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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1966 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1966
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  Victoria, B.C., November 9, 1966.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1966, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 9, 1966.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1966.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966
Hon. W. D. Black  Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson   Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler  Director of Social Welfare.
R. I. Burnham  Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
R. I. Stringer  Director of Regional Services.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid  Departmental Comptroller.
T. D. Bingham  Superintendent of Child Welfare.
F. G. Hassard  Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart   Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy   Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry....    Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Per
sons' and Disabled Persons' Allowances and
Supplementary Assistance.
Miss M. Jamieson   Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie    Superintendent, Provincial Home.
N. S. Brooke  \Casework Supervisors, Social Assistance and
Mrs. I. P. Scott  }    Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler  Training Supervisor.
A. A. Shipp  Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
C. W. Gorby   Director, Region I.
W. J. Camozzi   Director, Region II.
G. A. Reed  Director, Region III.
W. H. Crossley  Director, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore  Director, Region V.
A. E. Bingham  Director, Region VI.
A. I. Wright  Director, Region VII.
J. A. Mollberg  Director, Region VIII.
CONSULTANTS
C. S. Iones  Medical Social Work.
A. G. Gilmore  Office Administrator.
F. S. Hatcher  Rehabilitation.
Miss B. W. Snider  Research.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pace
Part I.—General Administration:
Director of Social Welfare  9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  11
Part II.—Regional Administration:
Region I  15
Region II  16
Region III  17
Region IV  21
Region V    25
Region VI  28
Region VII      30
Region VIII  32
Part III.—Divisions:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  34
Child Welfare Division  39
Medical Services Division  59
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, and Disabled Persons'
Allowances Board  62
Part IV.—Institutions:
Brannan Lake School for Boys  80
Willingdon School for Girls  85
Provincial Home, Kamloops  89
Welfare Institutions Board  92
Part V.—Accounting Division  97
7
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
It will be noted throughout the Annual Report this year that there is a continued development of community resources and services. This is a pattern which is
providing the necessary facilities to help individuals at the local level where their
needs are apparent and must be met.
It is sometimes difficult for a Provincial department to help to develop community resources, but the Department of Social Welfare has, by the use of financial
grants, planning with local people, and staff time, been able to give and is continuing
to give help where it is indicated and requested. This building of resources is the
keystone to all types of preventive services in the social welfare field.
In the various reports it will be noted that projects for certain activities are
mentioned. Projects have been used in some areas of the Province to test certain
social situations or to accomplish definite tasks which are necessary in a specific
locale which do not involve the commitment of a whole new programme for the
Department. This move has proved sound and is being used to give answers and
solutions to many problems.
The following tables outline the statistical information in connection with the
case loads during the year. In examining the tables, and specifically in Table I, it
will be noted that there have been only slight changes in the case loads over the
previous year. Table II, however, shows the turnover in case load and this movement indicates the work which is being done by the social-work staff members with
the individuals in the community who need help from the Department of Social
Welfare. Without this practically 100-per-cent turnover in case load there could be
cause for concern because it would mean that the situation was static with many
individuals merely being helped financially and left to their own devices without
having the benefit of all the resources available in the Province, either to ameliorate
their condition or to return them to the self-satisfying position of self-supporting
persons in the community.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1965 and 1966
Category
1965
1966
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
1,680
28,597
621
7,862
27,040
2,584
9,882
XK1
2.1
36.1
0.8
9.9
34.2
3.3
12.5
1.1
1 911
■y.A
?9 51")                   T7J1
Blind Persons' Allowance1  	
597
7,102
26,659
2,633
110,324
825
0.8
8.9
33.5
Disabled Persons' Allowance*	
Child Welfare-	
3.3
13.0
1.0
79.148       !       100.0
79,563
100.0
■ Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
9
 H 10 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1965/66
Category
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Centi
3,398
70,976
288
1,135
5,105
9,903
■14,248
658
3.2
67.1
0.3
1.1
4.8
9.4
13.5
0.6
3,333
70,061
313
1,085
5,865
10,2)83
13,641
715
3.2
66.5
0.3
1.0
5.6
9.8
C.hiM Welfare
13.0
0.7
105,711.1
100.0
105.296      !      100.0
i Percentages may not add due to rounding.
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category at March 31st and as a Percentage
of the Population at June 1st for the Years 1965 and 1966
Category
1965
Number
Per Centi of
Population
(1,789,000)
1966
Number
Per Centi of
Population
(11,862,000)
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowanced.
Old-age Assistance2-
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance2	
Disabled Persons' Allowance2	
Child Welfare    —
Health and Institutional-
Totals for Province-
1,680
28,597
621
7,862
27,040
2,584
9,882
882
0.09
1.60
0.03
0.44
1.51
0.14
0.55
0.05
1,91:1
29,512
597
7,102
26,659
2,633
10,324
825
79^148
4.42
79,563
0.10
1.58
0.03
0.38
1.43
0.14
0.55
0.04
4.27
1 Percentages may not add due to rounding.
2 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The Emergency Welfare Services Supervisor has continued his planning and
development work in the local communities on the basis of training and providing
facilities which can be available if a local disaster strikes, such as a flood or fire.
The Research Consultant and her staff have continued studies and services in
relation to staff utilization and projects in the Department.
The Office Administration section has been strengthened in order to carry out
the updating of manuals and the introduction of more efficient methods of operation
within the individual offices.
The Director of Regional Services has continued his field trips and this liaison
and channel of communication between the field and divisions is proving most
beneficial.
The Matron and staff of the New Denver Pavilion have continued to give
excellent service to their patients throughout the year.
Again this year there has been a constant demand for services and with the
rise in population more offices have been established throughout the Province.
The Department appreciates the co-operation extended to us by other Government departments and by municipalities and private agencies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1965/66        H 11
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. BURNHAM
As welfare services have developed and expanded across Canada and the
United States over the past years there has been an ever-increasing demand for
more trained staff and the universities, already operating at full capacity, have
fallen far short of meeting this demand. On the contrary, the ratio of university-
trained staff to total staff has become lower in most public and private agencies in
North America. British Columbia is no exception in facing this problem which is
likely to worsen before it improves with the continued rapid expansion of welfare
services.
To keep our offices adequately staffed we have for many years provided an
in-service training course for those persons who had not the opportunity of a year's
training in social work at a university. Our Training Division has done an excellent
job in preparing men and women for the work. Without our in-service personnel
we would never have been able to render a service to the people of this Province
and much credit goes to these members of our staff.
To reinforce this training programme and assist staff in their continued development, a number of meetings and conferences are arranged each year. This year
nearly all of our staff were able to take part in the American Public Welfare
Conference which was held in Victoria. Our District Supervisors were also able
to hold an institute to discuss their responsibilities and improve on their performance.
Our Department sent representation to a number of other recognized conferences
on welfare, many of which were held outside of the Province. This has enabled
us to keep up with new trends and ideas and hence keep our own programme up
to date. Consultative services have also continued to be made available to field
staff by trained, experienced specialists.
We have continued to expand our bursary programme, this year expending
over $38,000 to send 15 of our personnel and 9 staff members of other welfare
agencies in British Columbia to a School of Social Work. It is interesting to note
that all universities in Canada have now eliminated their Bachelor of Social Work
degree and have established a two-year postgraduate social-work course for which
they give a Master of Social Work degree. Our bursary programme is being
adjusted to take this into consideration.
Federal-Provincial welfare grants expenditures reached a sum of almost
$200,000 this year, providing for demonstration and experimental work to be carried
out, which is of great assistance to the development of our services. Several of these
projects included studies in adoption, placement of children in foster homes, deserted
wives, single transients, and work with group-living homes for children.
Our rehabilitation work with the handicapped continues to develop and expand.
There are now 17 communities in the Province serviced by a local rehabilitation
committee involving the Departments of Health, Education, Social Welfare, and
the National Employment Service. The responsibility for the administration of this
service falls under the Department of Health's administration, with our Department
fully involved in the planning and work at the field level.
Our Office Administrator has been actively engaged in Manual revision and
developing a more economical and efficient method of form and file handling which
should not only save time, but also provide for accurate identification. As well as
carrying many other duties, he has found the time to attend a number of meetings
with senior stenographic staff throughout the Province and advise them on many
details with respecet to their work.
 H 12 SOCIAL WELFARE
PERSONNEL
Miss Margaret Jamieson, Personnel Officer
During the fiscal year April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966, Mrs. Margaret
Dighton, Personnel Officer, resigned July 31st and as replacement was not appointed
until November 1, 1965, this report will cover a portion of the year in which the
writer did not participate.
The objectives of this Division remain constant in endeavouring to meet professional standards in supplying staff for normal turnover and increases. Competition
in recruiting professionally trained social workers becomes keener each year as
welfare services expand throughout the country, but we are fortunate in attracting
an increasing number of university graduates to our in-service training programme.
The 1965/66 estimates provided an additional 20 positions, which were
augmented by Order in Council dated July 22, 1965, for a further three positions
in Child Welfare Division.
Distribution of the 20 positions in 1965/66 estimates was as follows:—
Region I     AV2
Region II     2
Region III     3
Region IV     2Va
Region V     5
Region VII     1
Welfare Institutions     1
Office Administration     1
Total  20
New Denver Youth Centre opened in the fall of 1965, providing a special
facility for emotionally disturbed boys. Obtaining appropriate staff for this Centre
proved to be a lengthy process, but was achieved with the close co-operation of the
Chief Selection Officer of the Civil Service Commission and the Superintendent of
Child Welfare.
The Provincial-Federal grants programme continued to provide a valued
resource for staffing special projects such as the campaign for locating foster homes—
Joint Effort for Fostering, known as " J.E.F.F." Eleven extra staff members were
employed—nine social workers and two clerical positions. Retired professional
social workers rallied to meet this need. There were other smaller but no less
important projects continued throughout the year, and plans made for on-going and
new endeavours of this kind.
Rapid social change is bringing consequent problems of more stress in personal
relationship and employment difficulties. Thus there is need to carefully reassess
our staff requirements in order to meet the situation appropriately—casework
services, counselling, rehabilitation, child care, measure for early recognition of
problem areas. This means more well-trained staff at all levels with close co-operation with other disciplines such as education, labour, mental health, and others.
The following table shows the number of staff (clerical, professional, and
technical) who were employed and their locations in the Department at March 31,
1966:—
General Administration     12
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division       5
Field Service  412
Medical Services Division       13
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 13
Child Welfare Division     32
Provincial Home	
Brannan Lake School for Boys
Willingdon School for Girls	
Old-age Assistance Board	
New Denver Youth Centre	
New Denver Pavilion	
Welfare Grants projects	
Total
35
62
50
77
13
14
44
769
The following table shows total social-work staff employed for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1965, and March 31, 1966:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31, 1965                          	
120
+9
20
26
123
5
195
—9
69
42
213
3
315
Staff appointed April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966	
Resignations and retirements (3), April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966	
89
68
336
8
128
22
216
12
344
34
Totals
150
228
378
In addition to the Provincial social workers, there are municipal social workers
located in both municipal and (or) amalgamated offices. It is necessary to record
the number of these positions as this provides a complete picture of the social welfare
staff servicing the total case load as shown in the Director's report. As of March 31,
1966, the municipal social workers numbered 97 plus 14 social-work assistants,
making a total of 111.
The following table shows the breakdown of social-work degrees at March 31,
1966:—
Men
Women
Totals
6
5
22
2
11
11
4
104
8
1
29
20
6
1
2
2
110
14
6
51
22
17
1
13
Staff on educational leave toward Master of Social Work or Diploma	
6
214
165
179
344
During the year under review there was a total of 68 social-worker separations
which occurred for the following reasons:—
Domestic   21
To further education  12
To accept other employment  18
To accept municipal employment  5
To travel  4
 H 14 SOCIAL WELFARE
111 health  3
Unsatisfactory  1
Retired  3
Deceased     1
Total 68
In conclusion, this Division extends sincere thanks to all Departmental staff,
the Civil Service Commission, and many others for their unstinting co-operation and
assistance during this fiscal year.
TRAINING DIVISION
D. W. Fowler, Supervisor
This Division has had an extremely active year featured by an increase in the
number of persons included in our in-service training sessions and several changes
in the format of the programme. The increase in the number of persons trained
was due to more of our staff proceeding on educational leave and a staff increase.
Comparison with previous years is not appropriate as we have discontinued
the three-part training programme in favour of an eight-week block orientation prior
to assignment to a field office. Forty-nine Provincial staff and three municipal
workers were included in the first two extended sessions. In addition one Part-Ill
course was completed early in the fiscal year and a second one held shortly afterwards.   Thirty-four persons were included in these groups.
An innovation in the new training format has been the inclusion of a field
orientation of 10 days' duration. From the third to the seventh week of the course
the trainees spend two consecutive days each week in a public agency in the Greater
Vancouver or Lower Fraser Valley area observing and accompanying agency staff
on visits. The municipal administrators and our own regional directors and district
supervisors have given us excellent co-operation in the development of this section
of the programme and they have shown initiative and imagination in devising learning experiences for the participants.
In the remaining part of the programme, presentations are made by Training
Division staff and consultants from other divisions to give the new staff members a
well-rounded description of the work of the Department.
Recruiting and the interviewing of persons interested in employment in the
Department has been a time-consuming, but rewarding task. We have been fortunate in being able to attract a large number of persons with their Bachelor of Arts
degree and we have only deviated from this as the basic educational qualification
when the applicant can offer some other type of experience which could be considered useful as preparation for social work. In our quest for new staff we have
visited the campuses of the University of British Columbia, the University of Victoria, and Notre Dame University at Nelson. We plan to go to Simon Fraser
University prior to the first graduation.
While we are carrying on an active programme to permit staff members to
obtain professional training and are attracting a small number of new graduates, the
percentage of trained personnel remains relatively constant due to turnover and staff
increases. There is little prospect of much improvement in this situation due to the
great need for professionally trained workers. Schools of social work cannot meet
the need and the task of training staff for the public social services will rest on the
agencies themselves for some time to come.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 15
PART II.—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
C. W. Gorby, Regional Director
The region includes Vancouver Island, adjacent islands, and a northern strip
of the west coast of the Mainland.
The trend to municipal development continued in the fiscal year March 31,
1965, to March 31, 1966. Four new municipalities came into being—June 16,
1965, Port Alice with a population of 1,302; August 19, 1965, North Saanich with
a population of 2,811; August 26, 1965, Gold River with a population of 878; and
February 18, 1966, Port McNeill with a population of 731. Further new municipalities are expected in other developing communities.
The region is served by eight district offices.
The case load for the region on March 31, 1965, was 10,766. Table I shows
the administrative offices with distribution of case load by category of services and
Table II indicates the numerical and percentage comparison of case load by major
categories in Region I for the fiscal years 1964/65 and 1965/66.
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category
of Services as at March 31,1966
Category
u
<
II
H
u
3
o
u
c
U
Q
B
Q
O
a
£
a
t/3
'u
O
CD A
OS
O o?
>S
"«
£
54
393
2
27
79
253
312
8
37
146
7
14
68
162
151
4
16
247
2
19
92
270
201
1
31
257
4
29
96
348
234
18
66
637
9
65
194
793
530
29
235
8
56
71
468
30
727
27
101
176
1,385
63
88
348
6
59
90
663
205
49
292
2,990
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
65
370
866
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance.	
Child Welfare  - 	
4,342
1,633
208
Totals 	
1,128
589
854
1,017
2,323
868
2,479
1,508
10,766
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service     	
265
2,717
59
377
1,068
4,675
1,405
234
2.5
25.2
0.5
3.4
9.9
43.3
13.0
2.2
292
2,990
65
370
866
4,342
1,633
208
2.7
27.8
Blind Persons' Allowance	
0.6
3.4
8.0
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance	
Child Welfare	
40.3
15.2
4.9
Totals   	
10,800
100.0
10,766
100.0
 H 16 SOCIAL WELFARE
These tables indicate a small decrease of 34 cases in total case load. The
financial-aid categories of service continue their downward trend in the older age-
groupings. Assistance to families shows an increase. There are also increases in
services to families and in the child welfare case load.
There continues to be healthy regional activity in adoption services with a very
fine community response to the need for more foster homes. More permanent
placement resources are still required.
One group-living home for four to six children was opened during the year.
In Alert Bay the community opened the first nursery school on the Island. Further
community development is in process.
A drop in summer camps brought about a lower percentage of welfare
institutions.
In co-operation with the Department of Health, a rehabilitation committee has
become active in the Courtenay-Comox area and there are plans to extend this
service northward.
The northern area of the region continues to develop rapidly with air, bus, and
ferry services expanding.
In September of 1965 regional staff attended the American Public Welfare
Association Conference held in Victoria. There were meetings with social workers
and clerical staff as well as field visits by divisional consultants.
It is my pleasure to commend all staff, including social workers and clerical,
both municipal and Provincial, for capable and loyal service throughout the year.
May we render sincere thanks to all those with whom consultation and co-operation
has been the basis for a better and more effective welfare service.
REGION II
Walter J. Camozzi, Regional Director
Region II is served by a Regional Director and Assistant, and by Messrs. E. L.
Coughlin, J. Kincaid, G. A. Jones, E. P. Murphy, C. Gillingham, T. T. Hill, and
C. K. Toren, who administer the social welfare programme for Burnaby, District
of Coquitiam, New Westminster City, North Vancouver (City and District), Richmond, Vancouver City, and West Vancouver, respectively. Provincial supervisors
give case-work services therein, as well as supervising per capita municipalities and
unorganized areas. These are Miss J. V. Brown, Mrs. M. C. DeHaan, Mrs. B.
Mabee, Mr. G. C. Knowles, Mr. R. I. Murray, and Mr. W. Rasmussen. Credit
must be given to workers and the clerical staff, whose numbers preclude their being
listed in this allotted space.
The tables indicate increases in services in growing municipalities as well as
in Vancouver, and this is consistent. There is a long lag before institutions catch
up with population growth.   Richmond opened a fine hospital this year, for instance.
There is a growing community interest in services as contrasted with categorical
allowances which by now are completely acecpted. The concept of service as an
elaboration of the idea of simply granting money will take some time, because it
means more participation must be given by the community. Some leadership was
taken in this regard by the unification of Alexandra Neighbourhood House under
the Kitsilano Area Resources Council, but individuals have come forward to develop
foster-home associations, remand homes, group foster homes, etc. All offices have
worked very hard on the accelerated programme of adoption placing, but the
demand for children still does not keep up with the increased number available.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 17
This means that more youngsters are being taken into care. More retarded children,
too, are being put into foster homes and it is hoped that appropriate institutional
care can be found for them as our foster homes become more precious.
