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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-fifth Annual Report 1965/66 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1967]

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-fifth Annual Report
1965/66
By the Superintendent oj Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
  The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., LL.D., Ed.D., F.R.S.A..
Minister of Education.
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-fifth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister oj Education.
January, 1967.
  G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.,
Deputy Minister of Education.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.),
Superintendent of Education.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1966
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., LL.D., Ed.D., F.R.S.A.
Deputy Minister of Education:
G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.
Superintendent of Education:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Psed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Co-ordinator of Special Services:
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Surrey.
G. C. Bissel, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Fort Nelson.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B. Ed., Squamish.
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed., Fort St. John.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Hope.
J.   Chell,  M.A.,  Assistant  Superintendent,
Victoria.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Prince Rupert.
C. Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., Nelson.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C Ferguson, B.A. West Vancouver.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, North Vancouver.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Super-
tendent, Vancouver.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Qualicum Beach.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Port Alberni.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Merritt.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd., Victoria.
E. J. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Haney.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Powell
River.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Pasd., Kimberley.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., Vanderhoof.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver.
J. I. Macdougall, B.A., M.A., M.Ed.,
D.Pasd., Chilliwack.
A. B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C., B.A., B.Ed.,
M.Ed., Terrace.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Kitimat.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A. Trail.
F. A. McLellan, B.Pced., M.A., Sidney.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Oliver.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Prince
Rupert.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Courtenay.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Psed., Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., M.Ed., Murrayville.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Burnaby.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Creston.
9
 F 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests and Standards: C B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of Secondary School Correspondence: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Textbook Branch: D. W. C. Huggins.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D., Litt.D.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report of the Superintendent of Education	
Page
13
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)     39
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)_
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services	
45
52
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests and Standards     55
Report of the Director of Home Economics     59
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools-
Secondary and Vocational Courses	
62
Elementary Correspondence School  66
Report of the Director of the Division of School Broadcasts  67
Report of the Director of Visual Education  69
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch  71
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  72
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  78
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  81
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  95
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)  109
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  112
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act 124
Statistical Returns  125
Information re Examination Papers  184
11
 F 12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  13
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  14
Distribution of Instructional Staff and Pupils by Type of School  14
Teachers' Certificates—Various Tables  15
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  16
Number of School Districts  17
Number of Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  17
Number of Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District 18
Number of Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  19
Number of Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  20
Number of Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  21
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  22
District-employed Instructional Staff  23
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils.. 24
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance by Type
of School  25
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  25
Classification of Teachers' Salaries, Teachers and Principals Enrolling Divisions, Supervising Principals, Special Staff and Instructors  26
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1965  28
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1965  28
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1965  29
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1965 by School District  32
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  126
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  182
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1965/66
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1967.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister oj Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-fifth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1966.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
400,064 to 420,790 and the average daily attendance increased from 359,442 to
379,045.  The percentage of the regular attendance was 90.08.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown
hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Schools
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
Municipal
Rural
Total
14
97
55
39
40
11,061
1
2
1
5
4
53
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
7,615
72,913
35,827
20,880
16,658
257,496
222
403
563
1,909
1,087
5,217
7,837
Secondary ....	
73,316
36,390
22,789
17,745
262,713
Totals	
1,305
66
1,372
411,389
9,401
420,790
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 5,754 officially registered in other
schools)       3,363
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students  782
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction  48
4,193
Adult Education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—■
Day  14,210
Night :  11,734
Public-school adult education  100,292!
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)  8,109
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  197
i Includes 74,815 non-vocational.
13
 F  14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Day  1,173
Night  430
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)  51
University of Victoria non-credit courses.—  1,2342
University of British Columbia non-credit courses  6,7063
148,329
2 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1,391 summer session (credit and non-credit), 446
extra-sessional (evening division).
3 This figure does not include the following enrolments:  7,749 summer session (credit and non-credit), 1,541
extra-sessional evening division, 1,061 correspondence courses.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1965/66:—■
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
Kindergarten  '
Graclp. T
6,757
22,261
20,117
19,168
1,674
18,523
17,868
17,726
17,21.3
2,330
16,521
15,378
14,002
3,320
12,227
10,669
1,557
6,323
20,207
19,039
18,455
871
17,824
117,429
16,972
16,162
1,383
15,696
14,750
13,509
2,157
11,482
10,233
987
13,080
42,468
rirartft tt
39,156
Grade III                                                     —   	
37,623
2,545
Grade IV                                           	
36,347
Grade V                                                        - -	
35,297
Grade VI                                                     	
34,698
Grade VII                                                 .	
33,375
Intermediate and Senior Special     	
Grade VIII                                —    ~ - 	
3,713
32,217
Grade IX —	
30,128
27,511
5,477
23,709
20,902
Grade XIII                                   - - 	
2,544
217,311
203,479
420,790
DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND PUPILS
BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils
per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Teachers
Enrolling
Divisions
Senior secondary-
Secondary .
Special
Instructional
Staff
Total
Staff
Junior secondary  	
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary  	
District-employed	
Totals  __
271
107
2,392
1,013
1,194
445
777
264
601
139
8,113
750
107
13,348
2,825
378
3,405
1,639
1,041
740
8,863
107
16,173
Enrolment
7,837
73,316
36,390
22,789
17,745
262,713
420,790
Percentage of
Total
Enrolment
1.86
17.42
8.65
5.42
4.22
62.43
100.00
Average
Enrolment per
Division
28.92
30.65
30.48
29.33
29.53
32.38
31.52
Total
Pupils-
Total
Staff
20.73
21.53
22.20
21.89
23.98
29.64
26.02
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
F 15
The following table shows number and percentage of teachers in elementary
and secondary schools during the school-year 1965/66 by certificate level:—
Certificate Level
Elementary
Secondary
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
P-A (S-A)       -	
813
894
1,124
24
2,345
4,151
518
119
3.3
9.4
11.8
0.3
24.7
43.8
5.5
1.3
1,569
3,324
666
105
477
503
49
100
23.1
P-B (SB)	
48.9
PC (S-C)        _	
9.8
ST.	
E-A 	
1.6
7.0
E-B       _                       -          -	
7.4
E-C              	
0.7
E-T    -
1.5
Totals 	
9,488
100.0
6,793
100.0
Teachers with and without University Degrees
Type of School
With
Degrees
Percentage
of AU
Teachers
Without
Degrees
Percentage
of All
Teachers
Total
Teachers
Percentage
of All
Teachers
321
2,653
1,102
631
341
1,960
36
2.0
16.4
6.8
3.9
2.1
12.1
0.2
57
752
537
410
399
6,903
71
0.4
4.6
3.3
2.5
2.5
42.7
0.4
378
3,405
1,639
1,041
740
8,863
107
2.3
Secondary 	
21.1
10.1
Elementary-senior secondary.... 	
Elementary-junior secondary	
Elementary       ..
District-employed  — _. _.
6.4
4.6
54.8
0.7
Totals     	
7,044
43.6
9,129
56.4
16,173
100.0
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level
(Teachers, principals, and supervisory staff are included.)
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Total
Education-
Arts	
Science	
Science and Arts (B.S.A.).
Commerce	
Philosophy	
Not specified	
3,174
2,418
694
111
97
323
342
3
3
3
12
Total degrees reported .
674
3,505
2,762
697
114
100
12
57
7,247
 F 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78	
1882/83—.
1887/88.—
1892/93	
1897/98	
1902/03	
1907/08.—
1912/13 —
1913/14 —
1917/18 ....
1922/23	
1927/28	
1928/29—
1929/30 —
1930/31	
1931/32.	
1932/33	
1933/34	
1934/35	
1935/36...
1936/37 —
1937/38-
1938/39	
1939/40	
1940/41	
1941/42 	
1942/43 	
1943/44	
1944/45.—	
1945/46 	
1946/47	
1947/48	
1948/49—	
1949/50	
1950/51	
1951/52	
1952/53	
1953/54	
1954/55	
1955/56 	
1956/57	
1957/58	
1958/59 	
1959/60 	
1960/61	
1961/62	
1962/63 	
1963/64 _
1964/65	
1965/66 	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.08
$48,411.
60,758
113,679
174,775
290,255
473,802.
544,671.
1,663,003.
1,885,654
1,653,796
3,176,686.
3,532,518.
3,765,920.
3,743,317.
3,834,727,
4,015,074.
2,849,972.
2,611,937
2,835,040
2,972,385
3,277,660
3,524,962.
3,630,670.
3,585,769
3,963,848
4,028,397
3,924,243.
4,244,898
5,022,534.
5,765,205.
9,398,473.
12,468,653.
17,363,430
22,809,631.
25,830,076.
26,885,980
26,555,080.
24,060,233.
34,279,302.
I 41,067,740.
! 43.989.524.
! 50.8-S1.473.
| 53,288.028.
| 59,472,055,
I 70,174,999
| 77,632,903
| 83,782,121,
| 95,497,375
1105,017,594
1119,871,278
,141
.751
.361
.43
.26
.29
.60
.34
.11
60
.283
953
693
.083
193
373
.023
.803
.743
.043
.233
.693
783
.003
.243
.883
.533
.823
593
.503
463
183
943
.233
883
.433
.243
.153
273
.343
323
633
943
.063
.843
.483
.793;
.16-1
.753
.313
$215.
425.
604.
1,220.
4,658.
4,634.
3,519.
7,630.
9,261.
11,149.
10,008.
10,061.
9,719.
8,941.
8,213.
8,458.
8,775.
9,593
10,193.
10,640.
10,521,
10,982.
11,120
11,502.
12,231.
13,683.
14,818.
20,176.
25,768.
35,538.
47,726,
54,195,
57,881.
58,401,
70,791.
80,823.
69,314.
77,653,
90,483,
101,351,
115,941,
133,401.
145,535.
157,614.
177,539.
199,114.
227,937.
.056.222
,555.10
,357.86
,509.85
894.97
,877.56
014.61
009.543
094.983
996.273
255.663
387.993
333.813
,497.343
369.043
156.003
,353.783
562.643
,367.083
,740.473
,684.923
,364.493
,801.943
291.353
029.353
538.183
625.813
930.533
392.093
079.883
750.373
133.953
559.483
121.153
844.253
263.713
181.244
192.32*
765.63*
107.94*
018.06*
,622.84*
.715.48*
.783.79*
.584.16*
313.75*
,392.31*
1 The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities.
* This amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
F 17
The following table shows the number of classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1965/66:—
Municipal school districts  75
Rural school districts   12
Total1
,_ 87
1 There were 93 school districts prior to January 1, 1966.   Consolidation took place at that date.
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in schools enrolling pupils in Grades XI to XIII during the
school-year was 7,837. Of these, 4,118 were boys and 3,719 were girls. The
number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for
the school-year 1965/66 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
20. Salmon Arm.
22. Vernon	
34. Abbotsford—
36. Surrey	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby-
44. North Vancouver-
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich  _.
71. Courtenay..
72. Campbell River..
Totals	
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
15
1
24
15
49
43
40
13
11
9
19
21
11
271
23
3
33
25
67
58
47
22
17
14
24
31
14
378
457
86
704
458
1,418
1,270
1,013
408
297
222
561
659
284
7,837
 F 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The total number of pupils in schools enrolling Grades VIII to XII or XIII was
73,316. Of these, 37,952 were boys and 35,364 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1965/66 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
5
2
1
2
2
2
4
2
11
1
2
3
3
4
3
2
2
2
1
1
25
15
20
27
8
39
17
23
40
11
13
19
11
31
97
66
6
35
22
10
8
19
17
52
50
75
57
456
44
81
65
90
102
105
23
20
33
17
11
16
31
5
16
20
132
10
27
18
15
39
14
46
29
34
15
10
5
26
24
36
24
27
37
10
5®
24
33
57
14
.19
28
17
48
134
105
10
49
35
14
9
26
23
72
71
109
79
660
60
111
90
131
141
138
33
30
43
21
14
22
50
9
24
28
187
13
40
26
21
55
21
59
43
45
26
15
8
37
36
753
455
7. Nrfsnn
605
796
177
11. Trail               	
1,237
1?   firand Forks
446
688
15. Penticton _ _	
,1,181
269
18. Golden	
356
582
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen	
345
993
2,846
2,281
157
1,085
694
79   T illonpt                                                                               	
214
30. South Cariboo - - -
154
31. Merritt                                                         	
568
454
33   rhilliwu'-k
1,612
35. Langley _	
36. Surrey  _  	
37. Delta  ...   .     . _	
39. Vancouver
40. New Westminster  	
1,533
2,175
1,744
15,267
1,252
2,589
42. Maple Ridge _	
43. Coquitlam , .... „	
1,995
2,926
3,083
3,079
46. Sechelt 	
595
543
970
434
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Vanderhoof          _ 	
288
465
1,103
58. McBride  	
146
478
60. Peace River North  	
572
4,184
246
65. Cowichan                             .    .
662
504
380
68. Nanaimo         —
1,208
370
70. Alberni
.1,299
887
75. Mission...                                                  	
1,043
493
78. Enderby   ...
79    TTduMpt-Tnfinn
276
150
80. Kitimat. -   - -	
692
737
Totals
99
2,392
3,405
73,316
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
F 19
Schools enrolling pupils in Grades VIII to X had a total enrolment during the
school-year of 36,390. Of these, 18,916 were boys and 17,474 were girls. The
number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for
the school-year 1965/66 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
7
3
1
4
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
3
3
1
1
3
9
21
20
31
26
45
42
11
159
73
41
125
45
51
27
24
36
22
18
193
19
34
39
2®
23
33
12
31
27
43
32
60
55
15
209
98
61
174
65
72
43
34
48
31
23
266
25
47
51
39
32
46
232
11, Trail
606
614
22. Verncn _	
920
24. Kamloops  .. ..   	
33   rhilliwaok
796
1,252
1,239
294
4,793
38. Richmond
2,295
1,398
3,879
43. Coquitlam	
1,373
1,580
923
759
1,125
59. Peace River South   .                       	
633
491
6,051
563
974
1,013
790
70, Alhprni
756
1,041
Totals                                                     	
56
1,194
1,639
36,390
 F 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling Grades I to XII or XII decreased from 58 to
44 during the past year, and the enrolment decreased from 28,827 to 22,789. Of
these, 11,785 were boys and 11,004 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1965/66 in
each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie                                      	
4. Windermere  -	
2
2
6
2
1
34
14
13
20
3
21
12
23
5
19
19
11
11
31
8
328
9
32
10
16
17
18
16
3
56
16
12
45
20
17
25
3
29
15
30
6
21
25
16
12
36
9
480
10
40
12
19
20
26
22
4
64
19
16
933
359
271
8    Slnran
475
56
11. Trail       	
575
13. Kettle Valley.  	
275
17. Princeton,  	
18. Golden     	
735
121
512
24. Kamloops.   _   	
575
304
29. Lillooet -   —
217
30. South Cariboo   _	
812
205
39. Vancouver „   	
10,883
171
829
299
59. Peace River South     .                  -	
479
483
67. Ladysmith      .   	
509
464
64
1,442
86. Creston-Kaslo   	
448
293
Totals 	
44                   777
1
1,041
22,789
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-IUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
F 21
The number of schools enrolling Grades I to X decreased sharply from 83 to
44 during the year. The total enrolment of 17,745 included 9,138 boys and 8,607
girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-year 1965/66 in each district are shown in the following
table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie     	
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
7
12
23
9
23
25
7
21
43
18
111
23
84
25
22
4
7
8
10
56
9
17
31
16
20
9
7
3
16
9
5
21
8
15
31
12
33
29
7
28
53
24
12
29
110
34
27
4
8
8
12
69
10
21
38
18
23
10
8
3
18
9
5
24
186
334
3. Kimberley.. 	
4. Windermere 	
7. Nelson     	
11. Trail 	
13. Kettle Valley 	
689
18®
715
749
184
636
15. Penticton..... 	
1,198
28. Quesnel-	
53®
33. Chilliwack -	
375
38. Richmond    —
41. Burnaby  	
44. North Vancouver   „ 	
50. Queen Charlotte    '    	
51. Portland Canal 	
680
2,550
754
617
124
54. Smithers     	
193
1187
56. Vanderhoof  	
285
1,713
58. McBride	
269
529
68. Nanaimo
914
479
71. Courtenay  	
72. Campbell River	
583
232
81. Fort Nelson 	
146
82. Chilcotin	
51
526
85. Vancouver Island North 	
87. Stikine     	
231
136
 Unattached (John Stubbs Memorial) _ _
754
Totals _	
44
601
740
17,745
 F 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling Grades I to VII increased by 30 during the
year and the enrolment increased almost 20,000 to 262,713. Of these, 135,402
were boys and 127,311 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1965/66 in each district
are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
6
8
9
13
10
12
5
11
3
4
2
7
3
3
5
9
14
2
11
28
28
6
6
41
23
5
8
9
6
26
31
26
53
15
34
63
8
37
19
31
27
10
12
13
10
5
3
1
8
13
3
9
S
31
6
20
25
40
13
13
4
19
21
59
47
22
74
19
62
22
95
26
9
27
58
15
3
29
42
57
16
94
150
201
13
17
115
81
22
27
47
34
143
116
107
453
111
266
1,368
108
457
106
329
369
137
49
92
45
13
6
1
69
73
21
30
38
211
16
1*3
92
506
82
73
8
94
23
64
49
24
85
19
68
23
108
27
9
29
64
16
3
33
45
61
19
104
,164
226
14
17
124
87
23
29
51
36
150
1*21
112
490
120
283
1,567
121
506
106
352
401
15®
54
102
51
13
6
1
75
73
22
34
42
237
17
124
96
546
85
77
8
105
582
1,966
1,383
549
7. Nelson .	
2,446
432
1,808
598
11   Truil
2,891
12. Grand Forks      ■ 	
802
13. Kettle Valley-    	
156
832
15. Penticton     _	
16. Keremeos ~   	
1,909
422
25
18. Golden 	
909
1,302
1,808
559
3,113
4,921
6,113
348
416
24. Kamloops -	
25. Barriere  — 	
2,998
2,478
79   I illonft
583
680
31. Merritt ,	
1,365
971
4,566
34. Abbotsford— 	
3,710
3,134
36. Surrey	
37. Delta                      —               	
14,973
3,633
3®. Richmond  - 	
8,918
45,874
3,679
41. Burnaby   	
15,527
3,353
43. Coquitlam — _ —	
11,568
12,168
4,734
1,365
2,697
1,279
259
113
14
2,466
2,268
662
816
56. Vanderhoof	
1,090
7,174
58. McBride                 	
408
3,629
2,680
19,105
2,551
2,335
98
2,817
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
F 23
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
8
8
26
8
18
14
11
16
6
2
7
4
4
6
5
6
11
5
3
38
38
164
21
143
93
80
61
16
21
20
15
60
15
8
13
11
57
8
25
41
42
171
21
151
98
87
63
16
24
20
17
68
15
8
14
12
59
8
29
1,107
1,144
68. Nanaimo..    _   	
5,238
571
70. Alberni. ..„   _	
71. Courtenay          _	
10    r.arriphc'll River
4,545
3,188
2,412
1,845
424
77. Summerland -    	
78. Enderby     _	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino                	
667
501
398
80    Kitirnat
1,860
R1    Fort Nr.lsnn
392
8:7.   Chilpntin
166
267
220
1,753
152
87. Stikine        	
..... Unattached (Comox, Bamfield, University Hill)	
835
Totals—     —  _ 	
1,114
8,113
8,863
262,713
District Number
and Name
3. Kimberley 	
13. Kettle Valley
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos 	
22. Vernon	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island
28. Quesnel	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley  1
36. Surrey 	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond  1
39. Vancouver     10
Number of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number of
Teachers
2
40.
New Westminster __
___        1
2
1
1
41.
43.
44.
Burnaby 	
Coquitlam 	
North Vancouver __.
3
20
___      2
2
45.
53.
West Vancouver. _
2
Terrace 	
___      5
61.
62.
68.
Greater Victoria	
7
Sooke     	
4
Nanaimo 	
___      2
70.
Alberni	
.    12
8
2
72.
75.
Campbell River
Mission 	
1
1
1
76.
Agassiz	
1
3
86.
Creston-Kaslo - _ ._.
3
4
Unattached	
___      1
Total
107
 F 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14,
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere ..
Nelson 	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
Grand Forks 	
. Kettle Valley.	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos  —
Princeton- _	
Golden	
Revelstoke  	
Salmon Arm 	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon  	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops  	
Barriere  _ 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake  	
Quesnel 	
Lillooet 	
South Cariboo..
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley...	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby..
Maple Ridge 	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt.._ 	
Powell River	
Howe Sound 	
Ocean Falls 	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace  	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George.
McBride 	
Peace River South ..
Peace River North.
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan.
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo 	
Qualicum	
10
12
16
13
14
7
15
4
7
4
10
4
4
7
10
18
3
15
33
32
7
7
43
26
7
11
10
8
32
34
29
65
17
40
80
10
47
22
37
36
13
14
16
12
7
6
2
10
15
6
11
10
37
8
25
27
52
16
17
5
23
9
10
29
10
62
96
85
45
130
39
98
33
201
43
28
71
141
26
26
47
61
111
27
157
247
312
19
28
150
121
43
66
66
59
251
182
168
702
168
411
2,152
193
790
171
464
587
242
72
141
65
45
28
5
104
106
55
49
64
334
30
184
130
831
120
126
25
159
56
71
262
51
76
115
106
56
162
44
117
36
255
51
33
90
175
31
33
58
73
132
36
200
298
388
25
34
173
147
49
74
78
69
302
211
199
836
203
478
2,717
243
962
196
568
697
298
87
177
81
53
33
5
126
121
63
56
76
404
36
219
147
1,006
141
148
28
196
67
89
305
60
1,701
3,053
2,527
1,096
4,037
907
2,836
831
6,058
1,248
615
2,156
4,288
691
760
1,386
1,884
3,391
904
5,112
7,767
9,765
505
720
4,083
3,710
1,014
1,646
1,933
1,630
7,805
5,653
4,961
22,399
5,377
13,311
72,024
6,329
25,815
5,348
15,867
18,598
7,813
1,960
4,199
1,822
1,088
730
138
3,522
3,238
1,588
1,291
1,840
11,115
823
5,748
3,743
29,340
3,582
3,870
581
4,492
1,611
2,033
8,150
1,420
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
F 25
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River
75. Mission . 	
76. Agassiz  _
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby .... 	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat 	
81. Fort Nelson ,
82. Chilcotin	
83. Portage Mountain,.
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
...   Four unattached districts-
Totals	
20
212
19
167
15
129
17
95
7
32
3
36
8
30
5
20
5
86
7
22
6
11
1
16
7
16
15
76
14
97
6
13
5
58
1,372 13,348
I
254
198
155
109
39
50
35
25
105
23
11
18
18
85
117
13
70
16,173
6,600
5,471
3,815
2,888
888
1,160
777
548
2,552
538
217
526
331
1,893
2,938
288
1,882
420,790
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1965/66:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Boys
Girls
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
378
3,405
1,639
1,041
740
8,863
107
7,837
73,316
36,390
22,789
17,745
252,713   '
4,118
37,952
18,916
11,785
9,13®
135,402
3,719
35,364
17,474
11,004
8,607
127,311
	
6,797.08
Secondary 	
64,989.03
32,687.19
Elementary-senior secondary. 	
Elementary-junior secondary	
Elementary 	
20,470.64
16,347.35
237,753.66
	
