Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Annual Report of the Director of Correction for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1966 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0364208.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0364208.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0364208-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0364208-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0364208-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0364208-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0364208-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0364208-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0364208-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0364208.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Director of Correction
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1966
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  Victoria, B.C., January 27, 1967.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Director
of Correction for the year ended March 31, 1966.
ROBERT W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
 Department of the Attorney-General, Corrections Branch,
Vancouver, B.C., November 1, 1966.
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Corrections
Branch for the 12 months ended March 31, 1966.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. ROCKSBOROUGH SMITH,
Director of Correction.
 DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
CORRECTIONS BRANCH
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Attorney-General.
Gilbert D. Kennedy, Q.C., Deputy Attorney-General.
SENIOR CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
S. Rocksborough Smith, Director of Correction and Chief Probation Officer.
F. St. John Madeley, Acting Assistant Director of Correction.
C. D. Davidson, Assistant Chief Probation Officer.
HEADQUARTERS STAFF OFFICERS
O. J. Walling, Rev. W. D. G. Hollingworth,
Personnel and Staff Training Officer. Senior Protestant Chaplain.
R. V. McAllister, Rev. T. F. M. Corcoran,
Supervisor of Research. Senior Catholic Chaplain.
R. G. E. Richmond, W. Lemmon,
Senior Medical Officer. Supervisor of Classification.
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
R. E. Fitchett (Personnel).   E. M. Pierce (Training).   M. M. Berg (Catering and Services).
GAOL SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
W. H. Mulligan, V. H. Goad,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm. Director, New Haven.
J. Braithwaite,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution. ' '
„  _   _ Warden, Kamloops Provincial Gaol.
H. B. Bjarnason,
Warden, Prince George Gaol. S. A. L. Hamblin,
G. Chapple, Officer in Charge, Vancouver Island Unit
Officer in Charge, Chilliwack Forest Camps. and Sayward Forest Camps.
PROBATION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
A. A. Byman, O. E. Hollands,
Supervisor, Vancouver Region. Acting Supervisor, Fraser Valley Region.
A. E. Jones, J. Wiebe,
Supervisor, Vancouver Island Region. Supervisor, Interior Region.
J. V. Sabourin, Supervisor Parole and Special Services.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAROLE BOARD
H. Keetch, Chairman. M. G. Stade, Secretary.
Members:
F. C. Boyes. Mrs. T. G. Norris. E. Kelly. O. Orr.
 S3
I 3   I
■5 o
X
s
o c
1-4
>
o
ed
o
w
to
BJ
CO
-J
H
o
H <
1
|
1
r
~1
1
1
01
bO XJ
tf £
rt
j~i  to
•i-l
C    w
P     QJ
■H
to    Cu
-   *g
0)
i c
i
R
D.
■■-I
01   -H
•u   d
■u »
01
a 5
(J    4-J
•h c
U    0)
O   G
u -u
u   W
o
a)
u
at
to
•o
•i-i
ed
to
tj   a.
U   B
rt   rt
3 u
>.
Cfl    4J
U
>-i
0)
4J
rt
3
W
rt
O
X
60
•rl
O)
0
rt
<
s£
cS
■H
u
o
0)
■a
£3  M
O to
H O
Q to
E-i W
O M
3 U
0)  -O  Vh
CO    01  VW
2 O
o   C
O   4-t   nj
U4
u
m
m0i
rt
u
j_>
•H
w
<w
tf
o
H
bO
0)
c
d
•H
c
C
o
-H
01
rt
u
u
a
H
Pi
i
a
U
m
H
§
5
.-3
(4
o
CO
u
25
3i
O
CO
M
H
H
H
Si
cd
o
«
s
Oh
to
(0
to
(0
M
Ol
a
(U
01
o
•H
■H
■rl
Uh
H-l
VM
V4H
o
VH
iw
O
O
O
o
o
■o
•a
*o
•a
•o
01
1—1
0)
01
0>
0)
te
i
4
p
■4
p
4
n
to
•d
01
>
01
u
fs
0}
u
0)
u
0)
o
1-H    «H
CO  M-|
I-I  «4_|
o
M
>     tfl
d   d
o  o
O   -H
e &o
tfl   <D
>  «
o m
»w
•I-I
to     to
w u
sa fe
CJ   to
H°
a o
d O
>   -H
rt
M    C
QJ    O
4.)   -rt
rt  60
a>   aj
u ed
rt O
>
i-H
u  rt
oj   d
to    o
to -i-i
U   bO
to   OJ
ed
(-1  vw
O  O
•H
Jj   i-l
CJ    tfl
w d
c o
60
QJ
J3  r-(
w   n)
Vj   d
o   O
Z -H
DO
0)
pi
01
o
u
rt
Pm
CO  H
CO 3
<; nd
Ph
 CONTENTS
Page
Chapter I.—Review of the Year .  11
Chapter II.—Staff and Staff-training  15
1. Staff Turnover  15
2. Headquarters Staff .  16
3. Institutional Staff  16
4. Academy Traijiing  16
5. Basic, Field, and Advanced Training  16
6. Principal Officers' Leadership Training  17
7. Diploma Course in Corrections  17
8. Specialized Courses  18
9. Forestry Training  18
10. Chaplains' Conference  18
11. International Congress  18
12. Staff-training Grant  18
13. Federal Training Grant  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA GAOL SERVICE
Chapter III.—Treatment of Men  19
General  19
1. Population  19
2. Capacity  19
3. Juvenile Admissions  19
4. Security  20
5. Discipline  20
6. Assaults on Staff.  20
7. Central Classification  20
Social Education  21
8. General  21
9. Lay Counselling  21
10. Group Counselling    22
11. Academic Training    23
12. Physical Training  24
13. Recreation  24
14. Library  24
15. Religious Training  25
16. Alcoholics Anonymous  25
Vocational Training  26
17. Haney  26
18. Oakalla  26
19. Vancouver Island Unit  26
 DD 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Page
Chapter III.—Continued
Forest Camps  27
20. Chilliwack Camps  27
21. Say ward Forest Camps  27
22. Kamloops Gaol Camps.  29
23. Haney Correctional Institution Camps  29
Specialized Institutions  29
24. Alouette River Unit  29
Work Programmes  31
Chapter IV.—Treatment of Women  34
General  34
1. Population  34
2. Discipline  34
3. Security  34
Social Training  34
4. Group Living  34
5. Group Counselling  35
6. Individual Counselling  35
7. Education  35
8. Volunteers  36
9. Recreation  3 6
10. Religion  36
Vocational Training  37
11. Work  37
12. Housekeeping and Maintenance  37
13. Vocational Course  37
Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit  37
14. Women's Drug Research Unit  37
Health and Welfare  37
Parole and After-care  3 8
Twin Maples Farm  38
Chapter V.—Health and Hygiene  39
Excerpts from Senior Medical Officer's Report  39
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROBATION SERVICE
General  41
1. Probation Cases  41
2. Pre-sentence Reports  41
3. Case Loads  41
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 9
Staff..
Page
  41
  41
  42
  42
  42
  42
  43
  43
  43
  43
  43
  44
13. Victoria Family and Children's Court  44
14. Psychiatric Services	
15. Search and Leadership Training	
16. Marpole Hostel	
17. Intensive Supervision	
18. Group Counselling	
19. Family Interviewing	
4. Movement.
5. Training	
Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency..
6. Juveniles Placed under Probation Service.
7. Transfers to Adult Court	
8. Family and Children's Court	
9. Family Court Committees	
10. Appointment of Volunteer Probation Officers
New Developments	
11. Regional Development.
12. Field Offices	
20. Educational Leave of Absence.
21. Parole Supervision	
Provincial Probation Offices	
Probation Statistics	
44
44
45
45
45
45
46
46
46
47
APPENDICES
Excerpts from Annual Report of British Columbia Board of Parole.
Annual Statistical Tables	
50
57
  '
Annual Report of the Director of Correction
CHAPTER I.—REVIEW OF THE YEAR
The year under review showed slight increases in both the number placed on
probation and the number committed to prison. The significant factor is the steady
increase in the number of new probation cases over the average daily population
figure for the gaols—684 as compared to 493 last year. While more extensive use
is being made of probation, it is still confined mainly to those under 18 years of
age. Only 836 of a total of 2,879 new probation cases this year were over the age
of 18. This is at variance with the growing practice elsewhere of using probation
for an increasing number of adult offenders with highly satisfactory results.
The gaol accommodation situation has undergone little change during the
course of the year, with the exception of the construction of two new residences at
the Alouette River Unit for alcoholics, which provided accommodation for an
additional 102 alcoholic offenders, and the remodelling of the kitchen at Oakalla
Prison Farm, both of which were badly needed. Peak occupancy periods during
February and March led to serious overcrowding in all gaols, and the need for more
accommodation is still urgent. The three oldest institutions—Oakalla Prison Farm,
Kamloops Gaol, and the Vancouver Island unit on Wilkinson Road, Colquitz—are
completely outmoded and unsuitable for modern methods of penal treatment. However, the staffs of these three institutions continue, against formidable odds, to carry
out their duties to the best of their ability under conditions as they exist. Of particular concern is the receiving and discharge unit at Oakalla. Up to 250 men are
processed daily through this unit—on admission, discharge, proceeding to Court,
or on transfer to another institution. The conditions described in previous Reports
still prevail, with the added deterioration brought about by an additional 40,000
man-movements, in and out of the prison, during the course of the year.
The Waiting Trial Wing, with an average daily population of 209, continues
to present a problem in terms of the inadequacy of the accommodation for men
locked up for the greater part of each day. In spite of the constant vigilance of the
staff, acts of violence occur, the result of pent-up tension and suppressed frustration
which can find no harmless outlet.
Facilities for the observation and treatment of mentally disturbed prisoners
at Oakalla are sadly inadequate. The 37-per-cent increase in the number of prisoners committed to mental hospital from this prison is perhaps to some extent a
reflection of the times in which we are living. None the less, the responsibility for
the prevention of any deterioration in mental health and the creation of an atmosphere conducive to the growth of mental stability should be the prison's. A transfer
to mental health hospital for a period of weeks followed by an early return to the
same conditions does not offer a solution. The establishment of a psychiatric ward
with trained staff within the prison or, alternatively, adequate provision for the
accommodation in secure quarters in the Provincial Mental Hospital of prisoner-
patients for the total length of their sentence, if necessary, is a high-priority need.
The present plans currently under way for the extension of the Prince George
Gaol should, when completed next year, provide sufficient accommodation to look
after all northern prisoners for the time being. The proposed plan for a satellite
forest camp to the Prince George Gaol has unfortunately not as yet been implemented.
11
 DD 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The contract for the construction of a camp for women at Twin Maples, near
Ruskin, has now been let and should be completed in the next fiscal year. It is
proposed to use this camp as a treatment facility for alcoholic female offenders,
along the same lines of the Alouette River Unit for men. This facility will ease the
overcrowding at the Women's Unit at Oakalla.
The problem of the increasing turnover of gaol staff, reported last year, continued unabated throughout the current period and rose from last year's 10.8-percent turnover to 20.1 per cent. The reasons for the high turnover are many, and
include:—•
(1) The calibre of personnel required. Staff are expected to set an example
by their own standard of conduct and behaviour, both on and off the job.
(2) The exacting conditions of a disciplined service, dealing constantly with
some of the most difficult men and women in the community. Conditions
of service necessitate frequent week-end and night duty as well as attendance in emergencies and escapes at any time.
(3) The danger at all times of violence. Where the police deal with a cross-
section of the general public in the course of their duty, the prison officer
spends all his duty time mixing with prisoners, many of them hostile and
aggressive and easily upset, attempting to get them to do things they often
do not want to do (for example, work, exercise, education, etc.), usually
unarmed and frequently alone.
(4) The low basic salary, which does not compare favourably with the higher
wages and more favourable employment conditions prevailing in industry
and commerce.
The high turnover of gaol staff brought about a dearth of experienced officers. It
takes an average of two years to train an officer, providing he has the qualities of
personality and character to profit from the training, and another two years to
qualify him as a first-class officer. The circular chart on page 15 shows in graphic
detail the wastage of experienced first-class trained officers with over four years'
service. Men with this training and experience are readily enticed into industry
with offers of higher salaries and less exacting employment. Correctional programmes, the continuity of inmate training and custody, all suffer as a result of
these separations.
The increased training given both recruits and experienced officers in the Gaol
Service is dealt with in some detail in Chapter II. There is no doubt that this concentration on training is having its effect and is reflected in the encouraging parole
statistics reported in the appendix to this Report.
The number of short sentences under 30 days continues at a high level (over
50 per cent of the total), and the number of sentences under six months remains
fairly constant at over 75 per cent of the total. Sentences of under one month have
little training value and can scarcely be considered as a deterent. Prison administrators are at a loss to know what to do with these men, for there is insufficient time
to teach them a skill, and all too frequently they possess none; they are employed
in routine cleaning jobs about the institution for the length of their short stay, and
are released with no job, no skill, and frequently no funds.
Those with an alcoholic problem and with a sentence of over 30 days are
transferred to the Alouette River Unit. The success this unit is achieving is described in Chapter III. To benefit fully from the treatment programme at the
Alouette River Unit, a man should have at least two months to serve. With the
11-per-cent increase in the number of offences under the Government Liquor Act
noted in this year's statistics, there is a need for increased treatment facilities for the
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 13
alcoholic. It is to be hoped that the plans for completing the Alouette River Unit
will be reactivated during the coming year so that additional accommodation will
be made available.
The Half-way House, established at Haney by the Maple Ridge Half-way
House Association as a stepping-stone for re-entry into the community for men
released from the Alouette River Unit, has proven most successful. This house,
accommodating up to 16 men at one time, affords the support so badly needed by
rehabilitated alcoholics attempting to re-establish themselves in the community.
Many more such establishments are needed throughout the Province, and it is
to be hoped that this successful experiment will be duplicated elsewhere by groups
of public-minded citizens. A great deal of credit is due to the Alcoholics Anonymous
organization for its leadership in this movement.
The increase in probation services and parole supervision points up the need
for additional resources in the community. Probation supervision by itself can
only accomplish so much. Suitable substitute homes, group-living hostels, community activity groups, search and leadership training courses, and on-the-job training opportunities are some of the necessary tools required by the Probation Officer
to complement adequately his supervision. Much use has yet to be made of volunteers to assist the Probation Officer by taking an interest in individual probationers.
As a private individual, a volunteer may often be able to establish a positive relationship with an offender who rejects any contact with officials. The members of the
British Columbia Borstal Association have pioneered the use of volunteer sponsors
in connection with institutional after-care in this Province, over a period of nearly
20 years, with remarkable success. The right type of volunteer, suitably matched
to the personality and temperament of a probationer and working closely with him,
could be of great assistance to a Probation Officer saddled with a heavy case load
and only able to see his probationers on a weekly basis for minimal periods of time.
The responsibility for the recruitment and training of suitable volunteers might well
be undertaken by members of Family and Children's Court Committees with
guidance from their local Probation Officer.
The successful development this year of the first probation hostel in British
Columbia, in Vancouver, has shown what can be done with those difficult probationers who require a condition of residence as part of their probation order. The
establishment of additional hostels throughout the Province would undoubtedly
cut down on the number of juveniles presently being committed to the Brannan
Lake School or transferred to Adult Court. In this connection it should be noted
that the number of juveniles transferred to Adult Courts in the Province, for the
lack of satisfactory alternative resources for juveniles, rose by 32 during the current
year to a total of 210.
News that the Salvation Army is purchasing farm property in the Langley
district for the development of a hostel residence for youthful probationers, similar
to its House of Concord in Toronto, is indeed welcome. Any such development
will receive the whole-hearted support of the Probation Service.
The assignment of additional Probation Officers to supervise those young-adult
offenders released on parole from the Haney Correctional Institution, the Westgate
Unit at Oakalla Prison Farm, and selected forest camps has demonstrated the need
for closer integration between institutional training, parole release planning, and
supervision in the community. It is planned in the new year to establish a parole
unit within an institution, on a trial basis, to attempt to bring about better coordination of the total services provided the young-adult offender. It may well be
that the future will bring a much closer integration of institutional and probation
workers into one corrections service.   The taking-over of all casework, both within
 DD 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
and without correctional institutions, by the Probation Service in the United Kingdom is worthy of closer study. It could well provide a better co-ordinated service
with uniform training, the opportunity for improved after-care, increased promotional opportunities, and the more economical use of staff with a subsequent financial saving.
With the increasing implementation of the Family and Children's Court legislation, introduced in 1963, many municipal governments are at the point of entering
into negotiations with the Province with a view to establishing a Family and Children's Court in their areas on a cost-sharing basis. The servicing of these new
Courts with Probation Officers skilled in handling family problems and matrimonial
conciliation cases will place a heavy strain on the Probation Service. The importance of this type of service, stressing prevention, dealing with family problems
before they reach the point where a Court appearance is the only alternative, cannot
be overemphasized. In view of the competition in business and industry for university graduates with training in the behavioural sciences, every effort is being
continued by whatever means possible (the printing of brochures, public advertisements, talks to undergraduate clubs and high-school vocational groups, and published articles) to present probation as a challenging and worth-while career to the
university graduate. Some success is being obtained, but if we are to continue to
expand the Probation Service at the present rate, further consideration must be
given to increasing the salaries of the various grades of Probation Officer to make
the position more attractive. It is well to remember that, from a financial point of
view alone, one person placed on probation rather than committed to an institution
represents a cash saving of over $3,000 per year to the taxpayer.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 15
CHAPTER II.—STAFF AND STAFF-TRAINING
1. Staff Turnover
Throughout the Gaol Service, recruitment of staff has been a major concern.
Higher wages and more attractive working conditions in industry caused many
resignations, particularly amongst staff with only a few years of service. During
the year, 353 men and women were taken on strength and 234 left the Service.
The rate of separations, or staff turnover, almost doubled during the year,
reaching 20.1 per cent. This is the second consecutive year in which this index
has increased, as indicated below:—
1961/62	
1962/63	
1963/64   8.1
1964/65	
1965/66	
Turnover
Percentage Change
13.9
9.5
— 31.7
8.1
-14.7
10.8
+33.3
20.1
+87.0
Most of the separations occurred amongst those with least seniority in the
Security Officer category. The total separations of those holding Security Officer
rank was 162, or 69.3 per cent of all those leaving the Service. An analysis of gaol
staff at the end of the year disclosed that 38 per cent had less than two completed
years of service and 57 per cent had less than five years of service. This continued
wastage of staff seriously affects efficiency because of the time that must be devoted
to training replacements. It also increases the security risk when inexperienced
staff are responsible for inmates. To overcome the wastage of staff through resignations, it was necessary to recruit vigorously throughout the year. Applicants
were interviewed from many Provinces. One of the most productive devices was
the manning of the display booth at the Pacific National Exhibition by uniformed
staff in an attempt to interest as many as possible in a career in corrections.   A sub-
dlstribution of gaol staff by completed years of service
as at March 31, 1966
15-19 yrs. - 4% 30 or more years - 1%
 DD 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
stantial number of applicants resulted from this effort, and the staff who participated
are to be commended. Unfavourable publicity stressing negative aspects of Oakalla
Prison Farm hampered recruiting at times.
2. Headquarters Staff
Dr. M. A. Matheson, Assistant Director of Correction, was granted one year
leave of absence in January. Mr. F. St. John Madeley, Probation Officer 4, was
seconded in February from the Probation Service, Fraser Valley region, to the
post of Acting Assistant Director of Correction during Dr. Matheson's absence.
