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Civil Service Commission Forty-eighth Annual Report JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 1966 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1967

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Forty-eighth Annual Report
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31
1966
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
VC, P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C., CD.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission, Province of British Columbia, from January 1 to December 31, 1966.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1967.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
 The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 8 of the Civil Service Act
(chapter 56, Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1960), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceeding and work of the Civil Service Commission from January 1 to December 31, 1966.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
HUGH M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1967.
 HIGHLIGHTS DURING 1966
• Pay increases averaging 5 per cent of payroll were granted.
• 3,507 employees received merit increases within salary ranges.
• 4,728 appointments were made to permanent and temporary positions.
• 761 employees gained promotion through competitions.
• 24 student employees received Diplomas in Public Administration.
• There was an 18.3-per-cent turnover in staff.
• Disabling injuries to Government employees were reduced by 66, and the frequency rate of disabling injuries per million man-hours was reduced by 13V3
per cent from 1965.
• 6 grievances were formally presented to the Civil Service Commission.
• 89 Government employees received 25-year continuous-service awards from the
Premier and Executive Council at two luncheons.
• The third annual Civil Service Commissioners' Conference was held in Winnipeg,
Man., in June.
• Recruitment of psychiatric nurses increased 20 per cent.
• Sick leave averaged a total of 6.10 days per employee.
 ORGANIZATION CHART
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Personnel Officers:
J. Maxwell
W. Matichuk
M. F. Harts
Clerical Staff:
Mrs. G. M. Knott
MissW. E.Brown
Miss V. Evans
Mrs. A. M. Robertson
Mrs. C. McStravick
Miss D. L. Chamberlain
Mrs. L. Tyler
Miss M. L. Small
Miss K. A. Eames
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Clerical Staff:
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Miss D. L. Chahley
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Personnel Officers:
K. M. Hanson
Miss J. Johnstone
Clerical Staff:
Mrs. E. A. B. Mayne
Miss C. A. Woolsey
Mrs. M. A. Britt
 CONTENTS
Page
Introductory  9
Size and Composition of the Civil Service  9
Separations  10
Recruiting and Selection Division  10
General Entrance Examinations  12
Competitions for Promotion  13
Special Activities—Recruiting and Selection Division  14
The Vancouver Office  16
The Essondale Office (Valleyview)  16
Classification and Wage Division  17
In-service Training  18
Sick and Special Leave  22
Accident Prevention  22
Grievances  26
Concluding Observations  26
Appendix  27
Statistics  28
 The above photograph shows the new Civil Service Commission exhibit in the British
Columbia Building, situated on the Pacific National Exhibition Grounds, Exhibition Park,
Vancouver. The display depicts the Civil Service Commission as the gateway for all Civil
Servants, both in recruitment and promotion. The British Columbia Building contains
exhibits from all Government departments and is open the year round. Last year over
800,000 visitors toured the building.
 Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 8 of the Civil Service Act, from
January 1 to December 31, 1966
The accelerated pace in the Government's personnel administration as mentioned in the Annual Report of 1965 was even greater throughout 1966; whereas
the Commission met formally 29 times in 1965, it held 36 formal meetings during
1966. The welfare of Government employees is reflected in this continued activity
of the Commission.
Due to the extension of the Civil Service Act to include a large number of
employees on April 1, 1965, employee records were transferred from the Bureau
of Economics and Statistics to the Data Processing Branch of the Department of
Finance. This change enabled statistics to be obtained from payroll data and
provided a complete tabulation of all employees coming within the scope of the
Civil Service Act. As a result, comparisons with previous years in many cases
cannot be made.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
The total number of employees coming within the scope of the Civil Service Act
was 23,373 on December 31, 1966. Of this number, 13,968 were permanent
employees and 9,405 were temporary employees (see Table 1, Appendix). These
numbers included 1,538 employees of the British Columbia Ferry Authority and
1,674 employees of the Liquor Control Board. The following graph indicates the
percentage of employees within each of the major groupings in the main Civil
Service Schedules:—
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
36%
29%
19%
14%
Administrative
Clerical
Technical
Professional
Manual
and
Group
Group
Group
Group
Executive
Groups
 Y 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Employees classified within the main Civil Service Schedules comprise about
46 per cent females and 54 per cent males. However, in the total number of
Government employees about 34 per cent are females and 66 per cent are males.
SEPARATIONS
During the year, 2,562 employees left permanent positions within the Civil
Service. This represents a turnover of 18.3 per cent. The following graph shows
the percentage of turnover during the last 10 years, although direct comparisons
are not accurate due to the different basis for determining the rate of turnover this
year:—
RATE OF TURNOVER
30%
25%
20%
28.45
27.84
21.36
16.34^
(C^18.
14*Viw
r19       17.64        18.03
98 16
15
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
YEAR
1964
1965
1966
RECRUITING AND SELECTION DIVISION
General
The Recruiting and Selection Division operates offices at Victoria headquarters,
Vancouver, and Essondale. This was a record year for recruiting, with the highest
number of competitions and appointments on record—generally 19 per cent over
the previous year. The increase was due to several factors, a substantially higher
rate of turnover in the first half of the year, a larger total staff under Civil Service
Commission jurisdiction, and an increase in staff in most departments in keeping
with rising population and public service requirements. During the year, arrangements were made with the Department of the Attorney-General and the Department
of Education to extend the " position vacant" posting system to positions within
their institutions which were recently transferred to Civil Service status. Recruiting
assistance to the expanding British Columbia Medical Plan was provided. With
the growth of the British Columbia Ferry Service, the appointment of a Personnel
Officer to devote full time to employee relations and personnel matters in the Ferry
Authority was approved. This also provided some assistance in the conducting of
promotional competitions in the Ferry Service.