	
Totals 	
1,372
16,173
420,790
217,311
203,479
379,044.95
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into teachers and principals
enrolling divisions, supervising principals, and special staff and instructors.
Teachers and Principals Enrolling Divisions
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior secondary..
Secondary-
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary 	
268
2,387
1,187
774
606
8,060
$3,700
2,600
3.250
2,910
3,200
1,360
$13,025
13,500
11,000
13,833
12,430
13,428
$8,213
7,919
7,238
7,370
6,420
6,066
 F 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior secondary-
Secondary..
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary	
Elementary-junior secondary.—
Elementary	
14
99
56
40
29
25®
$12,555
9,303
9,205
8,725
8,712
6,630
$16,061
16,871
15,360
17,050
15,560
14,400
$13,905
14,005
13,328
12,888
12,707
12,232
Special Staff and Instructors
Senior secondary-
Secondary-
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary..
Elementary..
District-employed-
$9,095
8,515
7,909
8,563
7,638
5,314
6,063
SALARY CLASSIFICATIONS
(June salary, multiplied by 10 ±$250.)
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)
Salary
Number of
Supervising
Principals
Cumulative
per Cent
Salary
Number of
Supervising
Principals
Cumulative
per Cent
$17,000..
16,500..
16,000-
15,500..
15,000.
14,500..
14,000-
13,500-
13,000-
12,500-
6
7
7
16
£20
32
45
92
67
44
100.0
98.8
97.4
96.0
92.7
88.7
82.3
73.2
54.6
41.1
$12,000..
11,500-
11,000..
10,500..
10,000..
9,500..
9,000.
8,500-
6,500-
46
28
18
24
14
IS
8
5
2
32,3
23.0
17.3
13.7
8.9
6.0
3.0
tA
0.4
Total number of supervising principals, 496.   Median salary, $13,078; mean salary, $12,834.
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
Salary
Number of
Teachers
Cumulative
per Cent
Salary
Number of
Teachers
Cumulative
per Cent
$15 500
1
1
13
14
24
37
79
107
219
417
709
681
796
100.0
~99_)
99.8
99.7
99.4
98.9
98.2
96.7
94.0
89.4
84.9
$8,500   	
8,000	
7,500  .. .    ...
558
822
661
1,328
2,204
1,737
1,577
1,402
1,064
562
194
15
4
79.6
14,500                 	
76.0
14 000
70.6
13,500
7,000	
66.3
13 000
6,500 	
57.5
lr*).,500
6,000	
43.1
12 000
5,500	
31.6
11,500
5,000..      ..
21.3
11 OOO
4,500	
4,000	
12.1
10,500
5.1
10,000
3,500 	
1.4
9,500
3,000	
0.1
9 000
2,500 	
0.0
Total number of full-time teachers and teaching principals,
$6,872.
15,226. Median salary, $6,490;   mean salary,
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
District-employed Special Instructors
F 27
Salary
Number of
Special
Instructors
Cumulative
per Cent
Salary
Number of
Special
Instructors
Cumulative
per Cent
$13,000 	
1
1
2
11
7
1
6
8
11
100.0
98.9
97.8
95.5
83.1
75.3
74.2
67.4
58.4
$6,000          - .
10
10
6
7
3
2
1
1
1
4.J1
11,000
5,500  	
34.8
10,500        	
5,000         	
23.6
10,000 .   _ -     ...   ...
4,500         	
16.9
9,500     	
4,000         -
9.0
8,000     . -   .
3,500        	
5.6
7,500
3,000      	
3.4
7,000   	
2,000 	
2.2
6,500
1,000   .     i -	
1.1
Total number of district-employed special instructors, 89.   Median salary, $6,409;   mean salary, $6,781.
Part-time Teachers (Including District-employed Part-time Teachers)
Salary
Number of
Part-time
Teachers
Cumulative
per Cent
Salary
Number of
Part-time
Teachers
Cumulative
per Cent
$9,500       .   ..
1
1
2
3
5
4
6
9
11
100.0
99.7
99.4
98.8
97.9
96.4
95.2
93.4
90.6
$4,500        	
12
23
31
59
62
52
20
16
14
87.3
9,000        	
4,000        	
83.7
8,500
3,500          	
76.7
8,000   	
3,000  	
67.4
7,000
2,500    - 	
49.5
6,500        	
2,000         	
30.8
6,000
1,500        	
15.1
5,500        	
1,000 -	
9.1
5,000
500. 	
4.2
Total number of part-time teachers, 331.    Median salary, $2,763;  mean salary, $3,035.
 F 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
EXPENDITURES FOR EDUCATION, CALENDAR YEAR 1965
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures for By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $185,566,119.00
Add—
Department of Education expenditures for
administration, grants to University of
British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University,
correspondence schools, adult education, vocational and technical schools,
services, etc  $37,049,753.84
Teachers' Pension Fund       4,258,877.67
Free textbooks, maps, etc.        1,062,641.80
       42,371,273.31
Grand total expenditure  $227,937,392.31
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1965
Grand total cost of education  $227,937,392.31
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue    $2,968,194.00
Debt charges on school district debt     23,296,550.00
Department of Education expenditures,
grants to University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Simon
Fraser University, correspondence
schools,  adult education,  vocational
and technical schools, etc.      34,720,625.36
 60,985,369.36
Total operating cost   $166,952,022.95
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 379,045— $440.45
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
F 29
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H
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
F 35
IN RETROSPECT
The school-year 1965/66 saw the last year of the old University Entrance and
General Programmes in the public secondary schools. Commencing in September,
1966, all pupils except those who may be making up deficiencies will be enrolled in
one of the new programmes set up in accordance with the recommendations of the
Report of the Royal Commission on Education, 1960. The Division of Curriculum
has therefore been extremely active in revising old and preparing new courses.
The year proved to be a record in the value and amount of new school building
costs. A major effort resulted in the expansion of many of the larger secondary
schools to provide vocational wings for instruction in the newer vocational programmes. Many of the smaller secondary schools also reorganized their facilities
for the teaching of science and other laboratory subjects.
September of 1965 saw one more addition to the modern facilities of Jericho
Hill School, when the Honourable L. R. Peterson, Minister of Education, opened
MacDonald Hall, a new classroom building for the deaf.
There was a great deal of activity in another branch of public education—the
establishment of district and regional colleges. The first district college, Vancouver
City College, opened officially in this year with a varied programme of academic
and technical courses. Lacking a new building, its work is conducted in a complex
made up of the Vancouver Vocational Institute and the King Edward Continuing
Education Centre. Construction of the first regional college, Selkirk College at
Castlegar in the Kootenays, proceeded throughout the year in preparation for opening in September of 1966. A second regional college, the Okanagan Regional College, has made its first staff appointments and will commence instruction in September, 1968. The principal of the Okanagan College is a distinguished English Educator, Dr. N. Walker.
In the technical field, the British Columbia Institute of Technology extended
its curriculum to the second year of work and graduated its first technicians in June,
1966. Industry and commerce in the Province are eagerly awaiting more of these
highly skilled young people to satisfy a long-apparent need.
There were two major amalgamations of school districts effective in January
of 1966. A number of unattached school districts in the north-east portion of the
Province united to form the new large School District No. 87 (Stikine). The formation of this district reduces the number of unattached districts to four and leaves
only a very small portion of the Province unorganized for school purposes. A second
amalgamation united the former large school districts of Creston and Kaslo into
School District No. 85 (Creston-Kaslo). This new school district will have a larger
assessment base and a larger pupil population, enabling it to increase its educational
offerings, particularly at the secondary-school level.
DEPUTY MINISTER OF EDUCATION
On October 1, 1965, Dr. G. Neil Perry was appointed Deputy Minister of
Education, succeeding Dr. J. F. K. English. Dr. Perry, who resigned his position at
the University of British Columbia as Dean of the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration in order to assume his new post, is a distinguished educator, an
economist of international repute, and a dedicated public servant. A native of
Victoria, he took his elementary and secondary schooling in that city, and later
attended the University of British Columbia. Further graduate work brought him
M.A. and M.P.A. degrees and culminated in the award of a Ph.D. from Harvard.
From 1934 to 1947 he served as secretary to the British Columbia Economic Council and set up the first Provincial Bureau of Economics and Statistics.   In 1947 he
 F 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
became Assistant Director of the International Economics Relations Division of the
Federal Department of Finance and later served on the International Monetary
Fund, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and as financial
counsellor to the Canadian Embassy in Washington. From 1954 to 1956 he served
in Ethiopia, where he was the chief economic adviser to its Finance Minister and
subsequently governor of the Ethiopian State Bank. In 1956 he returned to the
International Bank as assistant director in charge of South Asia and Middle East
operations, later taking charge of operations in the Western Hemisphere. In 1960
he returned to British Columbia as Dean of Commerce at the University of British
Columbia and in 1963 was named Vice-President of the University. With his
background as public administrator, economist, and educator, Dr. Perry is well
qualified to serve the people of British Columbia in his new post.
Dr. J. F. K. English, who retired as Deputy Minister in October to take over
the position of Chairman of the Public Utilities Commission, has had a long and
distinguished service in education in British Columbia. A native son of Chilliwack,
he took his elementary- and high-school education in British Columbia, and graduated from the University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto. From
the former he received his M.A. degree and from the latter his B.Paed. and Ed.D.
degrees. In 1962 he was honoured with an LL.D. degree from the University of
British Columbia. He served as a high-school principal at Peachland, Maple Ridge,
and Kamloops before being appointed as a Provincial Inspector of Schools in 1939.
In 1945 he became Municipal Inspector of Schools for Victoria, and in September,
1953, Assistant Deputy Minister of Education and Director of Curriculum. On
June 17, 1958, he was appointed Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education,
retaining the latter post until July 1, 1965, when the two positions of Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education were separated.
OTHER SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
In August, 1966, another senior position was vacated when Dr. W. A.
Plenderleith retired from his position of Assistant Superintendent of Education
(Administration and School Board Relations). Dr. Plenderleith took his B.A.
degree from the University of British Columbia, his M.A. degree from the University of Alberta, and his B.Paed. and D.Paed. degrees from the University of Toronto.
An author of many articles and several books on various phases of educational
interest, he was frequently called into the service of other Provinces to deal with
matters of school finance. He served British Columbia as a teacher, supervisor,
director, and principal in various school districts. In 1933 he was appointed to the
Department as an Inspector of Schools and was called upon to organize and direct
British Columbia's first large unit of school administration in the Peace River area.
In 1955 he was appointed Co-ordinator of Special Services, and in 1964 took up his
post of Assistant Superintendent of Education.
Dr. Plenderleith was succeeded in October, 1966, by Mr. J. Phillipson. Mr.
Phillipson holds B.A. and B.Ed, degrees from the University of British Columbia
and is a past president of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. He was
appointed District Superintendent of Schools in 1958 and served in Prince Rupert
and Prince George before coming to Victoria in 1964 as Co-ordinator of Special
Services.
Another appointment at the Assistant Superintendent of Education level was
that Mr. J. R. Meredith, who in February, 1966, succeeded Mr. F. P. Levirs as
Assistant Superintendent of Education (Instructional Services). Mr. Meredith
attended high school in Victoria, received his B.A. degree from the University of
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
F 37
British Columbia and his M.Ed, degree from the University of Alberta. A teacher
and principal in various high schools in the Province, he joined the Department of
Education as a research assistant in 1947, became Assistant Director of Curriculum
in 1954, then Director of Curriculum in 1958.
A new position of importance was created within the Department this year,
recognizing the growing significance of post-secondary education and of liaison
between the universities, the new district and regional colleges, and the Department.
Dr. J. D. Chapman, of the University of British Columbia, was appointed as Acting
Assistant Superintendent of Education (University and College Affairs). Dr.
Chapman is a professor in the Department of Geography at the University of British
Columbia and one of the advisers who assisted Dr. J. B. Macdonald of the University
in both the Report on Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the
Future and the later Guideposts to Innovation. Dr. Chapman is a distinguished
scholar in his own field and holds an M.A. (Oxon) and a Ph.D. from Washington.
With his wide experience of the problems of higher education, he will guide the
establishment of this new branch of the Department.
Other changes in the course of the school-year have been the appointment of
Mr. W. B. Naylor as Assistant Director of Curriculum, Mr. J. C. Wright as Assistant Departmental Comptroller, Miss M. A. Musselman as Assistant Registrar,
Mr. B. A. Black as Acting Director of School Broadcasts, and Mr. D. W. C.
Huggins as Director of the Textbook Branch.
The retirement from the Department of Education in December of Mr. B. R.
Wilson, former Director of the Textbook Branch, brings to an end many years of
devoted service in the Department. Mr. Wilson first entered the Department with
the High School Correspondence Branch in 1932. He transferred to the Textbook
Branch in 1938 and became its Director in 1960.
One of British Columbia's senior District Superintendents of Schools retired at
the end of the school-year. Mr. John Gough had a long and distinguished career in
teaching. He received his early education in Victoria, entered the Victoria Normal
School, obtained his B.A. at the University of British Columbia in 1928, and later
received his M.A. from the University of Washington. A student of both history
and geography, he has written a number of textbooks in that field. After teaching
for some years in Victoria elementary and secondary schools, he was appointed to
the Victoria Normal School in 1931, and later became Municipal Inspector of
Schools for Saanich in 1942. With the amalgamation of school districts in 1946,
he became a Municipal Inspector of Schools in Victoria and later succeeded Dr.
J. F. K. English as District Superintendent of Schools for Greater Victoria. Mr.
Gough has been succeeded as District Superintendent of Schools by his former
assistant, Mr. J. Chell. Mr. A. J. Longmore, formerly District Superintendent of
Schools at Vanderhoof, is the new Assistant District Superintendent.
New appointments to the staff of District Superintendents of Schools were those
of Mr. J. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., formerly principal of the Saltspring Elementary
and Secondary School at Ganges, and Mr. W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., formerly
principal of the Grand Forks Secondary School.
The policy of recruiting two curriculum consultants each year from the active
teaching staff of the Province has been continued. The two appointees for the
school-year 1966/67 are Mr. P. C. Glover, vice-principal of Oak Bay Junior
Secondary School, Victoria, and Mr. G. Jenvey, vice-principal of Sir Guy Carleton
Elementary School, Vancouver.
 F 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The school-year 1965/66 saw many changes of personnel, not all of which
were reported above. As in any time of transition, the reallocation of duties has
resulted in a temporary increase in the load carried by officials of the Department.
That the work of the Department continued so effectively is a tribute to the devotion
and understanding of these persons.
I would like to extend my thanks to them for their patience and co-operation.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. P. LEVIRS,
Superintendent oj Education.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
F 39
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF DR. W. A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D_Pted., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
Introduction
During the past decade many changes in educational philosophy have taken
place. New procedures in teaching and new architectural design in school planning have also changed to adapt these phases of the educational picture to correspond with the new educational objectives. In British Columbia, particularly at
the secondary-school level, we have developed our buildings from the rigid classroom stage into a stage where flexibility is the paramount feature of an acceptable
school structure. By the inclusion of libraries, counselling rooms, gymnasiums,
study carrels, laboratories, shops, and classrooms (that can be readily adjusted by
movable partitions), our recently built secondary schools can meet the needs of
instruction rather than instruction being compromised to meet the dictates of the
structure.
We, in British Columbia, can all feel justifiably proud that our educators, our
School Boards, and our architects are co-operating so successfully in meeting the
challenge to provide modern buildings for the youth of our Province.
School District Organization
Provincial legislation places the operation and maintenance of the public
schools in each of the school districts under the jurisdiction of the locally elected
Board of School Trustees. At the end of the school-year there were 87 school
districts in the Province. These included 75 districts classified as municipal school
districts because they embraced a municipality within their boundaries. The other
12 were classified as rural school districts. In this latter category there were four
small school districts, commonly referred to as unattached school districts.
The new philosophy of education has also had an impact on the school district
organization. Under the former type of school district organization, it was possible
for a relatively small school district with a secondary school enrolling a few hundred
pupils to provide an adequate education, but now that the recommendations of the
Chant Report have been implemented at the secondary-school level, many small
school districts in British Columbia do not have sufficient secondary students to
reap the benefits from the revised curriculum. The School Boards in some of these
districts, realizing the inadequacy of their small units, have requested the Minister
of Education to permit their districts to amalgamate with a larger adjoining district.
By this means these far-sighted Boards have enabled the secondary pupils of their
small districts to benefit from attendance at a large secondary school where an
adequate choice of programmes and courses is provided.
On January 1, 1965, School District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West) was
formed by the amalgamation of several small school districts so that the secondary
students could benefit by attending the large secondary school which will be
established at Gold River.
On the same date, another amalgamation was approved by uniting the former
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay) with the former School District No. 74
(Quatsino) to form the new School District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North).
The latter district will provide secondary-education facilities at Port McNeill for
students from the whole area.
 F 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
In the south-west section of the Province, School District No. 5 (Creston) and
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake) were abolished in December, 1965, and
on January 1, 1966, School District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo) was created by the
amalgamation of the two former districts.
In the northern area of the Province, Atlin, Good Hope Lake, Haines, Lower
Post, McDame Creek, and Telegraph Creek School Districts were abolished on
December 31, 1965, and on January 1, 1966, these former districts were included
in the new School District No. 87 (Stikine).
At the end of the school-year, the Board of School District No. 78 (Enderby)
agreed to amalgamate with School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm) in order to
obtain better educational opportunities for its senior secondary pupils.
Boards of School Trustees
A School Board is composed of three, five, seven, or nine trustees, as determined by the Minister of Education. A trustee is normally elected for a two-year
term of office.
Trustees within a municipality are elected in accordance with the provisions of
the Municipal Act. Trustees within rural areas of a school district are elected in
accordance with the provisions of the Public Schools Act. This arrangement
allows rural trustees to be elected in four different manners. They may be elected
at large in the rural area of the school district, or they may be elected from an
attendance zone, or they may be elected by representatives who were elected at
annual meetings of attendance areas. They also may be elected by a combination
of any of the three methods. During the past year there has been no appreciable
trend toward election at large, and, because the method of election by representatives is apparently breaking down, the Minister of Education has been called upon
to appoint many attendance area representatives as a result of the failure of voters
to elect representatives.
Of the 87 districts in operation at the end of the school-year, there were
15 Boards with nine trustees each, 36 Boards each with seven trustees, 27 Boards
each with five trustees, and 3 Boards each with three trustees. In addition to these
elected trustees, there were 6 official trustees, appointed by the Council of Public
Instruction to operate 6 of the school districts.
School Construction and School Facilities
In this Province we have recently experienced a population explosion and an
expansion in our economy that stagger the imagination. Every school district in
the Province has increased in school population. Instant towns, each with a population of several thousand people, are springing up in areas that were formerly
unpopulated. Huge dams are being constructed on our once-untamable rivers to
generate electricity, to control flooding, and to irrigate thousands of acres of formerly
arid land. New mines are being opened, gigantic new pulp-mills are being constructed, and other huge industrial plants are being put into operation in many parts
of the Province. These new enterprises are now converting the raw materials from
our forests, mountains, and fields into manufactured products.
These new enterprises have resulted in school construction continuing to expand
at an accelerated pace. Under the provisions of the Public Schools Act, the Province shares at least 50 per cent of the capital costs which it considers necessary to
provide adequate sites, buildings, and equipment for public schools. While the
essential requirements for the public schools have been determined by the Department for the cost-sharing purposes, a School Board may, when planning its building, add features and details in which the Department does not share.    Because
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
F 41
capital funds for all major capital expenditures are provided by the sale of school
district debentures, the following two types of referenda are submitted to the
electors: Those which are eligible for Government grant and those which are not
eligible for Government grant. Funds thus provided under these two classifications
are commonly referred to as shareable and non-shareable capital funds.
The increases in elementary and secondary pupil populations, combined with
the implementation of the Chant Report and the added facilities required for new
vocational courses (under Programme I), have resulted in a very large increase in
expenditures on public schools.
A comparison of the data for the 1964 calendar year and the 1965 calendar
year is interesting because the data illustrate that the provision of facilities for
public education in this Province has reached an unprecedented peak.
Referenda Approved by the Department
1964   $41,677,431.00
1965      93,874,921.00
Increase
$52,197,490.00
(125.24%)
Emergency Capital Expenditures (Section 217 Public Schools Act)
1964
1965
Increase
$611,340.00
1,132,590.00
$521,250.00
(85.26%)
Equipment, Approvals to Expend Funds (Section 190, Public Schools Act)
1964      $3,342,165.00
1965        6,734,670.00
Increase      $3,392,505.00
(101.51%)
School-construction  figures  also  reflect the same heavy  increase  in  work
volume:—
School Construction and Site Development
1964   $23,406,831.00
1965      39,320,710.00
Increase   $15,913,879.00
(67.98%)
 F 42
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
An analysis of the expenditures for the two years is given below:
Building contracts—
Elementary 	
Secondary 	
Miscellaneous _
Building extras	
Site development	
Site purchase	
Total
Totals, 1965
$19,934,772.00
14,298,674.00
1,464,226.00
267,199.00
1,292,232.00
2,063,607.00
$39,320,710.00
Elementary schools—
Classrooms 	
Gymnasiums 	
Secondary schools—
Classrooms 	
Gymnasiums 	
Projects 	
Building contracts—
Elementary 	
Secondary 	
Miscellaneous _
Building extras 	
Site development	
Site purchase 	
Totals, 1964
727
83
397
15
463
Total
$12,391,799.00
7,253,885.00
591,259.00
236,722.00
1,017,979.00
1,915,187.00
$23,406,831.00
Elementary schools—
Classrooms	
Gymnasiums 	
Secondary schools—
Classrooms	
Gymnasiums 	
Projects	
494
59
248
7
327
Programme I (Vocational Schools Assistance Act)
The gross total estimated cost of school district vocational capital programmes
approved by this Department for the calendar year 1965 and scheduled to proceed in accordance with the provisions of the Vocational Schools Assistance Act
amounted to $29,692,039.
Of the above amount, the approvals were allocated as follows:—
Buildings   $21,443,018.00
Equipment        8,249,021.00
Total
$29,692,039.00
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
F 43
Review of Costs jor Public School Facilities since 1956
The following table indicates the extent and the cost of providing public-
school facilities over the past 10 years:—
Year
Classrooms
Activity Rooms
and Gymnasiums
Cost
1956...  	
804
543
657
655
409
711
702
762
742
1,124
41
62
68
57
25
38
61
48
66
98
$17,152,550
1957  ...
15,579,571
1958   	
15,226,491
1959            	
17,649,282
1960   	
1961   _     .	
10,273,945
17,671,416
1962  _	
1963 	
15,607,653
16,760,269
1964      	
f 20,473,6651
1965	
)   2,933,1662
f 35,964,8711
\   3,355,8392
i Buildings.
2 Sites.
The Work of the School Planning Division
The members of the School Planning Division have devoted the major portion
of their time to the evaluation and the approval of plans and specifications, sites
and site improvements submitted by the various School Boards. These evaluations
and approvals have not only embraced the $39,320,710 required for the work on
the regular public-school projects financed under referenda, but they have also
included the additional $21,443,018 provided for the special vocational projects
financed under Programme I.
In addition to the above-mentioned work, the members of the School Planning
Division have prepared plans and specifications and have supervised the construction
of 21 projects, amounting to $1,400,000, during the past calendar year.
Tutorial Assistance for Pupils in Isolated Areas
The establishment of classes for pupils living in isolated areas is authorized
where neither school accommodation nor transportation is available. All pupils
in such classes must be assembled in suitable quarters during the regular school-
hours, and they must be tutored by an instructor sanctioned by the Superintendent
of Education.
During the past school-year there were 10 classes of this nature in operation.
These classes enrolled a total of 48 pupils, of which 39 were elementary pupils and
9 were secondary pupils. These classes were operated in conjunction with the
Correspondence Branch of the Department and were authorized under the provisions of section 20 of the Public Schools Act. Under this section, salary aid, in
the form of a grant to the teacher, is paid directly by the Province. Such a grant
is normally $15 per pupil per month of instruction.
Conclusion and Acknowledgments
The figures in this report have demonstrated that the volume of work handled
by this Branch is at an all-time high. A projection of these figures indicates that
if the economic boom continues, the volume of work will again double before
eventually levelling off in the early seventies. In order to handle such a volume of
business effectively, it is desirable that electronic data-processing equipment and
other mechanical aids be utilized to the fullest extent.
 F 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Because this is the last report that I shall be writing as Assistant Superintendent
of Education (Administration), I would like to take this opportunity to express
my appreciation and indebtedness to the headquarters staff and the field staff of the
Department, to the members of the School Boards, to the secretary-treasurers, and
to the members of the teaching profession, who have all given me such excellent
support and co-operation during my term in this position.
In leaving, it is my hope that the spirit of goodwill and cordiality that has
existed between this Branch and the other individuals interested in education will
continue in the future as it has in the past so that the maximum results can be
attained for the benefit of the students of the Province.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
F 45
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION  (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
One of the functions of the Department of Education is the provision of
instructional services, including those pertaining to curriculum development, textbooks, tests and standards, correspondence courses, visual education, school broadcasts, home economics, and the education of handicapped children. Most of these
services are administered by a special division in the Department headed by a
director who submits an annual report for the division. Other matters related to
the instructional programme but not coming directly within the scope of these
divisions are included in the following report.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered 74 applications, accrediting 41 schools
as follows: 9 for four years, 14 for three years, 11 for two years, and 7 for one
year. Three schools were accredited for the first time this year. Two schools were
advised of a possible loss of accreditation if improvements were not effected. The
total number of accredited schools is now 118, a gain of 3 over the previous year.
Teacher Qualifications in Secondary Schools
The number of teachers with elementary certification only teaching academic
subjects at Grade X or higher secondary levels increased. This is not a desirable
trend. The number who have taken no courses within the last five years has
increased to 41 from 39 last year. Of the total of 185, 70 took at least one course
in 1965. Each year a significant number of elementary teachers qualify themselves for secondary work. Comparable figures for the past three years are shown
below:—
Year
Number with Certificate Shown
Totals
E-A
E-B
E-C
e-t
1965/66...     	
1964/65   	
104
81
55
58
6                 20
4                   15
185
160
1963/64   	
(.9                   72         1           5                   21
167
Choice of Programmes, September, 1965
As noted in previous reports, the reorganized secondary-school curriculum
was implemented at the Grade XI level during the year 1965/66. It is not possible
to provide completely accurate statistical information, but the figures available
indicate that the provision of alternatives to an academic type of education is
proving reasonably effective. Distribution of pupils on the various programmes at
the Grade XI level are indicated below for the year 1965/66. It may be noted that
some of these pupils are taking two or more specialties, and also that provision has
been made for some pupils to be permitted to transfer to another programme at the
end of their Grade XI year.
 F 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Programme and Specialty
Academic and Technical—
Arts	
Sciences 	
Technical	
Commercial—
Secretarial	
Number
5,941
6,574
1,495
14,010
Accountancy
Clerical	
Industrial—
Construction
Mechanics	
Electricity and Electronics
Community Services—
Foods	
Textiles	
Home and Industrial Services
Visual and Performing Arts—
Art	
Music __.
Theatre
1,679
930
1,783
939
1,274
213
358
338
177
152
15
5
4,392
2,426
873
Other new programmes	
Repeaters completing old programmes
Total	
Adult Education
In respect of the adult secondary programmes,
night schools and adult day schools to offer courses
172
383
680
22,936
approval was given to various
for credit, as follows:—
Year
School Districts     Schools        Courses
1965/66-
1964/65_
1963/64..
26
29
25
26
29
27
226
178
215
Organization of Secondary Schools
The newer types of school organization providing for the reorganized curriculum are becoming established.   Types are shown below:—
Types
Number of Schools
1965 1964
Senior secondary
Secondary
Junior secondary
15
100 (73)
56 (48)
8
96 (64)
50(38)
57 (34)
48 (15)
Elementary and secondary     45 (28)
Elementary and junior secondary     41 (19)
(The figures in parentheses show the number enrolling all grades in the category given, for example, secondary VIII-XIII, inclusive.)
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
F 47
The size of schools, with reference to secondary enrolments only, is shown
below:—
Enrolment
Over 2,000 _.
1,001-2,000.
501-1,000
251-   500.
101-   250.
51-   100.
Under 51 	
Number of Schools
1965 1964
1 1
34 36
88 83
55 51
38 41
20 17
21 30
Totals
257
259
The number of Grade VIII pupils in small elementary schools dropped from
112 to 106. The total number of elementary pupils housed in secondary schools
was 15,319, as compared to 16,283 in 1964.
Grade XIII Enrolments
A significant decline in enrolments may be noted in the following figures and
is due to the establishing of Simon Fraser University, Vancouver City College, and
Selkirk Regional College.
Number of districts with Grade XIII  	
1965
38
1964
38
Number of schools      _   _ ..
40
41
Enrolment  _ _
.  2,552
3,628
Kindergartens
Kindergartens increased in number and enrolment, as follows :-
1965
  26
        182
  12,210
Number of districts with kindergartens
Number of schools	
Enrolment	
1964
22
155
10,894
Grade VII Departmental Examinations
Final examinations at the Grade VII level were prepared and furnished to
those districts requesting them. The table below shows the number of Departmental examinations written:—
Subject
English—
Reading and literature 	
Grammar, usage, composition	
Vocabulary, dictation, word study
Mathematics—
Computation	
Problems	
Social studies	
Science	
Number of Papers Written
1966
1965
8,462
8,822
9,297
12,635
11,104
12,885
11,100
12,228
11,042
12,131
10,203
12,755
9,571
12,686
 F 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Promotion of Grade VII Pupils and Distribution in Grade VIII
Each year in June, District Superintendents report the promotions of Grade
VII pupils, while in September, Form K shows the actual distribution of the Grade
VIII enrolment.    The table below shows these figures for the past three years:—
June:  Recommended to—
September Enrolments
Year
Grade VIII
Occupational 1
Repeat
Grade VII
Grade VIII
Taking
French 8
Occupational 1
1965  	
1964   ....
1963	
28,342
26,276
25,077
1,132
1,388
1,367
1,353
1,462
1,758
31,513
29,454
28,292
30,063
27,960
26,705
2,247
2,174
2,219
Occupational Programme
This programme  completed its  fourth official year.    Enrolments  were  as
follows:—
Year
Districts
Schools
Teachers
Pupils
1965                           	
70
70
125                      332
12fi           I           322
5,299
1964—
5,309
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
The table below shows enrolments in schools operated by local chapters of the
Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia and supported by grants:—
Year
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils
in Relation to Grants
Fully Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1965	
1964	
40
42
43
45
448
505
51
45
33
64
532
614
There were also 556 pupils enrolled in public-school day classes in 14 school
districts, making a total of 1,088 trainable retarded pupils in day schools, as compared with 1,050 in 1964.
Retention of Pupils
For every 100 pupils in the net Provincial enrolment of Grade VII in the year
1959/60, there were 74 in the net enrolment of Grade XII in 1964/65, an increase
of 7 over similar figures of a year ago.
School Population Growth
The percentage of school population growth over the period 1959/60 to
1964/65 was 31 per cent.
During this period the 10 fastest-growing school districts were: Portage
Mountain, 782 per cent; Atlin, 208 per cent; Coquitlam, 196 per cent; Golden,
191 per cent; Queen Charlotte, 183 per cent; Delta, 172 per cent; Good Hope
Lake, 170 per cent; Vanderhoof, 167 per cent; Prince George, 165 per cent; Peace
River North, 164 per cent.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
F 49
Special Classes in Public Schools
Enrolments, as reported on September 30th, are shown in the following table:-
Numbsr of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1955               1964
■1965
1964
Slow learners (educable retarded)   	
293                261
76                  46
9                    8
23                    12
9                     6
13                    14
2                      2
2        |           2
2 |            2
8                    6
58                  43
3 ;          2
8        |           5
4,024
1,076
453
100
405
14
37
64
66
556
55
3,689
672
208
80
313
17
19
24
62
436
32
506                409
6,850
5,552
l Enrolment varies greatly.
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
1965 1964
Directors of instruction  29 26
Supervisors of instruction  100 83
Teacher consultants  20 26
Special counsellors  43 41
District teachers other than relieving teachers  68 49
Totals  260 225
Entitlement of Teachers
The total number of teaching positions within entitlement for grant purposes
and the number established over and above entitlement by local districts, as at
September 30th, are shown below:—
1965 1964
Teaching positions within entitlement   15,652.96 14,771.99
Teaching positions over entitlement        474.03 342.02
Totals   16,126.99 15,114.01
General
In order to ensure that senior secondary-school programmes be related as
closely as possible to those in post-secondary institutions, members of the Department of Education held a series of meetings with staff members from the regional
vocational schools, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and the three
public universities. Policy statements regarding admission recommendations and
requirements for these institutions were developed. Universities set their own admission requirements, but it is significant to report that these have been established in
terms of the philosophy and programmes offered in senior secondary schools.
 F 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Acknowledgment
I am greatly indebted to the Superintendent of Education, Mr. F. P. Levirs, for
the data contained in the foregoing report. In his former position, Mr. Levirs
developed a well-organized system for recording and reporting on these aspects of
the public educational system and carried on this work in addition to that of the
Superintendent during this past year.
Curriculum
The Division of Curriculum is concerned with developing courses of study,
selecting appropriate textbooks, suggesting methods and materials for teaching,
organizing courses and textbooks into a coherent and sequential pattern for elementary, junior, and secondary schools, and recommending general policies for
implementing this Provincial curriculum in each school. This work is carried on with
the assistance of advisory committees of teachers and other experts.
During the year under review, a total of 21 committees comprising 169 members held 183 meetings on curriculum-development matters. An estimated 6,500
hours of members' time was devoted to this work. Some indication of the increased
programme of activity in this field can be seen in the following:—
1965 1964
Number of committees        21 17
Total membership      169 143
Total number of meetings      183 165
Number of full-day meetings        48 30
Total number of hours  6,500 4,000
Two interesting trends are observable in the revision work represented in the
above. One is the trend toward decentralization and increasing the autonomy of
the local school in making decisions pertaining to the specific teaching curriculum.
The second is the shift of emphasis in nearly all subject fields away from a concern
with factual information or the product of learning and toward an emphasis upon
the process or methods by which subjects are learned. This is particularly noticeable in such subjects as science and social studies. Both trends have resulted in the
preparation and publication of curriculum guides containing a wealth of suggestions
for teaching and a less prescriptive outline of subject-matter.
Revision work was undertaken in the following curriculum areas: Arithmetic,
art, biology, chemistry, English, French, German, home economics, language arts,
music, physics, science, and social studies. Eleven new or revised courses and 57
new textbooks were prepared for use in September, 1966. In addition, special
studies were undertaken in report cards for primary grades, library facilities in
elementary schools, and a programme for special classes for slow learners in the
intermediate grades. Two special summer workshops were conducted: one to
develop a programme for slow learners, the other to rewrite the draft of the Grade
VIII course in the junior secondary-school science programme. The regular procedure for reviewing and recommending books for school libraries was continued.
Acknowledgment
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and to the three public universities for their co-operation, and in particular
to the members of these organizations and institutions who served on the committees. Particular acknowledgment is extended to the members of the two Professional Committees on Curriculum Development, who met regularly throughout the
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES F 51
year to advise on all matters affecting the curriculum for the elementary and secondary schools of this Province. Their help and advice has been most valuable to
the Department of Education.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by the Boards of School Trustees to work with the Division of
Curriculum. This year's appointees were Mr. W. J. McConnell (Burnaby) and
Mr. W. N. Mclnnis (Courtenay). The enthusiasm and knowledge combined with
the practical experience and professional training of both Mr. McConnell and
Mr. Mclnnis made an invaluable contribution to the work of this Division.
Information and Related Services
Services related to the curriculum were also provided by the staff of the Division. In addition to meetings and consultation with curriculum officials of other
Provinces, the Division undertook the preparation and distribution of curriculum
guides; announcement, teaching-aid, administrative, and curriculum circulars; and
participated in various conferences and meetings at which information on curriculum
development was provided.
 F  52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. PHILLIPSON, B.A., B.Ed. CO-ORDINATOR OF
SPECIAL SERVICES
Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-year 1965/66:—
Items 1965/66
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  76
2. Number of unattached districts providing transportation  Nil
3. Total number of vehicles   681
(a) District-owned   534
(£>) Contract   141
(c)  Other (water taxis, etc.)        6
4. Total daily approved mileage (miles)   43,684
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)   64.7
(£>)  Average number of trips per vehicle  2.0
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles  1,334
Average distance per single trip (miles)        16.2
6. Total number of pupils carried daily  59,266
(a) Elementary   28,894
(£>)  Secondary   30,372
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       88.4
8. Average number of pupils carried per route       44.3
Transportation Assistance
The Department of Education provides a grant to School Boards to offset
allowances which may be paid by the Board to parents who provide their own
transportation for their children. These grants are given in cases where there are
insufficient pupils beyond Departmental walk limits to establish a regular bus route.
During the school-year, 2,009 pupils from 69 districts utilized this means of
conveyance at a total cost of $366,144.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditure and the total conveyance costs over the past eight years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1956                 	
$69,234,423
80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
$1,918,902
2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721.510
2,886,696
3,125,447
3,475,895
2.8
1957  	
2.5
1958           -	
2.4
1959                      	
2.2
1960 -	
2.1
1961 -	
2.0
1962 	
2.0
1963      	
1.9
1964  	
1.9
1965	
1.9
 i!|wiiWi8i
<-
o
O
 f 54 public schools report, 1965/66
School Dormitories
In many isolaled rural sections of the large school districts, it is impossible
for the School Boards to provide transportation services for secondary pupils who
desire to attend centralized secondary schools. In order to enable these pupils to
attend secondary schools that offer a full high-school programme, authority to
operate school dormitories is given to School Boards.
The following table provides data respecting the dormitories that were in
operation during 1965/66:—
School District
Capacity
Occupancy
1965/66
Staff
Grade Limits
Accommodated
Number and Name
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
15
20
14
18
20
24
28
14
20
17
18
20
20
35
15
20
14
15
28
16
15
49
8
14
20
17
18
3
14
55
11
1
2
3
3
2
3
5
2
1
1
2
1        1
1
X
VIII
VIII
VIII
VII
VIII
VIII
VIII
VIII
VIII
IX
XIII
XII
100 Mile House	
XII
XII
20    I illnnpf
XII
56. Vanderhoof..	
XII
XIII
58. McBride 	
16      1      16
30            30
62            55
12             13
XII
XIII
XII
64. Gulf Islands	
XII
Totals  	
259      |    258
180      j    152
1
21
6
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitory
facilities, the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under
this arrangement a pupil can receive up to $40 per month on a basis shared by
the Department of Education. During the past school-year, 1965/66, there were
630 pupils from 47 school districts who received a total of $251,050 in such
boarding allowances.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
This Board consists of representatives from the Deaf and Blind Parent-Teacher
Associations, the Vancouver School Board, and the Department of Education.
The Board meets regularly throughout the year, considers matters relative to the
operation of the school, and provides reports of these meetings to the Department.
The accompanying report of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the Superintendent of the
Jericho Hill School, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in
the school.
School Board Services
The Department has been able, on request, to offer consultative service to a
number of School Boards during the past year. Members of the staff are pleased
to render such assistance when called upon to do so.
 DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
F 55
DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P_3D., DIRECTOR
The tremendous post-war growth in enrolment in the elementary grades in
British Columbia has only recently begun to affect the senior secondary and university entrance levels; yet, in relative terms, the secondary-school increases have
been much greater than those in elementary school. The modal year of birth of
students graduating from Grade XII in 1966 was 1948. In that year, 26,000
children were born in British Columbia, which represented a 20-year increase of
150 per cent; yet the enrolment in Grade XII has increased 340 per cent. By
1959 the number of births had risen to 40,000, and we may expect much larger
Grade XII enrolments in the future than would be indicated by the increase in
population.
Public-school Enrolment by Grade Groups
Grade XII
School-year
Grade I
Grades II-VII
plus Special
Grades VIII-X
plus
Occupational
Grades XI-XII
Average
of Corresponding
Grades II-VI
1945/46  	
1955/56	
1965/66 	
Percentage increase, 1966/1946
15,000
29,000
42,000
176
74,000
141,000
220,000
196
30,000
50,000
94,000
218
10,000
18,000
44,000
325
.39
.66
.76
A small portion of the increase in the secondary schools is due to immigration.
But studies of the age distributions of immigrants and census increases 1951—56—61
show that the peak of the immigration curve is at age 2 to 3 and its lowest point is at
age 14 to 16. Although interprovincial immigration is establishing new records at
present,* very few families migrate while their children are in the junior secondary
grades. Obviously, both immigrating and native-born children are staying in school
longer and are reaching higher grade levels before they leave. If we divide the
Grade XII enrolment by the average of enrolments in Grades II to VI for the
corresponding years, we find that even after allowance is made for immigration
almost three-quarters of the British Columbia elementary-school children subsequently enter Grade XII.
A similar trend is noticeable in post-secondary education, and it seems probable
that whenever additional institutions are provided, they will automatically be filled.
In 1964/65 only two public universities were available in British Columbia. Their
total enrolment, 18,187, was 1.426 times the 12,756 University Programme graduates of public schools in 1963 and 1964. In 1965/66 three universities were open,
and the total enrolment, 21,829, was 1.448 times the 15,080 University Programme
graduates in 1964 and 1965. But, in addition, 2,379 students were enrolled at
Vancouver City College, of whom 1,409 were University Programme graduates,
and 1,085 University Programme graduates were enrolled at the British Columbia
Institute of Technology. Only 1,255 could be accounted for in the decrease in
Grade XIII enrolment, and therefore about 330 additional university and 1,240
* The net gain of children aged 0 to 15.99 from July, 1965, to June, 1966, was 12,675 from other Provinces
and about 2,500 from other countries.   About 8,500 of these are presently in  school.
 F 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
COLLEGE DEGREES
3200
B.C.
SCALE
(Units)
1600
800
BRITISH  COLUMBIA,
CANADA, and  U.S.A.
Bachelor's and Other
First Degrees, 1964:
400
200
100
64
32
16
CANADA
SCALE
(JO'S)
 •;
...(est) Canada, 29,084      800
-••*_- B.C., 2,580   1
U.S.A., 502,000
_ 200
Master's, 1964:
U.S.A.. 100,000 _
Canada, 3,490
B.C., 301
*» -*•* _♦*•
Ph.D.'s, 1964:
U.S.A.. 14,000
B.C.. 56
Canada, 48 1
Semi-logarithmic Scales
_L
_1_
-1_
J L
_L
__.
_L
J_
_l_
__.
__.
UNITED
STATES
SCALE
COOO'S)
400
100
50
25
16
1955  '56 '57 '58   '59   '60   '61   '62   '63 '64   '65   '66   '67 '68 1969
B.C. includes U.B.C. only to 1961 ;  Victoria is included 1961 ff.
The scales are " rate " scales, not numerical ones, and their elevation does
not show their relation to population.
Although degrees of all levels have been increasing more rapidly in B.C.
than in the U.S.A., they are still below the U.S.A. in relation to total population.
Roughly B.C./U.S.A. (1965):   Bachelor's, etc., 0.6; Master's, 0.3;  Ph.D.'s, etc., 0.1.
B.C. /Canada (1964), population estimates 1,738,000 and 19,235,000:
Bachelor's, etc., 1.0;   Master's, 1.0;   Ph.D.'s, etc., 1.3.
Sources:   National Industrial Conference Board, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, University Registrars.
DIVISION   OF TESTS   AND   STANDARDS
 DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
F 57
college or institute students had been attracted to post-secondary education in a
single year. Proximity seems to be a major factor: between 70 and 75 per cent of
all British Columbia university students graduate from schools within commuting
distance.
Relation of British Columbia Public University Enrolment to Public-school
University Programme Graduates
Academic Year
1959/60
1961/62
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
(Prelim.)
Total    U.P.    public school
graduates,    two
8,115
10.570
130.3
1,061
13.1
10,248
13,063
127.5
1,740
17.0
11,343
14,350
126.5
2,028
17.9
12,756
15,647
122.7
2,540
19.9
	