Lack of appropriate housing generally is a very serious problem to many
people not on public assistance. The lower the income the higher percentage of
it is paid for housing. This is an unhappy commentary on a society which has been
burgeoning for years. Even though there is public money available for various
congregate housing, it has not been used by communities adequately to meet their
growing needs. This concerns staff who appreciate that working with people is
seriously hampered if they live under miserable (yet expensive) housing conditions.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region II as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
296
12,464
282
1,060
3,145
12,961
2,337
260
0.9
38.0
0.9
3.2
9.6
39.5
7.1
0.8
386
12,976
250
1,083
2,739
13,105
2,370
264
1.2
39.1
Blind Persons' Allowance	
0.7
3.3
8.3
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
rhiiH Welfare
39.5
7.1
0.8
Totals _
32,805
100.0
33,173
100.0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region II as at March 31, 1966
Category
>>
i
3
m
s
6a
u
q
J
fcj£
U
V
c
II
Z?0
U
u
5
•58
o ra
%>
S''H
B.2
■a
a
o
S
1
3
>
3
Q
o
a >>
CS.tt
>o
u
o
>
«■-
>0
u
u
s
o
85
Total
Mar.
31,
1966
78
1,010
22
123
363
1,649
507
85
25
276
12
38
112
276
221
14
45
758
7
61
129
641
173
22
41
371
2
36
74
281
304
21
55
463
11
49
119
561
233
52
34
92
2
13
34
101
98
6
32
255
6
35
79
332
240
18
1
9,488
176
676
1,731
8,764
(!)
55
158
8
33
78
229
527
19
20
105
4
19
20
271
67
27
386
12,976
250
Disabled Persons'Allowance	
1,083
2,739
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
13,105
2,370
264
Child Welfare	
Toti^s
3.8371974
1,836
1,130
1,543
380
997
20,836
1,107
533
33,173
1 Carried in Vancouver by Children's Aid Societies.
REGION III
G. A. Reed, Regional Director
The following report covers the activities of the Department of Social Welfare
in Region III for the fiscal year 1965/66.
The boundaries of the region have not changed and the region covers the area
from Bralorne to Revelstoke and from the International Border to Wells Gray Park.
 H 18 SOCIAL WELFARE
During the latter part of the year a new office was opened in Merritt with two
social workers and clerical staff, to service the increased demands of this area. The
economy of this area has grown and developed due to the mining activity and this
office has enabled the Department to bring its services closer to the people of this
expanding area. Formerly this area was serviced by our Kamloops Office which
was one of the nine offices in the region providing social welfare services. The
others are Lillooet, North Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Revelstoke, Vernon, Kelowna,
Penticton, and Oliver.
The main centres of population in the region, namely Penticton, Kelowna,
Vernon, and Kamloops, have continued to operate their City Welfare Departments
through which the financial-assistance services have been available and given to their
residents. As in the past we have enjoyed the fullest co-operation and sharing of
concern for those in need with the City Welfare Administrators and their staff, and
this we appreciate. Services in the Municipalities of Summerland, Salmon Arm,
Revelstoke, North Kamloops, Enderby, and Armstrong are provided by the nearest
Provincial District Office, and paid for by the municipality concerned on a per capita
basis. Under the provisions of the Municipal Act, certain organized areas are
exempt from providing social welfare services. There are 14 such district municipalities and villages in Region III and the necessary services are provided in them
as if they were actually unorganized territory.
The previous Annual Report noted the expanding economy of the area and
this has continued apace in many fields. Mining has continued its activity in the
Merritt-Ashcroft area, and exploration has been continuing in other parts of the
region, most notable of which has been in the Peachland area. One of the major
mines was affected by a prolonged strike and we experienced effects from this in
the nearby community. Construction was very active in all areas, but particularly
in Kamloops. Activity has been very strong in the Revelstoke area due to the work
on hydro projects within the area. Our Revelstoke office has faced a greatly
increased demand for services from the transient unemployed employables. Many
of these single persons have come from other parts of the Province seeking employment on the projects, but many have come from all the other Provinces in Canada.
We have been concerned about the need for hostel accommodation to assist these
persons and we hope that the coming year may see some progress on this. A hostel
has operated in Kamloops City with success and this may need to expand to meet
the demand for accommodation. The increased economic activity, particularly in
Kamloops and Revelstoke, has contributed to a shortage of suitable accommodation.
While there has been considerable growth in economy and population of the
area, it can be seen from the table that the Social Allowance case load has increased
from 34.0 to 35.2 per cent of the total case load, an actual increase from 3,277 to
3,408, an increase of 131 cases. The amount of $756,022.25 was granted to employable persons, an increase in dollars of $140,179.40 over the previous year. While
the amount has increased, the number of unemployed employables has decreased
from 31,865 to 30,030, a decreased of 1,835 persons over the previous year. The
increase in cost was due to the increase in rates of assistance. There was a decrease
of 139 cases of supplementary assistance to Old Age Security. There was, however,
a slight increase in the total case load from 9,648 to 9,671, an increase of
approximately 0.2 per cent.
In addition to this increase in the case load, there were 29,689 cases opened
and closed, approximately 10.5 per cent less than the year before. The child-in-care
case load rose from 786 to 825, an increase of 39 children-in-care, or 4.8 per cent
over the previous year. While there was an increase in children-in-care, a significant
number of children were reunited with their families during the year as a result of
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 19
continued rehabilitative services to both the children and the parents. Many other
children were not placed with substitute families due to the determined effort of
staff to work with the families on a preventive basis designed to keep the family
together.
The staff of the region increased by three during the fiscal year and this
resulted in a strengthening of our North Kamloops, Kamloops, and Penticton offices.
One staff member took educational leave for further professional training. The
social-work staff were interested and concerned in furthering their knowledge and
skills in their profession and many of them took advantage of educational opportunities in their local areas. These involved an adult-education course in Family
Group Counselling, a series of seminars given by the Extension Department, University of British Columbia, in family counselling and related subjects, and a workshop
in communications. This has provided much stimulus to staff and they have been
most anxious to have such opportunities to further their education and understanding. It is hoped that this programme of education at the local level can be continued
and developed in the next fiscal year. The increased knowledge and understanding
gained through these educational experiences is reflected in increased and more
effective service to our clients. Thus the aims of prevention and rehabilitation are
enhanced.
During the year the concern for giving adequate casework services to families
by staff has continued to receive emphasis. Much effort has been expended to
resolve family and marital problems, to prevent social and economic breakdown,
and to assist those requiring service to maintain the maximum degree of self-
responsibility. The Rehabilitation Committees have continued to function and they
have been assisted in their work and development by the appointment of a Rehabilitation Consultant from the Health Branch. In one area we have worked closely with
a representative community group in an attempt to assure that the need for family
counselling was met. In Lillooet a liaison committee comprising representatives of
school, health, probation department, and ourselves was formed to focus on the
problems and needs of the youth in that area. In the central part of the region a
district Family and Juvenile Court has been established and we have worked closely
with this to assist in the best possible planning for cases coming before the Court.
In the area of child-welfare services our focus has been two-fold. Firstly we
have endeavoured to maintain families together, thus reducing the need for substitute
forms of care for children. While there has been a slight increase in the number of
children-in-care, this would have been much greater, except that in many problem
situations we have kept parents and children together and in other situations many
children have been returned to their parents. The second focus has been the further
development of placement resources for children and emphasis has been placed on
completing applications for adoptions, and seeking out receiving and group-living
home resources as well as foster-home resources. Many children coming into care
have done so pending adoption placement. Our staff have been increasingly concerned with the rise in illegitimate births. This is a problem that must become a
community concern at large, and we have given emphasis to prevention in our public
interpretation to community and school groups. We have continued to work with
the Anglican Council for Social Services in their planning for a home for unmarried
mothers and it is hoped that this may shortly be in operation.
The Foster Parents' Association in Kelowna has continued its development and
they have been a strong resource for us. Similar associations have begun in North
Kamloops serving the greater Kamloops area, and in Penticton. We are looking to
the development of this resource in other areas of the region, and the Foster Parents'
 H 20 SOCIAL WELFARE
Associations are to be commended for their interest and participation in our
programme.
Our concern for services to the native Indians has continued and we look to
the further development of resources with them. We have in the Kamloops area
a very successful group-living home on the reserve. In Penticton we have continued
our close association with the Penticton Indian Affairs Committee and we have
worked closely with Indian families on a group basis to help them resolve some of
their problems.
In the Kamloops area we have been working with the staff at the Tranquille
school for retarded, with the object of placing those who can in resources in the
community. Other areas such as Vernon have participated in this. During the
year our association with community Homemaker services has continued and we
have utilized this important resource on many occasions in our rehabilitative work.
We appreciate the services of this resource and we look forward to and are assisting
areas that do not have this established resource to develop Homemaker services.
In the Kelowna area our staff has worked closely with the University Women's
Club on their project of the development of a directory of community services. This
directory was completed at the end of the fiscal year and it will be of real value to
the area. We have appreciated the opportunity to have been a part of its development. In North Kamloops we have participated in the development of housing
facilities for senior citizens and we look forward to the establishment in the near
future of the Thrupp Manor. During the year the Mount Paul Private Hospital was
opened in this area and it has been a real resource.
Each year seems to present an increasing demand for services from our Department and staff. This presents a responsibility that staff have taken very seriously
because of their belief in rehabilitation and prevention. They have made every
effort to achieve these two aims. However, problems arise from people in communities and it is to the communities that we must look for resources and solutions.
We have focussed on helping the communities to become aware and sensitive to
problems within the community and to work with us toward solutions. A real
awakening has occurred as to the need and use of volunteers to assist the professionally trained person in the alleviation of problem situations. In several areas we
have explored the use of volunteers with interested groups in the community and we
value this interest and look for further progress. We look to the development of
community groups or local welfare councils so that the communities may take a
greater part in meeting social problems that exist. We value this interest and
participation and we hope that with this assistance and partnership we may be able
to give increasingly effective service.
The progress achieved and the services given would not have been possible
without a devoted and dedicated staff in the Municipal and Provincial offices. This
is commended and appreciated and I know that staff will continue this dedication in
prevention and rehabilitation so that maximum responsibility and self-functioning
may be achieved by those needing services. This has been enhanced by the cooperation and interest received from other departments of government, by other
agencies, and the community at large and this we appreciate.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 21
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region HI as at March 31,1966
Category
p.
o
o
J2
M
C
5
o
i
o
o
q
'5
a.
o
O cs
u
u
_>
O
a
o
c
u
o
M
o
>
<D
a
0
Is
e
o
5
s
>
Cfl
o
o
a
MO
5
0<U
0
o
Bb
>o
o
H
116
333
9
70
161
15
361
23
12   53
250 236
2     9
52   70
190 111
24
133
6
28
64
5
65
1
21
222
4
47
89
13
196
11
4
147
1
94
186
25
52
8
101
248
6
64
247
36
339
17
4
133
1
13
38
6
45
5
25
185
9
55
214
15
150
4
36
249
7
171
246
44
234
13
467
396
267
5
127
355
339
6
100
785
199
3
80
.   272
3,408
68
Old-age Assistance 	
Supplementary Assistance to Old
46
135
1,017
2,593
33]  19
173 106
19|    1
12!     54
391     29
345
Child Welfare          	
1,721
Health and Institutional	
8|     10]       3|	
123
Totals        	
1.08817311605
326
603
517
1,058
245
657
1,000
fifiSl   818
7721   583
9,671
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region HI for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
420
3,277
67
1,058
2,732
328
1,661
105
4.4
34.0
0.7
11.0
28.3
3.4
17.2
1.1
396
3,408
68
1,017
2,593
345
1,7121
123
4.1
35.2
0.7
10.5
216.8
3.6
Child Welfare
17.8
1.3
Totals       	
9,648
100.0
9,671
100.0
REGION IV
W. H. Crossley, Regional Director
Region IV covered the same geographic area this year as it has for some years
past. The area we serve lies in the south-east corner of the Province. A triangle,
with the Alberta Border as one arm, Golden, B.C., near the apex, the United States
Border as the base, and a western boundary drawn from close to Golden to cut the
base at Bridesville, B.C., would cover the region on the map. Municipalities
administering allowances on a per capita basis with our Department contracting to
do the Social Work were: Fernie, Cranbrook, Kimberley, Nelson, Trail, Rossland,
Grand Forks, and Greenwood.
The population in the region continued to grow but not as quickly as the Provincial average apart from rapid expansion in Castlegar, Kaslo, and the Lardeau as
the result of construction on the High Arrow and Duncan Dams. Towards the
year's end Fernie was experiencing rapid growth due to increased economic activity,
rumoured and real, resulting from the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company's diversification into the forestry industry and their explorations for oil and gas. Their coal
output, too, remained high. For the first time in some years housing of any standard
became scarce in Fernie.
 H 22 SOCIAL WELFARE
Economic activity remained stable or above average in the region. The basic
economy of the region is still built on two foundations. The expanded forestry
industry and the enlarged operations of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at Trail, in the Kimberley area, at Riondel, and Salmo. In Slocan City the
building of a large, modern sawmill by Pacific Logging Company gave a boost to
the local economy. The most heartening economic fact to many old-timers who
remember the booming mining days was the great activity in mineral development
noticeable in the Boundary country, around Golden and in the Slocan area. Tourism
seems to increase each year with people coming from farther afield. The East
Kootenays particularly are affected by this.
The region suffered some economic slowdown in winter, inevitable in this
climate, causing a seasonal rise in Social Allowance to employable people out of
work. This, however, did not reach the peaks nor maintain as long as it had in past
years. Transients moving into the region searching for work still posed a constant
service need, most noticeable in Cranbrook, Trail, and Golden. The influx was
slower than in past years apart from the Golden area.
The Annual Report should be a saga of service to people, but without citing
lengthy case examples it is difficult to report the vast story of people helped during
the year in a really living way. One cannot help mentioning the courage, the motivation, the desire to help themselves that we encountered in our work in the course of
a year with people who faced adversity. This enabled our staff to carry on and to
create solutions with people involved or to alleviate the strain they faced. The
unfortunate truth is that most citizens usually see the small percentage of failures
while the successful social work fittingly remains unknown.
There was one change in the number of offices in the region this year when it
was necessary, due to lack of space, to set up a sub-office in Cranbrook with two
workers and a supervisor who is also responsible for the Creston office, handling a
selection of special cases. The second supervisor in Cranbrook remained in the
main office and still is responsible for this office and Fernie office. The new quarters
obtained for the sub-office are modern and tasteful.
Other improvements in office accommodation were made when the Nelson
office was relocated in August into much larger, newly decorated quarters which are
designed for efficient operation. In addition, much needed redecoratjon was carried
out in the Grand Forks office and in the regional office. The colour schemes,
designed by the Department of Public Works for all these offices mentioned, produced particularly attractive offices.
The rest of the region is still served out of large supervisory offices in Nelson
and Trail with sub-offices located in New Denver and Grand Forks. It is interesting
to note that in conducting their field operations in areas somewhat removed from
their district offices the social workers have received co-operation and show ingenuity
in obtaining part-time space to serve as field headquarters in some of the smaller
communities. Such space is used in the Municipal Hall at Kimberley and Castlegar,
in the Government Agent's offices in Golden and Kaslo, and through the co-operation
of the Public Health we used space one or two days weekly in their office quarters
at Greenwood, Natal, and Salmo. These arrangements make it much more efficient
for the worker to cover these smaller centres.
Several offices across the region received some staff increase this year. In
December, 1965, we were able to recruit an additional worker, that we had previously been given an allotment for in the April budget, and this worker was placed
in Fernie. The boundary of the area covered by this office was moved west to help
remove some of the pressure on the Cranbrook office. In September, 1965, an
additional half-time stenographer was placed in the Cranbrook main office and in
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 23
October, 1965, an additional half-time stenographer was placed in Grand Forks
office. The Trail office suffered the most staff dislocation in the region when in
late August two of the workers left and in early September the district supervisor
left. One of the workers was made acting supervisor, but the office operated short-
handed and with some inexperienced staff for four months. The staff in Cranbrook
also changed a good deal, increasing the difficulty the supervisors there faced in
maintaining proper service. The staff in the rest of the region, while there were
some changes, did not suffer nearly as much dislocation.
Staff development, which is continually needed to keep up to date and to
improve skills and techniques, was carried on throughout the year. Two people
from the region were sent as delegates to the B.C. Conference on Social Work in
May. In addition, Mr. Allman, Consultant in Protection and Children of Unmarried
Parents Section in Victoria, visited the offices and led informative discussions in
July, as did Dr. Bland, Superintendent of Woodlands School, who was accompanied
by Mr. Belknap, Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare, who both spoke at staff
meetings throughout the region in October. Mr. Langley, Federal Representative,
also visited various offices in the region in October. We found that several visits
made by Mr. Stringer, the Director of Regional Services, to share with the staff
recent developments in National and Provincial welfare planning, a great help. A
new approach was tried this year when Mr. Fowler, the Training Supervisor, visited
our region in February and spoke to two classes at Notre Dame University concerning the profession of social worker as a career. He also interviewed people
individually in a recruiting effort. There was much interest shown in this at the
University. At this time he also met for half a day with the district supervisors and
discussed the co-ordination of in-service training between the Training Division and
field supervisors.
The staff activity in Emergency Welfare Services under the Emergency Measures Organization (still commonly called Civil Defence) continued with some training carried out in the year. Mr. T. W. Butters, Provincial Supervisor, Emergency
Welfare Services, visited Nelson in March to discuss regional, Provincial, and Federal planning.   A new emergency feeding van was received in March.
The encouraging interest shown by various communities in participating with
us in programmes or else creating programmes to complement our services continued. We are operating gradually in communities more vitally interested in the
well-being of their citizens and less inclined to leave this as the sole responsibility
of our Department. This is fortunate because we cannot do a good job in a disinterested community. This ferment is very apparent in Trail where we have received numerous inquiries from the service clubs, charity groups, the local Mental
Health Association, and others as to methods of strengthening welfare services in
the community in which they can participate. In Nelson, the Nelson District Child
Care Society was officially formed in January after considerable preliminary work
had been done. This organization has as its first objective the development of a
receiving and observation home. In Trail, a close-working relationship developed
this year with the Mental Health Clinic culminating in a joint training programme
given to a volunteer group of our foster parents in methods of helping serve foster
children who are undergoing mental health problems.
A great move forward was made in the region in this year between the months
of December and February when rehabilitation committees properly constituted, and
with Mr. C. Bradbury, Rehabilitation Consultant from Vancouver, in attendance at
their meetings, were formed in Trail, Nelson, and Cranbrook. It is obvious that
they will be successful in formulating rehabilitation plans for some of the clients
 H 24
SOCIAL WELFARE
already referred. In addition to local cases, cases from other satellite offices are
presented for discussion.
The interest mentioned last year in my report concerning the New Denver
Youth Centre continued and in May a community meeting, well attended, arranged
with the co-operation of the local Board of Trade, including a meeting with the local
School Board, was held, attended by Mr. Sadler, the Director of Welfare; Mr.
Bingham, the Superintendent of Child Welfare; Mr. J. Scott, the Director of the New
Denver Youth Centre; Mr. S. Parker, his assistant; and myself. There were many
pertinent questions asked at the meeting, illustrative of a warm interest in the
projected programme.
Throughout the year we continued to operate the Pavilion in New Denver, a
small nursing home with a capacity for 15 patients, roughly divided equally between
men and women. This small, but needed, facility provided 5,101 patient-days' care
during the fiscal year.   Average patient occupancy was 14 patients.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region IV as at March 31, 1966
Category
u
o
0
v.