Mr. E. M. Pierce, Senior Correctional Officer at Oakalla Prison Farm, was promoted in March to Administrative Officer 2 at headquarters.
3. Institutional Staff
There were 109 promotions within the Service during the year. These included
the following: To Deputy Warden, 4; to Senior Correctional Officer, 9; to Principal Officer, 26; to Correctional Officer, 66; to Counsellor 2, 4.
The Service lost two devoted senior officers in the death of Deputy Warden
M. H. Adams of Oakalla Prison Farm in November and Deputy Warden T. S. Pink
of Kamloops Gaol in May. Both these officers died after extended illnesses.
Mr. Adams joined the Gaol Service in 1932 at Oakalla; his courage and devotion
to duty was always an inspiration to his fellow officers. Mr. Pink was appointed
to the staff of the Young Offenders' Unit in 1955 and later served at Prince George
Gaol and Kamloops Provincial Gaol; he worked tirelessly to improve the standard
of inmate training programmes. Both these officers left their mark on the Service
and will be long remembered for their contribution.
4. Academy Training
On October 26th two classes numbering 46 Security Officers graduated from
the first two courses of academy training at Oakalla Prison Farm.
It had long been recognized that pre-job training was necessary to cut down on
staff turnover and to put competent men on the job. An extensive recruiting campaign was launched throughout British Columbia in January of 1965, with the
assistance of the National Employment Service. In February of 1965 a two-day
planning session was conducted with senior staff at Oakalla to determine the content of pre-job training, the responsibilities for the leadership in this training, and
the methods of training to be used.
The result was a 64-day academy course, which commenced March 15, 1965.
The content of academy training consisted of orientation and field, basic, and
advanced training, which had previously been given during the first two years of an
officer's career in the Service. It also included 64 hours of foot drill, physical
training and self-defence, completion of the St. John Ambulance first-aid certificate
requirements, instructional techniques, and group-discussion techniques. Twenty-
six days of the course were devoted to rotation in various job situations of the
Security Officer. Course members were assigned topics to present to the class.
The response to this approach was encouraging.
A third academy class was planned to start in February, 1966, but recruitment
difficulties forced its postponement indefinitely.
This type of training will be continued as soon as the staff situation permits.
5. Basic, Field, and Advanced Training
It had been hoped that academy training would eventually replace the field,
basic, and advanced training courses, but an overlap was found necessary, at least
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 17
for the first few years of academy training, in order to complete the training of those
hired before the start of the academy programme. The following summary gives
the number of officers whose training was completed under the old scheme:—
Type of Training Number Trained
Field  163
Basic  247
Advanced     92
Since 1962, 38 advanced training courses have been conducted, and 605 of the
625 officers who took the course successfully completed it.
6. Principal Officers' Leadership Training
The third annual sitting of the Principal Officers' qualifying examination was
held March 14, 1966. One hundred and eight officers wrote the examination and
63 or 58.3 per cent qualified. Of the three sittings held to date, 510 have written
and 284 or 55.8 per cent have qualified.
Through assessment of job performance and examination results, it became
evident that many officers of good potential were having difficulty in their role as
supervisor and in providing leadership to subordinate staff. In order to overcome
these difficulties a Principal Officers' Leadership Training Course of three weeks'
duration was initiated in January, 1966, with 16 officers from all units attending.
The premise " leadership is learned, not taught" had been selected as the
focal theme in organizing the course. The role of the instructor was to raise
questions related to on-the-job situations, to help the class look for alternate solutions to problem situations, to clarify issues, and to provide resource material.
In this way, responsibility for planning and organizing was given the class, and the
instructor was left free to co-ordinate content and to insist on standards. The course
took on the dimensions of a workshop with a limited amount of " information
giving " and the class members themselves motivated to " information seeking."
The course was demanding of both time and effort on the part of the class and
instructor, but the participation and learning were considerable. The response of
the class to being given responsibility for many details of the running of the course
was most favourable and resulted in each member devoting an average of about
45 hours of his own leisure time to studies and planning.
A high sense of achievement was felt by participants, and most thought they
had found the answers to many on-the-job problems. The feed-back two months
after the course finished was that it had been the most useful training in which members had participated.
7. Diploma Course in Corrections
In order to improve the theoretical background of gaol staff and Probation
Officers without university degrees, a three-year night-school course was initiated in
October, 1965. Successful candidates will receive a Corrections Diploma, to be
issued by the Vancouver City College at the conclusion of the three-year period.
The curriculum includes courses in elementary psychology and sociology, theories
of crime causation and criminology, administration of justice, correctional techniques (individual and group counselling), as well as courses in effective communication and supervisory techniques. Each year consists of 80 hours of classroom
instruction. This year's class was open only to Probation Officers and Gaol Service
officers of the rank of Principal Officer and above. These officers will proceed to
the next phase of the course in 1966, while it is intended to select a new class to
attend the second running of the first four topics. The Department bore the expense
of this course, but staff were required to attend during off-duty hours.
 DD 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
8. Specialized Courses
Specialist courses were not conducted this year, and limited use was made of
Department of University Extension courses due to the start of the diploma course
in corrections. A total of 24 staff participated in University Extension courses in
adult learning, family counselling, and principles of interviewing.
9. Forestry Training
Nine officers attended a three-day course at the Forest Service training-school
conducted by the British Columbia Forest Service. All successfully completed the
course, which was of similar content to previous years.
10. Chaplains' Conference
In January a two-day conference for all Service chaplains was convened by
the senior Protestant and Roman Catholic chaplains. The participants included
nine Protestant and eight Roman Catholic chaplains. The conference took the form
of a workshop with the theme of group leadership.
11. International Congresses
The Director of Correction was a member of the Canadian delegation attending the United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of
the Offender, held in Stockholm during August.
Seven senior staff were selected to attend the International Congress of Criminology, held for the first time in Canada, at Montreal in September.
12. Staff-training Grant
The staff-training grant provided a wide range of services. It provided for
the diploma course, three senior officers attending the Civil Service Executive
Development Course, nine officers participating in partial graduate and undergraduate university training, and partial assistance in the form of bursaries to one
Probation Officer taking his Bachelor of Social Work and one taking his master's
in Sociology.
13. Federal Training Grant
Two officers were assisted with bursaries toward social-work training.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 19
BRITISH COLUMBIA GAOL SERVICE
CHAPTER III.—TREATMENT OF MEN
General
1. Population
The average daily population of male prisoners reversed last year's downward
trend, climbing to 2,195 compared to 2,088 for the previous year. The increase
was 107 or 5.1 per cent. On March 31, 1966, there were 2,369 male inmates on
the register, compared to 2,268 for March 31, 1965, an increase of 101 or 4.4 per
cent. The average daily population reached a peak of 2,443, the highest figure in
our history, in February, but dropped to 2,369 at the end of the year.
2. Capacity
During the year, capacity was increased by the opening of two new dormitories,
housing 51 inmates each at the Alouette River Unit and by opening a closed wing
with a capacity of 30 at the Vancouver Island Unit. The following table shows
the capacity and average occupancy of the various units, and indicates that overcrowding was still a problem, requiring solution at Prince George and at Oakalla:—
4
Peak
Occupancy
Oakalla Prison Farm..
Chilliwack Forest Camps..
Haney Correctional Institution and camps..
New Haven	
Vancouver Island Unit and camps	
Kamloops Provincial Gaol and camps..
Prince George Gaol 	
1
2
3
Maximum
Daily
Per Cent
Capacity
Average
Occupancy
942
993
105.2
246
231
93.0
521
453
86.9
42
35
83.3
250
200
80.0
167
168
100.6
97
115
118.6
1,184
251
519
42
252
173
137
It is apparent from a comparison of columns 2 and 4 in the above table that
practically every unit suffered from overcrowding at some time during the year.
Construction of an addition to the Prince George Gaol and the planned construction
of its satellite camp will relieve the overcrowding there, but the rapid population
growth in the northern regions of the Province may necessitate further expansion
of facilities in the north.
An increase in capacity is planned for the Kamloops Gaol, with the acquisition
of the buildings on the site of the former Royal Canadian Navy ammunition depot
east of the city. These buildings are being reconstructed to provide additional
accommodation and will eventually replace the old gaol situated in the downtown
section.
3. Juvenile Admissions
The number of male juveniles admitted to Oakalla is still cause for grave
concern, although there was a decrease from 214 in 1964/65 to 202 in the year
under review. Of this number, 24 were 15 years of age or under, the same number
as in the previous year.
The total number of males under 18 admitted to all receiving institutions was
258. Plans were under way at the end of the year to provide separate secure accommodation for all males under 18 on remand or waiting trial at the Haney Correctional Institution rather than at Oakalla.
 DD 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
4. Security
The number of escapes continued its upward trend, from 106 last year to 137
this year. Of the latter number, 14 ran away from Lakeview Camp, where they
were undergoing a physically demanding programme, designed to challenge the
value system of overly aggressive and hostile young inmates. These escapes represented a rejection of a deliberately difficult programme and had been anticipated
as a risk in planning the training syllabus. There was no appreciable increase in
escapes from other open facilities. The great majority of escapees were apprehended within 24 hours, and almost all received additional imprisonment for then-
escapes when they were tried in outside Court.
With increased use of camps, one-third of the prison population is now housed
in open facilities.
5. Discipline
It is gratifying to be able to report a decrease in inmate infractions of Gaol
Rules and Regulations and a year free of any major outbreak against discipline
within the gaols. There was, however, a refusal to work at Lakeview Camp on
Vancouver Island, which necessitated charging the six ringleaders in outside Court.
There were substantial decreases in disciplinary problems where programme was
intensified or revitalized. Particular attention is drawn to the Westgate A area of
Oakalla, where, as a result of programme changes, the number of disciplinary
charges dropped 63.4 per cent and the number of incidents requiring segregation
as a punishment dropped 69 per cent. Vancouver Island Unit, despite an increase
in capacity, reported a decrease in infractions to 102, compared to 120 the year
before.
One unit was selected for an experiment at Haney. A Trainee Disciplinary
Panel was set up, with the Principal Officer acting as a resource person to the Panel
in its deliberations. Infractions in the selected unit decreased significantly.
Trainees who had to sit in judgment on their fellows gained a new insight into the
necessity for authority. This experience contributed to their retraining for life in
the community.
6. Assaults on Staff
The number of incidents of assaults on staff remained unchanged at 31. Over
hah these assaults occurred in the last half of the year. In almost every case,
charges were laid in Magistrate's Court, resulting in additional prison terms for the
inmates involved. A number of sentences were appealed by the Crown where it was
felt they were insufficient to act as a deterrent. Such appeals resulted in substantial
increases in prison terms. The additional penalties set by the Court of Appeal gave
recognition to the seriousness of this type of offence. A total of 26 inmates was
involved in these assaults; two were involved in three assaults each and one in two
assaults. Fortunately, none of the assaults was as serious as the one reported last
year.
7. Central Classification
During the year the Central Classification Committee made 2,894 initial classifications and 454 reclassifications, a total of 3,348 in all. This was only a very
slight increase over the preceding year. The reclassifications were by reason of
escapes, parole violation, medical needs, or changes in training plans. The following tables give details of the classification decisions:—
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 21
INITIAL CLASSIFICATIONS
Chilliwack Forest Camps
Oakalla Prison Farm	
Haney Correctional Institution
Vancouver Island Unit	
Snowdon Forest Camp  	
Lakeview Forest Camp 	
New Haven    	
Total
817
1,070
468
271
158
61
49
2,894
RECLASSIFICATIONS
To—
From—
Oakalla
Haney
Vancouver
New
Haven
Prison
Chilliwack
Correctional
Snowdon
Lakeview
Island
Farm
Institution
Unit
Chilliwack Forest Camps
91
4
2
2
Oakalla Prison Farm	
7
92
10
3
15
4
Haney Correctional Insti
tution	
26
1
45
14
1
Vancouver Island Unit—
8
1
1
9
1
Snowdon Forest Camp.....
7
1
3
1
	
Lakeview Forest Camp_.
5
1
3
	
New Haven	
5
14
2
6
Parole violationl   	
11
18
30
2
8
Totals	
160
117
106
6
42
17
6
1 These were " technical " violators who did not receive additional sentences.
Throughout the year all those units not receiving prisoners direct from the
Courts were kept as close to capacity as possible in an effort to reduce the Oakalla
population.
Social Education
8. General
A programme of social retraining suffers from severe limitations when it has
to deal with a high proportion of short-term prisoners. Despite this handicap,
a continuing effort was made to reach these inmates and bring about a change in
their attitude and behaviour. Both lay and group counselling programmes were
expanded and intensified during the year.
Throughout the Service the deportment of staff contributed greatly to social
re-education by setting an example of firm but fair treatment. Staff are commended
for the fine example they set, even in difficult situations. At Haney an interesting
innovation was a compulsory programme, conducted by hospital staff, of social
education for new trainees in personal hygiene and sex education. The programme
was introduced in an attempt to supplement the lack in home training of most
trainees.
9. Lay Counselling
During the past year more staff have been involved in lay counselling, particularly at Oakalla, where an increasing number of experienced staff members have
been assigned small case loads of inmates for individual counselling. While rapid
turnover of staff has created difficulties in expanding this activity and in training
staff to handle this kind of assignment, it has not been allowed to halt expansion of
the programme throughout the Service. The effect on the morale of inmates has
been noticeable. Amongst the benefits cited in reports from unit heads are improved work output, fewer disciplinary infractions, and better relationships between
staff and inmates.
 DD 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Counselling was stepped up in the South and West Wings of Oakalla, which
house prisoners awaiting trial or appealing. The preoccupation of these prisoners
with the progress of their cases often limits counselling to such topics as Court
procedure and case presentation. The younger " waiting trial" inmate in prison
for the first time responds to lay counselling because he finds it helps him to deal
with a new and threatening situation. Older prisoners and recidivists, however,
are highly resistant to this approach, as they are to practically all programmes
aimed at an individual's problem areas. They rationalize their resistance by claiming
they are innocent people and therefore devoid of problems. A more intensive programme has helped improve the morale of inmates in these two wings, and many
more inmates have been taking advantage of the opportunity to talk about their
problems to staff members.
10. Group Counselling
Previous reports have outlined group counselling as an experimental programme. Last year's report indicated that it had become standard practice in all
institutions and forest camps. We have now been able to pin-point specific gains
which have followed the widespread introduction of group counselling.
These benefits have been classified into (1) personal benefits to the inmate,
(2) improved rehabilitation prospects, and (3) benefits to prison administration.
Unfortunately, it is not possible to present statistical proof of these benefits, but
trained officers have identified the following gains:—
Personal benefits to the inmate:
(i) Prisoners come to grips with their own weaknesses and problems,
(ii) They learn to think about themselves constructively,
(iii) They learn increased awareness of their self and are thus better prepared to face reality,
(iv) Hostility toward staff and other inmates is lessened,
(v) Communication skills are improved.
(vi) They learn the satisfaction that comes from helping others.
Improved rehabilitation prospects:
(vii) Changed attitude toward authority, better socialization,
(viii) More realistic release planning,
(ix) Greater acceptance of the individual's responsibility toward community,
(x) Improved personal confidence, ability to express themselves and their
ideas.
Benefits to prison administration:
(xi) Decrease in bullying,
(xii) Disciplinary infractions lessened both in frequency and severity,
improvement in prison behaviour,
(xiii) Prisoners become more accessible to other programmes, such as lay
counselling,
(xiv) Prison staff gain a better understanding of inmates and thus become
more effective,
(xv) Unrest amongst inmates is detected early and before it becomes
explosive.
Group counselling has definite limitations.   Rapid turnover of the prison population prevents the formation of group cohesion amongst short-term prisoners, with
the result that group discussion rather than group counselling takes place.   In other
words, the group fails to come to grips with a real problem but discusses it on a
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66 DD 23
surface, superficial level, avoiding the real issues. However, such discussions are
not valueless as they still give inmates practice in communication and expression of
their ideas.
Almost all units had voluntary groups in operation, which would indicate that
inmates themselves recognize the value of group counselling, as they would not
otherwise devote their own time to these groups. Some of these voluntary groups
are operating at a level that is comparable to group therapy. Of special interest
was the abreactive group, so called because the majority of the group members
have participated in or are about to undergo this kind of therapy. Its members are
highly motivated toward change. Through their participation in the group meetings
have come results which have been most gratifying.
Another group which was worthy of note was composed of trainees living in
semi-isolation in the segregation units. The group was led by a Correctional Officer
specially trained for this purpose. As might be expected, this was a particularly
difficult group, but the results to date have shown a marked change for the better
in many of its members.
Groups function best where group leaders have received training and where
skilled supervision is available for group leaders.
11. Academic Training
Substantial gains were made by all units in the number of inmates taking correspondence courses. At Oakalla the increase was one-third, and the Warden
recommended the appointment of a full-time teacher to assist inmates with their
courses. At Vancouver Island Unit and at Prince George compulsory courses for
illiterates continued. Some graduates of these courses have embarked on correspondence courses at the elementary-school level. At Haney, where academic training is a part of the daytime programme, 236 trainees were enrolled in 361 secondary correspondence courses, and there was a definite trend toward concentrating
effort on fewer courses. The decreasing age of inmates at Haney (average 18.6
years), coupled with a lowering of the academic achievement level of new trainees,
placed a heavy load on remedial classes. Tests revealed that many had an operational level much lower than their school records indicated, and it was found
necessary to redesign some pre-vocational training courses to meet this situation.
At times the waiting list for remedial classes approximated the combined total
of all trainees awaiting vocational shops. Although the accelerated Grade X
courses had a most successful year, here also a critical situation developed due to
the extra background preparation required by some trainees.
For many, attendance at remedial classes unlocked the door to further training in classrooms or shops. Direct teaching with its immediate rewards has been
found more effective than correspondence courses for trainees at this elementary
level. Of last year's total of 57 remedial pupils, 20 entered the Industrial Mathematics Course leading to vocational training. Eleven remedial-class graduates were
enrolled in a Business Arithmetic Correspondence Course, their first step into
secondary education. For the remainder, the remedial class, with improved basic
schooling, was the training goal.
Inmate students in Oakalla and our smaller gaols are hampered in their efforts
to better their education by lack of space for quiet study; however, the number of
inmates currently engaged in correspondence courses is gratifyingly high. While
many find correspondence courses difficult to follow without the aid of qualified
teachers, with the help they receive from enthusiastic staff members the results are
encouraging. Educational films have proven beneficial in stimulating interest,
particularly at Oakalla and at the Vancouver Island Unit.
 DD 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
12. Physical Training
Compulsory physical education for inmates under 35 was initiated at the
Vancouver Island Unit, where there was a qualified P.T. instructor on staff who
gave instruction for an hour five days a week. Although compulsory, there was
only one incident which involved disciplinary action for refusal to take part. Some
inmates over 35 volunteered to participate in the programme.
At Haney, physical training became an integral part of the pre-release programme by requiring trainees to reach a certain level of accomplishment before
they would be recommended for appearance before the Parole Board. All trainees
were tested as part of the intake process and were made aware of the standards
they would have to reach in four months time. Only if they failed to achieve these
standards were they assigned to compulsory physical training classes. A system
of achievement awards, consisting of badges in three colours corresponding to
colours used in Olympic awards, was introduced to give recognition to those who
reached certain standards.
13. Recreation
A varied and active programme of recreation, including sports, hobbies, and
interest groups, continued an important part of leisure-time activity in all camps
and institutions. Team sports have been actively promoted because of their importance in developing the social skills which so many young inmates lack, and
which are so necessary to succesful integration into community life after release.