Difficulty was experienced in recruiting in several classifications—primarily
professional positions, where the supply of qualified persons is apparently below
the demand in Canada.    Overseas advertising was continued for medical and
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y 11
psychiatric staff, and the services of the Federal Department of Immigration and
Citizenship were used with considerable success in recruiting hydraulic engineers
and ships' engineers from the United Kingdom.
The increase in activities and distribution of work load between the three recruiting offices is shown in the following tables:—
1965
1966
Per Cent
Change
from 1965
1966 Distribution
Requisitions and requests for staff-
Victoria  _ _ —
Essondale  	
Vancouver— _ _	
Totals  _	
Competitions—
Victoria	
Essondale....
Vancouver...
Totals...
Examinations  (persons taking written examinations)—
Victoria  _ _ _	
Essondale..
Vancouver  _	
Totals 	
Appointments (initial hiring) —
Victoria  _ _ _
Essondale..
Vancouver	
Totals	
Total positions filled (including competitions)-
Victoria  _  	
Essondale..
Vancouver-
Totals...
2,848
847
338
4,033
692
193
140
1,025
1,491
249
319
2,059
1,011
1,187
755
2,953
1,709
1,354
936
3,999
3,742
1,771
539
6,052
795
241
180
1,216
2,242
419
399
3,060
1,791
1,479
597
3,867
2,273
1,700
755
4,728
+ 31
+ 109
+59
+50
+ 15
+25
+29
-19
+50
+68
+25
+49
+77
+25
—21
+31
+33
+26
— 19
+ 18
 Y 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
Written examinations to establish qualified lists for such positions as stenographer, typist, clerk, and draughtsman were held as follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
Victoria
Clerk-Typist.
Junior Clerk-
Clerk 1	
Clerk-Stenographer 1_
Clerk-Stenographer 2 _
Key-punch Operator-
Draughtsman 1	
Draughtsman 2—	
Draughtsman 3 	
Draughtsman 4 	
Mapping Assistant 2	
Mapping Assistant 3	
Field Surveyor Assistant 3	
Computer Programmer Trainee-
Data Processing Operator	
Programmers (Land Registry)—.
Senior Clerk (Land Registry)	
Clerk 3 (Land Registry)	
Clerk 2 (Land Registry) 	
Surveyor 1 (Land Registry)	
Senior Examiner of Titles	
Electrician	
Totals, 1966-
Totals, 1965-
Vancouver
Clerk-Typist	
Clerk-Stenographer..
Clerk	
Fire-fighter, University Endowment Lands..
Totals, 1966	
Totals, 1965	
Essondale
Clerk-Stenographer..
Cook 1	
Cook 2	
Cook 3	
Cook 4	
Carpenter	
Clerk— 	
Clerk-Typist.	
Dietary Aide 2..
Plumber	
Projectionist (Assistant Photographer).
Stockman 2	
Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nurse..
Fire-fighter	
Totals, 1966-
Totals, 1965..
757
635
190
195
165
19
44
6
8
1
1
2
1
172
6
15
9
5
5
1
5
10
2,252
1,491
157
99
143
22
421
319
64
53
15
21
3
1
54
140
14
1
1
2
43
11
419
376
620
383
110
134
88
11
32
1
5
1
1
2
61
3
2
9
5
5
1
5
5
1,484
956
135
95
119
10
359
293
34
30
13
18
3
1
46
89
14
1
1
1
21
6
276
234
82
60
58
69
53
58
73
17
63
100
100
100
35
50
13
100
100
100
100
100
50
66
64
86
96
83
45
85
92
53
57
87
86
100
100
85
64
100
100
100
50
49
55
66
62
In total, 3,092 persons sat for the foregoing written examinations during 1966.
This was an increase of 906 or 41 per cent over 1965. Sixty-eight per cent of applicants qualified. In addition, written examinations were used in the selection of
candidates for Communications Technician, Hardware Consultant, and Factory
Inspector.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
COMPETITIONS FOR PROMOTION
Y 13
One of the many panels held in the Civil Service Commission office.
Apart from appointments through entrance examinations, there were 1,216
competitions held in 1966, an increase of 191 over 1965. Civil Service Commission
Selection Officers did not participate in 22 of these competitions, which were under
delegated jurisdiction such as the Provincial Gaol Service. These competitions
resulted in 1,311 candidates being appointed to the various Government departments
and agencies. Fifty-eight per cent of these appointments were promotions from
within the Service, and the remainder were initial appointments. The number of
promotional appointments made from one department to another was 53. This was
7 per cent of the in-service promotions or 4 per cent of the total appointments from
promotional competitions.
 Y 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following graph indicates the operation of the promotional policy for the
past five years:—
60%
55%
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
57
PROMOTIONS FROM WITHIN THE SERVICE
43
APPOINTMENTS FROM OUTSIDE THE SERVICE
10%
PROMOTIONS FROM ONE DEPARTMENT TO ANOTHER
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
In addition to the recruiting of new employees and the conduction of promotional competitions, the Recruiting and Selection Division, through its offices in
Victoria, Vancouver, and Essondale, devoted considerable time to the answering
of letters of inquiry and inquiries received over the counter concerning employment.
