the Legal Surveys Division, the energies of the Composite Map Section were
fully diverted to rehabilitating 39 of the most shop-worn sheets of the indispensable
Departmental reference maps, a remedial measure of dire extremity, mentioned in
previous Annual Reports.
Use of the electronic computer by all divisions of the Branch continues to
increase with significant benefits. Needs of this Branch used one-fifth of the total
time of the I.B.M. 1620 computer facilities during the year. The total cost of this
service was roughly equivalent to the aggregate salaries of three journeymen computers, but the results exceeded the potential of more than 20 such operators, working with (now) outdated manual machines and methods. By virtue of this facility,
section corners of four townships of the Inga Lake area of the Peace River Block
have been co-ordinated on the North American Datum for the use of drilling enterprise for petroleum and natural gas, as well as other alienations, thus realizing the
benefits of survey integration in a rural application. It is to be hoped that other
such areas may receive this treatment as basic control surveys are extended and tied
to cadastral boundaries.
The Air Division clocked an all-time record, both for hours flown and the number of square miles photographed, despite a sub-normal weather pattern. This
speaks well for the vigilance of the air-photo crews, for the high level of serviceability of aircraft and camera equipment, and for the performance of the two pilots
seconded from the Department of Highways for the photo season.
The addition of a new fixed-focus enlarger designed and built in the Instrument-
shop, the de-bugging of the electronic contact printer, and assembly of a second unit
of this type have permitted a marked increase in output of the standard 10- by 10-
inch air-photo prints in the Processing Laboratory, reducing the large perennial
backlog of requisitions to a tolerable magnitude, with no significant increase in staff.
The Geographic Division reports a noteworthy increase in new map-sheets
produced—a total of 14 compared to 9 last year. The policy of featuring " status "
maps at 4 and 2 miles-per-inch scale which show district lots and alienated land is
approaching a worthy goal, such that in the near future, possibly in the coming year,
this feature will be shown by Provincial map-sheets covering all of the Province
south of 56° north latitude, and containing 98 per cent of British Columbia's population.
The Topographic Division embraced a varied and somewhat expanded field
programme which included a return to the muskeg country north-east of the Alaska
Highway after a lapse of some 11 years since the original triangulation programme
there, this time to initiate improved vertical control with spirit levels as compared
to the former trigonometric heighting, and to up-grade and intensify the horizontal
control, with the advantage of tellurometer for trilateration and traverse, and the
new first-order control net established by the Geodetic Survey of Canada to strength-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 45
en the structure north-east of Fort Nelson. This project is tailored to the requirements of accelerated drilling for petroleum and natural gas in that area, and confirms the wisdom of our original policy, in 1953, 1954, and 1955, to cover the
whole area first with an extensive but sparse net of control, anticipating further work
when and where favourable areas for potential exploitation became known. The
experience gained in this year's project will benefit a much larger scale of operation
of this kind anticipated in the 1967 season.
The work initiated in the Stikine-Iskut region in 1965 was continued, but
against adverse odds imposed by poor weather, and the high snow and ice-ridden
country near the International Boundary with the Alaska Panhandle, where access
to alpine sites for control stations is restricted to a fleeting two months of the year,
and then only on good-weather days.
In connection with the establishment of co-ordinate control for integration of
surveys where the population density is high, a co-operative reconnaissance was
made of the Greater Vancouver area with representatives from the Geodetic Survey
of Canada for a 1967 programme of first-order stations, and with the Topographic
Survey of Canada for propagation of a second-order control net also next year. It is
gratifying to have the assistance of the Federal survey agencies in this huge task of
serving the major area of population in the Province, with adequate control for coordination of both engineering and cadastral surveys.
Under authority of section 88a of the Land Act (passed by the Legislature in
1965), Crown reserves, surrounding some 3,000 control survey monuments distributed throughout the Province, were established by Order in Council No. 1400, dated
May 10, 1966, and published in The British Columbia Gazette of May 19, 1966,
pages 1101 to 1110. Further reserves to create similar sanctuaries will be made
from time to time as new survey control stations are established and co-ordinated
on the North American Geodetic Datum.
British Columbia was host to Federal and Provincial officers for three separate
one-day meetings, September 26 to 28, 1966. The first was the annual plenary
session of the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names, chaired by
Mr. J. P. Drolet, Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of Energy, Mines, and
Resources, Ottawa, and of which our Mr. W. R. Young, B.C.L.S., Chief of the
Geographic Division, is accredited member for British Columbia. On Tuesday,
September 27th, there was the annual meeting of the Canadian Council on Cadastral Surveys, at which the writer, representing the host Province, presided, and on
the third day, September 28th, was the Federal-Provincial Survey Directors' meeting on control surveys, mapping, and cartography, chaired by Mr. S. G. Gamble,
Director of Surveys, Department of Energy, Mines, and Resources, Ottawa. These
meetings were attended by officials from 8 of the 10 Provinces, and a strong representation from the Federal Departments of Energy, Mines, and Resources, and
National Defence, in all about 50 delegates, plus a charming complement of ladies.
The technical sessions were adequately and agreeably accommodated in Rooms 210
and 211 of the Main Legislative Building. Delegates were welcomed by the Honourable Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, and by the Deputy Minister of Lands. Selected local authorities from the Attorney-General's Department
and the Corporation of British Columbia Land Surveyors, who do not normally
attend these meetings elsewhere, were invited to participate. Social diversions included a dinner for all participants and their ladies hosted by the Honourable the
Premier, represented by the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, at which Mr. Willard E. Ireland, Provincial Librarian and Archivist,
gave a brilliant resume of the circumstances and motivation for British Columbia's
 CC 46     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
entry into Confederation. On the Tuesday evening, a stag buffet was hosted by the
Corporation of British Columbia Land Surveyors. In the daytime, while the men
were engrossed in official business, the ladies were agreeably occupied with teas and
tours. The " Met" office co-operated, too, by laying on superb fall weather, such
that the sum-total effect was a good show for British Columbia and survey liaison,
long to be remembered both by the estimable coterie of guests from other parts of
Canada and their hosts.
In addition to the usual visits to surveys and mapping projects within the Province during the field season, which included an extensive loop via the Alaska Highway, Haines Road, coastal ferry services, the Island Highway, and a side trip from
Prince Rupert to Houston en route, the writer made three extra-provincial trips.
The first was to the Canadian Institute of Surveying Annual Convention in Ottawa
in January, where he participated in a panel on integrated surveys. In April he was
invited to the United Nations Technical Assistance Administration in New York for
discussions on basic surveys and resources inventory of a " developing " South
American country. In November, at the expense of the Department of Energy,
Mines, and Resources, in the capacity of member of the National Advisory Committee on Control Surveys and Mapping, he attended in Ottawa a symposium on
survey education, and was chairman of a two-day map users' conference sponsored
by the said Committee. On this trip the opportunity was also taken to visit the
Ministere des Terres et Forets and the Universite Laval in Quebec City. These
trips provided valuable contacts, and a broad perspective on realistic surveys and
mapping policy for the increasingly complex requirements of community, provincial,
and national development.
PERSONNEL
There were 20 separations from employment in the Branch during the year,
comprising about 10 per cent of the total staff and including one retirement due to
ill health and one untimely death. Eight resignations were for further education
and 10 were for other employment or transfer, including three with opportunity of
promotion.
Miss Isabel Richardson, after serving 10 years with distinction as secretary in
the office of the Director and Surveyor-General, won promotion to the same capacity
in a Deputy Minister's office.
Mr. Howard N. Davis, after more than 16 years in the Air Division as technical draughtsman, took voluntary retirement on superannuation due to chronic
ill health, engendered originally by war service and perhaps aggravated by his assiduous application to the exacting demands of his work in the Department. It was
his artistic ingenuity which produced the landform base for the six unique 10-mile
sectional sheets covering the whole Province. This programme occupied his time
and talents for several years and called for the meticulous study of tens of thousands
of air photographs to interpret and delineate faithfully the wide variations of topographic forms which characterize the amazing terrain of our Province. These maps
stand as a memorial to Mr. Davis's genius and devotion in the service of the Province of his adoption. Another contribution by Mr. Davis was the creation of the
original coloured " picture map " of British Columbia, published by the British
Columbia Natural Resources Conference, running through several editions, and
more recently used as the base by the British Columbia Centennial Committee for
a further edition. Fortunately Mr. Davis has been granted medical " entitlement"
by the Department of Veterans Affairs, and it is hoped that this, with the relaxation
of retirement, may enable him to recover better health.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 47
In April the resignation of Mr. Desmond W. Carrier, B.C.L.S., of the Legal
Surveys Division, was received with regret. Mr. Carrier had been on the staff for
almost 19 years. In 1951 he qualified for his commission as a British Columbia
land surveyor and transferred from the Lands Branch to the Legal Surveys Division.
He was outstanding for energy, competence, and dispatch in his work, and he had
a preference for remote assignments far from civilization. Mr. Carrier resigned to
enter private practice in land surveying.
Mr. Anthony Patrick McLaughlin, B.C.L.S., one of the staff surveyors in the
Legal Surveys Division, died suddenly of a heart attack while in the field in charge
of a highway right-of-way survey in the Bulkley Valley. Mr. McLaughlin was born
in Cairo, Egypt, of British parents with military connections, and received his early
education in Duncan, B.C., and in England. He later attended the Royal Military
College in Kingston, Ont. In World War II he had a distinguished career with the
British Army in India and Persia, achieving the rank of major. After the war he
returned to British Columbia, and in 1954 qualified as a British Columbia land
surveyor. Meanwhile he had joined the staff of the Topographic Division in May,
1951, and later transferred to the Legal Surveys Division. "Tony," as he was
known among his friends, enjoyed the high esteem of his confreres in the Department and in his profession, which his colorful background and competence as soldier
and surveyor won for him.
THE YEAR 1866  (APPROXIMATELY)
This year's Centennial commemoration of the union, in 1866, of the two British
colonies on the Northwest Pacific Coast to form the territorial entity we know today
as British Columbia motivates a short review of surveys and mapping progress during the century just completed.
Of the two colonial roots which were joined in 1866, that of the Island colony
is the longer, going back to 1849, prior to which certain incipient surveys were
carried out more or less ad hoc for the Hudson's Bay Company by Adolphus Lee
Lewes, " surveyor and clerk for the general service." In 1849 Capt. Walter Colqu-
houn Grant, " surveyor to the Company," arrived in Victoria, but due to private
preoccupations he accomplished little of value in surveying.*
The need for competent surveys was then recognized by recruiting, in 1851,
an eminently qualified surveyor in the person of Joseph Despard Pemberton as
colonial surveyor on contract with the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1860, Pemberton, having completed a second contract with the company, was appointed, by
Royal warrant, Surveyor-General of Vancouver Island Colony, the first of a long
line of worthy public servants in this field. This appointment reflected also the new
role of Victoria as a commercial depot and take-off point for the Fraser River gold-
rush. Pemberton relinquished his appointment in 1864, being succeeded by
Benjamin William Pearse, whose appointment as Assistant Colonial Surveyor of
Vancouver Island in 1851 further emphasized the importance attached to adequate
surveys at that early time. Pearse continued in office as Surveyor-General of Vancouver Island until the union in 1866.
The other colonial root identified with the Mainland colony had quite a different
character for its first five years, from 1858 to 1863, during which the survey and,
indeed, mapping (exploration) activities were carried out by the company of Royal
Engineers from the United Kingdom, under the command of Col. Richard Clement
Moody. This officer also filled the role of Surveyor-General and Chief Commissioner
* See Ireland, W. E., " Pioneer Surveyors of Vancouver Island."   Proc. 26th Annual General Meeting of the
Corporation of Land Surveyors of British Columbia, Jan. 11-12, 1951, Victoria, B.C.
 CC 48     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
of Lands and Works. He was supported by a staff of seven commissioned officers
and 130 other ranks of the company. On their recall to England in November,
1863, an interlude of transition from military to civilian status followed, and
Joseph William Trutch, civil engineer, was appointed, by Royal warrant dated
May, 1864, Surveyor-General and Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works of the
Mainland colony, taking active office in March, 1865. Walter Moberley was
appointed Assistant Surveyor-General by Governor Douglas. It is interesting to
note that up to and including the year 1865 salaries were listed in sterling currency
and thereafter in dollars.
In 1886 the consolidation of two heretofore separate colonial administrations
was necessary, probably with a few problems, one being in the judicial area. However, the Lands and Works Department seems to have offered no special difficulty,
and in this connection the following extract from the " Civil List" for 1867 is of
interest:—
Office
Name
Date of
Appt.
Authority
Annual
Salary
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
and Surveyor-General
•Assistant Surveyor-General and Supt. of
Light Houses, Victoria
Clerk                                                     	
J. W. Trutch ...
B. W. Pearse...
A. R. Howse
J. V. Woolsey
J. B. Launders
D. Deasy
T. Westgarth _
20 Feb. 1864
1 Jan. 1867
20 Oct. 1863
30 Nov. 1865
1 July 1865
26 Oct. 1863
31 Oct. 1860
The Queen's Warrant
$3,880.00
1,900 00
1,220.00
1,220.00
1,220.00
250.00
Clerk                       ...                   	
* Held similar appointment under government of Vancouver Island prior to union.
In the budget of the Lands and Works Department for the same year, among
some 25 items covering construction and maintenance of public buildings, harbour
improvement, roads and bridges are three survey items, namely—" exploration in
the interior, $1,182.00; survey of pre-emption claims, and surveys of Vancouver
Island, $1,260.00." These items comprised about 5 per cent of the total expenditure of the Department, the bulk of which (80 per cent) was for construction and
maintenance of roads, trails, and bridges, mostly in the Interior. It is worthy of
remark that by this time there had been a sharp decline in production of gold in the
Cariboo, resulting in a poignant recession in colonial revenues.
A century later, in 1966, the authorized surveys and mapping staff included
some 186 people, not counting temporary seasonal help, the total payroll of which
was in excess of $1,000,000. Authorized " expenses " for 1966 covering field and
office operations, equipment, maintenance, etc., grossed some $578,000. This,
with salaries, constitutes approximately 5 per cent of the total authorized expenditure of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, but, of course, only
a fraction of 1 per cent of the gross Provincial expenditures.
An inventory of what had been accomplished, or was known, in the realm of
mapping and surveys at the time of union in 1866 would include the cumulative
fruits of earlier exploration by sea and land, various route locations, and certain
legal surveys for urban and rural settlement. Thanks to hydrographic surveys by
Vancouver (1792-94), Kellett (1846-48), Provost (1859), Richards (1858-63),
and Pender (1863-70), and to the sea-borne fur trade, coastal geography between
Juan de Fuca Strait in the south and Cook's Inlet in the north was, in the main, well
known and charted. On land, as far north as the Stikine and Liard Rivers, the
primary framework of drainage and trade routes had been identified and positioned
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 49
E
*—.
o
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Ov
a
"3
PQ
00
o
0
H
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 CC 50     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
by explorer-surveyors of the fur trade Mackenzie, Thompson, and Fraser, by pathfinders Anderson, Downie, Dewdney, and by military officers Palmer and Mayne.