Si
a
a
6"
c
o
u
0
"5
u
lb
pa
o
tu
s
a
u
0
a
o
1
>
a
u
a
z
3
o
H
18
367
1
86
305
32
221
15
10
213
2
54
196
28
86
5
5
181
3
65
155
20
45
2
ii
196
5
53
238
26
57
6
38
544
4
76
373
33
126
5
21
99
2
36
169
9
47
2
50
393
9
95
330
53
270
16
',    153
1,993
Blind Persons' Allowance
26
465
, 1,766
201
rhiM wpifarp
852
51
Totals
1,045
594
476
592
1,199
385
1,216
5,507
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
1964/65
Number        Per Cent
1965/66
Number      Per Cent
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance..
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance..
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
Health and Institutional-
Totals	
130
2,039
■27
'541
I,7i62
213
752
75
2.4
36.8
0.5
9.8
31.8
3.8
■13.6
1.3
5,539
100.0
153
1,993
26
465
1,766
201
852
51
5,507
2.8
36.2
0.5
8.4
32J1
3.6
15.5
0.9
100.0
There are some interesting facts shown in the above tables. In Table II particularly, the apparent decrease in case load requires comment. The major portion
of this decrease is in the Social Allowance and the Health and Institution categories.
The Social Allowance decrease, I believe, reflects a more buoyant economy. I believe the major drop in Health and Institutional Services is a drop in welfare institutions of 24, the result of us no longer carrying summer camps. There have also
been fewer referrals for follow-up services from the mental hospitals since this service
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 25
is largely provided by the Mental Health Centre in Trail. There is an increase in the
Child Welfare category; part of this is tragic and part of it is hopeful. Tragically,
our case load of children in care increased 75 during the year. Nevertheless, partly
as a result of the J.E.F.F. campaign, the number of approved foster homes increased
21 and the number of pending foster homes increased 34. No one reason can be
singled out for the increase in foster children apart from population increase and the
apparent growing tendency for homes and people to break down under the stress and
strain of modern living. Some increase is due to the growth we are concerned about
across the Province and in this region in the number of births of children to younger
unwed mothers who cannot properly offer them motherhood after their birth.
As the year closed it was apparent that due to increasing pressures we would
have to try and plan for increased staff to cover the Golden area out of Cranbrook
or else to transfer it to Region III to be serviced out of Revelstoke if staff could be
obtained. This problem was under study at the year's end. Additional staff are also
urgently required in Creston and in Trail in order to provide a higher level of service.
In closing I would like to express thanks on behalf of the staff and myself
to the many people who helped us serve those in need in the region this year. Municipal officials have been co-operative, as have school authorities, members of the
National Employment Service, the Unemployment Insurance Commission, ministers
representing various faiths, and Probation Officers. Above all, I would like to thank
the members of my staff who, sometimes under difficulties, have managed to maintain
a spirit of service to those in need. Without the continued encouragement and
support shown us by the Senior Administration this year it would have been much
more difficult to maintain the level of our services.
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Director
The boundaries of the administrative area of Region V remained unchanged
during this fiscal year.   District boundaries also were stable.
A most significant feature was the rapid expansion of population. However, in
spite of this, the total case load in the region decreased during the fiscal year. That
decrease amounted to 259 cases or 6.1 per cent and more than cancelled out the 5.2
per cent increase which occurred in the previous fiscal year.
Since staff was increased by five (four social workers and one clerk-stenographer), it is interesting to speculate if the decrease may be partly attributed to a
greater opportunity to give casework services. In any case, the average case-point
rating per worker on March 31, 1966, was 104.6, as compared with the average of
131.8 at the end of the previous fiscal year.
Changes in the case load may be seen in the following tables. From them it is
interesting to note that decreases occurred in the essentially financial categories while
increases occurred in the service categories.
 H 26
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparisons of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region V as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Percent
156
2,012
44
409
579
55
981
30
3.6
47.2
1.0
9.6
13.6
1.3
23.0
0.7
180
1,770
40
3112
633
56
994
212
4.5
44.2
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
1.0
7.8
15.8
Disabled Persons' Allowance                      	
rhilrt Welfare
1.4
24.8
0.5
Total'
4,266
100.0
4,007
100.0
Table II.—Case Loads by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
in Region V as at March 31,1966
Category
Prince
George
Main
Prince
George
Sub
Quesnel
Vander-
hoof
Williams
Lake
Total
66
428
482
8
1
777
9
120
283
22
2
38
302
1
50
107   .
10
164
5
23
53
10
51
107
6
165
3
52
210
20
91
136
18
183
4
180
1,770
40
312
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance.....
633
56
rhilrt Welfare
994
22
Totals                                                  	
984
1,214
677
418
714
4,007
The Social Allowance case load showed the greatest change, having decreased
by 242 or 12.0 per cent. This indicates a stepped-up but continued move away from
this category which decreased by 15 or 0.7 per cent during the previous fiscal year.
Social assistance at the end of this fiscal year made up 44.2 per cent of the total
case load, whereas it comprised 47.2 per cent of the total case load a year ago.
Thus the decline of this category of case as a percentage of total case load has
continued regularly since it started in the 1962/63 fiscal year when it was at a peak
of 54.2 per cent.
The group with most prospect of rehabilitation to the point of no longer needing
financial assistance are naturally the unemployed employable members of the social
assistance case load. In comparing this group receiving Social Allowance in March,
1966, with those receiving assistance in March, 1965,1 find that the number of single
persons decreased by 30 to 467, while the number of families increased by 19 to
277. Transients (those in the local community less than one month at the time they
applied for social assistance) made up 24.3 per cent of the unemployed employable
case load in Prince George in March, 1966, whereas they had comprised 26.4 per
cent of the unemployed employable case load in March of 1965.
Grants to unemployed employables during the current fiscal year totalled 14.1
per cent less than in the previous one.
The Prince George Men's Hostel continued to serve single transient men
throughout the year. On April 1, 1965, there were 39 men accommodated in this
hostel. During the year, 1,948 men were admitted and 1,956 discharged, leaving
on March 31, 1966, 31 men in residence.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 27
Those who were known to have left this hostel to enter employment numbered
1,014, a significant increase over the previous fiscal year when they numbered 811.
The average stay per man was 6.0 days as compared with the average stay of 5.5
days in the 1964/65 fiscal year.
The general picture in Child Welfare is considerably better than it was in the
previous fiscal year. During the 12 months ending March 31, 1966, the total Child
Welfare case load increased by 13 or 1.3 per cent. In the fiscal year ending March
31, 1965, the increase amounted to 125 or 14.6 per cent. The relative stability of
this statistic for the current year resulted from greater services to families which
averted apprehension in some instances and achieved the return from foster care in
others. Also placement in adoption homes or change of status through adoption by
foster parents contributed quite substantially.
During this fiscal year the number of children-in-care increased by 31 or 6.5
per cent as compared with an increase in the previous fiscal year of 44 or 10.1 per
cent. At the same time the number of foster homes increased by 13 during the year.
However, that statement does not portray an important fact that the increase in
approved foster homes amounted to 36 while the number of pending foster homes
(those still requiring study and approval) decreased by 24. This indicates a greater
attention by staff to the studying and formal approving of foster homes.
Much attention was given to foster-home finding and the outstanding effort
was the J.E.F.F. campaign conducted in October, 1965. The welcome help of volunteers from the Kinettes in Prince George and two meetings at which approximately
40 prospective foster parents were informed about our programme were interesting
features.
However foster-home resources are still needed, particularly for older wards.
The relationship of children-in-care to approved foster homes still is 2.2 to 1 and
this is only a minor gain over the situation at the beginning of the fiscal year when
that relationship amounted to 2.4 to 1.
I think it is important to note that there was a significant improvement in the
situation in Prince George where the relationship of children-in-care to approved
foster homes was reduced during the fiscal year from 2.8 to 1 to 2.3 to 1. Unfortunately this gain was seriously countered by the closing of two receiving homes in
Prince George through foster parents moving away from the area in one instance
and illness in the other.
In January, 1966, K Kottage Group Living Home for Girls in Prince George
was converted to a receiving home. However the Voth Group Living Home for
Boys in Vanderhoof continued and indeed was improved considerably with help
from the local Kinsmen Club.
An important event was the Workshop for House Parents of Group Living and
Receiving Homes in Regions V, VII, and VIII which was held at the Prince George
Vocational School on June 21, 22, and 23, 1965, under the inspiring leadership of
Dr. Bennet Wong, psychiatrist, and Mrs. Anna Allen of Child Welfare Division.
The number of adoption homes requiring study amounted at the end of the
year to 59, an increase of two from the number at the beginning of the year. Adoption homes approved numbered 16, an increase of three. Children in adoption
homes numbered 62, a decrease of 17, resulting from the new practice of reducing
the probationary period to six months.
It seems safe to say that services to the communities in the region improved
during the year. The social-work staff was increased by four and the stenographic
staff by one so that on March 31, 1966, the social-work staff numbered 25Vi and
 H 28 SOCIAL WELFARE
the clerical-stenographic staff numbered 15 with one vacancy to be filled shortly
after the beginning of the new fiscal year.
In closing, I wish to thank all staff for their steadfastness and achievements.
I also wish to express my appreciation to the municipal personnel, organizations, and
individuals who have helped us so readily and generously.
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Director
This is the yearly report of one of the eight administrative areas of the Provincial Social Welfare, Field Service. It will deal with some of the social welfare trends
and developments in the Fraser Valley, in the year under review.
Region VI, the Fraser Valley region, serves the people of the Fraser Valley and
the Fraser Canyon, from Surrey and Pitt Meadows through to Boston Bar and the
summit of the Hope-Princeton Highway.
The area is undergoing rapid but uneven expansion, in urbanization and in
population increase. At the time of writing, the 1966 census figures are not available and so it is difficult to establish an accurate population figure. The regional
population is estimated to be in excess of 200,000.
In view of rapid changes in public welfare, theory, and practice, the Department
of Social Welfare has an on-going programme for the continuing education of staff.
The writer wishes to acknowledge a debt to the Department for a training grant and
leave of absence to enable him to attend School of Social Work, University of British
Columbia, for the academic year 1965/66. Mr. W. Teichroeb was the Acting
Regional Director for that period.
Provincial field offices are set up by Provincial-Municipal agreement, in areas
where municipal population is too small to support municipal offices. Provincial
offices are located in the areas of population concentration of Abbotsford, Chilli-
wack, Haney, Langley, and White Rock.
A municipality with population of over 15,000 is responsible for administering
its social welfare services and so Surrey has its own Municipal Social Welfare Department. The municipality provides office space, equipment, and staff. The Provincial Government shares in the staffing of social workers on a matching basis and
provides a supervisor.
The field staff was increased by two social workers during the year. (In addition, three social workers were added on a temporary basis to assist in the J.E.F.F.
campaign.) At the end of the year the field staff in this region totalled 46 social
workers, 6 district supervisors, 1 Municipal Administrator, and Regional Director.
Some developments of the past year are reported below under three main areas
of service—Child Welfare, Social Allowance, and assistance to those over age 65
years.
The Child Welfare statistics noted in Tables I and II, include services to unmarried mothers, foster-home care, and adoption work. Protection cases are included
with Family Service. The heavy demands for family and child welfare services
placed a great strain on all offices. During the year, 142 children were placed for
adoption in the region, also 316 children were taken into care. At the end of the
year there were 740 children in care in the region.
When the needs of children require placement outside the natural home a wide
range of resources are needed, such as foster homes, group homes, and receiving
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 29
homes. During the year under review there were three privately sponsored receiving homes opened in the region, each of which is subsidized by the Department of
Social Welfare, through the Child Welfare Division.
Chrisholme, a home for retarded boys age 16 to 21, opened its doors in August,
in Langley. This home is operated by a voluntary agency, registered as a society.
It is providing care, farm work, and occupational training for 12 mildly retarded
boys.
The Department of Social Welfare continues in its co-operative venture with
Woodlands School, in the placement of selected children from that school into Fraser
Valley foster homes. As at March 31st there were 34 such children placed in
Region VI.
Each of the offices in the region took an active part in the Province-wide
J.E.F.F. campaign. This campaign brought many applications from prospective
adoption and foster parents, and temporary staff was assigned to the region to help
process the applications. Also, through J.E.F.F., the communities in the Fraser
Valley became more aware of Child Welfare needs, and the work done by the Department of Social Welfare.
Any person in financial need and without personal resources may apply for
Social Allowance. The service given is not just financial. Financial need usually
indicates joblessness, disability, or the loss of the primary wage-earner. One of the
social worker's tasks is to get the primary wage-earner back to independence. But
financial dependence often brings on family stress and even disorganization, and the
social worker is required to deal with the dependents as well as the head of the
household.
Table I shows a net increase of 220 Social Allowance cases during the year.
Of the 4,370 Social Allowance cases at the end of the year, there were 1,987 single
people, 1,118 one-parent families, 933 two-parent families, and 246 couples.
Special planning and co-ordinating machinery is needed to create a pattern of
service to meet the need of helping dependent employable people into our highly
organized industrial society. Thus, in co-operation with the Department of Health
Services, a rehabilitation committee was set up in Haney, in August. This brings
to three the committees functioning in the region. The committees bring to the
clients at the local level the skills and resources of other departments of government
such as Health, Education, and National Employment Service. These committees
work very hard to make available vocational training and practice work experience.
If social welfare programmes are to strengthen provisions of meeting social
needs, some experimentation must take place in new approaches. In June a Federal-
Provincial project was established in Surrey to study one-parent families in receipt
of Social Allowance. A major part of the project will be to experiment with the
strategies and resources needed to tackle the social problems of families who have
experienced separation or desertion.
During the year under review, Surrey Social Welfare Department and four of
our Provincial field offices received referrals from Riverview Hospital and Woodlands School for boarding-home placement of adult, mentally disabled persons who
no longer need psychiatric or custodial care in a mental institution. For the most
part, patients accepted for boarding-home placement will remain on in boarding
homes indefinitely. For some, the boarding home will serve as a halfway house to
a more complete rehabilitation. The hospital places these patients on boarding-
home leave and accepts continuing responsibility. We were co-operating in 262 of
these boarding-home placements at the end of the year. Boarding-home maintenance is met in most cases through Social Allowance, administered by the local
municipality.
 H 30
SOCIAL WELFARE
There was a slight decrease during the year in the numbers of persons, 65 years
and older, who receive Old-age Assistance or supplementary Social Allowance. This
decrease follows a 10-year trend. These cases have also decreased as a proportion
of the total regional case load. In 1956 this age-group was approximately 63 per
cent of the total regional case load. At the end of the year under review it composed
approximately 39.3 per cent of the total case load.
Once again I have the opportunity to thank the field staff, Provincial and municipal alike, for the tasks they carry out day by day on behalf of the community,
protecting families, children, and elderly people. I know that they join with me in
expressing a special word of appreciation to the many foster parents, group-home,
and receiving-home parents in the Fraser Valley for their splendid work during this
past year.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI as at March 31,1966, for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
198
4,150
67
1,107
3,668
357
1,617
133
1.8
36.7
0.6
9.8
32.5
3.2
14.3
1.2
277
4,370
65
986
3,453
359
1,634
121
2.5
38.8
Blind Persons' Allowance  _ 	
Old-age Assistance	
0.6
8.8
30.7
Disabled Persons' Allowance  	
Child Welfare	
3.2
14.5
1.1
Totals  	
11.297         I       100.0
11.265        1      100.0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories as at March 31,1966
Category
Abbots-
ford
Chilli-
wack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
Family Service  	
28
828
20
82
210
769
320
25
110
1,063
15
68
236
625
497
16
7
568
7
41
118
327
129
21
25
490
4
46
110
338
159
98
1,219
15
99
272
1,174
478
9
202
4
23
40
220
51
9
277
4,370
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
Child Welfare ...	
65
359
986
3,453
1,634
Health and Institutional 	
9    |       41
121
Totals.     	
2,282    | 2,630    |  1,218
1,181    j  3,396    |     558    | 11,265
REGION VII
A. J. Wright, Regional Director
The boundaries of Region VII remain unchanged. It lies in the north-west
corner of the Province with the Alaska Border to the north and Milbanke Sound to
the south. The village of Endako constitutes the eastern border while the Queen
Charlottes lie to the west. Again this year there was a marked upsurge in population,
mainly due to expansion in the major industries. This was notably in the Prince
Rupert area where the pulp-mill was enlarged.
The economic situation remained at a constant high level. Although the fishing
industry did not have its expected good year, construction of the power-line from
Kemano to Prince Rupert as well as the Columbia Cellulose expansion made up for
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 31
this. In the eastern and northern areas mining speculation and test-drilling bolstered
an ever-increasing logging industry. This in part accounts for an increase in applications for social assistance by an influx of job-seekers.
Community interest and participation in our programme continued at a high
level. This was particularly evident in Smithers where committees have been established to meet with representatives of the Smithers District Office to discuss problems
of mutual concern. One of these committees has been established to discuss native
and white interracial and cultural problems with emphasis on developing more
effective native leadership and better understanding. Similar committees have been
set up in Burns Lake and Hazelton. Foster-parent group meetings have also had an
informal beginning. An active mental health committee sponsored a visit from Dr.
George Evans, who outlined the sex-education programme he established in Victoria.
We were fortunate in having him meet with interested professional groups in Prince
Rupert and Terrace and Kitimat as well.
The established resources are still in operation and are proving their worth.
Friendship House in Prince Rupert runs almost to a capacity with transient men.
Attempts are under way to improve its services to the local Indian residents. The
receiving homes both in Terrace and Prince Rupert are being used to their fullest
extent and are providing a valuable service to our children. McCarthy Home for
girls opened its doors in Prince Rupert in the summer of 1965 and after a somewhat
shaky start is now operating to capacity. It provides a warm group environment to
six girls who we feel need need a group-living environment rather than pure foster-
home care. Plans are now under way for an expansion to eight girls. As well, a
similar home for boys is in the planning stages.
The Indian project in Smithers came to a successful conclusion after two years
of operation. It was felt by all staff, particularly those who worked closely with the
project worker, that the work done by him and his findings were invaluable.
A Federal-Provincial adoption and foster-home project was started in June,
1965, and continues to prove its worth. Unfortunately, a change in staff interrupted
the programme as it was getting under way. It is proving valuable in that it has
turned up a significant number of homes, particularly in the Kitimat area, as well as
raised the standard of service to a considerable degree. A second project dealing
with transients in the Friendship House setting is now under way. We look forward
to some interesting results from this.
Some experimentation has also taken place in the area of child-care. A central
registry of all foster homes was established in order to make the fullest use possible
of what resources we have available in the region. A further one has been in the
establishment of a foster day-care centre under the supervision of Mrs. J. Rose.
Both of these are being carefully studied to see if they prove their worth.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region VII for the Year 1965/66 as at March 31, 1966
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance..
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance-
Disabled Persons' Allowance  _
Child Welfare  	
Health and Institutional  	
Totals   	
6
124
9
16
61
8
63
 2_
289
41
426
18
91
136
26
208
13
959
18
333
15
45
128
16
146
1
"702"
40
274
6
43
51
13
240
6
673
105
1,157
48
195
376
63
657
22
2,623
 H 32
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII as at March 31, 1966,
for the Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
114
887
56
229
341
61
663
27
4.8
37.3
2.4
9.6
14.3
2.6
27.9
1.1
105
1,15:7
48
195
376
63
657
22
4.0
44.1
1.8
7.4
14.3
2.4
Child Welfare,
25.0
0.8
Totals
2.378       1       100.0
2,623
100.0
The preceding tables show an increase in numbers over the previous year.