15,080
16,510
109.5
2,982
19.8
2,337
15.5
16,700
Enrolment—
University of British Columbia    	
17,300
103.4
3,416
20.3
4,225
	
25.3
The introduction of the new secondary curricula with resulting changes in the
populations on which university-entrance standards are based, the need for large
quantities of statistical information, conversion to different types of computers, and
personnel changes within the Division have placed stresses on the Division during
the past two years. Extra-provincial organizations have become voracious consumers of educational data. Studies by the Economic Council of Canada, for
example, have led to investigations under ARDA, the Agricultural Rehabilitation
and Development Act, which are directed at the problem of low incomes in rural
portions of several school districts. A Ministers' Information Services Committee
has been established to collect and disseminate information on data processing in
education. A Service for Admission to Colleges and Universities has been established to produce Canadian tests and co-ordinate admission policies. The Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, the office of the Secretary of State and other Federal branches,
UNESCO, the C.E.A. Research Council, the Canadian Council for Research in
Education, and the British Columbia Educational Research Council are all becoming more active in the collection of educational information. We have even provided results of testing in French to the Biculturalism Commission.
The study of achievement in Grade IV arithmetic that was begun in May, 1965,
was completed during 1965/66. A traditional arithmetic test with eight sub-tests
and a scholastic aptitude test were administered to 16,555 pupils. Contemporary
mathematics tests were administered to 32,792, which was 95 per cent of the
Grade IV enrolment. Studies of the accuracy of photoelectric scoring were carried
out (errors were much fewer if careful editing preceded scoring) and the difficulty
and validity of 245 arithmetic items were determined. Some of these could be compared directly with data collected in surveys carried out in 1943 and 1950, and it is
interesting to notice that many traditional difficulties still exist that modern mathematics is supposed to minimize; for example, carrying and borrowing, zeros, column
arrangement, and dollars and cents. There seems to be an inherent difficulty in
many of these concepts which is independent of the method of approach.
Standardization of the California tests at the B.C. Grade IV level indicates
that there is a population difference which is independent of the grade.   All recent
 F 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
scholastic aptitude tests which have an American mean I.Q. of 100 have produced
B.C. means in Grade VII of 110 to 112. The B.C. Grade IV means on the California Test of Mental Maturity were Language I.Q., 111.9; Non-language I.Q.,
107.9; Total, 110.6. It must be remembered, of course, that British Columbia
children in special schools or institutions have not been tested.
As Grade X is now the final year of junior secondary school and an important
level in the selection of senior secondary-school programmes, a beginning was made
in the investigation of ability of students, particularly those enrolled and not enrolled
in foreign-language courses. Grade X has been neglected as a testing year in the
past as it was not a terminal or transitional year in the 6-3-3 system of organization.
Now that the 7-3-2 grade system has been adopted, new achievement and scholastic
aptitude norms will be necessary for assistance to principals and teachers.
 HOME ECONOMICS
F 59
HOME ECONOMICS
HE 8
FN 9__
CT 9_
CC 9„
CFS9-
Fd IL
Tx IL
HE 20	
       25
HE 21	
                  16
HE 22	
                  16
HE 23„„    _.
                339
HE 24	
                622
HE 26	
                249
HE 30
           38
HE 31
HE 32	
     73
     56
VT 91	
     49
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
The total number of pupils enrolled in home economics courses in the public
schools of British Columbia during the 1965/66 session was 51,596.
The enrolment by courses was as follows:—
  15,461
  8,929
  9,684
  1,563
  1,850
  2,615
  3,222
Mgt 11  1,065
HE 91  3,523
Occupational 1, 2, 3 ~_ 2,201
Notes regarding enrolment figures for 1965/66:—
(1) Enrolments in the junior secondary course CFS 9 (boys) and CC 9 show
increases in 1965/66.
(2) Courses designated as HE 20 to HE 32, inclusive, above were offered
only to Grade XII pupils or repeaters during the current year.
(3) Due to the fact that in 1964/65 some pupils were counted twice when
enrolled in FN 9 A and B and CT 9 A and B, whereas in 1965/66 each
pupil in FN 9 and CT 9 has been counted only once, the enrolment figures shown above for FN 9 and CT 9 appear lower than those for the
preceding year. In some schools, FN 9 and CT 9 are taught as complete
courses in Grades IX and X; in other schools, Part A of both courses is
taught in Grade IX, and Part B in Grade X.
(4) In the reorganization of the senior secondary-school curriculum, Community Services is the name used for the new home economics programme
in Grades XI and XII. Fd 11, Tx 11, and Mgt are the new Grade XI
courses introduced in September, 1965, for pupils on the Community
Services Programme and as electives for pupils on the other programmes.
Fd 11 enrolment includes boys and girls.
(5) Enrolment in the three Grade XI Community Services Programme
courses appears to be similar to enrolment in Grade XI home economics
courses in 1964/65, although it is difficult to compare figures of enrolment of the new programme with those of the old programme.
In addition to the above, there were a few schools offering home economics
and (or) Community Services Programme courses where one or more classes (or
individual pupils) were registered with the Secondary School Correspondence.
In some schools it was not possible to obtain teachers with sufficient professional
home economics background to teach the senior home economics and Community
Services Programme courses.
There has been a great spread of secondary-school home economics to communities throughout the Province during the past 15 years. In 1950/51 there were
112 secondary schools offering home economics. In 1965/66 the number of
secondary schools offering home economics-Community Services Programme courses
had grown to 221, which is an increase of 97 per cent.
 F 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
The total number of home economics and Community Services Programme
rooms in operation in the public schools of the Province was 452, showing
an increase of 29 over the total number for last year. The home economics-
Community Services Programme departments in the secondary schools vary in size
from one to six rooms, the greatest number of schools having two rooms in operation.
Home economics departments opened in September, 1965, were as follows:
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack)—Arthur D. Rundle Junior Secondary School;
School District No. 35 (Langley)—Fort Langley Junior Secondary School; School
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)—Carson Graham Senior Secondary School;
School District No. 57 (Prince George)—Blackburn Road Elementary-Junior Secondary School, Kelly Road Junior Secondary School, and Winton Elementary-
Junior Secondary School (Occupational only); School District No. 59 (Peace River
South)—Chetwynd Secondary School (home economics was offered for the first
time in Chetwynd in September, 1965); School District No. 72 (Campbell River)—
Campbell River Senior Secondary School.
In School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge), the Maple Ridge Junior Secondary
School and the Maple Ridge Senior Secondary School were amalgamated into a
" campus " school in 1965/66, thereby forming one home economics-Community
Services Programme department instead of two separate home economics departments.
There were 452 teachers of home economics in the public schools of British
Columbia during the 1965/66 school-year, which is an increase of 40 over the
previous year and an increase of 82 since 1962/63. Of the 452 teachers of home
economics and Community Services programmes in 1965/66, 246 teachers held
Bachelor of Home Economics or equivalent degrees. In September, 1965, teacher
demand (to cover drop-outs plus expansion) was 26 per cent of the total number
of teachers of home economics in the public schools and is somewhat higher than
that for secondary teachers in general. This continues to present problems in
securing teachers and in providing in-service education. Drop-out of home economics teachers is due mainly to marriage and (or) family responsibilities.
To assist in meeting the continued shortage of fully qualified home economics
teachers, the Emergency Summer Session Teacher Training Programme, whereby
home economics graduates may fulfil teacher-training requirements for the Professional Basic Certificate in three summer sessions of prescribed courses, was
retained through co-operation of the University of British Columbia and the Department of Education. Teachers with Elementary Basic Certificates or higher may
train to teach home economics by taking courses for the Bachelor of Education
Secondary Programme, with a major in home economics, at summer sessions or
winter sessions at the University of British Columbia. In March the Director of
Home Economics met with and spoke to the fourth-year home economics students
and teacher trainees at the University of British Columbia. For part of each week
of summer session, a member of the Division of Home Economics was on the
University of British Columbia campus for interviews with teachers and prospective
teachers of home economics.
Although the Community Services Programme Development Workshops of
1963 and 1964 compiled equipment lists for Community Services courses, further
study of and research on the teaching cafeteria kitchen, as an optional facility for
Fd 12B, was carried on in 1965/66 by consultants and groups of teachers. A layout
for a teaching cafeteria kitchen, to accommodate the recommended equipment and
teaching facilities, was developed. The teaching cafeteria for Fd 12B should not
be considered for schools whose enrolments are less than 600 in Grades XI and XII.
 HOME ECONOMICS
F 61
In schools where a teaching cafeteria is set up, the facilities would be usable for
both teaching and food service purposes.
In co-operation with the Division of School Planning, revision of the Home
Economics-Community Services section and of the Food Service section of the
School Building Manual has been undertaken.
The Director of Home Economics attended an in-service education meeting of
the Victoria home economics teachers, participated in the Vancouver Island Teachers
of Home Economics Specialists Association Spring Seminar, and spoke at the January meeting of the Consumers' Association of Canada Victoria branch on consumer
education and management in relation to the home economics and Community
Services Programme of the secondary schools of British Columbia. Miss Jean
Campbell, Inspector of Home Economics, served as guest speaker at two sessions
of the Home Economics Teachers' Section at the 1966 North-Central District
Teachers' Convention.
Bulletins, with information related to home economics and Community Services
courses, were compiled and sent to the home economics teachers in September and
February.
A survey based on a sampling of per capita food costs for home economics and
Community Services classes throughout the Province indicated a slight increase,
which was to be expected with the reorganized courses and programmes plus the
general over-all rise in costs for food and food products.
As well as frequent contacts being made throughout the year with Miss I.
Elliott, Supervisor, Vancouver City Home Economics, and Miss M. Johnson, Supervisor, Victoria City Home Economics, a conference with the supervisors was held in
Victoria in December, 1965.
A Home Economics and Community Services Textbook Selection Committee,
of practising home economics teachers from Vancouver Island and the Lower
Mainland, was set up in February, 1966, by the Curriculum Division to review the
needs for textbooks for the reorganized courses of the home economics and of the
Community Services programmes. The Director and (or) Inspectors of Home
Economics attended the majority of meetings of this Committee. The work of the
Committee is to continue in 1966/67.
 F 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF J. R. HIND, B.A., B.P/ed., DIRECTOR
In an ever-changing society, instruction by mail continues to make an important contribution in the lives of many people. School-age children still accompany
their parents into new frontier areas and isolated positions at home or on special
assignments abroad where formal schooling does not exist or is ineffective in terms
of their future. Some normally in attendance at schools continue to lack subjects
essential to their programmes or are bedridden for long periods of time. Adults in
the early and middle years find this form of instruction a convenient means of adding to their knowledge and background while maintaining work schedules connected
with their employment. Others in the later years fill leisure time with courses
especially designed to fit their interests. Many persons in institutions and unfortunate circumstances generally use this as a means of rehabilitation. Finally, New
Canadians, with the assistance of a responsible adult and carefully prepared courses,
learn to speak and write English as a second languge.
The regulations of the Division and a description of the courses offered are set
forth in the booklet " Regulations and Detail of Courses for Secondary School
Correspondence Education," which is released annually in July. The 1965/66
booklet was extended to include the Grade XI year of the Reorganized Programmes
and describes 12 new courses and two revised courses which were released in
September.
The details of service rendered by the Division during 1965/66 follow:—
Enrolment
(a) By Age.—The dramatic increase of adult education facilities in the Province has resulted in a decreased adult enrolment.
1963/64      1964/65      1965/66
18 years and under     8,719 9,044 9,117
19 years and older     8,555 8,980 8,109
Totals   17,274        18,024        17,226
(£>) By Sex.—Figures are not available for previous years.
1965/66
Male Female
18 years and under  4,444 4,673
19 years and older  5,495 2,614
Totals   9,939 7,287
(c) By Residence.—The policy of assistance outside British Columbia was
continued. Delivery to and from foreign-based students continued to be satisfactory,
except in certain South American republics and Punjab. The most distant student
was located in Zambia, Africa.
1963/64      1964/65      1965/66
British Columbia  16,292        16,930        16,281
Elsewhere in Canada       789 832 755
Outside Canada        193 262 190
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
F 63
(d) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom
instruction in particular courses, as follows:—
1964/65      1965/66
Small secondary schools (fewer than 140 pupils in
Grades IX to XII)   1,380 1,279
Larger secondary schools (more than 140 pupils in
Grades IX to XII)  3,286 4,030
Private schools       424 445
Total
5,090
5,754
1964/65
1965/66
476
465
12
6
455
425
1,015
954
178
143
68
63
The reasons accepted as a basis for this service and the numbers involved
follow:—
1964/65      1965/66
Courses not offered in school  3,508 4,015
Time-table difficulties      975 899
Failure in a subject      602 838
Acceleration           3 2
(e) By Special Arrangement.—Certain persons were exempted from enrolment fees in the amount of $43,917. This service is an effort to overcome disparity
in educational opportunity and is also a rehabilitation measure. It was extended
as follows:—
1963/64
Illness     478
Needed at home  15
Living too far from a school  493
Correctional institutions  1,020
Social assistance  214
Unemployed persons  102
(j) Oj Adults.—(i) Percentage of total enrolment in 1963/64, 49.5 per cent;
1964/65, 49.8 per cent;  1965/66, 47.1 per cent.
(ii) Counselling and evaluations were provided when adults desired to complete an interrupted (adult) or other programme of studies.
(iii) Adults in the senior age-grouping frequently requested technical courses
in addition to art, English, and the like. A woman aged 73 completed the course
Radio and Wireless 30.   A man aged 79 registered for the course Draughting 11.
(iv) Private companies and certain government departments now use courses
for staff-training programmes. The following courses have been used for this purpose: Diesel Engines, Automotive Mechanics, Electricity for the Building Trades,
Electricity 10, Stationary Engineering, Geology, and Business Law.
Instruction
(a) The instructional staff consisted of the following: Inside staff (Grade VIII
instructors), 2; outside staff, 98; total, 100.
(£>) Additions and replacements in the instructional staff numbered eight.
The deaths of Mr. A. R. Evans and Mr. G. B. Benson are noted with regret. Both
of these instructors served faithfully and well with this Division for many years.
(c) A total of 204,694 papers was graded in 1965/66, compared with 219,-
711 papers in 1964/65.
(_?) Course-writers attached to staff were available at all times for counsel and
assistance to instructors and for adjudication of students' papers as required.
 F 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Courses
(a) A total of 132 courses was available.
(b) New courses were prepared and released as follows: Business Law for
Credit Union Officers (final version), Draughting 11, Electricity for the Building
Trades (revision), English Literature 10, General Business 11, General Mathematics 11, German 9, Industrial Mathematics (revision), Latin 12, Mathematics 11,
Shorthand 11 A and B, and Typewriting 11.
(c) The following courses from former years were withdrawn: English Literature 10; German 10 (old), Latin 92, Mechanical Drawing 10, Physics 91, Social
Studies 32.
(d) The work of course writing and revision was shared by course writers
(three full time, one part time) attached to the Division and certain outside writers
working on a temporary basis.
(e) A total listing of courses offered by the Division and the enrolment in the
subject field follows: —
(i)  Secondary-school and Grade XIII Courses:
Agriculture 9, 10, 38, 39  161
Art 9, 10, 39  316
Auto Mechanics 10, 30  603
Bible Literature   80
Biology 91   245
Bookkeeping 11 (34), 91   614
Business Arithmetic 9   200
Business Fundamentals 10  225
Chemistry 91, 101   275
Clothing and Textiles 9   95
Diesel Engines 11   71
Economics 11   145
Electricity 10  162
English Literature 8, 9, 10, 30, 40, 100  2,391
English Language 8, 9, 10, 30, 40 101  2,913
English and Citizenship 1, 19, 29  197
English 32 (Journalism)   39
English 91   242
English 93 (Business English)   118
English 99 (Short-story Writing)   95
Extramural Music 9, 10  39
Foods and Nutrition 9  131
Forestry 30  144
Frame-house Construction 11   78
French 8, 9, 10, 11, 92, 110, 120  1,246
General Business 11   93
General Mathematics 11   138
Geography 91   242
Geology and Prospecting 30  107
German 9. 10, 90, 91, 92, 110, 120  687
Guidance and Health 8, 9 (10), 10 (20), 30  568
History 91, 101, 102   529
Home Furnishing 11   112
Home Economics 8, 20, 30, 91  492
Latin 9, 10, 11, 12, 110, 120  478
Law 9 3   270
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
F 65
Mathematics 8, 9, 10, 11, 20, 30, 91, 101, 120  4,285
Mechanical Drawing 8, 9; Draughting 11  510
Physics 101  49
  314
  151
  254
  748
  43
(n)
Practical Arithmetic 9
Radio and Wireless 30
Record-keeping 9	
Science 8, 9, 10	
Secretarial Practice 92
Shorthand 10, 31, 11 A and B _.       201
Social Studies 8, 9, 10, 30  1,545
Spanish 9, 10, 11, 92, 110, 120      385
Typewriting 9, 10, 11      629
Vocational Mathematics 10      174
Vocational Non-credit Courses:
Air Navigation I, II	
Business Law for Credit Union Officers
Dressmaking
Electricity for the Building Trades
Glove-making 	
House Painting and Decorating	
Industrial Mathematics	
Mathematics for Second-class Stationary Engineering
Spherical Trigonometry 	
Steam Engineering, Fourth Class	
Steam Engineering, Third Class	
Steam Engineering, Second Class	
Stationary Engineering, First Class	
Steam Heating for Plant Operators	
21
63
57
197
8
95
322
77
15
379
162
42
23
70
English for New Canadians
(a) Assistance is provided by the Division to the following groups:—
(i) Persons enrolling in English and Citizenship I, English 19, English 29,
especially designed to teach English as a second language, were as follows:
1962/63, 194;   1963/64, 333;   1964/65, 290;   1965/66, 197.
(ii) Provision of textbooks and other material for students working privately
under the guidance of a tutor,
(iii) Provision of textbooks and testing material for the use of students enrolled
in public-school classes, as follows:  1963/64—80 classes, 1,533 students;
1964/65—97  classes,  1,614 students;   1965/66—155 classes,  2,545
students,
(iv) Provision of textbooks for the use of students enrolled in private-school
classes,
(fr) The textbooks available through this Division are English and Citizenship,
Books I, II, and III. Book I is supplied on a loan basis with new textbooks added
as the need demands. Other reference material is supplied also as it is received from
the Queen's Printer in Ottawa. In recent years the following have been available
in quantity: Introduction to Canada, Our History, Our Land, Our Government,
Our Resources. When additional textbook or lesson material is required, School
Boards are authorized to order directly from the publishing firm or other source.
The English and Citizenship textbooks released by this Division in recent years are
as follows:   1962/63,1,496;  1963/64,1,316;  1964/65,1,370;   1965/66,1,434.
3
 F 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1965/66, pupils of school age totalling 782 were registered in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 712 were registered at
Victoria and 70 at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
The following tables show the active monthly enrolments at each of the
centres:—
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Month
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
85
54
67
55
53
48
88
55
72
59
51
49
86
58
68
52
56
57
88
48
60
46
54
62
83
50
60
44
57
59
85
55
56
44
52
60
76
56
50
41
49
51
76
45
45
40
49
46
74
39
49
40
48
48
74
39
50
39
48
50
Grade
VII
Total
September-
October	
November...
December...
January	
February..—
March	
April	
May..	
June 	
49
58
60
60
71
71
66
60
63
62
411
432
437
418
424
423
389
361
361
362
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September-
October	
November.
December ..
January	
February-
March 	
April	
May	
June —	
6
7
4
•
4
4
3
8 1
7
7
5
6 -
5
3
9
6
7
5
1
6
4
9
6
7
5
7
6
4
9
8 i
10
7
8
8
4
8
9
10
7
8
9
4
9
10
12
7
8
9
4
9
9
11
8
8
11
4
10
8
11
8
9
11
4
11
9
11
8
10
11
4
11 1
1
36
42
44
44
53
56
59
61
62
64
The number of papers of school-aged pupils marked at the two centres was as
follows:  Victoria, 94,693; Pouce Coupe, 8,378; total, 103,071.
In addition to above numbers, adult students enrolled in courses Grades III
to VII, inclusive, totalled 197, and 6,804 papers were marked.
In all, courses were provided for 979 individuals and 109,875 papers were
marked by the instructors at the two centres. No outside markers or instructors
were employed.
The average number of papers marked per instructor was 9,156. The average
number of papers submitted per pupil was 112, as compared with an average of 109
in 1964/65.
As additional services, kindergarten kits were supplied to 144 pre-school age
children and instruction kits for teaching illiterate adults were sent in 29 cases.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction classes were established at 13 centres, with a total enrolment of 53 pupils.
During the school-year the following entirely new courses were produced:
Arithmetic, Grades I, II, and VI; Mathematics, Grade VII; Social Studies, Grade
VI; Writing, Grade III; and Art, Grade V. Revisions were carried out in six
other courses currently used and new formats devised in many courses and other
material. All these were devised, written, and illustrated by the staff of the School
in Victoria.   No outside course-writers were employed.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, 11 instructors, and five clerks; at
Pouce Coupe, one instructor and one instructor-clerk.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS F 67
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A.,
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes (planned, prepared, production supervised,
results evaluated)   101
Western regional programmes (local productions planned, prepared,
supervised, evaluated)   27
Western regional programmes (shared planning, results evaluated)  41
National programmes  (suggestions and advice provided, results
evaluated)    51
Total number of radio programmes presented  220
Television
Provincial programmes (seven were new productions)     27
Western regional (seven were planned, prepared, and produced under
our supervision)      28
National programmes   (advice  and  suggestions  provided,  results
evaluated)       72
Total number of school telecasts presented  127
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins—-
Elementary   12,000
Secondary   3,000
Junior Music  50,000
Intermediate Music   52,000
Ecoutez   15,000
Calendars—
Radio  15,000
Television   15,000
Demonstration Classes
Classes were conducted during winter and summer courses at the University
of British Columbia and the University of Victoria Colleges of Education.
Use of School Broadcasts
Per Cent
Number of Total
Schools reporting  1,262 89.91
Reporting schools using radio broadcasts  870 68.93
Divisions using radio broadcasts  4,036 	
Students using radio broadcasts  124,562 	
Reporting schools using television broadcasts ___ 340 26.94
Divisions using television broadcasts  1,725 	
Students using television broadcasts  52,880 	
 F 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Increases in Use of School Broadcasts (from 1964/65 to 1965/66)
Radio
Number
Per Cent
Increase
Television
Number
Per Cent
Increase
Schools using	
Divisions using	
Students using	
+103
+575
+ 16,693
13.94
16.61
15.47
+159
+953
+28,438
87.84
123.44
116.35
Award
The School Broadcasts Division has won another international award for school
radio broadcasting. The Pictures in the Air broadcast, " Pied Piper," a creative art
programme, was judged the best educational radio broadcast in the Fine Arts
category at the Institute for Education by Radio-Television, Ohio State University.
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
F 69
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1, 1965, to August 31, 1966.
District Number and Name
1. Fernie 	
2. Cranbrook 	
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere 	
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan 	
Castlegar
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
Arrow Lakes	
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley 	
Southern Okanagan
Penticton 	
Keremeos	
Princeton 	
Golden	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen
Vernon 	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops 	
B arriere 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
South Cariboo
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford 	
Langley 	
Surrey 	
Delta	
Richmond 	
Vancouver 	
New Westminster
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver
West Vancouver _
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
217
165
354
223
425
181
201
59
120
76
69
195
471
127
99
301
200
384
244
761
626
685
75
26
656
326
109
266
125
420
. 1,599
358
_ 1,215
1
508
140
1,002
1,122
636
1,355
547
1,302
568
471
Number of
Films trips
Supplied
172
128
544
598
704
150
818
66
110
119
145
268
263
117
56
548
273
445
459
911
,197
453
222
165
024
808
155
406
433
892
943
825
985
4,006
34
901
357
653
517
1,737
2,550
232
200
1
1
 F 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
District Number and Name
46. Sechelt 	
Powell River 	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls 	
Queen Charlotte
Portland Canal _
Prince Rupert __„
Terrace 	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66. Lake Cowichan
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo 	
69. Qualicum 	
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South
Peace River North
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
Summerland	
Enderby	
Ucluelet-Tofino
Kitimat 	
Fort Nelson	
Chilcotin 	
Portage Mountain	
Vancouver Island West -
Vancouver Island North
Creston-Kaslo 	
Stikine 	
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
267
854
345
220
357
38
273
324
155
132
295
391
177
766
157
5,512
456
325
225
450
132
290
736
132
521
687
1,032
500
115
247
51
171
50
34
Unattached —
Miscellaneous
21
185
242
225
90
433
673
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
302
1,062
117
592
213
27
291
584
120
179
470
707
160
,396
528
1
773
254
241
863
130
362
727
1,377
801
481
230
293
99
179
273
570
57
104
338
302
6
368
472
Totals
38,295
42,437
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH
F 71
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF D. W. C. HUGGINS, DIRECTOR
This year, for the first time since the early days of World War II, all stock of
the Textbook Branch has been housed under one roof ready to satisfy the 1966/67
school-opening requisitions. The move from the Parliament Buildings precinct to
commercial premises at 517 Esquimalt Road permitted the arrival of books by rail
from the eastern printers and by truck trailer from British Columbia printers, to be
assembled under the direct control of the staff of the Branch. At the time of writing
this report the benefits of this close control have already been felt, and school
requisitions have been filled with the minimum of delay.
In February of 1966 advice was circulated to all schools that advance copies
of new books could be requisitioned from the Textbook Branch, and that the teaching
staff would thus be afforded the opportunity of studying the new texts before their
introduction in the 1966/67 school-year. Where requisitions were received and,
as printing schedules permitted, new texts were dispatched to the schools, but still
many teachers arrived at summer classes without knowledge of this opportunity.
Liaison between the sponsors of the courses and this office did help to alleviate this
problem, and the experience of this year's inadequacies should ensure a wider
application of this service in the ensuing year.
Repair of books held in the schools was divided into two separate programmes
this past year. School districts east and north of Hope were instructed in a new
procedure which entails the pick-up and delivery of repair stock by the contractor
during the summer school recess. In this way books needing repair remain as part
of the school inventory, thus obviating the need for purchases of additional stock to
replace repairables previously taken out of circulation for a full school-year. Over
50,000 textbooks were processed under the new procedure, with the net spoilage
being less than 1 per cent, resulting in considerable saving in inventory investment
and prolonged life of books in use in the schools.
Two members of the staff have completed the practitioners' course at the British
Columbia Work Study School, and one other has attended the management appreciation course at the same school. Special studies have been made of internal accounting procedures, and a survey of areas of mechanization has been completed with
a view to computer control of inventories. Streamlining of procedures in the sales
area has resulted in the unification of invoices and more efficient handling of accounts
receivables with school districts and commercial enterprises. A study is currently
in progress of the materials-handling and plant-layout aspect of the concentrated
shipping process experienced in the months of July and August. It is hoped that
findings of this study will lead to improvements in future years.
Statistical comparisons of operations are shown below:—
1966
1965
Percentage
Increase
Sales	
Purchases..
Year-end inventory  	
Operating costs   	
Accounts receivable _ 	
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund-
Rental Plan operation—
Depreciation expense _	
Gross cost of plan  	
Fees collected   	
Net cost (subsidy) of plan-
Charges to the Free Vote (Grades I to VI...
Shipments by freight, express, and mail—
Cost	
Pieces	
Weight (lb.).
$1,597.
$3,328.
$1,086.
$79.
$19,
$2,616,
$1,374,
$1,463,
$888.
$574.
$994,
$37,
78.
2,162,
168
424
290
207
137
,413
,252
571
,648
.922
.408
,830
,729
162
$1,298,471
$2,471,650
$685,452
$64,329
$14,743
$2,034,723
$1,232,986
$1,311,611
$855,434
$456,176
$764,456
$29,907
75,061
1,902,193
23
35
59
23
30
29
12
12
4
26
30
26
5
14
 F 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY W. D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1965/66 saw the introduction of new programmes in Grade
XI and marked the beginning of the new curriculum at the senior high-school level
which has followed the introduction of new courses and programmes in the junior
secondary schools.
This report will, in a later section, attempt to summarize the reports of the
work of the District Superintendent of Schools of this Province, and will undertake
to outline trends and development noted in those reports. It should be understood
that a report of this length can do little more than select highlights which are noted
in the reports of the District Superintendents and mention those items in which the
writer has been directly concerned.
Organization and Staff
The total of 56 District Superintendents and six Vancouver City officials represents no change in staff over the previous year. Two new District Superintendents were appointed to replace Mr. L. A. Matheson, whose untimely death occurred
in June, 1965, and to replace Mr. R. M. Hall, who resigned from the service with
effect July 31, 1965.
The newly appointed District Superintendents of Schools were: Mr. R. S.
Boyle, principal of the Prince Rupert Junior Secondary School, and Mr. R. B. Cox,
principal of the Princess Margaret Junior Secondary School in Penticton.
The following transfers and appointments have been made and were effective
on August 1, 1965:—
(1) Mr. R. E. Flower has been named District Superintendent of Schools for
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake) and official trustee of School
District No. 82 (Chilcotin), vice Mr. R. M. Hall.
(2) Mr. J. L. Canty has been named District Superintendent of Schools for
School District No. 59 (Peace River South), vice Mr. R. E. Flower.
(3) Mr. R. S. Boyle will replace Mr. J. L. Canty as District Superintendent
of Schools for School Districts No. 81 (Fort Nelson) and No. 83 (Portage Mountain) and the unattached schools at Atlin, Good Hope Lake,
Haines, Lower Post, McDame Creek, and Telegraph Creek. In addition,
Mr. Boyle will be a relieving Superintendent for the northern superin-
tendencies.
(4) Mr. R. B. Cox will replace Mr. G. M. Paton as District Superintendent
of Schools for School Districts No. 52 (Prince Rupert), No. 51 (Portland Canal), and No. 50 (Queen Charlotte).
(5) Mr. G. M. Paton has been appointed District Superintendent of Schools
for School Districts No. 15 (Penticton) and No. 77 (Summerland), vice
the late Mr. L. A. Matheson.
During the school-year, District Superintendents and their senior supervisory
staff members made 14,958 supervisory visits to classrooms and wrote 4,016 reports
on the work of teachers. It must be noted that as districts have become larger and
as supervisory staff in districts have increased, the work of the District Superintendent of Schools has changed to a degree. A considerable lessening of the inspectoral and report-writing function is to be detected, in some instances, due to the
fact that many District Superintendents have accepted additional responsibilities at
the requests of the Boards with whom they work.
 inspection of schools and school services f 73
In-service Education
Zone Meetings oj District Superintendents oj Schools
Zone meetings of District Superintendents of Schools in the six zones of the
Province were held during the school-year 1965/66 in both the fall and the spring.
As in the past, these conferences have been held in several centres in the Province—
namely, Lakelse, Cranbrook, Osoyoos, Princeton, Trail, Castlegar, Campbell River,
Nanaimo, Haney, Langley, Prince George, and Burnaby. The earlier established
pattern of having one of the Superintendents in the field acting as chairman of each
meeting was continued. The Chief Inspector of Schools, occasionally accompanied
by other headquarters staff, attended to bring information from the headquarters
and to attempt to find areas in which clarification and study should be made.
After discussion with many members of the field staff, it appears that the meetings are considered to be of value, particularly in the providing of explanation for
new developments in education, and in the provision of opportunities for discussion
of local and area problems. Zone conferences may be considered by Superintendents in the more remote areas of the Province as an opportunity to meet with other
professionals and to share experiences and interests in a meaningful manner.
In the school-year 1965/66 no Department conference was held, although it
is anticipated that a Department staff meeting will be held in the spring of 1967
and thereafter every second year.
Special Workshops in Counselling, Industrial Arts, and Community Services
It was planned to hold workshops for teachers in the Province in the area of
counselling, industrial arts, and community services during the Easter vacation.
However, due to poor response, which was the result of several complicated factors,
the workshops were cancelled.
Principals' Conference
In late July a two-week principals' conference was held at the University of
British Columbia under the chairmanship and direction of Dr. Lome W. Downey,
of the Faculty of Education of the University of British Columbia. The conference
has been held biannually in the Province and was in this year, as in the last several
previous years, jointly sponsored by the British Columbia School Trustees' Association, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the University of British Columbia, and the Department of Education. The writer had an opportunity to visit
the workshop on two occasions, and, in discussion with principals at the workshop
and subsequent to it, found the conference was well received by those taking part.
A detailed report of the conference will be prepared by the Director and should be
circulated in the Province in the fall of 1966. Approximately 80 principals took
part in the conference and represented elementary, junior, and senior secondary
levels of instruction.
Special Zone Conference
In June of the school-year, special zone conferences in the six zones of the
Province were held in order that District Superintendents may be made fully conversant with the certification of teachers. These conferences were attended by the