The first International Boundary Commission had surveyed and marked accessible
segments of the 49th parallel from salt water to the Rocky Mountain divide
(1857-61). However, 100 years ago, with few exceptions, vast areas between the
narrow lines of that early geographic framework and all of the Interior north and
west of the Stikine and Dease Rivers were terra incognita (as graphically illustrated
by Dr. A. L. Farley's diagrammatic " Summary to 1871," reproduced here with his
kind permission).
An 1871 Atlas of British Columbia and environs shortly after the time of union,
at the end of the colonial period, 1871, could have contained some interesting map-
sheets, mostly at small scales. An outstanding series had been produced by Aaron
Arrowsmith (1750-1823), his sons, and a nephew, John Arrowsmith (1790-1873),
of London.   Their maps were revised periodically as new information accrued from
many sources, including the expanding knowledge of the Hudson's Bay Company,
the good graces of which the Arrowsmiths enjoyed, as well as those of the British
Colonial Office. Aaron, the father, produced pertinent editions in 1795, 1814, and
1824, and John continued with further editions of 1832, 1837, 1855 (Vancouver
Island), 1859, and 1862. A selection of these and other maps of special interest,
which had appeared up to and including the year 1871, the end of British Columbia's
colonial period, are listed in chronological sequence below, with occasional comment.
(Asterisk (*) indicates copy or photostat in the Provincial Archives, Victoria, B.C.)
1831:  "Map of British Dominions in North America.   Compiled by Joseph
Bouchette, Jr., Deputy Surveyor-General of the Province of Lower Canada, 1831."   (The western portion of this map includes the territories of
Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and parts of California and Montana within
the red (British) outline.)
*1842:  " Ground Plan of portion of Vancouver Island selected for New Establishment taken by James Douglas, Esq.   Drawn by A. Lee Lewes, L.S."f
(Scale, 4"= 1 mile.)
Circa 1849-50:   "Original sketch of exploration between 1846 and  1849,
Alex C. Anderson."   (Scale 1 inch = approximately 10 miles.)    Fort
Langley to Kamloops.  (This sheet was endorsed:   " This map was handed
to the Surveyor-General by J. A. Anderson, February 1910—(signed)
E. B. McKay.")    (LXV.)
*1855:  "THE    SOUTH    EASTERN    DISTRICTS    OF    VANCOUVER
ISLAND.   From a Trigonometrical Survey made by Order of The Honourable Hudson's Bay Company.   By J. D. Pemberton, Engineer and
Surveyor to the Company."    (Scale, l"=lVi miles approximately.)—
Published by John Arrowsmith, London, October, 1855.    (LXIV.)
*1858:  " MAP OF THE GOLD REGIONS OF THE FRAZER [sic] RIVER
AND THE WASHINGTON TERRITORY on the WESTERN COAST
OF AMERICA.   By James Wyld, Geographer to the Queen & the Prince
Consort, Charing Cross, London 1858."   (Scale, 1"=28 miles.)   (This
map shows the International Boundary routed via Rosario Straits, and
Kamloops Lake is spelled "Lake Kenloop.")    (LXVI.)
*1858:   "MAP OF VANCOUVER ISLAND AND ADJACENT COAST
COMPILED   FROM   SURVEYS   OF   VANCOUVER,   KELLETT,
SIMPSON,  GALIANO, VALDEZ, &c, &c,  &c,  by  J.  Arrowsmith."
London, April, 1858.   (Scale, approximately 1"=20 miles.)   (LXVIII.)
t See Ireland, W. E., " Pioneer Surveyors of Vancouver Island."   Proc. 26th Annual General Meeting of the
Corporation of Land Surveyors of British Columbia., Jan. 11-12, 1951, Victoria, B.C.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 51
*1861: " BRITISH COLUMBIA. THOMPSON RIVER DISTRICT. From
a Map in the Possession of H. E. Gov. Douglas, C.B. Made in 1835 by
S. Black, Esq., H.B. Company's Service. The positions of New Westminster, Douglas & Hope are those determined by the Royal Engineers.
Lithographed under the Direction of Capt. Parsons, R. E., New Westminster, July, 1861, by order of Col. R. C. Moody, R.E., etc. Drawn by
R. Armstrong, R.E. Printed by W. Oldham R.E." (Scale, approximately
1"=22 miles.) (This map extends from New Westminster in the southwest corner to Jasper House in the north-east corner. Considerable detail,
but some distortions.)    (LXXIV.)
♦1861: "BRITISH COLUMBIA—NEW WESTMINSTER TO LILLOOET
FROM A GENERAL MAP IN PREPARATION BY THE ROYAL
ENGINEERS. Prepared under the direction of Capt. Parsons, R.E.,
New Westminster, August 1861. By order of Col. R. C. Moody, R.E.,
etc."   (Scale, 1"=10 miles.)    (LXXIII.)
*1862: "THE PROVINCES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA & VANCOUVER
ISLAND; WITH PORTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES &' HUDSON'S BAY TERRITORIES. Compiled from Original documents by
John Arrowsmith, 1862. London, 1st June 1862." (Scale, 1"=40
miles approximately.) (This map incorporated much of the new information accruing from gold-mining activities, explorations of A. C. Anderson, the Harrison-Lillooet-Kamloops-Coquihalla route in 1846 and the
Fraser-Thompson-Nicola routes in 1847, hydrographic surveys in the
Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound. It also corrects earlier confusion between the Skeena and the Nass Rivers.) (LXIX.)
Circa, 1863: "SKETCH OF ROUTE FROM FORT HOPE TO FORT
COLVILLE TRACED FROM LT. PALMER'S MAP." (Probably
traced at the office of Lands and Works, New Westminster.) (Scale, 1"=
3 miles.) Manuscript is in the vault of the Department of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources, Victoria.    (LXXI.)
*1863: "SKETCH OF THE ROUTE FROM NORTH BENTINCK ARM
TO FORT ALEXANDER. By Lieut. H. S. Palmer, R.E., 1862.
Drawn by J. Turnbull, Lance Corp., R.E. Scale, 1"=10 miles." (Inset
is a profile of the route from sea-level to the Chilcotin plateau.)   (LXXII.)
1865: "A General Map of the Routes in British North America Explored by
the Expedition Under Capt. Palliser During the Years 1857, 1858, 1859,
and 1860." Published in 1865 by Stanford's geographical establishment,
London. (Scale, 1"=35 miles approximately.) (LXXV.) (Nicola
Lake and River are shown as " Nicholas " Lake and River; Shuswap
(Lake) is "Shouswap.")
* Circa 1866: "PLAN OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER DISTRICT SHOWING THE ROUTES EXPLORED BY MESSRS. MOBERLEY, GREEN
AND TURNBULL." (Scale, 1"=10 miles approximately.) Drawn
by James Turnbull (ex R.E.).   (LXXVI.)
*1866: " GUIDE MAP TO THE BIG BEND MINES (ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER) SHEWING THE ROUTE FROM NEW WESTMINSTER. The portion of this map in British Columbia is compiled chiefly
from government reconnaisances and recent surveys and is in its main
points correct. (Signed) Joseph W. Trutch, Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works and Surveyor General, New Westminster, February 5, 1866."
 CC 52     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(Includes Columbia River to Portland, Oreg., latitude 45° 30/ to latitude
55° and from Juan de Fuca Strait east to Rocky Mountains.)    (Scale,
1"=25 miles.)    (LXXVII.)
*1867:  "Map of portion of the Colony of BRITISH COLUMBIA.    Compiled from various sources including original notes from personal explorations between the years 1832 and 1851.   Dated 23 May, 1867.   A. C.
Anderson."    (Scale, 1"=10 miles.)    (LXX.)
•1871:  "MAP OF BRITISH COLUMBIA to the 56th Parallel, North Latitude. Compiled and drawn at the Lands and Works Office, Victoria, B.C.,
under the direction of The Hon'ble J. W. Truch, M.Inst.C.E., F.R.G.S.,
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works and Surveyor General, 1871.
J. B. Launders, Draughtsman, May 9th, 1870, additions to January, 1871.
Scale, 25 English statute miles to 1 inch."   Published by Edward Stanford, 55 Charing Cross, October 18, 1871.    (LXXX.)    (Comment by
Dr. Farley:   "...   a careful portrayal of surveyed areas and for the
remainder, a bold attempt to convey what knowledge was available.   It
stands as a milestone in the historical cartography of British Columbia.")
A full and meticulous treatment of this fascinating aspect of British Columbia's
development is given by Dr. A. L. Farley in his thesis " Historical Cartography of
British Columbia, with a separate appendix of maps, Vancouver, 1960," of which
copies are available in this Branch and in the Provincial Archives, Victoria, and in
the libraries of the Universities of British Columbia, Vancouver;  Michigan, Ann
Arbor; and Wisconsin, Madison.   Roman numerals noted in the foregoing list of
maps refer to photostat copies included in Dr. Farley's appendix.
Surveys of legal boundaries for the partition of land went hand in hand with
exploratory surveys for routes and resources in colonial times as they do today,
because knowledge of terrain and its potentialities invites enterprise which, in turn,
requires legal occupation and access. The first legal surveys were done in and
about Fort Victoria, J. D. Pemberton's first plan of the settlement being dated 1852,
the year following his initial appointment by the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1858
Governor Douglas sent Mr. Pemberton to survey a townsite at " Derby," near Fort
Langley, anticipating it would be the capital of the new Mainland colony.
Early surveys of rural land for settlement by J. D. Pemberton are well summarized by Dr. Farley in his thesis mentioned above:—
" By 1859 he had directed the survey of some 30,000 acres of land in the
vicinity of Nanaimo and nearly another 30,000 acres in the Cowichan Valley—the
survey extended over eight districts, each district, except where interrupted by the
coast, containing 16 square blocks of 1,000 acres each and each block subdivided
into 100-acre sections. Eight other districts were surveyed in the southern portion
of the Island, covering the Sooke-Saanich area. The district surveys were later
published, at a scale of 20 chains to the inch, by the Topographical Depot of the
War Office under direction of the Royal Engineers."
Quoting from another source:—*
" TTiere was a lively demand for surveys of townsites and consequent sale of
lots. On 12th July, 1858, twenty-five town lots in Esquimalt were sold by auction,
bringing from $475.00 up to the highest bid of $1,450.00, by a Mr. Ah Gim, Chinese
merchant from San Francisco. This same year surveys of Victoria were completed
by the Colonial Surveyor and compiled into an official town map. Streets were
named, in order of priority, after colonial governors, distinguished navigators, early
ships, Arctic explorers and, lastly, Canadian cities, lakes, rivers, etc.   The evidence
* See Andrews, G. S., " Survey and Mapping in B.C. Resources Development."  Transactions of 7th British
Columbia Natural Resources Conference, Victoria, B.C., Feb. 24-26, 1954.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 53
of Pemberton's nomenclature persists to this day, identifying older parts of the city.
Fort Langley, capital-elect of the mainland colony, was surveyed in anticipation of
the arrival of the Royal Engineers under Colonel Moody toward the end of the year.
There, in November, 400 town lots were auctioned, fetching a gross of $68,000.00.
Before the sale it was officially announced that English Law protecting the rights of
alien property owners would prevail. Colonel Moody was not satisfied with Fort
Langley as a capital, and selected a site better suited to defence and deep draught
vessels, about 18 miles down river, and named it Queensborough—later changed to
New Westminster. Townsite surveys and construction were commenced early in
1859, a suburb nearby being chosen for the Royal Engineers' barracks and called
Sapperton. Sale of town lots in Queensborough took place in June, 1859, prices
ranging from $100.00 to $1,925.00 per lot. On Vancouver Island 20,000 acres of
rural land were surveyed into lots and put on sale at 4s. 2d. per acre."
The Royal Engineers also surveyed the townsites of Hope in 1860, Yale in
1862, Clinton and Barkerville in 1863.
The evolution of statutory regulation of land alienations and surveys is indicated
in the following:—*
"A Proclamation by His Excellency, James Douglas, C.B., Commander-in-
Chief, Vice-Admiral and Governor of British Columbia and its Dependencies " dated
January 4, 1860, made provision for the following:—
(1) The piece of land authorized to be acquired by pre-emption should be of
rectangular form, and the shortest side be at least two-thirds of the longest
side.
(2) That persons authorized to acquire land (by pre-emption) might purchase
in addition any number of acres not otherwise appropriated.
And by further Proclamation dated January 19, 1861:—
(3) Boundaries shall also run as nearly as possible by the cardinal points of
the compass.
(4) Natural boundaries authorized.
(5) Prior boundaries of adjacent parcels may be adopted, notwithstanding any
irregularities in said boundaries.
(6) Vacant fractions up to 160 acres enclosed by prior locations may be
acquired, notwithstanding irregularity of shape or disproportion in length
of any of the sides.
(7) " The Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works (then Col. R. C. Moody,
R.E.) from time to time may appoint Sworn Surveyors to survey the piece
of land acquired, etc., etc., and shall administer to them the oath set forth
in the schedule hereto and shall also acquire from each of them security
to the value of £100 that they will well and efficiently survey such piece
of land as they may be required to survey."
(8) Purchaser may apply to Chief Commissioner to appoint a Sworn Surveyor
to survey the land at the expense of applicant.
(9) The Sworn Surveyor shall make an accurate survey of said land and report
thereon to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
(10) The report of a Sworn Surveyor may also be received as evidence upon
application for a certificate of improvement.
(11) The Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works may issue a scale of
remuneration to be paid to the Sworn Surveyor.
* Andrews, G. S., " The Land Surveying Profession in British Columbia."    Report Proc. 50th Annual General Meeting of the Corporation of Land Surveyors of British Columbia, January 13-14, 1955, Victoria, B.C.
 CC 54     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(The Land Registry Act of 1871 required the owner of land to produce " a
properly authenticated" map, and, by amendment in 1873, that "such map shall
be certified by a competent Land Surveyor or Civil Engineer.")
Having reviewed the surveys and mapping situation at the time of union, and
close to the end of the colonial period, and leaving for another occasion a narrative
account of the century since then, we can, by contrast, examine the situation today,
as reported in following sections for the year 1966 by the four divisions of this
Branch.
The surveys and mapping inventory as of December 31, 1966, reflects the
benefits of continued and sustained vigour on the part of British Columbia's Provincial survey activity, as well as important benefits from her entry into the Canadian
Confederation in 1871, especially in the field of primary control, hydrographic,
topographic, and geological surveys by Federal agencies, both civil and military.