Interestingly, this is most evident in the Prince Rupert area, which is also the area
of the greatest economic growth. This could lend weight to the theory that with
prosperity comes an increase in social problems. Again this year percentages
remain relatively unchanged, with a slight decrease in Child Welfare and Old-age
Assistance and similar increases in Social Allowance. We find that the demand for
service remains in the major categories Social Allowance and Child Welfare.
In closing I wish to thank all staff, stenographic, social work, and supervisory,
for their devotion to the complex job of bringing the services of this Department to
their clients. The co-operation of the communities that comprise this region has been
excellent during the past year. As well we have been fortunate in receiving the
same fine standard of co-operation from related sources such as schools, Indian
Affairs, probation, and other professions.
REGION VIII
J. A. Mollberg, Regional Director
The boundaries of Region VIII remain unchanged since last year. It consists
of the northern portion of the Province from the Peace River district on the south and
bounded on the other three sides by the Alberta Border, the Yukon Border, and the
Alaska Panhandle. It is serviced by two district offices located in Dawson Creek and
Fort St. John, and the regional office in Dawson Creek. Staff remained unchanged
with a supervisor, seven workers, and five and one-half stenographers in Dawson
Creek and a supervisor, five workers, and three and one-half stenographers in Fort
St. John. We also appreciated the services of an additional temporary J.E.F.F.
worker from February to April who completed a blacklog of adoption and foster-
home studies in our Dawson Creek office.
Case loads have gradually been decreasing over the past year, which is an indication of the stability of the economic conditions in the community. Staff have been
concerned about the increasing numbers of unmarried parents and continued emphasis has been placed on the recruitment and study of adoption and foster homes. This
has also helped in the development of local Foster Parents Associations which have
been formed in both Dawson Creek and Fort St. John. The need for homemaker-
housekeeper services is also apparent, and efforts have been made to encourage the
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 33
community development of these services.   A great deal of ground work has been
laid, and it is hoped that this will materialize in the coming year.
The receiving home in Fort St. John is continuing to function most successfully,
and our hostel in Dawson Creek for transient single men is continuing to meet a
pressing need in the community. One of our workers in Dawson Creek has been
assigned a rehabilitative case load and works closely with the Rehabilitation Committee formed in 1964. We have also developed an intake worker in our Fort St.
John office. We have chosen a person with the most training and experience on
staff in order to provide clients on their first contact with our Department with the
best service possible. In this way it is planned that their problem will be solved in
the minimum length of time with as adequate a solution as possible.
Table 1.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VIII as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Category
(1964/65
1965/66
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
\
101                5.0
1,051      .        51.5
6      |,         0.3
132                6.5
241               11.8
24                1.2
466      1        22.9
18      |         0.9
122
847
9
113
229
28
463
15
6.7
46.4
0.5
6.2
12.5
1.5
Child Welfare.   '  	
25.4
0,8
Totals  „	
2.039               100.0
1,826
100.0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VIII as at March 31, 1966
Category
Dawson
Creek
Fort St.
John
Total
90
540
3
87
■126
22
279
7
32
307
6
26
103'
6
184
8
122
847
9
Old-age Assistance	
113
229
Disabled Persons' Allowance  	
Child Welfare     -     	
28
463
Health and Institutional—  	
15
Totals        .....   . _	
1,154
672
1 826
Staff changes have been heavy during the year and I would like to thank not
only those who remain, but the new people who arrive, for the devotion to duty and
the excellent service they perform. I would also like to thank the many members of
the community who have helped to make our programme successful.
 H 34
SOCIAL WELFARE
PART III.—DIVISIONS
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
The Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division oversees the programme for
persons in need other than those eligible under the programmes for children and the
aged. There were 66,596 applications accepted for assistance during the fiscal year.
As at March 31, 1966, financial assistance was being provided for 17,309 single
recipients, for 11,993 heads of families, and for 35,586 dependent family members.
The statistics further show that this case load was composed of 57 per cent, single
applicants; 5 per cent, couples without children; 13 per cent, two-parent families;
23 per cent, one-parent families; and 2 per cent, children with relatives. The most
significant change over the previous year is an increase from 20 per cent to 23 per
cent in the proportion of one-parent families.
Over-all expenditure increased from $25,840,129 in 1964/65 to $29,683,919
in 1965/66. The majority of this increase is attributable to substantial increases in
social-assistance rates effective May 1, 1965. These increases have had an appreciable impact in improving the economic situation of the Social Allowance recipient.
Extra rental allowance of up to $10 monthly and other assistance is also available to
help in those situations where there are particular difficulties because of high rental
or other costs. A grant for school-starting supplies of up to $10 has proved of great
value and the majority of families with school-age children have applied for and
received this.
Marginal earning capacity and large indebtedness are factors that handicap
numbers of families in achieving self-dependence.
Popular opinion commonly is that many persons who receive assistance simply
do not want to work. Contrary to this, the findings are that the majority of recipients
suffer from acute feelings about their need to receive social assistance. There are
relatively few instances of fraud and when these do occur, reference is made to the
Courts, which are then able to take into account mitigating circumstances.
Table I.—Case Load and Number of Persons Assisted by Month for
Fiscal Year 1965/66
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
April, 1965	
May, 1965	
June, 1965	
July, 1965	
August, 1965	
September, 1965..
October, 1965	
November, 1965-
December, 1965...
January, 1966	
February, 1966	
March, 1966	
11,034
11,092
11,161
10,769
10,674
10,755
10,600
11,137
11,544
12,539
12,502
11,993
32,275
32,514
32,514
31,266
30,662
30,887
30,245
32,013
34,027
36,510
35,834
35,586
16,537
16,562
16,703
15,984
16,336
15,854
15,962
16,897
17,486
17,137
17,328
17,309
59,846
60,168
60,378
58,019
57,672
57,496
56,807
60,047
63,057
66,186
65,664
64,888
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
H 35
March, 1964
March, 1965
March, 1966
Opened
4,796
5,261
5,896
Closed
5,318
5,594
5,049
Table HI.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1966, 1965, and 1964
municipal
Mar.,   Mar.,   Mar.,
1966     1965     1964
PROVINCIAL
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
1966
1965
1964
Region I—
Alberni 	
.._     264
294
394
Campbell River .	
236
450
	
Courtenay    ~ ,	
502
588
1,065
Duncan   	
....     224
230
242
Nanaimo  	
....     761
785
1,081
Victoria 	
—     597
463
546
164
103
27
Alberni     205
Courtenay   129
Central Saanich       29
Campbell River   151
Duncan   170
Esquimau  182
Ladysmith   _      84
Nanaimo   662      620
North Cowichan  210       178
Oak Bay _ _..      48        27
273
141
33
149
144
139
146
51
651
231
44
Port Alberni       510      503       594
Saanich   	
Victoria 	
582      467      535
1,675    1,571    1,587
2,584   2,810    3,328
4,637    3,999   4,379
7,221    6,809   7,707
Region II—
New Westminster 	
17
19
63
Burnaby 	
2,636
2,608
2,715
Vancouver 	
.     387
446
384
Coquitlam  	
655
651
651
Powell River	
60
73
74
Delta   	
374
330
380
New Westminster	
1,587
1,416
1,574
North Vancouver City
682
598
582
North Vancouver Dis
trict 	
359
375
371
Port Coquitlam 	
368
303
260
Port Moody 	
181
176
174
Powell River	
211
201
223
Richmond	
644
584
627
Vancouver   _
16,355
15,680
16,090
West Vancouver 	
134
151
106
464      538      521
24,186 23,073 23,753
Region III—-
Kamloops  _.
_     854
1,029
1,543
Kelowna     	
684
608
599
Lillooet  	
345
341
361
North Kamloops	
_     270
250
Oliver    	
411
468
Penticton      	
..     523
436
883
Revelstoke     	
242
228
Salmon Arm       	
..    433
491
613
Vernon    	
..     632
633
500
24,650 23,611 24,274
Armstrong
Enderby .
Kamloops 	
Kelowna    	
Merritt -  	
North Kamloops
Penticton   	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm District-
Summer land 	
Vernon 	
51
34
34
38
47
39
581
733
627
738
516
391
151
115
268
380
306
773
792
659
113
137
201
155
186
199
150
142
154
341
376
434
4,394   4,484   4,499
3,471    3,346    3,044
Region IV—
Cranbrook
Creston 	
Fernie 	
7,865   7,830    7,543
Grand Forks	
Nelson   	
New Denver	
Trail  	
633
788
614
598
596
701
244
184
141
325
258
238
728
788
797
240
239
269
712
465
581
Cranbrook ...
Fernie	
Grand Forks
Greenwood ...
Kimberley ....
Nelson —	
Rossland  	
246
313
239
193
184
217
98
93
90
5
8
14
104
153
154
497
414
377
102
83
109
Trail        199       183       183
3,480   3,318    3,341
1,444    1,431    1,383
4,924   4,749   4,724
 H 36
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table HI.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1966, 1965, and 1964—Continued
PROVINCIAL
MUNICIPAL
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
1966
1965
1964
1966
1965
1964
Region V—
Prince George     . .
.. 1,792
1,665
1,854
Prince George    	
576
512
1,046
Quesnel	
..    469
482
493
Quesnel —	
327
375
237
Vanderhoof
....     159
187
222
Williams Lake 	
40
20
Williams Lake	
557
571
600
2,977
2,905
3,169
943
907
1,283
Region VI—
Abbotsford    	
....     384
286
331
Chilliwack City 	
491
472
485
Chilliwack
.    535
543
601
Chilliwhack Township
1,221
1,322
1,158
Haney 	
95
118
106
Hope 	
114
92
Langley City    .
213
164
127
Langley Township __
891
914
882
Maple Ridge   	
1,267
1,287
1,029
Matsqui 	
773
752
813
Mission District    .  .
464
424
439
Mission Town	
306
269
229
Sumas      	
158
153
171
Surrey 	
3,731
3,961
4,010
White Rock
414
300
379
1,014
947
1,038
10,043
10,110
9,722
Region VII—
Burns Lake 	
...     332
254
204
Kitimat 	
35
32
29
179
140
284
572
484
453
Smithers 	
709
699
632
Terrace   	
373
327
269
Terrace	
...     154
123
120
1,374
1,216
1,240
980
843
751
Region VIII—
.    1,024
1,132
1,098
894
996
999
Fort St. John    	
624
650
718
Fort St. John	
355
502
192
1,648
1,782
1,816
1,249
1,498
1,191
3,920    3,812   4,452
11,057 11,057 10,760
2,354   2,059    1,991
2,897   3,280    3,007
64,888 63,207 64,458
Table IV.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, Etc.
Fiscal Year
1963/64
Fiscal Year
1964/65
Fiscal Year
1965/66
Basic Social Allowances.
Repatriation, transportation within the Province
nursing- and
boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants.
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home
by fire or similar circumstances	
Tuberculosis cases—
(a) Boarding-, nursing-, and private-home care	
(6) Transportation-
(c) Comforts allowance..
Hospitalization of social assistance cases (short stay, etc.)..
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts	
$25,756,670
3,521,102
16,137
174,687
568
3,627
6,727
$29,479,518
$25,840,129
3,7718,829
15,256
1711,051
402
2,837
11,326
$29,819,830
$29,683,919
4,154,468
14,530
151,566
524
171
14,899
$34,020,077
Municipal share of costs	
Reimbursement from other Provinces-
Federal-Provincial cost sharing	
$3,444,981
152,532
15,764,256
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 37
REHABILITATION
The Department continually endeavours to increase its capacity for providing
rehabilitative services and in its programme compares very favourably with welfare
programmes in other parts of Canada. It is difficult to show statistics for this since
it usually cannot be conclusively shown how a recipient of assistance has been able
to return to employment. One indication is in the number of cases closed each
month. In the fiscal year this averaged 5,573 cases monthly. The basic medium for
provision of this service is through the skills and knowledge of the social workers
who assess the individual situation and provide appropriate counselling and supporting services. This may include consultations with other agencies or referral of
the individual to other resources, particularly those of an educational or employment
placement nature. For disabled persons a number of rehabilitation committees are
functioning. Here individual problems can be assessed in an inter-disciplinary way
and a plan worked out on the basis of the pooling of the knowledge and skills available from Health, Welfare, National Employment Service, educational, and other
agencies. As a result of referral for educational upgrading and vocational education,
approximately 579 Social Allowance recipients received academic upgrading or
vocational training.
Hostels for single transients have continued to provide a valuable service in
Prince George and Dawson Creek. Through this medium 2,971 transient men were
enabled to settle and obtain employment after a stay in hostel averaging seven days.
It should be recognized that for the majority of recipients of assistance, placement in employment is not a feasible objective. This includes mothers who must
care for small children, many persons just short of pension age, children in the care
of relatives, and many persons disabled physically and mentally or by serious character problems that preclude employment. An important part of the social worker's
skill is in assessing those who can be helped for appropriate helping service. The
social worker's success is dependent on the availability of opportunities for unemployed persons. This includes opportunities for education and training as well as
opportunities for employment. The importance of this is evident when it is considered that the average attainment of single recipients of assistance is approximately
Grade VIII. There are still, however, a number of people for whom placement is
difficult because of gaps in resources. One such special group are the adults who
have dropped out of school earlier and have applied to the Department for assistance
that would enable them to return to Adult Day Centres for high school completion.
It would appear assistance to enable this would be an advantage to them and to the
community and might well prevent future public dependency. The native Indian
presents a special problem. Because of limited educational attainments and cultural
reasons, he is particularly handicapped in competing for employment. This problem
is likely to grow as increasing numbers leave the reserve in search of opportunity.
PREVENTIVE SERVICES
The importance of prevention is very apparent in welfare programmes because
so many of the human problems that social workers are called upon to help have
developed over many years to the point that their resolution is difficult and often
virtually impossible. These services are difficult to provide for in planning, because
help for less serious but developing problems must compete with the service needs
of more severe immediate problems. Since the impoverished family is peculiarly
susceptible to problem development, it is an important part of the social worker's
function to try to be aware of what is happening to families on assistance so that
 H 38 SOCIAL WELFARE
appropriate helping services can be provided. Because of the complexity and
severity of the problems commonly encountered, this demands a maximum of staff
skills, knowledge, and insight. It is estimated over half of the serious social problems that come to the attention of the Department are found amongst social-
assistance recipients. Many, although by no means all, of the families involved have
a number of serious problems. Almost two-thirds of the families have only one
parent at home, usually because of separation, desertion, or divorce. Nearly one-
third of all recipients are children. Because it is found that children whose parents
have had to be dependent on assistance are peculiarly vulnerable to future public
dependency as adults, it is important to allocate some time in services to helping
these children, particularly in encouraging their continued education. The importance of preventing school drop-out is apparent when it is noted that the majority
of applicants for assistance are handicapped by limited educational attainments.
Because of concern about the growing number of one-parent families, a
project has been undertaken in one large welfare office to attempt to determine more
accurately the reasons for family breakdowns, the effect on family members, and
what can be done to help these situations.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
During the year 22 Boards of Review were held, and of these 16 were in favour
of the applicant.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 39
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
T. D. Bingham, Superintendent
J. V. Belknap, Deputy Superintendent
Social welfare services to the families and children of our Province continue to
expand and diversify. As reported last year, communities are rallying to provide
a range of services to strengthen family life and to support and sustain the family
that is faltering. Our communities have come to recognize that unless help is quickly
available for a disturbed family, the entire neighbourhood and community suffers.
The realization of the deleterious effect family breakdown has upon individuals
and the community at large, coupled with the responsible concern of the community,
holds out great promise that root causes of social problems may yet be uncovered
with methods and services developed that can diminish and prevent tragedy occurring. The contagious effect of social breakdown is becoming more clearly evident.
A family that is in turmoil because of marital discord or faulty parent-child relationship can, through the behaviour of its members, bring disharmony and tragedy to
the entire neighbourhood as well as to itself.
A disturbed child may disrupt an entire school classroom even to the point of
nullifying much of the teacher's attempt to enrich the learning experience of the
remainder of the class. A bully on the street terrifies young children and immediately the households in that area are tense and anxious. Thus affected families are
quick to support services designed to prevent the social problems of one family
adversely affecting the whole community.
The recognition that good family and child welfare services universally affects
the well-being of the entire community has led to increasing demands on social
workers to assist at a point when prevention of further breakdown is possible.
Related to this has been requests from communities for social workers to work
more closely with educators and health personnel to concentrate on programmes to
strengthen family life rather than concentrate on caring for the family members
after the family has disintegrated.
Social workers, while always concerned with the community at large, have
possibly concentrated too much of their time on work with individual families rather
than assisting the community to develop services benefiting all its members. The
shift to community participation, while still under way, is resulting in communities
and families solving their own problems rather than tending to let someone else be
responsible. The results will slowly become apparent in a better standard of
well-being of the total community. However, there will continue to be need for
intensive service to some families within our communities.
SERVICES TO FAMILIES
(D. W. Mack, Consultant)
Family Service
One of the most challenging tasks is to provide family casework services to a
family in serious conflict for the purpose of strengthening the family unit to the point
where it can cope with its own difficulties.
The Department is continuing to increase its family service capacity. Over
5,000 families {see Table I), in addition to those receiving financial assistance, were
counselled by the Department during the year.
 H 40 SOCIAL WELFARE
As previously mentioned, increasing attention is being given to community
development of locally administered programmes, such as homemaker and day-care
services. Announcements of increases in support for these programmes reflect the
desire existing in local neighbourhoods to assist one's neighbourhood in need.
Leadership and support by the local social workers is moving this community
helping action from a dream to a reality.
Protection Service
The most demanding job in the entire range of child welfare services provided
by social workers is that provided by the protection worker. To serve a family that
is so badly disorganized that it abuses, deserts, or neglects its own children, requires
the widest range of skill and judgment. To work with that family, if necessary,
through a Court case which results in removing guardianship from the parents and
to continue to work with those parents toward the time when the child can safely be
returned home, places a most exacting responsibility on a social worker.
It is distressing to note that protective services for children are more necessary
today than ever before. The need appears to be increasing much faster than the rate
of population growth.
Two of the leading social problems which often have accompanying need for
protective services continue to increase in incidence. These are desertion (or abandonment) of children and the need for conflicted parents themselves to be rehabilitated prior to reassuming responsibility for their children {see Table IX).
In preparing programmes to cope with this increase one must be mindful of
examining those social, health, housing, and vocational pressures which bear on
families and design services that prevent such inexorable conflict that parents abandon their fundamental obligation of child care.
Unmarried Parents Services
The increasing incidence of out-of-wedlock births {see Table XV) continues
to be the most significant single phenomenon which faces all those concerned with
child welfare services. The percentage increase (5.9 per cent) was less than the
previous year (12.5 per cent). While the rate of increase was not as great, there is
every indication that the number of children born out of wedlock will continue while
the total births decline.