The involvement of inmates in coaching, arranging schedules, and refereeing
games enriches the programme by providing opportunities to put into practice within
an institution many of the requirements necessary for social adjustment which came
up for discussion in lay and group counselling sessions. The difficulties inmates
encounter, both in organizing and participating in these activities, have provided
alert staff with opportunities to relate these difficulties to situations in the community.
A varied recreational programme reduced boredom in our prisons. It also
provided opportunities for self-expression and for the development of new skills
and interests leading to the growth of self-confidence. Many inmates experienced
for the first time the sense of satisfaction that comes from successful completion
of a project or the acquisition of a new skill.
Amongst the new developments this year was the implementation of a compulsory recreation programme for difficult prisoners at Oakalla. After some initial
difficulties, the project gained acceptance and has made this group more tractable
and improved its morale. A hobby-supply control centre was established at
Oakalla to provide improved opportunities for inmates to participate in hobby
activities and better control hobby supplies.
The variety of interest groups in operation was remarkable. Many of the
groups owe their existence to the enthusiasm of staff members, which stimulated
new interests amongst their charges. Their zest was the spark that kindled a new
flame.
14. Library
The lack of a librarian at Oakalla has limited the effectiveness of library
facilities. At Haney, however, where a librarian is employed, library use continued
to increase and reached a total attendance of 27,122, or an average of 101 trainees
per night. An average of 400 books were out on loan daily, and total circulation
during the year reached 21,741.    Careful selection of books for the interests of
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 25
trainees has reduced " escape " reading and fostered a trend toward increased non-
fiction reading.   The demand for " westerns " was noticeably less.
15. Religious Training
Protestant and Roman Catholic chaplains have given dedicated service in a
most difficult field. Regular services have been held, and most have been involved
in individual counselling activities as well as in religious discussion and instruction.
Increasing use was made of discussion groups in which subject-matter was not
restricted to spiritual concerns but expanded to include moral and ethical problems
faced by inmates both within and without the institution.
Audio-visual aids, such as films and filmstrips, records, and tapes, have been
increasingly used to stimulate discussion. Family services at Haney and New
Haven have continued to meet with good support.
A special service of particular significance was the dedication on July 22, 1965,
of the Church of the Good Shepherd at Mount Thurston Camp, one of the Chilliwack
Forest Camps. This chapel represents the first building designed and constructed
solely as such in the British Columbia Gaol Service. It was constructed entirely by
inmate labour.
There has been a noticeable trend amongst Protestant chaplains toward an
informal rather than traditional service of worship. This type of service seems to
appeal to inmates by its very simplicity.   The chaplain of Oakalla reports:—
" I am becoming more convinced that traditional church services of whatever
denomination do not provide the best means of communicating with the men in this
prison. There seems to be a great gulf fixed between those on the platform and
those in the congregation. I am not yet in a position to recommend a remedy for
this problem. However, on the last Sunday in January and on Easter Day, I conducted what I called ' experimental' church services. At these services I was
assisted by the inmate concert party from Westgate B. I was grateful for the willing
help and interest of these men. The service was quite simple and consisted of
various vocal and instrumental numbers, such as spirituals and more modern religious songs and some secular songs. In lieu of a sermon, I simply commented on
the words and music we were hearing along with reflections on erroneous ideas about
religion. I also used prayers phrased in contemporary English about matters concerning today's living. I think we succeeded to some extent in demonstrating that
church services can be pleasant. Familiar words and music—familiar to so many
of the men who seldom, if ever, attend church in the community and therefore find
traditional forms of worship foreign—can be used quite validly in the worship of
God. We have at least 175 men attending on an average each Sunday, and this is
a great opportunity."
A Lenten mission was held for four days at both Oakalla Prison Farm and the
Haney Correctional Institution. The mission was conducted by the Right Rev.
Chandler Sterling, Episcopal Bishop of Montana. Bishop Sterling, who earned his
way through his divinity training by playing jazz piano with professional dance bands
in the United States, had an unconventional approach and met with considerable
response, particularly at the Haney Correctional Institution.
During the 1965 Vancouver crusade of Billy Graham, a large number of trainees
from the Haney Correctional Institution were permitted to attend a session, which
left a considerable impact.
16. Alcoholics Anonymous
Throughout the Gaol Service, Alcoholics Anonymous groups continue to function.   In most cases the sponsor was a staff member, frequently the chaplain.   The
 DD 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Senior Protestant Chaplain represents the Gaol Service on the Alcoholics Anonymous
committee which oversees Alcoholics Anonymous groups functioning in institutions.
While inmate participation in these groups may not always be sincere, the programme does reach a number of inmates, and many are put in touch with community
Alcoholics Anonymous groups on release and continue their membership.
Vocational Training
17. Haney
The past year was a most successful and challenging one in all areas of vocational training. There have been a greater number of course completions within
this programme than in previous years. An increasing number of those released
found employment in trades they studied while at the institution. All vocational
instructors at Haney are fully qualified. Their consistency, patience, motivation,
and encouragement were instrumental in achieving the increased course completions.
Reclassification of trainees who could not settle down or cope with their work was
reduced by refining classification procedures and by development of the unit team
approach. The unit teams, by improved communication, have been instrumental
in keeping training objectives clearly in front of trainees and staff alike, and thus
have added to the purposeful pursuit of training goals.
Inspection of the vocational programme at Haney was made at required intervals by Mr. P. McGregor, Vocational Inspector for the Department of Education.
His reports were favourable, in spite of the limitations of ageing equipment. Much
of this equipment is now 9 years old and does not reflect the new techniques and
equipment found in modern industrial shops because of technological changes of
the past decade.
18. Oakalla
Vocational training, as in previous years, was geared to the various production
shops and maintenance work within the institution. There has been a noticeable
decrease in the trade skills of new inmates. The present training has been designed
to encourage any inmate with a complete lack of skills to gain some sense of accomplishment. His interests are explored and tested by assignment in varying jobs. If
he lacks interest, he is moved to another area with the hope that he will adapt somewhere along the line.
If he shows interest in a particular phase, he is given instruction and employed
as a helper to another inmate with more skills and experience. Every attempt is
made to establish good work habits and to provide practical on-the-job training.
Although this procedure has many drawbacks, a surprising number of inmates have
acquired skills which have aided them in finding employment on release. In many
instances the necessity of meeting production goals has limited the opportunities for
vocational training.
Of the inmates employed in the steam plant, one completed and passed the
third-class engineering course from Victoria, one passed the Government Inspectors'
examination for third-class engineers, and another inmate passed a similar examination for fourth-class papers. Men assigned to the Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit
learn baking by producing all the bread and buns used at Oakalla.
19. Vancouver Island Unit
An instructor in carpentry was hired to provide training in this trade at the
Vancouver Island Unit. In addition, vocational skills were imparted by informal
on-the-job training in welding, auto mechanics, cookery, and butchering, as well as
in greenhouse work and farming.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 27
Forest Camps
20. Chilliwack Camps
These four camps in the Chilliwack River valley continued sawmill and reforestation programmes, as well as advancing the construction of a new camp. In the
sawmill at Mount Thurston Camp, 194,948 board-feet of rough lumber were produced. The planer processed a total of 288,710 board-feet, of which roughly one-
eighth was cut in the sawmill at Haney. In reforestation, the programme included
field planting 550,000 seedlings and transplanting 519,000 seedlings in the nursery.
In addition, a number of areas were cleared of hardwoods, brushed out, and prepared
for replanting. The hardwood was salvaged for fuel for heating purposes. At the
end of the year, construction of the new camp at Ford Mountain to replace the old
camp at Tamihi Creek, was well advanced. The camp consisted of five 12-man
living units of 860 square feet each, ablutions building, kitchen and mess hall, and
an office building containing a lecture and group counselling room, a medical and
first-aid room, and six cells. Inmate labour was used throughout. The improvement
in morale resulting from a construction project of this nature was impressive. A pilot
pre-parole programme involving 15 to 18 young offenders was instituted. The
programme involved regular attendance at group counselling sessions, the completion
of at least one correspondence course, some interest in hobbies and sports, and
achievement of above average work habits, conduct, and attitude. A total of 21
inmates underwent this programme and were released during the year on British
Columbia parole. Only four revocations have occurred amongst this group to date,
although not all paroles have been completed.
Centre Creek Camp was electrified and a 200-gallon water tank, 30 feet high,
constructed at that site. Crews from this camp slashed 3.5 miles of a 70-foot-wide
right-of-way for the Chilliwack Forest Development road, and in addition cleared
1,000 feet, 100 feet wide, for the Ford Mountain Lookout Road. During June to
August, 80,000 feet of logs were salvaged from a 4-mile log jam on the Chilliwack
River.
Although group counselling in the Chilliwack camps is not compulsory except
for those in the pre-parole group, 95 per cent of the men are involved. Lay counselling, on a case-load basis, was extended to include almost all inmates.
Weekly meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous groups were started in October,
1965, with an average of nine participants from each camp. Inter-camp meetings
were held each month, with outside speakers participating. Each month one representative from each camp was allowed to attend a community Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting. These delegates took back matters of interest to their own groups. There
were no escapes or disciplinary infractions resulting from this community involvement, which helped to broaden the scope of the Alcoholics Anonymous programme
and contributed to the sense of purpose of the participating inmates. Inter-camp
soccer and baseball schedules operated in season, and a successful sports day was
held in the summer. Hobbies were actively fostered, and a number of items were
displayed in a booth at the Chilliwack Fall Fair. Family visits were encouraged by
assigning one Sunday each month for visits to each camp. Visitors were transported
by chartered bus from Chilliwack to the selected camp and returned after the visiting
period.
21. Say ward Forest Camps
At Snowdon Camp, the training emphasis was on the establishment of good
work habits through forestry work. Achievements during the year included the
transplanting of 400,000 2-year-old trees, the pruning of 15 acres, and the preparation of 12 acres for transplanting.   In addition, 17,784 man-hours were devoted to
 DD 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
clearing old logging-roads as forest access roads and the operation of a road patrol
during the wet weather to ensure that ditches and culverts were kept clear. During
the fire season, three fire-suppression crews were formed and assisted in controlling
seven fires.
When not engaged on forestry work, men from this camp serviced nearby campsites of the Department of Recreation and Conservation. Over 12,000 man-hours
were spent servicing Morton Lake, Miracle Beach, Quinsam, and Elk Falls campsites.
Community service projects included repairing toys for Christmas distribution
by local service clubs and participation in two Red Cross blood donor clinics.
From August 1, 1965, the camp came under the Vancouver Island Unit for
administration. Inmates were selected by Central Classification from first offenders
considered to have a high potential for training and subsequent re-establishment
into the community. Lay counselling was extended to short-term prisoners on a
case-load basis, and a voluntary advanced group functioned in the group counselling
programme. An active sports, hobby, and a voluntary Alcoholics Anonymous
programme completed the leisure-time activities for this camp. At the Lakeview
Camp, staff difficulties were encountered in the Search and Leadership Training
(SALT) programme. In an effort to overcome some of these difficulties, responsibility for administration of the camp was transferred to the Vancouver Island Unit,
effective August 1, 1965. Although the situation improved, it was not found possible
to recruit suitable staff for such a demanding programme in sufficient numbers to
enable the Search and Leadership Training to continue. As a result, the SALT
programme was reluctantly suspended and the camp programme redesigned as a
normal forestry camp at the end of February, 1966. The application of Outward
Bound training principles to corrections, which formed the basis for the SALT programme, has shown what can be achieved in changing the attitude and outlook and
in challenging the anti-social value system of the hostile, aggressive young inmate
who has failed to respond to the more conventional training programmes.
It is to be hoped that we will be able to reintroduce this type of training, perhaps in a modified form, when suitable staff are available. In a rigorous programme
such as Search and Leadership Training, accidents are bound to occur. Fortunately,
most accidents were of a minor nature. One that was not involved a staff member
who slipped on glacier ice while leading a mountain-climbing expedition. He received
multiple injuries, none of which were of themselves severe. However, the combination was serious. Rescue and first-aid techniques, taught as part of the SALT
course, were put to practical use as the inmates effected a rescue in rugged mountainous terrain. Had the course not been effective in changing attitudes, developing
skills, relationships, and a sense of responsibility, a fatality might well have occurred.
Last year an additional 48 inmates took the SALT course. Only 28 completed
it. Sickness, escapes, and behaviour resulting in disciplinary action and removal
from the course were but a few of the ways inmates used in attempts to evade the
demanding challenges placed before them. Those who had been depending on
bravado and bluff were soon exposed. A significant change in the reconviction rate
was effected amongst those who successfully completed the course, many of whom
were well on the way to a lifetime of crime. Had they not had the course, their
chances of survival in the community without further criminal activity would have
been slight.
In its role as a forestry camp, Lakeview Camp was involved in slashing, pruning,
burning, and general clean-up at Wolf River and McCreight Lake, as well as in
manning lookout stations and in fire suppression at Armour Lake, Quadra Lake,
Roberts Lake, Mount Kitchener, and Pye Lake.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66 DD 29
22. Kamloops Gaol Camps
Clearwater Camp has assisted three Government departments—Highways,
Recreation and Conservation, and Forest Service—in this year's operations. In
addition, a great deal of maintenance and many camp improvements were effected.
These included new roofs and eaves, exterior painting, completion of a hobby-shop,
enlargement of the chapel area, construction of a log retaining-wall at the camp
entrance, as well as construction of a rustic fence, over a mile long, to keep range
cattle out of the camp-site. In addition, a tangle of fallen trees creating an unsightly
fire hazard was cleared and the area transformed into a garden plot.
Rayleigh Camp operated more as a wing to the main gaol than as a forestry
camp, with a selection of short-term prisoners serving sentences from 30 days to
six months. Its farm operation was expanded, and 80 tons of potatoes were harvested. Most of these were transported to other institutitons to save on food costs.
A small-scale cannery preserved surplus garden produce for later use. Some 38
head of young beef were purchased for the anticipated weight gain expected from
growth and good pasturage. Of these, 26 were slaughtered, with an estimated 9,500
pounds gain in weight.
In both camps, counselling programmes were expanded and an active sports
schedule followed. Alcoholics Anonymous groups continued, with outside speakers
attending meetings.
23. Haney Correctional Institution Camps
Gold Creek Camp continued to function as a pre-release camp designed to
reorient to community life those about to be paroled. The training schedule involved
hard work during the day, coupled with discussion groups focusing on four areas
of individual adjustment. These groups, with skilled leadership, discussed individual
and family living, the proper use of recreation, and the responsibilities of citizenship.
They attempt to help inmates identify their past problems of adjustment and help
them develop successful ways of dealing with these problems on their release.
The work programme saw the start of a long-range log-salvage project which
will provide fruitful occupation for many years to come. There are some 300 to 600
acres of drift logs available in upper Alouette Lake. During high-water periods,
these logs are collected in booms and towed to the lower lake, where salvable logs
are separated from useless logs and debris. In low-water periods, the waste material
is burned. The useful logs are delivered to the sawmill for cutting into lumber. A
tugboat, camp tender, and three work boats were used in this work.
Pine Ridge Camp continues as an honour camp for those whose behaviour
merits the reward of living outside the Haney Correction Institution during the later
stages of their training. Forty of the 55 inmates returned to the main institution
daily, on their own, for their regular training assignments, 15 were employed operating the sawmill and planer, while the remaining 10 were employed on camp maintenance. During the past year the planer-mill was completely rebuilt and returned
to full-scale operation at the year's end. The sawmill cut 103,856 board-feet of
lumber of various dimensions. In addition, 766 cedar fence-posts were split by
hand and 75 shake blocks cut. The Forest Service commended both staff and
inmates for the excellent efforts of the fire-suppression crew.
Specialized Institutions
24. Alouette River Unit
The year was one of expansion and consolidation at this unit. It was tripled
in size with the construction of two new dormitories of concrete-block construction.
Total capacity is now 153.   The staff complement has been increased to 45, doubling
 DD 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the numbers reported last year. Staff training and orientation created some problems, but these were solved without serious disruption of the programme outlined
fully in last year's Report. There were 886 admissions, including readmissions,
during the year, and 752 were discharged. The average length of stay was 5.8
weeks.
Statistical reviews, conducted at six-month intervals, have demonstrated continuing substantial success for this experimental programme, as shown by the
following table:—
Number released up to December, 1965  576
Admissions with 20 or more convictions  42
Admissions with less than 4 convictions  22
After 6 to 11 months freedom—
Percentage not reconvicted  34
Percentage reconvicted only once  22
After 12 to 17 months freedom—
Percentage not reconvicted  28
Percentage reconvicted only once  14
Of 45 first and second offenders, only two were reincarcerated, which gives
evidence of the prophylactic effectiveness of the unit with the early alcoholic offender.
These figures demonstrated that the carefully planned programme, administered by
an enthusiastic and imaginative staff, has successfully pioneered a significant breakthrough in the pattern of repeated arrests to which the alcoholic offender is subject.
The programme hinges on four concepts—the regeneration of self-respect, help
and encouragement of facing up to the problem of alcoholism, the redevelopment of
sound work habits, and assistance in formulating plans for life in the community
following release. The objective is to motivate the resident to a desire for behavioural
change for the better. Once this has been accomplished, he is helped to develop to
the point where he is ready and willing to take his place in society as an honest, law-
abiding, useful, and happy citizen. To the alcoholic this means, first and foremost,
sobriety. Methods used to achieve these objectives include individual and group
counselling; various techniques to bring back lost self-respect and to dispel the
feeling of hopelessness; religious instruction; Alcoholics Anonymous meetings;
group contact with the Alcoholism Foundation; rehabilitative courses (designed to
inspire and revive interest rather than to re-educate); talks by visiting speakers;
films of general interest; and the instillation of good work and personal habits.
Underlying these methods is a basic faith, held by all with whom the resident comes
in contact, in his ability to make something of himself with the right help.
After-care.—Post-release planning while within this institution, followed by
suitable after-care, was vital to success in most cases. Rehabilitation Officers, working within the unit and serving as a link to the outside community, deserve particular
mention for their contribution. Tribute is also paid to the Maple Ridge Half-way
House Society, which was formed to operate a hostel for recovered alcoholics. The
venture originally started as a volunteer service in April, 1965, but it soon became
apparent that community support was required if the Half-way House was to survive.
This was accomplished by the formation of the Maple Ridge Half-way House Society
in the latter half of the year. Success ratios have been significantly better when
referral to the Half-way House was a part of the release plan.
Some Success Stories.—The following typical success stories, in which all names
have been disguised to protect the identity of the resident, are quoted from a report
by the Senior Rehabilitation Officer in October, 1965:—
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 31
" Mr. Sam L., released on April 21, 1965, passed through Maple Ridge Halfway House into a job in Langley. He has continued close association with the A.A.
programme and has recently visited the Alouette River Unit with a community A.A.
group. Working, sober, and looking prosperous, he has had a great effect upon his
former skid-road acquaintances.
" Mr. David R., age 45, released on parole on August 2, 1965, to Maple Ridge
Half-way House. Now employed in construction work, he has remained sober and
can already look back on himself objectively. He does not remember such a long
period of sobriety since his youth.
" Mr. Joseph S., age 42, released July 7, 1965. Though given only a fan-
chance of success due to the severity of his alcoholic problem (22 previous admissions to Oakalla Prison Farm), he has remained sober with A.A. help and is holding
down a steady job at a foundry. He also has returned to the Alouette River Unit
with visiting A.A. groups to persuade old acquaintances that they too can change.