Today's inventory of maps and air photographs covering British Columbia is
comprehensively displayed in no less than 18 indexes to be found in the pocket
inside the back cover of this Report. Indexes 1 to 3, inclusive, show the cadastral
series compiled and maintained by the Legal Surveys Division. The Departmental
reference maps, Index 1, give up-to-the-minute land status of the entire surface of
the Province at 1"=1 mile, 1"=2 miles, and \"=V2 mile, according to density of
occupation. Mineral reference maps, Index 2, show concentrations of mineral
claims and placer mining claims at 1"=1,500'. Composite maps, Index 3, show
the cadastral (legal) survey network in various unincorporated areas of comparatively dense population at 1"=500' scale.
Standard topographic mapping at \"=Vi mile, fully controlled with contour
interval of 100 feet, in manuscript form, is shown in Index 4. Approximately two-
thirds of the Province is covered in this manner, just over half of which has been
done by Federal agencies, and the balance by the Province. Special engineering
projects at large scale, with close contour intervals for pondage, drainage, irrigation,
etc., by the Provincial Topographic Division are shown on Index 6.
The Air Division interim maps without contours, compiled from air photographs, are shown in Indexes 5 and 7 at V'=1/2 mile and 1"=% mile respectively.
Vertical air-photo cover over the whole Province at 1"=40 chains is shown in Index
16, and at 1"==20 chains in Index 17. Smaller-scale air photography and tricamera
photography are shown in Index 15.
Lithographed maps, distributed and produced in part by the Geographic Division, are covered in Indexes 8 to 13, inclusive. Maps of the Province as a whole
are covered by Index 8, the 1J series at 30 miles per inch and 1a (in two sheets) at
16 miles per inch. The 10-mile-per-inch series covers the Province in six sheets,
and a few surviving pre-emptors and other miscellaneous series at 3 and 4 miles per
inch are indicated in Index 9. The popular Provincial 1"=2 miles series featuring
land status is shown in Index 10, and the 1:250,000 (4-mile) series in Index 11, of
which about one-third are Provincial editions showing status, district lots, and vacant
Crown land. The balance are Federal editions. The Federal 1:500,000 (8-mile)
and 1:1,000,000 (16-mile) series are shown in Indexes 12 and 13 respectively.
Index 14 shows the lithographed 1:50,000 topographic series maps, all of which are
printed in Ottawa. Those in dark red, about one-third of the total, have been surveyed and compiled by the Provincial Topographic Division, and those in light red
are Federal productions.
Indexes of certain larger-scale maps, such as the 1:25,000 series, now being
extended over urban and suburban areas, and a few special miscellaneous series, are
available on special request.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 55
It is obvious that today, at the end of the century of union, a complete atlas of
current British Columbia maps would run into several bulky volumes which would
include a comprehensive array of one-sheet maps of the whole Province (the 1j
series at 30 miles per inch); eight Federal sectional sheets and the Provincial map
1a at 1:1,000,000 scale; six Provincial regional sheets at 10 miles per inch; 23
Federal sheets of the 1:500,000 series; 76 sheets of the 1:250,000 (4 miles per
inch) series. Each of the foregoing series gives full coverage of the Province. TThe
2-miles-per-inch series covers less than one-tenth of the Province in 41 sheets, and
the basic l:50,000-scale topographic series, in either lithographic or manuscript
(Ozalid print) form, now covers about two-thirds of the Province in some 800 full
or 1,600 half sheets. In addition are special series of legal surveys maps and air
interim maps.
It is also of primary significance that every square mile of the Province can be
inspected in realistic stereoscopic (three-dimensional) air-photographic detail. This
air-photo cover is continually being up-dated to record the ever-changing surface
features, due mostly to man's activities, much being praiseworthy—roads, logging,
new and growing towns, dams, reservoirs, etc.—but some regrettable, such as forest
fires and ribbon development. Natural processes of erosion, particularly in the
ambience of water boundaries, are also portrayed most effectively by revision
photography from the air.
The founders of British Columbia's survey and mapping policies and activities
a century ago, and their long line of able successors, would be amazed and, I think,
gratified at the progress which their example and foresight have inspired and realized.
This goes not only for the public servants professionally responsible, but also for
the heads of government, such as His Honour James Douglas, who well appreciated
that surveys and mapping comprise the very foundation of all enlightened development and administration of the land and its resources.
 CC 56     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
D. Pearmain, Chief
The Legal Surveys Division, under the direction of the Surveyor-General, is
responsible for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands of the Province. This entails
the issuing of instructions to the land surveyors engaged to make each survey and
supplying them with copies of the field-notes and plans of adjoining or adjacent
surveys. After the completion of the survey, the returns are forwarded to this office
for checking and plotting. In the above, returns are all right-of-way surveys, including those for highways, railways, and transmission-lines. During the year, 1,181
sets of the above instructions were issued, which is an increase of 42 over 1965.
During the year, 654 sets of field-notes or survey plans covering the survey of
1,013 lots were received in this office and duly indexed, checked, plotted, and
official plans prepared therefrom. Of the above-mentioned surveys, 1,001 were
made under the Land Act and 12 under the Mineral Act. At the present time there
are approximately 99,799 sets of field-notes on record in our vaults.
There were 367 plans received from land surveyors covering subdivision and
rights-of-way surveys which were made under the Land Registry Act. These were
duly indexed and checked, and certified copies deposited in the respective Land
Registry Offices.
In order that a graphic record may be kept of alienations of both surveyed and
unsurveyed Crown lands together with reserves, a set of 249 reference maps, covering the whole of the Province, must be maintained. These show all cadastral surveys which are on file in the Department, and are kept up to date by adding new
information as it accrues from day to day. Prints are available to the public (see
Indexes 1 to 7 in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report).
All applications to purchase or lease Crown lands or foreshore which are
received by the Lands Branch and all applications to purchase Crown timber received by the Forest Service are channelled through this Division for clearance.
The orderly processing of these applications requires that an exhaustive status be
made from the reference maps, official plans, and Land Registry Office plans. From
the reference maps, together with other information and facilities maintained by
this Division, it is possible to give an up-to-the-minute status of any parcel of Crown
land in the Province.
It was necessary during the year, for status and compilation purposes, to obtain
2,752 plans from the various Land Registry Offices.
This Division co-operates with the other departments of Government by preparing and checking legal descriptions which they require. Those assisted in this
way were the Attorney-General's Department (descriptions of Small Debts Courts),
the Department of Agriculture (descriptions of disease-free areas and pound districts), the Forest Service (descriptions of tree-farm licences and working circles),
and the Lands Branch (descriptions for gazetted reserves, etc.). During the year,
304 of the above descriptions were prepared, and this entailed 172 man-hours.
REPRODUCTION SECTION
The Legal Surveys Division, through this Section, continues to supply a service
to all departments of Government and to the public, as well as supplying all the
prints and photostats, etc., required by the Surveys and Mapping Branch. The
total number of prints made during the year was 300,458, in the preparation of
which 301,250 yards or 171.2 miles of paper and linen were used. The number
of photostats, films, autopositives, and Xerox copies made was 163,724.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 57
Of the 300,458 prints made, 45,172 were for the Surveys and Mapping Branch,
62,192 for other branches of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, 174,472 for other departments of Government, and 18,622 for the public.
Likewise, of the 163,724 photostats, films, etc., made, 47,216 were for the Surveys
and Mapping Branch, 105,429 for other branches of the Department, 8,460 for
other departments of Government, and 2,619 for the public.
The multilith machine turned out 435,614 copies during the year.
COMPOSITE MAP SECTION
This Section is responsible for the compilation and fair drawing of composite
maps, mostly at a scale of 500 feet to 1 inch, of the more densely subdivided areas
of the Province, and especially where they occur in unorganized territory. (See
Index 3 inside back cover.)
During the year no composite mapping was done; instead this Section was
given the responsibility of recompiling and renewing reference maps which, through
constant use, had become very worn and dirty. In certain cases the scale of the
new maps has been enlarged from 1 inch to 1 mile to 1 inch to one-half mile. The
total number of reference maps recompiled and redrawn during the year was 39.
Early in December this Section was withdrawn from the recompilation of reference maps and a start has been made in revising the composite maps which lie
within the Kamloops Land Registration District.
LAND EXAMINATION PLANS SECTION
This Section is responsible for the preparation of plans for the use of the Land
Inspectors in their examination of applications for Crown lands. These plans are a
consolidation of all the information available in this Department and pertinent to
the applications requiring inspection. A synopsis of the work accomplished by this
Section during the past six years is as follows:—-
Year Plans Prepared Year Plans Prepared
1961  2,660      1964  2,827
1962  2,941      1965  2,212
1963  2,944
1966  2,808
LAND REGISTRY OFFICE PLAN CHECKING SECTION
This Section supplies a service to the Land Registry Offices at Victoria, Vancouver, Kamloops, Nelson, Prince George, and Prince Rupert by giving a thorough
and complete mathematical check to plans tendered for deposit in the said offices.
This mathematical check is accomplished through the use of the electronic computer
which is available to this Division.
During the year, 2,463 plans received this check, as compared with 2,436 in
1965 and 2,216 in 1964.
GENERAL
The receiving and distribution of survey-posts, which are stored at 859 Devonshire Road, has operated smoothly and efficiently. The following synopsis shows
the quantities of posts shipped during the past year and to whom:—
Standard
Pipe
Driveable
Pipe
Standard
Rock
B.C.L.S.
Bars
Purchased by private surveyors from headquarters..
Supplied to Departmental surveyors	
Shipped to Government Agents for resale	
Totals  	
235
93
170
532
573
4,364
294
10
1,025
100
2,660
900
498      |      5,469
1,329
3,660
 CC 58     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
COMPUTER OPERATIONS AND PROGRAMMING
During 1966 a large volume of work was carried out on the Government I.B.M.
1620 computer. Principal users were the Legal Surveys Division, for checking plans
prepared under the Land Act and Land Registry Act, and for the computation of
the larger field survey jobs; the Trigonometric Control Section, for the computation
and adjustment of all triangulation, trilateration, and control traverses, with particular emphasis on the adjustments required in connection with integrated surveys; and
the Photogrammetric Section, for the adjustment of aerotriangulation in both strip
and block form.
The Legal Surveys Division combined with the Trigonometric Control Section
to compute rectangular co-ordinates of section corners in four townships in the Peace
River Block, in the Inga Lake area where petroleum and natural-gas drillings and
land alienations are active. Surveys in this area will thus be integrated and serve
as control for subsequent surveys.
The Surveys and Mapping Branch used 18.8 per cent of the operational time
of the 1620 computer during the 12-month period October 1, 1965, to September
30, 1966.   The following table shows the hours of usage and cost by section:—
Section
Hours of
Computer time
Hours of
Key-punch time
Total Cost
Legal Surveys Division  	
Photogrammetric Control Section ....
Trigonometric Control Section	
Total cost 	
57
63
222
1,293
144
172
$6,718
3,889
11,876
I
$22,483
This table shows that the usage by the Legal Surveys Division involves a large
amount of time in data preparation as compared with computing time. The Trigonometric Control Section, on the other hand, is heavy on computer time, with the
more intricate computations and elaborate adjustments required.
It is interesting to note that the total cost of the computer operation represents
the salaries of between three and four men at the technical assisant level. While it
would be impractical to perform some of the adjustments without a computer, it is
estimated that 20 additional men would be required to replace it, together with the
required office space and desk calculating-machines.
Programming
Two new programmes were prepared in 1966: Surmap 116 for the reduction
of geodimeter observations and Surmap 124 for the computation of geodetic position, given azimuth and distance, and for the inverse computation given two positions. A number of changes and improvements were made to existing programmes
to meet new demands upon them.
Preparation for I.B.M. System 360
The 1620 computer is to be replaced in 1967 by an I.B.M. System 360. This
will involve rewriting nearly all existing programmes in one of the several languages
compatible with the new system. For Surveys and Mapping Branch programmes,
the most suitable language is Fortran IV, and a start on the necessary conversions
has been made.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 59
Summary of Office Work for the Years 1964 and 1965,
Legal Surveys Division
Number of field books received
„        lots surveyed	
„        lots plotted	
„        lots gazetted	
„        lots cancelled	
„        lots amended	
mineral-claim field books prepared ___
reference maps compiled or renewed
applications for purchase cleared	
applications for pre-emption cleared _
applications for lease cleared	
timber sales cleared	
Crown-grant applications cleared
cancellations made 	
inquiries cleared
letters received and dealt with	
land-examination plans	
Crown-grant and lease tracings made
photostats made	
blueprints made	
offset prints made	
1965
565
860
735
648
11
212
70
50
2,025
67
4,138
3,910
1,146
3,361
1,454
6,423
2,212
5,557
151,105
323,604
284,580
1966
654
1,013
763
828
19
230
92
35
1,302
65
4,935
4,105
1,069
3,117
1,106
6,488
2,808
6,635
163,714
300,458
435,614
FIELD WORK
Subdivisions of Crown Land
One large lot west of the Mission Flats at Kamloops, of 165 acres, was surveyed for lease. A road right-of-way into a subdivision at Ness Lake, of 1.2 miles,
was necessary for access. Southern Okanagan Lands Project lands surveyed consisted of one 28-acre lot at Hester Creek, a sewer effluent right-of-way at Osoyoos,
and a nine-lot acreage subdivision west of Oliver on the bench. Tabulation of the
bulk of the small-lot surveys is as follows:—
Waterfront Lease Lots
Green Lake (Cariboo)
Norman Lake	
Ness Lake 	
  99
  82
  28
Fraser Lake  21
Lac Le Jeune	
Topley Landing	
Seymour Lake (Smithers)
Lakelse Lake	
Lake Cowichan 	
7
25
25
10
1
Total
298
 CC 60     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Rural Roadside Lots
Shawnigan Lake, V.I.  6
Cheekye-Squamish  10
Grand Forks  1
Horsefly Road  40
Nanaimo  1
Topley Landing   51
Seymour Lake  25
Lakelse Lake  10
Total  144
Land Settlement Board Lands
The subdivision at Krestova, begun last year to encourage orderly settlement
in that area by Doukhobors and their descendants, was enlarged to include all the
usable land within the Krestova repository. Seventeen acreage lots south of Goose
Creek totalling 230 acres were laid out, as well as 125 lots of 2 to 8 acres each in
the vicinity of the old settlement, for building-sites. These lots will all be serviced
with a good gravel road and power. A school-site on Pass Creek was surveyed out
of a large block of land to lease the balance for alienation, and at Camp Lister (near
Creston) a large parcel was divided into five lots.