Social workers constantly help provide individual and community understanding in coping with the heartbreaking tragedy a family faces when one of its members
is responsible for bringing a child into the world without the benefit of a secure
marriage and full capacity for child nurturing. From this experience the social-work
profession sees the need for increasing the opportunities for adults and young people
alike for family-life education. It is hoped that more communities will sponsor
family-life educational opportunities. The curriculum for family-life education, it
is hoped would include, at least, information in the following areas:—
(i) Understanding of growth and development of personality,
(ii) Information regarding child care and nurturing.
(iii) Preparation for marriage and parenthood, including sex education.
(iv) Examination of the serious problems that occur in families such as death,
serious illness, divorce, desertion, and unwanted children.
Social workers also are seeing the need for facilities where unmarried mothers
who are able and wish to care for their children may do so in suitable surroundings.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 41
SERVICES TO CHILDREN IN CARE
(Mrs. A. Allen and Mrs. I. Preddy, Consultants)
Eleven thousand four hundred and thirty-seven children, an increase of 1,007
over the previous year, were cared for during the year by the three children's aid
societies and the Department {see Table III). At March 31, 1966, 7,689 children
were in care, a net increase of 432 over the previous year.
Foster Homes
Most children who must be cared for away from their own homes are capably
provided for by substitute parents. Foster parents often have a difficult but usually
a most rewarding experience in providing a home for a child. The indefinite time
period that a child may need fostering adds to the complexity. In spite of these
difficulties the people who offer their homes are invariably blessed with that extra
ability to love, which makes the foster-home placement a rich and rewarding
experience for the child.
Foster Parents' Associations
Realizing the need to learn from one another, foster parents have themselves
decided to form associations where they can meet and become more knowledgeable
in their work. Associations have begun in a number of communities. All who have
seen the results agree that this development will undoubtedly spread throughout
the Province.
Recognizing the wish of foster parents to increase their knowledge of child
behaviour, a beginning was made on providing a group of foster parents with an
intensive three-day training course with one of British Columbia's leading child
psychiatrists as leader.
As the year ended plans were being developed for an extension of foster-parent
training with a conference for representative foster parents from throughout the
Province.
J.E.F.F. (Joint Effort for Fostering)
The week of October 24 to October 30, 1965, was proclaimed as J.E.F.F.
week. This was a combined approach by the Department and children's aid societies
to recruit homes for children.
With the outstanding co-operation of the news media, volunteers, and the
J.E.F.F. committee, over 1,000 homes were offered for the placement of children.
Many municipalities and community groups assisted in the recruitment campaign.
The resultant publicity resulted in a better understanding of the needs of children
who may require adoption or foster-home placement.
Special Placement Resources
Steady increase in special-placement resources for children is noted. Treatment centres were available for 100 children by the year's end, an increase of 22
{see Table XII). The child welfare programme can well be proud of the carefully
prepared programmes for disturbed children. While there will continue to be different approaches to caring for disturbed children, social work directed programmes
have made important contribution to the knowledge of how children with profound
disturbances may best be helped.
The New Denver Youth Centre opened in November, 1965. This centre is
designed to care for boys 13 to 15 who cannot be contained in foster homes but who
 H 42 SOCIAL WELFARE
do not require treatment centre services. Emphasis is on remedial education with
retraining in social controls and behaviour. When fully operative the centre will
provide a much-needed placement for some 36 children who without such help
would in all probability be involved in delinquent activities.
Maintenance Costs
Costs for caring for children are rising, both due to the increasing numbers of
children and the increased costs of caring for children outside of their home. The
development of more treatment facilities for the increasing number of profoundly
disturbed children has also added to the increase in costs.
The gross expenditure for children increased by $1,041,378 during the year to
$6,598,084. However, due to more efficient policies of collection of maintenance
payments from parents and agencies, the net cost to the Province increased by much
less, namely $401,411.
ADOPTION SERVICES
(Mrs. L. Fowler, Consultant, Adoption Placement)
(Miss M. Evans, Consultant, Adoption Completion)
Adoption Placement
Again a record number of adoption placements were made during this year.
The previous year had seen an active recruitment drive with a slogan " one thousand
homes needed." This was exceeded with the placement by all agencies of a total
of 1,394, up 163 from the previous year {see Table XVI).
Because of careful planning by social workers and outstanding co-operation by
the medical profession and hospitals, approximately one-third of the adopting
couples had the thrill of taking their chosen child directly home from hospital.
Children with Special Needs
There is a continuing need for families who can share their life with a child
of interracial origin, a child with a severe health defect, or a family group of three
or four children who usually have had most unhappy life experiences. Many
families each year do respond to this challenge.
Permanent Foster Home with Eventual Adoption
To assist families who wish to open their hearts and home, a new programme
has been commenced. Children who are free to be adopted are placed on a permanent foster-home basis with the eventual plan that of adoption. Through this
programme, financial maintenance can be continued for those families who have
much to offer a child but cannot, in fairness to all, comfortably provide without
continuing financial help. It is hoped that through the permanent foster-home
programme more families might be encouraged to widen their circle of love to
include another child.
Adoption Court Orders
An adoption order by the Supreme Court creates a new family with the adopted
child becoming in law " as though born " to the adopting parents.
Many step-parents choose adoption to provide that children of the new family
unit are fully participating family members.   To assist the families and the Supreme
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 43
Court, social workers explain the implications of adoption and prepare recommendation for the Court as required by the Adoption Act.
Through this service 2,180 adoption orders were made during the year, an
increase of 414 over the previous year {see Table XXIII).
CONCLUSION
The experience of recent years indicates that the services of health, education,
and welfare will need increasingly to understand their inevitable interdependence
and communicate more effectively. The failure of any part of one programme
limits the effectiveness of the other. Preparation for family life will have to occupy
the attention of all concerned. As man learns to more successfully understand his
outer environment, it becomes obvious that he also needs to be better prepared to
live within the inner environment of family and community.
The desire to improve the capacity of the family and child welfare programme
to achieve its goals has been obviously evident throughout the entire Department.
Special appreciation is extended to the members of the Senior Administration of the
Department, the Field Service staff, and Divisional persons. Other agencies, departments, professions, and interested citizens have co-operated to the fullest on behalf
of children and families it has been our privilege to serve.
 H 44 SOCIAL WELFARE
STATISTICAL TABLES
List of Tables
Table I.—Family Service Cases.
Table II.—Services Related to Protection of Children.
Table III.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies.
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, Regions, and Societies.
Table V.—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table VI.—Children in Care by Age-groups.
Table VII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care.
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care by Legal Status.
Table IX.—Reasons for New Admissions to Care.
Table X.—Number of Children Discharged from the Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status.
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care.
Table XII.—Children Receiving Institutional Care.
Table XIII.—Maintenance Costs.
Table XIV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XV.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia.
Table XVI.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XVII.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption.
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, Homes in Which
Placement Made, and Homes Closed.
Table XIX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare by Type of Placement and by Regions.
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies by Religion of Adopting Parents.
Table XXI.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Origin Other than White Placed
for Adoption.
Table XXIII.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 45
Table I.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance
from Department of Social Welfare) Served by the Department of Social
Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1965/66.
Total at
Total at
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Beginning
Opened
Closed
End of
of Month
Month
Year
1,846
272
257
1,861
1,838
1,861
320
282
1,899
1,872
1,899
269
267
1,901
11,859
1,901
329
334
1,896
1,83!
11,896
248
263
1,881
,      1,783
1,881
265
344
1,802
1,730
1,802
330
340
1,792
1,792
1,792
267
215
1,844
1,797
1,844
228
201
,      1,871
1,797
11,871
316
283
1,904
1,877
1,904
254
287
1,871
1,858
1,871
300
260
1,911
1,846
April, 1965	
May, 1955	
June, 1965	
July, 1965	
August, 1965	
September, 1965-
October, 1965	
November, 1965..
December, 1965_
January, 1966	
February, 1966.—
March, 1966	
Table II.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children, by Type of Service,
for the Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66.
Type of Service
Opened during
Year
Carried during
Year
Incomplete at
End of Year
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
1964/65
1965/66
Custody 	
74
260
65
11
101
300
86
7
124
283
134
316
33
16
26
3
41
42
88
17
112
10
45
Legitimation	
4
Totals
410
494
512         1         572
78
132
i Cases are the number of family units receiving service on behalf of their children.
2 Children's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table III.—Number of Children in Care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
and the Children's Aid Societies during and at the End of the Fiscal Year 1965/66
During At Mar. 31,
1965/66 1966
Superintendent of Child Welfare  6,961 4,744
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  2,358 1,616
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver   1,327 862
Victoria Children's Aid Society      791 467
  4,476   2,945
Totals
11,437
7,689
 H 46
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care1 of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
and of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, by Regions, and by Societies
as at March 31,1966.
P.CA.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Provinces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Other
Agency
Non-
wards,
Wards,
and
Before
Court
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare
Region I	
Region II	
Region III  	
Region IV	
Region V	
Region VI  _
Region VII	
Region VIII-
S.C.W. and agency wards supervised by another
Province  	
Total children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
Children in care	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver
Children in care  	
Victoria Children's Aid Society
Children in care	
Total children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and three
Children's Aid Societies	
511
659
642
277
427
535
305
148
113
3,617
1,238
712
212
5,779
52
80
29
17
17
42
252
29
54
19
354
60
24
22
29
19
28
5
7
202
23
10
48
283
5
20
22
5
5
18
2
5
61
62
107
39
35
89
14
25
31
29
20
8
13
28
13
3
13
720
874
842
375
516
740
347
195
135
98
433
212
48
109
158       4,744
106
35
74
802
373
1,616
862
467
7,689
1 " In care " is defined as the actual number of children being cared for by the agency regardless of which
agency has legal responsibility for the child.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 47
Table V.—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status,
by Regions, and by Societies, as at March 31, 1966.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
the
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Provinces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare
Region I.....
Region II—
Region Ill-
Region IV-
Region V~
Region VI 	
Region VII	
Region VIII _ _.  	
S.C.W. children under other agency supervision.
S.C.W. wards supervised by another Province	
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare    — _	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
Vancouver C.A.S. children in own care	
Vancouver C.A.S. children in S.C.W. or other agency
care*        	
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Vancouver Children's Aid
Society  	
Catholic Children's Aid Society
Vancouver C.C.A.S. children in own care	
Vancouver C.C.A.S. children in S.C.W. or other agency
carei	
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver  	
Victoria Children's Aid Society
Victoria C.A.S. children in own care	
Victoria C.A.S. children in S.C.W. or other-agency carei
Total number  of children who  are the  legal
responsibility of Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies—
511
659
642
277
427
535
305
148
155
126
3,785
1,238
65
1,303
712
83
795
212
31
243
6,126
52
80
29
17
17
42
8
7
1
253
29
29
54
1
55
19
1
20
357
60
24
22
29
19
28
5
7
17
5
20
22
5
5
18
2
5
19
219
101
23
2
25
10
10
48
56
61
62
107
39
35
89
14
25
29
1
462
212
5
217
48
48
109
4
113
840
689
845
822
367
503
712
334
192
221
135
4,820
1,502
72
1,574
824
84
908
388
44
432
7,734
1 The Children's Aid Societies children in another Province are included in section " (Vancouver, Catholic,
and Victoria) Children's Aid Societies children in Superintendent of Child Welfare or other agency care."
There are a total of 13 of these children (see Table IV).
2 The total number of children for whom each agency has legal responsibility should be equal to the
number of children in care. However, in the process of amalgamating the.reports of the Children's Aid Societies
and Superintendent of Child Welfare it has not been possible to achieve complete statistical accuracy.
 H 48
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table VI.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's
Aid Societies by Age-group at March 31, 1966
Age-group
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Under 3 years...
3— 5 years	
6-11    „	
12-15   „    .	
16-17    „    	
18-20   „	
912
600
1,249
973
536
474
Totals-
467
194
297
268
226
164
227
117
219
129
83
87
1
4,744
1,616
.862
76
41
115
95
72
68
467
1,682
952
1,880
1,465
917
793
7,689
Table VII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care as at March 31, 1966
Type of Care
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
3,518
242
250
339
325
70
1,227
88
31
78
169
23
649
48
20
54
86
5
289
31
33
20
92
2
5,683
409
Free home and free relatives (or parents') home
334
491
672
AW OX
100
Totals         -	
4.744        1     1.616        1        862
467
7,689
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the Fiscal Year
1965/66.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act—
Committed under Juvenile Delinquents Act	
1,437
86
730
61
251
11
423
222
3
164
94
20
206
1
2,004
120
1,523
61
Total of new admissions	
Transfer of supervision —             	
2,314
211
685
174
389
43
320                3,708
44        |           472
Total of new admissions and transfers....
2,525
859
432
364                4,180
1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 49
Table IX.—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to the Care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1965/661
Reason
Physical abuse	
Parental neglect	
Desertion or abandonment	
Emotional disturbances, needing treatment
One parent deceased	
Sole parent deceased	
Parental illness, mental	
Parental illness, physical .....
Awaiting adoption placement	
Removed from adoption placement
Awaiting permanent plan	
Rehabilitation plan for parents	
Physical handicap	
Mental retardation	
Delinquent behaviour (J.D.A. only)
Transient	
Unmarried mother	
Parental failure to provide needed medical treatment or prevention
Parent or parents imprisoned	
Inability of family to provide needed education and training	
Requested by other Province	
Transfer of guardianship __
Change of legal status.
Number of
Children
21
364
267
50
31
20
109
155
369
6
111
224
5
31
79
136
49
21
53
72
60
80
Request by other agency ..
1
Total new admissions	
Transfer of supervision from other agencies
2,314
211
Total new admissions and transfers  2,525
i This table is not entirely comparable with previous years' tables as changes have been made in defining
reasons for admissions.
Table X.—Number of Children Discharged from the Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during Fiscal
Year 1965/66.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Protection of Children Act wards	
722
56
347
224
fi20
220
4
32
7
303
213
2
76
2
111
30
4
59
189
1,185
66
514
233
1,223
Other Provinces' wards	
25
25
Total direct discharges from
1,994
223
566
17fi
404
fi1
282
42
3,246
502
Total direct discharges and
transfers.
2,217
742          I         465
I
1
324         |       3,748
1
 H 50
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1965/66
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Wards
Twenty-one years of age-
Married (female)	
Deceased	
Committal order rescinded—
Guardianship transferred	
Returned to other Province-
Adoption order granted	
Sub-totals	
Before the Court (Protection of Children Act)
Withdrawn from Court	
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (6) and (4)_
Deceased	
Adoption order granted-
Married (female) ~
Apprehended but not presented-
Sub-totals	
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age-
Married (female)	
Deceased	
To parents or relations-
Placed for adoption	
Change in legal status—
Other	
Sub-to tals_
106
49
8
223
12
23
380
801
227
117
II
5
224
574
■1
503
115
619
47
17
6
25
54
75
25
7
3
38
5
135
224 213
31
1
75
1
2
39
78
203
100
112
1
Total direct discharges-
Transfer of supervision	
1,994
223
303
~566~
176
_113_
"404-
61
Total of direct discharges and transfers-
2,217
742
465
15
:l
34
22
37
59
3
131
48
1
6
189
282
42
324
185
77
17
301
72
23
597
1,272
355
154
2
6
233
750
4
949
264
1
6
1,224
3,246
502
3,748
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 51
Table XII.—Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at
March 31,1966.
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Health Institutions
General hospitals	
23
4
1
39
9
6
1
30
4
13
5
1
5
38
4
2
1
Woodlands and Tranquille Schools and other mental
87
Other                                           -    	
9
Totals	
76
37
17
"
141
Educational Institutions
4
6
59
4
1
6
1
1
1
3
7
13
62
Other
4
Totals
73
7
2
4
86
Residential Institutions
11
6
2
2
147
10
7
5
11
1
38
9
6
2
2
1
29
2
1
2
5
2
1
22
2
24
5
21
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A.                           _               	
4
4
1
Own agency group and receiving homes	
236
14
Other
17
Totals               ...        .           	
185
64
43
34
326
Treatment Centres
14
16
12
5
18
5
14
1
2
1
11
1
21
31
23
6
Other
19
Totals
65
20
2
13
100
Correctional Institutions
28
27
50
1
1
5
5
8
4
1
1
3
2
5
2
1
9
4
8
45
Willingdon School for Girls
City and Provincial gaols and related correctional institutions
38
71
7
7
Other.	
2
Totals
107
24
13
26
170
506
152
77
88
8231
l The total of this table should agree with the total for institutional care in Table VII. However, in the
process of amalgamating the reports of the Children's Aid Societies and Superintendent of Child Welfare, it has
not been possible to achieve complete statistical accuracy.
 H 52
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XIII.—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes	
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Children's Aid Societies	
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent 	
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent	
Grants to sundry homes	
Gross expenditure	
Less collections	
$3,056,355
3,430,088
44,258
66,283
1,100
$6,598,084
1,791,996
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts— $4,806,088
Table XIV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1965/66
Number at
Beginning
of Fiscal
Year
Number
Opened
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Served
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Closed
during
Fiscal Year
Number
at End of
Fiscal Year
611
576
109
131
1,284
914
292
200
1,895
1,490
401
331
1,250
791
280
167
645
Vancouver Children's Aid Society            „  —
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver
699
121
164
Totals
1,427
2,690
4,117
2,488
1,629
Table XV.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia by
Age-group of Mother during Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
Age-group of Mother
Fiscal Year
Under 15
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40 Years
and Over
Total
10fi4/fiS
23
34
47.8
1,222
1,282
4.9
1,120
1,293
15.4
516
533
3.3
513
457
—10.9
73
71
—2.7
3,467
19fi5/fifi
3,670
Percentage increase or decrease
5.9
Table XVI.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Years 1964/65 and 1965/66
1964/65 1965/66
Regions   810               989
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  251 240
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver—    86 73
Victoria Children's Aid Society     84 92
     421           405
Totals  1,231 1,394
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 53
Table XVII.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare and Children,'s Aid Societies during Fiscal Year 1965/66
Department of
Social
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouvei
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
94
57
117
20
iiir
33'
6
3
8
5
5
6
125
76
164
Totals
268
64
17
16
365
i Children over 1 year of age who are of interracial origin and origin other than white or have a health problem have been shown in either of these two categories and are not shown in the category "over 1 year of age."
 H 54
SOCIAL WELFARE
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Sub-total
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 55
Table XIX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Type of Placement for
Fiscal Year 1965/66.
Region
Type of Placement
Direct Placement
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation*
Foster Home to Adoption
Within
Same Home
In Another Home
6 Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probationi
Total
II_
IIL
rv_
V....
VI..
vn_
VIIL.
56
119
51
28
15
73
21
13
Outside Province..
Sub-totals-
18
19
9
5
12
7
5
3
123
137
63
40
35
61
33
17
12
Vancouver Children's Aid Society	
Catholic   Children's   Aid   Society,
Vancouver-
Victoria Children's Aid Society-
Grand totals	
376
159
61
42
638
78
32
12
14
521
45
36
14
1
136
602
15
200
280
125
74
62
142
60
34
12
989
240
73
92
1,394
l These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies by Religion of Adopting
Parents for the Fiscal Year 1965/66.