Selection Officers took part in career days at secondary schools and administered
employment examinations for typists and stenographers at vocational schools in
Victoria and Nanaimo. The Chief Selection Officer initiated general Civil Service
employment briefing sessions for graduating students at the University of British
Columbia and University of Victoria. Subsequently, 24 senior students at the University of Victoria applied for individual recruiting interviews, which were conducted
at a later date. Staff from the Division's offices attended the Civil Service Commission booth during the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver.
Two small research studies were carried out. An interdepartment mobility
study was carried out at the Clerk 2 level.   A review of the current year's Clerk 2
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y  15
competitions at the end of November revealed that of 81 competitions, 64 per cent
resulted in promotion within the department, 15 per cent were filled by appointments
from outside the Service, and 21 per cent by promotion and transfer from another
department. This is a much higher incidence of interdepartmental movement than
the average of all competitions and indicates a healthy acceptance of merit-system
principles and a Service-wide viewpoint by selection panels and departments at this
non-specialized work level.
One of the weekly examinations held in the lecture room of the Civil Service Commission.
The second study concerned the clerical examination passing rate and the relationship between the passing scores used on the Employment Test (Henmon-Nelson)
and the General Clerical Test (Psychological Corporation). The sample used was
the 737 candidates who wrote their examinations in the Victoria offices during the
first 10 months of 1966.   The results of the study were as follows:—
Number
1. Passed both Employment Test and Clerical Test  456
2. Passed Employment Test only  157
3. Passed Clerical Test only     13
4. Passed neither test  111
Totals
737
Percentage
61.7
21.3
1.8
15.2
100.0
The results indicate that 83 per cent of the candidates achieved a passing mark
on the " thinking ability " General Employment Test. The Clerical Test then
screened out some 21 per cent. Since only 1.8 per cent passed the Clerical Test but
not the Employment Test, it appears that the passing mark on the Clerical Test is
properly set. It becomes truly a supplement to the General Employment Test designed to aid in selection of persons with clerical aptitude. Twenty-one per cent of
the candidates may fail the Clerical Test but nevertheless be eligible for employment
in other occupations such as typist, stenographer, mapping assistant, etc., provided
they have skills in those lines.
 Y 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
The work of this office was mainly concerned with the recruitment and selection of office personnel and advising Government officials in Vancouver and the
Lower Mainland area on matters relating to personnel practices and procedures.
The following table shows the number of competitions and appointments handled
by the Vancouver office during the past five years. The reduction in appointments
in 1966 was due primarily to a 44-per-cent reduction in appointments of ferry staffs
; v aucuuvci umcc.
Competitions
  118
Total
Appointments
586
     71
633
     95
668
  140
936
  180
755
Increasing numbers of students from the University of British Columbia, Simon
Fraser University, Vancouver Vocational Institute, Burnaby Vocational School, and
British Columbia Institute of Technology seeking information concerning career
opportunities and summer placement kept the counter and telephone activity high.
An increase in personal visits from applicants throughout the Fraser Valley and
Surrey-Ladner-Tsawassen area has been noted since the opening of the Port Mann
and Deas Freeways.
THE ESSONDALE OFFICE (VALLEYVIEW)
The Essondale office is located at Valleyview Hospital and is primarily engaged
in recruiting and selection for the various Mental Health Services institutions
throughout the Province.
The year 1966 saw a marked increase in the number of appointments made
by this office, reflecting the rapid growth of the Mental Health Services.
The following table shows the total number of appointments by institution:—
Location
Total Appointments
1963  I   1964
I
1965 I   1966
Percentage of
Total Appointments
1963      1964      1965 I   1966
Tranquille.—
Dellview.	
Skeenaview..
Vista, Venture, and Mental Health Centres, except Burnaby	
Valleyview	
Woodlands	
Riverview   __ 	
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby	
Headquarters and Education Centre  	
Department of Public Works and Department
of Agriculture	
Totals..
940
41
29
7
170
264
497
30 |
19 |
154
39
32
18
149
364
484
24
21
i
189
38
22
18
150
353
517
31
13
23
1,200 | 1,294
I
1,354
272
46
33
22
188
394
643
42
42
18
1,700
11.6
3.4
2.4
1.0
14.1
22.0
41.4
2.5
1.6
11.90
3.01
2.47
1.39
11.52
28.13
37.40
1.85
1.62
0.71
13.9
2.8
1.6
1.3
11.1
26.1
38.2
2.3
1.0
16.0
2.7
2.0
1.3
11.0
23.2
37.8
2.5
2.5
1.7 |      1.0
100.0
100.00
100.0 | 100.0
In examining this table, the percentages of this year approximate the percentages of 1965. However, there is a substantial increase of appointments made in
some of the institutions; for example, Tranquille School and Riverview Hospital,
which were 44 and 24 per cent respectively. It is significant to note the large number of people entering directly from society to the Mental Health Services. Over
1,400 new employees were hired.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966 Y 17
Appointments for the nursing divisions of the Mental Health Services (895
positions) are a 22-per-cent increase over last year's total of 732. Non-nursing
appointments of 805 are an increase of 29.4 per cent over last year's total of 622.
The percentage of trained nursing staff to untrained nursing staff rose slightly to 54
per cent during 1966. The total increase of nursing appointments was 100, which
represented a noteworthy 26-per-cent increase in hiring of registered nurses and
public health nurses. Recruitment of psychiatric nurses was 316, an increase of
20.1 per cent over last year's appointments of 263.