Interdepartmental Surveys
Two lots were surveyed at Red Rock in connection with a Forest Service
nursery, as well as a half a mile of road into it. Public Works properties at Lee
Avenue in Victoria, Mann Avenue in Saanich, at Burnaby, and around the Government Buildings Precinct in Victoria were posted. Work is practically completed on
the consolidation by survey of all Government-owned properties comprising the
institution-site on Wilkinson Road in Saanich. A park-site was surveyed at Topley
Landing, and at Colwood in Victoria a site for a Centennial project by the local district was cut out of some Federal Government land. In connection with the development at Fort Steele, a reservoir-site and right-of-way for water pipe-line were
surveyed at the request of the Water Resources Service.
Reposting and Restoration
This programme was regrettably curtailed this year due to our inability to field
the usual survey crew specifically for this purpose. However, restoration work at
Port Edward was possible, where five district lots were relocated in a very difficult
area where the Highways Department needed this information in order to make
agreements for road location. This is one of the few cases where it was possible
to get in ahead of road-building. Some reposting was done at Midway, south of
the bridge, to facilitate road work. Five sections in the Highland District around
Victoria were reposted. One old lot at Glimpse Lake, near Nicola Lake, was re-
surveyed, where a trespass on Crown timber was investigated for the Forest Service.
A large discrepancy in surveys made this quite troublesome. An old mineral claim
on Jumbo Creek had to be posted and removed from lands subsequently alienated.
Three quarter-sections were remonumented at Red Rock in connection with subdivision there.   In all, 148 district lot and section corners were replaced by our staff.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 61
Highways
Four survey parties accomplished 51.2 miles of highway surveying. Of this
total, 8 miles of the Southern Trans-Canada Highway between Greenwood and
Grand Forks and 6.1 miles between Hosmer and Olson were surveyed by one party.
Another party completed 16 miles of the highway in the Merritt area. Two parties
were on the Northern Trans-Provincial Highway, completing 11 miles east of Burns
Lake and 9.6 miles east of Houston. These latter two sections were tied into the
Provincial triangulation network, which, together with the valuable remonumentation
of remote district lot and section corners, continues to be of worth-while long-term
benefit to the survey and mapping control in the Province.
Inspections
Only one inspection was requested by the Corporation of British Columbia
Land Surveyors, to investigate what turned out to be an ill-founded complaint about
a survey at Kelowna. Another investigation on our own initiative at Comox turned
up an interesting anomaly in title records, now in the process of correction.
Personnel
Early in 1966 Mr. D. W. Carrier, B.C.L.S., an experienced surveyor who had
been with this Division as a surveyor since he was commissioned as a land surveyor
in 1951, resigned from the Service. The good work carried out by him during his
service will be long remembered. Shortly afterwards, in May, another valuable
land surveyor, Mr. A. P. McLaughlin, B.C.L.S., who had surveyed many hundreds
of miles of highways for this Department since he was commissioned in the Service
in 1954, died while on survey near Smithers. Mr. McLaughlin's meticulous attention to detail and precise work will serve as a tribute to himself and this Department.
He made many friends in areas where he worked. It was possible to continue the
work he started by appointing Mr. Harry Millard, B.C.L.S., who continued the work
without interruption. Mr. Millard has since become a permanent member of this
Division.
 CC 62     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
TOPOGRAPHIC DIVISION
A. G. Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Chief
As a direct result of the reactivation of the Interdepartmental Co-ordinating
Committee on Surveys and Mapping, this Division was provided with funds to continue pondage and mapping surveys in the Stikine-Iskut Rivers area, as well as mapping for three additional requests. Two of them, on the Kechika and Fort Nelson
Rivers, were pondage surveys, and the third for the strengthening of the vertical and
horizontal control in part of the northern portion of the North-east British Columbia
oil and gas fields.
Two helicopter contracts were awarded, one for three months and the other
for four. It is worthy of note that although tenders were called for earlier than in
past years, all of the larger companies were already fully committed and could not
tender. Excellent service was received from the two successful companies, both
small ones, despite a below-average weather year that held the hours flown far below
the banner year of 1965.
The Branch's De Havilland Otter aircraft was used on the Kechika and
North-east British Columbia projects as required, until an engine failure occurred
on June 19th, fortunately while the aircraft was directly above its base at Parker
Lake. A replacement motor was trucked from Victoria and installed in the field,
an operation that entailed a great deal of work and ingenuity as there were no
facilities available at this lake. The aircraft was ready for service again by July 13th,
and immediately went to work moving supplies into the Cabin Lake area for the
North-east British Columbia crew. On July 15th the Otter aircraft left for Kinaskan
Lake to join the Stikine-Iskut crew, with which it remained for the balance of the
V -mJ
The river boat " Judith Ann," plying between Wrangell, Alaska,
and Telegraph Creek, B.C., on Stikine River.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 63
season. A Cessna 185 aircraft from Fort Nelson, also using Parker Lake as a base,
was chartered as required to service the crew at Cabin Lake for the balance of the
season, as well as the Fort Nelson River crew while at the northern end of their
work, being a more economical means of obtaining supplies than by the river boat
at their disposal. The Highways Department allowed the use of its De Haviland
Beaver aircraft for flights out of McLure Lake, near Telkwa, to Kinaskan Lake for
two weeks in July while our Otter was being repaired.
For the purpose of hauling the equipment, instruments, and supplies for all of
the survey crews, a 5-ton chassis was purchased, on which was installed an aluminum
van with full-width rear doors. This unit was able to take care of all of the three
northern groups at the beginning of the season and, at the end, remaining in the
interim at Kinaskan Lake to haul gasoline from Watson Lake for the Stikine-Iskut
crew. A professional driver-mechanic was hired for the summer to drive the unit,
thus releasing a staff member for more important duties, and as well ensuring better
maintenance procedures, a fact well in evidence when the vehicle returned to Victoria
for the winter.
Control was obtained for seven National Topographic Series 1:50,000-scale
map-sheets in the Stikine-Iskut Rivers area, as well as 243 miles of pondage control
over the Stikine, Iskut, Chutine, and Scud Rivers. Based on the experience of the
previous years, this crew commenced operations in July to allow as much snow as
possible to melt from the high rugged peaks. Map-sheet control had to be abandoned early in September due to new snowfall that stayed on the higher elevations,
so that only pondage control was carried on during most of that month. This is
a very difficult section of the Province to photograph due to the very heavy snowfall.
Fig. 1.
 CC 64     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The Kechika River pondage control, including its tributaries Gataga and Frog
Rivers, was completed in 35 days commencing June 1st, utilizing the helicopter that
was later to do the Stikine River work. This watershed was part of a Provincial
triangulation scheme completed during 1939-41. Field work consisted of photo-
identifying the existing stations and adding side shots by tellurometer to control the
multiplex extentions. The Frog and Gataga Rivers were controlled by running
closed tellurometer traverses commencing in each case from stations established by
Mr. H. Pattinson, B.C.L.S., in 1939. Work completed was 239 miles of tellurometer
traverse, 39 old topographic stations occupied and photo-identified, and 40 new
stations established.
With the addition of two men and exchanging the helicopter crew for two boatmen, this crew then moved to Fort Nelson to commence work on the pondage maps
of the Fort Nelson and Liard Rivers. For the heavy work a 40-foot Finlay River
type boat with a 40-horsepower motor was hired, the observing crews using rubber
boats powered with 20-horsepower motors for daily transport. A new 15^-foot
" Explorer 66 " was purchased, which performed well on the fast river with plenty
of room to spare, replacing an older boat 3 feet shorter and too cramped for a working crew with all its gear. For a fast, safe means of transport on these large northern
rivers, the rubber boat has proved very satisfactory. The initial plan of traversing
the valley banks in this exceptionally flat part of the Province had to be abandoned
due to heavy tree cover in favour of an M.R.A. 3 tellurometer traverse along the
banks of the river. The meandering river reduced the length of the traverse courses
so that a total of 145 stations was required. Photo identification was a problem
because of the high stage of the water when the air photos were taken in the spring,
and to overcome this some clearing was done at each station and 15-foot strips of
cotton were used as a ground target. The whole project was then reflown in September with all targets in place. The river traverse commenced at a triangulation
station near Fort Nelson and continued down-river to the 60th parallel, where ties
were made to two boundary monuments, British Columbia-Yukon on the west bank
and British Columbia-Northwest Territories on the east. Another terminal connection was made to two of Mr. A. D. Wight's 1960 stations. Intermediate ties were
also made along the Fort Nelson River to four of Mr. E. R. McMinn's 1955 stations,
with azimuth observations on polaris taken on three occasions resulting in a total
of 253 miles of river traverse completed. A request from the Water Investigations
Branch of the Water Resources Service for additional horizontal and vertical control
in the vicinity of Dam "A" on the Liard River was received in August, and we completed this request while in the vicinity with the assistance of the helicopter that had
just finished its contract for the North-east British Columbia project.
The Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources was the requesting agency
for additional horizontal and vertical control in the Clarke Lake, Yoyo, Kotcho, and
Petitot gasfields, which lie in National Topographic Map-sheets 94 J/9, 10, 15, 16,
1/13, 14, and P/3, 4, 5, 12, 13. The Air Division was able to photograph the
areas covered by these map-sheets in early May. Using these photographs, mosaics
were assembled, which then were examined to plan the routes for the tellurometer
traverses. The mosaics revealed interconnections between seismic lines, which in
turn allowed a tentative route to be chosen which could then be checked by helicopter. Tellurometer traverse of 440 miles was run using 149 stations, of which 54
were marked by monuments, which consisted of 6 feet of 3A -inch steel reinforcing-
bar with a standard rock post fastened to the top by 1-inch copper pipe. Twelve
more were either tied to well-heads or the well-heads were used as stations, and 18
were either O.I.P.s (old iron posts) or were tied to O.I.P.s of well-sites, while eight
were original triangulation stations, set up by Mr. E. R. McMinn, B.C.L.S., in 1955.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 65
Of the 204 miles of levels run in the area, 71 permanent bench-marks were
established, using the same type of monuments as those set for the tellurometer
stations, while 105 temporary bench-marks were set (8-inch spikes driven in the
base of a tree).
In the Clarke Lake area, nine concrete right-of-way monuments were levelled
to and used as bench-marks. Over the soft ground and muskeg sections, 6-foot
aluminum poles with adjustable sliding brackets were used as turning points and for
instrument set-ups, which proved invaluable and were designed and constructed in
the Air Division workshop before the crew left for the field, utilizing our previous
season's experience. This portion of British Columbia, with its gumbo mud and
muskegs, is a very unpleasant part of the Province for surveyors working there.
There were three separate integrated surveys worked on during the year,
the largest being in the Municipality of Delta and was an extension of the work done
in the Municipality of Surrey. Four new second-order and five third-order control
stations were required to co-ordinate the 320 monuments installed by the local
authorities. Vertical control was obtained by spirit level for 401 monuments in
the two municipalities.
The City of Kelowna installed 41 monuments following a visit by a member of
the Division the previous season, and these were co-ordinated and tied into the
main geodetic triangulation, requiring five new stations for the purpose. M.R.A. 3
tellurometers were used for the horizontal control, and a spirit level was used for
the vertical control, utilizing three geodetic bench-marks.
The City of Vancouver installed 50 monuments in the False Creek area under
the direction of one of our staff surveyors, who then proceeded to co-ordinate them,
using three new control stations from the local second-order network previously
installed. The Model 6b geodimeter was used on this project for the shorter distances, and the M.R.A. 3 tellurometer for those over half a mile. A level crew from
Vancouver City engineering department obtained the necessary elevations.
The initial work for four other proposed integrated surveys has been done in
the City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver, Cranbrook, and Nelson,
the monuments being installed to the pattern suggested by the staff surveyors. They
will be co-ordinated during the 1967 season.
Eleven National Topographic map-sheets, totalling approximately 3,200 square
miles, were compiled in the Photogrammetric Section. In addition, bridging was
completed for the Stikine-Iskut Rivers map-sheets and those of the Southern Vancouver Island area, the former now being plotted by multiplex. There were 23
large-scale projects, ranging in scale from 100 to 1,000 feet to 1 inch, including
17 for the Water Resources Service, 2 for the Highways Department, 2 for British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, 1 for the Department of Recreation and
Conservation, and 1 for the Museum, a small reconnaissance map of an archaeological site on the Fraser River near Yale. This is an increase in production over the
past year, and results from the installation of five new pantograph attachments to
our multiplex plotting tables, allowing a reorganization of men and equipment.
The Draughting Section reports the compilation of 38 standard topographic
manuscripts at the scale of 2 inches to 1 mile and 181 large-scale mapping plans
at various scales. In addition, the plotting of cadastral surveys on 11 Federal Government 1:50,000 manuscripts was completed, 29 mosaics were assembled and
distributed to the various departments requesting them, and 5 integrated survey
plans were completed.
The Federal Government now has 121 of our 1:50,000 scale manuscripts on
hand for printing, which are in various stages of reproduction.   Due to a reorganiza-
3
 CC 66     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
tion in the map reproduction section at Ottawa, most of these sheets are expected
to be completed during 1967.
Copies of the photogrammetric large-scale mapping and the completed manuscripts listed at the end of this Report are available on request. (See Indexes 4
and 6 contained in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Report.)
List of Large-scale Mapping
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
XI
S.P.I
S.P. 2
Goldfields	
Richmond	
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
1"=800\ 900',
1,000', 1,320'
1"=200', 600'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=20 ch.
1"=   550'
1"=10 ch.
1"=10 ch.
l"=10ch.
1"=1,300'
1"=13 ch.
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
\"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=1,320'
1"=   400'
1"=   500'
V—   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,320'
V'=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
V'=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   400'
1"=   200'
V—   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   600'
1"=1,000'
100'
Mosaic
5'-50', then 50'
5'-50', then 50'
20'
20'
100'
50'
50'
50'
500'
5'
50'
20'^tO'
5'
50'
10'-20'
20'^tO'
50'
5'
Spot heights
5'-10'-25'
5'-10'-25'
Planimetric
50'
20'-100'
20'-40'
20'-A0'
50'
50'
20'-^0'
20'-40'
20'-^.0'
50'
20'
20'
50'
20'^W'
10'
10'
10'
20'
5'-10'-15'
20'-^(0'
10'
20'
10'
Planimetric
10'-20'
20'-40'
20'-40'
20'-40'
20'
10'
10'-20'
20'
20'
18
20
t1)
13
1
1
38
8
6
13
28
73
2
7
1
("2")
11
12
8
6
6
1
1
26
3
48
8
23
11
5
2
7
7
20
8
11
2
4
2
4
5
3
9
16
40
7
3
1957
S.P. 3
1958
1
1952
2
1951-52
3
1950
4
1951-52
5
1951
6
7
Kemano    .
1952-53
1951
s
1951-52
9
10
Salmo... 	