Religion
Region
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Hebrew
Sikh
Buddhist
Total
T
164
953
36
95
~2
~2
—
1
200
TT
280
III	
101       1         23
125
TV
56
50
132
49
31
9
18
11
10
11
3
1
74
V   .    .                                                      ....
62
VI
142
VIT
60
VIII
34
12
845
237
78
1     138
1
73
14
5
1
~\
1
989
Vancouver Children's Aid Society 	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver	
Victoria Children's Aid Society        	
240
73
92
1,160
226
6
1
1
1,394
 H 56
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XXI.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the Fiscal Year 1965/66
Ages
Number of Children
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Regions I
to VIII
Outside
Province
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Birth up to but not including 15 days	
15 days up to but not including 1 month	
1 month up to but not including 3 months	
3 months up to but not including 6 months-
6 months up to but not including 1 year	
1 year	
2 years	
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
19
14
15
16
17
18
19
Totals-
332
«9
139
115
120
95
27
22
8
9
5
5
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
I
977
9«
13
31
22
33
18
15
1
3
1
3
1
12
240
7
9
26
10
8
2
2
1
2
3
1
1
2
36
20
14
12
3
1
1
2
73
92
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 57
Table XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid
Societies According to Sex of the Child and Religion of the Adopting Parents
during the Fiscal Year 1965/66.
Sex of Child
Religion of Adopting Parents
Male
Female
Total
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Sikh
Buddhist
Total
Department of Social Welfare
22
2
5
4
~l
3
1
34
2
4
3
2
36
4
9
7
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
2
1
39
4
8
5
1
1
1
8
1
2
1
17
1
2
1
1
—
1
56
4
Chinese and white	
9
7
Native Indian and East Indian	
1
1
Arabic and white	
1
1
Native Indian
9
1
Japanese
1
1
38
56
94
71
22
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
1
I
1
1
3
8
2
2
1
1
9
3
3
2
3
1
9
3
3
2
2
1
	
1
_..
9
3
3
2
3
1
Sub-totals
7
14
21
20
1
—
21
Catholic Children's Aid Society,
Vancouver
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
--
3
2
1
—
-
3
2
1
Sub-totals	
3
3
6
....      |          6      |      ....
	
6
Victoria Children's Aid Society
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
—
-
2
1
1
       |      ..
1
3
2
5
5
5
51
75
126
96
28
1
il
.126
 H 58
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XXIII.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by
Regions and Children's Aid Societies, during the Fiscal Year 1965/66
Region and Society
Type of Placement
Agency
Relative
Stepparent
Other
Private
Total
I	
II._
HI..
IV	
V	
VI	
VII....
VIII...
Sub-totals..
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver-
Victoria Children's Aid Society  	
Sub-totals  	
Grand totals .
177
306
128
93
55
142
56
52
1,009
290
90
106
486
1,495
41
129
60
25
31
82
17
14
2
5
10
18
4
9
2
3
6
5
4
9
4
6
1
4
87
46
14
15
6
2
147
23
546
56
24  |
225
463
201
123
97
237
S3
71
59  | 1,500
17 409
6 148
1  |  123
680
83
2,180
—
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 59
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.D., Director
During 1965/66 the number of persons eligible for health services remained
almost unchanged from the previous year. A major change was effected in the
drug programme, and improvements in the administration of several phases of the
Division's responsibilities were made.
As will be seen from Table II there has been some reduction on expenditures
for drugs, which is the largest single item in the budget of the Division. The drug
programme involves payment for drugs supplied to individual welfare clients through
retail pharmacies and the provision of drugs from the Provincial Pharmacy to nursing homes, and certain government institutions.
It will be noted in the last Annual Report that the Drug Advisory Committee
had been working on a revised method to facilitate the provision of necessary drugs
to eligible welfare patients.
On October 1, 1965, a new drug-benefit list and increased use of data processing came into effect. Experience with the plan to date has demonstrated few
difficulties in administration. Data are being collected to make possible an accurate
assessment of all aspects of the programme.
With advances in medicine and changes in methods of distribution of pharmaceuticals, any programme for the provision of drugs must be constantly under review
to provide the best service possible at a reasonable cost. The Drug Advisory Committee of practising physicians, university staff, and representatives of the medical
and pharmaceutical associations continues to be active. When sufficient data are
available the effectiveness of the present programme will be analysed.
Following successful experience in the compilation of statisics on the dental
programme through data processing, it was decided to extend the use of data processing to include the payment of dental accounts. Starting early in 1966/67 all
accounts will be paid by machine, except those at present processed directly by
either the municipalities or the B.C. Dental Association. This should prove more
efficient.
Discussions have been held with the Dental Association regarding a revision
in the fee schedule for services toi welfare recipients. As a result it is expected that
a new schedule will be in effect early in the new fiscal year. In addition to the basic
care it is planned to outline more specifically in the new fee schedule the special
dental care that may be provided with prior approval.
An increasing sum of money is being spent each year for transportation for
medical reasons and consideration is being given to the factors influencing this
increase. A large part of the cost is for ambulances within the local area, and there
have been increased charges for this service in some districts.
With the development of a greater variety of chronic care facilities in the Province there may be an increased demand for transportation to provide the most suitable type of care for each patient. Consideration is being given to this problem in
relation to the Department of Social Welfare.
The Division of Medical Services wishes to thank the professional associations
in the health field for their co-operation, without which it would be impossible to
provide an effective health programme. The co-operation of other Government
departments, voluntary agencies, and staff in all sections of the Department of Social
Welfare is also very much appreciated.
 H 60
SOCIAL WELFARE
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table I.—Gross Costs for Fiscal Years 1961/62 to 1965/66
Year
Medical
Drugs l
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1961/62..
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66-
$2,085,017
1,919,185
2,015,598
1,970,136
1,985,970
$1,758,768
1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
2,148,641
$548,974
513,762
534,820
588,500
590,074
$95,768
92,192
104,671
104,057
113,337
$99,311
108,482
116,709
133,268
144,757
$33,176
39,165
35,698
34,986
40,510
$4,621,014
4,610,292
4,964,944
5,035,070
5,023,289
i Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table II.—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Other
Total
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66...
$2,072,721
1,912,970
2,009,854
1,965,208
1,979,597
$12,296
6,215
5,744
4,928
6,363
$2,085,017
1,919,185
2,015,598
1,970,136
1,985,970
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with Average
Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1961/62-
1962/63...
1963/64-
1964/65..
1965/66-
36,097
32,527
34,388
35,016
36,219
4,462
4,813
5,359
5,953
6,558
34,282
30,152
28,522
26,347
25,010
6,899
6,746
6,259
5,863
5,582
2,123
2,155
2,214
2,215
2,276
83,863
76,393
76,742
75,394
75,645
Table IV.—Drug Costs
Fiscal Year
Number of Prescriptions
Provincial
Pharmacy!
Drugstores
Total
Cost of Medicines
Provincial
Pharmacy 2
Drugstores
Total
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64..
1964/65-
1965/66..
31,969
25,436
21,055
19,665
18,972
649,746 | 681,715
696,364 | 721,800
689,038 1 710,093
703,071 | 722,736
619,845 | 638,817
$153,451
171,143
190,911
226,291
274,239
$1,605,317
1,766,363
1,966,537
1,977,832
1,874,402
$1,758,768
1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
2,148,641
i The number of prescriptions shown for the Provincial Pharmacy covers only the number supplied to individual patients and those drugs which, by law, are required to be numbered. The bulk of the volume goes to
nursing homes and are not counted in the number of prescriptions.
2 The cost of drugs for the Provincial Pharmacy includes all costs with the exception of the cost of those
supplied to certain Provincial Government institutions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66       H 61
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
1961/62                     	
$227,033
229,099
264,977
310,009
$74,340
64,317
64,120
61,700
$247,601
220,346
205,723
216,791
$548,974
1962/63	
1963/64         	
513,762
534,820
1964/65      .           .                 	
588,500
Fiscal Year
Examinations,
Prophylaxis,
Miscellaneous
Surgery
Restorations
Dentures
and
Repairs
Total
1965/66      	
$64,209
$49,652
1
$237,004
$239,209
$590,074
Starting in 1965/66 newer statistical reporting has resulted in more detailed
information on dental costs. This detailed information cannot be given for the years
prior to 1965/66.
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1961/62..
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65..
1965/66-
$19,496
19,362
20,803
20,268
24,384
$76,272
72,830
83,868
83,789
88,953
$95,768
92,192
104,671
104,057
113,337
 H 62 SOCIAL WELFARE
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES BOARD
E. W. Berry, Chairman
GENERAL
The Provincial authority for the administration of the Old-age Assistance Act,
the Blind Persons Act, and the Disabled Persons Act is a Board within the Department of Social Welfare consisting of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council. Besides the Chairman, present members are Mr. J. A. Sadler
and Mr. H. E. Blanchard.
In addition to being charged with the administration in British Columbia of
the above three Acts, including the consideration of applications for and the payment
of assistance or an allowance, the Board is the central agency for the processing of
all applications within the Province for Supplementary Social Allowance and related
health services, and grants these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
Social workers attached to the Board complete applications in the home where
necessary and otherwise at the Board office for those clients living in the City of
Vancouver who wish to apply for the categorical allowances and for Supplementary
Social Allowance. Welfare workers from the Board also make annual visits within
the city and throughout the Province, where feasible, mainly in connection with the
Supplementary Social Allowance programme.
The lowering of the age of eligibility for Old Age Security was felt for the first
time during the fiscal year. On January 1, 1966, approximately 1,550 Old-age
Assistance recipients were transferred to Old Age Security on reaching 69 years
of age. Normally these cases would not have been transferred until reaching 70
years of age.
During the fiscal year the report of the Special Committee of the Senate on
Aging was released and the Canadian Conference on Aging was held in Toronto.
Both these events will have far-reaching effects on the efforts to meet the needs of
the increasing number of persons over 65 years of age in our society.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 63
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 H 64 SOCIAL WELFARE
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1966
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  2,298
Reapplications      168
Applications granted    2,079x
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)      400
i Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not of age  79 19.8
Unable to prove age  5 1.3
Not sufficient residence  7 1.3
Income in excess  89 22.3
Transfer of property  5 1.3
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance  10 2.5
Information refused  48 12.0
Applications withdrawn  91 22.8
Applicants died before grant  23 5.8
Whereabouts unknown   21 5.3
Over 70 years of age (to December 31, 1965) ) 10 2.5
Over 69 years of age (from January 1, 1966) \
Assistance from private sources  2 0.5
Receiving Old Age Security  5 1.3
Miscellaneous   5 1.3
Totals   400 100.0
Table HI.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male   1,053 50.3
Female  1,042 49.7
Totals   2,095 100.0
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married       842 40.2
Single       361 17.2
Widowed      525 25.1
Separated      292 13.9
Divorced        75 3.6
Totals   2,095 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66       H 65
Table V.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Men                Women             Number Per Cent
Age 65  722             698          1,420 67.8
Age 66  146             162             308 14.7
Age 67     87               97             184 8.8
Age 68     63               51             114 5.4
Age 69 (toDecember 31,1965)    35               34               69 3.3
100.0
Totals
2,095
Table VI.—Forms by Which Age Proven
Men                Women             Number Per Cent
Birth certificates       625             690          1,315 62.8
Baptismal records      128             122             250 11.9
Census records alone       20                8              28 1.3
Tribunal           8                 3               11 0.5
Other records       272             219             491 23.4
100.0
Totals 	
1,053
1,042
2,095
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia
Other parts of Canada
Men
  129
  252
United States of America     91
British Isles   163
Other parts of British Commonwealth       3
Other foreign countries  415
Totals
Women
140
274
112
248
5
263
Number
269
526
203
411
8
678
2,095
Per Cent
12.8
25.1
9.7
19.6
0.4
32.4
100.0
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Men Women Number Per Cent
In own home      383 468 851 40.6
In children's home        43 151 194 9.3
In home of other relatives        30 36 66 3.2
In rented house      165 123 288 13.7
In rented suite        68 113 181 8.6
In housekeeping room      186 97 283 13.5
In single room (eating out)        88 8 96 4.6
Boarding        38 14 52 2.5
In public institutions        41 25 66 3.2
In private institutions        11 7 18 0.9
Totals
1,053
1,042
2,095
100.0
 H 66
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Men                Women             Number Per Cent
Living alone  447             358             805 38.4
Living with spouse  376             366             742 35.4
Living with spouse and children    61               39             100 4.8
Living with children     27             163             190 9.1
Living with other relatives     33               56               89 4.2
Living with others  109               60             169 8.1
100.0
Totals
2,095
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding personal property with cash value—
Men Women
$0   574 376
$1 to $250  250 313
$251 to $500     78 144
$501 to $750     41 54
$751 to $1,000     29 35
$1,001 to $1,500     32 43
$1,501 to $2,000     14 26
$2,001 and up     35 51
Totals 	
(b) Holding real property with assessed value—
$0   681 542
$1 to $250  13 10
$251 to $500  19 13
$501 to $750  30 21
$751 to $1,000  31 41
$1,001 to $1,500  63 58
$1,501 to $2,000.  74 95
$2,000 and up  142 262
Totals 	
Number
Per Cent
950
45.3
563
26.9
222
10.6
95
4.5
64
3.1
75
3.6
40
1.9
86
4.1
2,095
100.0
1,223
58.4
23
1.1
32
1.5
51
2.4
72
3.4
121
5.8
169
8.1
404
19.3
2,095
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 67
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31, 1966,
Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta   23
Saskatchewan      9
Manitoba      9
Ontario   10
Quebec     2
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia     1
Yukon Territory	
Prince Edward Island
Newfoundland 	
Total  54
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $75)
Amount of Assistance Per Cent
$75   85.8
$70 to $74.99  2.4
$65 to $69.99  -  2.2
$60 to $64.99   1.8
$55 to $59.99   1.2
$50 to $54.99   1.3
$45 to $49.99  1.1
$40 to $44.99  0.8
$35 to $39.99  0.6
$30 to $34.99  0.8
$25 to $29.99  0.6
$20 to $24.99  0.5
Less than $19.99  1.0
Total  100.0
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65	
Age 66	
Age 67	
Age 68	
Age 69 (to December 31, 1965)
Totals 	
27
11.9
44
19.5
38
16.8
60
26.5
57
25.2
26
100.0
 H 68 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia  27
Reinstated  268
Suspended  430
Deaths   226
Transferred to other Provinces  70
Transferred to Old Age Security  3,009
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  5,302
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  100
Transferred to British Columbia  6
Reinstated  2
Suspended  8
Deaths   2
Transferred out of British Columbia  11
Transferred to Old Age Security  95
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  5,478
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  42
Reapplications   10
Applications granted  3 6
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  18
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not blind within the meaning of the Act     9 39.1
Income in excess     2 8.7
Applications withdrawn     3 13.0
Died before grant     2 8.7
War Veterans' Allowance  	
Information refused     2 8.7
Whereabouts unknown  	
Other      5 21.7
Totals   23 100.0
Table HI.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male   19 52.8
Female  17 47.2
Totals        36 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66       H 69
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married
Number
16
... 13
Per Cent
44.4
Single  	
36.1
Widowed 	
...    2
5.6
Separated  	
3
...    2
8.3
Divorced    	
5.6
... 36
Totals 	
100.0
-Ages at Granting of Allow an
Men         Women
     6            2
ce
Number
8
1
1
1
1
4
2
8
5
5
Table V-X
Ages 18 to 19	
Per Cent
22.2
Ages 20 to 24	
     1
2.8
Ages 25 to 29	
     1
2.8
Ages 30 to 34 	
Ages 35 to 39	
     1
2.8
Ages 40 to 44	
     1
2.8
Ages 45 to 49	
_   ....         3            1
11.1
Ages 50 to 54	
             2
5.6
Ages 55 to 59	
.         3            5
22.2
Ages 60 to 64  	
....    1            4
13.9
Ages 65 to 69	
     2            3
13.9
Totals 	
36
100.0
—Forms by Which Age Provt
Men         Women
      15            9
Table VI,
Birth certificates	
Number
24
1
11
36
its
Number
19
6
5
2
4
36
Per Cent
66.7
Baptismal records	
Census records alone	
Tribunal 	
Other records	
             1
     4            7
2.8
30.6
  19          17
Totals	
100.0
—Birthplace of New Recipiei
Men         Women
  10            9
Table VII.
British Columbia	
Per Cent
52.8
Other parts of Canada	
     3            3
16.7
United States of America .
     2            3
13.9
British Isles 	
     2
5.6
Other parts of British Commonwealth	
Other foreien countries     2           2
11.1
  19          17
Totals 	
100.0
 H 70 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Men Women       Number Per Cent
In own home     6 8 14 38.9
In children's home	
In parents' home     4
In home of other relatives     2
In rented house     1
In rented suite	
In housekeeping room     1
In single room (eating out)      2
Boarding     1
In public institutions      1
In private institutions     1
Totals  19
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Men Women Number Per Cent
Living alone     4 2 6 16.7
Living with spouse     3 10 13 36.1
Living with spouse and children     3   3 8.3
Living with children  1 1 2.8
Living with parents     5 2 7 19.4
Living with other relatives     1 1 2 5.6
Living with others     3 1 4 11.1
2
6
16.7
1
3
8.3
3
4
11.1
1
1
2.8
2
3
8.3
_
2
5.6
1
2.8
_
1
2.8
-
1
36
2.8
7
100.0
Totals   19 17 36 100.0
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
{a) Holding personal property of value—
Men         Women       Number Per Cent
$0   10            6          16 44.4
$1 to $250     3            3            6 16.7
$251 to $500     3            3            6 16.7
$501 to $750             2            2 5.6
$751 to $1,000     112 5.6
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000             1            1 2.8
$2,001 and up    2           13 8.3
Totals  19          17          36 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 71
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
(b) Holding real property of value—
Men Women       Number Per Cent
$0   13 9 22 61.1
$1 to $250  ____ --           	
$251 to $500  .... --           	
$501 to $750     112 5.6
$751 to $1,000  1 1 2.8
$1,001 to $1,500     2 .... 2 5.6
$1,501 to $2,000  1 1 2.8
$2,001 and up     3 5 8 22.2
Totals   19 17 36 100.0
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31, 1966,
Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta   6
Saskatchewan  2
Manitoba ._  1
Ontario   2
New Brunswick  1
Total  12
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$75   93.0
$70 to $74  1.5
$65 to $69.99 .___  .2
$60 to $64.99   1.9
$55 to $59.99   .2
$50 to $54.99  .6
$45 to $49.99  .4
$40 to $44.99  .2
$35 to $39.99 .„  .4
$30 to $34.99       	
$25 to $29.99  .8
$20 to $24.99  .2
$19.99 and less  .8
100.0
 H 72 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 29         1 5.6
Ages 30 to 39          2 11.1
Ages 40 to 49      	
Ages 50 to 59          6 33.3
Ages 60 to 69          9 50.0
Totals        18 100.0
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended  25
Reinstated  13
Transferred to other Provinces  6
Returned to British Columbia  2
Transferred to Old Age Security    32
Deaths  17
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  7
Retransferred to British Columbia  2
Reinstated  2
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  1
Deaths   1
Transfers to Old Age Security    1
Suspended  3
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  487
Other Province     45
  532
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applicants
New applications received  319
Reapplications     74
Applications granted  217 x
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  240
i Includes some left over from previous year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 73
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not 18 years of age	
Too much income	
Refused information	
Whereabouts unknown	
Unable to meet medical test
Mental hospital	
Hospital
Nursing home	
Application withdrawn	
Died before grant	
Not sufficient residence	
War Veterans' Allowance	
Allowance under Blind Persons' Allowances Act
Receiving Old Age Security	
Referred for rehabilitation	
Institutions 	
Number
16
14
183
7
2
2
11
4
1
Totals       240
Per Cent
6.7
5.8
76.3
2.9
0.8
0.8
4.6
1.7
0.4
100.0
Table HI.—Sex of New Recipients
Male
Number
      126
Per Cent
57.5
Female
Totals _   	
        93
42.5
      219
100.0
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married          .   - 	
Number
        35
Per Cent
16.0
Single .                         	