It is significant that there were 49 male psychiatric nurses recruited this year
over last year, which, in the main, is attributed to the continuous advertising across
Canada and in the United Kingdom.
There were 241 competitions closed in this office, of which 30 were local postings and 76 advertisements. There were 1,283 applications from all competitions,
of which 635 were interviewed. As the preponderance of the recruitment done by
this office is for beginning level or non-competitive positions, many of which are in
the professional classifications, several thousand applicants were seen by the staff,
in addition to the 635 mentioned above.
With the expansion of the Mental Health Services and decentralization of the
Service, great pressure resulted in trying to meet with the requirements and standards
of the several centres and institutions. With this expansion there appears to be a
greater requirement for professional staff, and considerable time was spent in trying
to recruit for this group.
CLASSIFICATION AND WAGE DIVISION
During 1966 the Division reviewed a greater number of individual positions for
the purpose of classification than during 1965—711 as against 682. Table 2 of
the Appendix indicates the number of reviews by department. Upward revisions
totalled 524, downward revisions were 21, and a total of 166 remained unchanged.
The increase in the number of positions reviewed was attained despite a large
number of complex and time-consuming miscellaneous studies, and the fact that the
Division was one staff member short for over half the year. Credit must be given
to the members of the Division for their co-operation and willingness to work many
extra hours.
The number of requests from departments for classification studies was unprecedented, and a backlog of approximately 400 reviews remained at the end of
the year.
The Division investigated 100 requisitions for appointment, amended or rewrote 137 position specifications, and investigated 18 requests for extensions to
casual appointments. Annual wage surveys again were carried out, necessitating
visits to various outside concerns for the purpose of ensuring proper matching of
positions. In connection with the clerical survey alone, 24 jurisdictions were visited
and their classification systems examined in relation to Civil Service standards.
Many trips were made to the Greater Vancouver and Essondale areas; an extended field trip was made to the Kootenay, Okanagan, and Kamloops areas, plus
an extended trip to the Prince George, Prince Rupert, and Pouce Coupe areas.
Miscellaneous studies carried out during the year were as follows:—
Handicraft Instructors, Riverview Hospital.
Bus-drivers, Riverview Hospital.
Cooks 4, Riverview Hospital.
X-ray Technicians 2, Riverview Hospital.
Oxygen Therapist, Riverview Hospital.
 Y 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Building Service Workers (Night Supervisors), Brannan Lake School.
Outside staff, University Endowment Lands.
Public Health Inspectors.
Technical Forest Officers.
Furniture Repairmen and Radio Technician, British Columbia Ferry
Authority.
Steam Boiler Operators, Drag-line and Clam-shell Operators, and 10-ton
Tilting Trailer Operators, Department of Highways.
Radio Technicians, Forest Service.
Terminal Attendants and Terminal Assistants, British Columbia Ferry
Authority.
Data Processing Operators, Key-punch Operators, Programme and Systems Analysts.
British Columbia Medical Plan.
Psychiatric Social Workers.
Laundresses 3 and Industrial Therapists, Riverview Hospital and Tranquille School laundries.
Promotional Policy Study: Amount of increase on promotion or reclassification (retention or otherwise of annual increment date).
Numerous salary survey returns were completed for other organizations.
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
Executive Development Training Plan
Twenty-four Government employees enrolled in Class VIII of the Executive
Development Training Plan received Diplomas in Public Administration at a special
academic assembly at the University of Victoria on November 18, 1966.
The employees who received their diplomas were: G. F. Alexander, K. E.
Littler, and M. J. O'Brien, of the Department of Finance; D. J. Chorlton, A. B.
Robinson, and H. Waelti, of the Forest Service; A. M. Barber, R. P. Murdoch, and
A. D. Wight, of the Lands Service; R. W. Gittens, E. E. Readshaw, W. C. Thomson, and N. C. Tattrie, of the Department of Highways; R. N. Hitchman, of the
Department of Agriculture; J. Glenwright, of the Hospital Insurance Service; W. L.
I ?f ff -7^7 ^t    ^t
*W     %#      ^     %-§    %&   ^ 0   W
Class VIII of the Executive Development Training Plan.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y 19
Ingram, of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources; J. T. Gulliver, of
the Water Resources Service; P. J. Bandy, of the Fish and Wildlife Branch, Department of Recreation and Conservation; K. E. G. C. Jackson, of the Civil Service
Commission; F. J. Otte, of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority;
F. W. Ramsay, of the British Columbia Ferry Authority; J. M. Sotkowy, of the
Department of the Attorney-General; H. P. Thornton, of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce; and D. A. Cooper, of the Department
of Labour.
The Diploma in Public Administration awarded to the late A. P. McLaughlin
was mailed to his widow.
Courses in Appraisal
Thirty-four employees in the Lands Service, Department of Finance, and private industry enrolled in the correspondence section of the Appraisal 1 Course;
29 students attended the two-week institute and wrote the examinations; 26 students
qualified and three failed.
Thirty-seven employees from the Lands Service, the Forest Service, the Department of Finance, and private industry are taking the correspondence section of
Appraisal 2, and will be attending the two-week institute in March, 1967. Candidates will write the Appraisal 2 examinations on the final day of the institute.
In addition, six candidates, who had taken the earlier Appraisal Courses, completed their full A.A.C.I. accreditation during 1966.