"Mr. Harry B., age 47, released October 15, 1965, has already obtained his
longest period of sobriety out of gaol for years and is looking forward to his first
Christmas outside gaol in 17 years.
" Mr. James A., age 35, released on August 27, 1965, is one of the few Indians
to understand and admit his alcoholic problem. He has a steady job and anticipates
the day when he can return to the Alouette River Unit to try to motivate other
Indians to tackle their drinking problems.
"Mr. Carl J., age 31, left the Alouette River Unit after a second visit on
August 26, 1965, with 53 previous admissions to prison, and asked for referral to
the Half-way House. He now admits that his reasons did not include a desire for
sobriety. However, after a short period of hanging back at A.A. meetings he was
selected group chairman, since then he has developed considerably in self-respect
and in his understanding of his problem. He has not had a drink since he left the
Alouette River Unit."
Work Programmes
Productive work well performed continued to be the principal objective of the
work day programmes in all institutions and camps. In the larger institutions, maintenance and the day-to-day " housekeeping " work involved in keeping a large population of prisoners housed, fed, and clothed absorbed a substantial portion of the
inmate force. Prison industries and vocational training programmes absorbed
another substantial portion of those available for work.
The therapeutic value of work is enhanced if it contributes to the common good
of society. To this end, work programmes of assistance to other departments of
Government have been actively sought out. In this way the taxpayer gets some
return for the otherwise unproductive expenditure of public funds in maintaining
prisons and camps. A brief review of these types of programmes is of interest and
indicates the nature and extent of the contributions thus made.
Forest Service.—The forestry camp programmes, guided by the Inter-departmental Rehabilitation and Forestry Committee, continued to expand in all phases.
Some mention of facets of this programme has been made above, and the following
table sets out salient facts of the substantial contribution made by the forest camps
to the economically important forest industry of the Province:—
 DD 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY OF FOREST CAMP WORK PROGRAMMES
Totals
Chilliwack
Camps
Haney
Correctional
Institution
Camps
Say-
ward
Camps
Kamloops
Camps
Prince
George
Camps
Miles of road construction in which camps assisted
Miles of trail cut 	
Acres planted, reforestation  	
Acres cleaned, weeded, thinned, or pruned 	
Acres cleared and burned for nursery use „...
Seed-beds constructed	
Trees planted, reforestation (thousands)	
Seedlings transplanted, nursery (thousands)	
Seedlings lifted for field planting (thousands) —
Manning secondary lookouts (man-hours)	
Fires in which inmate crews assisted .	
Helespots constructed 	
Logs sawn to lumber (m.b.f.)  	
11
22%
370
545
11
280
232
,818
,438
640
23
2
299
I
15
252
120
80
519
550
4
195
250
5
639
838
2
104
Vi
140
6
40
400
50
640
11
43
35
240
35
260
75
117
Substantial savings were effected by utilization of the lumber mentioned above,
which was used for a variety of purposes by both the Gaol Service and Forest
Service. For example, almost all the lumber required for the new Ford Mountain
Camp came from the two sawmills at Pine Ridge and Mount Thurston Camps.
A review of the types of services performed for other departments of Government is of interest:—
(1) For Recreation and Conservation Department:
Clearing camp-sites of winter debris.
Road and trail construction, gravelling and grading.
Construction of safety fences at view points.
Grading and regravelling parking-lots, boat-launching ramps, tent
and picnic sites.
Cutting and stack-piling firewood.
Brushing out undergrowth to improve camp-sites and preparation of
new camp-sites.
Slashing and clearing rights-of-way into new camp-sites.
Clearing floating driftwood from Alouette Lake.
(2) For Highways Department:
Manufacture of blanks for highway signs.
Cutting bridge and culvert timbers.
Grading and clearing bank slopes.
Clearing bridges of heavy snow.
Sanding and salting hills.
Filling and repairing roadside sand boxes.
(3) For Provincial Secretary's Department:  Opening and closing graves and
cemetery maintenance at the Provincial Home for the Aged, Kamloops.
(4) For British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority:
Cutting and peeling power poles.
Assistance in power-line construction.
(5) For British Columbia Ferry Authority:  Manufacture of wheel blocks for
Government ferries.
(6) For internal use in Corrections Branch:
Manufacture of socks for inmate wear.
Manufacture of file cabinets.
Manufacture of new inmate boots.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 33
Repair of boots.
Manufacture of denim uniforms, cooks' whites for kitchen wear.
Construction of some office furniture.
Farm operations — growing produce, raising hogs  and chickens,
grazing cattle for beef.
Canning of surplus produce for later use (Kamloops).
Farm Programmes.—There was some curtailment of the farm programme of
the Kamloops Gaol and its satellite camps. The golden nematode infestation created
difficulties at the Vancouver Island Unit farm. Otherwise, all farming operations
were carried on successfully. For example, produce from farms at Oakalla, Vancouver Island Unit, Rayleigh, and Prince George included the following used in
kitchens throughout the Gaol Service with substantial reduction of food costs: Beef,
21 tons; pork, 74.5 tons; eggs, 23,000 dozen; milk, 28,000 gallons; carrots, 41.5
tons; cabbage, 45 tons; turnips, 29 tons; potatoes, 153 tons. In addition, substantial quantities of vegetables were used as cattle and hog feed.
 DD 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHAPTER IV.—TREATMENT OF WOMEN
General
1. Population
Admissions during the year reached 1,254, an increase of 16 over the previous
year. The daily average population also increased from 134 to 141, as compared
to the rated capacity of 138. The highest daily average population figure was 141.
Overcrowding continued to pose problems which had adverse affects on programme, staff, and inmates. It is hoped that the new Twin Maples Unit will
alleviate overcrowding at the Women's Gaol shortly.
The number of inmates of Indian origin remained fairly constant at about half
the population. More than two-thirds of the women came from the Lower Mainland of the Province. The proportion of illiterates remained fairly constant, at
about 13 per cent. Three-quarters of the women were confined for liquor and
narcotic offences.
Although the numbers transferred to the Provincial Mental Hospital decreased
from 18 to 12, emotionally disturbed inmates continued to pose a major problem.
2. Discipline
There were no serious disciplinary outbreaks during the year and only one
serious assault on staff members, despite an increasingly sophisticated type of
inmate. Prisoners on remand or awaiting transfer to a Federal penitentiary continued to be the principal source of disciplinary problems.
3. Security
There were no escapes from the Women's Gaol during the past year, but the
Chief Matron reports an increasing escape risk because of a higher proportion of
aggressive and combative prisoners. It is still necessary to house prisoners requiring
maximum security in the central part of the main building, through which most of
the daily traffic must flow. Structural changes will be required to correct this
situation.
Social Training
4. Group Living
The treatment programme is based on group living, with the inmate population
divided into 10 groups. The intent is to approximate the therapeutic community
concept. There are limitations, however, in achieving this objective imposed by
custody and security aspects, the physical plant itself, which was not designed for
this type of programme, and by the high proportion of inmates with short sentences. This proportion varies from day to day, but remains fairly constant at
about one-third of the total population.
The inmate serving a short sentence receives little benefit from the group-
living experience, but the remaining two-thirds do benefit from it. It is estimated
that a minimum of three months is required for the programme to have an appreciable impact.
Seven of the 10 groups live in more or less self-contained units, which facilitate group counselling and allow discussion of problems which arise in the group
setting. The give-and-take discussions, by means of which these problems are
solved, is a highly effective socializing medium. Inmates learn to consider the
feelings of others and to control themselves for the benefit of the group. Stronger
members of the group support and help the weaker ones.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 35
5. Group Counselling
All staff members participate in formal weekly group-counselling sessions.
These meetings assist in assessing the progress of each group. The Drug Research
Unit, composed of addicts who volunteer for this unit, is housed in a self-contained
Pan-Abode cottage. It appears to be more advanced than the others in its use of
group counselling.   This is mainly because
(a) its members volunteer for this type of programme;
(b) they live in a self-contained unit, which promotes a flexible programme;
(c) they do their own pay ratings and institutional adjustment reports;
(d) they have a project which makes them financially independent of former
undesirable associates;
(e) the additional staff working with this unit enables the fuller use of day
parole.   The group is therefore able to see concrete results for its efforts;
(f) the staff of the Drug Research Unit are dedicated to the counselling programme and are a small group of integrated workers who communicate
group interaction and moods to all staff working with the group.
The two cottage groups—one composed of first offenders and inmates from
rural settings, and the other of native Indian women with a drinking problem—are
particularly susceptible to counselling because they live in dormitories. Their
members cannot retreat to their own rooms to avoid personality difficulties. Therefore, these groups have many opportunities to apply group counselling informally,
and staff are quick to use opportunities to work out adjustments within the group.
Whereas formerly they took their problems to a staff member, expecting her to
correct the situation, they have now come to accept that all problems must be discussed in a counselling session.
The effectiveness of the group-living experience and of group counselling is
somewhat limited in the five groups housed in the main building because these
inmates have to conform to work schedules which limit counselling sessions. The
two groups which have separate self-contained living-quarters gain more from group
counselling than do the other three groups not having the advantage of separate
living-quarters.
6. Individual Counselling
Whereas the focus of group counselling is changing the inmate's value system
and helping her to adjust in a group situation, individual counselling is directed
toward solution of specific problems, either of adjustment within the institution, in
cases where group counselling has not had the desired result, or of problems rooted
in the community life of the inmate. There were over 1,200 individual counselling
interviews held last year. Interviews based on adjustment within the institution
were usually initiated by staff. However, many were sought by the inmates themselves when community problems were involved. Such counselling attempts to help
the inmate to assess herself and her circumstances and encourages her to make use
of the appropriate community resource for her problem. Many of the interviews
were followed by referral to social agencies for appointments to discuss problems
of special concern with professional counsellors.
7. Education
The schoolroom can accommodate 10 students, and seldom was this capacity
not fully utilized. Inmates studied a total of 16 courses, of which seven were commercial, five were academic, three were vocational, and one was art.   Fifty-five tests
 DD 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
were written during the year. Most of the results obtained were over 75 per cent;
21 achieved 90 per cent or over. There were no failures, and those who failed to
achieve high marks were working up to capacity. One student earned a typing proficiency certificate with a speed of 53 words per minute.
8. Volunteers
Volunteers, either individually or in groups, made an outstanding contribution
to the social development of the inmates. Some provided instruction in specific
skills, such as dancing, public speaking, and various sports.
Entertaining the volunteers adds to an inmate's poise, and all such contacts
provide an opportunity for the women to mix with members of the community who
have no authority over them and who stimulate and broaden their outlook. New
vistas for normal living are opened up for those from deprived backgrounds who
have known nothing but depravity, exploitation, degradation, and rejection throughout their lives. Staff found that reticent inmates were drawn out of their shells and
began to relate to staff in a meaningful way as a result of these volunteer visits.
Members of the Elizabeth Fry Society continued to support and encourage the
efforts of students. They brought in speakers from vocational schools and the Special
Placements Section of the National Employment Service, who were most willing to
assist girls wishing to continue their education on release. Members were often able
to relay gratifying news of former students who are continuing their studies or
working and making a real effort to lead a normal life.
Captain Kerr, of the Salvation Army, continued to lend her staunch support
and friendship to students. She arranged for them to stay at the Catherine Booth
Home upon release, if they wished to do so, and was always ready and willing to
help if needed.
A volunteer group of university students visited regularly and gave the young
narcotic addicts group opportunities to meet intelligent people of broad outlook.
By their interest and warmth they stimulated many valuable discussions.
Alcoholics Anonymous and the Legion of Mary continued to support the
social training programme by providing a sustaining positive influence. A number
of church groups were again active throughout the year.
9. Recreation
Interest in sports was maintained through group competition, league play, and
tournaments. All groups became involved in the badminton tournament during
the month of March. A track and field meet held June 14th was the culmination
of a month-long practice of all groups for the various events. First, second, and
third prizes were given for the athletes obtaining the highest points. Participation
in events was keen and outstanding.
Thirty-eight games were played against teams from the community during the
softball season. Volunteer coaches were helpful in contacting teams for league play
and in developing good teams in the institution. At the termination of the season,
September 18th, a barbecue for the ball teams was held, and trophies were presented. Swimming at the lake-shore commenced the last two weeks of June and
continued until the end of August. All sentenced women participated in this activity
once a week.
10. Religion
Both chaplains held regular Sunday services at the Women's Unit throughout
the year. In addition, a padre's hour, though held during the inmates' leisure time,
drew consistently good attendance on a voluntary basis.    These periods featured
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 37
religious films and group discussions on religious topics.    In addition, the two
chaplains were available for individual consultation.
Vocational Training
11. Work
Good work habits continued to be the basis of training. Slipshod performance
was never tolerated, and most inmates soon learned to develop a sense of satisfaction from a well-done job. Retraining in good work habits was stressed as an
important part of rehabilitation. As in other years, the total population was
engaged in housekeeping, maintenance, and vocational or occupational training.
12. Housekeeping and Maintenance
Laundry.—Fifteen to twenty inmates work in this department.
Kitchen.—Training in the kitchen, which continued to produce meals of a
high quality, provided many inmates with a saleable skill on release. Cookery
skills are also of value to those returning to housekeeping in their own homes.
Maintenance.—The building and grounds were kept clean and in good condition.   Much of the interior of the main building was repainted.
Carpentry.—This programme resulted in many improvements and minor repairs to the buildings.
13. Vocational Courses
The cosmetology course occupied eight inmates at all times. Some girls
earned certificates and found work in this field on release.
The home-nursing course was not in operation throughout the whole year
because transfers to the Twin Maples Farm absorbed some of the women assigned
to it. However, a new course is now functioning, and it is planned to continue
throughout the forthcoming year.
The power-sewing department suffered from lack of a qualified sewing instructor. Both production and training were adversely affected by frequent changes
in staff.   This department was moved to a new location during the year.
Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit
14. Women's Drug Research Unit
This unit continued to focus its programme on group counselling. The type
of group counselling strived for in the unit can best be described as problem-solving,
here and now, on a reality basis, directed toward conditioning the group to meet
its goals.
The group continued to keep up its weekly visit to The Woodlands School for
retarded children. This year they took on another project, that of assisting the
C. G. Brown Pool staff to teach retarded children to swim. The children are always
very happy to see the " blue ladies " (Women's Drug Research Unit inmates) and
are learning how to swim. In turn the " blue ladies " are gratified by the progress
of their charges.
Health and Welfare
Obstetrics and gynecology were the main reasons for the 463 referrals to the
Vancouver General Hospital. Some minor surgery was performed at the prison
hospital, mainly for removal of tattoos, suturing, rhinoplasty, and removal of a
lipoma.
 DD 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy-nine psychiatric interviews were arranged during the year. A small
psychiatric ward where severely disturbed women could be segregated would be a
substantial improvement to the facilities at the Women's Unit.
Parole and After-care
Twenty-two full paroles were granted, of which 12 were successfully completed
and four are still in effect. Only six failed and had their paroles revoked. Ten
day paroles were approved. A remarkable success was achieved by women released
on parole from the Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit. All eight women granted day
parole successfully completed it. Of the seven released on full parole, six successfully completed their parole periods and one was still on parole at the year's end.
Twin Maples Farm
The farm continued as a minimum-security facility for women, housing an
average of 20 inmates. Some 200 women passed through this unit during the year.
Those selected had short sentences, came from rural settings, and were considered
to be good security risks. Many were first offenders and native Indians with drinking problems. As its name implies, farming is the focus of the work programme,
but skills in cookery, laundry work, sewing, and housekeeping are also imparted.
Group and individual counselling are integral parts of the social education programme. During the year, 270 hours were spent in group counselling. Community groups have been of great assistance in helping residents to mix socially.
An Alcoholics Anonymous group meets regularly, and various church groups have
assisted in the social programme.
Compulsory evening classes for those with Grade V education or less have
been operating throughout the year. In addition to those required to attend, a
number voluntarily participated in order to improve their reading, spelling, grammar,
and arithmetic. Substantial gains were achieved by women from remote areas of
the Province, where educational opportunities are limited or non-existent.
Recreation included contemporary and social dancing, art, indoor games, folk
singing, flower arrangements, and native handicrafts. In the summer months, outdoor games, cook-outs, and picnics were added to the programme.
Religious services for residents, the great majority of whom were Roman
Catholics, were conducted by the Senior Chaplains.
At the end of the year, the new dormitories and administration offices were
under construction. When these are completed, capacity of this unit will be increased to 60.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66 DD 39
CHAPTER V.—HEALTH AND HYGIENE
The Senior Medical Officer reports as follows:—
" There has been an inevitable expansion of all medical services throughout
the year under review. The different types of correctional units required wide and
readily adaptable medical resources. Wherever people are deprived of their liberty,
there are special problems posed, and even in the minimum-security establishments,
such as the camps, the attending doctors are confronted by many situations which
they would not meet elsewhere; it is greatly to their credit that the general health
and safety of so many prisoners employed so actively with all the hazards, for example, of working in the bush, have been maintained at a high level. We appreciate
the willingness of heads of units to accept partially disabled inmates and find wholesome and appropriate activities for them as opposed to the alternative of confinement in a regional gaol.
" Perhaps the most pressing need of a strictly medical legal nature is that of
ensuring that no prisoner complaining of illness or injury is first attended or
diagnosed by any professionally unqualified person. In other words, there should
be readily available at all times the services of a male or female psychiatric nurse
or someone with an up-to-date industrial first-aid certificate or similar diploma in
all correctional institutions or units.
"As always, the major focus of medical comment is Oakalla Prison Farm.
There are six physicians on the roll of part-time attendants, and I have continued
to spend the greater part of my time there. We have been able to retain the
psychiatric services of Dr. A. M. Marcus, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, and Dr. E. Mellor, in charge of the Riverdale Unit,
Riverview Hospital. Dr. Mellor was of great help in the screening of mentally
ill patients for admission to Riverview Hospital. Dr. Marcus's sessions have been
devoted to psychiatric assessments. There has been no resource for psychiatric
treatment as such. We have found our psychiatric bed in the Fairview Pavilion at
Vancouver General Hospital of great assistance, mainly in the carrying-out of intensive psychiatric and psychological investigations in certain highly selective cases.
" The general medical services have again been remarkable for the unstinted
co-operation of the staff at the Vancouver General Hospital with its accompanying
facilities.
" Except for a brief period, the 12 beds in Fairview Pavilion I have been continuously utilized. I doubt if any other correctional agency in Canada has the
facility of so many specialist services on an out- and in-patient basis. In the years
past we have failed to record adequately our appreciation of this. It is stimulating
to all of us in prison medical work to have the privilege of such close contact with
a general hospital of such eminence as the Vancouver General Hospital.
" The technical services of the prison hospital at Oakalla Prison Farm have
been used both by the physicians there and the Vancouver General Hospital. All
departments in the central prison hospital have been actively engaged during the
year. A considerable share of this responsibility is borne by the Superintendent of
Nurses, Mrs. I. Passey, and it is largely due to her that there has been such competent co-ordination of medical services and personnel. Much of the surgery and
most of the technical medical investigations for trainees at the Haney Correctional
Institution have been carried out in the central prison hospital. Mrs. Braun has
contributed a great deal in her role as physiotherapist to both the Haney Correctional Institution and Oakalla Prison Farm inmates.