      160
73.1
Widowed          _ 	
        11
5.0
Separated  	
          6
2.7
Divorced       	
          7
3.2
Totals    .     	
_       219
100.0
 H 74
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table V.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Men
Ages 18 to 19  38
Ages 20 to 24  11
Ages 25 to 29  8
Ages 30 to 34  6
Ages 35 to 39  10
Ages 40 to 44  7
Ages 45 to 49  5
Ages 50 to 54  12
Ages 55 to 59  11
Ages 60 to 64  14
Ages 65 to 69  4
Totals 	
Women
Number
Per Cent
34
72
32.9
13
24
11.0
8
16
7.3
6
12
5.5
7
17
7.8
1
8
3.7
4
9
4.1
7
19
8.7
5
16
7.3
7
21
9.6
1
5
2.3
219
100.0
Table VI.—Forms by Which Age Proven
Men Women
Birth certificates   110 82
Baptismal records  6 2
Census records alone  1 1
Tribunal   1
Other records  8 8
Totals 	
Number
Per Cent
192
87.7
8
3.7
2
0.9
1
0.5
16
7.3
219
100.0
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men Women Number Per Cent
British Columbia     63 51 114 52.1
Other parts of Canada     43 27 70 32.0
United States of America       3 4 7 3.2
British Isles        5 7 12 5.5
Other parts of British Commonwealth       	
Other foreign countries     12 4 16 7.3
Totals
219
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 75
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Men Women Number Per Cent
In own house     17            6            23 10.5
In children's home       2            3              5 2.3
In parents'home     58          53          111 50.7
In home of other relatives     11            7            18 8.2
In rented house     10            3            13 5.9
In rented suite     10           7           17 7.8
In housekeeping room       3                         3 1.4
In single room (eating out)        2                         2 0.9
In boarding home       6            6            12 5.5
In private institutions       6            8            14 6.4
In public institutions       1                         1 0.5
Totals   219 100.0
Table IX.—With Whom Recipients Live
Men          Women Number Per Cent
Living alone       7            3 10 4.6
Living with spouse     24            5 29 13.2
Living with spouse and children       6          ____              6 2.7
Living with children       2            6              8 3.7
Living with parents     60          53 113 51.6
Living with other relatives     12          10 22 10.0
Living with others -      15          16 31 14.2
Totals   219 100.0
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding personal property of value—
Men          Women         Number Per Cent
$0   79    68    147 67.1
$1 to $250  24    15    39 17.8
$251 to $500   9    2    11 5.0
$501 to $750   4    1     5 2.3
$751 to $1,000   4    2     6 2.7
$1,001 to $1,500   1    ....     1 0.5
$1,501 to $2,000     1     1 0.5
$2,001 and up   5    4     9 4.1
Totals   219 100.0
 H 76 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
(b) Holding real property of value—
Men          Women Number Per Cent
$0   109    87 196 89.5
$1 to $250   1    __.. 1 0.5
$251 to $500   1    .- 1 0.5
$501 to $750     1 1 0.5
$751 to $1,000   1     1 2 0.9
$1,001 to $1,500   2    2 4 1.8
$1,501 to $2,000   4   _.. 4 1.8
$2,001 and up   8    2 10 4.6
Totals   219 100.0
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1966, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta      8
Saskatchewan      8
Manitoba      7
Ontario   15
Quebec      3
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia  1
Yukon   1
Northwest Territories  1
Total  44
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Per Cent
$75  94.4
$70 to $74.99  1.4
$65 to $69.99  0.8
$60 to $64.99  0.6
$55 to $59.99  0.7
$50 to $54.99  0.3
$45 to $49.99  0.6
$40 to $44.99  0.3
$35 to $39.99  0.1
$30 to $34.99  0.1
$25 to $29.99  0.1
$20 to $24.99  0.2
$19.99 and less  0.4
Total  100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 77
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19  	
Ages 20 to 24     4 6.9
Ages 25 to 29         	
Ages 30 to 34     4 6.9
Ages 35 to 39     3 5.2
Ages 40 to 44     4 6.9
Ages 45 to 49     5 8.6
Ages 50 to 54     5 8.6
Ages 55 to 59     8 13.8
Ages 60 to 64  15 25.9
Ages 65 to 69  10 17.2
Totals   58 100.0
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   197
Reinstated   122
Transferred to other Provinces  15
Returned to British Columbia  8
Transferred to Old Age Security  50
Deaths   56
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended   7
New transfers to British Columbia  24
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  5
Reinstated  4
Deaths   1
Transferred to Old Age Security  2
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  2,228
Other Province      157
  2,385
 H 78 SOCIAL WELFARE
Table XV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases  7 3.2
Neoplasms   2 0.9
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases  1 0.5
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs      	
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  104 47.5
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  57 26.0
Disease of the circulatory system  8 3.7
Diseases of the respiratory system  6 2.7
Diseases of the digestive system      	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system .
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues      	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement  12 5.5
Congenital malformations  6 2.7
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions  1 0.5
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury).. 15 6.8
Totals       219 100.0
General Information re Old Age Security Category
Disposition of Applications
New applications received  773
Reapplications received  215
Applications granted  724
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, dead, etc.)  3841
1 Does not include pending cases.
Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance
as at March 31, 1966
British Columbia cases  22,767
Other-Province cases        504
Total  23,271
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66       H 79
Annual Investigations Completed in Calendar Year 1965
(All Categories by Regions as at December 31, 1965)
Total
Region Cases
I    5,353
II   14,788
III  3,535
IV  2,317
V   927
VI  4,549
VII   615
VIII  350
Number
Percentage
Reported
Reported
4,055
75.8
13,676
92.5
3,318
93.9
2,120
91.5
733
79.1
4,091
89.9
550
89.4
246
70.3
Totals   32,434 28,789
Recipients in institutions were:  Total cases, 273; number reported, 261; percentage reported, 95.60.
Field-service Reports Completed by the Welfare Officers of the Board Office
by Regions
Region I     2,294
Region II  10,329
Region III     1,464
Region IV ....     1,185
Region V 	
Region VI     2,593
Region VII	
Region VIII	
Total  17,865
Completed by field offices  10,924
Total completed  28,789
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of government and many outside agencies.
 H 80
SOCIAL WELFARE
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
The following table shows the statistics for the fiscal years  1956/57 to
1965/66:—
Fiscal Year
v©
ov
00
—
ov
ov
in
\
00
in
OV
o
VO
Ov
ov
vo
©
vo
ov
vo
vo
ov
VO
*-*
cs
VO
o\
VO
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vo
*>*
■vt
vo
OV
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129
1
152
2
3
164
1
27
162
5
175
1
49
313
85
398
21.4
387
3
1
188
3
1
173
4
3
1
190
1
1
193
1
1
188
2
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st
Number in Riverview Hospital, April
1st     	
4
1
Number in Woodlands School, April
1st   -  -
Number on extended leave, April 1st—
17
1
14
Number on special leave, April 1st	
34
284
82
366
22.4
342
43
1
250
94
344
27.3
366
4
3
33
60
357
103
460
22.4
410
1
1
Number on parole, April 1st      ...
Number on provisional release, April
1st           -	
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
14
107
362
123
485
25.4
329
2
263
275
129
404
31.9
424
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
240
52
292
17.8
283
5
307
103
410
25.1
372
1
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
Number on extended leave, March 31st
Number on Special leave, March 31st...
27
34
49
43
33
60
1
190
185
67,392
5.5
80
107
Number on provisional release, March
31st....: ~-	
263
4
1
188
176
64,196
4.5
108
261
Number on parole, March 31st	
1
188
181
65,927
5.1
77
1
173
185
67,473
5.7
62
Number in Riverview Hospital, March
31st	
	
1
175
173
63,233
5.8
61
1
1
175
149
54,379
4.31
782
Number in Woodlands School, March
31st  	
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
164
152
55,516
6
122
162
159
58,079
6
105
193
181
66,006
5.3
117
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year—
1 There were a number of boys who were in the School for less than two months and some less than
a month. These were returned home for various reasons and their stay in the School does affect the average
stay of all boys.
2 Involving 53 boys.
During the fiscal year there were 275 admissions and 129 recidivists, making
a total of 404 admitted to the School. There was a 31.9 percentage rate of
recidivism. Twenty-five of the recidivists were committed for the third time and
eight for the fourth time. Of the boys admitted, 273 were Protestant, 130 Roman
Catholic, and one of other religion. Fifty-one of the total number of boys admitted
during the year were of native Indian status.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 81
Range of Age upon Admission
Age in Years Number of Boys Age in Years
10 years   1      14 years	
11 „    1      15 „ ....
12 „   16      16 „ ....
13 „   37      17 „ ....
Average age on admission was 15.0 years.
Number of Boys
.____ 83
.___. Ill
  102
..... 53
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Provincial Probation Branch	
Department of Social Welfare	
Vancouver Probation Service	
Family and Children's Court, Victoria	
Family and Children's Court, Cloverdale
Children's Aid Society	
Number
of Boys
    186
  60
  66
  37
  9
  17
Catholic Children's Aid Society  5
Family and Children's Service  7
Indian Department  15
Provincial Probation Branch and Department of Social Welfare  1
Individual   1
Of this number 45 were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, 13 of
the Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, 5 of the Catholic Children's Aid Society,
8 of the Family and Children's Service of Victoria, and one of the Province of
Manitoba.
Four hundred and four boys were committed from the following Family and
Children's Courts:—
Agassiz                  	
Number
of Boys
..     ....      1
Fernie 	
Number
of Boys
     6
Alberni	
Alert Bay
2
     3
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John	
2
     3
Alexis Creek     	
     5
Ganges	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
     1
Armstrong	
Atlin
2
1
     1
1
     4
Bella Bella	
Haney 	
Hazelton 	
Hope	
Invermere 	
Kamloops    .
Kelowna	
Keremeos  	
     3
Bella Coola	
     3
     1
Burnaby	
Campbell River	
Cassiar	
Castlegar	
Chase
14
3
2
1
1
1
7
2
1
__    6
     3
     2
Chemainus	
Chilliwack
Kitimat	
Ladner 	
3
     3
Clearwater
2
10
5
8
1
     3
Lake Cowichan
       2
Cloverdale
Langley	
Lower Post     	
     5
Coquitlam	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook
     1
Matsqui	
Merritt	
_    3
     3
Dawson Creek 	
Mission 	
Nanaimo 	
Nelson	
     3
Duncan ., 	
     1
  20
Enderby	
     4
     3
 H 82 SOCIAL WELFARE
Number Number
of Boys of Boys
New Westminster  2 Rossland  1
North Vancouver  24 Saanichton   1
Ocean Falls  1 Salmon Arm  3
100 Mile House  3 Sechelt  2
Oliver  1 Smithers  4
Pemberton   4 Squamish  2
Port Alberni  2 Stewart  1
Port Coquitlam  1 Sumas   2
Port Edward  1 Terrace   6
Port Moody  2 Trail  6
Powell River  2 Vancouver  82
Prince George  11 Vanderhoof   1
Prince Rupert  12 Vernon  2
Qualicum Beach  1 Victoria  42
Quesnel   7 West Vancouver  1
Richmond   9 Williams Lake  3
Of the 404 boys committed to the School during the year, 301 were committed for offences against property, 13 against persons, and 90 for other offences
which included incorrigibility. There were 424 boys released from the School
during the year. The average length of stay of boys in the School was 4.3 months.
When considering the average length of stay of boys in our School, it must be taken
into account that there were a number of boys who were in the School for less than
two months and some less than a month. These boys were returned home for
various reasons and their stay in the School does affect the average stay of all boys.
Fifty-three boys accounted for 78 A.W.O.L.s. The difference in the figures is due
to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two or more times during
the year.
Medical and Dental Treatment
Four hundred and sixteen boys were physically examined on admission to the
School and 164 received dental care; 424 boys were tuberculin-tested and 36 were
positive, but X-rays proved negative.
In early spring of 1966 there was an epidemic of influenza. Approximately 90
boys were stricken.   Fortunately there were no serious physical complications.
In addition to the usual large number of boys treated for minor ailments, the
School hospital dealt with 696 patient-days and the Nanaimo Regional Hospital
with 113 patient-days.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 83
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1965/66
Salaries  $332,391
Office expense  2,623
Travelling expense  215
Office furniture and equipment  803
Heat, light, power, and water  27,106
Medical and dental services  12,625
Clothing and uniforms  8,662
Provisions and catering  55,545
Laundry and dry-goods  11,106
Equipment and machinery  1,860
Medical supplies  1,764
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  6,319
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,913
Transportation  4,802
Incidentals and contingencies  2,930
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  1,392
Training programme expense  3,422
$475,478
Less—
Board      $2,226
Rentals       2,943
Sundry   201
         5,370
$470,108
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31, 1966  $18,615
Inventory at March 31, 1965     20,806
         2,191
$472,299
Add—
Public Works expenditure  $61,860
Less rental credit  912
       60,948
$533,247
Per capita cost per diem:  $533,247-r-54,379=$9.81.
 H 84 SOCIAL WELFARE
RECONCILIATION
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $454,133
Add—
Maintenance receipts     $2,703
Salary adjustment     13,272
Decrease in inventory       2,191
Public Works expenditure  $61,860
Less rental credit  912
     60,948
79,114
$533,247
The purpose of Brannan Lake School is to attempt by various means to
rehabilitate those boys who have failed in the community despite the persistent
efforts to help them within the community. In a changing society we must always
be prepared to adapt to changing circumstances. New difficulties, new discoveries,
make us think of new methods. Here at Brannan Lake School we as a staff are
always trying to find ways of improving our treatment programme. We do not
profess to have all the answers to the many individual and complex problems of
human behaviour. It can be said that there is no such problem as delinquency, only
a variety of delinquents. Our statistics show that during the fiscal year there were
592 individual boys worked with in this School.
As in previous years we have continued to enjoy the closest co-operation and
help from the various church and service-club groups in Nanaimo, also civic authorities, Provincial Probation Branch, Vancouver Probation Service, various civic police
forces and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I wish to thank clergymen, service
clubs, civic officials, members of both the Federal and Provincial departments of
government, private agencies, and School staff members who have assisted in the
rehabilitation of boys. Their assistance has been appreciated by the school
administration.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 85
WILLINGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
Miss Winifred Urquhart, Superintendent
The following statistical table shows no significant change in population movement over the previous year. While there is a slight decrease in new admissions
there is also a slight increase in the average length of stay, so that we have operated
practically at capacity throughout the year.
Fiscal Year
IT)
OO
"ft
1
2v
Ov
00
Ov
8
o
*
CM
VO
n
m
VO
<3
vo
Ov
S
<*>
vo
Ov
Ov
8
m
vo
Ov
47
12
60
11
71
15.5
55
13
62
13
59
7
66
10.6
75
7
58
7
4
66
15
81
1'8.5
72
9
66
9
91
5
9
8H
13
94
13.8
100
in
77
111
82
11
87
■1/7
88
18
97
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
14
Number elsewhere, other institutions,
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
13
1(119
15
134
10.4
79
14
3
3
Number on provisional release, April
1st
3
%
10
106
9.4
79
5
22
94
7
101
6.9
99
17
1
12
102
15
117
12.8
IIS
19
12
88'
86.7
91,7135
10.8
:186
55
100
15
Total number of admissions	
115
13.0
125
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
11
Number elsewhere, other institutions,
March "Vst
1
4
58
51.6
IS ,'851
12.4
187
9
91
76.5
28,010
10.4
147
1.1
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
Number on provisional release, March
Alst
3
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
22
812
73.4
26,783
11.4
2113
12
87
80.0
29,216
12.5
195
55
97
89.1
32,524
9.2
164
51
62
46 .a
16,871
11:1.6
1'8?
92
82.0
29,9213
Average length of stay (months)	
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year	
10.5
130
Provisional release continues to be an effective part of treatment. During this
year 135 provisional releases were granted. This figure includes more than one trial
period for some girls who have been returned to the institution either for a further
period of training or as a disciplinary measure or to protect them from another breakdown. A return period may be lengthy or as short as a few days, depending on circumstances. It is difficult to present exact figures due to the carry-over on provisional
release from the previous year; however, our records show only four recommitted
by Court while on provisional release and approximately 20 returned during this
particular year for a further term.
The number of committals of native girls dropped back to 0.25 as against 44
per cent the previous year.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
12 years
13 „
14 „
Number
of Girls
Age
Number
of Girls
20
15 years   32
16 „      35
17 „      17
 H 86
SOCIAL WELFARE
Charges were as follows:—
Unmanageable	
Broken probation
60
16
Infractions of Government Liquor Act     12
Theft	
Breaking and entering	
Possession of stolen goods	
Infractions of Motor-vehicle Act
Truancy from school	
Sexual immorality
Vagrancy—prostitution
Assault	
Forgery
Unlawfully escaping custody
Property damage	
False pretences	
11
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
115
The 115 girls were committed from the following Courts:—
Number
of Girls
Number
of Girls
Alberni	
    1
New Westminster	
    1
Bella Coola	
    1
North Vancouver	
  2
Burnaby	
  2
Oak Bay	
  1
Burns Lake	
  1
Penticton	
  1
Chilliwack	
  2
Port Coquitlam and
Coquit-
Cranbrook 	
  2
lam	
  4
Dawson Creek  	
  4
Prince George	
  3
Duncan 	
  1
Prince Rupert	
  5
Fort Nelson	
  1
Quesnel 	
  2
Fort St. James	
  2
Richmond 	
  1
Fort St. John	
  2
Rossland 	
  1
Grand Forks  	
  1
Salmon Arm	
  1
Hazelton	
  1
  1
Smithers	
Squamish 	
  3
Hope	
  1
Kamloops 	
  2
Sumas 	
  1
Kitimat	
  2
Terrace   	
  2
Langley	
  1
Trail	
  3
Masset" 	
  4
3
Vancouver 	
 27
Matsqui	
Merritt 	
Vanderhoof	
  2
  1
Vernon	
  3
Nanaimo 	
  6
Victoria	
  7
Nelson	
  2
Williams Lake	
  1
These tables do not appear to show any significant trends beyond the average.