Registrar, Mr. H. M. Evans, and by the Superintendent of Education, Mr. F. P.
Levirs. The writer also attended two of the sessions. The purpose of the special
zone conferences was to provide District Superintendents with sufficient information that they might be able to offer one-year certificates to those trained teachers
who wish to enter teaching from outside the Province of British Columbia.    The
 F 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Department of Education has undertaken to support the level of certificate which
is granted by the District Superintendent for the one year in which it is granted.
It should be noted that the certificate is granted by the District Superintendent
only, subsequent to the teacher's accepting employment in the district in which he
is to work. It is thought that this will enable some School Boards to obtain the
service of teachers readily who might otherwise have difficulty in obtaining a rapid
evaluation of their certificate level by the central agency, the office of the Registrar
of the Department of Education. Time alone will indicate the extent to which use
will be made of this device, which has been provided in the interest of improving
recruitment for school districts.
Industrial Education Workshops
In July one- and two-week workshops were arranged for experienced industrial
arts instructors. These workshops were held in the Templeton Secondary School
in Vancouver, and were generally quite well attended. It was encouraging to note
the number of senior and experienced industrial arts instructors who were prepared
to give of their time and energies in order to improve their knowledge and understanding of the work in the new courses at the senior secondary level. The organization and arrangement of this course was undertaken by Mr. Joseph Jupp, of the
Department of Education.
Special Reports
Kamloops Educational Television Experiment
In early December Mr. W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent of Schools, North
Vancouver; Mr. Lawrence Irving, head of the Communications Division of British
Columbia Institute of Technology; and the writer visited the Kamloops School
District in order to become more familiar with the educational television experiment
which was being conducted in that school district. The three visitors spent the
better part of two days in a brief examination of the organization and operation of
the closed-circuit television programme being offered in the school district.
Subsequent to the visit, an interim report was filed with the Department of
Education, copies of which were sent to the Kamloops School District.
It should be noted that the team considered the programme to be experimental
and was impressed by the enthusiasm of those associated with the programme.
Mica Creek
In April the Chief Inspector of Schools visited and spent time in discussion of
the problems surrounding difficulties in education at the Mica Creek Dam site.
A report concerning this visit was filed with the Deputy Minister and the Superintendent of Education.
Jericho Hill School
In March a special team of Department of Education officials under the joint
chairmanship of Mr. J. Phillipson, Co-ordinator of Services, and the Chief Inspector
of Schools spent several days in examination of the facilities, the curriculum, and
associated organizational matters of the Jericho Hill School for the Deaf and the
Blind. The members of the survey team were Miss Jean Irvine, Inspector of
Schools, Department of Home Economics; Mr. E. Marriott, District Superintendent
of Schools, Surrey; Mr. C. I. Taylor, District Superintendent of Schools, Burnaby;
Mr. W. J. Mouat, District Superintendent of Schools, Abbotsford.
The committee spent considerable time at the school and met on two further
occasions to consolidate its report, which was extensive and which contained a
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES F 75
large number of recommendations.   The report was filed with the Deputy Minister
and the Superintendent of Education in May of 1966.
Investigation Committee
The Chief Inspector of Schools acted as chairman of an investigation committee
with respect to the dismissal of a teacher by the Board of Trustees of the Burnaby
School District. Members of the investigation committee were Col. J. N. Burnett,
representing the British Columbia School Trustees Association, and Mr. J. W.
Killeen, representing the Burnaby Teachers' Association. The report of the investigation committee was filed with the Superintendent of Education in June.
The Board elected to continue with its dismissal of a teacher, and the teacher
elected to continue with his appeal against the action of the Board. Subsequent
to a Board of Reference, the action of the Board of School Trustees in dismissing
the teacher was upheld.
External Aid Interviews
In November a committee of three under the chairmanship of the Chief Inspector, which included Mr. W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent of Schools, North
Vancouver, and Mr. K. M. Aitchison, representing the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation, interviewed 55 candidates who were prepared to offer their services in
developing countries through the office of the External Aid Branch of the Department of External Affairs of the Federal Government.
The panel of three interviewed all of the candidates and made recommendations concerning their suitability to the central agency in Ottawa.
It is of interest to note that approximately 45 teachers from British Columbia
are serving in developing countries in Africa, in the Far East, and in the West Indies.
Accommodation of Students for Practice Teaching
During the school-year two meetings were held with the deans and directors of
practice teaching, representing the University of British Columbia, the University of
Victoria, Simon Fraser University, and the University of Notre Dame. The purpose
was to provide against the overuse of certain school districts in practice-teaching
periods. The high degree of co-operation which was obtained from the universities
is officially recognized and appreciated.
Workshop and Conference Forecast
At the end of the school-year, the office of the Chief Inspector attempted to
consolidate a list of projected workshops and short courses which would be offered
by the several agencies in the Province of British Columbia who offer these. The
co-operation of the universities and of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation
and the British Columbia School Trustees Association is much appreciated by this
office. The forecast which was sent out for the fall of 1966 was, of course, incomplete, but it is hoped that it will be of value to District Superintendents in
attempting to plan the attendance of members of their staff at such functions.
General Observations from a Study of District Superintendents'
Reports
The most frequently reported item was the number of successful building
referenda. At least 30 received well over the required 60 per cent, and in many
instances the voters gave overwhelming support. Provisions were made for elementary classroom additions, secondary vocational wings, and alterations to accommo-
 F 76
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
date the new Grade XI and XII programmes. The correlation between new buildings, referenda, and reported growing school population was very high.
Very active in-service programmes were reported throughout the Province.
These workshops were varied in composition—local teachers, visiting teacher
specialists, or university personnel in charge—and covered a large number of new
courses and new methodology. Language arts, arithmetic, science, and social
studies seem to be the most popular elementary areas. The new courses in Grades
XI and XII, especially the sciences, were most frequently reported at the secondary
level. It is interesting to note the expanding interest of Board personnel in these
workshops. Many Superintendents reported that their Boards helped teachers
financially to attend these workshops. The assistance of district staff personnel was
also noted. In significant numbers, supervisors, consultants, and special counsellors
were appointed during the year. These do not include adult education directors or
librarians.
During the year many new schools were opened. Several reported that " the
new school or additions should be ready for occupancy by September, 1966."
Significantly, in rather isolated areas of British Columbia, a population trend toward
the larger centres of the rural areas occurs. This resulted in the closure of 22 schools.
In three cases the Grade XI and XII years were discontinued and students transported to a nearby, much larger senior secondary school. Several small secondary
schools are experiencing difficulty in offering the new Grade XI and XII programmes. (Three schools closed—no teachers.) An interesting development in
the East Kootenay was the amalgamation of Creston-Kootenay Lake and Yahk-
Kingsgate area of Cranbrook into the new school district, No. 86.
Adult education continued to be a major concern of Boards in the Province.
Nearly every Superintendent commented on this vital programme. The enrolments
and course offerings depended upon the size of the community. In significant numbers, Directors of Night School/Adult Education, either part time or full time, were
appointed. Also reported was a very encouraging increase in the number of native
Indians being educated through this programme. Also, in post-secondary education,
many Superintendents reported that a Board member was a representative on a
Regional College Planning Committee.
Local library facilities received increased emphasis through the year. In many
cases, school or district librarians were appointed. A similar emphasis was noted
in the music programme.
Provision for special class instruction continued to be widely reported. These
classes include slow learners at all levels, emotionally disturbed, impaired motivation,
hard of hearing, and New Canadians learning English. Several Boards have accepted
full responsibility for the operation of the retarded children's schools in their districts.
The difficulty in recruiting and retaining fully qualified teachers was frequently
reported. Staff turnover ranged from minimal to over a reported 29 per cent. The
specialty areas—girls' physical education, music, commerce, and art—seemed most
difficult to fill.
The number of kindergartens, either newly established or previously functioning, continued to be successfully operated.
Approximately 21 District Superintendents mentioned the Occupational Programme. Of these, 20 were reported to be operating well or fairly well. Only one
was disappointing.
Summer school, either elementary or secondary, was offered in more than 12
centres. A teacher internship programme was mentioned in five areas, and one of
these had found the programme unsatisfactory.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES F 77
Under educational experiments, the following were most frequently reported:
Family Life Education (always in co-operation with the local health unit, doctors,
and Social Welfare Branch); Educational Television; Continuous Promotion on
the Levels System; Initial Teaching Alphabet; Team Teaching (Co-operative
Teaching); Elementary French; Driver Education; and Markers. Many of these
have received approval and are no longer considered experimental by individual
school districts. Computers and data-processing equipment were introduced in
District No. 45 (West Vancouver) and District No. 39 (Vancouver), restricted to
use in some secondary schools.
Conclusion
This report would be incomplete without inclusion of thanks and appreciation
to my colleagues in the headquarters staff, to District Superintendents who comprise
the field staff of the Department of Education, and to the many School Boards and
officials of those School Boards with whom it is my good fortune to associate. The
continuing courtesy and kindness shown to this office and to me are deeply
appreciated.
 F 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
This Branch exists as a service to the Department of Education and others
interested, in providing statistics on teacher supply and professional standing; to
institutions concerned with the preparation of teachers, in encouraging suitable candidates; to School Boards, in proposing and discussing recruitment projects and in
distributing related information; to prospective teachers, in providing answers to
questions about teacher education and certification; to practising teachers, in giving
advice and direction regarding up-grading and requirement for higher certification;
to public-school pupils and university students, in bringing to their notice the general
need for teachers and the opportunities and satisfactions that the profession offers.
Publicity
In co-operation with Mr. S. Halton, Administrative Officer, this Branch assisted
with the planning and necessary follow-up to a programme of publicizing the need
for teachers, conducted by the Minister of Education during March, April, May,
and June. Advertisements over the Minister's signature appeared in all British
Columbia daily and weekly newspapers with the heading " British Columbia Needs
Teachers." Concurrent with and following this, the Minister made a series of spot
announcements over seven leading British Columbia radio stations and appeared
on several occasions on a number of television stations. In each case, those
interested were invited to write for further information. Over 760 letters were
received and directed to suitable officers for attention. This Branch dealt with
approximately half of these, and sent out several hundred copies of the booklet
" Teaching in British Columbia." This was revised during the year, to include
details of recent developments in such things as teacher-education programmes,
particularly that introduced by Simon Fraser University.
In addition, other written and oral requests for information were dealt with
from day to day throughout the year.
Future Teachers Clubs
Recognizing that the most promising supply of future teachers is to be found
in our public schools, the Department of Education, through this Branch, continued
to support, advise, and direct Future Teachers Clubs in the secondary schools of
the Province. During the year 117 clubs were reported, with a total membership
of 2,194. In one or two of the larger schools more than one club was in existence,
but some of the most lively groups were those in smaller, often isolated schools,
with a very small membership. Each teacher sponsor was supplied with a kit of
materials, including a club handbook. Each member of a club received a copy of
" Teaching in British Columbia " and a membership card. Club crests and pins were
also available, often through the kindness of the local school trustees. Four issues
of a club newsletter were distributed to all club members during the year.
Club activities include discussing relevant information about teaching and
teacher-preparation programmes, school service projects, and classroom observation
in various schools. A debt of gratitude is owing the devoted teachers, who act as
club sponsors, and also such interested bodies as the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation, the British Columbia School Trustees Association, the individual School
Boards, and the universities.   With their co-operation, such projects as conferences
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT F 79
for club members and sponsors are arranged and conducted annually.    Two such
were held during the current year.
Teacher Supply and Certification Surveys
During the summer months a close watch was kept on teacher-supply figures.
While late August reports seemed to indicate an increased shortage, there was reason to suppose that the situation was remaining remarkably constant, in spite of a
marked increase in the total number of classrooms.
In December a survey of teacher certification also showed a high degree of
consistency in comparison with previous years. As may be concluded from figures
provided elsewhere in this Report, most factors in relation to teacher supply show
the same tendency. Such things as proportion of teachers available from the
teacher-preparation institutions, percentage of teacher drop-out each year, as well
as percentage increase in the total number of teachers needed are all fairly steady.
For example, the percentage increase in the number of teachers has ranged between
6.0 and 7.1 per cent in the past five years. However, figures for certification do
show some change. Numbers of teachers with professional type certificates this
year reached approximately 25 per cent of the total at the elementary level, and
over 80 per cent of the total at the secondary level. The percentage of teachers
with less than regular qualification shows a steady decline from a figure of 9.6 six
years ago to a figure of 6.3—barely two-thirds as high a proportion—this year.
Those teaching without a certificate amount to 2.1 per cent, a figure constant over
the last three years, as compared with 2.3 per cent six years ago.
Recruitment in the United Kingdom
Notices were placed in nine of the leading educational journals and newspapers
of Great Britain, and a recruitment campaign was carried on with the co-operation
of Mr. D. Todd, District Superintendent of Schools for School District No. 57.
As a direct result of the campaign, 86 teachers from the United Kingdom were
placed in British Columbia schools. There is evidence that the campaign excited
enough interest to induce a number of other teachers also to come to the Province
in search of positions.
Teacher Scholarships
This Branch received applications for Government scholarships offered each
year to outstanding classroom teachers, and the Co-ordinator serves as secretary to
the selection committee. This year scholarships were awarded to Mr. G. W. Broad-
ley, Colquitz Junior Secondary School, Victoria; Miss A. G. Molberg, Chief Ma-
quinna Elementary School, Vancouver; and Mr. R. J. Wilson, Maple Ridge Secondary School, Haney.
Guidance Services
The Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment acts unofficially as director of guidance services. In this capacity the Branch attempts to assist and direct guidance
and counselling services in the schools. During the year some 79 separate pieces
of information were sent to schools, together with three issues of a guidance bulletin.
The material is mainly concerned with occupational information, but also includes
resources related to other aspects of the school guidance programme and the function of school counsellors. In addition, the office maintained an informational service for individuals seeking details of various occupations and related training programmes.
A growing demand for consultation by various guidance groups is noted. In
this connection also, the director maintains contacts with such groups as Parent-
 F 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Teacher Associations, business organizations, and service clubs interested in studying and co-operating with school guidance services. Under the general sponsorship
of the Vancouver Board of Trade, for example, three " business-education " conferences were arranged for school counsellors and for businessmen. Another example is the consultation given the North and West Vancouver Rotary Clubs in arranging a careers exposition. A course in group guidance methods was conducted by
the director at the University of Victoria summer school.
The director was privileged to be able to attend the founding conference of the
Canadian Guidance and Counselling Association at Niagara Falls in October.
Centennial Youth Travel
Acting as Provincial co-ordinator for the Canadian Centennial Youth Travel
Programme, the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment organized and directed the
activities of 10 local committees, generally under the chairmanship of District Superintendents of Schools. Ten groups of 24 students each travelled from this Province
to points as far away as Sydney, N.S., and an equal number of students were received from all parts of Canada. The students travelled in railway-car groups, each
accompanied by two adult escorts. To facilitate the organization of the groups
going, students were in general selected from an area surrounding specific centres,
which also acted as hosts for incoming students. Centres participating were Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Cranbrook, Haney, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, North Vancouver, Quesnel, and Victoria. Preliminary plans were made for hosting and sending 19 such groups for the summer of 1966.
That the programme unfolded with nothing worse than minor mishaps is largely
due to the energy and interest of local people in all these centres, including members
of committees, School Boards, local organizations, business people, citizens who
provided billets for visitors and assisted in entertainment, and others. There is no
question that this interprovincial flow of young people will contribute largely to the
realization of the ideals of national understanding and unity, for which the Canadian
Centennial was organized. The kindness of the Canadian Confederation Centennial
Committee of British Columbia must also be acknowledged in assisting with some
of the clerical work necessary in administering the programme.
By 1967 students from senior secondary schools in all parts of the Province
will have had an opportunity to participate.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
F 81
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRArNING.
Additional construction projects continued to make progress at the British
Columbia Institute of Technology and the British Columbia Vocational School at
Burnaby, whilst new schools at Terrace and Dawson Creek forged ahead, the latter
scheduled for opening its first phase in September, 1966. Preliminary construction
and curriculum plans for schools at Kamloops and Victoria received additional
attention, whilst new classes were added to a number of existing schools.
The complete adult training programme continues under the Federal-Provincial
Training Assistance Agreement, which expires on March 31, 1967, at which time
it is anticipated that it will be replaced by a new Agreement.
The present training is offered and conducted under 10 different programmes,
and the following sections outline major points in each programme.
General
Three appointments were made during the year in an effort to exercise control
and administration of this continually and rapidly expanding branch of the Department; namely, (a) Co-ordinator who is primarily responsible for initiating and
investigating training programmes, maintaining close liaison between the Department of Labour, National Employment Service, and other agencies concerned with
training and manpower requirements of the Province; (b) an Equipment Control
Officer to review capital equipment needs and establish a capital inventory for all
schools, and which is valued at several million dollars; and (c) an Administrative
Officer to correlate financial, personnel, and general administrative matters.
During the past year the Co-ordinator attended meetings concerning proposed
new training programmes and adjustments to existing ones for 21 different courses
in addition to counselling potential students, reviewing applications, and serving on
financial assistance committee meetings.
Programme 1
This programme provides for approved technical and vocational programmes
in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and
performing arts, and other occupational fields.
Construction
The Vocational Schools' Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965, requires that
the School Board provides 10 per cent, the Province 22.5 per cent, and the Federal
Government 67.5 per cent of the capital cost. Progress of capital projects to date is
as follows:—
Projects completed or near completion  68
Projects out to tender     3
Projects approved and in planning     7
Total
78
 F 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Staffing
The 1965/66 survey indicated that 105 teachers would be required for September, 1966. The graduating class from the industrial education accelerated
programme at the University of British Columbia, numbered 62.
To meet a possible shortage of 43, a concentrated appeal by the Minister
brought forth inquiries from over 300 persons, who were briefed and interviewed
with the view of entering the teaching profession. Files have been raised on 273 by
the Technical Branch.
The requirements for entering an emergency seven-week training programme
in the summer of 1966 in preparation for teaching in September were:—
(1) Occupational competency in the fields of construction, mechanics, or
electricity-electronics, to the journeyman level:
(2) Recent experience, preferably for five years, in one of the above fields at
the journeyman level:
(3) British Columbia secondary-school graduation or an acceptable equivalent; and
(4) An acceptable personality and suitable deportment for teaching secondary-
school pupils.
Sixteen persons were accepted and will commence teaching in September.
Some eight qualified instructors have joined the Province from elsewhere. Four
only are to be employed on a letter of permission. All vacancies in the Province
were filled by the second week in July.
Recruitment
The forecast need for 125 industrial education teachers in September, 1967,
less the graduating group from the accelerated programme in 1967, indicates that
50 to 60 additional industrial education teachers will be required for September,
1967.
Post-secondary Training
Administrative Circular 8/2/66 was developed and issued to all schools in
February of 1966. This circular contains the requirements for admission of students from British Columbia secondary schools to British Columbia adult vocational schools. The prerequisite for each course is defined within the terms of the
Curriculum Organization for B.C. Secondary Schools.
Secondary Schools
This past school-year, 1965/66, has been one of great progress as many of the
school districts have been planning and constructing new industrial education facilities for the new courses to be taught in Grades XI and XII. New and expanded
facilities have been provided in 48 school districts.
During this past year the new industrial education programme for Grade XI
was taught for the first time. Many of the districts lacked adequate accommodation
and equipment, but the teachers rose to the occasion and made a satisfactory
beginning.
A series of in-service workshops was conducted in several centres to up-grade
industrial education teachers to more adequately handle the new courses. These
non-credit workshops were well attended, indicating a real desire on the part of the
teachers to improve their knowledge.
As these new courses require more teacher time in both Grades XI and XII,
a serious shortage had to be dealt with by rather drastic methods. Journeymen
were invited to accept teaching positions, and arrangements were made for them to
 Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, British Columbia Institute of Technology
 F 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
begin their teacher-training at the University of British Columbia during the summer
session, July 4th to August 19th.   Others will teach on a letter of permission.
The number of industrial education teachers required to staff our schools in
1965/66 was 605. Over 100 additional teachers will be required for this coming
school-year.
Pupils participating in industrial education in junior secondary schools numbered 49,431, and those in senior secondary schools numbered 19,585. The number
of pupils in occupational classes numbered 3,386.
Programme 2
Training under this programme is conducted at the British Columbia Institute
of Technology and consists of post-secondary education in the technical field, but
excluding university programmes. Candidates require secondary-school graduation
in English, mathematics, and science, and undergo a two-year programme of at
least 2,400 hours.
Enrolment increased over the previous year by almost 100 per cent.
Enrolment at British Columbia Institute oj Technology, July 1,1965,
to June 30, 1966
Technology
Broadcast Communications
Building
Business Management	
Chemical and Metallurgical
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics —
Food Processing	
Forestry 	
Forest Products 	
Gas and Oil	
Enrolment
  60
  49
  154
  52
  53
  111
  39
  62
  55
  25
  45
  56
  77
  28
  50
Medical Laboratory No. 1       32
Medical Laboratory No. 2  54
Medical Laboratory No. 3   74
Medical Radiography No. 1   22
Medical Radiography No. 2   23
Medical Radiography No. 3   30
Medical Radiography No. 4   22
Hotel, Motel, and Restaurant Management
Instrumentation and Control	
Mechanical 	
Mining 	
Surveying
Total 	
Total enrolment, night school
1,173
430
Programme 3
Training under this programme covers a wide field, mostly at the trade and
general commercial level. Apprenticeship, pre-apprenticeship, and pre-employment
training, plus up-grading training of a person's existing skills, constitute this form
of adult education which is offered in regional schools located at Victoria, Nanaimo,
Burnaby, Kelowna, Nelson, Prince George, and Vancouver.   Other " crash " pro-
 , ........   ......  ....  ....       .     ........
Log Loading Course, British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo.
Diamond Drilling Course, British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo.
 F 86
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
grammes of a temporary nature are often conducted as and when required at suitable centres.
A large section of adult night classes comes under this particular programme,
and in addition to regional night schools, many courses are offered in conjunction
with local School Boards throughout the Province.
Development of vocational curricula is undertaken within Programme 3, and
during the year course outlines were prepared in the following fields: Aircraft Maintenance, Carpentry (apprentice), Commercial, Court Reporter and Stenotype, Electric Heating Installations, Electrical (pre-apprentice), Electronics (night school),
Erection Boiler Makers, Foundrymen (draft in preparation), Log Scaling, Logging,
Meat Cutting, Pastry and Bread Baking, Refrigeration, Retail Lumber Salesman,
Secretarial, Sheet Metal (revision), Structural Steel Fabrication, Tire Repair, Travel
Counsellors (revised), Welding for Pulp Mill Apprentices, Welding Trade Extension.
In addition, instructional material was produced for 20 different courses, manuals for six courses, together with transparencies and slides in various trade and
technological subjects.
Examinations were developed in: Refrigeration, Instrument Mechanics
(draft), Bricklaying (draft), Practical Nursing, Millwright (draft), Heavy Duty
(in preparation only), Auto Body Repair (in preparation only).
In the spring the Director participated in a seminar on examinations held under
the auspices of the Federal Technical Training Branch.
Distribution of publicity materials is made over the whole of the Province from
a mailing list of over 2,000 names, and one of the more important publications is
our " Vocational Schools Announcement, 1966-67," booklet, of which some 15,000
copies were printed and distributed. Five other booklets and large quantities of
pamphlets were also printed and distributed covering all vocational training courses.
Several reports, some of them on a national basis, were produced.
In the secondary-school area, shop plans were drawn up and distributed, whilst
a display entitled " The Impact of Technological Advance in the Forest Industry
on Education at Various Levels " was completed for inclusion in Expo '67.
Assistance was provided to the Green Timbers Forestry School, the Vancouver
Police Academy, the Work Study School, U.B.C. Commercial and the Civil Service
Real Estate Appraisers' Course.
New Programmes in Regional Schools (Day)
Burnaby.—Basic Training for Skill Development: This six-month programme
was established at the request of the Department of Indian Affairs. Of the 25 students that registered, 18 completed Grade X equivalency in English, mathematics,
science, and social studies. After completion, several students continued with further courses.
Court Reporting: This programme, under the sponsorship of the Attorney-
General's Department, is designed to train qualified court reporters. It is interesting to note that eight members of the class have been working on a part-time basis
in various courtrooms in the Lower Mainland.
Retail Lumber Salesmen: One three-month course to train countermen in the
building supplies industry was offered during the year. Most of the participants
were successful in finding jobs.
Aircraft Maintenance: This programme, originally 19 months long, has now
been reduced to 12 months, and many more applications are on file than ever before.
Millwright and Steam-fitting: Steam-fitting apprentice training changed from
the former night-school programme to day classes.
 Welding—typical of all welding courses in British Columbia Vocational Schools.
 F 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Courses in Aeronautics, Chef Patissier, Mechanical Maintenance and Repair,
Electrical Appliance Repair, Electrical, Electronics, and Heavy Duty Mechanics
were modified in length to accommodate a greater number of applicants than could
otherwise have been handled, and to provide opportunity for specialization in a
specific field after completion of their basic course.
Short courses were conducted for some students of the British Columbia Institute of Technology to supplement their major courses in the Institute.
There was an over-all increase in day enrolment of 46.25 per cent, and shift
classes had to be organized.
Nanaimo.—Logging is being conducted through the co-operation of the Crown
Zellerbach Company on its land.
Basic Training for Skill Development Course and a Commercial Up-grading
Course.
Both Welding and Heavy Duty Mechanics are on evening shift, and there has
been an over-all day enrolment increase of 24 per cent.
Nelson and Kootenay School oj Art.—A Waiter and Waitress Course and a
staff in-service training programme organized and conducted by the staff in their
own time.
The British Columbia Telephone Company demonstrated its mobile television
unit at the school, in the course of which students in the Commercial Art Course
were able to participate in the practical handling of cameras and other television
equipment. The result of this visit was some excellent publicity for the school
through the company's advertising campaign.
Three-day seminars on specialized welding techniques for managerial and
supervisory personnel from private companies were also given.
Mrs. S. Golling, one of the art students, was awarded a silver medal for ceramics at the International Exhibition in Faenza, Italy, a singular honour.
Kelowna.—Additional automotive, auto body repair, and waitress-training day
courses were conducted.
Two short seminars for the Okanagan fruit-growers were held in conjunction
with the Department of Agriculture, and other short courses were offered through
five other agencies.
Finally, a television programme was produced and shown on local stations
depicting training in the practical nursing and commercial fields.
Prince George.—A " break-away " from the usually accepted type of training
was made with the offering of a Tourist Guides' Course, as a result of which 10
Indians were trained and placed with licensed guides. A third Basic Training for
Skill Development was added under the sponsorship of the Department of Indian
Affairs, and a second Heavy Equipment Operators' Course commenced in April.
A number of other short courses were conducted in conjunction with 12 different private companies and agencies.
Sundry.—Courses and seminars in support of the tourist services were held
as follows:—■
Students
Waiter and Waitress Training  369
Room Maids      5 6
B.C. Ferries Catering—up-grading  400
B.C. Ferries Travel Counsellors     23
Candidates
Instructor Seminars     47
Plus 25 meetings with secondary-school teachers, counsellors, and students.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
F 89
Assistance was provided for a course in real-estate appraisal administered by
the Civil Service Commission, and with an enrolment of 35 students.
The Vancouver City Police Academy received a grant toward its training programme, which had a total enrolment of 275 students.
In the British Columbia Forest Service training-school in Surrey, 145 staff
members received training in various aspects of forestry work.
A Hydraulic-Pneumatic Course for vocational personnel in the public-school
system was attended by 62 persons from various school districts.
Some 546 " status " Indians passed through the regional vocational schools,
through the office of the Department of Indian Affairs, which indicates a considerable increase in the interest being shown by and opportunities offered to these native citizens.
•
  TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Enrolment by Schools
F 91
Course
Burnaby
Kelowna
Nanaimo
Nelson
Prince
George
Victoria
V.V.I.
and
School
of Art
Total
Art  	
Aeronautics 	
Auto Body Repair  	
Auto Collision and Repair ...
52
72
25
27
32
90
186
302
67
95
39
57
42
292
36
47
220
86
20
33
53
70
140
76
22
202
19
41
108
45
31
78
7
211
408
2,255
145
186
60
56
89
32
27
25
95
147
59
43
214
39
41
15
"~25
57
23
18
24
272
50
239
37
28
86
48
31
81
62
43
81
53
38
64
17
30
24
91
28
86
29
57
127
71
16
36
37
8
82
11
"24
218
106
64
34
8
45
27
82
458
34
70
50
313
279
75
114
415
194
32
88
137
74
114
823
33
41
39
93
57
360
52
250
134
31
169
104
539
52
145
34
652
Barbering.  	
Basic Training for Skill Development  	
50
628
358
Boatbuilding-	
27
32
Bookkeeping and Account-
15
90
Building Service Workers ....
186
433
206
825
Commercial Secretarial..
Commercial Up-grading
Court Reporter 	
Dental Office Assistants
329
63
57
32
24
88
Draughting	
179
366
Electrical Appliances Repair
Electronics ...     -   — _
36
161
823
Farm Machinery Repair	
Graphic Arts.	
Homemaker - Housekeeping
" Trained Family Aides "
27
33
41
583
Heavy Equipment Operators
Hydraulics   for Towboat
Engineers	
Ironworkers —-
87
39
86
20
239
37
28
93
33
Mechanical   Maintenance
53
Medical Office Assistants.
57
70
Millwright 	
Navigation 	
Painting and Decorating	
172
360
76
27
Plastering	
Plumbing 	
22
202
52
686
Radio Telecommunications-
134
19
Service Station Attendants ...
Sheet Metal  	
41
108
Shoe Repairing 	
31
45
Sprinkler Fitting	
31
78
Timekeeping and Industrial
48
31
11
Waiter-Waitress Training	
176
595
833
Welding tests 	
2,476
Totals 	
5,586
964
1,433
541
793
260
4,633
14,2101
1 Includes 1,670 students on register as at July 1, 1965.
 F 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Night-school Enrolments in Regional Schools
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
British Columbia Vocational School—
Burnaby. 	
2,237
63
289
264
3,405
554
6,812
2,526
175
448
127
512
4,251
900
8,969
2,889
249
455
Nelson     _    	
216
845
22
6,065
927
Totals   ...
11,668
Sundry    	
	