 DD 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Facilities for observation and treatment of mentally ill prisoners at Oakalla
Prison Farm are sadly inadequate. The observation ward in the prison hospital
has not proved to be a suitable area for close observation. The plumbing has been
found to be inadequate to handle the antics of those who try to choke it. For more
intensive psychiatric care we require a psychiatric annex with all it implies in the
way of supplying approved mental health services. The 128 transfers during the
year to Riverview Hospital for psychiatric care document this pressing need.
" We regret to record two suicides (one male, one female) during the year.
There were 50 episodes of self-injury, and 20 attempts at suicide by hanging. The
self-injuries are more the nature of rage directed inwardly and of attention-seeking;
nevertheless, the incidence is an indication of the need for more facilities for the
very disturbed young people to ventilate then problems with the help of skilled
counsellors. Prisoners awaiting trial or appeal are held for many months due to
the prolonged processes of law, and during this inactive confinement become apprehensive, depressed, and hostile. This presents a flourishing medium for morbid
and spiritually noxious influences.
" I have continued to visit the Haney Correctional Institution on a regular
basis. It has been most encouraging to observe the efforts and achievements of
the staff in the training of so many grossly maladjusted offenders.
"At New Haven I have maintained the practice of general medicine with
routine psychiatric assessments of each trainee and also see those referred by the
social worker. The Central Classification Panel has found it necessary to send some
quite disturbed young people there, and inevitably some of these have absconded,
though some have succeeded on their return despite initial failure. The New Haven
curriculum, with the relatively small number of trainees involved, continues to
highlight the success of such methods which make possible such concentrated care
and attention, which demands behaviour of high calibre.
" Perhaps, from a medical observer's point of view, the evolution of treatment
focused on changing the offender at the Alouette River Unit has been a most welcome event. The staffing accommodation and functioning of this unit is an earnest
of both science and humanity in the correctional field. It is hoped that similar
efforts will be exerted in the area of follow-up within the community.
" Medically there was little of significance to report from other sub-units, where
health matters were well cared for by local practitioners. The only exception was
a mild outbreak of infectious hepatitis at one of the Chilliwack camps. The outbreak was confined to one camp and quickly brought under control."
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66 DD 41
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROBATION SERVICE
General
1. Probation Cases
During the year under review, 2,879 persons were placed on probation. This
number marks an increase over the previous year of 298 cases. Of the total number,
314 were women, approximately 11 per cent. Similar to last year, approximately
67 per cent of the total number placed on probation were under the age of 18 years,
21 per cent fell between the age of 18 and 24 years, inclusive, while the remaining
11 per cent were 25 years of age or older.
2. Pre-sentence Reports
It will be noted from the appended statistical report there was an increase in
the number of pre-sentence reports prepared where some disposition other than
probation was made. During the year, 1,223 reports were prepared on juveniles,
while 1,747 were prepared on adults. These figures indicate definitely that while
the Magistrates' and higher Courts of the Province do not use probation as a method
of treatment as frequently as perhaps they might, nevertheless these Courts are
obtaining social investigations on the offenders, realizing this information is an
effective asset in sentencing.
3. Case Loads
As at March 31, 1966, there were 995 adults and 1,390 juveniles under probation supervision. In addition to this total of 2,385 cases, the following were
also under supervision: 20 parole cases from the National Parole Service, 205
Provincial parole cases, and 117 on release from Provincial training-schools. At
the same time the Probation Service was giving supervision to 259 under maintenance orders, while a further 205 were being supervised and counselled on a
voluntary basis. The Probation Service was involved in post-release planning for
a further 216 offenders in either Provincial gaols or training-schools who were
being considered for release on parole or provisional release. The number of cases
receiving supervision as well as those for whom post-release plans were being
formulated totalled 3,407, an increase of 255 over the previous year. A marked
increase will be noted over the previous year in the numbers being given a service
as a result of a maintenance order having been made against them, as well as those
receiving a service on a voluntary basis. This trend has resulted from greater
emphasis being given to the extension of the Family and Children's Court concept,
which stresses preventive measures at the local community level.
As at the end of the year, the average case load per officer in the field was
47.3 cases, a marked drop over the previous year. In addition, an average of 41
pre-sentence reports was prepared by each officer during the year. In spite of the
general average reduction in case loads, certain officers carried case loads substantially higher than the average, and reductions in such case loads can only be effected
by additional personnel.
Staff
4. Movement
Compared to the previous year, there were considerably more staff changes.
A total of 36 new appointments to staff was made during the year, and 12 persons
were separated. Of the 12 separations, three were Probation Officers-in-training
who, it was felt, would not become efficient Probation Officers; three left the Service
 DD 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to accept other employment; one officer returned to university;  and the balance
were separated for various reasons.
Of the 36 new appointments, 27 were university graduates, while a further
eight had prior gaol service or experience as a Probation Officer in another country.
During the year one staff supervisor was appointed to give supervision to the officers
engaged specifically in parole duties, as well as to assist in the development of specialized programmes and facilities.
5. Training
Two 16-week orientation courses were conducted during the year, the first
commencing in May and the second in October. The first course consisted of 12
officers (10 men and two women), while the second course was composed of two
women and eight men. One person in each course did not meet the standards
required. These training courses were again held at New Haven, and the instruction
was provided by senior staff of the Probation Service. As in previous years, many
field trips were made by the trainees to institutions and social agencies, giving them
the opportunity to become familiar with the policies and practices of various community resources.
These orientation courses provide training quickly for inexperienced personnel.
In the lecture portion of the course they become familiar with the objectives and
theoretical concepts of probation, which they are later able to apply during the
field training portion of the course.
The eighth annual staff meeting of the Probation Service was held at the Coach
House Inn in North Vancouver. The theme of the meeting was " Family Counselling," and leadership was provided by Mr. Ben Handleman, M.S.W., of Sacramento,
Calif., who is regarded as an expert in this field. Counsellors from the Haney Correctional Institution and New Haven, as well as the Rehabilitation Officers from the
Alouette River Unit, were invited to participate in the meeting as the general theme
had application to their work.
With the increased emphasis on the preventive role Probation Officers can
play, especially in relation to the Family and Children's Court, the choice of the
staff-meeting theme was most appropriate. Probation Officers were able to see
family counselling in action, as demonstrated by an expert, and were able to realize
how this technique could assist them in their day-to-day work.
The School of Social Work of the University of Brtish Columbia again placed
students for field-work training with the Probation Service. Working from an office
at New Haven and under the supervision of Mr. Frank Dignman, of the school, the
students accepted selected referrals from the Burnaby Courts.
Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency
6. Juveniles Placed under Probation Supervision
During the year under review, 1,729 boys and 206 girls were placed under
probation supervision. This total of 1,935 juveniles exceeded the number for the
previous year by 183. As the number of Probation Officers grows, it will be possible to give an increasing service to the Family and Children's Court, which will
result in more children being placed under probation supervision with few committals to the boys' and girls' training-schools.
7. Transfers to Adult Court
During the year, 210 cases were transferred from the Family and Children's
Court to Magistrate's Court under the provisions of section 9 of the Juvenile Delin-
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 43
quents Act. This figure indicates an increase of 32 cases. It is felt that this substantial increase highlights again the need for more varied resources for children in
the individual communities throughout the Province. Coupled with the need for
resources such as remand homes, group-living homes, or probation hostels, we must
find and develop more imaginative and resourceful probation conditions to help
those children having special problems. Only through such means will transfers to
the Adult Court be curtailed.
8. Family and Children's Court
Again this year there is a substantial increase in the number of voluntary
cases—1,181, as compared to 858 last year. These cases are grouped under "miscellaneous " in the statistics. It is believed the increase in this type of case resulted
in the increase in the number of officers working exclusively in the Family and
Children's Court. While some of the cases represent juveniles handled on an out-
of-Court basis on referral by parents or police, a larger number are cases of adults
who have come to the Probation Officer to seek counselling about a marital problem.
In some instances the officer has been able to assist the person to resolve his or her
problem, while in others Court action has followed. In September, 1965, an officer
was assigned on a full-time basis to the Family and Children's Court sitting at
Cloverdale, and in October another officer was assigned to work exclusively with
the Family and Children's Court sitting in the City of New Westminster.
9. Family Court Committees
Throughout the year Probation Officers have acted as consultants to Family
Court Committees appointed under the Family and Children's Court Act. The
activities of these Committees have varied, depending on the make-up of the Committee and the identified community needs. Many Committees have taken a hard
look at detention-remand home facilities for juveniles, while others have been concerned over the actual physical facilities for the Court and its staff. While the
activities of these Committees have been varied, they have been valuable in each
community by drawing together a group of people selected on the basis of their
interest in the welfare of children. This interest in the needs of children goes
beyond actual Committee meetings, and individual members stimulate and enthuse
others. It is to be hoped that entire communities will in this manner become more
conscious of the need to preserve and strengthen family life and avert the breakdown which so frequently leads to the delinquency of the children.
10. Appointment of Volunteer Probation Officers
During the year this practice has continued, especially in areas not covered by
adequate probation services. On a number of Indian reserves voluntary officers
have been appointed to supervise local youths to good effect.
New Developments
11. Regional Development
In October Mr. J. V. Sabourin was appointed a Regional Supervisor to give
supervision to those officers doing parole work exclusively and also to develop and
give supervision to specialized programmes and resources. Since his appointment,
the Marpole Hostel came into being, and by the end of the year plans were being
formulated for an enlarged Search and Leadership Training programme to be
carried out during the summer of 1966. The practice of holding quarterly meetings
with Regional Supervisors has continued. These meetings have proved to be an
effective means of communication both for the field and the administration.
 DD 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
12. Field Offices
A new field office was opened at Lillooet in February. This office has provided services to the Lillooet, Lytton, Ashcroft, and Clinton areas, which previously
had not received a satisfactory service because of travel distance from Williams
Lake. With the opening of this new office, the officer at Williams Lake has been
able to give more concentrated service to the Williams Lake-100 Mile House area.
In September an officer was placed on a full-time basis in the new Family and
Children's Court in New Westminster and in the same Court sitting in Cloverdale.
While still carrying a juvenile case load, these officers have tried to concentrate on
the family aspect of the work of the Court.
In November an officer was placed in a new office at Revelstoke. This officer
has been able to give services to both Revelstoke and Golden areas, which heretofore were without probation services. In February an office was opened in
Smithers, making probation services available to the Courts at Hazelton, Smithers,
and Burns Lake.
13. Victoria Family and Children's Court
During the year a fifth officer was added to the staff serving this Court. The
volume of cases handled by the Court has continued to increase, and the temporary
quarters of the Court in the former detention home on Coldharbour Road have
been strained almost beyond capacity. By the end of the year it was very apparent
a permanent prosecutor should be assigned to this Court and a full-time Judge.
From the Probation Officers' point of view, the availability of a full-time prosecutor
would be most desirable as each family case involves some technical legal point
which the Probation Officer is not competent to decide.
14. Psychiatric Services
Arrangements made last year with Dr. Bennett Wong to give three hours per
week for individual psychiatric assessments and group therapy sessions have continued during the year under review. Probation Officers in the Lower Mainland
area have received much help from Dr. Wong in terms of case-handling. His very
full and thorough assessments have given officers a better insight into, and understanding of, their clients, which has resulted in improved probation supervision.
As the need for such services has continued to be far greater than can be supplied
by Dr. Wong, Probation Officers have continued to use other available community
services.
15. Search and Leadership Training
Based on the success of last year's experiment, a Search and Leadership Training Course was conducted in the Marble Canyon area in the East Kootenay during
the summer. Probationers living principally in the Interior of the Province were
participants in the course. The programme followed many of the principles of
Outward Bound, involving basically the opportunities for development of character
through the challenge of a rugged physical environment and the absolute necessity
of a team concept to survive in the environment. The course included mountain-
climbing and was prefaced by practice expeditions in which safety and survival
measures were instilled in the participants. A considerable amount of counselling
was given by the two leaders.
This type of training introduces a youth to an experience in living with a group
of his peers and to a challenge supplied by the awesome magnificence of a mountainous setting which he will remember for the rest of his life. Under such conditions and with competent leadership, new concepts and attitudes can be developed
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 45
quickly and the whole experience can be a turning point for the youth who is
searching for his identity and for basic values. From a pragmatic viewpoint, this
type of training is economical as it does not demand costly and elaborate facilities.
It is hoped this training can be expanded to include a much larger number of probationers in the years ahead.
16. Marpole Hostel
In November, 1965, a pilot probation hostel was opened in the staff house
adjacent to the Marpole Infirmary. This facility became available to the Probation
Service with the closure of the infirmary and the transfer of the remaining patients
to Pearson Hospital earlier on in the year. The object of the hostel was to provide
as normal a home setting as possible to between 8 and 10 youths who either had
no home of their own or whose own homes for one reason or another were not
suitable. All those approved for residence in the hostel had to be on probation
and under 18 years of age. The hostel was staffed by an officer and his wife,
recruited from the Gaol Service, and an assistant.
The number of trainees resident at the hostel did not build up as quickly as
was anticipated, but by March 31, 1966, there had been eight admissions. Residents at the hostel either attend school or work, and if working are expected to
pay a nominal amount for board. Special evening and week-end programmes have
been developed, keeping in mind the demands of homework for those who are
attending school. It is anticipated the hostel will shortly build up to its maximum
capacity.
17. Intensive Supervision
In the Vancouver probation office an experimental project in intensive case
supervision was initiated. This programme commenced as a research design based
on a newly evolved pre-sentence report format which assigned objective values to
certain personality factors believed to be critical in terms of a successful or unsuccessful response to probation. A limited case load, not over 20 cases, of marginal
cases selected on the basis of the evaluation in the pre-sentence report was then
given to one officer to supervise and counsel on an intensive basis. It was hoped
that a control group of similar marginal cases could be selected and given to an
officer carrying a normal case load. It would then be possible to determine by
comparison which of the two groups had greater success and whether intensive
supervision of a small selected group had any validity.
As this project was still continuing at the end of the year, it is not possible
to summarize and evaluate the project.
18. Group Counselling
Group counselling was carried on during the year in the Vancouver probation
office. The second group, which met in North Vancouver under the leadership of
Mr. Thorvaldson, had to be terminated when Mr. Thorvaldson returned to the
University of British Columbia for further training.
19. Family Interviewing
Following the stimulation given by the staff meeting in " Family Counselling,"
several Probation Officers began meeting together weekly to share their experiences
in using this techniuqe. Family interviews undertaken by some of these officers
were recorded at the time of interview and the recordings used as a training device.
Interest in this technique has continued, and family interviewing is being more
widely used throughout the Service.
 DD 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
20. Educational Leave of Absence
Four Probation Officers were granted leave of absence to pursue further studies
at the University of British Columbia. Three of the four enrolled at the School of
Social Work, while the fourth entered graduate studies in the field of psychology.
Financial assistance was granted all four officers.
21. Parole Supervision
Parole supervision has continued to be an important part of the responsibilities
of the Probation Service. Five officers were employed exclusively on parole work
with trainees at the Haney Correctional Institution, Oakalla Prison Farm, and the
Chilliwack forest camps.
A close contact has been maintained with the British Columbia Parole Board
through both the Chairman and the Secretary of the Board. Field Probation
Officers have continued to supervise parolees returning to their areas.
The statistical report indicates the number of " provisional release " cases from
training-schools supervised by field Probation Officers, as well as the number of
cases supervised for the National parole service.
Provincial Probation Offices
Headquarters:
205,  1075 Melville Street, Vancouver 5,
B.C.
Vancouver Probation Office:
719, 193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver,
4, B.C.
Abbotsford:
Courthouse, Abbotsford, B.C.
Burnaby:
7272 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C.
Campbell River:
Box 749,  Public Health Building,  Birch
Street, Campbell River, B.C.
Chilliwack:
Room 75, Courthouse, 77 College Street,
Chilliwack, B.C.
Courtenay:
Box  1017, Courthouse, Courtenay, B.C.
Cranbrook:
Room 213, Courthouse, 102 South 11th
Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.
Dawson Creek:
10300b Tenth Street, Dawson Creek, B.C.
Duncan:
271 Canada Avenue, Duncan, B.C.
Haney:
Room 4, Mide Block, 22336 Lougheed
Highway, Haney, B.C.
Kamloops:
Room 211, 523 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Kelowna:
435 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Lillooet:
Courthouse, Lillooet, B.C.
Marpole Hostel:
8982 Hudson Street, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Nanaimo :
Courthouse, Nanaimo, B.C.
Nelson:
Room 2, Courthouse, Nelson, B.C.
New Westminster:
618, 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster, B.C.
New Westminster Family and Children's
Court:
511   Royal   Avenue,   New   Westminster,
B.C.
North Vancouver:
1676  Lloyd  Avenue,  North  Vancouver,
B.C.
Penticton:
Room 4, 284 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.
Port Alberni:
Room 216, 400 Argyle Street, Port Alberni, B.C.
Powell River:
4687 Ewing Place, Powell River, B.C.
Prince George:
Courthouse, Prince George, B.C.
Prince Rupert:
Courthouse, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Revelstoke:
307 First Street, Revelstoke, B.C.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 47
Richmond: Vernon:
105, 676 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. Courthouse, Vernon, B.C.
Smithers- Victoria:
P.O. Box 2267, Smithers, B.C. Room 104> Law Courts Building, Victoria,
B.C.
Surrey Family and Children's Court: Family and Children's Court, 1527 Cold-
17671—56th Avenue, Cloverdale, B.C. harbour Road, Victoria, B.C.
il: Williams Lake:
03 Federal Building, 805 Spokane Street, P.O. Box 697, Speers Building, '
Trail, B.C. Avenue, Williams Lake, B.C.
Probation Statistics, April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966
New probation cases—
Males (married, 261;   single, 2,304)—
Under 18 years  1,729
18 to 24 years      544
25 to 39 years      193
40 to 64 years        95
65 years and over  4
 2,565
Females (married, 66; single, 248)—
Under 18 years  206
18 to 24 years  65
25 to 39 years  35
40 to 64 years  8
65 years and over    	
314
Total  2,879
New follow-up cases—
Provincial parole  347
National parole  35
Training-schools—
Boys   196
Girls   41
Total      619
Pre-sentence reports—
Juveniles  1,223
Adults  1,747
Total  2,970
Total cases   6,468
Miscellaneous   1,181
Parole and follow-up cases (married, 32; single 587)—
Training-schools—
Boys       196
Girls         41
      237
 DD 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Parole and follow-up cases—Continued
Paroles (National, 35; Provincial, 347)—
Under 18 years   42
18 to 24 years   315
25 to 29 years  18
40 to 64 years  7
65 years and over     	
      382
Total      619
Transfers from Family and Children's Court to Magistrate's Court
1962/63   188      1964/65   178
1963/64   167      1965/66   210
6,000
PROBATION CASELOADS
1942/3  to  1965/6
5,000
"
Total  Cases
(including Pre-Sentence  Reports)          X^
f
4,000
_
3,000
-
/                                                                                    /
/                                          '/
/                                               * s
/                                                                                   Ss
/           Pre-Sentence  Reports                  „«*""""    f
2,000
-
^T                                        <,'*         ^^^y^        New
.X^                                        ^****        -——"""^ -Probation  Cases
1,000
tt^f^1^                                                          Miscellaneous  _f
j.A**"                                                                                                "Jr
•~*                               New Follow-up Cases                                  S           ..**
~==^====::==™^====r
~=====7ZZ-—
^*                 HCf*          •'***"*
1942-3      1945-6       1948-9        1951-2       1954-5
1957-8 1960-1
1963-41964-5        1965-6
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 49
V
rH
\
<t
r-I
in K
7    / m
\      o                                                                                      —
cn
rt
<N IX
f     I    Ol
1      ^
\o
4J
C\
O
U 1   ^/
/     M
1      u
«-t
H
° I   A
/       $
/       "O
r-t
1
o
vO
CJ»
I-t
u.