1952
1952
11
1952
13
14
Trout Lake   	
1953
1951
15
16
Fraser Pondage 	
1953
1953
17
1953
18
1953-54
19
Doukhobor Lands—
1953-54
Krestova-Raspberry, etc	
1953-54
1963
1953-54
21
Agassiz (Extension)  ....
1954
28
M2
MoriceLake 	
1954-55
1955
M4
1955
M5
M6
Gaspard Creek. _.
1955
1955
M7
1955-56
M8
M9
M 11
Upper McGregor River	
Sinclair Mills  	
1956
1956-62
1955
M 12
1955
M 13
1954
1954
M 15
1954
1956
M17
M21
Creston..	
1954
1955
M 24
1956
M27
1958
M29
1956
M30
1956
M34
M36
Fruitvale —
1957
1957
1956-57
M 38
1956-57
M39
(1957)
M39
(1958)
M39
(1960)
Dease River Dam-sites	
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites	
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites
1956-57
1959
1960
1956
1959
i One map (5e).
2 See Map No. 17.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 67
List of Large-scale Mapping—Continued
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M42
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
1"=   600'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"—   200'
1"=   500'
1"=2,640'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"= 1,320'
1"= 1,320'
1"= 1,000'
l"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=     40'
1"=     40'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
\"=   300'
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   250'
1"=   500'
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"= 1,320'
1"_=   100'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=     40'
1"=1,000'
1"—1,320'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   400'
1"=     40'
V—     40'
1"=   500'
1"= 1,000'
1"=     40'
1"=   100'
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
\"=     50'
20'
50'
5'
5'
50'
100'
20'
20'
10'
20'-2,600', then 50'
20'
10'
10'
20'
25'
20'
10'
10'
10'-20'
10'-20'
20'
2'
2'-5'
10'-20'
20'
5'
20'
5'
5'
5'
10'
10'
2'
Spot heights
50'
20'
Planimetric
20'
5'
5'-10'
2'
2'
20'
10'
10'-20'
10'-20'
20'
2'-4'
10'-20'
10'
2'
20'
50'-100'
20'
10'
25'
50'
10'
2'
10'
25'-50'
2'
10'
2'
10'-20'
2'-5'
10
2
8
17
1
10
2
2
98
5
10
4
3
10
48
5
1
25
20
17
4
5
11
5
5
14
15
19
24
11
4
4
2
6
5
12
3
4
8
2
3
68
7
7
4
9
4
3
5
1
6
4
4
7
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1957
M43
1956
M44
1958
M45
1958
M52
M54
Kaslo 	
Big Bar      	
1958-60
1957
M56
1958
M59
1958
M62
1958
M63
M63A
Parsnip River Pondage	
Parsnip River Pondage Ad-
1958, 59,
61,62, 63
1962
M66
1958
M67
1958
M68
M70
Hansard Lake	
1958
1958
M73
1959
M73
1959
M74
1959
M75
1959
M76
1960
M77
1960-61
M83
Oakalla       	
1960
M84
Victoria University, Gordon
Head       _	
1960
M88
1963
M88
1964-65
M89
1960
M89
M90
M90A
North Thompson 	
Similkameen— 	
1960
1961
1965
M90B
M92
Similkameen	
1966-67
1962
M98
1960
M100
M100
M105
M107
Essondale 	
Essondale.—  	
Clearwater Lake-Azure Lake
1962
1962
1962
1961
M108
1961
M109
London   Mountain   (Mount
Whistler)	
1961
Mill
M113
Clearwater River Dam-site
1961
1963
M114
1962
M114
|       1962
M117
1962
M117
M118
M121
Liard River Dam-site	
Nitinat  _ 	
Winfield	
1962
1962
1961
M122
1962
M125
M126
M127
Port Hardy 	
Thompson River  	
1962
1962
1965
M129
1962
M130
M131
McGregor River Pondage	
|       1962
1962
M134
1962
M135
|   1963-65
M136
M138
M139
Haney _	
Hobson Lake Extension	
j       1962
1962
|       1962
M141
M141
M142
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
(under-surface plan) 	
1963
1963
1963
M144
M145
M146
Marysville 	
Kamloops Gov't Buildings
1963
1963
1963
M146
1963
M150
|       1963
M150
Prince George Gaol	
!       1963
 CC 68     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
List of Large-scale Mapping—Continued
No.
M151
M152
M155
M158
M160
M161
M162
M163
M164
M165
M165
M168
M170
M171
M171
M172
M172
M173
M175
M176
M178
M179
M 180
M181
M182
M182
M186
M188
M189
M196
M197
M198
M200
M201
M202
M204
M205
Name
Prospect Lake..
Ruby Burn	
Sechelt	
Parksville Building Site..
Ladysmith-
Hudson Bay Mountain..
Haney By-pass-
Slesse Creek Bridge	
Saanich Garbage Disposal..
Saltair Gaol Site	
Saltair Gaol Site	
Peace River Pondage (Find-
lay River) 	
Gibson Pass	
Black Tusk Meadows..
Black Tusk Meadows..
Chilcotin Road	
Chilcotin Road 	
Copeland Mountain..
Shuswap Canal Diversion_
Stewart	
Sparwood.
Niskonlith	
Colwood-Langford..
Nematode.	
Stikine-Iskut Dam-sites..
Stikine-Iskut Dam-sites..
Revelstoke	
Otter Lake	
Shuswap-Okanagan..
Keremeos	
Hurley Pass	
Peachland	
Merritt 	
Archaeology	
South Revelstoke-
Prince George West-
Nelson-Liard Pondage	
Government House Grounds.
Victoria University Campus..
Colquitz Mental Home	
Available
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
In hand
Yes
Yes
Yes
In hand
No
No
No
Scale
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
1"= 600'
1"= 600'
1"=1,000'
1"= 100'
1"= 300'
1"= 200'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"=1,320'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"=1,000'
1"= 200'
1"=1,320'
1"= 200'
1"= 400'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"=1,000'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 400'
1"= 500'
1"= 200'
V'= 100'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 20'
1"= 20'
1"=     20'
Contour
Interval
2'
5'
20'-50'
20'
20'
50'
2'-5'
5'-20'
5'
5'
50'
25'-2,500', then 50'
25'-50'
5'
10'
5'
10'
50'
5'
100'
5' and spot heights
50'
5'
5'
10'
20'-100'
2'
5'
5' and spot heights
5'
25'
V
5'
2'
10'
20'
2'
2'-5'
2'
No. of
Sheets
1
1
23
1
1
8
24
1
1
1
1
31
3
2
1
9
16
4
10
2
3
1
"l
4
49
4
4
3
2
5
3
1
5
9
2
5
1
Date
1963
1963
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1965
| 1965-66
|  1965
1965
1965
1965-66
1965
1965-66
1965
1965
1965
1965
1965
1965-66
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966-67
1967
1959
1960
1963
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work
Manuscripts complete except as follows:—
* Field work not compiete, photo identification of shoreline stations only.
t Field work completed, no manuscript available.
t Compilation completed, no manuscript available.
Sheet
82F/3 	
82 F/4 	
82 K/ll, W.
82K/12  	
82L/7   	
82L/10 	
82M/13 _.._.
83D/4 	
83D/5  	
83D/12
83 D/13, W.
92B/5   	
92B/5, W. ..
92B/6.W. .
92B/11, W.
92B/12	
92B/13   _	
92B/13   _	
92B/14   —
92C/8	
92 C/8 	
92C/9
Date
. 1951, 1960
.1944, 1947
  1952
  1952
  1958
  1958
  1959
  1959
  1959
..1959, 1960
1960
.1937, 1938, 1955
 J1963
 1955
  1955
...1938,
.1942,
1955, 1963
1943, 1951
 tl963
 1951
.1937, 1938
-,1963
92 C/9, E.
.1937, 1938
 J1963
Sheet
92 C/9, W. ..
92C/10  	
92C/10  	
92C/11, E. .
92C/11, E. .
92C/13, E.  .
92C/14  	
92C/14, E.  .
92C/15 	
92 C/15 ........
92C/16
92C/16   	
92E/1, E. ~.
92E/7, E.  ..
92E/8  	
92E/9  	
92E/10   _	
92E/14   .	
92E/16
92F/1   _	
92F/2 	
92 F/2, part
92F/3   	
Date
 tl963
-1937, 1938
 tl965
  1938
 _-tl965
  1938
  1938
-T1965
..1937, 1938
_.tl965
.1937, 1938, 1942
 - _tl965
  1942
  1946
.1943, 1946
.1938, 1946, 1947
  1947
   1948
  1947
.1942, 1943
.1938, 1940, 1942
-11965
.1938, 1940, 1941
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 69
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work—
Continued
Sheet
92 F/4 	
92 F/5   	
92 F/6	
92 F/7  	
92F/8  	
92F/9   	
92F/10 	
92F/11  	
92F/12  	
92F/13    	
92F/14   	
92 F/15, E., part
92 F/16, E., part
92G/4   	
92G/5   	
92G/7, part
92G/10, part   —
92G/11  	
92G/12 	
92G/13 	
92G/14 	
92H/1 	
92H/2 	
92H/3   	
92 H/4 	
921/12  _	
921/13    	
92 J/4, W. 	
92 J/15
92 J/16
Date
  1942
   1937, 1938, 1943
-1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943
 —.1940, 1941, 1942, 1943
  1942, 1943, 1950
 _   1950
 1950, 1953
 1934, 1935
..1936, 1937, 1938
 1935, 1936
  1935
  1950
  1950
-1942, 1943
1950, 1952
  1940
  1940
  1952
.1950, 1952
.1950, 1952
  1952
.1920, 1923, 1950
.1923, 1949
92 K/l, E, part .
92 K/2, E 	
.1924, 1931, 1948, 1949
 1948, 1956
  1958
  — 1958
   *1962
   1948, 1949
 1948, 1949
   1950
  *1962
92 K/2, W    tl961
92K/3
92K/4	
92K/5 	
92K/6 	
92K/7 —	
92 K/8, W. ..
92K/10, W.
92K/11  	
92K/12 	
92K/13  	
92K/14 	
92K/15  	
92L/1 	
92 L/2 	
92L/3 	
92 L/4	
92L/6  	
92L/7 	
92L/8	
92L/10   	
92L/11 	
92 L/12 	
92L/13   	
92M/2  	
92M/3   	
92M/4 	
92M/5  --	
92M/6  	
92 M/ll, W.
92M/12  	
92M/13  	
92 M/14, W.
92 N/1  	
92 N/7 	
92 N/8 	
92 N/9 	
92 N/10	
92 N/15 	
92 0/1 .-	
92 0/2 —	
92 0/3 	
92 0/4 	
92 0/5 	
1949
... 1949
  1949
  1949
 tl961
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 1- 1932
.1931, 1932
  1948
   1948
..1931, 1934, 1940
   1931
 1931, 1932
.1931, 1940, 1956
  1940
 1935, 1936
— _. 1936
 *1962
  1959
  1959
   1959
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
._  *1962
     *1962
    1958
   1958
    1958
    1958
   1958
   1958
  1950
  1947
 J...-. 1958
  1958
   1958
Sheet
92 0/6 	
92 0/7
92 0/8 ......
92 0/9 —
92 O/10 —
92 0/11 ....
92 0/12 —
92 0/16 ....
92P/2 	
92P/3 	
92P/4 	
92P/5     ...
92P/6	
92P/7	
92P/10 ....
92P/11 _
92P/12 _.
92P/13 _
92 P/14 _.
92P/15 _
92P/16 —
93 A/1 .....
93 A/2
93 A/3 	
93 A/4 .....
93 A/5 .....
93 A/6 .....
93 A/7 	
93 A/8 —
93 A/9 —
93 A/10 _
93 A/11 _
93 A/12 __
93 A/13 ...
93 A/14 _.
93 A/15 ...
93 A/16 _.
93 B/l 	
93 B/6 	
93 B/7 	
93 B/8 .	
93 B/9 	
93B/9, W
93 B/10 _
93B/11 ....
93 B/12 ...
93B/13 ....
93 B/14 _.
93B/15
93 B/16
93 B/16
93C/5   _
93D/2 	
93 D/3  	
93 D/4 	
93D/5	
93 D/6  	
93 D/7, E. ..
93 D/7, W.
93D/8 _	
93 D/ll, E.
93 E/5, W. .
93 G/2 	
93G/3  	
93G/4 	
93G/5 ..—
93 G/6 	
93G/7 	
93G/10 	
93G/11  —
93G/12
93 G/14  —
93 1/8 -	
93 1/9 	
93 1/10 	
931/11 	
W.
Date
  1958
..1950, 1958
  1950
  1951
  1958
  1958
. ...1958
  1951
  1959
  1959
  1958
  1958
  1959
  1959
 .. 1959
  1959
  1958
 -- 1958
  1959
... ■. 1959
  1959
.41959
.41936, 1959, 1960
  1959, 1960
  1959
  ! 1935
    1935
.41936, 1959, 1960
.41959
41959, 1960
-41934, 1960
-1933, 1934
-1931, 1933, 1934
  1934
 1933, 1934
 1.1934, 1960
 1*1960
  .. 1951
 41963
 U963
  1952
 -.. 1950
  J1965
.41963
.41963
41963
 41963
 41963
 tl963
 - 1950
 .41965
- * 1959
 ...*1962
 *1962
 *1962
_ _..*1962
— „.*1962
 — 1958
 *1962
..1958, 1959
 ,.*1962
  *1963
1960
1960
1960
1960
1960
...1933,
..1933, 1960
 . 1960
 1960
  1960
 . 1948
  1956
 : 1956
 „ 1956
  1957
 CC 70     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work—
Continued
Sheet
93 1/12 ...
93 1/13 -
93 1/14 ...
93 1/15 _
93 1/16 _
93 J/2 _
93 J/3 _..
93 J/5 ....
93 J/6 ....
93 J/11 -.
93 J/12 .
93 J/13 ..
93 K/l ..
93 K/2 ...
93K/7 _
93K/8 ~
93K/9 ~
93K/10
93K/U
93K/12
93K/13
93K/14 .
93K/15 .
93K/16 .
93 L/2 ....
93 L/7 -
93 L/8 ...
93 L/9 ...
93 L/10 .
93L/11 .
93 L/14 .
93 L/15 ..
93 L/16 -
93 M/l ._
93 M/2 _.
93 M/5 ..
93 M/7 ..
93 M/8 _
93 M/9 -
93 M/10
93 M/ll
93 M/12 .
93 M/13
93 M/14
93 M/15
93 M/16
93 N/1 ..
93 N/2 -
93 N/3 _
93 N/4 ..
93 N/5 -
93 N/6 ..
93 N/7 -
93 N/8 ..
93 N/9 ..
93 N/10 .
93 N/11 .
93 N/12
93 0/1 -
93 0/4 _
93 0/5 ..