	
66
1                                1
Night-school Enrolment in School Districts
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
4,970
5,290
26
6,782
8,935
474
8,723
13,590
Miscellaneous         	
Totals   	
10,286
16,191
22,313
Programme 4
This programme caters to the training of supervisory personnel in industry
and self-employed persons (small-business management). Another area of training included in this programme is that of the tourist services, which is closely related
to those offered under Programme 3, and has therefore been included in that section.
Supervisory Training
There was a further increase in interest from the management side of industry
reflected in increased enrolments.
Special courses included Management Development programmes for International Power and Engineering Consultants Management, conducted at the dam-site
at Hudson Hope, with a similar course offered to the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. A programme in Work Study Techniques was provided for the British
Columbia fruit-growers and packing-houses, and a second one for the chief stewards and supervisors of the British Columbia Ferry Authority.
Enrolments
Enrolments in Communications and Human Relations Course conducted by
Department of Education amounted to 184; in Work Study Course conducted by
Department of Education, 187; and in conferences conducted in industry, 172;
for a total enrolment of 543.
Small-business Management
This training was offered in night schools across the Province and provided
instruction for 945 students in 74 courses.
It is primarily designed to assist owners of small businesses in organizing and
administering their operations, and is proving to be most popular.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
F 93
Programme 5
This programme is specifically tailored to assist persons who are unemployable
with their present skills and knowledge and who are likely to be unemployed for a
large part of each year unless they obtain new skills and knowledge and are taught
good work habits.
In order to qualify for financial assistance, an applicant must be unemployed,
registered with the National Employment Service, and require additional skills and
knowledge to be fitted into gainful employment. Training may be basic in nature,
a refresher for those who are returning to a former occupation, or up-grading to
meet the changing requirements of industry.
A selection and advisory committee, after consultation with management,
labour, and other organizations, determines which training programmes are suitable
for the training of the unemployed and if, in their opinion, completion of such training will lead to gainful and continuing employment.
These meetings have played a large part in co-ordinating the policies and planning of the various agencies concerned with the training and placement of the unemployed. The committee recommended approval of 27 new training programmes
for purposes of Programme 5 and that seven training programmes be deleted from
the list of approved training programmes.
For the period July 1, 1965, to June 30, 1966, 2,411 unemployed persons
applied for financial assistance for training; 2,118 of these applications were approved, and tuition fees, books and supplies, and a subsistence allowance were provided where necessary to enable them to attend school for periods of from 2 weeks
to 12 months. In addition, 244 of the approved applications werec re-examined
during the year after consulting with the school concerned, the National Employment Service, and the local social welfare agency. Adjustments were then made in
the training arrangements and the existing approvals amended.
Because of the enormous demand for workers, every effort was made to encourage applicants to seek employment and use their present skills and knowledge
rather than seek additional training at this time. On the other hand, those without
employable skills and knowledge were provided with short intensive courses that
would fit them for immediate employment in areas of greatest demand. Some of
the existing training programmes were reduced by one-half to provide skilled workers to meet the demands of industry and also to make more extensive use of existing
facilities, in terms of numbers being trained.
1962/63
Enrolment
2,005 1964/65
1963/64 2,633 1965/66
Programme 6
2,956
2,381
This programme provides training for adults who have a continuing disability
and who require retraining in order to assist them in their rehabilitation.
Enrolment
1962/63
1963/64
62
97
1964/65    91
1965/66  195
Programme 7—Technical and Vocational Teacher Training
Teacher-training is offered under this programme to vocational instructors in
adult schools and secondary-school teachers in vocational and industrial subjects.
 F 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Revised Course Structure and Industrial Education Building
The course structure of the double major in industrial education has been
revised to prepare teachers to offer the new industrial education specialty in the
junior and senior secondary schools. The revised programme will extend the range
of content to include work in Power Mechanics, Industrial Power, Materials Technology, Synthetic Materials, and further work in Construction, Metalwork, Electricity and Electronics.   The revised programme appears in the 1966/67 calendar.
The implementation of the new programme is dependent upon the acquisition
of additional laboratories, shops, and lecture rooms.
Summer School Courses for Vocational Education Teachers
The Division of Industrial Education organizes teacher education programmes
for vocational teachers who are employed in the regional vocational schools of the
Province.
1. Vocational teachers who have University Entrance may complete Education 200, 301, 332, 410, 412, and 435 and Vocational Education 181. All courses
except Vocational Education 181 may be counted for credit toward a vocational
teachers' certificate and a Bachelor of Education degree.
2. Vocational teachers who do not have University Entrance may complete
Vocational Education 180, 181, 182, 183, and 186 and any two of Vocational Education 184, 185, 187 for credit toward a vocational teacher's certificate only. This
programme is offered through the Department of University Extension.
Statement oj Enrolment for Year July 1,1965, to June 30,1966
Additions (tradesmen, 40;  other, 31) 	
Discontinued (tradesmen, 6; other, 3)
  71
     9
Completed   62
Number on register at June 30, 1966  62
Summer school for industrial education teachers, July and August
only   51
Programme 8
Training under this programme is carried out on behalf of Federal departments
and agencies.
There are two centres of instruction—one at H.M.C.S. Naden (Esquimalt)
and the other at the Army Engineers' School at Chilliwack. The Department of
Education is responsible for the recruiting of instructors and inspection of classes.
This year there were 20 teachers conducting the training programmes.
Programme 9
This provides assistance for correspondence courses.
Programme 10
A research programme into manpower requirements.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH F 95
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The development of leadership for recreation is the primary objective of the
Community Programmes Branch. During the 1965/66 period this aspect of Branch
work received much attention. To achieve the quality of leadership public recreation demands, due to the increasing problems of leisure, we must establish programmes which will provide maximum opportunity for a large number of community recreation leaders to learn procedure and develop skills designed to make
them integral parts of the recreation leadership corps in every community. The
year 1965/66 continued emphasis in this aspect of work, and the standard of such
activities increased in quality in a majority of projects.
The Adult Education and the Sports and Fitness Divisions experienced great
expansion. The services of these Divisions reached many more people than in
1964/65, and consequently made heavy demands on Branch administration.
The added duties concerned with the Centennial have increased the work of
the Community Programmes Branch to such an extent that it has been with great
difficulty that regular services have been maintained.
The vacancies caused by resignation and retirement of two consultants made
it impossible to adequately serve two of our regions; this caused some disruption of
service to the Kootenay and north-west regions.
The growth in numbers of Recreation Commissions is now small each year
because there are few communities not served by the Branch. There have been
several amalgamations due to the formation of municipalities, thus eliminating
former Recreation Commissions. We can also expect the new regional districts to
grow into recreation administration units which will take direct responsibility for
administering public recreation to the smaller communities within the district.
Growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March 31,
1966, follows:—
1955  140 1961  307
1956  183 1962  332
1957 216 1963  351
1958  250 1964 359
1959 266 1965 375
1960 281 1966 390
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) Fitness and Amateur Sports Division, which provides special service to
sports organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division, which provides grants, consultation, clinics,
and conferences to School Board adult education divisions.
(4) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library—materials and advisory services.
 F 96
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
(7) Leadership training through workshops,  conferences, clinics, regional
schools, and a Provincial summer seminar.
(8 ) Grants-in-aid to Recreation Commissions on behalf of full-time recreation
directors and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) Provide resource personnel and act in advisory capacity for Provincial
conferences.
(10) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commisions receiving
t Inactive Commissions.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford  	
grants for directors'
Annual
Grant
$480.00
300.00
salaries.
Recreation Commission
Canal Flats	
Annual
Grant
_  No grant
Adams Lake  ..               .    .
Canyon 	
Cape Mudge  	
t Cawston       	
$300.00
tAinsworth . _        *
420.00
Alberni ....       ....
600.00
Alert Bay 	
        720.00
Cedar  	
420.00
Alexandria   	
300.00
        240.00
Central Saanich           _. 	
480.00
Alexis Creek   „_ 	
Chapman Camp 	
480.00
Argenta-Johnsons Landing
300.00
600.00
Chase  	
300.00
Armstrong     . .            . 	
Chase River    ..      ... ...
60.00
t Arrowhead-Sidmouth   	
Chehalis Crossing .... . ..   _
420.00
Arrow Park West   ... _   	
180.00
300.00
Chehalis Reserve 	
240.00
Ashcroft
Cherry Creek 	
Cherryville      _            	
540.00
Avola
240.00
540.00
420.00
480.00
Cheslatta District      .    -	
300.00
Bamfield
t Chetwynd       ..   — 	
Barnhart Vale
240.00
Chilliwack
600.00
600.00
240.00
.   „..       240.00
tChristian Valley           __
Bear Creek   __._ .. „_. ..
Christina Lake  	
300.00
Beaver Creek
480.00
Clearwater    ,
Clinton
300.00
tBeaverdell
300.00
Belmont Park _
        420.00
Columbia Valley       ._       .
240.00
Bessborough	
240.00
240.00
240.00
♦Comox Village         .
900.00
f Connaught Heights  —
Coombs   	
*Courtenay      ..
Blackburn Road   	
240.00
Black Creek
480.00
.    2,400.00
IBlue River         	
Cowichan Indian Band   _
540.00
Bonnington-Corra Linn _ .
.     ..       240.00
♦Cranbrook	
Crawford Bay -            .
.    2,100.00
Boston Bar
300.00
420.00
.   --       360.00
300.00
Boswell       _   _        .   .
Crescent Valley	
360.00
Bouchie Lake  _       	
Creston      ..   _     .     . -   ...
600.00
i'Bowen Island ._       .   	
Cultus Lake  . 	
480.00
Bralorne-Pioneer     . ~_	
        600.00
*Cumberland 	
tDawson Creek .             ..   _
...-    1,500.00
Bridesville                       -
240.00
        240.00
Brisco          -  -     -     	
Decker Lake   „       .     	
300.00
Britannia Beach
480.00
Deep Cove               _   .. 	
300.00
Brocklehurst
300.00
240.00
3,600.00
        480.00
♦Delta	
Denman Island
._    1,800.00
420.00
*Burnaby 	
Burns Lake   ...     _ ._ _
Departure Bay	
Deroche     -   - -       	
540.00
360.00
Burton                           	
420.00
Dewdney	
'"District of Coquitlam
420.00
Cache Creek _                 _
80.00
1,800.00
♦Campbell River	
     1,800.00
District of Matsqui	
600.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
F 97
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
District of Mission  $480.00
District of Salmon Arm  600.00
♦District of Surrey  1,500.00
Doe River  240.00
tDragon Lake	
Duhammel 	
Duncan	
Eagle Valley	
East Kelowna	
East Wellington
Edgewater 	
tElko 	
Elk Valley	
Emerald Mines _
tEnderby	
Erickson 	
Errington	
♦Esquimalt 	
Falkland	
Fanny Bay	
Farmington 	
Ferndale	
Fernie	
Field 	
Forest Grove __
Fort Fraser	
Fort Nelson	
Fort St. John ....
Francois Lake _
Franklin River
Fraser Lake	
Fruitvale	
Gabriola Island .
Galiano 	
Galloway	
Genelle 	
Gibsons	
Gillies Bay _
tGiscombe 	
tGIenmore	
Glenora 	
Golata Creek.
Golden	
Grand Forks _
tGreat Central
Greenwood 	
Gray Creek	
Grindrod 	
Groundbirch „
tHaida Masset.
180.00
100.00
240.00
420.00
420.00
420.00
240.00
600.00
420.00
300.00
1,200.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
480.00
360.00
240.00
600.00
540.00
No grant
420.00
420.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
420.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
No grant
Halfmoon Bay
Happy Valley-Glen Lake  420.00
Harrison Hot Springs  _ 480.00
tHarrop     	
Hatzic Prairie   300.00
tHazelton    	
Hedley  240.00
Hixon  420.00
Holberg   300.00
Hope  600.00
Recreation Commission
Horsefly	
Houston	
Inonoaklin	
Invermere	
loco 	
Jeune Landing.
Jordan River _
Justportel	
Kaleden 	
Kaslo 	
♦Kelowna	
Kent 	
tKeremeos 	
Kersley
Kettle Valley
Kilkerran	
♦Kimberley __
Kingfisher
Kitwanga Valley
i'Kootenay Bay _
tKyuquot 	
Lac la Hache 	
Ladysmith 	
tLa France	
tLaidlaw	
Annual
Grant
$300.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
480.00
150.00
480.00
216.00
420.00
600.00
2,100.00
480.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
2,400.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
540.00
Lakeview Heights  300.00
Langford   480.00
♦Langley  1,200.00
Lantzville   600.00
Lardeau  180.00
Lavington Coldstream   600.00
Lillooet  240.00
Lister   480.00
Little Fort  300.00
tLone Butte     	
Lower Similkameen
Lumby 	
Lund	
Lytton
Mahatta River
Mahood Falls .
Malaspina 	
Maple Ridge ...
Mara	
Marysville 	
Mayne Island
tMerritt	
Merville	
Metchosin 	
Michel 	
Midway
t Minstrel Island
Minto	
Montney	
Montrose 	
Moose Heights
Mount Currie _
tMud River	
Hornby Island
4
300.00
McConnell Creek
fMcBride 	
McLeese Lake	
60.00
300.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
600.00
240.00
600.00
240.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
600.00
180.00
360.00
240.00
300.00
 F 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Recreation Commission
Nakusp 	
♦Nanaimo 	
Nanaimo Indian Band ...
Nanoose 	
Naramata	
tNarcosli Creek	
Natal 	
Nazko	
♦Nelson 	
New Denver ...
New Hazelton .
tNew Masset _
New Westminster
Nicomen Island __
Noralee-Clemretta- Colleymount
North Bend	
North Cowichan	
Northfield	
North Kamloops	
North Shore (Nelson)
North Shuswap	
t North Vancouver	
Oak Bay
tOkanagan Centre
Okanagan Falls .
tOkanagan Indian Band
tOkanagan Mission	
tOliver	
tlOO Mile House
tl50 Mile House
tOsoyoos	
Oyama	
Palling 	
Parksville 	
tPaul Creek	
Peace Canyon —
Peachland	
Pemberton Valley .
Pender Harbour __
Pendleton Bay	
Penticton 	
tPitt Meadows	
Pleasant Valley	
Popkum 	
♦Port Alberni	
Port Alice 	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Hardy	
Port Mellon	
Port Moody	
Port McNeill	
Port Renfrew	
Pouce Coupe	
♦Powell River	
♦Prince George	
♦Prince Rupert 	
Princeton	
Procter	
Progress
Quadra Island —
Qualicum Beach
Annual Annual
Grant Recreation Commission Grant
$600.00            Queen Charlotte    $180.00
2,400.00 tQuesnel     	
210.00            Radium Junction  360.00
420.00            Red Bluff  300.00
300.00 tRedwell     	
  tReid Lake  	
360.00            Revelstoke  480.00
240.00          ♦Richmond  4,500.00
1,800.00            Riondel  300.00
240.00            Riske Creek  300.00
360.00            Riverside   300.00
             Roberts Creek  No grant
No grant            Robson   600.00
360.00            Rock Creek  240.00
360.00            Roe Lake  360.00
480.00             Rose Lake  300.00
600.00            Round Lake  240.00
420.00            Royston   360.00
600.00            Rutland  300.00
600.00            Saanich Indian Band  600.00
360.00            Salmo   300.00
           ♦Salmon Arm  1,200.00
600.00            Saltspring Island   600.00
             Saltair  420.00
240.00            Sandspit  180.00
             Saturna   240.00
             Savona  300.00
             Sayward  480.00
             Sechelt   480.00
  70 Mile House and Watch Lake 45.00
  tShalalth      	
300.00            Shawnigan Lake  480.00
_    420.00            Shirley   240.00
_   600.00            Sidney  540.00
              Silver Creek (1)   300.00
120.00             Silver Creek (2)    300.00
300.00            Siiverton     No grant
300.00            Skidegate Mission  240.00
No grant            Slocan  360.00
180.00 tSmithers     	
600.00            Soda Creek  240.00
             Songhees Indian Band  480.00
420.00            Sooke  540.00
360.00            Sorrento  300.00
1,800.00             South Cortez  420.00
420.00            South Cowichan  105.00
600.00            South Hazelton  360.00
180.00             South Kelowna  75.00
No grant            Southside   360.00
600.00            South Slocan  420.00
540.00            South Taylor  240.00
420.00             South Wellington   360.00
300.00            Sparwood   240.00
1,200.00             Spences Bridge   180.00
1,500.00            SproatLake  420.00
3,300.00            Squamish  600.00
420.00 fSquamish Indian Band    	
480.00 tStikine (Telegraph Creek)    	
300.00           Straiton    360.00
480.00            Stuart Island   240.00
300.00            Sumas  600.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
F 99
Recreation Commission
Summerland 	
Sunnybrae
Sunrise-Two Rivers
Sunrise Valley	
Sunset Prairie 	
tTappen
Tarrys and District
Tatla 	
Tatlayoko Lake
Taylor .
Tchesinkut Lake
tTelkwa 	
Texada 	
♦Terrace 	
Tofino 	
Topley 	
Tower Lake	
♦Trail-Tadanac 	
Tulameen 	
♦Ucluelet	
Union Bay	
tUniversity Hill.__
Valemount 	
Valleyview .
Annual
Grant
$480.00
180.00
300.00
180.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
120.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
1,200.00
540.00
240.00
240.00
3,000.00
300.00
900.00
480.00
Recreation Commission
Village of Mission	
♦Wallace Gardens	
Wardner 	
Warfield	
Wasa Lake	
Wellington	
Wells 	
Westbank 	
West Bench ..
Westbridge ...
West Creston .
Westsyde
♦West Vancouver
Whaletown 	
White Lake 	
Williams Lake	
tWillow River	
Wilson Creek	
Windermere 	
Winfield	
Winlaw 	
Wistaria (Ootsa)
Woodfibre	
Wynndel	
Yahk	
Yale 	
Ymir 	
Zeballos 	
Annual
Grant
$600.00
732.00
300.00
600.00
180.00
420.00
360.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
240.00
2,400.00
360.00
300.00
600.00
No grant
300.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
480.00
600.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
420.00
  360.00
  360.00
♦Vancouver Board of Parks  7,800.00
Vanderhoof  360.00
Vavenby  240.00
♦Vernon   1,500.00
View Royal  540.00
During the year 62 Recreation Commissions were inactive or not receiving a
grant. Inactive Recreation Commissions are of serious concern as they become this
way through poor leadership and community disinterest. In the case of an incorporated community, lack of interest of the local government is the principal reason.
Quarterly Reports
In the past, statistics concerning numbers of recreation activities and people
participating have been taken from reports and listed. This has been discontinued
because of the inaccuracy of the information due to the problems confronted with
listing programmes and cost where there are so many variables and difficulties in
local programme breakdown.
Usually between seven and eight thousand reports are received by this Branch
on various types of recreational activity.
The reporting system is used primarily for regional assessment of commission
activity, and to keep the Branch informed re personnel engaged in commission work.
Quarterly reports indicate the pressing need for good leadership. The whole
future of adequate public recreation service depends upon this.
Staff
The leave of absence granted to Mr. D. M. McCooey for 10 months to attend
the University of British Columbia, plus the resignation of Mr. M. E. Gordon in
September and the retirement of Mr. T. Ruben in March, left the Community Programmes Branch understaffed in two regions for most of the fiscal year.
Replacements with necessary qualifications are very difficult to obtain; as
a result it becomes a serious matter when the Community Programmes Branch loses
staff.   The 1965/66 year was the most difficult we have had in this respect.
 F 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
The consultative staff have continued a heavy Centennial programme. This
will continue, especially in the Victoria office, until the end of 1967. The staff
traveled 38,016 miles on Centennial business and 50,117 miles on Branch business.
During 1965/66 the field staff made 875 visits to communities.
Staff meetings to discuss problems and policies were convened as follows: May
5, 1965; July 12 to 17, 1965, during summer school; September 13 to 15, 1965;
March 10, 1966.
The Sports and Fitness and the Adult Education Divisions, represented by
Mr. Maltman and Mr. Cartier, had greatly increased calls for service, which made
the work more demanding than in the past.
The Community Programmes Branch staff and their locations are as follows:—
A. L. Cartier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
T. Ruben, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt (retired March 10th).
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—Central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island.
D. M. McCooey, Smithers—North-west British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
R. C. Davis, Quesnel—North-east British Columbia.
M. E. Gordon, Nelson—Kootenays (resigned in September).
Miss A. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
Leadership services are of paramount importance if we are to develop an
effective and adequate total recreation programme in British Columbia. In this
respect the Branch is continually endeavouring to develop and promote more opportunity for all categories of recreation leaders to increase their knowledge and skills.
Local clinics, zone meetings, regional conferences and workshops, and Provincial conferences, workshops, and clinics are sponsored by the Branch. Leadership
aid was also given to many Provincial organizations to conduct their own Provincial
training and conference programmes.
The 1965 Provincial Leadership School was in session in Kelowna from July
12th to 17th, inclusive. The school provided learning opportunity in recreation
leadership and was designed to encourage enthusiasm and stimulate interest in
a better approach to community organization problems in sports, aquatics, and an
appreciation of the use of the outdoors in recreation. In conjunction with the
Leadership School, all community recreation directors were invited to Kelowna to
participate in a seminar for the exchange of ideas and to establish a professional
association in British Columbia. This was the second year for this project, and it
finalized the formation of the British Columbia Professional Recreation Society.
The Annual Provincial Recreation Conference in Victoria from May 6th to
8th included, for the first time, the British Columbia Sports Federation. The
amalgamation of two organizations of similar interests was very successful. It
facilitated the use of resource personnel and broadened the scope of the conference.
One hundred and nine-two people, representing 67 Recreation Commissions, were
in attendance; cost to the Branch was $2,042.32.
Elementary-school P.E. Workshops were again successful, although Federal
support was not available. However, all Superintendents were notified that it would
be continued as a Provincial project, and workshops were conducted in Langley,
Courtenay, Burnaby, Gibsons, and Creston.
Leadership services of prominent resource people in all areas of recreation are
made available for many communities throughout the Province.    The growing
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH F 101
interest and continuing increase in requests for aid in this aspect of Branch service
is indicative of the increasing interest in community recreation.
Financial assistance was given to the Okanagan School of Fine Arts, the
Okanagan Valley Symphony Society, and the Notre Dame Drama Leadership
Workshop. This assistance is provided to encourage the development of leadership
in the areas of recreation which can best be served in this manner.
Leadership Statistics
Regional Clinics
Number held  56
Number attending  2,994
Number of commissions  179
Regional Conferences
Number held  7
Number attending  385
Number of commissions  107
Regional Workshops
Number Number of Number ot
Attending     Commissions Courses Cost
Kelowna  190 34 9 $889.68
Fort St. John  70 18 7 840.45
Kimberley  40 5 1 201.50
Trail  29 6 1 110.00
Williams Lake  63 12 9 1,037.75
Smithers  72 19 6 714.85
Richmond  19 1 14 75.00
Totals   483 95 47        $3,869.23
Provincial Leadership School, Kelowna, July 12 to 17,1965
Courses: Sports, Fitness, Aquatics, Leadership, Outdoors.
Number attending, 83.
Total cost, $8,944.57.
Elementary-school P.E. Workshops
Attendance Cost
Courtenay  55 $95.00
Burnaby (primary)  47 50.00
Burnaby (intermediate)   53 50.00
Gibsons  66 105.00
Creston   24 100.00
Langley  74 35.00
Miscellaneous Activities
Cost
Secondary-school Sports Conference  $432.40
All Native Basketball Tournament     156.00
Notre Dame Leadership Workshop     500.00
B.C. Federation of School Athletic Associations     301.25
Okanagan Summer School of the Arts     300.00
Okanagan Valley Symphony Society     400.00
 F 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $8,766. One hundred and thirty-six
communities received this aid. These grants are provided to encourage community
activity in these extremely important aspects of recreation.
Library Services
The film library is located in Vancouver and maintained by the Visual Education Division.   Fourteen new films were purchased, and 560 were circulated.
The book library was kept up to date with 572 new additions of books and
plays, and 519 were circulated.
Publications
The Community Programmes Branch bulletin continued publication on a
quarterly basis, with 650 copies mailed out at each mailing. The bulletin is designed
as a reference book for Recreation Commissions.
Provincial Advisory Board
Members of the Provincial Advisory Board on Adult Education and Recreation
are as follows: Mr. B. M. Baker, Kelowna (Chairman); Dr. B. E. Wales, Vancouver; Mr. A. T. Alsbury, Vancouver; Mrs. W. Saxton, Ucluelet; Dr. A. W.
Mooney, Vanderhoof; Mr. P. F. Mclntyre, Victoria; Mr. L. J. Wallace, Victoria;
Prof. R. F. Osborne, Vancouver; Dr. J. F. K. English, Victoria; Mr. J. E. Fletcher,
Trail; Mr. D. L. Cunnings, Vancouver.
The Board met twice during the fiscal year—September 13, 1965, and March
31, 1966.   Dr. English and Mr. Mclntyre retired from the Board during the year.
The Board was appointed to act in an advisory capacity to the Department of
Education concerning policy and procedure as related to the Community Programmes Branch. The Board meets periodically to hear reports from the Community Programmes Branch which outline problems and requirements. The Board
then discusses any aspect of the Branch it deems necessary and submits recommendations to the Deputy Minister.
Drama
Interest in drama continues to grow in British Columbia as more-experienced
and better-trained leaders take an active part in establishing a high standard of
performance, and more discriminating audiences flock to see the theatre in operation.
Teachers and community leaders are taking advantage of summer schools and
night classes as well as attending week-end and month-long workshop sessions.
Centennial has created a speical interest in Canadian plays and pageants.
A greater awareness of the arts by the public has been encouraged through
touring groups such as the Holiday Theatre.
Festivals continue to dominate the spring picture. Over 35 festivals of drama,
speech arts, music, and dance are held annually. Of these, more than 10 included
entries from school groups only, 11 were primarily for adult entries, and the
remainder had classes of younger children to retired adults. Specialists in the field
of adjudication follow each session with helpful, constructive, and critical analyses.
It has become the practice to follow each festival with a one-day workshop so that
those taking part can benefit from the advice of the adjudicator while problems are
still fresh in their minds.
The Provincial One-act Festival was held in Kelowna with Dr. Ian Rose, of
Kamloops, as adjudicator. White Rock Little Theatre's entry of " Riders to the
Sea " received the award for best production.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH F 103
This branch works closely with the British Columbia Drama Assocation, which
is the parent body of the adult drama groups. Plans for touring experienced directors and leaders to each community to assist with the production of a play should do
much to improve the standard of presentation.
The Dominion Drama Festival was held in Victoria and proved a most successful event. Well over 300 players and many more supporters attended from as
far away as Newfoundland.
The drama library continues to serve the needs of the schools and the community at large. Over 8,000 books, pamphlets, periodicals, etc., are sent out
annually to teachers, community leaders, students, drama committees, etc. This
service is much appreciated, as is the loan of a limited quantity of free lighting
equipment and stage curtains.
Adult Education
(A. L. Cartier, M.A.)
During 1965/66 there was an over-all increase of 11 per cent in the school
district adult education enrolment, which includes a 25-per-cent increase of enrolment in vocational courses. Ten more school districts appointed full-time Directors
of Adult Education and four more full-time assistants. Finally, an Institute of Adult
Studies came into being in Victoria.
Co-ordination with Other Agencies Involved in Adult Education
Many agencies of both the Federal and Provincial Governments are involved
in some form of adult education. This year a concerted effort was made to establish
intercommunication, co-operation, and co-ordination with the following agencies:
Agriculture Extension, Social Welfare, Health, Corrections, Provincial Secretary
re Indians, the Technical and Vocational Branch, Municipal Affairs, the Federal
Citizenship and Indian Affairs Branches, and the Department of Extension at the
University of British Columbia. Representatives of these agencies have held
bimonthly meetings and a two-day workshop to learn what each is doing and ways
in which they can help each other in the education of adults as well as their other
functions.
The local Director of Adult Education, because of his facilities and channels
of communication, is in a strategic position to assist local representatives of all
the other agencies in the development of programmes for adults.
In collaboration with the Citizenship Branch, a workshop was held on means
of developing citizenship education, and a week-long course was held for teachers
of English as a second language. There was also collaboration in the area of
community leadership training.
Through co-operation with the Indian Affairs Branch, conferences for Directors of Adult Education were held in Prince George and New Westminster to
promote and develop some 20 literacy classes for Indian adults. Our joint community development project continues at Port Simpson.
In collaboration with the Extension Department of the University of British
Columbia, four workshops were held for Indian chiefs and councillors. Conferences on counselling, poverty studies, and theory of learning were also jointly
sponsored.
In-service Conferences and Workshops
Regional workshops for Directors of Adult Education were held for Vancouver
Island, the Lower Mainland, the Kootenays, and the north central region. The
Directors also met for a Provincial conference at Easter in Kamloops. In addition,
there was a workshop on the case-study approach to business-management training.
 F 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
In many areas of the Province, in-service training courses were held for
instructors in an effort to improve the quality of instruction. This was done
especially in the areas of training for the hospitality industry, business management,
and how to teach English as a second language. In each case this Division helped
to conduct the training sessions or helped to bring them about by organizing or
giving financial assistance.
Community Leadership
Workshops for community leaders were assisted or organized by this Division
in collaboration with the recreation consultants and other organizations in Kelowna,
Fort St. John, Chetwynd, Cranbrook, Grand Forks, and Victoria.
Changing Role oj Local Directors oj Adult Education
Four years ago, only two school districts had full-time Directors of Adult
Education. This year some 30 school districts will have full-time Directors and
about 10 more will have half-time Directors. Thus the role of a Director of Adult
Education has changed into that where a professional adult educator assumes
responsibility for identifying the educational needs of the adult community, and
then to helping the community to organize itself to meet as many of its educational
needs as possible. This means that in addition to meeting the need for night-school
classes he organizes day classes, conferences, workshops, and speaker institutes.
Also, as the opportunities for adult education multiply, he finds it necessary to
provide counselling services.
Since adult education is voluntary, the Director needs to design programmes
which appeal to the adult public, he must suitably publicize his programme, and he
must find and develop instructors who will be able to give their students the kind of
instruction which will maintain their interest. The success of the local Directors
in performing these functions is indicated by the fact that enrolment has doubled
in the past four years.
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment and Number oj Classes, Instructors,
and School Districts Participating
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60    	
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
1,578
1960/61                                    	
2,220
1961/62_	
2,219
1962/63                                                	
3,070
1963/64
3,964
1964/65  _
4,261
1965/66  	
5,067
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60   .                                                .
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
1,194
322
1960/61    .                                                _
552
1961/62 ....     .     ..   .
512
1962/63 _-	
681
1963/64 	
910
1964/65 _	
1,116
1965/66	
1,384
I
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
F 105
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment and Number of Classes, Instructors,
and School Districts Participating—Continued
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60                                                       	
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
74,815
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
2,947
1,256
1960/61                                                                                       	
1,648
1961/62
1,707
1962/63                                    - -
2,389
1963/64                                                            .. - - -
3,054
1964/65                                                       	
3,145
1965/66	
3,683
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Course
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
3,455
5,660
1,005
1,454
1,824
2,156
1,451
1,296
1,091
596
499
4,090
149
290
55
87
102
99
49
55
59
40
28
181
162
407
64
96
117
100
54
Engineering	
55
60
41
28
200
Totals                                      	
25,477
1,194
1,384
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
14,782
3,538
8,444
6,823
10,941
7,115
4,262
9,561
9.349
449
175
333
306
507
365
113
318
381
535
217
Liberal Studies (non-credit)	
327
343
716
453
109
560
423
Totals    	
74,815
2,947
3,683
Total enrolment, 100,292.
During the past four years the total enrolment has increased by over 100 per
cent. In the past three years enrolment more than doubled in the following types
of vocational courses: Business Management, Machine Shop, Construction Trades,
Electronics, and Agriculture. Enrolment in non-vocational adult classes has increased as follows: Hobby courses, 14 per cent; domestic arts, 25 per cent; parent
education, 30 per cent; liberal non-credit courses, 35 per cent; academic courses
for credit, 50 per cent; recreation and fitness, 50 per cent; English for New
Canadians, 80 per cent; and in the fine arts, 100 per cent.
The trend in enrolment is toward the more serious types of courses. There is
also a trend toward the organization of more local conferences and short workshops
designed to find solutions to problems that are of interest to various sectors of
the community.
 f 106 public schools report, 1965/66
Sports and Fitness Division
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E., Co-ordinator)
The year 1965/66 was the first since the Sports and Fitness Division was
established in 1962 that Federal-Provincial agreements were signed well in advance
of the fiscal year. This enabled the Division to approve and process projects early
in the year. It also enabled sports bodies to plan projects and make comprehensive
submissions to the Division to substantiate requests.
The result of the three-year agreements, due to expire in March of 1967, was
increased interest and much more extensive use of moneys available. Forty-one
projects were approved in 1965/66 and a total of $128,652.77 was expended.
The Sports and Fitness Division has become a vital factor in the work of many
of the sports governing bodies in the Province. Extension of sports development
and leadership programmes, has been encouraged by the Community Programmes
Branch. The policy for the provision of assistance to sports groups is based on the
principle of leadership development and self-help. This has encouraged a serious
approach to sports leadership training, which will have beneficial effects on sports
in the Province.
One of the most effective contributions of this office has been in the field of
communication. Information concerning many aspects of sport and fitness has
been provided on request. Many organizations have used clerical assistance and
facilities to expedite their work. A better understanding and co-operation between
sports groups has been achieved. This has developed a better rapport in amateur
sports in British Columbia.
Significant Accomplishments
Instrumental in establishing British Columbia Sports Federation and recreation
association office in Vancouver.
Instigated formation of British Columbia Federation of School Athletic
Associations.
Bursaries and scholarships worth $11,550 provided for 29 students. Federal
programme administered by the Province.
Plan for bringing sports bodies together to study projects and to acquaint them
with Federal-Provincial plan.
Planned, organized, and provided facilities for many meetings.
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1965/66
1. B.C. Women's Field Hockey Association Tournament.. $299.59
2. B.C. Canadian Football Union clinics  5,400.00
3. B.C. Table Tennis Association Clinics and Equipment_ 775.00
4. P.E. and Recreation Student Summer Assistance  6,000.00
5. Provincial Recreation and Sports and Fitness Conference   739.50
6. Provincial Leadership School, Kelowna  8,944.57
7. B.C. Minor Baseball Association Clinics  1,800.00
8. Canadian Youth Hostels Association (not approved by
Ottawa)        	
9. B.C. Safety Council Mile Swim for Fitness  450.00
10. Sechelt Recreation Director Experiment  12,817.69
11. Boy Scouts of Canada Provincial Training Course  1,500.00
12. Administration Costs of Sports and Fitness Office in
Vancouver  18,606.13
 —
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
13. Boys' Clubs of Vancouver Leadership Training Camp
14. B.C. Golf Association Promotion of Junior Golf Development 	
15. Canadian Amateur Swimming Association Clinics	
16. Vancouver Women's Field Hockey Association Tournament 	
17. Vancouver Y.W.C.A. Leadership Training Camp	
18. B.C. Gymnastic Association Clinics	
19. B.C. Field Hockey Association Tournament and Clinics
20. B.C. Amateur Wrestling Association Clinics, Workshops, and School	
21. B.C. Women's Field Hockey Association Clinic and
Seminar	
22. B.C. Sport Federation and B.C.R.A. Joint Administration Office 	
23. Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Services	
24. B.C. Rugby Union Clinic	
25. Scholarships and Bursaries	
26. B.C. Basketball Association Clinic and Tournament	
27. B.C. Kayak and Canoe Association Workshop  and
Clinics 	
28. B.C. Black Belt Association Clinics	
29. B.C. Basketball Officials' Association Conference	
30. B.C. Amateur Basketball Association Tournaments and
Clinics 	
31. Amateur Synchronized Swimming Association Clinics
and Meets 	
32. Kelowna Yacht Club Summer Sailing Schools	
33. Boys' Clubs of Vancouver Fitness Research Training	
34. B.C. Amateur Hockey Association Clinic	
35. Canadian Figure Skating Association Annual Operation
in British Columbia	
36. Mountain Access Committee Trail Clearing and Marking 	
37. Royal Canadian Legion Coaching Award Plan	
38. B.C. Camping Association Camp Leadership Conference 	
39. Wrestling and Gymnastic Equipment	
40. Canadian Amateur Ski Association Instructional Programme	
F 107
41. B.C. Badminton Association Clinics	
42. B.C. Handball Association Competition.
$1,000.00
800.00
1,595.20
375.00
1,875.00
5,399.03
1,840.00
3,000.00
951.40
7,680.00
4,000.00
85.00
11,550.00
500.00
2,500.00
1,586.00
1,000.00
1,902.50
1,125.00
700.00
300.00
6,000.00
4,000.00
500.00
3,000.00
500.00
4,006.16
2,500.00
800.00
250.00
Total
$128,652.77
 ■
 IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
F 109
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., Litt.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT
The net enrolment for the 1965/66 school-year was
346, divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
99
46
2
133
66
232
112
2
Totals. _	
147
199
346
General Remarks
The new intermediate-senior deaf classroom building was officially opened on
September 17th by the Honourable Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of Education.
With him on the platform were the Honourable W. N. Chant, the Honourable
Robert Bonner, and the Honourable Frank Richter.
It was an enjoyable ceremony attended by approximately 200 persons. At the
conclusion of Mr. Peterson's opening address, he officially named the building
MacDonald Hall and presented a symbolic key to the school and unveiled a bronze
plaque commemorating the occasion.
From time to time, consideration has been given to the practicability of adding
a second story to the classroom wing of the deaf primary unit (Lawrence Hall).
However, the senior structural engineers of the Public Works Department reported
that such an addition would be inadvisable for numerous reasons.
With permission of the Department of Education, our teachers have organized
Jericho Hill Teachers' Association. One of the primary objectives is to promote the
cause of the education of the visually and aurally handicapped in British Columbia.
During the year, four partial-sighted and two hard-of-hearing pupils were
transferred to appropriate public-school classes. All of them have successfully completed the year.
Our school band took part in the 51st Kiwanis International Convention in
Portland, Ore., immediately following the close of school in June. Their performance
was very well received. Two years ago the band played a similar engagement in Los
Angeles with marked success.
Mr. Michael Marsden resigned at the end of June to teach for the Department
of Northern Affairs in the Hudson Bay area. Miss Linda Martin married and
moved to Halifax.
For several years the salaries of two teachers of pre-school deaf children at
Sunny Hill Hospital have been provided by the Department of Education in the
Jericho Hill School budget.  This year the salary of a third teacher has been added.
The operation of deaf off-campus classes has continued over the past 13 years
with marked success. There were three such classes in the city last year, and a fourth
one is planned for next year. Integration with hearing children in these school
situations does much to motivate the use of speech and lipreading by our pupils.
  IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
F 111
For the past six years it has been the policy of this school to transfer senior
blind pupils to sighted secondary schools at Grade XI level. This integration programme, like that for the deaf, has been most successful in all respects.
Arrangements have been completed for the transfer of our two deaf-blind children in September to the special department for deaf-blind in the State School for
the Blind, Vancouver, Wash.
Before the end of the school-year, a survey of the school facilities and staff was
conducted by Mr. J. Phillipson, Mr. W. Reid, and a small group of District Superintendents. Their recommendations to the Deputy Minister of Education, Dr. Neil
Perry, will doubtless prove helpful in any short- or long-range planning for Jericho
Hill School.
I wish to take this opportunity to express thanks for the very splendid cooperation received from the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee,
parents, and staff.  The joint effort has resulted in a very successful year.
 F 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF
EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past 10 years, and indicates that the number of individual
service records to be maintained has increased by approximately 87 per cent in this
period.
1	
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
2a _.
2b—	
2c  	
2d 	
3a._	
3b	
8,757
176
534
6.5
(?)
(?)
287
(?)
(?)
9,482
221
725
8.3
1,135
13.0
310
1,860
21.2
10,119
297
637
6.7
1,165
12.3
313
1,802
19.0
10,856
332
737
7.3
1,270
12.6
348
2,007
19.8
11,547
369
691
6.4
1,357
12.5
388
2,048
19.0
12,148
327
601
5.2
1,356
11.7
317
1,957
16.9
12,815
254
667
5.5
1,503
12.4
385
2,170
17.9
13,624
336
809
6.3
1,562
12.2
418
2,371
18.5
14,470
376
846
6.2
1,715
12.6
404
2,561
18.8 '
15,263
359
883
6.1
1,757
12.1
350
2,640
18.3
16,281
360
1,018
6.7
2,061
13.4
4	
5a	
5b	
481
3,079
20.2
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed as at October, from district nominal rolls. For 1955/56 a portion of Victoria College
is included, and up to 1963/64 inclusive the regular staff of the Vancouver Vocational Institute and Vancouver
School of Art are included. These are omitted in later figures. If included for 1964/65 the figures would be:
2a, 15,359;   2b, 389;   2c, 889;   5a, 2,646.    Figures include supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
over age, included in 2a.  A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown; that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1965/66 there was little change in the number of temporary certificates or
letters of permission issued. Many of these persons so employed had undertaken
a year of teacher-training but had not qualified fully for certification. The number
of teachers employed rose significantly, as did the number of drop-outs and the
number who left positions during the year.
II. Letters of permission and temporary certificates, 1959/60 to 1965/66,
were as follows:—
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62..
1962/63-
369
327
254
336
335
285
228
312
1963/64.
1964/65..
1965/66..
376
389
345
359
360
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
F 113
In 1963/64, of the 345 in regular public schools, 10 were temporary elementary certificates (E-C) because of age and 6 were temporary secondary certificates
(P-C), leaving 329 letters of permission. In 1964/65, of the 359 in regular public
schools, 7 were temporary elementary certificates and 5 were temporary secondary
certificates, leaving 347 letters of permission, of which 216 were E-T and 131 were
S-T with degree qualifications. Figures for 1965/66 were generally similar. As at
September, 1963, the employment of those in public schools on letters of permission
was as follows:—
Elementary Grades
No
Teacher-
training
Partial
Teacher-
training
Plus University Year Standing
Total
U.E.
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Special
E-T
S-T__
Totals...
45
20
79
3
88
30
1
2
1
2
124
23
65
82
—
—
—-
—
—
....
147
Secondary Grades
E-T
S-T
Totals—
62
73
28
19
33
16
14
24
3
_-
90
92
135
47
	