One cottage supervisor and the sewing instructress retired, one cottage supervisor had to resign for health reasons, another resigned for personal reasons. The
office secretary also resigned to go travelling. The Chief Supervisor was on educational leave from January to April.   All were replaced.
I am pleased to record a high degree of individual devotion on the part of most
staff to the task of rehabilitation of our girls. There are a few who give of their
own time and energy to taking girls on outings, seeing and carrying on correspon-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66       H 87
dence with those who are back home, and in many small ways extending the friendly
interest so needed by the child who has suffered much by rejection earlier.
Our social workers go far beyond the line of duty in an effort to meet with
parents who can only visit in the evenings or week-ends, and it is not unusual for
them to make 5-a.m. trips to the airport to get girls off home. An institution of
the in-between size, such as Willingdon School, does not permit staffing to cover all
needs, and therefore throws a heavy burden on some, nor is it always possible to
compensate in full everyone for extra services. Working together as a team has
brought about lessening of tensions and a more comfortable atmosphere for all.
I am pleased to report increased activity on the part of the Mental Health Clinic
team in our programme with the development of a therapy group within the school,
more family counselling when possible, and an increase in individual assessments
brought about by these developments.
In September we welcomed another group of six master's degree student social
workers from the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, and their
supervisor, who were with us until mid-April. These enthusiastic young people
have time to spend with the girls and to experiment with groups and they do much
to stimulate the regular staff.
Our staff nurse and Dr. T. C. MacKenzie of the Cambie Clinic continue to take
care of our girls' medical needs and there have been no major illnesses during this
year.
Our volunteer friends continue to work with us and do much to improve the
girls' outlook spiritually and socially.
Every effort was made to provide a full programme for each girl, including
instruction, recreation, and free-time activities, and most girls take little persuasion
to actively join in the full all-round life of the school. It is always encouraging to
see tension and hostility disappear as the girl becomes absorbed in the group and an
active participant in healthy activities. Perhaps the most exciting event of the year
took place July 9th when the girls and staff had as their guests for a chuckwagon
luncheon over 160 delegates to the Western Regional Correctional Education Association Conference. The girls mingled freely with the delegates serving lunch and
eating with the guests and acting as guides throughout the institution.
On another occasion the girls served tea to the members of the Elizabeth Fry
Society at their semi-annual meeting held at our school. On both occasions they
would have been a credit to any establishment.
The Elizabeth Fry Society is to be congratulated on the opening of their new
group-living home for girls this year; an event they have worked toward for a number of year and which fills a long felt need in the community.
An ever-increasing number of groups have requested and been given tours of
the institution or asked for a speaker at their meetings. These requests come from
educational and church groups and have value in providing an informed and sympathetic public. However, it has placed a heavy burden on the Superintendent, and
if these groups are to continue in ever-increasing numbers, another plan will be necessary to provide this service.
I take this opportunity to express my appreciation to all who have co-operated
with us during the year in carrying out our programme, also to senior administration
for their support and encouragement, and to all the members of my staff who have
given much of themselves and their time to our girls.
 H 88 SOCIAL WELFARE
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1965/66
Salaries   $234,031
Office expense  2,503
Travelling expense  2,034
Heat, light, power, and water  23,987
Medical and dental services  3,164
Clothing and uniforms  5,985
Provisions and catering  37,026
Laundry and dry-goods  352
Good Conduct Fund  1,597
Equipment and machinery  1,163
Medical supplies  1,981
Maintenance of buildings and grounds 1  3,351
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,517
Transportation  3,035
Vocational and recreational supplies  2,838
Less—
Board    $2,232
Rentals      2,160
$325,564
4,392
$321,172
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory, March 31, 1965  $8,971
Inventory, March 31, 1966  10,946
         1,975
$319,197
Add Public Works expenditure       35,731
$354,928
Per capita cost per diem: $354,928-=-29,923=$11.86.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $305,840
Add—
Maintenance receipts  $4,400
Salary adjustment  10,932
Public Works expenditure  35,731
       51,063
$356,903
Less increase in inventory         1,975
$354,928
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 89
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
The following is the Annual Report of the Provincial Home for the Aged and
Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1966.
The aged are a growing proportion of Canada's population, about 7.5 per cent;
and will be, on the average, older than they have been in the past. They will require
various kinds of living accommodation and related services. Our operation cares
for aged and infirm men, total capacity 150.
Illness is much more prevalent among the aged than among any other age-
group. Illness is also more prolonged among the aged. The average amount of
patients seen by the attending doctor on his weekly visit is 31, plus an average of
7 additional visits a month, plus an average of 17 office visits by patients. Patients
received 849 days in the City Hospital, 55 X-rays of various kinds, 14 electrograms,
132 laboratory tests, 8 consultations, and 20 operations. The patients received 20
eye examinations resulting in 17 receiving glasses. A urologist treated 13 patients
with one having a major operation. Dental services supplied include 13 patients
for extractions, 6 receiving dentures, plus denture repairs. The services of a psychiatrist were also used. Physiotherapy in the Home is valuable and the men in need
of this treatment readily avail themselves. New equipment added to this department
are 4 rubber-foam mats for the exercise tables, a shoulder wheel with height adjustment, and a set of exercise springs. The daily bed-patient average was 24 or 19
per cent of the inmate total. The Irving Clinic provided adequate and efficient
medical and surgical service.
To improve the appearance and comfort of the Home is a continual project.
This year the dining-room was redecorated and new linoleum laid. The main lower
hallways floors also received linoleum. Fire temperature devices have been installed
in strategic locations along with an electrical battery-charger for the fire-alarm
system.
New equipment purchased within the past year include a deep-freeze, a suitable mat for the main entrance, a bus 'n tote cart with matching bins, television
lamps, and 4 exercise bars with trapeze for use in the sick ward.
Unlimited leisure time presents a problem for many elderly people, particularly
in an institution. Various programmes have been developed to meet this problem.
Movies, small games, bingo, television, gardening, bus rides, plus many activities
in the city. Religious services are conducted by most denominations on certain days
each week. Some residents are employed for a nominal fee and used in and about
the Home.
The Provincial Home Cemetery is now very well kept, being fully fenced and
in lawn, with beautiful flower beds, trees, shrubs, and a large cross planted in flowers.
Consideration is being given for the cross to be lit up at night. There were 33 deaths
during the year with 22 burials in our cemetery. The other 11 were buried in the
following locations: Five in the City of Kamloops Cemetery, two in the Chinese
Cemetery, Kamloops, one in the Field of Honour, Kamloops, one in Little Fort, one
in Merritt, and one in Salmon Arm.
It is our desire to maintain the level of function already present and improve it.
We feel that time and energy for the betterment of the resident is not wasted, as we
wish them to enjoy old age.
I wish to express the Home's appreciation to all who have assisted in its work
during the past year.
 H 90 SOCIAL WELFARE
INMATE-DAYS
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1965  133
Inmates admitted during the year  55
Inmates discharged  22
Inmates deceased i  33
188
55
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1966  133
Total number of inmate-days 47,689
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1965/66
Salaries   $129,469
Office expense  657
Travelling expense  145
Medical services  10,047
Clothing and uniforms  707
Provisions and catering  37,192
Laundry and dry-goods  6,443
Equipment and machinery  733
Medical supplies  6,404
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,241
Maintenance and operation of equipment  722
Transportation  330
Burials   3,450
Incidentals and contingencies  3,152
$200,692
Less—
Board  $393
Rentals   300
  693
$199,999
Add Public Works expenditure         9,800
$209,799
Per capita cost per diem: $209,799-^47,689=$4.40.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $104,682.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 91
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $30,138
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $104,682
Municipalities          3,465
Transfers from Provincial Home Trust
Account         9,712
Miscellaneous revenue         2,012
Receipts from  Government of  Canada
under the Unemployment Assistance
Agreement        48,915
Salary adjustments         9,156
  $177,942
$208,080
Add Public Works expenditure         9,800
$217,880
Add proportion of excess of receipts over disbursements
for Tranquille Farm  395
$218,275
Less pensioners' comforts         8,476
$209,799
 H 92 SOCIAL WELFARE
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act
for the year 1965. As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this
report covers the period from January 1, 1965, to December 31, 1965.
LICENCES
A total of 1,016 licences was issued during the year, of which 863 were renewals and 153 were new licences. Of the licensed institutions, 94 were either closed
or changed ownership, requiring new licensing. There were 258 new applications,
and 173 pending applications were closed.
Case load at December 31, 1965, totalled 1,225, of which 922 were licensed
institutions and 303 were files pending. It is noted that in the past year total case
load has increased 13 per cent and 49.5 per cent in the past five years.
BOARD MEETINGS
Thirteen regular Board meetings and one special meeting were held during the
year. Mr. Frank Levirs, a member of the Board since March, 1955, found it necessary to resign in October because of pressure of work in his own Department. Mr.
J. Phillipson was appointed to the Board in November as representative of the
Department of Education.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
There were 10 institutions licensed for the full-time care of children as of
December 31, 1964, one of which was closed during the year. Two institutions give
boarding-home care only, the remaining seven giving specialized services.
Number of institutions licensed in 1965  9
Number of children cared for        348
Total days' care  60,3 59
Private Boarding Homes
There were 15 licensed boarding homes for children as of December 31, 1964.
During the year two new licences were issued and five files were closed, leaving 12
licensed homes as of December 31, 1965.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1965  16
Number of children cared for  71
Total days' care  11,916
B. Day Care of Children
Family Day Care
There was a great increase in the number of family day care homes during the
year. As of December 31, 1964, there were 32 licensed homes and 34 pending
applications. Thirty new licences were issued during the year, and nine files were
closed, leaving a total of 53 licensed homes as of December 31, 1965.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 93
There were also 83 new and pending applications during the year, 63 of which
were closed either by licence being approved or because they were found to be
unsatisfactory.
Number of family day care homes licensed in 1965  62
Number of children cared for        547
Total days' care  33,667
Group Day Care
During 1965 there was an increase in the number of groups giving full day
care to children, and a number of kindergartens changed their operation from half-
day to full-day care. The most apparent reason for such an increase is the increase
over the years of the number of women working in industry.
For this reason, what was formerly listed as foster day care, has been broken
down into the two categories of family day care and group day care.
Number of day care groups licensed in 1965  12
Number of children cared for        580
Total days' care  59,398
Kindergartens, Play-schools, Etc.
Privately operated and co-operative kindergartens continue to increase in
numbers.
The committee on standards, which was set up by the Superintendent of Child
Welfare in 1964, brought in its report early in the year, and these have been accepted
by the Welfare Institutions Board as standards of day care for kindergartens, group
day care, and family day care homes.
Number of kindergartens licensed in 1965  343
Number of children registered        18,224
Total days' care  1,571,328
Schools for Retarded Children
A total of 29 licences for schools for retarded children was issued during the
year, several schools which were carried forward from 1964 being closed early in
1965. Two new licences were issued and five schools closed, leaving a balance of
27 as of December 31, 1965.
There was one application pending at December 31, 1965.
Number of schools licensed in 1965         29
Number of children registered        514
Total days' care  66,111
MATERNITY HOMES
There was no change in the status or programme of the three licensed maternity
homes.
Number of homes licensed in 1965  3
Number of mothers cared for        438
Total days' care  27,084
AGED-CARE
Proprietary Institutions
A total of 327 proprietary institutions was licensed during the year, with a total
of 313 being carried forward as of December 31, 1965.
 H 94 SOCIAL WELFARE
The numbers of new licences and new applications have both dropped considerably from the last few years, and it would appear that particularly in the Lower
Mainland, we have almost reached the saturation point. Operators are continually
telephoning to advise that they have vacant beds, and to ask about a revision of
boarding-home rates.
Number of proprietary institutions licensed in 1965  327
Number of persons cared for  5,062
Total days' care  1,055,647
Non-profit Institutions
A total of 39 non-profit institutions was licensed during the year.
Number of non-profit institutions licensed in 1965  39
Number of persons cared for      2,557
Total days' care  641,285
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
Three new licences were issued during the year, and one licence was cancelled.
There were also four new applications pending.
Number of hostels licensed during 1965  9
Capacity         246
Number of persons cared for     3,431
Total days' care  53,465
ADULT DISABLED PERSONS
Fifteen licences were issued during the year, a further increase in the number
of persons caring for the mentally disabled person. There were 12 new applications
and six pending files were closed.
Number of homes licensed in 1965  15
Capacity          95
Number of persons cared for        111
Total days' care  28,769
SUMMER CAMPS
During this past season the Department of Health Services took over the supervision of summer camps on a trial basis, and the experiment appears to have worked
out very well.
Camps operated by church groups and voluntary organizations still form the
bulk of those licensed, but there is an increasing number of privately operated camps,
particularly of the children's dude ranch type of operation.
Number of camps licensed in 1965  99
Number of children attending     35,626
Number of attendance days  299,484
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 95
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
1962
1963
1964
1965
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions	
Boarding homes.-
Capacity—
Institutions	
Boarding homes_
Number of children under care—
Institutions	
Boarding homes-
Number of days' care
Institutions	
Boarding homes-
Summer Camps
Number licensed..
Capacity-
Number of persons attending-
Number of attendance days	
9
20
239
60
265
63
60,178
13,764
83
6,324
26,897
351,298
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care	
Group day care	
Capacity—
Kindergartens.-
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care	
Group day care-
Number of children enrolled-
Kindergartens_
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care	
Group day care-
Number of attendance days—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care .	
Group day care	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Proprietary institutions—
Number licensed	
Capacity...
Number of persons cared for..
Number of days' care	
Non-profit institutions—
Number licensed	
Capacity-
291
28
32
8,383
618
98
14,226
516
157
1,215,154
65,216
14,898
288
4,294
5,860
1,246,891
Number of persons cared for..
Number of days' care	
Adults—Employable
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care	
Women—Maternity
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
Infants	
Number of days' care..
6
171
5,95®
32,867
3
•125
489
13
29,013
9
19
250
60
306
55
65,657
10,664
93
6,856
29,106
236,768
311
30
33
1,919
661
103
15,720
610
192
1,349,595
81,576
15,529
325
4,843
6,776
1,481,205
6
169
16,349
46,201
3
81
433
26,049
9
17
250
61
33'8
66
62,022
14,086
94
7,093
29,8211
285,614
324
31
32
9,639
727
139
17,769
708
364
1,597,324
83,881
37,752
321
3,516
5,012
965,344
38
1,980
2,584
757,2213
7
214
5,579
40,337
3
87
471
28,710
9
16
250
65
348
71
60,359
11,916
99
7,696
35,626
299,484
343
29
62
12
12,126
691
167
3H7
18,224
514
547
580
1,571,328
66,111
33,667
59,398
327
3,642
5,062
1,055,647
39
1,988
2,5517
641,285
9
246
3,431
53,465
3
83
438
27,084
 H 96
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions—Continued
1962
1963
1964
1965
Adult Disabled Persons
4
31
34
10,093
5
36
37
11,410
11
71
85
18,992
15
95
111
28,769
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1965
LICENSED
Jan. 1,
1965
New
Licences
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1965
Children—total care—
Boarding homes	
Institutions	
Camps  	
Children—day care—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care-
Group day carei	
Aged—■
Boarding homes	
Institutions 	
Adults—employable	
Homes—maternity	
Adult disabled persons-
Totals	
15
10
94
324
30
32
298
39
7
3
11
40
2
30
11
52
3
5
863
153
5
1
3
32
5
9
37
12
9
99
332
27
53
11
313
39
9
3
15
94
922
i Group day care includes seven cases transferred from kindergartens.
PENDING
Jan. 1,
1965
New
Cases
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1965
Children—total care-
Boarding homes..
Institutions	
Camps..
Children—day care-
Kindergartens_
Schools for retarded children-
Family day care-
Group day carei	
Aged—
Boarding homes	
Institutions 	
Adults—employable	
Homes—maternity	
Adult disabled persons-
Totals	
4
30
53
3
34
84
4
4
57
4
83
9
78
2
4
1
12
218
258
3
3
37
6
63
2
51
2
6
173
5
31
73
1
54
7
HI
2
6
1
12
303
1 Group day care includes one case transferred from kindergarten.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1965/66        H 97
PART V.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The Accounting Division continues to move toward automation with a greater
use of data-processing machines. A successful system has been established whereby
the basic statistical information for our dental programme is stored on tapes and
used to produce a variety of information monthly and annually, and further to produce special statistical information whenever needed. The dental statistics thus provided to the Medical Services Division and other interested persons are believed to
be unique, at least in this country. The basic information stored has been increased
in the last year and the programme modified, and now it is also being used for checking accounts, establishing records, preparation of vouchers and financial reports,
and issuing cheques to the dentists for dental services provided to recipients of the
Department of Social Welfare's dental programme. Having successfully combined
the dental statistics programme with the accounting for and paying of dental accounts,
it is contemplated to extend this to other programmes of the Department as machine
and programming time become available. The method of obtaining statistical information concerning the drug programme of the Medical Services Division was improved considerably during the last year, so that now we have much more information about the drugs prescribed, the strength and quantity, the manufacturer and
pharmacist supplying them, and the person receiving them. This information is
designed for controlling and improving the drug programme, and for controlling
costs.
A review of the Department's expenditure for the period from April 1, 1965,
to March 31, 1966, shows that direct payment of allowances to the aged and handicapped and to persons in receipt of Social Allowance accounted for $52,008,500,
which is slightly over 76 per cent of the total budget of the Department. The average number of persons assisted by these two programmes decreased slightly between
the fiscal years 1964/65 and 1965/66, from 94,097 to 93,426, but each of the
groups benefited from increased rates during the year which accounted for the increase in expenditure. The Social Allowance rates were increased at May 1, 1965,
raising, for example, the maximum for a single person from $66 to $75 per month,
and for a family of four from $147 to $175 per month. The maximum supplemental
assistance paid to the aged and handicapped group (Supplementary Social Allowance) was increased from $24 to $25 per month at January 1, 1965, and further
to $30 per month at February 1, 1965.
The other large increase during the year under review was in the section maintenance of dependent children, which increased $1,120,800 to $6,687,500 in
1965/66. This provided care for an average number of children during the year
of 5,915, for a total of 2,037,040 days' care. (In addition, there were some children
in foster homes which provide care at no charge to the Province. These children
and the number of days are not included.)
The final sections, administration, institutions, and field service, show an increase in expenditure by reason of additional staff and salary increases granted
April 1,1965.
 H 98
SOCIAL WELFARE
Main Service
Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
1964/65
Value
Per Centi
1965/66
Value
Per Centi
Administration-
Institutions	
Field service	
Maintenance of dependent children-
Medical services, drugs, optical, etc..
Social Allowance, etc..
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Social Allowance for the aged and handicapped	
Totals .
$768,300
1,048,300
2,322,000
5,566,700
5,035,100
29,954,700
16,698,300
1.3
1.7
3.8
9.1
8.2
48.8
27.2
$825,600
1,067,400
2,654,300
6,687,500
5,023,300
34,144,000
17,864,500
1.2
1.6
3.9
9.8
7.4
50.0
26.2
$61,393,400
100.0
$68,266,600
100.0
i Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
1,560-1166-9600
  

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