93 0/6 -
93 0/8 -
93 0/11
93 0/12
93 0/13
93 0/14
93P/1 -
93P/2 _
93P/3 ..
93P/4 ..
93P/5 ..
93P/6 ..
93P/7 ..
93P/8 -
94B/4  „.
Date
.  1957
  1957
  1957
  1956
.  1956
  1949
.  1949
  1961
  1961
  1961
 1961
 1961
  1946
...... 1946
.  1960
  1960
  1960
  1960
  1961
  1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
  1951
  1951
  1951
  1951
-1950, 1951
  1950
  1950
 $1962
 $1962
 1962
  1963
  1949
 $1963
  1963
 $1963
..$1963
- 1949
.41963
.41963
.41963
.41963
-41962
-41962
_tl962
.41962
-41962
-41962
.41962
-41962
-41962
.41962
-41962
.41962
.. 1957
-41961
-41961
-. 1957
„ 1957
.. 1957
.. 1957
.. 1957
.. 1957
.. 1956
_ 1956
.. 1957
_ 1957
... 1957
_ 1957
.. 1956
.. 1956
Sheet
94 C, part	
94D/1  	
94D/2 	
94D/3  	
94D/4 	
94D/5 _.	
94D/6 	
94 D/7 	
94D/8 - _..
94 E, part	
94 F, part 	
94 L, part	
94 M, part .	
102 1/8, E. 	
1021/9  	
1021/15	
102 1/16 	
102 P/8, E. _
102 P/9, E. —
102P/16, E. ..
103 A/1  	
103 A/2, E	
103 A/6, E. _..
103 A/7	
103 A/8 	
103 A/9  	
103 A/10 	
103 A/11  	
103 A/13, E. ..
103 A/14 	
103 A/15  	
103 A/16  	
103 G/l, E. —
103 G/7, E. _..
103 G/8  	
103 G/9	
103 G/10, E. ..
103 G/15, E. -.
103 G/16	
103 H/l, W. ...
103 H/2	
103 H/3  _ -
103 H/4 	
103 H/5 -	
103 H/6 	
103 H/7 .-..	
103 H/8 	
103H/10 	
103H/15 	
103 1/2 	
103 1/7 -	
103 1/10 	
103 P/9 	
103 P/10, E. ..
103 P/14, E. -
103P/15   	
104 A/2, W.   ..
104 A 3 	
104 A/5, E	
104 A 6 	
-1939, 1957
104 A/11, W.
104 A/12	
104 A/13, W.
104 B/12, W. .
104 B/13, E. ..
104 B/13, W. .
104B/14	
104B/15   -	
104 B/16 	
104 F/16 	
104 G/l  	
104 G/2  _
104 G/3  	
104 G/4, E	
104 G/4, W. ..
104 G/5, E	
Date
  1939
 T1963
 tl963
 T1963
 tl963
 1-1963
 T1963
 tl963
 T1963
  1939
  1939
-1940, 1941
 1941
 1935, 1937
..1935, 1936, 1937
  1937
-1936, 1937
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 H963
 *1963
 $1961
 $1961
 *1963
 «1963
 $1961
- *1963
 *1963
 *1963
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 *1963
  *1963
 —$1961
 $1961
..$1961
..$1961
..*1962
..*1962
..*1962
-1962
.. 1949
.. 1948
.. 1947
.. 1949
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1950
.. 1951
.. 1951
.. 1951
.41966
.41965
.41966
.41965
.41965
1951
.41966
.. 1951
.41965
.41965
-41965
.41966
.41965
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 71
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work—
Continued
Sheet
104 G/5, W. -
104 G/6 	
104 G/7 	
104 G/8 -	
104 G/9  	
104G/10	
104G/11 	
104G/12 	
104G/13 	
104G/14	
104G/15	
104G/16	
104 H/12, W.
104H/13, W.
104 J/2, W	
104 J/3  —	
104 J/4  	
Date
. $1966
. 14965
 1-1965
-.._ 1951
  1951
 T1966
 1-1966
..-41966
 41966
  1951
  1951
 1951
  1951
 1951
  1952
 1952
... 1952
Sheet
104 J/5 ..
104 J/12
104 J/13
E.
104 K 16,
104 N/1  —
104 N/2 	
104 N/3, E	
104 N/5 	
104 N/6 	
104 N/7, W.	
104 N/7, E, part .
104 N/11, W	
104 N/12 	
104 N/13 	
104 P, part	
104P/15 	
Date
  1952
  1952
 1952
..1952, 1953
..1952, 1953
 1953
  1953
  1952
..1952, 1953
  1953
 1953
 1952
 1952
  1952
  1941
  1941
 CC 72     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION
W. R. Young, B.C.L.S., Chief
In 1966 the Geographic Division continued to expand its inventory of maps
showing the status of Crown land. A full statistical record of the Division's activities
during 1966 may be found in Tables A to K following this written report. Where
applicable, the tables give comparative figures for the preceding five years.
Fourteen maps were prepared and reproduced during 1966 (see Table H),
compared with nine in 1965. Six were entirely new editions, including four status
maps (that is, maps showing vacant, alienated, and reserved Crown lands), one
general map, and one Provincial park map. Status Maps 93b (Quesnel) and 93g
(Prince George) at 1:250,000 scale fill an important gap in status coverage in the
Central Interior of British Columbia. Maps 93b and 93g together with 93a (Quesnel
Lake)—in press—will supersede Pre-emptor Maps 3f, 3g, 3j, and most of 3a,
leaving only four of the old regional status series to be replaced. Reproduction of
82K/NW (Beaton) and 82K/NE (Invermere) virtually completes coverage of
l-inch-to-2-miles status maps across the populated belt east of the Coast Mountains
and south of the 51st parallel. Reproduction of status maps currently in preparation (Table J), together with existing sheets at 1:250,000 and l-inch-to-2-miles
scale, will complete a six-year cycle of land status and cultural detail for the area
south of the 56th parallel and containing 98 per cent of the Provincial population.
A new issue of General Map Ijf (British Columbia Electoral Districts) was
printed at l-inch-to-30-miles scale to show the boundaries of redistributed Provincial ridings. Map P.S.-B2 (Bowron Lake Park) was reproduced as a new three-
colour sheet at a scale of 1 inch to 1 mile. As the result of stock depletion, Sheets
92P (Bonaparte River), 82L/SE (Sugar Lake), and 82H/NE (Tulameen) were
reprinted without revision. The first two are currently being prepared as new status
editions (Table J). Three other status maps, however—93E (Whitesail Lake),
93M (Hazelton), and 92I/NW (Ashcroft)—were completely revised. As shown
in Table E, map distribution, totalling 95,540 sheets, marked a healthy gain of
8,785 over 1965 and was close to the former record of 1962.
In connection with map revision, a field trip was made to check and revise
cultural detail on Sheets 92I/SW (Lytton), 92H/NE (Tulameen), and 92H/SE
(Princeton).
Among the geographic work done for other Government departments (Table
F) was preparation of boundary descriptions and maps of the redistributed
Provincial electoral districts. At the request of the Provincial Redistribution Commission, the Geographic Division undertook the task of preparing legal descriptions
and maps. The completed assignment included the description, by metes and
bounds, of 52 proposed electoral districts, together with 12 additional descriptions
necessitated by division and amalgamation of certain proposed districts. Maps
outlining the revised districts were either hand-drawn or type-patched photographic
reproductions of existing maps. These were used as bases for 884 polling divisions
or stations. Four base maps overprinted in red to show the 1966 redistribution
were made for the Chief Electoral Officer. In addition, General Map Ijf (British
Columbia Electoral Districts) was printed in four colours showing the final boundaries of the 1966 redistribution. To complete this huge assignment, a revision of
the List of Polling Divisions, Settlements, Post Offices, Railway Stations, and Steamer
Landings was made for and issued by the Chief Electoral Officer.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 73
For the first time in many years, Federal Government mapping agencies reproduced no Provincial topographic manuscripts (Table I). Thus the backlog of
manuscripts awaiting reproduction in Ottawa continues to grow, from 104 in 1965
to 122 at the end of 1966. Consequently we can expect a veritable flood of completed maps in 1967 as many have reached final proof stage already. However, the
Army Survey Establishment printed five National topographic maps at 1:250,000
scale and 35 sheets at 1:50,000 scale. Stocks of the latter were received for
distribution. Twenty-four of the 1:50,000 prints were seven-colour revisions of
the Queen Charlotte Islands section of National Topographic Block 103, thus completing revised coverage of the Islands at that scale. The Federal Department of
Mines and Technical Surveys printed eight full-colour and seventeen provisional
1:50,000 scale maps.
The long-awaited new edition of the Gazetteer of British Columbia was being
readied by Federal agencies for distribution early in the new year.
The checking of name sheets for our own maps and those published by Federal
agencies continues to occupy a large percentage of Gazeteer staff's time, and it is
interesting to note that the number of maps checked bears little relation to the
number of names checked; for example, Table D shows a decrease of eight maps
and (or) charts checked compared with 1965, but an increase of 5,574 in the total
number of names. When one considers that it is not unusual for less than a dozen
names to take a full day of research, it follows that the Gazeteer staff is fully
occupied.
The fifth annual meeting of the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names was held in Victoria on September 26th, in conjunction with
meetings of the Canadian Advisory Council on Cadastral Surveys and that of the
Federal-Provincial Directors of Surveys.
This is only the second time that the plenary meeting of the Canadian Permanent Committee or its predecessor, the Canadian Board on Geographical Names,
has been held outside of Ottawa, but is part of a new arrangement whereby these
above-mentioned groups will meet in Provincial capitals every second year, an
arrangement which, beginning with the meetings held in Winnipeg in 1964, is
proving to be beneficial.
The research officer made revisions to the maps and texts of several land series
bulletins. These were Kootenay (Bulletin Area No. 1), Vancouver Island (No. 4),
Quesnel-Lillooet (No. 5), Kamloops (No. 6), Atlin (No. 9), and Peace River
(No. 10). A field trip was undertaken in connection with preparation of a completely
revised second edition of the Vancouver Island Land Series Bulletin No. 4. Several
brief research projects were also completed. An abridged hard-cover edition of the
combined Land Series Bulletins Nos. 1 to 10 was printed under the title "British
Columbia Source Book " by the Department of Education. It is used in the schools
as a textbook for the General Business 11 Course.
As listed in Table A, the Trigonometric Control Section completed 14 least-
square adjustments by the " Groom " electronic computer programme. These
involved a total of 1,190 triangles or traverse stations in the Canadian Hydrographic
Service and Provincial nets. Another 246 traverse stations were adjusted by the
least-square method using the "Bride" computer programme (Table B). In
addition, 226 petroleum and natural-gas well-site plans were checked.
The envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report holds a printed
index to published maps (Indexes 8 to 14).
 CC 74     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONS
Table A.—Least-square Adjustments by "Groom" Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Triangles or
Traverse Stations Involved
Canadian Hydrographic Service
Provincial	
Provincial 	
Provincial — 	
Provincial  	
Provincial    	
Provincial	
Provincial  	
Provincial  	
Provincial- 	
Provincial 	
Provincial  	
Provincial  —
Provincial  	
Dean and Labouchere Channels (revision).
Bute Inlet (revision)	
Ingenika River (revision) 	
Takla Lake (revision) ..
Kemano Tunnel (revision) 	
Clinton-Williams Lake (revision)	
Chilko Lake and vicinity (revision)..
Liard River (revision) .
North-eastern British Columbia (revision)	
British Columbia-Alberta Boundary (revision)..
Marysville-Kimberley  —	
Stikine-Iskut Rivers    	
Penticton — 	
Trail 	
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
66
98
67
60
29
36
221
43
167
149
55
108
22
69
Checking of petroleum and natural-gas well-site surveys totalled 226.
Table B.—Least-square Adjustments by " Bride " Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Traverse Stations involved
Grid
Grid
Grid
Grid
125
29
51
Provincial  	
Penticton  	
41
Table C.—Records
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
Index cards—
New   -	
1,930
149
32,374 '
333
917
9
33,291
417
781
6
34,072
341
1,475
293
35,547
389
1,693
1,453
37,240
334
673
2,482
Total on file _   	
37,913
368
Table D.—Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
74
7,837
360
35
7,168
215
59
6,821
375
22
6,090
277
93
5,854
402
85
Number of names checked    	
Number of new names recorded  	
11,428
440
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table E.—Map Stock and Distribution
CC 75
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
Nnmher nf requisitions filled
Maps issued to department and public    	
9,130
87,198
126,502
$32,936
10,549
99,324
130,420
$35,391
8,700
78,165
116,705
$48,674
10,395
88,322
71,178
$58,469
9,429
86,755
107,741
$56,152
9,550
95,540
155,133
Total value of maps issued.	
$62,977
Table F.—Geographical Work for Other Departments and Public
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
22
$1,452
18
$1,708
18
$1,729
19
$5,213
20
$4,460
23
$4,307
Table G.—Letters
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
8,670
8,790
7,274
8,469
7,297
8,007
Table H.—Maps Prepared and Reproduced by the Geographic Division,
Victoria, during 1966
Map No.
lc
1 JF
P.S.-B2
92F
92p
93b
93e
93 G
93m
82 K/N.W.
82 K/N.E.
82 L/S.E.
92 H/N.E.
92 I/N.W.
Name
British Columbia (two colours)	
British Columbia Electoral Districts..
Bowron Lake Park 	
Alberni (second status edition)	
Bonaparte River (second status edition)..
Quesnel (first status edition)	
Whitesail Lake (second status edition) _
Prince George (first status edition)	
Hazelton (second status edition)	
Beaton (first status edition)	
Invermere (first status edition)	
Sugar Lake (first status edition)— 	
Tulameen (second status edition)—	
Ashcroft (second status edition) 	
Scale
in. to 55 mi.
in. to 30 mi.
in. to 1 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
Remarks
Reprint, no revision.
New, redistribution 1966.
New, three colours, contoured.
Status overprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, complete revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, complete revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, complete revision.
Table I.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Prepared and Reproduced at 1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1966
Nil.
 CC 76     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table J.—Maps Being Prepared by the Geographic Division, Victoria, during 1966
Map No.
SGS-1
lo
lJR
92f
92j
92m
92p
93a
931
93J
82 L/S.E.
82 L/S.W.
92 G/S.E.
92 H/N.W.
92 I/S.W.
Name
Vancouver Island	
East Central British Columbia-
British Columbia ReUef Map-
Alberni (third status edition)..
Pemberton (third status edition)	
Rivers Inlet (second status edition)	
Bonaparte River (third status edition)..
Quesnel Lake (first status edition)	
Monkman Pass (first status edition)	
McLeod Lake (first status edition)	
Sugar Lake (second status edition)	
Vernon (second status edition)	
Langley (second status edition)	
Yale (second status edition)	
Lytton (second status edition)	
Scale
in. to 6 mi.
in. to 10 mi.
in. to 30 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
Remarks
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In lithography.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In lithography.