Correspondence Course in Basic Public Administration
Thirty-four students, enrolled in Class 2, successfully completed the assignments of the above training programme. Mr. A. G. Richardson, Chief Personnel
Officer and Chief Assistant to the Civil Service Commission, presented certificates
of achievement to the employees on April 6, 1966, at a luncheon held on the final
day of the three-day workshop.
Students were required to submit 24 assignments during the fall and winter
months. Five courses were studied: (1) The Government of Canada; (2) The
Organization of the Public Service of the Province of British Columbia; (3) Provincial Fiscal and Accounting Procedures; (4) A Guide to Improved Letter Writing;
and (5) Staff Management—Supervision. The three-day workshop held in early
April consisted of group discussions and lectures on supervision. Mr. C. J. Ferber,
Comptroller-General, spoke on Provincial fiscal and accounting procedures.
The graduation class of Correspondence Course in Basic Public Administration.
 Y 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The students who received certificates were: R. W. Aldred, A. M. Broughton,
Mrs. A. G. Burton, M. E. Carroll, K. H. Dawson, T. D. Devitt, S. H. Haines, K. M.
Hanson, A. A. Hindley, H. I. Johnston, L. King, G. C. Leonidas, R. A. McLaren,
H. J. Morlok, W. G. Mundell, A. L. Repasse, D. G. B. Roberts, R. Rutherford, J. S.
Shannon, W. H. Shaw, Miss M. Sing, G. L. Standen, H. E. Stennett, D. B. Steuart,
D. E. Stevens, J. D. Sutherland, W. J. Tattrie, K. G. Stewart, G. A. Stewart, J. M.
Donald, N. M. Scorgie, W. A. Harvey, P. W. Saville, and R. Winbow.
Forty students selected for Class 3 of this course commenced their studies in
October, 1966.
Computer In-put Seminars
Mr. W. Matichuk, Classification Officer of the Commission; Mr. J. Baird, Director of Data
Processing; and Mr. G. Spring, Operations Manager, examine computer programme.
The Civil Service Commission sponsored two sessions of a two-day seminar of
computer in-put. It is proposed to give this course to senior officials and to all
Government employees involved in the preparation of source documents for computer programmes. Mr. C. J. Ferber, Comptroller-General; Mr. K. Lightbody,
Co-ordinator of Accounting Procedures; and Mr. J. Baird, Director of Data
Processing, were responsible for the preparation of the course material and gave the
lectures.
Personnel Officers' Course
Seven departmental Personnel Officers attended a 10-hour course on "How
to Conduct Supervisory Training Programmes."
Preparation of Publications Seminar
Much of the preparatory work has been completed on the above programme,
which will be given in the spring of 1967. Employees involved in the preparation
of pamphlets, brochures, and publications will be invited to attend. Lectures will
be drawn from the Queen's Printer and the Photographic Branch.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y 21
In addition to the training programmes sponsored by the Civil Service Commission, many of the departments of Government conduct seminars, workshops,
orientation courses, and short training programmes related to the work of the department concerned. Major in-service training programmes of a continuing nature
conducted by the departments are listed below:—
Department or Service and Branch Course Name
Attorney-General—Corrections (1) Probation Officer-in-training
Course.
(2)  Security Officers Academy
Course.
Education—Technical and Vocational Teacher Education Programme for
Vocational Instructor's Certificate.
Forest Service (1) Basic Course for Technical
Forest Officers.
(2) Advanced Course for Technical
Forest Officers.
Mental Health Services—
Education Centre (1) Psychiatric Nursing Pogramme.
(2) Psychiatric Aide Programme.
Riverview Hospital (1) Management Development.
(2) Supervision.
Mental Health Services—Woodlands School (1) Dietary Aide.
(2) Hospital Housekeeping.
(3) Nursing Service
Administration.
(4) Pediatric Nursing.
Highways—Construction, Location, and Pav-   (1) Engineering Aide Programmes.
ing Branches (2) Paving.
Labour Industrial Relations Officers'Course.
Recreation and Conservation—
Fish and Wildlife Branch Hatchery School.
Parks Branch Parks Course.
Social Welfare In-service Training Course for Social
Workers.
Employees on Educational Leave of Absence for Postgraduate Training
During the year, 52 employees were on educational leave of absence taking
postgraduate training. Of these, 42 were either on bursaries or agreements under
the National Health Grant programme or the Federal-Provincial Professional Training Plan; four received partial salaries (50 to 75 per cent) from the departments
in which they are employed, and six were on educational leave without pay. A
breakdown by departments is as follows: Agriculture, 2 employees; Attorney-
General, 4 employees; Health Services, 13 employees; Mental Health, 10 employees; Highways, 1 employee; Mines and Petroleum Resources, 2 employees;
Recreation and Conservation, 1 employee; Social Welfare, 19 employees.
Agriculture:  2 employees taking postgraduate studies on 75 per cent salary.
Attorney-General: 4 Probation Officers taking postgraduate training under
Federal grants.
Health Services: 13 professional employees taking diploma or degree courses
under Federal Health Grants.
 Y 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mental Health: 10 professional employees taking diploma or degree courses
under Federal Health Grants.
Highways: 1 employee completed master's degree on educational leave without
pay.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:   1 employee on educational leave (half pay).
Recreation and Conservation: 1 employee in Parks Branch taking master's
degree (half pay).
Social Welfare: 15 employees taking postgraduate training under National
Training Grants and 4 on educational leave without pay.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
Sick leave granted during the period October 1, 1965, to September 30, 1966,
totalled 77,504 days—65,998.5 days with pay and 11,505.5 days without pay, an
average of 6.10 days (see Table 3, Appendix), and an increase of 0.48 day over
the average for the previous 12-month period of 5.62 days. These figures are
exclusive of sick leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and the
Department of Veterans Affairs section of the Sick Leave Regulation.