....
....
....
—
—
182
Total Elementary and Secondary
E-T
S-T
Totals...
107
93
107
22
121
46
15
26
4
2
214
115
200
129
	
—
—
—
....
—
329
A
nalysis
byTyp
e oj Work—Secondary Grades
No
Partial
Teacher-
Teacher-
I.A.
Comm.
Music
Art
P.E.
Occ.
H.Ec.
General
training
training
E-T  .
4
4
-
10
8
1
1
....
11
~8
—
—
—
—
—
2
3
9
6
	
	
15
	
3
2
	
	
	
5
.     .
1
	
	
1
30
13
—
—
—
—
—
43
S-T   	
4
4
4
....
4
_
9
3
	
12
3
	
	
	
3
53
16
--
—
—
—
—
69
Totals—
135      |      47
1
4
15
12
3
27
8
1
112
III. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the university.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the faculties of education of the universities,
and enrolment figures are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-
 F 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
training programme as enrolments cover all years of training.   The following charts,
however, covering some 15 years, permit of useful comparisons.
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
M.
F.
T.
M.
F. T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F. T.
M.
F.'
T.
M.
F.
T.
la—  _
175
109
54
338
152
96
44
292
36
259
128
423'
32
249
117
398
211
368
182
761
184
345
161
690
170
124
79
473
137
110
66
313
9
2
2
13
300
35
251
162
448
30
239
149
418
2
2
6
10
40S
205
375
241
821
167
349
215
731
11
4
8
23
70S
102
108
33
243
88
96
24
208
13
10
23
184
39
228
136
403'
35
214
124
373
2
12
1
15
358
141
336
169
646
123
310
148
581
15
22
1
38
543
77
116
48
241
67
102
44
213
5
3
1
9
204
35
284
156
475
35
271
149
455
1
6
3
10
445
112
40*3
204
776
102
373
193
668
6
9
4
19
649
86
114
40
240
71
100
37
208
8
5
1
14
194
22 108
219 333
125 165
366|606
20 91
206 306
119 156
345 553
8
13 18
4  5
17 31
91
204
90
385
74
185
83
342
2
2
4
338
22
342
155
519
17
322
150
489
8
3
11
478
113
546
245
904
91
507
233
831
2
10
3
15
816
72
196
99
367
55
177
93
325
3
12
6
21
304
50
393
228
671
44
369
222
635
2
11
6
19
616
122
lb..__	
lc  	
Id	
589
327
1,038
2a	
99
2b 	
2c  „	
2d... 	
3a  	
3b
546
315
960
5
23
3c   	
12
40
4 -    -	
3281522
920
References:   M.-=male;   F.=rfemale;  T.=total;   a—University of British Columbia;   b^Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at October.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.    Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;   that is,
supply from training institutions.
1960/61
M
I
F.    T.
1961/62
M.  F. I T.
I      I
1962/63
M.  F.    T
1963/64
I       I
M.| F. | T.
1964/65
M.| F. I T.
1965/66
M.  F.    T
la....
766
lb —
378
lc......
1,144
2a	
549
2b —
131
2c	
680
3a —
487
3b	
120
3c	
607
4a —.
(?)
4b	
(?)
4c _
525
5a—
(?)
5b—
(?)
5c	
(?)
985
410
1,395
716
135
851
657
119
776
589
16
605
46
125
171
1,353
523
1,876
967
177
1,144
835
199
1,034
787
46
833
99
114
213
1,635
666
2,301
1,149
200
1,349
1,026
216
1,242
893
. 47
940
145
186
331
392
29
421
57
90
147
2,006
798
2,804
1,416
257
1,673
1,258
266
1,524
1,009
57
1,066
154
326
480
2,127
855
2,982
1,506
266
1,772
1,371
284
1,655
1,019
63
1,082
181
421
602
411
8
419
79
125
204
2,021
957
2,978
1,451
285
1,736
1,417
316
1,733
1,056
40
1,096
193
473
666
673
20
693
61]118
1681483
229 j 601
I
[2,234
11,172
|3,406
1,664
328
1,992
1,594
329
1,923
1,085
35
1,120
179
651
830
432
12
444
100
134
234
2,429
1,297
3,726
1,793
409
2,192
1,725
378
2,103
1,202
28
1,230
304
603
907
2,382
1,318
3,700
1,846
377
2,223
References:   M.=-:male;   F.=female;   T.=total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years; (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
Figures are for the University of British Columbia and University of Victoria only. (An additional 23 persons
contemplated completion of secondary training at Simon Fraser University in 1965/66.)
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a certificate at end of year.
(Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency industrial arts and summer-session home economics training programme. The discrepancy between the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arise from the
fact that some not included in 3c passed further work to be included in 4c plus 5c. Until 1964/65, University
of Victoria students were included in elementary training above, although some were secondary. The distortion
is relatively small.)
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases)—prior to summer session and supplementals.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total—after summer session
and supplementals
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
IV. The following table shows the certificate classifications awarded those in
the training-college in the year shown, who were teaching in November of the year
following; that is, actual supply from the training college.   Note that E-C supply
 —
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
F 115
dropped from 211 in 1959 to 68 in 1965, E-B supply is almost the same, and E-A
supply rose from 68 to 293. Similarly, P-C rose from 58 to 187 and P-B from 155
to 352. These latter gains are significant. (It should be noted that these figures
include certificated teachers who may have left teaching to return for further winter-
session training in the Faculty of Education in the year shown.)
oo
o
OS
m
as
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1
M. ' F.
1
T.
M. 1 F.
1
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.  F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
F-T
E-C
E-B-	
E-A  	
S-T	
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
44
186
387
101
3
55
155
9
21
64
111
37
8
38
138
4
27
123
327
42
1
54
68
3
48
187
438
79
9
92
206
7
21
34
117
46
7
40
161
3
32
95
318
86
3
44
73
2
53
129
435
132
10
84
234
5
8
30
87
63
2
48
171
6
32
69
270
136
2
85
81
2
40
99
357
199
4
133
256
8
9
20
73
75
7
45
196
2
19
53
237
196
1
93
89
5
28
73
300
271
8
138
285
7
6
22
61
59
e.
16
46
236
234
22
68
297
293
6
P-C . .
en   no
187
P-B
221
2
131
3
352
P-A-	
5
Totals	
833
940
421
645
1,066
429 1 653
!
1,082
419
677
1,096
427
693
1,120
444
786
1,230
V. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in the
training-college in the year shown, who were not teaching in November following.
E-T and S-T indicate that had the individual taught, a letter of permission would
have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have received
a certificate or been considered for a letter of permission, nor those in programmes
not normally leading to certification; for example, first year elementary, various
years secondary. Note that the numbers of persons eligible for a certificate who did
not enter teaching the September following rose from 201 in 1959 to 786 in 1965,
and that in the same period the level of certificate classification of those individuals
rose significantly. The figures reflect the decision of trainees to undertake extended
training for higher qualifications before commencing teaching, evident in other
figures available. The process, temporarily at least, is aggravating numerical supply
in terms of demand but fortunately is creating a pool of longer-trained persons who
may be expected to enter teaching within the next year or two, thereby increasing
numerical supply and quality supply.
OO
1
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
M.
F.  T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.  T.
M.
F.
T.
E-T
11
95
31
97
128
56
85
141
28
102
130
42
102
144
35
79
114
E-C
56
58
34
64
98
46
84
130
52
89
141
52
117
169
39
119
158
E-B—
81
83
49
108
157
59
137
196
47
178
225
54
246
300
68
295
363
E-A.-
30
49
12
36
48
14
59
73
40
65
105
31
84
115
40
120
160
S-T....
1
10
4
18
4
6
3
10
7
16
6
8
3
11
9
19
1
13
6
15
7
78
8
14
5
76
13
40
4
17
3
72
7
P-C
39
P-B
23
23
11
15
76
17
17
-34
73
fi
79
77
7,1
48
30
33
63
P-A
Totals	
1
1
1
1
1
2 1  3
213
331
147
333
480
206
396
602
204
462
666
229
601
'830
234
673
907
Totals
eligible for cert-
Totals, E-T, S-T
201
232
112
233
345
144
308 | 452
175
354
529
179
494
673
195
591
786
12
99
35
100
135
62
88 | 150
1
29
108
137
50
107
157
39
82 | 121
1
 F 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
VI. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-
colleges as a percentage of demand:—
m
vo
C-
CO
Os
m
tn
tn
■^
*--,
■--,
■^
ID
t>
CO
S
Vr>
tn
£
ov
Ov
Ov
Ov
Ov
3\
*"*
*■"
W
r"1
'""'
1-1
*"•
*"'
*-
w
la	
553
831
960
607
776
1,034
1,242
1,524
1,655
1,733
1,923
2,103
lb 	
522
816
920
525
605
833
940
1,066
1,082
1,096
1,120
1,230
2   _   ..
1,637
(?)
1,860
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
2,170
2,371
2,561
2,646
3,079
3a	
33.8
(?)
(?)
51.6
33.7
38.7
50.5
63.5
70.2
69.8
67.7
65.5
68.3
3b           	
31.9
49.5
29.1
29.9
40.7
48.0
49.1
45.6
42.8
42.3
39.9
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June as a percentage of demand;  that is, ia as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of 2
—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
Teacher Recruitment in the United Kingdom
A District Superintendent of Schools (District No. 57) proceeded overseas to
carry out recruitment in the United Kingdom in 1965. Again in 1966 arrangements
were made for a District Superintendent to recruit similarly.
School Boards are encouraged to list the number of specific positions available.
(1) These lists are used by the interviewing officer, who offers appointment
direct to one of these positions.
(2) On return from the United Kingdom the interviewing officer provided the
Registrar with a list of suitable persons interviewed for whom appointments had not been made. This special listing was circulated to District
Superintendents and Boards in order that direct negotiations and appointments might be made.
(3) A number of other individuals worked independently of the interviewing
officer, and in many cases came direct to the Province or were appointed
direct by Boards, although negotiations commenced under the recruitment
plan.
The chart below indicates these refinements of recent years. Figures for official
United Kingdom recruitment are as follows:—
Certificate
VD
tn
tn
tn
as
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tn
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00
tn
tr-
Ov
OV
tn
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00
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Os
O
VO
Ov
m
ov
VO
o
VO
ov
so
VO
Os
m
vo
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SO
Ov
VO
----
m
so
Ov
vo
vo
Ov
VO
VO
~~.
V>
VO
Ov
Elementary certificates-
....
....
—
-
—
—
	
....
_..
20
21
21
20
12
Totals  	
21
30
48
61
33
35
20
19
32
41
53
Secondary certificates—
—
-
-
-
—-
—
—
14
14
21
5
Independent - -
7
Totals   . - -.
41
35
33
30
35
27
9
15
14
28
33
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
34
46
69
86
In addition to the above group, an indefinite number of teachers from the United
Kingdom proceed annually to this Province.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Teacher Exchange
F 117
Teacher-exchange applications proceed through the Registrar's office. The
number of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange
positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as follows:—
m
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vo
^s.
-^.
"-N
^
"s.
"■--
"•N,
*»s,
vo
CO
tn
m
m
vD
VD
ov
Os
as
Ov
OV
Ov
Ov
Ov
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as
United Kingdom	
22
23
26
26
28
23
22
22
23
20
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
Elsewhere	
5
1
1
1
1
1
Totals	
31
25
29
28
30
25
23
23
23
22
Division of Examinations
There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
University Programme (Grades XI-XII) and for the June and August Grade XIII
examinations. Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible
for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of records. Until 1965/66 the numbers of candidates registered with the
Division of Examinations rose annually. In recent years a number of changes have
occurred. In 1965/66 Grade XI students who formerly would have written Departmental examinations were on the reorganized curriculum for secondary schools and
were not required to write. Examinations were continued in a number of Grade XI
subjects for certain candidates completing their University Programme requirements,
principally as supplemental examinations. The number of candidates registered and
number of examination papers written decreased. The introduction of Vancouver
City College in 1965/66 reduced significantly the number of Grade XIII candidates
and examination papers.   The following tables give significant data:—
Number oj Markers
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
■1961/62 11962/63
1
1963/64 1964/65
1965/66
June	
234
39
243
41
246
44
290
48
301
50
343
61
395
61
439
19
511          562
16    |       15
519
15
Totals.	
273
284
290    |     338
351    |     404
456    |     458
527    |     577    |     534
$96,000
$113,000
S123.fll>(llSi153.0nfl
$168,000
$179,000
$212,500
$210,000
$251,500|$297,000
[
...   .
Number of Candidates (June)
University
Programme
Grade XIII—
Totals —
9,418
1,765
11,183
10,924
1,565
12,489
13,014
.1,797
14,811
14,933
2,204
17,137
16,786
2,673
19,459
19,113
3,253
20,103
3,597
22,366 I 23,700
22,411
4,044
26,455
25,793
4,157
28,246
4,792
18,586
3,068
29,950     33,038     21,654
Number Completed in June
University
Programme
Grade XIII_
Totals	
3,160
410
3,570
3,433
383
3,816
4,025
341
4,366
4,215
464
4,679
4,720
587
5,307
5,651
620
5,779
659
6,271
6,438
6,827
840
7,667
7,840
809
8,490
936
9,870
733
649     10,426     10,603
 F 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Papers Marked in June
1955/56 1956/57
1957/5'g
J1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
19611/62
1962/63
1963/64 1964/65
1985/66
University
Programme
Grade XIII—
21,042     24,024
6,028 |    5,647
29,765
6,388
36,236
8,055
41,963
9,751
46,227
11,974
39,318
13,812
54,488
15,649
1               1
1               1
62,654 1 60,333  1 38,919
15,995 j 18,825 | 12,278
Totals
27,070
29,671
36,153 I 44,291
51,714
58,201  I 63,130
70,137
78,649
79,158
51,197
Papers Marked in August
University
ZZ
	
6,844
1,727
8,931
1,869
9,236
2,489
8,569
2,192
1,943
2,018
2,181
Grade XIII-
	
1,226
Totals...
5,185
5,789
7,031
8,571
10,800
11,725
10,761
1,943
2,018
2,181
1,226
Number oj Candidates (August)
School-year
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
4,178
1,164
5,985
1,262
6,245
1,537
5,878
1,434
1,315
1,352
1,556
Grade XIII         	
909
Totals  	
5,342
7,247
7,782
7,312
1,315
1,352
1,556
909
Number Completed in August
University Programme	
Grade XIII   	
534
132
882
161
993
210    J
712
172
189
219
267
202
Totals   —
666
1,044
1,203    1
884
189
219
267
202
Total University Programme and Grade XIII papers for June and August,
1953/54 to 1963/64, were as follows: 1953/54, 27,943; 1954/55, 30,894;
1955/56, 32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862;
1959/60, 62,514; 1960/61, 69,926; 1961/62, 73,891; 1962/63, 72,080 (with
University Programme August examinations discontinued); 1963/64, 80,667;
1964/65, 81,339 (with reduction resulting from only a single paper in English 40);
1965/66, 52,423 (with Grade XI starting to disappear and Vancouver City College
reducing Grade XIII).
For 1965/66, examinations were prepared for June in 23 University Programme subjects and for June and August in 20 Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1966, 177 regular and 23 special examination centres were established in the
Province and 40 outside British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being
in Venezuela and France.
There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations
of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia secondary
schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete requirements,
as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter similar professional courses. A very large number of persons has sought evaluations and
permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students. These numbers
are increasing rapidly every year, with expansion in the number of areas offering
academic courses through night-school and adult classes.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
F 119
Scholarship Awards
For many years the Department of Education announced, on behalf of the
University of British Columbia, the names of winners of the 15 General Proficiency
Scholarships for University Entrance awarded jointly by the University and Chris
Spencer Foundation. It also announced the winners of the six Royal Institution
Scholarships for Grade XIII. Since 1964 such announcements are made by the
University of British Columbia.
The top-ranking scholarship candidates for 1965/66 on departmental examinations appear below in academic order:—
Name
School
Per Cent
University Programme
Gary James Paterson  (winner of the Governor-
General's Silver Medal)  _ 	
William James Sparks (winner of the Governor-
General's Bronze Medal)   	
Paulette Marie E. Terlinden  —
Eleanor Jane Griffiths   	
Nicholas Charles Kendall 	
Brian Michael Joyce
Hamar Russ Kenneth Foster-
Dinah Marie Woodworth	
Helen Ruth Young 	
Valerie Jean Hunter	
Dawn Ellen Speed „ 	
Patricia Elaine Thomasen	
Peter Fleck Ladner  	
Walter George Rilkoff	
Robert Gordon Shugg 	
Ingrid Amelia Tepesh —	
Sheryl Anne Thomson	
Gillian Patricia Wallace	
Roger Darryl Conchie	
Maureen Therese Murphy	
Patricia Marie Bigelow	
Linda Noreen McMeekin	
Thomas William Skinner	
Kathryn Laura Small _	
Carolyn Jean Zapf
Douglas Michael Finlay	
Rosemary Jeanne Gagne	
Raquel Maria Goncalves	
Linda Katherine McDonald .
Carolee Mae Orme  	
Janice Mary Griffiths 	
Margaret Rose MacNeil! _
Ian Peter W. Sinclair— _
Norman William Duff —
Betty-Lou Edwards
Helen Agnes Klassen	
Paul Garth Harrison	
Brian John Harvey _	
Craig Henry B. Leitch	
Jane Margaret Woollends .
Robert Michael Couch	
Richard Gregory C. Johnston
Ronald Gary McCaig	
Philip Douglas Townsend	
Grade XIII
James Andrew Finlay	
Alison Patricia Bunning.
Sharon Kathleen Woodhouse.
Barbara Lynn Blakely 	
Evi Rosin   	
Lynn Diane Husted 	
Charles Ross Goodwin  	
Terrence Lyle Crockford _	
Roy Meredith Grout. 	
Adrian Stoutjesdyk 	
Sir Winston Churchill
Oak Bay Senior 	
Delbrook Senior 	
Crofton House	
Lord Byng  	
L. V. Rogers Senior	
Shawnigan Lake	
Windermere  _
Max Cameron Senior —
Queen Elizabeth Senior..
St. Ann's Academy	
John Oliver __	
Shawnigan Lake _
Grand Forks  	
Handsworth   .-.-— 	
Little Flower Academy .
Burnaby South Senior-
Victoria Senior  	
Delta       ...	
North Vancouver Senior
Sparwood —       	
Sir Winston Churchill —
Prince George Senior
Burnaby Central Senior ._.
Mount View Senior ... —
North Vancouver Senior ..
Delbrook Senior	
Little Flower Academy	
Victoria Senior	
Kelowna 	
Lester Pearson Senior.
George Pringle  —
Esquimau Senior
Lester Pearson Senior .....
Queen Elizabeth	
Queen Elizabeth	
Lord Byng   —
Oak Bay Senior	
West Vancouver 	
Crofton House 	
Point Grey   	
Summerland 	
Mount View Senior .
George Elliott _	
North Vancouver.
West Vancouver...
Kamloops	
J. Lloyd Crowe ....
Vernon Senior	
Magee  	
J. Lloyd Crowe.	
Alberni District	
West Vancouver ...
Chilliwack Senior..
96.250
95
95
94
94,
93,
93,
93,
92,
92
92
92
92
92
92
92
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91,
91
91,
90.
90,
90,
90,
90.
90,
90,
90,
90,
90
90
90
90
90
500
250
500
500
750
250
OOO
.750
.500
500
500
250
250
250
250
.750
.750
,500
.500
.250
,250
,250
,250
.250
.000
000
,000
000
000
750
750
750
500
500
500
250
250
250
250
,000
000
000
,000
92.900
91.500
91.000
89.200
89.000
86.800
86.500
86.300
85.600
85.100
 F 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to high-school graduates, Grade XIII students,
and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College. To
qualify to receive an award in 1966, candidates must be domiciled in the Province,
are required to apply, and must undertake a full-year winter-session undergraduate
programme (at least two continuous semesters) at the University of British Columbia, or University of Victoria, or Simon Fraser University, or in Grade XIII in public secondary schools of the Province, or approved full-year winter-session undergraduate programmes at the Notre Dame University of Nelson, or at the British
Columbia Institute of Technology, or at the Vancouver City College, or at Selkirk
College. Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final examinations of
Grade XII or Grade XIII or of the Universities of British Columbia or Victoria or
Simon Fraser or Notre Dame or the British Columbia Institute of Technology or of
Vancouver City College. There are two awards: first class, for all students who
obtain an average of 80 per cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and
second class, available for up to 3,500 top-ranking students with high second-class
standing. The second-class awards are divided among Grade XII (University Programme), Grade XIII, and Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser,
or Notre Dame undergraduate students, British Columbia Institute of Technology
students, and Vancouver City College students, and among the various faculties and
groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class awards amount to one-half
the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate study, and second-class awards
similarly to one-third the tuition fee. An average of at least 70 per cent, subject to
minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for a second-class award.
Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
has continued similarly annually, with an increase in 1963 from 2,000 to 2,500 for
second-class awards, in 1965 from 2,500 to 2,750, in 1966 to 3,500, and with
broader provision made this year for awards for study to be taken at Selkirk College.
Candidates writing University Programme or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, and university and college students through
their respective institutions. All applications are then considered by the Scholarship
Selection Committee, representative of the public universities of British Columbia
and the Department of Education, chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all
candidates is made from the Registrar's office. Until 1966 cheques were issued
through the Departmental Comptroller, but a voucher system was introduced in 1966.
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based
on applications received:—
Examination Year
Original Applications
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Final Awards
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59..
1959/60.
1960/61.
1961/62-
1962/63 .
1963/64.
1964/65.
1965/66...
2,703
3,466
4,223
4,488
4,929
5,647
6,008
6,511
1,860
2,300
2,557
2,871
3,210
3,464
3,893
4,701
552
635
703
771
896
931
1,064
1,286
1,308
1,665
1,854
2,100
2,314
2,533
2,829
3,415
1,782
2,192
2,437
2,727
3,067
3,339
3,783
531
612
677
739
870
898
1,037
1,251
1,580
1,760
1,988
2,197
2,441
2,746
$229,175.16
276,513.32
304,117.00
336,472.00
383,479.00
474,513.00
621,483.30
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
University Programme Examinations
F 121
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent) 	
268
337
271
298
492
403
313
554
506
354
550
383
399
557
458
393
631
539
552
636
595
534
605
502
876
1,193
1,373
1,287
1,414
1,563
1,783
1,641
Grade XIII Examinations
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)—.
Ineligible	
Total applications..
26
104
100
230
37
133
170
340
33
169
271
473
37
213
279
529
51
173
261
485
54
186
297
46
207
347
537
600
37
219
253
509
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates were provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
In 1965, using I.B.M. tabulations, lists were distributed showing all scholarship candidates in the school district, arranged by schools. Successful candidates were arranged in academic rank and non-successful candidates alphabetically.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake
further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $70 to $120. These awards may be made available to
those undertaking undergraduate university and college studies within the Province
(Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre Dame, and
Selkirk College and Vancouver City College), recognized nurse's training in the
Province, and for recognized university study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available in this Province; for example, veterinary
science. All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the universities and chaired by the Registrar,
determine awards. Notification to all candidates is made from this office, with
cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959.  ..
I960....	
821
1,071
1,395
1,426
1,886
2,411
3,057
3,863
693
904
1,171
1,199
1,619
1,966
2,501
3,184
653
865
1,125
1,168
1,574
1,924
2,444
—
$82,650
113,465
1961    	
1962	
133,145
140,285
1963	
152,680
1964	
190,725
1965
231,815
1966	
 F 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance, with
a further significant change for 1964/65 with the introduction of the Canada Student
Loans Plan. In 1959, by amendment to the British Columbia University Act, authority was given for establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to $2,000,-
000. A joint committee composed of two representatives of the university and two
representatives of the Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the
Departmental Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no
longer provides loans. Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate
training at the public universities of the Province and the Vancouver School of Art,
or recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such
training is not available in British Columbia. Loan awards from this plan have been
as follows:—
For Year
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
Number of Awards
   843
   842
   875
   694
.   844
6
2
Totals
4,106
Amount
$397,570
435,130
475,186
389,378
457,239
2,650
1,800
$2,158,953
IV. The Canada Student Loans Plan was introduced for 1964/65 by the
Federal Government in co-operation with the Provincial Governments. Each
participating Province appoints a Provincial authority responsible for issuing a
certificate of eligibility to any student who is authorized to receive a loan. The
British Columbia Student Aid Loan Committee acts for this Province, authorizing
such certificate for students with acceptable qualifications to undertake approved
post-secondary training at institutions designated by this Province as specified
educational institutions for the purposes of the plan. Students must be undertaking
a minimum 26-week year of training to qualify. Amounts of loan authorized are
dependent upon need. The British Columbia committee considers applications of
bona fide British Columbia students, although training, both undergraduate and
graduate, may be undertaken within or outside the Province at specified institutions.
Loans are interest-free to students during training but become interest-bearing after
completion or cessation of training. In any loan year a maximum of $1,000 may
be authorized to a maximum of $5,000 over total training. On receipt of a certificate
of eligibility, a student may commence negotiation for a loan from any chartered
bank or approved lending institution of his choice, with loan to be made when the
student is duly registered and in attendance at the educational institution.
Annually the Federal Government determines the maximum dollar amount
which is available for loan awards for that loan year for each Province, generally
based on the number of persons aged 18 to 24 years, inclusive, in the Province as
compared with the same age-group for the country as a whole. Supplementary
allowances were granted by Canada each year.   The following awards were made:—
Year Number of Awards Amount
1964/65   5,074 $3,110,751
1965/66   7,924 5,043,511
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
F 123
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp
at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets
attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district super-
intendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by
the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
six on 1960/61, five on 1961/62, five on 1962/63, five on 1963/64, six on
1964/65, and six on 1965/66.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for
Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates
authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the number of certificates issued
were as follows: 1955,57; 1956,62; 1957,16; 1958,18; 1959,10; 1960,17;
1961, 10;  1962, 40;  1963, 7;  1964, 30;  1965, 30.
 F 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. VERNA KINGSLEY, SECRETARY
TO THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1965/66 a total of 447 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, 173 were turned down, the chief reason being that
family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes. Two
hundred and seventy-four applications were approved for grants, a decrease of 71
over the previous year.
It should be recorded that, although the cost-of-living index has increased
steadily each year, the ceiling under which grants are paid has remained the same
as in 1963.
The students for whom assistance was granted were distributed by grades as
follows: Grade IX, 57; Grade X, 80; Grade XI, 68; Grade XIII, 61; Occupational II and III, 8.
During the year, 13 students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $126.65 for the year; the
balance received $111.65.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
 F 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
715
218
354
111
361
107
Sub-totals      .              	
933
186
22
45
249
253
13
465
91
11
21
119
121
6
468
95
11
24
130
132
7
20
6
8
82
27
3
	
13
3
7
88
40
4
15
Elementary—■
Elko                 	
5
4
79
48
Waldo                                    -                -     	
2
582
1,701
753
334
475
549
23
495
398
26
278
834
384
177
250
291
13
265
213
9
304
867
369
157
225
258
10
230
185
17
32
134
142
155
126
146
70
86
3
77
52
6
138
Totals
153
District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
	
68
70
12
70
69
3
Elementary—■
54
66
4
T M Roberts
59
48
2
<n*M"ta!**
1,966
3,053
455
689
272
92
119
247
67
11
16
559
1,041
1,602
264
358
132
45
65
139
39
9
8
286
925
1,451
191
331
140
47
54
108
28
2
8
273
166
166
292
292
	
294
294
	
.....
53
14
50
29
10
3
3
44
233
Total"
233
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Elementary—
48
12
48
39
11
42
30
21
41
3
Ta Ta Creek
             1
2
6
51
2
62
1,383
2,527
359
104
84
723
1,345
182
51
51
660
1,182
177
53
33
216
216
206
206
203
Totals
203
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—David Thompson	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
	
	
24
12
11
188
22
34
14
223
63
12
52
42
87
102
12
20
7
114
25
5
26
18
43
86
10
14
7
109
38
7
26
24
44
24
3
13
2
27
14
3
10
11
12
5
12
2
39
16
2
7
7
10
11
Elementary-
	
7
9
3
24
	
12
Mineral King     _ -	
3
	
13
4
  |       14
15
549
1,096
605
271
715
270
554
311
141
385
279
542
294
130
330
	
97
121
100
112
90
Totals           	
101
District No. 7 (Nelson)
	
 ENROLMENT
STATISTICAL RETURNS
F   127
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
	
67
91
71
83
41
13
8
11
	
63
32
85
42
88
37
51
33
60
33
24
20
67
8
1
9
34
4
91
15
1
8
~55
71
26
6
9
38
124
13
11
8
11
	
95
25
127
25
125
19
84
93
24
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~~ 20
18
48
123
76
71
4
74
49
4
64
170
53
150
30
62
71
66
4
11
24
15
15
8
10
11
8
5
120
152
223
144
185
~93
117
24
44
124
84
161
37
64
69
75
28
7
252
81
69
___.
	