\
CO
in
3
m
\
m
h
vO
P
i
■cr
^""^^•^^                           >cv
S
\d o
o
CP»    >
p
r-S   "rT
hJ
CQ
o
O    P
f*H
o
^*^^c>cw      ^\.                                                       -
<r
i<3
CM   fi
in *lH
^^\.     N.
m
C^
Ed
i—»
tJ
q
m
ctf
C\
<i
w
fu
I
i
i                 i                i     X^
CM
1
T-I
m
3
o
o
o
ooo
o\
 DD 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDICES
EXCERPTS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD OF PAROLE
During the year the British Columbia Board of Parole released 396 trainees
on parole, an increase of 10 per cent over last year. This is more than 20 per cent
of the number of paroles granted by the National Parole Board. It was necessary
to revoke 121 paroles or 31 per cent of the number released, the same percentage
as last year.
The Board met on 81 occasions to consider trainees for parole. On two occasions, members met with the Director of Correction.
British Columbia paroles combined with National paroles were considered in
21 cases. Of these, the British Columbia Board of Parole approved release on
parole in 16 cases and supported the trainee's application for a National certificate
of parole during the remainder of the definite portion of the sentence. The Board
is grateful to the National Parole Service for its co-operation in these joint cases.
Board membership remained at five during the greater part of the year. Major
O. L. Erickson, Chairman of the Board since 1949, died on May 5, 1965; Mrs.
T. G. Norris was appointed as a member of the Board in August, 1965, and Mr.
H. Keetch was named Chairman. The many functions of parole emanating from
the decisions of the Board continue to be administered by the Secretary of the
Board with the help of a stenographer at the headquarters of the Corrections Branch
in Vancouver.
During the year there were 274 trainees who completed definite-indeterminate
sentences. Of this number, 80 per cent were released on parole, 5 per cent were
refused parole by the Board though recommended by institutions, and the remaining 15 per cent served the indeterminate portion of their sentences in custody
because of failure to secure a recommendation for parole from the institution in
which they were undergoing sentence. The Board's experience indicates three
elements must be present for optimum likelihood of successful completion of parole.
These are a strong desire for parole, a sound release plan, and effective supervision.
In assessing these, many factors must be considered before the Board reaches a
decision to grant or refuse a parole application. The following analysis of the
attached statistical statements provides a realistic assessment of the effectiveness
of parole.
Table No. 1 indicates the extent of the Board's activity. The 81 meetings held
represents an increase of five over last year. The total of 746 decisions made is
102 more than last year, and the 9.2 cases considered per meeting indicates a slight
increase in work involved at each meeting.
Table No. 3 compares the various institutions on the basis of the revocation
rate. Revocations occurred at the rate of 31 per cent of the number released, the
same over-all rate as last year, maintaining the 6-per-cent improvement over the
previous year. New Haven, with a success rate of 85 per cent, is 2 per cent lower
than last year. The Haney Correctional Institution maintained a success rate of
70 per cent. (Rates for Lakeview Camp are not reliable because of the small
number of completed paroles from this camp.) Oakalla Prison Farm now shows
a success rate of 51 per cent. This is an improvement of 8 per cent over last year
and represents considerable effort with a group who have, for the most part, not
been found suitable for, or have failed to respond to, other programmes.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66 DD 51
Table No. 4 gives an indication of the effectiveness of first, second, and third
parole periods. Results averaged over the past three years show that 70 per cent
successfully completed their first parole, 55 per cent successfully completed their
second parole, and only 40 per cent successfully completed their third parole. The
probability of successful completion of parole decreases by a regular 15 per cent for
each successive parole granted. In Table No. 5, " prison sentence " represents the
number of periods spent in custody and not the number of sentences received. The
only noticeable improvement in success lies in the group serving their first prison
sentence and having no previous record. Table No. 6 is presented to show the part
played by the Courts as compared to parole officers in returning parole violators to
custody.
Table No. 7 presents data on average age, time spent in custody, and the
average time lapse between release and revocation. Of the 396 paroled (one was
granted a temporary parole and is not included in some statements), the average
age was 20 years; the average training period was about 13 months; 121, or 31 per
cent, had their paroles revoked and about 70 per cent of these revocations took
place during the first four months on parole. This appears to be a critical period
during which parole officers should be giving intensive supervision in order to help
their charges readjust to life in the community.
Table No. 1.—Summary of Meetings Held and Cases Dealt with,
April 1, 1965, to March 31, 1966
Number of meetings held     81
Decisions made—
New cases considered  426
Miscellaneous—
British Columbia-National paroles considered    21
Reviews     70
Special consideration      56
Revocations considered  150
Administrative decisions    23
  320
Total decisions made  746
In co-operation with National Parole Service—
Applications for National parole supported by British Columbia Board of Parole     16
Disposition by National Parole Board—
Paroles granted     10
Parole refused       1
Decisions outstanding      5
Applications for National parole not supported by British
Columbia Board of Parole      5
Total considered     21
Average number of cases dealt with per meeting    9.2
Released on regular parole during fiscal year  395
Released on temporary parole during fiscal year       1
Total released  396
 DD 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table No. 2.—Progressive Summary of Meetings Held and Cases
Considered, 1949 to 1965/66
Number of
Meetings
Decisions Made
Year
New
Miscellaneous
Total
1949                                   ...           ..            	
5
12
12
14
23
37
44
	
460
684
460
356
319
259
63
270
320
15
1950     .._.  	
10S]
79
61
10"!?,
72
1051
147
1054
343
1055
409
1056
51
69
84
93
70
74
69
73
17
76
81
457
450
389
417
331
355
91
374
426
521
1017
621
loss
917
1050
1,134
1060
849
1061
773
1962	
1963..      ......
650
614
154
1064/65
644
1965/66                                 	
746
Totals
904
	
8,749
Average number of decisions per meeting, 9.7.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 53
VO
VO
>cO
VO
Ov
T-H
Q
z
<
in
vo
VO
Ov
cn
VO
Ov
CO
|
<
o
>
a
Ph
Q
z
<
w
>-)
o
<
Ph
Z
O
CO
n
<
w
hJ
w
o
H
z
W
w
H
<
H
00
w
S
o
U
o
w
►j
M
i?0,
z
SCO
Jig
a8
°-a
•SS
Oc^
11
OB
a
i3pgo
>n      hh
Os       cs co
co      h
OO i-H  t*»
OS i-H  CO
CN *H
rt   m
9 »
O   BO
•3 rt
rt tt
Ou
K t-«
u
rt a
&
SI a
u    a<
vo
VO
\
IT)
VO
o>
.—i
Q
Z
<
in
VO
VO
cOv
cn
VO
OV
Q
W
HH
O
<
CO
w
O
<
Ph
Z
o
CO
z
o
H
<
o
>
Pi
a
z
<
W
co
<
W
w
Ph
Ph
o
§
co
2
<
a.
1
o
U
o
w
I-I
M
<
*
os (S co                     t- so
nn                          fN
o\
1-1
SO
a
vi O m                     tJ- sO
ro i-i                          tN
H
ON
to
SO
Ov
OS  rt tO                              CO SO
SO
th —   :                ho
V)
so
p i          s
OS
4)
,_l
Ph
OS
-si      "1
£
1-1
CO
~*                      "-.
os
SS i         Si
$
SO
tJ- co m
«-h »n
CN
Os
S
b
rt
SO
5
ON
$
so r-
#
•o
CO
o
SO
O
S
'"",
SO
r> so so
ON
oo
SO
V)
ro fN i—
t± tN »n
!H OS
fN t*
Ph
so
2 r- on
tf.
r- h
i§
&
in
«n
a
o
V
CO
sO
OS
h os SO
fN VI
so
s*.
r- so oo
in c—
SO
Os
0
rt
SO
H OS O
s?
no
$
Ch
Tf
so
O oo ro
ro
6
CO
CS^
O
c-
CO
so
OS
OSO-fr
V) 00 CO
CN
Tf so
so so
>»
3
1
y
3
4>            <U
Cfl         o
d
DO
rt
Si     S
rt      mT
rt        7^ s SO   rt
ca
aj
"5
>
o
H
i
o
U
T-
 DD 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
s
h v-» t- so so
in O
*0
tN i-i vj fN t-
0\ o
so
tN
CO  H
Os
na
3
1-1
«n
SO
m    I m h Tt-
n    i to co so
i              CN
»n O
|
i
in o
to T-H
H
Os
to
so
OS
!       IHHVO
! in co h
CO O
Ov O
i     !              CN
tN h
P;
<
h-l
SO
so
X
H
2
5
m
SO
fO (N fN ^J t+
H  OS
m so
2s
Os
a
feg
	
£
SO      j V> *H 00
00 O
<n
VI
2
OS
j H        CN
tj- in
Z
fl
w
oBh
S
c
p.
CO
SO
L-II.II
o o
CO  Tf
Ph
OS
>
i-l
O
>
SO
so
z
to CO 00 SO OS
Os tN
h-1
in
so
OS
m
c- c-
CO
3
o
VI
>
w
rt
*o
O co
so
$
OS
CO     | SO fN Tf
m co
»n >n
ro
SO
Ph
S
1-1
ft.
Ph
O
a
CO
SO
OS
CO
o
Iiii!
tJ- in
r- m
co
M
«SJ
m
SO
OS
W
3
H
|
tn
Os os o cJ r-
fN h SO
fN
Z
o
'I
O
in
SO
05
Z
o
o
s
a
rt
s
Os
fN     ! SO ro t-
H           cN m
r- tN
o r-
CO
so
CO
d
0
«
o
,"H
3
<
Oh
1
to
SO
Iiiii
Tf Os
Os SO
§
G
Ph
H
iiiii
'-,
O
Ph
r }
E
7
•a
Vh
$
i^
iri
M
1
O
1
O
o
S
Ph
m
vjD
OS
so h r- oo so
tN
oo O
Tf   Oi
d
0
it
tH
o
1-1
Os
00
55
«n
so
I-I
-v.
tJ-    [ h vi in
in os
0
a
g
to
Tf  CO
a
1
Os
1      i
3     1
2    !
ti       i
5
1
o
Ch
1 E
u 1?
P.
-M           {     K
rt   u 3
pi
s
fc,0 | _
Ofl
ca
O * Ph   >
rf 4> m .«
0      3   a
.£2  rt   cd  <u  cd          S    c
u
►-
c
z
X
ft.
5
I
28
-
r- fN cs
n co
CN CS
Tf   T-H   SO
CO fN
£
fNTf
to
£
o
?,
!
1  i !
CO Tf
5
>
CO SO
t- ro
*H        so
co tN in
r- co
^
m tN
fN
to
iiiii
so ro
fll
2 S
a o
« u ,™      d
W5  *J [L rt
sag   3
g 5 cs cjU
.s>sa >j
UJOZK
-H «
^cm OH
S ° CO
§ &
" 1
Ph 0
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1965/66
DD 55
VO
VO
in
VD
Ov
i—i
Q
Z
<
v\
VO
\
TT
VO
Ov
cn
vo
Ov
i
>■<
pa
X
H
rt
o
Ph
CO
I
<
o
>
w
oi
tn
O
i-l
<
z
vo
d
w
>-i
m
<:
H
so
SO
Os
CO Tf                       CO SO
O SO                    Tf to
cN O
tfl
I
1-1
m
so
s
Os
in os                Tf t-h
t— so                to to
S.S
,~l
to
so
in r>                so to
SS
OS
co r>                tN co
1-1
T-H    T-H
SO
SO
"rt
m
so
Os
Tf m                Os in
ro O
m so                  fN co
oo o
fs
T"H
£•3
m
so
6-3
^ Cfl
s
in os                in t-h
o o
«n so                fN to
00 o
>.o
OS
T-H
Iffr-H
d
T-H
rt
to
so
w
Tf   SO                               t>  Tf
«n I-                  h tN
T-t   O
os
c- o
TM
rH
so
SO
Vl
so
»H in                          fO  in
fN                        t-
«8
Os
d
>
rt
m
so
th m               c
"t O
o
c4
s
Os
z
ro
so
Os
m so              Tt Tt
VI                                        Tf
0s O
o
*H
rH
sp
e
so
E
vi"
O t-h                oo os
CO O
fN O
Ph
OS
tN t>                     rN
a
1
m
so
H
A.
Tf
m in                mm
*-< r-                   tN
fN O
rt
Os
1-1
rt
•M
rt
to
0
SP
Os
^o Tt              m so
tN CO                                  TH
ro §
1-1
rH
Cfl
so
a
so
1
m
sp
to o                  «NO
SO                                        Tf
"8
U
OS
*""'
cn
CD
tH
m
O
so
Ph
Os
oc
CN
cOg
rt
is
	
g
to
a
VP
A
OS
!     !
u
*"*
SO
a
SO
1
•n
so
~8
rH O
o
U
Os
83
TH
t-t
O
so
3;
Os
i
1     !
1 j
M
ro
<a
VP
hJ
Os
1
1   i
d   i
°
0
i 1
-d   1
•O'S
2   I
CU
S >•
ffl   i
£
rt   i
rt    i
rt a*
u   ;
•° s
* •S
o
0
0
>
S '<3
CA    IH
QJ       1
5 y u
oat
rt    a.
Sort
o     >H    J,
60  -J  bO
co  5 rt
QJ   H   1>
Ph
Ih
o
Ph
 DD 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table No. 7.—Miscellaneous Statistical Information, Year Ended
March 31, 1966
Parolees
1963
1964/65
1965/66
Total parole	
Average age of parolees (years)  	
Average length of training period (months)	
Institutional comparison—
For Lakeview Forest Camp (months)	
For Chilliwack Forest Camps (months)..
For Oakalla Prison Farm (months)	
For New Haven (months)-
For Haney Correctional Institution (months).
298
11.8
12.7
12.1
11.6
355
20.3
12.4
7.8
11.3
12.1
13.0
395
20.2
12.9
13.7
7.7
13.5
12.6
13.1
Revocations
Total revocations	
Average age of revokees (years)	
Average length of training period (months) _
Average period on parole (months) ~
Occurrence of revocation relative to period on parole—
During 1 to 4 months	
During 5 to 8 months	
During 9 months	
121
20.9
13.4
3.9
73%
21%
6%
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 57
5
a
w
p
z
00
w
w
3
_J
w
PQ
!*
<
nf
H
g
J
h
<C
2
u
in
h-1
H
X
n
t/1
HH
H
z
<
H
%
>
w
M
d<
O
H
2
1
rt   H
•S ° a 9 a
g aoT) &
rt o « d E
^ o rj S a
J^fiO
S S u s
a -o ,o co
co    ftO
s ■a
SO
►1
Zw
u»
n g
HI .2
rt cs
SO
3" £ fi
O ^ft(J
ft
fi
i  o MAy ce
tjj-« fi ca fi.ti
rt *e w a, a, pj
zSafisS
3  OIS).h
<US3
id 2
« 9
oj rt
SO
Ssosoooor-ininoosco
mr-tOTfosoT-iotNT-i
so o> o^ fN co os^ i> rN_ to m r-
»» co oo" rf so Tf m" m r^ t-^ oC
commT-H      mosmsOT-H
t-h fN fN T-H CO        fN
tocor-T-ieoo\osooosoofNi>sor-Tto
TtsoofNomsor^osOT->osooomo
Os Os^ so t-h co CN fN oo o tN oo oo SDOv 0° <N
r-? rf oo to" Tf Tt" so" -rf co" r^ cn Tt to" tt t-h
oo os m so     i
oo to        CO Tf
CN
OT-HvoooooosmtNOoo
mcooosmotor^T-ir--
.mTfsoT-HTfootNtNTtco
r^ os m to co t— t-h
ro Tt m co m Tt so
oo o m m o t>
tNinmso"     TftN
Tf o to o
m co so t-h
os r^cs co
CN oC      T-^
tNcosoocor--soootN
OSOr^fNT-HOsOsOOsm
OssOT-HoorosDtsooo.ro
Tf 00 O
so ro Tf
m as so
mosr^cocoooTfoo
mmosor-TfT-iT-HT-Hos
.soroooo     r^soomTt
O CO t- SO CO CO t-h
o so Tf co os m oo
O *-" CN co  o co
tNO\r-intNOtor>oco
tNinCsO       mn-hhn
j.coroc^Tf       fN r- co in oo
SO" Tf rH CO"fOCo"        00
OO t-h CO 00
in in r- os
Os OS fN SO
OS
Tf   CO
""■'
i       1
TfsomTffNsot*-TfOt^
coTfasomrNOsmcNT-H
j.TfOS'-^COCOtSCMSOOCO
co" Tf" rN fN
O T-H
CN
O OS Tf o in Tf t-i
t~-   Tf f- Tf Tf SO SO
CO C^ Ov so  so r-
o o r> r-
fN CO Tf Tf
OS Tf    T-H
r- so r- t-h oo
Tf   00
CM
so
m
c-
fN OS Tf Tf os
O OS CO CO so
so os oo co in
CO tN CO   fsf
mtOTft^fNroosOso
r-osoT-Hoosomm
OsOt-Ht-icNsOt-hOsO
o o
o o
Tf cN
os ro t~- o m
co m t-h o so
Tf r- so Tf so
ossoooooowos
moooootNoosco
t-lnTfTfT— omTf
5
TT
or>T-Hr-t-^r--coos
TfSOOOO\T-HCOOOSO
Tft— socomcoT-HTf
r>cNOSDTttNTfOcot^cNm
C-oorOTfsoor^osoooco
Tt o\ Tt cm Tt Tf o^ os r^ r> c^ cn
os os" m so" t-T t-h" cn of ts" r-T     t-h"
OtNOmTfT-irososOTt
msoi>oocNoooooooo
^ CO co Tf SD_ Tf o^ Tf SO^ fN cN
in"coco"T-H  o" m Tf co" Tf"
CO (N rH t-H OS    CO
tN t- r- t-h co J> m
in Tf in ro to t— Os
r- so cm to  Tf m
ro so t~~ os
as so co r>
O rH
t-h"o"
OvvOrHOmsOtNTftNcNfO
OTff-oorooocOCOOsOT-H
r-COOcNOinosinfNcNt>
* cm" Tf" cm" cn" CN cn" Tf" in t> co
in so tN rHOsOSTfoo
to
rHOt-or^ossofooTfmosso
mcooscoT-HrNmsocoTtmTfso
r^ossor^fNr^osTfT-^TOfNinso^
©" t-h" Tf ts tN c-^ r^     vT o" t-T o" to"
CNmCOCO COt-H l-H TfT-H
fN
CN
Tf O
m o
oo fN
SO OS o
CO  O  O
fN tS CN
TfCOOOOfNTfTfTfrHVO
roTfTttsr^rHmooso
j.ossotDmsococomoorH
OS rH Tf" vT Vi CO Tf
SDOOOT-HTfCOOtOrH
OOOOSOCOOSOSOSD
OsmOTfrHOSCOrnm
! OS CO
: o m
! rH CN
CO OS CO Tf Tf
C-. OS CO T-H OS
fN Tf t> CO
f- Tf ro tN
CN OS Tt f-
Tf o co m
t-h cn oo" oo"
fN Os fN t^ Os 00 vo
to m m c- o t-h r-
*i. *"* ^**©* ,H «i
rNminnf     fN"co"
i r- cn f
! CO O OS
! SO tN
comOscoosc-TT-HSOCOTfro
vocor—rovor-moomfNT-i
o t— o^ r^ os ts Tf os^ o^ m^ r>
os so m co so
CO
^CN   T^    OS   T-H
OO  00
r^TfmtNTtcoo ifNtSossoso
OsOTfTfcNOCN     IcOTfOsosSO
tNint-^ocoi>rH los^sq^asfNso
to" Os* so" co t-T os co" ! cf r> o"co
rHfNCNfN        fNT-Hj TfT-H
 DD 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
3
• S
s
5
,
CO Tf
Tf so
o      oo r- oo      tN oo
CO
r*
so to
Os
CO
os r^
O   T-H
fN          t- t- rH          OS O
r~-
Tf
so Os
m
CO
OS tN.
cvcj
N
O oo      oo so
Tf
C-;
SO Os
sO
on
t— SO
rH t—       so v;
to t*-
o
*■    H
to
00 CO
CM
tN cN      co
Ov
ro
tH CO
m
oo
ft
OS rH
is1
CO
tN
CM
CO
tN
ts
m
Prince
George
Gaol
and
Camp
Tf  t-
+4
1 OS tN       tN Tf
! t- SO        f- tN
r-
Tf
Tf
tN CO
m
ro
«■
m
j OS Tf        vo O
Tf
Tf
t-h CN
CO
tN         rf cn
co"
in
m
OS
OS
C-
]     !
r-
CO
CO
!             w
ro
1   :
CO
S&S'Sfi'
^ o rt c C
1
Tf   O
Tf
O    I      o
o
Tt
Tf
so m
Tf        1            O
Tf
tr-
r-
»
CO CO
t^T-H
CO
o
CN
o
so"
so
so"
CO
CO
w
r-
t-
n-i
CO
1
ro
CO
rt'C o rt
i-l^ftO
CO
00
1     1           1
CO
i   i
CO
1
«■
SO
Tf
tN
tN
so
Tf
CN
!   i      1
i  i      '•
SO
Tf
cm"
fN
!   1
1 i
1     !
vo
Tf
tN
tN
•a
1
!   1       1
!    !         II
!   i
I   i
i _, m ft
«* fl u e
oo"s
:
Tf      j
5
1    1         j    i
Tf
!     !