The above figures do not include the Gaol Service, which average was 6.176
days, the Liquor Control Board (average, 7.35 days), nor the British Columbia
Ferry Authority or daily-rate employees, totals for which are not available.
The average number of days' sick leave per employee (exclusive of the above
groups) for the past 10 years was as follows:—
Year-Ended
Sept. 30
1957	
Average per
Employee
  5.85
Year-Ended
Sept. 30
1962	
Average per
Employee
  5.53
1958	
  6.54
1963	
  5.59
1959	
  5.85
  5.73
  5.37
1964
5.91
1960	
1965
  5.62
1961	
1966	
  6.10
On an average salary of $20.55 a day, the 65,998.5 days' sick leave with pay
cost $1,356,269. In most cases the absences were for short periods only and the
question of relief did not apply, so that this actually was not an additional
expenditure.
Twelve employees were granted leave for the purpose of training with Reserve
units of Her Majesty's forces, and 53 employees were granted leave for the purpose
of further training and study.
The assistance and co-operation of the Director of Occupational Health in
connection with sick-leave incidence is very much appreciated. Further details
regarding this will be found in the Report of the Health Branch.
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
Following on the promotion of Mr. W. J. Williams to the position of Chief
Selection Officer, Mr. B. Pass was appointed Co-ordinator of Accident Prevention,
March 7, 1966. One of his first tasks was to meet Deputy Ministers and branch
heads. During March and April, initial visits were made to 42 Deputy Ministers,
Assistant Deputies, and other senior officials. Many more visits were made subsequently, particularly at Interior points. During the year, several additions were
made to training equipment and materials, increasing effectiveness in this sector.
Safety promotion and education activities, as outlined in last year's Report,
have been continued and expanded. Through the co-operation of the B.C. Government Employees' Association, an article on accident prevention was printed
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966 Y 23
Work Injury Rates by Departments, 1966
Frequency Rate Cost Rate
(Disabling injuries (one or more days' time loss) (Costs of medical aid, compensation, and disability
per million man-hours.) pensions per million man-hours.)
* Labour 0
* Mines and Petroleum Res. 0
* Municipal Affairs 0
* Departments  which  worked  less
than 5_ million man-hours.
t Departments which worked from
. _ to 1 million man-hours.
0 Recreation and Conserv'n f
0 Municipal.Affairs *
0 Public Utilities Com. *
* Public Utilities Com. 0
F=Fatal accident.
$8 1
Labour *
* Ind. Devel., Trade, & Com. 0
38 1
Mines and Petroleum Res. *
* Commercial Transport 0
911
Commercial Transport *
* Hospital Insurance Service 0
126J
Hospital Insurance Service *
Finance 10.8
497 1
Ind. Devel., Trade, & Com. *
Education %%%%% 6.3
6871
Finance
Social Welfare ..Bill
1,419 ■
Lands Service f
f Lands Service   ■■■7.7
2,478 c_B
Education
Attorney-General  ■■■8..
3,81.
■■
Provincial Secretary t
Health Services   ■■■■
10.1
4,440
MB
Health Services
t Agriculture   -BBB-I
10.4
4,513
■M
Public Works
* Water Resources Service   BBH0n_H
■ 12.5
■■15.9
(F.)
19,0851
(F.) 7,661 B=
Attorney-General
f Provincial Secretary  ■■_■■
7,918 _■
8,055 ■■
8,539 ■■
Mental Health Services
ALL DEPARTMENTS   _____■__■
■■ 16.9
ALL DEPARTMENTS
Highways  ■ngoa
■^■17.7
Agriculture f
Public Works  BBBHI
)«■_■■ 22.5
(F.) 8,710 urn.
Social Welfare
Forest Service   ■■■H
11,877 ■-■■
Highways
12 003 HSHt-Bi
Forest Service
Water Resources Service *
Frequency rate reflects how often disabling injuries are occurring relative to the size of staff (man-hours
worked) in a department.
Cost rate varies with the frequency of injuries, but in addition reflects the severity of the injuries relative to
the size of staff.
For comparison:—
In 1965 the frequency rate for all departments was 19.5 and highest single rate was 33.2.
In 1965 the cost rate for all departments was $8,261.
in the " Provincial," and the Co-ordinator addressed the general meeting of the
Vancouver-New Westminster branch. Service-wide distribution was made of
material respecting the " Canadian Driver's Test" on C.B.C. television, winter
driving booklets, hazards in using sleeping-bags, and precautions to be followed
with griddles on camp stoves.
The Division placed special emphasis on the organizational side of safety in
1966. A headquarters Safety Co-ordinating Committee was set up in the Department of Public Works, with the co-operation and support of the Deputy Minister.
The Committee is developing a comprehensive safety programme throughout the
Department, and local and district safety competitions will be started in 1967.
Depth studies have been conducted into the safety needs of Mental Health Services,
which work will be continued and intensified in 1967 in conjunction with departmental officers.
The Co-ordinator attended 20 headquarters safety committee meetings and
9 local safety committee meetings; addressed 15 departmental conferences, training
sessions, and other meetings; investigated and reported on 2 fatalities and 1 murder.