	
	
	
	
	
18
18
14
5
278  1     243
203
233
224
224
15
30
8
14
5
16
252
188
161
219
117
191
278
41
20
~30
11
1
2
82
280
46
16
_ 27
7
4
3
97
10
223
185
34
198
44
11
71
15
187
42
31
10
	
	
15
91
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
118
	
19
19
187
187
12
7
200
200
14
16
201
201
142
213
26
6
22
9
9
14
12
16
7
188
74
7
10
187
71
6
10
232
73
219
46
191
43
11
15
7
12
19
	
19
7
2
28
21
1
6
6
10
30
5
43
2
8
8
9
31
28
	
	
17
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
47
1
8
6
18
15
	
11
	
	
	
	
	
81
100
75
105
80
111
26
80
49
82
  1 	
91
73
121
33
96
46
211
43
43
222
38
51
7
12
2
18
7
87
	
	
1     4
8
1
1
9
44
247
57
255
	
*
 F 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 7 (Nelson)—Continued	
Elementary—
139
34
121
48
497
497
54
111
129
337
379
30
70
65
16
60
31
244
258
25
62
69
158
200
14
38
74
18
61
17
253
239
29
49
60
179
179
16
32
27
3
15
9
63
55
15
14
23
49
52
5
9
24
4
19
10
55
60
16
15
25
32
36
6
7
15
7
64
60
22
9
Hume   	
51
68
North Shore                                    	
11
	
15
13
35
55
67
38
W. R. Wasson
6
Ymir
14
Sub-totals	
2,446
4,037
122
163
190
1,240
2,077
61
85
97
1,206
1,960
61
78
93
214
214
339
339
309
309
10
336
Totals        .     ..   .            	
336
District No. 8 (Slocan)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
15
W. F Graham
13
475
23
65
100
21
26
34
44
51
17
51
243
11
37
53
10
14
16
26
30
6
29
232
12
28
47
11
12
18
18
21
11
22
	
15
10
20
7
12
7
6
9
7
10
5
4
4
6
7
6
7
13
Elementary—■
Appledale  ...
	
7
10
	
10
8
2
	
9
7
Winlaw	
11
8
432
907
796
232
77
51
172
16
352
41
18
230
190
410
75
176
232
475
433
102
41
19
84
8
177
20
9
128
101
212
39
90
200
432
363
130
36
32
88
8
175
21
9
102
89
198
36
86
	
78
93
50
60
12
3
32
8
4
50
40
73
20
33
61
74
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
	
21
Elementary—
17
Brilliant
34
8
3
50
35
86
33
33
30
	
4
31
Ootischenia 	
6
2
34
34
35
22
Woodland Park  —
28
Sub-totals                                 	
1,808
2,836
177
56
59
50
58
115
316
928
1,463
77
26
29
22
36
58
157
880
1,373
100
30
30
28
22
57
159
303
303
9
13
3
24
43
275
275
10
15
14
23
30
243
Totals                                  	
243
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Needles	
Elementary—
Burton     	
41
13
12
25
33
598
831
302
405
296
426
41
41
92
92
92
92
83
83
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 129
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
22
3
24
8
65
64
12
12
22
69
41
6
8
33
7
25
7
83
65
18
6
16
5
77
68
	
	
4
	
	
	
—
	
	
39
57
25
39
	
	
	
19
22
52
37
4
9
11
24
33
51
3
11
	
	
	
	
	
15
15
	
	
12
	
15
356
356
16
363
363
323
323
176
307
27
34
28
15
15
291
30
29
23
312
16
27
18
"250
18
20
19
~254
17
16
11
260
14
11
6
15
12
7
20
10
51
""IT
8
11
20
16
9
7
16
11
8
10
16
6
9
12
8
9
20
6
12
17
89
7
8
11
82
61
57
44
31
	
14
	
17
	
	
	
8
9
8
5
8
	
	
	
4
5
8
4
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
70
86
4
"~ 72
2
63
5
3
45
29
78
89
10
70
3
50
5
4
41
31
27
64
84
... 1 	
7
11
-
82
61
209
57
199
~~44
178
31
156
31
89
8
5
11
	
38
13
23
	
232
	
28
	
	
	
_—
	
4
49
9
2
10
21
93
'	
80
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
109
	
31
	
	
24
	
14
254
254
7
9
9
16
26
241
241
14
12
27
30
248
248
	
217
217
13
13
232
49
14
209
36
15
178
28
8
14
11
5
199
39
7
156
25
3
38
-___
18
	
9
1
	
	
	
	
8
	
	
	
	
62
51
67
67
83
83
88
88
52
61
	
	
63
51
46
~36
	
28
 F 130
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 11 (Trail)
1,237
606
575
749
20
251
48
199
363
574
350
212
223
84
567
676
307
273
394
11
118
26
99
167
292
187
121
126
41
303
561
299
302
355
9
133
22
100
196
282
163
91
97
43
264
82
5
44
11
40
48
72
55
30
28
12
63
	
84
7
31
12
46
47
83
51
27
31
10
68
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Rossland        _ 	
67
Elementary—■
8
49
	
11
46
31
	
67
60
27
33
Tadanac.	
16
64
2,891
6,058
446
43
636
123
1,491
3,141
225
26
319
53
1,400
2,917
221
17
317
70
413
497
8
90
408
490
412
	
479
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
Elementary—
4
71
23
12
77
John A. Hutton  	
  |       18
33
802
1,248
275
78
106
398
623
132
43
51
404
625
143
35
55
  1     116
98
98
25
10
22
122
116
24
5
11
122
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
Elementary Senior Secondary—Greenwood	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
26
7
9
■184
51
6
72
27
94
29
4
37
14
90
22
2
35
13
	
16
8
5
5
32
5
1
8
5
16
Elementary—
8
1
Kettle Valley                 —             ~     	
5
Westbridge	
5
156
615
688
636
85
747
84
310
340
341
40
390
72
305
348
295
45
357
	
18
58
76
6
105
19
76
63
14
103
19
61
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos	
Elementary—
61
13
90
832
2,156
1,181
573
625
430
1,111
605
290
325
402
1,045
576
283
300
111
187
48
32
117
■180
53
33
103
	
164
District No. 15 (Penticton)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
McNicoll Park        	
46
31
Sub-totals  	
Elementary—
1,198
398
98
115
542
509
102
145
615
218
55
58
280
276
57
74
583
180
43
57
262
233
45
71
	
80
55
15
17
65
74
14
14
86
58
18
16
71
72
21
14
77
47
13
14
64
Queen's Park —    -	
62
16
28
1,909
4,288
1,018
2,238
891
2,050
254
334
270
356
244
321
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 131
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
	
"~ 87
	
16
il
5
13
1
12
2
297
99
83
415
367
350
105
273
114
92
63
42
14
39
59
80
63
40
35
17
63
121
110
63
78
79
89
65
13
52
29
56
	
	
	
....
	
28
60
74
49
49
31
15
82
16
55
74
72
39
34
14
104
	
30
	
	
	
31
	
	
*
—
	
	
13
	
110
30
452
515
417
504
448
500
282
513
29
45
	
479
97
479
85
494
94
456
93
415
64
43
16
14
14
13
105
6
73
24
3
89
25
10
91
15
16
114
	
	
	
	
16
103
103
25
117
117
17
101
101
29
114
114
26
29
15
15
	
 13
4
97
15
27
22
~~93
16
64
16
16
85
27
27
3
	
	
12
9
	
	
	
12
6
16
1
9
6
12
6
29
6
2
	
■ *
	
	
27
2
il
27
6
16
	
	
4
1
26
5
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
60
78
13
101
24
50
36
65
8
63
62
15
103
3
18
6
4
18
3
45
139
62
6
60
87
65
116
50
~~16
112
16
150
14
34
50
l'l
105
57
13
110
6
13
17
	
	
13
114
192
116
166
44
25
123
180
118
180
	
35
37
17
23
~14
19
18
10
152
106
126
130
"iii
217
148
~150
314
13
24
15
201
121
140
114
112
325
34
54
45
41
36
34
	
	
	
86
55
16
18
88
66
10
24
69
61
15
10
71
84
13
16
70
64
9
19
80
61
16
20
72
58
12
21
72
74
12
29
17
10
	
254
256
148
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
6
	
	
	
20
277
363
270
339
269
339
278
350
27
27
15
10
375
~365
325
20
19
362
314
54
 F 132
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
23
7
29
23
10
28
Grade
III
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
Secondary—Similkameen	
Elementary—
Cawston   	
Hedley-
Keremeos..
Sub-totalS-
Totals	
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Princeton..—
Elementary-
Allison Pass	
Coalmont	
Tulameen	
Sub-totals _
Totals	
District No. 18 (Golden)
-Golden..
Secondary-
Elementary-Senior Secondary-
Elementary—
Alexander Park..
-Field..
Columbia Valley..
Donald	
Golden	
Nicholson	
Sub-totals-
Totals	
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke..
Elementary—
Albert Canyon	
Arrowhead	
Beaton — 	
Big Eddy..
Farwell	
Mica	
Mountain View..
Selkirk	
Twelve Mile	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
District No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
Senior Secondary—Salmon Arm	
Junior Secondary—J. L. Jackson	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Eagle River  	
North Shuswap	
Sub-totals  	
Elementary—■
Carlin	
Deep Creek..
Falkland	
Gleneden—
Malakwa	
Mount Ida	
North Broadview_
North Canoe	
Notch Hill	
Salmon Arm	
Salmon Arm West-
Silver Creek	
South Broadview-
South Canoe	
Sub-totals.-
Totals	
269
126
60
236
422
691
735
25
760
356
121
150
114
46
474
125
909
1,386
582
14
33
19
75
289
77
486
295
14
1,302
1,884
457
614
351
161
512
217
18
121
49
75
50
51
166
16
589
87
65
199
105
1,808
3,391
129
67
31
122
220
349
379
14
393
184
68
81
69
20
227
62
459
711
309
18
10
36
154
38
244
161
6
675
984
240
321
192
86
278
112
11
59
26
30
29
24
92
8
295
52
39
93
54
924
1,763
140
59
29
114
37
202
342
356
11
367
172
53
69
45
26
247
63
450
675
273
6
15
9
39
135
39
242
134
627
900
217
293
159
75
234
105
7
62
23
45
21
27
74
8
294
35
26
106
51
884
1,628
68
68
81
58
5
63
18
21
22
7
64
31
145
163
3
6
5
22
69
19
98
3
225
225
59
59
65
2
2
1
5
70
63
24
142
151
3
7
2
14
48
10
105
1
190
190
55
38
5
23
12
12
11
10
26
3
80
20
11
32
20
38
29
2
16
9
10
6
4
18
4
72
11
10
31
16
303
358
238
276
15
10
26
51
51
62
1
1
2
66
18
18
18
9
63
31
139
157
3
6
5
17
59
12
92
 3_
197
197
28
17
45
24
8
14
4
13
5
6
23
5
70
9
7
24
21
233
278
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 133
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIU
18
10
26
17
11
24
12
5
25
9
	
	
51
66
55
47
41
18
7
27
	
14
	
	
	
14
52
52
52
54
54
56
1
2
52
52
62
42
42
49
	
	
51
62
66
48
47
33
41
44
14
9
12
 ~"
55
54
9
1
	
3
.1
3
1
	
	
	
	
	
4
56
10
25
12
5
51
24
3
59
11
11
17
8
60
15
3
65
1
50
9
12
7
1
4
48
80
7
54
74
6
_ 33
47
2
"~44
40
4
7
62
97
13
11
38
17
9
66
12
11
7
z-
	
	
89
18
	
	
	
117
127
3
5
2
10
22
7
107
3
111
122
130
141
100
112
4
1
25
25
—
4
no
149
80
124
44
78
7
3
4
5
87
111
49
108
2
2
2
	
3'
2
12
38
8
114
	
20
	
	
■14
39
12
115
9
130
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
3
	
	
14
159
159
178
178
175
175
144
144
20
20
5
149
199
29
12
Ill
184
39
10
~T_4
108
200
78
176
15
3
14
3
14
4
81
31
12
10
11
196
25
14
34
23
....
41
12
23
16
___
26
9
 —
43
25
3
19
6
9
5
9
18
4
59
14
10
26
12
57
37
13
7
10
6
10
20
53
42
39
22
11
5
8
10
34
	
	
41
12
49
39
35
18
	
	
.
13
6
13
7
12
27
51
8
17
21
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
	
	
15
70
12
10
29
17
75
13
	
	
	
	
	
36
	
	
	
15
219
262
241
298
236
289
214
253
16
16
14
10
1
11
12
252
233
235
15
235
194
81
 F 134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
345
352
207
175
181
113
170
171
94
80
87
Elementary—
79
T pn W  Wood
Totals
559
904
86
184
809
294
469
48
92
402
265
435
38
92
407
	
80
80
87
87
79
79
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Secondary—
993
920
154
641
54
301
540
87
431
114
263
37
491
494
463
74
326
25
149
280
41
225
58 '
129
26
246
499
457
80
315
29
152
260
46
206
56
134
11
245
	
20
77
11
67
79
17
74
15
61
13
68
23
58
9
44
73
12
72
20
59
9
74
Elementary—
21
65
10
37
70
20
61
13
Silver Star
61
South R X.
6
77
Snh-totals
3,113
5,112
520
268
211
1,511
336
1,579
2,584
256
139
112
772
164
1,534
2,528
264
129
99
739
172
502
502
453
453
441
Tntals
	
441
District No. 23 (Kelowna)
Secondary—
2,846
420
189
33
21
124
170
117
67
159
403
145
57
459
124
222
96
54
17
128
106
101
400
442
61
244
211
111
240
1,443
214
92
22
13
65 1
91
59
36
88
204
77
29
232 '
63
112
53
32
11
61
49
51
198
219
32
127
112
61
127
1,403
206
97
11
8
59
79
58
31
71
199
68
28
227
61
110
43
22
6
67
57
50
202
223
29
117
99
50
113
	
54
14
11
2
64
19
11
17
49
36
28
15
13
6
20
4
35
22
12
45
58
33
38
24
25
Elementary—
73
20
7
8
60
13
14
32
64
37
29
14
17
10
18
5
53
18
16
69
65
25
38
30
25
34
53
18
8
11
De Hart
10
	
13
80
58
29
17
42
9
16
8
40
13
11
63
58
17
South Rutland               - _
31
23
West Futland
23
Winfield
30
Sub-totals
4,921
7,767
2,530
3,973
2,391
3,794
794
794
660
660
681
Totals	
681
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 135
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
98
72
5
8
4
71
86
73
50
48
8
69
66
	
98
98
77
77
66
66
72
72
	
5
71
54
	
8
4
86
43
73
50
29
324
48
16
294
86
	
	
42
191
	
	
23
5
54
373
43
357
233
150
353
310
22
122
19
12
19
69
12
39
71
9
51
18
41
9
67
34
82
4
40
75
16
53
14
41
76
15
101
8
37
87
13
54
15
48
	
	
	
	
37
85
	
	
	
	
.
	
ZZ
	
11
55
19
—
	
	
64
65
59
405
405
435
435
394
394
405
405
19
19
23
43
310
69
35
243
43
59
12
5
427
181
43
55
286
99
400
159
71
49
277
77
383
129
62
49
256
91
353
51
23
23
288
26
86
	
	
	
	
15
14
89
_ —
... . 1 	
43
15
14
664
633
587
411
390
89
57
18
7
58
39
62
45
63
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
42
16
8
61
43
43
20
10
46
39
11
39
	
	
	
	
	
30
rrz
	
	
	
50
100
17
34
22
18
10
53
55
~~40
22
13
37
53
68
	
30
	
	
109
16
36
80
19
41
14
140
21
	
	
39
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
18
16
61
54
19
48
22
16
36
17
15
60
49
21
49
103
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
42
35
10
39
	
4
30
39
7
	
	
	
46
696
696
641
641
684
684
682
682
37
37
633
587
411
46
43
15
14
664
390
89
 F 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Secondary—
Kamloops .
North Kamloops..
Sub-totals .	
Junior Secondary—John Peterson	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chase-
Elementary—
Adams Lake 	
Allan Matthews	
Arthur Hatton	
Arthur Stevenson..
Barnhart Vale	
Beattie	
Ben Edwards..
Brocklehurst ...
Dallas	
Deadmans Creek-
George Hilliard—
George Slater	
Heffley Creek	
J. E. Fitzwater	
John Tod	
Lloyd George	
Mission Flats	
Monte Lake	
North Kamloops...
Pritchard	
Ralph Bell	
Rayleigh — _
Savona 	
Stuart Wood	
Trapp Lake	
Valleyview	
Westsyde	
Westwold	
Sub-totals _
Totals	
District No. 25 (Barriere)
Secondary—Barriere  	
Elementary—
Barriere .
Brennan Creek-
Chinook Cove...
Chu Chua	
Little Fort	
Louis Creek	
Sub-totalS-
Totals	
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Clearwater—
Elementary—
Avola  	
Birch Island._
Blue River	
Dutch Lake -
Star Lake	
Vavenby	
Sub-totals.
Totals	
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—
Williams Lake    	
100 Mile House.
Sub-totals ...
945
1,336
2,281
796
575
11
482
555
192
11
278
371
373
158
8
541
142
53
53
453
505
23
47
629
22
165
126
129
256
8
298
150
74
6,113
9,765
157
198
18
20
13
46
53
348
505
304
49
41
74
128
77
47
416
720
748
337
512
689
433
647
1,201
430
281
240
304
107
5
152
189
190
75
3
278
56
30
31
243
264
14
25
319
9
85
72
62
134
7
162
89
33
3,186
5,098
78
105
5
12
7
21
28
178
256
165
33
16
47
79
40
20
235 |
400 |
379
169
1,080
366
294
3
242
251
85
6
126
182
183
83
5
263
86
23
22
210
241
9
22
310
13
80
54
67
122
1
136
61
41
2,927
4,667
79
93
13
8
6
25
25
170
249
139
16
25
27
49
37
27
181
320
369
168
39
39
45
3
69
98
36
2
46
65
83
18
3
92
25
17
51 j
3
69
80
35
4
42
65
58
22
3
76
25
10
63
59
6
12
128
7
21
21
29
36
2
45
23
17
62
67
8
5
77
6
31
14 |
20
38
1
39
19
9
1,026
1,071
40
3
5
1
6
939
63
63
10
6
19
33
20
52
52
38
10
9
14
96
96
56
94
1,085 |
I
548
537
43
5
72
100
36
2
32
56
65
23
67
29
7
73
66
6
5
81
9
23
13
9
29
4
50
25
11
898
941
29
33
1
3
4
3
1
4
10
5
1
9
57
57
12
5
12
34
9
9
81
81
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 137
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
DC
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIH
319
254
269
282
239
131
118
	
32
340
297
50
64
55
15
45
32
32
17
4
340
356
40
297
345
40
573
26
551
370
118
~56
50
4
28
5
72
57
68
65
18
27
16
16
51
84
28
60
73
24
~~-8
58
50
27
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
	
	
37
51
65
23
1
73
37
8
62
66
3
9
100
38
44
52
22
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
1
106
	
	
	
	
	
	
  .
	
68
26
11
~ 69
69
6
78
59
	
— ..
	
23
30
	
13
48
101
63
77
	
	
	
	
	
5
70
5
63
	
	
16
16
__.__
	
	
27
16
13
42
1
45
27
6
23
15
29
40
27
27
10
29
13
20
19
42
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
42
20
16
44
21
6
33
15
9
	
	
	
71
875
947
842
898
754
811
31
700
750
35
3
59
59
54
33
578
35
71
53
736
43
682
40
599
26
386
13
118
30
4
2
9
_-.
6
2
8
29
	
	
1
	
2
3
8
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.
	
1
45
45
48
48
37
7
7
5
13
10
44
44
38
38
48
	
43
51
40
38
13
17
1
26
32
35
24
	
11
8
4
8
9
33
9
8
6
6
9
28
9
6
	
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
71
71
42
79
64
64
6
54
	
H
16
8
~~ 32
145
77
"~24
112
50
51
183
93
38
206
76
17
72
41
14
  .
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
14
	
276
282
222
162
113
r
 F 138
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)—Continued
Elementary—
11
40
15
13
11
16
59
65
86
14
72
203
10
17
30
14
99
9
233
92
104 '
11
33
17
53
36
15
13
12
108
47
172
22
119
12
57
525
40
344
103
46
8
13
10
5
4
6
30
40
47
8
36
100
8 '
9
15
7
52
6
119
49
54
6
15
7
35
19
10
7
8
49
22
84
12
58
6
32
262
21
172
54
31
3
27
5
8
7
10
29
25
39
6
36
103
2
8
15
7
47
3
114
43
50
5
18
10
18
17
5
6
4
59
25
88
10
61
6
25
263
19
172
49
15
3
10
1
3
6
10
5
17
2
24
46
2
3
6
2
18
2
42
15
10
2
9
2
9
7
2
1
1
29
12
32
8
23
1
11
75
8
52
-19
4
2
7
3
4
12
6
8
3
8
36
4
2
7
2
19
4
40
14
16
3
7
2
4
4
1
2
17
6
31
3
19
2
14
71
4
55
17
8
1
2
2
2
1
1
9
	
8
13
2
11
28
3
5
2
11
1
31
14
18
2
2
4
9
3
2
2
1
26
9
Poplar Glade    —   	
27
4
26
5
7
46
Wright Station
7
60
lin Mile
15
93 Mile      -	
9
2,998
4,083
694
385
153
1,536
2,084
342
168
83
1,462
1,999
352
217
70
534
534
467
467
21
431
Totals          .               	
431
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Wells-Barkerville _ — 	
17
26
538
19
50
15
331
57
175
193
131
385
95
54
41
23
22
17
61
9
251
9
28
5
160
37
98
102
72
187
48
27
20
14
12
4
35
6
287
10
22
10
171
20
77
91
59
198
47
27
21
9
10
13
26
3
	
17
8
14
4
62
21
28
32
15
54
18
15
6
8
4
10
1
21
3
10
4
54
12
21
30
16
53
16
14
7
~5
4
11
2
26
Elementary—
1
11
3
61
20
36
19
51
14
6
3
1
7
2
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 139
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
1
4
5
2
5
1
4
1
6
8
13
2
15
31
1
4
3
4
11
26
9
11
1
9
2
10
4
5
2
4
12
4
23
2
23
1
12
49
4
44
14
3
4
9
3
2
6
	
	
1
6
	
2
3
	
	
	
	
1
2
4
| 	
	
	
2
6
9
11
3
7
34
1
2
1
3
17
2
39
15
17
1
6
4
14
11
1
3
4
14
6
33
2
19
2
8
63
6
38
12
3
2
8
10
14
1 	
6
9
10
2
7
27
1
1
5
1
11
.._.-..
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
1
2
3
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
36
9
12
2
1
7
7
3
1
19
11
20
	
	
	
5
	
	
	
-	
	
	
	
1
	
	
1
	
	
	
1
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
10
26
3
9
1
5
45
6
44
11
7
	
	
	
	
	
15
4
	
	
13
148
5
41
15
12
	
	
	
6
	
	
	
20
20
431
431
7
383
383
22
359
359
334
334
65
11
19
19
16
11
14
8
19
6
14
290
164
102
18
6
288
103
133
12
222
139
60
7
162
142
113
127
	
	
12
	
7
3
7
4
56
12
20
21
17
55
9
10
6
4
6
1
22
4
8
12
76
	
11
8
6
120
7
145
67
	
	
44
30
32
20
53
8
13
5
6
-
12
42
12
28
24
26
55
18
12
7
4
4
10
	
	
ZZ
	
28
18
18
50
12
_.__
	
	
	
	
14
__.-.
—
	
	
-
—
13
	
...
	
3
	
—
	
1
2 1 	
—
 F 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 28 (Quesnel)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Pinecrest...      .          ...
135
16
215
91
278
65
71
7
118
49
137
35
64
9
97
42
141
30
	
18
10
35
17
34
13
16
6
45
17
51
5
18
•Red Rl,iff                                                                              _ 	
23
Rich Bar
9
42
12
2,478
3,710
214
217
27
67
396
35
58
1,281
1,874
115
113
15
34
202
21
30
1,197
1,836
99
104
12
33
194
14
28
	
427
444
33
7
7
46
6
20
402
423
28
4
4
27
6
25
339
Totals                                      	
365
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
	
28
Elementary—
5
55
15
54
Pavilion"                                                            - —
Riverview
4
Sub-totals 	
583
1,014
154
407
405
302
530
80
197
194
281
484
74
210
211
55
55
86
119
36
38
66
94
28
39
78
Totals                                                    	
106
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
38
45
812
25
190
26
8
304
33
45
49
391
15
91
17
1
157
18
21
23
421
10
99
9
7
147
15
24
26
	
74
4
41
2
1
44
5
10
13
67
4
31
8
83
Elementary—
2
25
	
2
2
36
5
9
9
37
Scotty Creek
4
7
70 Mile House                                                	
7
Sub-totals -     —
Totals                         .      ..                 	
680
1,646
568
123
10
139
336
13
15
484
207
38
343
814
286
70
6
77
160
7
7
244
95
28
337
832
282
53
4
62
176
6
8
240
112
10
	
120
194
28
1
24
63
2
1
75
48
6
102
169
32
1
23
63
1
1
56
32
5
86
169
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt...      —
Elementary—
22
3
Collettville    	
27
57
2
	
2
67
29
	
5
1,365
1,933
454
205
568
31
72
171
41
88
694
980
245
124
304
17
34
88
23
46
671
953
209
81
264
14
38
83
18
42
	
248
248
214
214
17
83
3
12
17
6
17
214
Totals                        	
214
District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
22
90
6
15
23
8
17
26
Elementary—■
58
15
62
Flood 	
5
North Bend —	
17
21
Sf Elmo
11
Yale   	
9
Sub-totals    -    	
971
1,630
512
881
459
749
73
73
159
181
138
155
125
Totals
151
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 141
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
15
25
15
51
ill
15
24
11
33
9
19
34
39
11
34
	
	
	
	
	
 *
	
24
11
33
15
	
—_
	
 .
	
	
13
348
355
346
368
25
2
9
59
4
320
332
25
4
13
41
6
262
338
17
1
6
47
5
14
14
14
11
6
I
5
25
3
7
291
63
11
206
38
13
127
14
13
248
49
12
142
36
4
.
21
4
13
53
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
13
74
95
36
36
74
99
29
29
64
89
59
76
14
14
I
7
~7
74
51
40
31
61
25
36
29
51
21
28
20
14
17
26
12
13
6
6
~9
5
12
40
15
28
15
17
35
26
30
51
	
10
8
	
27
72
6
20
9
3
21
5
6
8
58
3
30
2
32
6
6
8
61
3
17
3
1
51
8
7
4
81
3
26
9
8
7
71
65
48
43
38
	
	
	
1
48
	
18
17
 *
.	
	