In compilation.
Table K.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Being Prepared at
1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1966
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
82F/3, E. &W.
Salmo (second edition).
93 C/5, E. & W.
Atnarko (first edition).
82K/11,W.
Trout Lake (first edition).
93 D/7, E.
Bella Coola (first edition).
82 K/12, E. & W.
Beaton (first edition).
93D/8, E. &W.
Stuie (first edition).
82 L/7, E. & W.
Lumby (first edition).
931/8, E.&W.
Narraway River (first edition).
82L/10, E. &W.
Mabel Lake (first edition).
93 1/9, E. & W.
Belcourt Creek (first edition).
82M/13, E. &W.
Raft River (first edition).
93 1/10, E.&W.
Wapiti Lake (first edition).
92 1/12, E. &W.
Lillooet (first edition).
93 1/11, E.&W.
Monkman Pass (first edition).
92 1/13, E. &W.
Pavilion (first edition).
93 1/12, E. & W.
Missinka River (first edition).
92L/10, E. &W.
Alert Bay (first edition).
93 1/13, E.&W.
Sentinel Peak (first edition).
92M/3, E. &W.
Belize Inlet (first edition).
93 1/14, E.&W.
Kinuseo Falls (first edition).
92 M/4, E. & W.
Cape Caution (first edition).
93 1/15, E.&W.
Kinuseo Creek (first edition).
92 M/5, E. & W.
Goose Bay (first edition).
93 1/16, E.&W.
Redwillow River (first edition).
92 N/1, E. &W.
Chilko Mountain (first edition).
93 O/l, E. & W.
Mount Reynolds (first edition).
92 N/7, E. & W.
Mount Queen Bess (first edition).
93 0/6, E. & W.
Morf ee Lakes (first edition).
92 N/8, E. &W.
Stikelan Creek (first edition).
93 0/8, E. & W.
Le Moray Creek (first edition).
92 N/9, E.&W.
Tatlayoko Lake (first edition).
93 0/11.E. &W.
Cut Thumb Creek (first edition).
92N/10, E. &W.
Razorback Mountain (first edition).
93 0/12, E. & W.
Blackwater Creek (first edition).
92 N/15, E. &W.
Tatla Lake (first edition).
93 0/13, E. &W.
Finlay Forks (first edition).
92 P/2, E. & W.
Criss Creek (first edition).
93 0/14, E. & W.
Point Creek (first edition).
92P/3, E. &W.
Loon Lake (first edition).
93P/1, E. &W.
Kiskatinaw River (first edition).
92 P/4, E. & W.
Clinton (first edition).
93 P/2, E. & W.
Flatbed Creek (first edition).
92P/5,E. &W.
Jesmond (first edition).
93 P/3, E. & W.
Bullmoose Creek (first edition).
92 P/6, E. & W.
Green Lake (first edition).
93 P/4, E. & W.
Sukunka River (first edition).
92P/7, E. &W.
Bridge Lake (first edition).
93P/5, E. &W.
Burnt River (first edition).
92P/10, E. &W.
Deka Lake (first edition).
93 P/6, E.&W.
Gwillim Lake (first edition).
92P/11, E. &W.
100 Mile House (first edition).
93 P/7, E. & W.
Sundown Creek (first edition).
92P/12, E. &W.
Gustafsen Lake (first edition).
93P/8, E. &W.
Tupper Creek (first edition).
92P/13, E. &W.
Chimney Lake (first edition).
94 B/4, E. & W.
Wicked River (first edition).
92P/14.E. &W.
Lac la Hache (first edition).
104K/16,E.
Nahlin River (first edition).
92P/15.E. &W.
Canim Lake (first edition).
104 N/1, E.&W.
Nakina Lake (first edition).
92P/16, E. &W.
Mahood Lake (first edition).
104 N/2, E.&W.
Nakina (first edition).
104 N/3, E.
Sloko River (first edition).
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 77
AIR DIVISION
A. C. Kinnear, B.C.R.F., Chief
FLYING OPERATIONS
A highly successful field season was experienced in 1966, with more hours
flown than in any previous year. A total of 641.10 hours was flown on a programme of 71 projects for various Government agencies and departments.
The total square-mile accomplishment, which also is a new high for the Division, was 61,500, recorded on 29,350 new negatives.
It is a noteworthy fact this year that two Department of Highways pilots,
inexperienced in air survey photography, were obtained as pilots for the season,
and their competency can be seen by the accomplishment achieved by both field
detachments.
The O.S.C. cameras, purchased six years ago as surplus equipment from the
R.C.A.F., showed the effects of time and wear. Many of the internal parts have
been rebuilt over the past six years in the instrument-shop, but the delicate shutter
mechanisms finally succumbed to the excessive wear of nearly 90,000 new B.C.
negatives and were the cause of some defective film this year. With the entire
production of this Division being dependent upon reliable cameras, approval has
been given to purchase two new cameras primarily for the forest inventory programme, but will be used as well on other large-scale projects. The cameras are
now on order and should be in operation during the 1967 field season.
A small amount of colour film was exposed again this year, with excellent
results. The added information derived from colour film for specialized projects
more than offsets the increased cost of material, and it is expected that a greater
demand for colour film will be experienced in the future. Major research projects
combining the facilities of both Provincial and Federal resources will be greately
assisted by the use of the various colour combinations in aerial photography.
The maintenance and servicing of photographic aircraft continues to be done
at Hangar No. 1, Victoria International Airport, with Government mechanics.
Again this year it can be reported that no lost photographic opportunity was experienced due to unserviceability of aircraft. With the greater amount of photographic
weather occurring in the early spring and late summer and fall of 1966, the aircraft
were required to perform to their maximum for every opportunity. As an example,
during one six-day period in August the accumulated flying-time of the two aircraft
was 84 hours 15 minutes. Also on 10 different occasions a total of 8 or more hours
of flying was logged by an aircraft in one day to take advantage of all photographic
light available.
INTERIM MAPPING
The interim mapping programme of making planimetric bases for forest inventory purposes continues to have an increasingly important role in the work of this
Division. While the original purpose of these maps was to provide a suitable base
for the recording of forest survey information, the ultimate use has grown beyond
all expectations. A tabulation for 1966 shows that nearly 10,000 paper Ozalid
prints of all interim maps have been made for use by Government departments and
the public. For a service originally intended for one purpose, these interim maps
have proven their value and are being requested more and more by a greater number
of users.
 CC 78     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
|   91    fmHatt
•■&i^ W^*€^m'emk^m^^, *.'%??■■*■■
mWmkmm mmmm
^ Z7'ZfZ:Z7 7''
■ '•%
Ji
-    i
. ■■■:,
%im&;>7
**te
Farming area to north of Dawson Creek.   Flown September 16, 1966;
altitude, 8,200 feet above sea-level.
In order to increase the output of finished maps, more modern methods of
mechanical draughting techniques are being tried by the existing staff, and the
results to date look encouraging.
All 20- and 40-chain maps have been revised where necessary to show all
new district lot surveys, highway surveys, pipe-lines, and power transmission-lines
where plans are available. The number of new lot surveys has been steadily increasing, particularly in the Peace River District.
It has been found that a considerable demand exists for a revision of the 40-
chain-scale interim maps, and in order to satisfy this demand, without having to
rephotograph the existing 20-chain photography, it is planned to reduce some existing 20-chain base maps to half-scale, make the necessary joins, and issue new
40-chains-to-l-inch maps where necessary. A few trial sheets were made this year,
with the results so acceptable that more 20-chain sheets will be reduced this year.
A summary of the completed phases of the interim mapping programme for
1966 is as follows:—
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
CC 79
20 chains—
Control and lot completion	
P.P. lay-downs	
Kail plotting	
Finished   drawings   (Edgewood-Granby,
Barriere-Adams, Say ward) 	
40 chains—
Control and lot completion	
P.P. lay-downs	
Kail plotting
Raft-
Finished drawings, completed or in hand (Quat-
sino) 	
Sheets
351
432
292
85
22
17
17
22
Square Miles
16,000
18,000
14,000
3,400
3,200
2,136
2,136
3,200
INSTRUMENT-SHOP
The largest single project designed and built in the shop during the year was
the new fixed-focus enlarger, used for printing 5-inch film. This enlarger was put
into operation in the latter part of the year and satisfies a demand which has existed
for many years.
As more and more specialized and highly technical equipment is being used
in the Surveys and Mapping Branch, the more complex become the problems of
servicing and maintaining equipment. Precision equipment must be kept in proper
adjustment and alignment in order to take advantage of the full capability of the
particular instrument. An oscilliscope, for example, was purchased during the
year, to be used in measuring the variation of electrical impulses in connection with
air-camera time-lapse studies, vibration and shutter checks, and the operation of
the Cintel printer. All of these studies permit a higher-quality final result to be
achieved from the existing equipment.
In addition to the design and servicing function of the shop, the routine maintenance of ordinary survey and mapping equipment in continual use was continued
through the year. Adjusting and servicing Forest Service binoculars, repairing snow
tube tools for the Water Rights Branch, and repairing specific tools for the Department of Highways are just a few of the many services the shop provides for other
Government departments.
AIR PHOTO LIBRARY
The continuing use being made of the library is evident in the statistics shown
for this service at the end of this report.
A total of some $76,000 received from the sale and loan of air photos is a
new all-time high and serves to show the value of British Columbia Government air
photos to persons other than Provincial departments. The year's totals for reprints
and loans are the highest in the past 10 years.
PROCESS LABORATORY
Improved facilities in the Process Laboratory and a small increase in temporary-assistance staff during 1966 assisted in another increase in total production
of air-photo reprints.
Nearly a quarter of a million 10- by 10-inch reprints were made during 1966,
which is about a 20-per-cent increase over 1965. The Cintel electronic printer,
reported last year as not producing to its optimum, was in full operation during the
year and produced as was originally expected. As the operators gain more experience with this printer, a higher volume of quality prints should be achieved.
 CC 80     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Fixed-focus enlarger designed and built in Air Division instrument-shop.
More colour film was processed during the year, particularly the 70-mm. size
for forest survey experimental work. One roll of colour 9- by 9-inch size for
studies of water currents in Johnstone Strait was processed for the Fisheries Research Board. It is anticipated that the demand for processing colour film will
increase in the future for specialized research projects.
The demand for the other types of processing, such as enlarging, Kelsh and A8
plates, etc., remains at a constant level.
Production figures for the Process Laboratory will be found at the end of
this report.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH CC 81
STATISTICS
Orders for Standard Prints (9 by 9 Inches) From
British Columbia Negatives, 1966
Reprints
Loans
?
Requisitions
Number
Requisitions
Number
Public-
Individuals   __	
Companies    	
Mining 	
1,039
180
475
171
23
119
112
314
4,626
1,741
24,051
11,017
219
2,884
582
16,156
152
44
169
18
2
32
34
126
2,467
737
8,166
760
6
Commercial air surveys  	
340
151
3,053
Totals   	
2,433
61,276
577
15,680
Federal Government—
48
11
37
67
10,187
136
26,552
872
5
1
109
21
90
11
ARDA             _	
22,873
Miscellaneous 	
384
Totals	
163
37,747
136
23,358
Provincial Government—
Land Inspection Branch.  	
91
240
54
165
77
17
20
20
28
1
29
13
14,302
30,044
3,884
86,357
1,500
1,582
2,004
702
261
12
518
190
68
131
62
373
160
23
19
20
7
15
168
11
715
27,623
1,483
21,155
2,920
Department of Finance 	
316
486
272
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
116
164
Department of Recreation and Conservation
2,350
115
Totals    -	
755
141,356
1,057
57,715
3,351
240,379
1,770
96,753
Public Loans and Reprints
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
Loans    	
Reprints  	
9,960
28,226
12,568
27,281
16,727
35,385
13,033
53,141
15,680
61,276
Totals	
38,186
39,849
52,112
66,174
76,956
 CC 82     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Letters Inward and Loan Requisitions
Letters inward	
Loan service requisitions
Cash sales
Loan fees .
Revenue
Land accounts .
Total
2,685
672
$5,494.91
4,540.24
66,856.11
$76,891.26
Production Record to 1966
1946-63
1964
1965
1966
Grand
Total
Processing completed—
Air films—
O.S.C. and R.C. 8	
291
2,821
73
22.5
5.5
1,360
120
116
5
1
3
2
800
112.5
3
2
1
875
650
78
2
56,960
639.5
F?4 anil F.aplK
2,829
1.5
0.5
75.5
Test rolls    .        	
28
Colour films (R.C. 8)          	
8.5
70-mm. black and white                         ft.
500
100
3,535
750
Topographic—■
116
3,866
5
1,804,552
46,087
4,132
172,837
3,728
24,772
22,295
378
8,051
640
4,027     '
30,549
75
2
56,831
4,019
9
Printing completed—
Standard prints, 5 by 5 inches enlarged to 10
45,173
1,963,516
46,087
Kenora prints, 9 by 9 inches reduced to 5 by
4,132
117,037
30
1,649
95
6
77
379
284
2,854
143,855
1
1,752
114
183,419
22
1,160
1,184
74
336
359
3,616
617,148
Contact prints, 20 by 24 inches and larger	
3,781
29,333
23,688
384
82
83
578
3,263
8,284
Film transparencies up to 40 by 46 inches
Kelsh A7 and A8 miscellaneous ground nega-
1,438
5,248
Requisitions completed...
40,282
 surveys and mapping branch
1966 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects
CC 83
A. 40-chain vertical cover, topographic—■
1. New cover—
Blocks 104 F and G  	
Block 104 A	
Blocks 94 I, J, O, and P..
Sub-totals	
2. Revision, Agriculture Department—
ARDA         	
Blocks 92 H and I.
Sub-totals	
Totals    	
Average cost — —
20-chain vertical cover, Surveys and Inventory
Division—
1. New cover—
North Thompson  	
Purden-Bowron    	
Queen Charlotte Islands.
Rivers _  	
Sayward— 	
Slocan-Nakusp  __
Sub-totals	
Revision-
Adams .
Edgewood-Granby..
Kamloops	
Sechelt	
Sub-totals.
3. Improvement flying, all districts..
Totals	
Average cost.— 	
C. Special projects—
Attorney-General's  Department
Vancouver.. 	
Greater
Fisheries Research Board-
Forest Engineering—
Burnt River ._
Gold River _ _
-Strait of Georgia
Meziadin-Kitwanga	
Parsnip River	
Peace River Pondage	
Rossland Water Supply..
Forest Management—Strip Mining .