 Y 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In addition, he made extensive tours through the Kootenays visiting Highways locations, Northern British Columbia visiting Highways and Forest Service locations,
and Forest Service locations in the Vancouver Forest District. He attended the
British Columbia Safety Conference in Vancouver, the National Safety Congress in
Chicago, and completed the course in Industrial Accident Prevention held at the
University of British Columbia under the auspices of the British Columbia Safety
Council.   Forty-three per cent of his time was spent away from Victoria.
During the year the Safety Officer addressed 3 safety rallies, conducted 51 film
showings, and addressed 12 other meetings. He took part in the special Safety
Week at Riverview and Valleyview organized by the Central Safety Committee,
investigated and reported on one fatality, and made three depth studies of accident
problems in areas where particular departments had adverse results. He completed
the National Safety Council Driver Improvement Instructors' Course and the U.B.C.
Industrial Accident Prevention Course, and attended the British Columbia Safety
Conference and the Motor-vehicle Branch Driver Examiners' Conference. Over 50
per cent of his time was spent away from Victoria.
Safety Award Presentation
Representatives of award-winning departments.
The highlight of the year's activities was the safety awards presentation attended
by the Premier and members of the Cabinet, 18 Deputy Ministers and assistants,
the president and executive director of the British Columbia Safety Council, and
Commissioner E. V. Ablett of the Workmen's Compensation Board. The main
results, as summarized by the Co-ordinator, were as follows:—
(1) There were 3 fatal accidents, compared with 5, 8, 12, and 2 in previous
years.
(2) Despite a 4.79-per-cent increase in man-hours worked, the number of
disabling injuries to Government employees was reduced by 66 from
1965.   The frequency rate of disabling injuries per million man-hours
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y 25
declined 13.33 per cent from 1965. It was 35.49 per cent below the 1962
rate (see table following). The number of employees suffering medical
aid and time-loss injuries in 1966 was 879 less than it would have been
at the 1962 rate.
(3) The number of days lost through injury was 2.6 per cent more than in
1965.
(4) The direct costs of medical aid, compensation, and disability pensions
were 2.0 per cent higher than in 1965. To get a true comparison of direct
costs however, weight has to be given to man-hours, up 4.79 per cent;
wage rates, up about 5 per cent; and increases in Workmen's Compensation Board benefits effective this year, the latter comprising disparate
percentage increases for various payment categories. The cost rate per
million man-hours allows for increases in total hours; the combined effect
of increased wage and benefit rates may be judged from the average cost
per time-loss day, which was 11 per cent higher in 1966 than the previous
year. Applying this percentage adjustment to the 1965 cost rate, the
direct costs in 1966 were 12 per cent lower than 1965 experience, if wage
and benefit rates had remained unchanged.
(5) The Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources earned the first
bronze-on-gold award for an entire department. In addition, the Premier
presented a gold award to the Department of Municipal Affairs; silver
awards to British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service (its second silver
award), Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, and Commercial
Transport; and bronze awards to British Columbia Lands Service and the
Department of Labour. The bronze-on-gold and silver award winners
also qualified for the Premier's Safety Trophy.
Disabling Injury Frequency Rate   per Million Man-hours
«    twelve-nlonth rolling averages  »
CUMULATIVE
First Year
Aug. '62 to July '63
10
I
i
.....    J
0 :
j                                          I
$30,000
Cost Rate of Injuries per Million Man-hours
Cost
Rate
$20,000
(Av. 1962, $16,744)
All Departments
1
$10,000
j     Aug. '62 to July '63
0 !   L.
1962 1963
1965
 Y 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(6) One hundred and thirty-three British Columbia Safety Council awards
were won by units of various departments, including the first awards to
entire highway regions—Region 1, a bronze award covering 1,140 employees, and Region 2, a silver award covering 928 employees. The
Prince George Forest District won a bronze award covering 247 employees.
The Co-ordinator, Mr. B. Pass, concluded:—
" This was another year of progress in reducing both time-loss injuries and
medical-aid cases. While it is disappointing that similar reductions were not
achieved in direct costs in absolute terms, the continued rise in recent years in man-
hours and cost levels has had a cumulative effect that inevitably must be reflected
in any straight cost comparison. It is encouraging that costs have not only been
controlled, but relatively have shown measurable improvement. The results were
due to the interest and co-operation of all levels in the Service and the excellent
support of Ministers and Deputy Ministers. I would acknowledge the invaluable
help of the Workmen's Compensation Board, the British Columbia Safety Council,
and the loyal and unstinting effort of the staff of the Accident Prevention Division.
With such teamwork we look forward with confidence to the challenges of the future
in reducing human loss and suffering from work injuries."
GRIEVANCES
The Commission reviewed 6 grievances during the year, and heard 15 briefs
concerning wages and working conditions from groups of employees.
CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
Mr. W. J. Williams was appointed Chief Selection Officer, replacing Mr. D. J.
Slader. Mr. B. Pass was appointed Co-ordinator of Accident Prevention, replacing
Mr. Williams.
Mr. W. T. McLaughlin was appointed to the Commission's staff to assist with
specialized problems within the British Columbia Ferry Authority.
In September, 1966, a committee chaired by the Director of Occupational
Health and including the Chief Selection Officer, the Senior Classification Officer,
and the Administrative Officer of the Civil Service Commission was formed to maintain uniformity throughout the Service in dealing with employees unable to perform
their duties due to ill heath.
The Chairman attended the third annual conference of Canadian Civil Service
Commissioners, held in Winnipeg in June, and the Public Personnel Association
Conference in Washington, D.C., in October.