Tf
1—1
S3
1
fN     |
CN
i !    i i
1                  i
r-
fM
1
1     !
fN
§
s
>
1
rH        I
1-1
1   !      1   i
^
!   i
'
1-1
So
cN m
r-*      oo m co
SO
,_,
^H
i
OS 00
r>      r^ r> m
o
r~
t^
w-
m r>
Os"oC
Tf   CO
CO
Os"
00
fN tN
T©
CO
r-
CO
ro
4)  >
.   j
Tf SO
o
so r-     tN   I
m
m
m
m so
tN
fN m       th    j
Ov
CM
tN
«■
CN so^
UK
CN
SO
SO
zw
r-^tN
os1
m   |
in
Tf
Tf"
to
to
CO
CO
1   1
*"•
1-4
^
'
<■'
a
Cfl
.
CO
ro
OO     !
00
in
—r
m
i.2
&
m
m
OO     !
CO
SO
so
i
tV>
00
oo
cn   ;
CN
in
m
h a
rt
CO
oo"
oC   j
OS
os
oT
Is
fcfl
o
o
tN
o
CN
OS
i
OS
!   Tf
t-~ OS
SO
m so     cn    j
ro
ro
1     !
!
CO
Hi8
11
1 t-
Os r>
r>
to o      mi
Os
00
|     j
;
00
: cn
fN^SD
OS
Tt to      co    :
in
CO
CO
■3 o
ffi.o
So
«■
0C00
co tN
SO
0\ TH          Os"     !
SO     j
o"
CO
i
oo
CO
oo
r^
r>
i       *J ce
r>    :
l-^
!        Tt     !
Tf
ro
CO
3 2 £ S
•SgSrt
U^ftO
m
00     !
co
r-
r>
tW-
CO     I
Tf"      f
oo
Tf
CO     ]
vo    |
oo
so"
:
Os
Tt   :
Tf
CN
CM
m    i
m
in
m
CO
Tf   OS
CO
o
ro
1
Tf
*rt
OS
CO CM
SO
ro
ro
r-
OS
CO  Tf
i>
so
:
Tf
,0
»*£
COr-?
Tf1
t^
C-"
1
tn"
H
CO
OS SO
00
m
OS
Tf
o
CO
1
m
m
co"
CO
CO
i
co"
CM
tN
1            SO
SO
SO
so
1
ft
a
*»
3
so
55
SO
i
1
co"
CTv
5s
ro
ro"
SO
T*
co"
so
-L          U,,
Tf CN
so
1         00      1
00
CO
i   j
"T
CO
§
tH
Ph
Tf   CO
t^
Tf        |
Tf
CM
cN
«■
Os O^
oCtN
r-
OS
oo
!  3 |
m"
cc
so"
| j
i
CO
VD
rt
3
tsi
CN
!         i
fM
!   !
]
fN
co   :
CO
SO
so
r>
j
r-
4b 2
£gO
:
r-    !
r-
OS
OS
:
Ov
:    O
</>
t—   1
00      !
00
in
j
m
to     1
CO
CO
co
CO
m r-
tN
fN  O          Tf Tf
o
CM
so co
OS
to
^f-i
OS
SD OS
VO
fN  Tf            Tf   OO
OS
r-
so Os
in
"fl o
o rt
so
Os
fN CO
so
tN t-       rH m
SO
°1
SO OS
so
to
**s
00 OS
l>
r^m     o*co"
so"
o"
fOt>
,-T
oC
CO
m m
cn
tN        OS
(N
Ov
o
rn  CO
CN
m
CM
CO
00
CO
CO
(O
oi
I
|   I
a
rt
TJ
tn
.
(fl        1
O       i
a
:
o     !
ft a
1
cn   Ifl
tu    o
H 5
«
8
'u    CJ
<u «
a   i
*3 8
C ■«
9 5
'«□ ca
I'M
3£
S   1
fl    O
1 §
.a S
o £
O    fl
*   rt
ft B
73 73
0
3
"C
a
|
E
5
Ih
,1
Ih    v
50
M
g
1
o>   S   " ft
3    &   M   O
g B -g-s
£ « §6
ih   fl a «
^H     ^H     TJ  t-J
rt   rt   c R
3   BO   O o
•2.3 H a
(4
&£ s >> .o p a a
SS
j
.9.S2
■3     , S
«h             Ph
T      i3
0   Si*,     fl                       tH.lfW
3
0
o
V
'C
Ph
to
TJ
<
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 59
IBJOX IBI3HIA0J£
JOBQ 33-I03O aouiJ j
fN 00
r- oo
OS ©_
Os"o"
m oo
oo >n
voV
CM Tf
Tf   T-H
CO  Tf
Tt"m
o l>
to CO
m to
CO   T-H
CN oo
fS 00
rM co
fN co
s^
ON
[^
R
o
SdlHB3 pUB
loeo sdooxuiE3
OS SO
T-H  <T>
co co
dlllBQ JS3IO£ M9TA33[B1
dureo js9jo,kI uopAioas
m co
oo so
i> i-h
co r-
fM Tf
CO Tf
<s
Tf
CN
! CM
! SO
: to
!
CM
SO
CO o
co O
CO CO
'!UI1 pnsisi jsAnoaoBA
tN   Tf
r- oo
so co
U3ABH M3N
co m
o CM
o so
O  Tf
to CO
00 CO
fN SO
00 oo
CO   Tf
CO 00
r- co
§3
(aSpra 3OTJ
pUB 3(9310
Pioo) sdureo
so m
to so
so^rn
fMoC
O OS
fM  T-H
t- os
m o
nopmpsni
sdtaB3 ;s3i0;i ^oBMnimO
llPili^lifii
Tf   OS
os r-
O  CO
rH CN
Tt m
tN to"
^    j
m oo
Tt m
CO CO
Tf xr~
OO  CO
t> CO
Tf SO
Tf CO
SO SO
m m
r- os
ro to
S3
OS tN      I f-
t> SO        1 rH
co co      !
SO Tf
to to
O   rH
a
4>
■a
C Oc CTc
S-H-H
firt _T
ass
.9  Hfi J3
ESS
sss
fc! U12 cc
fi fi a « c
aSSsn
m so
so vo
os o\
|SS
« TJ TJ
m so
SO SO
OS os
to CO
if.
•a a 3  3
A u u   •
fi rt rt
o u «
.2>H>H
ft
3 rt
2 a*
fill
piss
«
TJ
C m vo
rt so so
arHH
.9  TH*^
3 co CO
2
ft rt rt
sss
*M "OTJ
D o a>
Ih TJ TJ
3   A   fl
.ton)
aj  4j at
**m vo
>-vSO SO
rt os os
TtHrt
*H _T *
Q.CO CO
Mil
O  H   H
o rt rt
&SS
rt TJ TJ
•S TJ TJ
-a fl fl
aj o v
tt t; *-<
rt rt oi
Ih     O    U
m so
, so vo
os os
Q   -   -
O  1-H   ,-H
•-J to to
,2-fl rfl
3    CJ    O
UJ
ca >o >rt
a 9 fi
" § S
g|jj
 DD 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
a
m
a
J
I
P
Oh
.S
rt
H
.as a
>. jo c
co fi 3
iJO.cc
■rtPnO
H
III
Vi
=-iS co &
1111
.9-3 S&
bS2n
O  CUI^h
C fi 2
.Sort
Ch  COrK
&<0o
§o«§
3      TJ    ,
Pi
« SE S
S£ph£
lilt
OH
SO I © Os
m CN M
o\       ] m rN
o       p*
Tf OS
fN : co     !
OS        Tf SO 00
Tf      Tf    ; m
vo      m
t-h        CM
SO CM to
rH  OO  CO
OS CO 00
CO O CM OO
ro r- oo wo
m rH co Os
TH t-^
-  Tf        t        I   t>  t-        j
"T-H !   T-H   f-
!   I   !
'CO       I       I SO  fO rH
1 !       !  rH  CO
rH  O       !  rH  O  O  fO       I  rH
Tf m    : th m Tf »h    i
COrH
! Tf t-h 00 to tN CO
3 i
mmTft^mtNmcoo
roi-H cocomTfinvo
CM Os Tf fN
voosTfmTfT-HTtfsm
mcN      ot-hcosoosvo
rH HHIflhr-
N OM/i h in h i> h in
COfN i-H  CO  CO  f-  rH  SO
tN t-h t-h m os co
00
m
-+
CO
r-
in
o
Tt
r-
w
CO
Q
o
Tf
*H
>> 0 ti
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 61
as
SS
2H
Ph
S°  Ch O
&$0
O »
aZ
h?i28
Eg
i - w °c
s a u s
O O Cn fi
fi -O O rt
W      PhU
.a -.
rt rt
So
CO £
Z5
fiilci &
HUUC
•fi rt ch fi
r? it o &
8§.gJs
t-sgjfj
5 rtHc^Pn
£0    *
8S&
3U2S
|S
mow    | cn m
H*   O   **        j   O   OC
in Ov tn    ! in in
!   !   I
S* I I I
I t* -tf     I VO l^
I t^ CN     I On O
I in cn    I      ^h
CO  ^.
^ O J2   S   O    «
-2 3 j?-"- o
I  »  »  C   S  §
Jfifl  O   H   h
rt u u O o o
UUUPSQfl
o
H
H
D
0-
SH
Ph
CJ   °firt
a fi 2
.fi O rt
Ch cOrh
PhOU
its.
OJ H H
refeO
(J
III
Vi
SO
CO >
^r   CCJ
Zffi
>.ia a   i»
g 5 rt 3 fi B
WO
o
1 U -i-i
tj3  w
es
O rt
PhU
«> «S   Ct   B-H/-S
C    .ce rt"       d
§-3J!Z»aS
fe2&-o2g(H
^OIiqE-
§2*2 II
Oco-gQgS
£3 3
M
ie^ t.
^coce
rt rt tN
cn in Oc
cN tN rt
2-2
£ §
IH   Si
S
"a cs
c?  CO
qi27j
 DD 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
z
o
S
Ph
o
55
O
u
8co
ODrt
hhO
•a o co
ch eorh
PhQ
ISO
.2 So.
rtmO
it B S
§£0
■il
hh 2
SO
ZW
o fi
U"
lit
S O rt
g*0
firt
fi rt
§0
V°
n> rt
8
r-      m so rn
rH OS Tf
oo m to so Tf
OS O CO SO rH
rn m t^- m
Os O
Tt m
tN m co t-h
CO  CO
fN tN
rH       ,  O  O  t-h
fO      |  SO Tf 1-H
! Tf to
cn c— m t— co
00 SO rH t> i-H
SO   Tf
r> SO co CM
ro tN t- Os
CO  m  Tf  rH
>   w
' O 3  £
Bill
•a ill?
O
3
Ul
H
0
I-I
o
-si
ai,
tN rt        t~
^   i   i
3 TJ
OB   ^
Og  «
rt o £
tN  tN       j     Tf    rH  m
CJ.           j    OS
II * s
i-t
t-HCO       1     Tt     CO  Tt  rH  Tf    fN    SO
00 CO      !    r
H     t-H C-.
"    OS  o
Tt          :   m
SO
T-H                     '       T-H
1-1
OS       1       1     OS    rH
1       1    rH     O
os   i   ! os
o
, '■—,
!   '
«-<
Tf i-h    |   m  c- Tt
i   i *
H     SO
OS             i    OS           rH
1        1      tN      rH
OS            !    OS
o
rH               ■     rH
CN
OIIO       J     !
1 o
OIIO      i     !
1  °
i-h   :   .  r
H         1       j
1        1
O     1     1    O       I     !
1   ;
I <=>
CM     !     !   CM       1
1    CM
1-H        ,        |      1-
'     '
'        '
!    rt
vo   : i-h  r-     i to
1     !    CO    O
OS    1         Os      !
o
i
1
1     '
*H
CO     1 t-H    OS       1 vo
1    !   so   in
VO     1         so      !
j
r-
rH       I             i-
"
rH  m             SO    t-H  CO
1       1     Tf     o
OS                Os
.
o
I—"—.
1-1
O   O   T-H      T-H      O   CO
i   Tf     t^     CO
Tf   SO               O      rH   CO
1                   Tf       Tf
O                        rH
T-H                         T-H
*"■
tfl
co cn    ]   m     : m
I    !   m   o
z
Os        i   os     :
;    i
o
g
'
1    '•
1-1
CO
—,_,.-*       «-.
p^
CO
m   .   iv
%
m
3
j
<
rS^
Ch
Os CN          CM    cN SO
1     1    00   o
CO                     OS
o
O
.—.
VO CN  T-H     OS     OS  OO
t-   vo
0.
tN rn          CO          CN
to   t>
Tf                         Tf
Tf
3
cn
Z
w
£ £       ^ ! ^J
N
CM CN         t(
1-H Tf
1  m  o
OS               o
o
P
6
oo Tf m   t-
t-   t-   T-,                   V
1    CM
r- t-h       o-
to
Tf      Tt
„
t>            c-
00
to to       sc
CO  rH
! *
Q
S
S
OS             o-
J
O
z
O
CN t— CO    CM
CO OS
1      t>
Tf
t^  CO            rH
CO
T]
m
P
rH                tN
1
N
5
fc
T-H                              T—
w
m co ts  o
ts r> t-h       c
o
00                OS
o
OO
^-"—V
T-H
Tf Ov SO    Ov
Tf   CM   Tt      rH
os so m os   o
CO
•n co co cm   c
CN
t-^Tf   fN      Tf
fN r-
m
OS                c
1-1
>.
«
fi
o
rt
>.
a
J3
"«
£Z
a
O    o
% 3
i 1
8   o
a  c
a
o   V
fi   hO
si
*&
c   fi
ro
c
r
fl   C
a   <u
fl
's«
H
rt
M
eu   0 7
tH
5>
p
•fl       c b t
,3
c3
•H
w                       fi      3     «H
1
u
CQ
0
< w
o
O
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 63
2
Q
<
Ph
O
H
O ro ro fN cm
O
g£?o
t£
Sort
Ih  01  TO
hO^
t> CO I> OS  C
so
1
T-   T-H  Tf   00   Tf
O
z
*H
rt
>s
t-h co m os cm
O
a
o
Ph
O O
§0
t- co os cm m
vo
co m os co Tf
«
z
CM   Tf              T-H
o
fN
&%&
•rtPnO
►3
6
z
VO t-h rH
o
o
fN
CM   O   T-H   CO   Tf
CO CN         i-h
fi
fi
^rt
HH
C
IS
m co
o
fi
Tf CO rH SO rn
m
*
Z
o
0
G
>
1*
Tf m co cN vo
m tN      rn
o
.S'o
rt rt
SO
m i> o rn m
tN oo co Tf so
CO
Tf
Z
-
IS
8   li 1  |   1
o
o
& 4>
£,42
d
Z
m    I    I    I    I
m
3 fi
£
O  OS       1 rH       |
>i
SI    £
OS
o
9
w
SB'S I
"■-j rt «
6
Z
00 1-H       If-       1
CM Tf      ]
t>
t
JM
Tf
-4
OO   Tf   CO   T-H   Tf
^
m   fN              T-H
O
SftO
t-h cm in m os
S5
i
j
Tf CM
OO
<$
s
H
rt
Ph
fi —
to O
oO
CO CM        tN
O
£
Tf m os vo os
in
fi
O
z
Tf  CO          CM
Ih
^
CO tN  Tf  f- Tf
o
ta
o
*rt
fi rt
T
^
CO
o
o
CM O Tf SO Os
CM
t- t-H          rH
^h"
1-1
a
s2
•a
•a
■n
X
£ S i
1
OJ
1
& rt cj
■ii    &  >
XA
s
*
&
a
s
D
<
to
O
o
£
o
li
O
«!
O
1            T-H  CO  CM  fN
o
so
O
!            fS   Tf   Tt   Tf
so
*"<
o
o
!
r~'
so
cm in m so
o
fN
1 t- tN SO 00 t-
j              Tf   CNrH
o
1-1
m co tN
fN
'
o
I      to co tN
o
'
w
1 m cn so vo vo
m
'
o
o
*1
CO
co oo co co in
Tf
CM CM tN CM
rH
tH
f- O CO      1      1      1
O
l-H
Tf r- so   i
l>
rH CO      1      1      1
rH t^ SO SO       1       1
CM SO
o
'     '
1-1
r> vo Tt os   i   i
SO
CM t-h cN           1
t-
Tf
1 i-h cm so vo m
CM CO fN rn
o
T""1
i o Tt m so t—
CN
1   T-H   CO   O   T-H   fM
1          t-H  CO fN rH
;
£                                    ^
I     co Tt m r*
o
1         fN CO CM rH
o
*"*
j          00  CM  rH  tN
IT
I        CM Tf CO CN
r
1
r1
o
rH fN CO CO
o
^V-v
**.
Tf oo m so oo r^
oo
i-h fM CO CO
1-1
o «
s
S 5
>J   11   O   !J   O   U    L
C  >» >> >» ■>> >>  L
3 r- co Tt m m
TJ rH CN tO Tf Tf
Soopojj
m vo oo Tt m X
CO
s
Q
<
Ph
O
J
o
H
O
0
Ph
0
rt
co
tN co m
CO so
O
O
37
535
1,034
SO
o
rH SO CO
Ov
o
o
27
121
1,868
so
o
CN
to cm m
Tt m
o
o
o
CM
Tf rH m
m vo
m cn co
Tf in
o
o
OS to CO
r-- os
m
co r- o
fN t-
o
o
Qt**rH
Tf  O  O
CO  00
00
Tf
m os so
Tt  CO
o
o
co oo so
CM CM
m
vo r- r-
m co
o
o
O cN Tf
co r- r-
fN   T-H
vo
Tf
1
37 !  4
159 j 19
646 j 77
O
o
CN
Tf
CO
Tf  OS  t-
t-h I'
O
O
ve ro in
m co so
fN Ov
Tf
m
r4
Tf m rH
T-H   CO
g
o
447
1,787
9,294
CO
tN
m
V-
<L
c
e
t?