Forest Surveys—Hazelton Area	
Land Inspection Division—■
Alberni Canal	
Bamfield	
Chilliwack Lake-
Howe Sound	
Indian Arm	
Kelsey Bay	
Kootenay Lake.—
Muchalat Inlet	
Port Alice	
Port Hardy-
Port McNeill-Beaver Cove.
Stave Lake 	
Sukunka	
Tahsis Inlet	
Tofino-Ucluelet _
Legal Surveys Division-
Northern Trans-Provincial Highway..
Tsawwassen Causeway-
Mines and Technical Surveys Department—
Esquimalt Area 	
U
Hr. Min.
29 05 855
20 35 705
48 30 | 1,760
Accomplishment
3:3
VIA
3,200
3,100
8,800
as
EU
98 10 | 3,320|15,100|-
144 40 I 5,575126,610
14 30 j  945| 3,865
159 10 | 6,520(30,475]-.
257 20
23 15
16 55
38 55
35 50
1 30
33 50
9,840|45,575|
$3,931 $0.85
1,995
1,725
2,630
2,675
130
2,080
1,875
1,865
3,300
3,100
160
2,215
150 15 |11,235|12,515[—
2 30
170
205
7 20
350
435
24 05
1,985
2,400
9 15
350
370
43 10
2,855] 3,410|	
18 00
1,195[ |	
211 25
15,285|15,925|.
$2.99| $2.87| —	
25
15
40
2 10
25
30
2 55
40
40
1 25
40
20
1 00
40
1 25
40
15
3 55
186
124
14
123
142
20
155
45
93
225
40
15
11
66
20
16
62
11
17
13
21
11
30
17
69
17
10
239
$2,224.81
1,574.58
3,710.14
o o
HO
$1,651.03
1,361.37
3,398.61
$3,875.84
2,935.95
7,108.75
$7,509.53| $6,411.01| $13,920.54
$11,066.66 $10,765.48   $21,832.14
1,109.22     1,824.83       2,934.05
$12,175.88|$12,590.31| $24,766.19
$19,685.41 [$19,001.32   $38,686.73
$1,778.58
1,294.08
2,977.03
2,741.17
114.75
2,588.17]
$3,852.41
3,331.02
5,078.60
5,165.50
251.03
4,016.54
$5,630.99
4,625.10
8,055.63
7,906.67
365.78
6,604.71
$11,493.78|$21,695.10| $33,188.88
$191.25
560.98
1,842.32
707.60
$328.28
675.86
3,833.09
675.86
$519.53
1,236.84
5,675.41
1,383.46
$3,302.15] $5,513.09|    $8,815.24
$1,376.96| $2,307.58]    $3,684.54
$16,172.89|$29,515.77   $45,688.66
242
102
10
62
116
15
171
33
160
364
34
12
7
105
12
12
52
9
9
10
16
8
46
12
58
7
3
65
$458.99]
305.99]
I
51.00]
254.99
153.00
51.00
254.99
191.24
299.61
497.24
31.87
19.12
51.00
165.74
31.87
38.25
223.12
51.00
51.00
108.37
51.00
25.50
76.50
51.00
108.37
51.00
19.12
299.61
$359.17
239.45
27.031
237.52'
274.21
38.62
299.31
86.90
179.59
434.49
77.24
28.97
21.24
127.45
38.62
30.90
119.72
21.24
32.83
25.10
40.55
21.24
57.93
32.83
133.24
32.83
19.31
461.52
$818.16
545.44
78.03
492.51
427.21
89.62
554.30
278.14
479.20
931.73
109.11
48.09
72.24
293.19
70.49
69.15
342.84
72.24
83.83
133.47
91.55
46.74
134.43
83.83
241.61
83.83
38.43
761.13
 CC 84     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1966 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
SI
tn
° B
is
!■§
Accomplishment
no
EO
Photographic
Costs
CcJ
VxA
CA
CD O
HS3
as
c-H   CA
o 0
HO
C. Special projects—Continued
Hr. Min.
1 25
20
20
1 10
11 55
1 30
40
45
35
8 15
2 45
1 15
1 05
6 45
30
35
3 50
1 35
1 40
1 50
30
1 00
1 55
20
30
20
20
5 20
12 40
8
2
	
20
1
1
4
227
21
20
11
20
314
115
18
7
245
3
16
69
89
40
13
4
88
10
1
3
3
4
242
108.37
25.50
25.50
89.25
911.59
114.75
51.00
57.37
44.63
631.11
210.37
95.62
82.87
516.36
38.25
44.63
293.24
121.12
127.49
140.25
38.25
76.50
146.62
25.50
38.25
25.50
25.50
407.99
968.97
15.45
3.86
23.17
36.69
299.31
73.38
69.52
36.69
73.38
357.24
210.47
61.79
27.03
366.90
13.52
61.79
235.59
312.83
139.03
61.79
19.31
104.28
115.86
5.79
25.10
17.38
15.45
617.93
1,259.02
123.82
Public Works Department—
29.36
12
48.67
19
155
38
36
	
125.94
1,210.90
188.13
120.52
Topographic Division -— Liard River Dam-
site          . .                               	
Water Resources—
19
38
185
109
32
14
190
7
32
94.06
118.01
	
988.35
420.84
157.41
109.90
	
883.26
51.77
106.42
122
162
72
32
10
54
60
3
13
9
8
320
528.83
Salmon River
433.95
266 52
	
202.04
57.56
Internal—
180 78
262.48
31 29
	
63 35
42 88
40.95
Saanich Peninsula Photographic Test	
Improvement flying, all projects	
1,025.92
2,227.99
652
Totals
123 35
4,225
$4.17
3,361
$5.24
$9,453.84
$8,158.60
$17,612.44
Average cost 	
D. Miscellaneous flying—
Highways   Department   —   Administration
flights
4 55
6 40
18 20
5 55
13 00
$376.11
$376.11
Legal  Surveys  Division — Administration
509.98
1,402.46
509.98
Internal—
1,402.46
48 50
1           1
$2,288.55
$2,288.55
.   .   ..
641  10
29,350
61,500
3,361
$47,600.69
$56,675.69
$104,276.38
i Cost of maintenance charged to all projects.
 UNIVERSITY
ENDOWMENT LANDS
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
CC 87
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
M. E. Ferguson, Project Manager
With the tempo of modern living one often wonders where the time has gone.
This is particularly noticeable when it comes time to review events for the past year.
Although no major changes have occurred in our general administration or implementation of legislation to set up the proposed development corporation, we have
had a busy year.
The major item of interest to our residents was the pleasant surprise that once
again no material increase was made in the general tax mill in spite of rising costs.
The Department of Highways made a start on major road access to the university. Unfortunately, due to wet weather conditions, only one-half of the first section
of divided highway along South-west Marine Drive was completed. As the enrolment at the university is still increasing, we are hopeful additional work will commence early in 1967 on Marine Drive and that 16th Avenue will also be constructed
in order to handle the increased traffic.
During 1966 two new fraternity houses were constructed, and at least three
more are in the planning stage with the hope of building early in 1967. In
addition, the Lutheran Student Building was erected on University Boulevard at
Westbrook Crescent. This is a very attractive and unique building and has attracted
many students. It would appear there has been a real need for this type of service
for our young university students.
Another feature was the new courtroom facilities on University Boulevard at
Allison Road. They should be ready for occupancy early in January, 1967. Congratulations are due to the Department of the Attorney-General and the Department
of Public Works for an excellent job.
Cablevision for the area has been under consideration for several years, and
it now appears likely this service may become a reality early in 1967. With the
renewed interest in television through colour sets, this service will be appreciated
as it will ensure maximum efficiency for coloured television reception to an area that
does not have good reception by individual household antenna.
During 1967 it is hoped a new water main will be constructed along 16th
Avenue to serve the growing needs of the university, and that a sanitary interceptor
sewer will also be constructed along South-west Marine Drive to serve the new
student housing at Acadia Park and the new research buildings on the south slope
of the university campus.
The following tabulation shows comparative figures for the past several years
regarding revenue in addition to a summary of building permits.
 CC 88     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the
Calendar Years 1964, 1965, and 1966
1964
1965
1966
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
1
10
1
7
1
2
1
9
2
5
1
$354,894.00
63,000.00
70,000.00
40,800.00
1
1
11
1
2
1
5
1
$55,000.00
$66,087.00
135,000.00
38,500.00
69,700.00
3,000.00
Alterations to commercial build-
15,500.00
5,000.00
42,000.00
1,500.00
Garages, etc 	
Swimming-pools	
7,350.00
4,785.00
5,000.00
3,350.00
4,000.00
19
$116,350.00
21
$580,479.00
23
$287,637.00
 university endowment lands
CC 89
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  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
CC 93
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
The Land Settlement Board's balance-sheets will appear in the Public Accounts
of the Province as in the past. The following is a brief summary of the Board's
activities and collections for 1966.
During the year the sales made by the Board amounted to $55,183.80. One
hundred and fifty-five purchasers completed payment and received tide deeds, and
two borrowers paid up in full and received release of mortgage. Collections were
as follows:—
Loans	
Land sales	
Miscellaneous revenue..
Total.
       $3,768.15
     103,185.11
       24,728.21
  $ 131,681.47
The above figures include collections from the sale and rental of Doukhobor
lands in the amount of $75,683.16.
As in the past years, the activities of the Board were concentrated this year on
the sale of the Doukhobor lands in accordance with the recommendations of the
report of Justice Arthur E. Lord.
The lands in the subdivisions that were made of Board lands for disposition
to Doukhobors at Krestova last year—namely, at South Goose Creek and North
Goose Creek—have nearly all been sold. Only one lot at South Goose Creek and
one lot at North Goose Creek remain unsold at the present time. As a result, a
further subdivision was carried out at Krestova this year.
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
CC 97
PERSONNEL OFFICE
J. H. Palmer, Personnel Officer
A year of extremely high turnover and staff changes is reflected in the comparative table below. Very substantial increases in personnel activities are indicated, particularly in regard to terminations, reclassifications, and recruitment. The
economic boom made recruitment difficult, particularly in respect to draughtsmen
in Victoria and stenographers and land inspection staff for northern areas.
1966
1965
1964
1963
55
42
22
7
12
44
5
58
45
12
23
3
9
28
2
55
25
18
4
6
7
15
1
42
18
17
Promotions      	
12
5
3
Terminations for continuous staff _	
23
Retirements  _	
1
Short-term casual appointments and terminations 	
40
There was no change in the organization or establishment of the department
this year. However, the staff of the University Endowment Lands was brought
under the jurisdiction of the Civil Service Commission as a result of legislation in
the previous year, and its members were transferred for pension purposes from the
Municipal Superannuation Act to the Civil Service Superannuation Act.
Several staff members improved their personal qualifications during the year.
Four Land Inspectors—Messrs. G. H. Wilson, D. I. Snider, J. A. Esler, and W. V.
Lowry—gained accreditation as registered appraisers with the Appraisal Institute
of Canada. Ten Deputy Land Inspectors attended a course in Appraisal I which
was sponsored by the Civil Service Commission, and seven completed the work
satisfactorily. One of those who failed subsequently passed both Appraisal I and
II on rewriting the examinations.
Three land surveyors—Messrs. A. M. Barber, A. P. McLaughlin, and A. D.
Wight—were awarded Diplomas in Public Administration from the University of
Victoria following the completion of the three-year study course under the Civil
Service Commission's Executive Development Training Plan. The award was made
to the widow posthumously in Mr. McLaughlin's case owing to the untimely death
of this popular and efficient officer one week after completing the course requirements. (Reference is made elsewhere in this volume to the services of the late Mr.
McLaughlin.) Mr. R. P. Murdoch, of the University Endowment Lands, received
a similar diploma. Messrs. R. H. McAra, K. M. Bridge, B.C.L.S., P. J. Brennan,
B.C.L.S., and J. H. Palmer completed the second year of this course, and Mr. D. M.
Thom the first year. Messrs. R. Rutherford and A. M. Broughton were awarded
certificates following their completion of the correspondence course in Basic Public
Administration, and Messrs. W. C. Fry and G. H. Fielding enrolled in this course.
Messrs. L. E. Clarke, D. K. Reed, R. D. Reid, and J. E. Curtis completed the first
two sections of an in-service course as computer programmer, and Mr. M. Perks,
B.C.L.S., and Mr. A. M. Broughton attended several short courses required in connection with the System 360 installation.
Three long-service employees whose total service time was 137 years retired
in consecutive months this year. These were Mr. E. A. Walls, Adjudications Officer,
Lands Branch (48 years); Mr. W. J. Holman, Principal Clerk, Lands Branch (46
 CC 98     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
years); and Mr. J. A. Grant, Principal Clerk, General Administration (43 years).
Each received a gold watch and meritorious scroll from the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources to mark the occasion. In addition to
this, Mr. H. N. Davis, Draughtsman 4, Air Division, and Mrs. V. Mclvor, Clerk-
Stenographer 2, Fort St. John, retired after 16 and 13 years' service respectively.
The Department's safety record was recognized by the presentation of the
British Columbia Safety Council's bronze certificate award of merit for having
worked 375,158 man-hours without a lost-time accident.
   MAIL AND FILE ROOM
CC 101
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
While the Lands Service showed an increase of 6,770 in the number of letters
received during 1966 as compared to 1965, and the Water Rights Service showed
an increase of 1,293, a decrease in incoming mail of 12,750 is noted in the Forest
Service. This decrease is no doubt due to recent changes in policy and procedures
in the Forest Service and to the drop in the number of forest fires reported during
1966.
A vehicle was allotted to the Mail and File Room during the year for the transportation of files to and from the Topaz Avenue storage vault and to handle individual file requests of important and urgent nature. This vehicle has proved to be
of tremendous assistance and has contributed much to file service efficiency in the
department.
Letters Inward
Branch
1965
1966
10-year Average,
1957-66
Lands _  _  	
Forests
53,467
138,313
29,893
20,702
58,813
125,563
31,186
22,126
46,331
141,973
26,589
19,674
Totals   	
242,375
237,688
234,567
Letters Outward (Recorded)
Branch
1965
1966
10-year Average,
1957-66
Lands 	
Forests    _     	
10,295
1,740
4,365
9,943
2,150
3,916
13,465
1,964
2,705
Totals  	
16,400
16,009
18,134
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
Forest-fire reports	
Logging-inspection reports	
Land-classification reports	
Stumpage-adjustment notices-
Totals	
1965
2,688
9,873
5,266
614
18,441
1966
1,967
11,048
6,192
2,935
22,142
10-year Average,
1957-66
4,664
14,227
4,146
3,848
26,885
 CC 102     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
New Files Created
Designation
1965
1966
10-year Average,
1957-66
•<r>" fiip«
6,642
1,634
1,713
6,983
1,550
1,472
5,970
1,371
2,541
Totals	
9,989
10,005
9,882
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
1,060-367-3006
 \
 

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