In conclusion, the Chairman extends his sincere appreciation to his two colleagues on the Commission, to each member of the Commission's staff, to Government Agents, to the Civil Service Commissions of other Provinces, and the Federal
Government for their able assistance, and to you, Mr. Minister, for your deep and
sympathetic appreciation of the Commission's problems.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. E. Brown, Member.
E. R. Rickinson, Member.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1966
Y 27
APPENDIX
Twenty-five-year continuous-service certificates were awarded to the following
Government employees in December, 1966:—
Department of Agriculture
Leslie King.
Miss Mary Rae Smith.
Department oj the Attorney-General
Miss Velma Eva Arbuthnot.
Joseph Melville McHale.
Gerald Marcel Davison Ridout.
Maitland George Stade.
Robert Blanc Wilson.
Liquor Control Board
William Thomas Coates.
John Lonie Cook.
Cecil Arnold Ferguson.
Miss Margaret Elizabeth Heap.
Robert Louis Picotte.
Department of Education
Raymond Dawson Elders.
Herbert George Pidcock.
Miss Dorothy Ethel Thompson.
Department of Finance
George Lawson Brodie.
Miss Margaret Therese Hallinan.
Miss Isabelle Janet Harbord.
Kenneth Shaw Lawson.
Public Utilities Commission
Miss Mary Alice Caston.
Health Services
Harold Hawksworth.
Miss Joyce Mary Arrowsmith Smith.
Mrs. Kathleen Smith.
Miss Lillian Gertrude Warne.
Hospital Insurance Service
James Wishart Mainguy.
Mental Health Services
Wendell Emerson Coffey.
Vernon Garfield Copp.
John Forbes Glennie.
Miss Mary Alice Hagen.
Robert Chester Harkness.
Miss Marjorie Hawkins.
Charles Henry Jones.
George Sparling McConkey.
Samuel Anton Neid.
Joseph Harold Salisbury.
Cyril Roy Scott.
Kenneth Bell Scovil.
Miss Lois Helen Siddall.
Arthur Ray Toop.
Albert Hall Warriner.
Elmer John Woods.
Lands Service
Earle Raymond Gandy.
John Clifford Moore.
Forest Service
Gordon McKellar Abernethy.
Maxwell Kennedy Bennett.
Lucius Albert Chase.
Charles Deacon Semple Haddon.
James Ralph Johnston.
Robert James Little.
James Harold Robinson.
Charles Miles Yingling.
Water Resources Service
James Hoyt Hallett.
Miss Phyllis Hazel Jones.
Arthur Walker Lees.
Department of Highways
Norman Allan.
Horace Brown.
Donald Alexander Carmichael.
Wilfred Stanley Charter.
Leroi Francis Cote.
John Humphrey Davy.
Reginald Hewgill Dill.
George Grummett.
Mrs. Hilda Maude Haylmore.
Robert Lomas.
Mark Kent Nicholson.
Thomas Nutter.
Matthew Ovington.
David Cameron Pollock.
Alan Ernest Rhodes.
John Wilson Richardson.
William Henry Sluggett.
Neil Clayton Tattrie.
George Wilkinson.
Donald Osman Young.
Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources
Robert Blair Bonar.
Department of the Provincial Secretary
Mrs. Christine Ross Fox.
Department of Public Works
Albert Ernest Beaveridge.
Charles Edward Monteith.
Edwin Ainley Robinson.
Department of Recreation and Conservation
Siggie John Kristjansen.
Miss Martha Ileene Lawson.
William Job Mason.
Robert Walter Sinclair.
Department of Social Welfare
Walter Shogan.
Workmen's Compensation Board
Daniel Raymond Beaton.
John Patrick Berry.
Frederick Houson Clark.
Harry Borden Duke.
Miss Ulrika Helen Larson.
 Y 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Number of Full-time Permanent and Temporary Employees in Each
Department and Agency as at December 31, 1966
Department
Combined
Hospital Insurance Service
Highways
Lands Service
Forest Service 	
Water Resources Service
Mines and Petroleum Resources
Municipal Affairs
Provincial Secretary
Public Utilities Commission
Public Works
Recreation and Conservation
Social Welfare
Totals
Liquor Control Board
British Columbia Ferry Authority
Grand totals
Table 2.—Classification Reviews by Departments in 1966 with Comparative Figures
for Previous Years
Department
Upward
Revisions
Downward
Revisions
Reviews
Resulting
in No
Change
Total
Agriculture	
Attorney-General — _
Commercial Transport-
Education... 	
Finance 	
Hospital Insurance Service..
Highways.
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce .
Labour   	
Lands Service    	
Forest Service..
Water Resources Service .—	
Mines and Petroleum Resources .
Municipal Affairs .
Provincial Secretary 	
Public Utilities Commission -
Public Works 	
Recreation and Conservation..
Social Welfare 	
Public Health	
Mental Health..
Liquor Control Board	
British Columbia Ferry Authority_
Non-Civil Service agencies	
Totals, 1966 .
Totals, 1965 .
Totals, 1964 _
Totals, 1963 .
Totals, 1962.
15
99
1
26
53
17
25
7
11
12
38
8
3
5
10
2
20
12
21
19
25
3
2
90
524
21
1
16
9
13
1
6
4
2
5
2
3
9
4
3
3
6
14
7
5
45
166
16
116
1
39
67
18
31
11
11
14
43
10
6
5
19
11
24
15
28
25
39
10
9
143
711
682
541
628
611
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT, 1966
Y 29
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