X
<
4
l
I
u
rt
i
i
V
a
 DD 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
i*
j 00-h
a o ca
Os
o
hOu
so
o
z
m
SS
co
8
OS
OS
o
o
°T-
■3 «
6
Z
SO 00 tN
VO
(2
CD
fN
o^
fN
£
t*
s    i
o
.as &
F a 8
III
d
OSrH      j
o
i2
hJ
Z
rH              !
g
TJ
*
O     1     1
O     1
o
o
•§s&
rH
*si
OJ
>
fiftO
CQ
6
Z
m    !    i
m
O
o
fi
>
>S
00 CM
OS
o
o
11
rt S
So
-WV^
1-1
CO
z
6
Z
CM CM Tf
CM        fM
00
Tf
O
*"i
*"i
CO
?!
l>      1 CO
o
i$
Os    1
o
<
si
CO fe
T
b
rH
m    : cm
c-
o
fl
m    I
m
cfl
U
SS
s
to
§2      ce
h 3^ c=
j3 0 fi
£
Ov           1
Os
o
o
0,
<
!■<
Ph
w
5S   u
3 3
6
Z
Tf                 I
so
1*-
Tf
0
Cfl
d
fS
OS rH
o
i->
Iks
3 O rt
= PhU
6
Z
rHTf r>
tN
;
;
CO
CA
IS
CM 00
o
C —
fl
rt
Ph
1°
6
CM Tf CO
Tf
m
o
Z
CM
tH
SO Tf
O
rt
^
Os
r*
CJO
00
O
SO
d
CN        O   fN
rH          Tf    <n
fiS s
S = H
•ill
£)t5   <X
<
a
SO O Tf      |
o
co oo m
oo in so
o
SO
OS CO Ov O
*"*
tN
o
tN 1> OS tN
fN
m m cn oo
O
O
SO CM Tf CO
m
t^ r- Tf cN
o
O SO SO vo
SO CM Tf 1-H
z
O
C-tN     1
O
CO
s
Tf  1-H        1        |
m
D
<
Ph
m o os so
o
in co
O
Q
S.
U
Tf
C*1
r-H
to oo Tf m
O
OS SO CO Tf
tN
m o co Tt
Tt
t^  V0  CO  Tf
O
so r- m so
m
Tf  Tf
o
CO
so r-     o
m
m Tt      t-h
-
c
B
c
b
a
|
0
tH
0
H
rote
thei
ther
Ph
Pi
<
0
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 65
S
a
«,
Ch
o
w
o
z
H
H
Z
W
Cfl
I-I
o
<:
o
►J
o
z
>
o
Ph
P.
O
z
o
PhQU
«
CO CO OS t*
Tf tN
r
1 1-H  t-H
0
0
r-1
,
H,
~
"*
z
35
a
•3 rt
^
^
£
fN  OS SO  Tf  CO rH  rH
Pi
CO
0
0
Tf  Tf  CO CO  rH  O  t-
\0  t- rH  00  m  CO  rH
OS
CO                  Tf  CO
vo
W
Z
Tf t—<  %-H
fN
.as a
$
O
i     jrtrttNrt
m 1 I      i I
sac
Ma
CM i-h tN CMI SO        *~
rH  tN  CO  rH
so
to
j      j
O
CM
c
H
z
i !
rH
U
fi
3
c
0 S ft
£
m m 00 m
Tf  CO
iii            i   i
O
O
l-H
tH
oPhU
m
rH  C-SO  rH
r-
s
z
1
1
rH
0
fi
>
$
Tf rH 00 m rH CO tN
CC) rH          -*  *-i
Tf
|           ts
O
O
■a 0
rt rt
So
CO
CO tN Os r*- tN CO CM
cn
Tf
z
CO rH          i-H  rn
c-c
rH„
*""'
□
<£
1     1     1     1 tN CO     j        CM
C   !   1            i    1
0
0
§1
111:            i
1    1
t»
d
rH  CN
CO
m
i
Z
1           i   i
*rt e
Haney
Correction
Institutio
and
Camps
<*
1 CO rH m \0 Tf CO         r-
r-                   :   1
c-                   :   1
0
0
'
11           11
1-H
d
z
|i/)hf
rn        CH
1
OS OC
CN r-
SO          TJ
Tf
SO
to
VO
Tf
gsa
Sit
^
1 to Tt Tt so m to
! tN CN CM rH
■" 1 1     1 I
0
0
Ifeu
OS O  O  CO  Tf  CM
Tf
u
z
t-h CM fN rH
Vi
$
r> co 00 r* to cn rn
Iii          ^ tN
O
a
Ml
O
rt
Ph
1°
fi
O
T-H   O   OS   CO   Tf   CN   rH
fN   Tf
z
1
CN
tS
<*
m ts vo m co i-h rn
Tf       1       I                  CN  rH
O
m rH
rH
O
w
0°
*"H
0
S*o
r- m vo co in so co
00
£
CO  Tf  f>  m  CO rH  rH
Tf                           fN fN
v>
1-1
2
3
i £
O
fl
O
b 2 ,
> &
t/
tt
Cfl
X
6 £ S
a
0 -H 5
sss§
rH  rH CN    Ih
Ih    >h    tH    P
« u oj >
S.g0
S O J3
-3   Ch
to Ph-O
SEE
"     H     C
a
0)
4>
la
1
w-a-n-o-a-o ° ^
i
i-l 0 a
^OfiqfiCrt"'
CO _.   3
jS "-1 3 >
%3 -5 5 P
■ch a „-fi.
°3°a
fi *■* « w  a
7; fl fl fl c
.fl  J
6 §
fl  v
0 fl
•I i
H
fl    t
O   C
CO   ce   g  fi   " S  |h
c
|
I
f>
E
CC
E
VC
E
OC
Tf
tN
4.
C
e
0.
5
0   p.
z
0
to Tf 00 t>
r~
c
fO rH                  CN  i-H
y
rn cn 0 to m m
vo
m tN  rH rH  CO CN
r"«
CO CO 00 SO OS rH
O
CO rH                   rH  fN
VO  CN  rH  rH  CO  Tf
O
CN
os i-«   :   :   1   1
O
OS   1-H
1-<
O
cN CO
m
r-
0
1-1
00
00 ro in Tt 0 cm
Tf
'"I
J
u
00 O tN     1     1     j
O
0
h-I
CQ
4
O
i   1   i
cn
V3
s
1   1   1
q
<
t>
CO
r*          i   !   i
Tf
D
O
>
O
w
OO   1-H                                    1
Oh
1-H
CO t> Tf 00 0
tN
00
tH
co i-h os vo m vo
0
CN t-h              CM CN
Tf
CM i-h i-h         CO CO
Tf tN r> m os co
0
CM   rH                     TH   CO
00
CM
tN rH                   CN  CO
r^
c/
IH
O
R
I
E
°
O
H
§
41
e
C
5
s
f-
!
I
fi
1
S
 DD 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PhO
E70
O rt
-a
i  i
Bi
a
a
H
O
|
2
D
Q
o
a
rt    .gin    Irt    irt
co    I tN r-    i t-h Tt    : cn '
r-  «
§o
00 CV
s
I' i
•3°
cS s
So
! tN cN rt VO
cnj£
i -*   !   I r- Ht tt
rt   CO   Tf   CS   OC   -t
-»   fi
Zw
I i
'JS
i°   !-h    :k-i
|
o
11
CO    r*
Oh   g
S3 —
o
i
Hi
§
Ph
s
w
SS
8*3*1
go
KfcS
Ch  CH
rt rt
u
-A O rt
SPhU
u
tN o cn cn \o o ,
to o
pO
I tN Oc CO O tN
r i r ii 11 i i
I     i I     MINI
|   CO rH   rH
! !
So
CT1 rH 00 t> l> VO rH
ososr^ootNTfvocomcNOOoocNTf
cMCMoosomrHtNrHcsr-^cMrHmos
m  rH CM rH CO  Tf
■ag,
o fl u i* tt
a € p fl s
,s a rt ci rt
« y w si -
IS]
% 8
■O 3
ii  rt
o4J
S-o.
E
rt  ?c  l.
ce 2 fi
I p.,
<u
"oo 3
C T3   _,
UU                tH    TJ    _ ni      P
S   «  fc-J   rt   C &3
S w -o 2 « •? E «
C U  fl
<<<<<< & S S U « CJ < w
I
rtSoiprt      S'c'fl
i-i
fl> '5 -b fl
"fl ^ a «
Sdocg
of
§§
O    CCQ
£ a
•g.8
a g f » s s
- -   ft-R   ce .S   6fS
•als|lfi|g
<mhPSPhPhPhUBhDHP<
».5S5
hSSS
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 67
I Tf  rH       !  CO
sss
1     i £ CN
to
T.H-
rt t~-
S§
eg
csg
2«£
i i
CN      I      I CM rH rn
cOCOCNOv\OVOt-h-Ht
2^
2S
58
rt-8
?*
CN -t
rt CH      !      !      [00
SVS
cn co co    I tN in vo
TJ- c>.
cn o
I tN     I     ! cN     ! rt co     I
! ! i
3*S
fM Tf o r* CM O CO
CO  .--,
CN *s
s>s
"$
th oo
m ,-v
3*S
° 1&
CO 6"
»P
CO
£c£
"8
CN ©••
m o
rH °
rn    Ci>
§
an
.9
a
to
a
go's' ^h
fi > -ti —■ £
MS « fi £
a & S e
>> fi.
S    CO
CJ
mSO
rt w>
■H-E
J .SB b.S
I 81 a -I |
a co o fi 2
.S^opHfi;
o
>. ca a a
S3 §>
fl  rt  S3 s^
>^<
ci  too   C _
3  3 1-1  u
■IfiOT
SShO
cu  C3   O ^. .
S.y£s;
I g §S
o a To <
li-    VH    -i-    -—
OOOO.
. .fl .fl 43 -fl
OOOO
rt rt c<3 rt
u   u 1)   u
Ih    IH    '
mo fi b 5
fi H .2 rt S
coo
1,11
fi-fi.S i
.-.•fi *«
t-  ai 'C *!•
o
*c>
">
•«
•g
CJ
c
0
fe
«J
c
0
*5
o
O
ty
0
O
H
6
l-H
■U
TJ
C
o
TJ
I
Ih
0
mP5cona<MWpH
lo«ft5>UQO«
 DD 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
I
«
Ph
Ph
O
m
H
Q
5
o
Ph
o
i
S
a
o
safe!
8o
.as &
> to fi
tO ^  H
►H*
•gs
ISO
.9-5
n rt
SO
s- fl
osos m o -i> Tf
JtHVOOCOCO      I      I      I      I COT*      I      I
rH CO CN rH 1      j      Uh
tN 00 .h Os tN    I    I    |    I fS SO
•TJ  i^i  .fen CM r\l
cs m CO CN
SS
ii:
SS
SS
I   I   1T«.T
j   Tf   rt   ©
1     '     ' tN rt rt
I vo cn   l
VOO     I
j cn rt     j     !
3 fl S3
till
igse
ItN  I O O CN Tf tN VO  I CO rH  j
CN CO    CM rH
los    ii-HincooTfco    iTfTf    i    I
I   OS   CO T-H   m   fN j   T-H
r- tN   I vo m m
£  « fi
=3 o a
|phO
I vo m m    I    I    I    I co t
tN  rH  CO !       I rH
u
SS.2B
|^ftn     [rtHtrtcoiNrt-ctHt
S3.
*0,
ii>somootorHOvo
l-H    «
oSM-h
rt oj fl
OgD
MM    IH
os r* m o r- os t-h
ty.
ft
II
S-S3SI.
•S   to  O  O J3
' ■  " JJ ,Q  ■— •
rt rt <
'§,§
as s
4>    P.   Kt
3 fl rt 2
rt !
.a s
^ o
rt o
fl 'fl
.3 E
rt  u  S
fi fi
iis.g-
fi    Ch    Ch    CH   ■
rt  ft
' «j C u
IP
_0  i3   Ih
ft "fi  (5
£    *H     O
rtcScOSOfipcj
SSP-PhPOX
ftg
S S 5 5 ° '<■">
0.Q DD P3cn
> <J 3 s
ifloS
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 69
-H-rtOOcnrtHC-cOrtVOcncNtNtNlNNrtrtrtTH
-h      cn oo o\ rt
rt cn
^h rt rt rt HHrcnrtrtrtcNrtTi-rtcocnmrt
3 &-
.9 O rt
ch torn
rtO
rt    jrt    I    I    r0vR-    |    |rt    ,    |    |    |    |    |    j    !    |    |     |    |    |    |    j    ,    !    |     |    |    |    |    j
rt    |rt    |    ltscn.no    |    |    |    j    |    |    |    |    |    |    I    |    |    ]    ]    |    |    |    |    |    j    |    |    |    |    [    !
•a
-.=-PhU
MMI M*00 11 i I M ii i i ! M M M M li M M M
i _« ce ft
5 fi co c
H T3,0 rt
cn     PhO
•3°
-55
SO
VO
s
u
%
a
Ph
O
Ph
CO
to >
Zffi
I ,rtrt.
M I i M I M I I I I I I I II I  i i i I M I I
! M I! 1 I i i I M i i ! M I llH II
M i I |-*«T" I i M M I II li II M li I i I i I'
as
« fl
xs
So
ill! |-*a M M li II II 1 II M M II II II li I M
r-t    I to m    11^ oo
O W r- rH r
i rH  CO O
I     I    I    I     I-    I     jOrtrtrtrtrtrt
lilt
g
■PhO
Ph
a
•3
o2S3
SqgD
Z   £■
cu tJrt
fi.S5
3
4> O
Er»
1°
Mr-f
fl 2
u rt
SO
I    |    |rt   ircvown
m os   I   I   I   I    I   I    I   I
I Ll I I I I..-I'
II II 1 i^-** M M I i I II I I I II M I M li M
IIII I-"-"Si
I I
M !  II M M M ! I M I
i •   i i i
a a
u to
T3 -fi
^    Cti    t.    H
■5t5 S o
fi  CJ  3   3 hh  o
™ -fi   CJ   co jh  H
SSg
all
Oi    S     IH
o O «
o fi§
lis
ft    CJ   .*fi
O     JO    IH
.9 g3
fiOcn
s
o
o rt
.9 *
tO .CJ -fi -fi .fO
* *7
as
00.       .
P) acncn §
to -23 cj co rt
3 ce 2 '.3   ce
o<ioo<
S E
,°    CH
Ph  o
E 2 ft
to fl   o
r°   COCO
CJ   CO   fi
•jo?
rt    O    *H
cj a co
u a u
PhI3c«
•O  fi   cc
i § i
HO*
■5 pp o
l=VJjH
fl    O    Ih
•2-92
O   fl   fl
P3 Ph Oh
O cN
is
g E o
.°   co rt
fe fi fi
K O co
hh Ll -o
°M    fi
a fi 2
lii
fl     O     Ih
U   ft U
cn a
cfl   O   I
o -fi rt
y o fl
.9    22
"Sort a
fl -fl "fl
ax '
m P   O •
ssg
db'T ce  «
a,;?
CJ  cj
.3   O   jh
rt -fi   fi
5 a sa
Z cfl co a,
.a • 3 a 5
3 bS fi £
wKSoca
o >n o
8'Ba
3 3 fi
CH    O    CH
S 3 S
fi ij a
I—C    u,  rH
73 & 73
9 oo 9
.2 a .2 "
^3 t5 S3
p o p 13
>0>PQ
 DD 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tH
HtN-*rt-tvO     !cnr>cncnrtrtOrtr-rtrtrtrttNcncnrtrt
3 a-
Ifs
i* SO
PhO
iiiii
SSOTJ'
rt O M I 1
(^oOaj"
iiii M r iiiii! i i I ii ii i i r ii
5
ft) te 2t S*
|5J.E
►H?(20
I I I 11 II li I li M II II 11 II I II 1!
> fl 4> fl
o o «- 9
w    feU
I I I I.I I 1 i I I i M i
iiiiii
•9*3
So
MMMM!"
iiiiii
13
CJJ
3
c
i
X
(J
1
p.
O
cfl
■«!
s
§
&
Z|U
6.2
U w
B3
fl
rt fl
So
rtrtrttNrtrtcNVD      | 0\r4i-*<rir4r«0-*      \
i       rt ce
3 Jed ce ft
••fi a Si S
U *PhO
! I
I I" I
SSS'5
«OSD
I I
°2D
M   !   I
v o
E rt
SO
i   !   !
SO
i es   i fN m   j Tf co
rm!
$       5
jS  |  I
i N" CCJ (
v rt Jfi M .
. E &a
■f II
o rt
h|JPh<
.fit-
* ciirt '
T--|1
„ OJ JO
ftf;
,(010
o co cn
iWtHrt
'   CO   CO   tO
CJ   u   flj
mOOUUUbSOJ
Ch 'fi
_rti.9
BO s
W -t? -,   Ih
O o & rt
I .g-I-jB
cj c-c
PhO
rt    ^
ca a
83i
j c 2
i| 2
I   M Si
> Hfi a
c
rt rt
CJ    CH
Is
•gcE.
hS
2 n
I     CO
8 5
83&
Oo.
a E fi
.2 "it
a &s
■- rt >
co .-^ rfi c- [> rt
S '3 rt ft 2 cK
d >,nfi 9 e o
•a -a «j rco o ,o
H. (KPiHcflU
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1965/66
DD 71
>VH
^h  a
Q  -ch   o
H
1)    3   W
60 *J   ctj
J
■U  i-i   D
P vo
> c o
§2
^        tn
^r
o;"
pa
<r-U
=1
§s
PL,  O
JH
> m"
H m
o °^
H^
,_!    o   o o o  o
o    o   o O   o
in   <r  ro cm   i—i
ooo
ooo
o os  co
o o   _
o  o   o  O   o
\0   u~i   -tf   CO    CM
o   ooooo   o
-   -ooooo
oo   oo   ooooo
Oo    Oo    oo   ooo
c^Ou-i    -tf   ro     CMc-hOonoQ
OOOO
OOOO
lA   <f     CO   O*
I    I  I  I   I   I I   I  I   I  I   I  I   I  I  I  I   I   I   I   I   I  I   I I   I  I   I   I   I   I I   I I
H «
I     llllllllll
v_-   -....   _   o o ■_#
o o   o o o o o
CO   CN    t-t   O   os  00   r—
I   I
o o
o o
1  I I I   I  I  I  I
so  in   -f co   cm
ooooo
' t_> o o o o o o
i O   os   CO    r-   \D   in   -tf
lllll   I
I  I   I I  I I   I   I  .
o ooooooo oo oo
oooooooooooo
ro   CN«-HOaiQ0r-\Du-)-tf   e^cN
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
560-367-3113

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0364208/manifest

Comment

Related Items