	
	
18
45
78
150
87
145
17
1
13
37
2
1
49
18
5
94
155
78
159
9
36
3
4
81
13
17
17
15
22
20
14
14
8
122
136
90
117
69
122
58
93
55
56
 .
24
3
25
46
2
1
54
31
8
1
18
34
1
5
70
21
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
16
15
—_
	
	
31
194
194
19
64
9
8
20
5
15
143
143
14
68
4
9
22
4
17
159
159
18
62
4
11
24
7
13
146
146
16
16
2
22
10
14
9
8
5
136
112
24
117
86
25
122
99
3
56
78
4
31
93
55
2
	
31
69
10
	
	
	
29
	
	
	
10
10
!
121
140
1
124
138
,121
139
98
129
2
2
10
~   9
"1
136
Ill
102
__.-.
82
	
 F 142
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total        Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Secondary—
Chilliwack-
Sardis	
District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
Sub-totals ...
Junior Secondary—
A. D. Rundle	
Chilliwack	
Rosedale	
Sub-totals.-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Yarrow..
Elementary—
Atchelitz	
Bernard	
Camp River-
Chadsey..
Cheam  	
Chilliwack Central-
Cultus Lake	
East Chilliwack	
Evans	
F. G. Leary	
Fairfield Island-
Greendale	
Kipp..
Little Mountain-
Lotbiniere	
McCammon	
Miller	
Robertson	
Rosedale	
Ryder Lake~
Sardis	
Southlands-
Strathcona...
Unsworth—
Vedder	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Senior Secondary—Abbotsford	
Junior Secondary—
Abbotsford	
Clearbrook	
Sub-totals	
Elementary—
Abbotsford  	
Aberdeen	
Alexander	
Arnold	
Barrowtown..
Bradner	
Clayburn	
Clearbrook...
Dunach	
Gladwin	
Glenmore	
Godson	
Huntingdon...
Jackson _	
Jubilee	
Kilgard —
King-
Margaret Stenersen..
Matsqui 	
McMillan	
931
681
1,612
355
641
256
1,252
375
121
261
48
94
75
612
153
115
61
110
80
203
141
448
58
185
70
211
216
43
355
85
135
63
201
422
4,566
7,805
704
860
379
Mount Lehman North-
1,239
256
166
253
27
66
130
44
187
133
23
58
287
89
56
23
43
102
30
249
64
64
498
357
855
177
361
130
668
188
69
129
29
55
40
318
77
55
34
53
35
95
79
203
30
95
33
'102
107
16
186
36
69
29
113
219
2,306
4,017
339
463
182
645
129
86
147
13
34
68
23
102
68
12
33
169
44
29
10
21
44
15
125
34
33
433
324
757
178
280
126
584
187
52
132
19
39
35
294
76
60
27
57
45
108
62
245
28
90
37
109
109
27
169
49
66
34
88
203
2,260
3,788
365
397
197
594
127
80
106
14
32
62
21
85
65
11
25
118
45
27
13
22
58
15
124
30
31
58
10
36
7
13
17
54
21
12
10
22
14
23
50
57
9
39
8
20
22
9
52
35
22
8
30
69
48
22
26
10
10
9
52
21
15
2
19
12
24
41
58
11
28
11
11
36
8
40
24
25
8
26
57
669
727
606
654
43
17
39
7
11
12
54
21
17
9
11
17
43
41
47
8
36
8
20
34
4
44
23
19
4
23
73
642
685
60
11
30
5
14
15
6
32
23
8
9
43
9
14
7
11
15
17
25
12
12
62
16
51
7
8
17
14
29
17 |
6
13
39
13
15
9
6
14
13
26
9
67
14
42
6
10
18
6
19
13
9
5
38
19
13
4
4
18
26
12
15
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 143
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
	
	
	
~209
Tie
28
148
373
138
401
129
	
 .
	
	
	
	
.   38
30
209
129
200
101
186
96
214
71
176
130
135
84
511
401
129
	
~24
	
	
	
	
48
19
27
6
16
14
93
23
16
5
20
12
25
~"49
9
26
10
34
41
4
42
3
24
11
31
51
34
17
32
«
11
9
87
28
14
5
16
12
28
74
6
56
6
42
16
9
58
15
12
28
63
57
17
36
10
10
14
125
17
23
14
22
13
35
69
15
13
38
40
4
46
12
9
21
64
38
24
30
430
381
30
349
	
	
28
19
36
23
135
22
18
25
14
12
15
--
—
	
 _
	
	
	
	
	
16
	
	
	
9
	
94
14
46
27
5
59
	
	
	
	
	
	
g
6
18
	
	
11
31
45
g
3
	
	
 .
56
611
659
652
686
667
724
628
656
35
35
24
30
	
20
597
525
511
316
401
299
56
38
668
268
139
129
89
	
23
16
279
115
254
125
67
34
45
9
10
16
6
37
19
j
41
8
14
3
5
9
~32
7
9
21
23
16
20
407
394
379
	
35
47
~~  9
13
12
25
12
35
38
	
	
	
	
15
23
	
28
17
19
	
	
28
14
10
35
15
	
	
	
6
10
	
	
	
14
37
6
	
12
24
19
18
18
|
	
1
	
  1   	
	
	
	
8
17
9
11
| 	
	
	
	
	
	
1    	
	
2
31
12
9
42
12
11
55
in i
	
	
	
1
	
| 	
1
1
 F 144
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys        Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
North Poplar  	
Peardonville	
Philip Sheffield-
Ridgedale	
Ross 	
Simpson-
South Poplar	
Straiton	
Swensson	
Upper Sumas	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
Secondary—
Aldergrove..
Langley	
District No. 35 (Langley)
Sub-totals..
Junior Secondary—Fort Langley..
Elementary—
Aldergrove	
Anderson  	
Belmont	
Coghlan.
County Line-
East Langley..
Fort Langley ~
Glenwood	
Langley Central..
Langley Prairie.-
Lochiel	
Milner 	
Murrayville	
North Otter	
Otter	
Patricia	
Peterson Road...
Simonds 	
South Carvolth-
South Otter...	
Sperling	
Tillicum	
Topham 	
West Langley	
Willoughby	
Wix-Brown	
Sub-totals—
Totals	
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—North Surrey	
Secondary—
Lord Tweedsmuir.	
Princess Margaret-
Queen Elizabeth—
Semiahmoo	
Sub-totals..
Junior Secondary—
Cloverdale	
Johnston Heights	
Mary Jane Shannon-
Newton 	
West Whalley	
White Rock	
William Beagle	
Sub-totals	
261
87
270
51
21
196
192
20
22
240
3,710
5,653
621
912
1,533
294
241
86
251
85
130
26
191
182
210
106
87
126
197
145
141
45
94
112
86
43
89
23
105
151
124
58
3,134
4,961
458
420
337
968
450
133
52
136
29
13
107
103
10
11
126
1,959
2,943
307
460
767
156
146
46
126
45
62
15
97
102
126
62
37
59
102
82
74
26
49
61
44
20
50
13
56
76
74
26
1,676
2,599
243
205
156
488 |
215 |
2,175
1,064
621
336
662
350
768
409
584
327
752
387
598
316
808
427
4,793
2,552
128
35
134
22
8
89
89
10
11
114
1,751
2,710
314
452
766
138
95
40
125
40
68
11
94
80
84
44
50
67
95
63
67
19
45
51
42
23
39
10
49
75
50
32
1,458
2,362
215
215
181
235
1,111
285
312
359
257
365
282
381
2,241
31
13
7
6
22
19
2
6
34
41
10
9
6
32
18
3
5
31
518
518
547
547
27
14
29
12
16
12
27
35
18
35
14
20
31
16
17
7
20
24
14
4
17
23
23
30
10
30
15
37
14
24
5
21
31
6
22
12
11
24 |
23 |
21 I
12
12
19
16
11
13
20
27
18
12
495
495
456
456
41
18
10
9
28
22
4
11
37
538
538
32
17
42
11
20
9
18
18
18
21
13
23
26
18
21
5
11
11
15
8
18
13
21
15
11
435
435
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 145
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occu-
•pa",
tional
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
45
11
12
34
13
68
10
35
34
5
"~37
44
9
90
3
25
13
112
22
30
	
	
	
	
	
25
32
6
35
32
37
	
	
27
39
	
	
20
20
544
544
523
523
540
540
442
442
38
38
23
17
15
16
8
10
20
6
5
407
143
173
394
124
141
379
126
156
316
118
218
299
79
153
89
	
41
41
15
45
21
18
37
9
40
10
10
16
21
34
13
21
21
22
24
7
14
22
13
12
13
17
15
13
3
32
12
18
10
11
7
316
92
265
102
282
71
336
232
41
29
29
11
15
14
15
34
16
29
17
19
	
	
73
-
	
1
	
35
22
14
28
15
13
25
9
20
9
26
16
6
2
14
""" 14
14
15
12
28
16
42
9
19
37
17
16
5
11
20
8
6
14
31
25
63
iT
19
33
40
22
	
	
	
	
	
_23
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
34
15
	
	
	
18
17
18
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
449
449
407
407
_7fi           *tRR
78
78
18
408
	
367
353
	
426
388
44
28
336
212
186
147
469
183
232
192
144
124
385
143
41
54
	
	
90
66
34
68
	
	
80
	
56
	
1
1
.... 1 	
215
194
240
195
234
209
247
258
114
199
191
124
205
133
212
985
796
136
...
17
17
19
15
36
12
13
17
18
17
20
11
19
33
12
11
16
18
8
8
14
246
223
285
212
258
217
289
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
129
135
|       87
1
1,730
1,534
1,178
	
 F 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Elementary—
A. H. P. Matthew .
Anniedale	
Bear Creek 	
Bridgeview..
Cedar Hills.
Clayton	
Cloverdale...
Colebrook—
Crescent Park	
David Brankin	
Dr. F. D. Sinclair .
East Kensington.—
Elgin.
Erma Stephenson-
Fleetwood	
General Montgomery..
Grandview Heights	
Green Timbers	
Grosvenor Road	
H. T. Thrift	
Halls Prairie	
Harold Bishop	
Henry Bose 	
Hjorth Road	
J. T. Brown	
James Ardiel	
Johnston Heights	
Johnston Road	
K. B. Woodward	
Kensington Prairie-
Latimer Road	
Lena Shaw	
Mary Jane Norris	
Mary Jane Shannon.
McLeod Road	
Newton	
Old Yale Road-
Peace Arch	
Port Kells	
Port Mann	
Prince Charles-
Ray Shepherd....
Riverdale	
Senator Reid	
Simon Cunningham-
South Westminster-
Strawberry Hill-
Sunnyside	
Surrey Centre	
T. E. Scott 	
Tynehead	
White Rock-
William Watson..
Sub-totals-
Totals	
Secondary—
Delta	
District No. 37 (Delta)
North Delta-
Sub-totals..
Elementary—
Annieville	
Boundary Bay-
Boundary Beach-
Delta Manor	
Devon Gardens.—
East Delta	
548
164
115
383
494
181
382
48
346
334
576
118
19
113
403
217
39
360
503
186
136
196
310
198
367
350
282
148
797
180
174
276
186
459
186
266
637
216
199
144
689
222
754
293
108
48
55
289
224
296
165
454
140
14,973
22,399
986
758
1,744
612
373
52
206
190
42
281
82
60
215
247
91
218
26
172
173
303
65
9
57
232
112
17
202
273
97
69
99
150
106
196
182
159
88
394
80
86
149
102
229
112
138
336
124
102
77
340
127
403
151
54
25
29
146
109
169
91
253
79
7,886
11,745
493
384
I
877
309
201
28
105
97
22
267
82
55
168
247
90
164
22
174
161
273
53
10
56
171
105
22
158
230
89
67
97
160
92
171
168
123
60
403
100
88
127
84
230
74
128
301
92
97
67
349
95
351
142
54
23
26
143
115
127
74
201
61
7,087
10,654
493
374
867
303
172
24
101
93
20
88
24
16
94
45
39
49
22
58
61
80
15
5
15
50
26
11
62
90
29
21
30
54
34
54
57
34
21
126
27
34
46
71
76
26
41
98
34
22
35
105
33
138
36
18
20
23
45
28
33
23
52
17
75
25
25
44
49
24
52
11
46
54
83
16
7
16
73
22
12
45
68
27
17
24
49
27
47
75
39
22
124
27
18
43
72
71
34
41
82
23
20
25
118
28
125
45
9
12
22
45
32
42
19
51
29
2,391
2,391
2,231
2,231
104
76
6
26
30
12
89
53
6
24
29
9
83
24
15
48
38
22
42
15
53
48
76
15
7
19
62
21
16
66
68
29
22
29
42
28
55
46
52
25
119
25
19
40
43
59
29
50
79
27
37
18
110
35
121
53
14
16
10
39
34
40
33
61
16
2,193
2,193
91
54
11
30
31
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 147
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
33
75
26
27
38
98
28
49
63
23
11
64
86
17
50
53
24
9
44
80
31
50
48
44
80
15
67
18
12
51
98
20
48
50
30
80
19
—-_
50
30
~ 49
56
30
28
34
40
26
46
30
45
25
111
28
27
42
~49
22
31
67
39
22
15
86
30
66
38
15
58
28
34
28
74
17
11
	
	
	
	
II
	
	
	
	
	
	
27
15
18
'	
	
	
42
33
83
17
49
46
77
21
  1    	
	
17
	
	
—
	
	
	
13
56
27
48
71
29
11
25
47
30
51
49
31
18
117
23
26
37
59
18
27
103
29
34
19
96
28
115
40
26
20
39
40
39
63
20
19
29
39
25
49
49
41
21
102
26
21
37
57
23
35
107
27
25
16
93
26
94
37
16
13
59
35
51
70
22
18
25
39
28
65
44
30
16
98
24
29
31
58
34
41
85
37
31
16
81
27
83
29
10
	
	
	
9
5
	
16
	
	
	
17
	
	
	
	
	
10
23
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
	
	
2
6
	
	
	
	
15
12
7
	
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
33
35
31
30
72
21
29
27
48
17
57
23
40
40
38
15
55
17
	
15
~17
	
15
	
	
15
	
	
	
	
166
166
2,020
2,020
1,947
1,947
1,929
1,929
1,926
1,926
170
170
129
7
12
135
8
6
87
6
7
1,730
230
179
iT-34
216
163
1,436
214
153
1,197
148
140
""988
138
98
190
19
	
94
44
9
32
21
62
45
10
32
20
81
48
1       it)
14
13
409
379
367
288
236
-
19
7
77
53
10
32
31
13
7
	
	
...
30
28
	
1
 F  148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 37 (Delta)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
English Bluff  	
140
225
147
506
521
55
195
319
50
73
109
64
276
273
30
110
166
30
67
116
83
230
248
25
85
153
20
	
34
37
32
66
87
5
28
40
9
23
41
27
56
75
10
24
42
14
27
Heath                                                                   	
43
21
46
70
Sunbury  .        _ —
7
23
39
14
3,633
5,377
832
586
1,893
2,770
442
308
1,740
2,607
390
278
592
592
522
522
515
Totals
515
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior Secondary—
1,418
652
910
733
750
340
457
401
668
312
453
332
	
	
Junior Secondary—
Cambie                                                             —    .
	
Robert C. Palmer                                        	
2,295
680
91
151
564
55
147
473
389
96
28
137
128
96
14
62
531
83
113
672
85
268
468
483
515
183
513
477
381
296
148
85
437
157
436
156
1,198
344
43
71
284
23
72
243
217
59
18
78
70
51
9
27
278
40
58
328
35
140
255
244
266
90
244
238
212
148
74
43
229
78
225
87
1,097
336
48
80
280
32
75
230
172
37
10
59
58
45
5
35
253
43
55
344
50
128
213
239
249
93
269
239
169
148
74
42
208
79
211
69
	
20
51
94
14
50
14
30
30
50
27
12
4
19
60
34
32
121
22
38
56
55
64
55
73
61
53
54
28
26
62
54
64
49
11
24
85
11
49
20
30
35
33
38
10
3
12
57
27
22
109
20
43
72
56
53
51
77
56
63
33
22
21
64
57
58
49
Elementary—
18
39
84
14
48
Blundell	
30
31
54
Donald E. McKay   —	
18
20
4
F. A. Tomsett  -	
17
66
22
20
111
21
47
57
John T. Errington. ,    — -
64
60
37
Mitchell-                   - 	
66
52
51
46
Sidaway      — 	
Tait   —	
Thomas Kidd
20
23
68
46
58
W. D. Ferris  	
58
8,918
13,3111
1,126
1,842
1,398
2,147
533
4,577
6,869
608
923
693
1,125
296
4,341
6,442
518
919
705
1,022
237
	
1,476
1,476
1,371
1,371
1,370
Totals 	
1,370
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 149
ENROLMENT—
Continued
Pri-
Inter
Occu
Occu
Occu
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
medi
pa
pa
pa
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Special
rv
V
VI
VII
ate
Special
tional
1
tional
2
tional
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
33
30
23
23
28
23
19
23
15
10
	
	
12
68
69
85
76
28
6
77
64
65
68
9
	
	
	
	
9
7
23
9
37
29
31
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.    .
40
41
62
55
	
	
	
.,   . -
	
	
	
	
	
13
	
	
	
	
	
—	
	
	
	
	
34
526
489
453
440
62
	
	
	
34
526
489
453
440
62
19
14
13
409
379
367
288
236
19
414
338
80
	
	
—
	
	
_—
	
	
	
	
306
280
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
720
618
80
19
24
19
219
189
182
26
12
9
292
332
239
.
	
	
	
	
  |       24
23
15
233
240
198
—   -
  1       69
59
43
744
761
619
	
	
155
           13
14
7
199
167
125
	
	
10
37
64
16
11
12
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
82
84
71
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~117
110
101
111
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
24
86
85
88
16
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
22
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
3
16
23
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
	
	
	
	
84
91
81
92
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
— _-
	
99
22
38
88
8l"
63
—	
	
	
	
	
	
~36
33
33
	
'
96
95
92
	
86
89
69
64
15
52
40
86
82
77
80
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
66
70
75
58
71
95
84
16
59
45
33
39
22
	
30
52
35
46
	
20
15
88
25
15
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
84
71
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
65
51
74
66
	
	
	
	
	
	
II
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
62
1,286
1,202
1,131
939
81
62
1,286
1,202
1,131
1,094
81
82
73
50
943
928
744
720
618
80
9
3
3
267
260
240
195
149
	
	
	
	
	
25
36
21
374
355
376
318
337
	
—.	
50
23
21
276
260
274
257
237
	
 _
	
	
	
	
65
38
39
430
474
399
369
333
	
	
	
	
.          j
	
	
1
123
113
116
98
83
1
 F  150
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Secondary—Continued
1,655
943
1,116
1,126
1,654
1,727
859
459
602
587
826
885
796
484
514
539
828
842
——
	
	
	
Sir Winston Churchill	
15,267
1,840
1,860
1,948
1,852
1,782
1,601
7,863
973
953
1,039
968
975
796
7,404
867
907
909
884
807
805
	
	
	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Killarney	
Kltsilano	
	
10,883
519
598
781
429
779
481
712
756
399
573
563
389
626
413
524
718
783
595
782
984
443
750
615
1,134
1,092
679
550
753
1,050
579
1,135
996
538
953
469
526
177
623
1,022
828
489
865
590
569
639
1,055
832
1,058
837
372
1,274
946
5,704
264
294
398
206
384
257
370
377
205
300
272
198
357
213
284
368
407
337
404
493
219
386
313
578
527
365
288
382
533
280
560
512
280
474
221
268
113
331
522
403
249
438
303
281
336
545
412
529
451
188
644
490
5,179
255
304
383
223
395
224
342
379
194
273
291
191
269
200
240
350
376
258
378
491
224
364
302
556
565
314
262
371
517
299
575
484
258
479
248
258
64
292
500
425
240
427
287
288
303
510
420
529
386
184
630
456
57
99
112
44
113
92
122
128
42
85
59
30
92
48
63
89
125
85
146
133
58
92
60
197
150
104
87
96
155
47
181
174
93
121
57
64
105
177
102
55
110
87
61
112
140
75
143
64
51
178
134
54
88
115
55
112
86
113
104
45
95
81
28
75
61
81
99
106
82
163
140
53
99
89
209
145
94
72
94
139
83
188
174
89
100
55
79
107
159
99
56
96
101
66
99
168
97
141
88
47
170
130
51
84
98
49
103
66
81
110
51
65
61
35
69
58
65
93
101
64
126
139
57
73
70
151
135
80
77
84
148
61
149
108
68
127
59
72
63
118
102
68
87
75
71
94
134
93
145
65
48
188
134
Elementary—
54
86
Captain James Cook  	
99
38
91
Chief Maquinna. 	
63
73
94
49
Dr. A. R. Lord	
74
87
Dr. R. E. McKechnie   .    . 	
Edith Cavell	
35
63
35
Florence Nightingale _   - 	
62
96
92
70
113
Hastings —     .     —	
Henry Hudson          	
113
40
T. W. Sexsmith
89
96
156
134
83
52
92
140
56
151
80
72
109
55
70
Queen Alexandra... 	
54
152
115
58
91
55
Shaughnessy    	
79
66
127
Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith  	
90
119
95
48
Sir Matthew Begbie    .
163
112
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 151
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
	
	
	
27
14
31
8
13
38
334
193
239
235
302
390
345
181
214
229
332
352
296
187
236
204
312
348
320
161
209
211
324
273
352
200
191
247
357
295
	
	
21
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
.
148
105
265
66
154
61
221
159
40
27
20
41
38
84
4
48
32
29
60
3,163
347
380
323
414
317
366
3,115
367
392
345
333
291
327
2,988
341
327
349
327
308
335
2,735
316
315
299
301
268
275
2,781
277
257
287
237
242
208
21
9
28
104
104
29
_
	
.
	
68
89
85
43
92
62
89
82
50
78
69
47
49
53
48
78
122
74
52
101
60
101
68
132
133
103
64
100
110
78
115
82
56
126
60
63
55
101
105
54
121
49
51
67
117
115
118
106
45
144
108
799
76
100
69
86
274
166
173
2,147
2,055
4
1,987
1,774
1,508
71
80
94
45
91
64
88
73
45
69
97
64
49
56
56
104
110
50
58
112
46
85
73
126
134
102
45
92
117
70
114
91
68
123
46
67
73
119
107
59
101
57
79
63
135
117
118
99
43
160
105
60
72
78
50
76
48
76
77
47
60
76
78
50
41
44
77
127
65
61
103
43
102
73
137
143
98
57
106
121
52
108
72
77
132
39
49
28
36
15
	
	
	
	
	
8
70
88
59
36
33
72
50
61
40
67
11
	
 	
'
	
11
=
	
	
41
88
—	
._.-..
15
50
15
	
1
-	
	
13
76
63
103
56
88
74
16
	
	
11
14
5
12
12
29
16
	
3
	
14
	
	
	
118
59
89
120
70
99
77
	
	
	
15
6
	
	
	
	
62
15
132
15
52
	
	
	
15
	
6
——
	
	
115
34
62
	
	
	
	
177
15
	
	
24
64
94
98
47
107
52
93
77
118
130
113
109
47
140
123
63
102
100
77
105
48
69
61
116
115
116
136
43
131
100
	
	
	
	
15
	
	
	
16
31
50
	
16
	
	
	
	
30
61
	
15
	
14
 —
	
	
	
	
1
 F  152
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Secondary—Continued
Sir Sandford Fleming _ 	
Sir Wilfred Grenfell 	
Sir Wilfrid Laurier _ 	
Sir William Dawson	
Sir William MacDonald..
Sir William Osier. 	
Sir William Van Home .
Southlands	
Tecumseh 	
Trafalgar  	
Walter Moberly	
Sub-totals	
Totals	
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Secondary—Lester Pearson   	
Junior Secondary—Vincent Massey  	
Elementary—■
Connaught Heights 	
F. W. Howay   	
Herbert Spencer —
John Robson	
Lord Kelvin	
Lord Tweedsmuir..
Queen Elizabeth	
Sir Richard McBride .
Sub-totals	
Totals	
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
Senior Secondary—Burnaby North	
Secondary—
Burnaby South .
Burnaby Central.
Sub-totals	
Junior Secondary-
Alpha 	
Kensington
McPherson Park.
Moscrop	
Sub-totals
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Burnaby Heights 	
Cariboo Hill  	
Edmonds  	
Sub-totals 	
Elementary—
Armstrong Avenue	
Aubrey  _ 	
Brantford     -
Brentwood Park 	
Buckingham
Cameron Road 	
Capitol Hill 	
Cascade Heights	
Chaffey-Burke __.	
Clinton Street	
Confederation Park.
Douglas Road	
Gilmore Avenue	
Glenwood	
Inman .  	
Kitchener	
Lakeview	
Lochdale	
Lyndhurst	
Marlborough
823
413
1,018
490
598
292
357
187
510
257
562
285
823
412
602
310
1,329
668
1,098
550
1,312
700
45,874
72,024
1,252
1,398
189
266
578
477
502
565
310
792
3,679
6,329
1,270
1,270
1,319
2,589
600
985
1,206
1,088
3,879
756
691
1,103
2,550
560
435
154
610
186
151
779
518
418
660
200
567
596
146
647
707 |
325 |
364 j
192 j
559 1
23,373
36,940
630
691
90
143
314
238
269
279
155
430
1,918
3,239
624
667
764
313
479
618
554
1,964
391
336
541
1,268
291
207
81
311
88
78
408
269
191
326
101
293
298
78
307
353
172
191
96
314
I
410
528
306
170
253
277
411
292
661
548
612
22,501
35,084
622
707
99
123
264
239
233
286
155
362
1,761
3,090
646
603
555
287
506
588
534
1,915
365
355
562
1,282
269
228
73
299
98
73
371
249
227
334
99
274
298
68
340
354
153
173
96
245
117
105
151
128
82
63
27
42
109
85
54
92
104
94
68
82
217
183
153
162
197
213
6,373
6,418
6,373
6,418
97
156
65
32
68
56
75
72
195
126
183
25
25
95
70
70
74
60
119
538
538
5,698
5,698
28
31
90
68
77
84
51
114
543
543
.._ | 	
39 |
44
104
115
75
31
60
91
105
65
181
136
178
5,527
5,527
30
32
71
63
66
79
48
109
498
498
53
39
44
82
98
63
51
14
34
79
77
27
28
18
15
111
112
66
69
60
73
100
87
34
32
90
94
113
83
43
41
102
103
111
104
45
38
63
47
29
36
100
85
53
73
62
17
84
25
21
124
70
61
84
36
82
89
32
87
121
47
60
33
79
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 153
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
101
124
67
29
44
70
95
87
166
139
143
98
118
76
34
57
57
110
77
142
123
134
93
116
74
32
59
64
117
72
149
119
128
108
110
96
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
95
15
13
	
	
78
103
79
82
125
136
	
20
	
	
	
15
	
	
	
340
5,375
5,375
19
38
83
57
76
76
37
114
5,213
5,213
31
48
81
66
78
69
42
102
5,261
5,261
4,544
5,343
1,109
1,109
8
5,318
535
4
5,174
594
3
4,978
258
254
1
4,510
375
	
340
495
49
325
21
257
28
4,289
456
21
65
15
24
53
80
67
65
86
44
119
32
39
78
69
70
80
28
100
	
	
17
	
17
	
	
	
	
15
	
17
500
500
517
517
538
538
496
496
32
47
21
375
594
673
456
590
410
502
17
49
28
86
535
594
512
65
	
	
187
42 |  546
229
	
	
  1   1 	
170
309
402
369
229
186
321
353
298
1,219
912
229
19
5
1
219
355
451
421
	
.
	
	
	
	
47
45
19
5
1
1,446
172
217
301
1,250
213
220
250
1,158
167
173
192
	
	
204
81
58
	
	
50
8
16
50
86
71
35
80
25
23
88
63
53
74
28
82
85
30
101
79
51
49
33
72
47
73
55
24
102
20
20
103
70
61
100
33
76
89
45
74
70
30
91
31
18
101
71
48
111
37
73
104
86
98
55
47
31
72
343
74
63
8
16
690
683
532
	
	
__.__
	
	
	
97
30
36
102
83
62
104
	
	
	
	
	
12
26
12
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
70
15
18
84
101
38
51
30
64
84
93
37
47
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
	
	
	
3
	
	
	
5
79
 F 154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total        Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 41 (Burnaby)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Maywood ..
Morley Street _
Nelson	
Parkcrest	
Riverside 	
Riverway West..
Rosser	
Schou	
Seaforth 	
Second Street	
Sperling Avenue-
Stride Avenue—
Suncrest	
Sussex	
Twelfth Avenue-
Westridge	
Windsor	
Sub-to tals..
Totals	
Secondary—
Garibaldi.
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Maple Ridge—
Pitt Meadows—
Sub-totals-
Elementary—
Albion	
Alexander Robinson-
Alouette	
Blue Mountain-
Eric Langton	
Fairview	
Glenwood	
Golden Ears—
Hammond	
Haney Central	
Maple Ridge	
Meadowland	
Mount Crescent-
Pitt Meadows	
Ruskin	
Thorn Hill-
Webster's Corner-
Whonnock	
Yennadon	
Sub-totals-
Totals	
Secondary-
Como Lake-
Moody_
Distrlct No. 43 (Coquitlam)
Port Coquitlam..
Sub-totals—
Junior-Secondary-
Mary Hill	
Montgomery-
Sir Frederick Banting-
Sub-totals-
Elementary—
Alderson	
Anmore	
Austin Heights..
Brookmere	
Cape Horn	
Cedar Drive	
359
525
566
395
132
290
402 |
230
299
618
471
296
432
319
344
555
520
15,527
25,815
496
1,140
359
1,995
92
144
62
120
197
199
229
219
257
262
208
118
300
295
90
60
191
139
171
3,353
5,348
1,537
575
814
2,926
406
563
404
1,373
381
64
504
377
189
317
186
290
286
207
74
143
213
110
149
333
253
152
225
146
165
280
288
7,953
13,240
250
583
203
1,036
43
80
27
71
107
115
114
103
143
139
123
60
156
146
45
22
96
67
84
1,741
2,777
821
311
411
1,543
227
295
199
721
185
34
265
187
102
156
173
235
280
188
58
147
189
120
150
285
218
144
207
173
179
275
232
73
58
72
59
26
40
77
35
45
113
66
57
50
46
67
95
59
69
72
85
61
16
43
54
36
42
97
67
44
58
48
58
93
7,574
12,575
246
557
156
2,388
2,427
2,334
2,378
959
49
64
35
49
90
84
115
116
114
123
85
58
144
149
45
38
95
72
87
15
20
21
23
31
32
45
43
46
30
34
21
30
39
9
6
29
25
26
12
17
15
19
27
31
31
35
35
33
33
14
38
37
20
12
40
19
20
1,612
2,571
716
264
403
525
525
488
488
1,383
179
268
205
652
196
30
239
190
87
161
62
57
62
61
47
12
68
48
32
47
47
10
67
55
38
47
54
73
85
66
19
35
64
37
48
111
69
41
55
48
42
90
73
2,297
2,350
17
22
13
17
22
29
27
30
3'5
31
20
18
50
46
16
4
25
19
20
461
461
49
111
51
41
27
31
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 155
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occu-
•pa~,
tional
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
57
78
84
50
16
39
77
27
42
98
81
36
58
32
53
60
44
64
79
74
58
17
47
56
33
30
99
72
43
65
36
49
84
64
42
64
69
53
10
47
51
35
50
88
63
50
56
37
36
79
80
	
	
	
	
	
	
101
97
48
12
39
	
	
16
	
14
	
9
——
	
27
42
53
25
78
65
39
54
62
	
	
	
	
12
12
40
	
	
	
	
—_
—
	
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
	
104
2,140
2,190
2,164
2,211
2,158
2,203
1,803
2,146
139
139
II
27
39
21
33
87
""Ti
2/136
1     118
211
93
1,933
151
204
92
1,81:3
60
210
62
1,502
47
1     148
1      43
104
1,919
120
235
69
229
44
	
15
23
13
15
30
21
32
27
40
30
29
17
28
37
11
9
29
21
15
12
18
39
33
16
422
447
424
332
238
44
	
13
26
17
26
31
32
29
29
35
29
21
38
40
16
13
24
17
30
8
18
18
22
25
33
27
33
39
24
12
38
34
9
6
20
16
35
~-5
16
~~ io
15
	
11
24
30
29
28
39
27
39
15
33
47
9
10
24
22
25
	
	
	
21
	
	
	
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
36
36
442
442
442
442
466
466
417
417
76
76
~~39
54
9
15
~33
21
7
18
16
i      31
_422
109
160
"_447
215
102
133
424
361
154
209
332
4115
103
167
238
341
91
112
44
99
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
I      78
8
46
3
I      31
269
304
204
I    217
450
91
202
1    187
724
1157
685
1    544
99
48
11
49
41
28
35
48
10
63
42
26
37
28
58
43
18
24
16
| ~~"l2
i        8
3
	
725
480
157
	
	
36
10
64
45
20
35
	
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
 F 156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
HI
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Central 	
Coronation Park-
Glen	
Glenayre	
Harbour View	
Hillcrest	
loco   r-
James Park..
Leigh-
Lord Baden-Powell-
Mary Hill	
Millside	
Montgomery	
Moody-
Mountain View-
Mundy Road	
Parkland 	
Pleasantside	
Porter Street	
Ranch Park	
Seaview	
Sir Frederick Banting-
Sunny Cedars	
Vanier y	
Viscount Alexander..
Sub-totals	
Totals	
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Senior Secondary—
Carson Graham.—
North Vancouver-
Sub-totals-
Secondary—
Argyle..
Delbrook _
Handsworth-
Windsor	
Sub-totals...
Junior Secondary—
Hamilton _
Sutherland	
Sub-totals...
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Balmoral-
Elementary—
Braemar	
Burrard View	
Canyon Heights..
Capilano 	
Carisbrooke	
Cleveland	
Cloverley	
Eastview	
Fromme	
Highlands	
Keith Lynn	
Larson	
Lonsdale	
Lynn Valley	
Maplewood	
Montroyal	
Norgate	
North Star.	
Prince Charles .
Queen Mary	
Queensbury..	
Ridgeway	
341
175
428
594
410
483
119
250
151
419
492
312
549
466
297
569
658
50
588
302
214
598
68
371
832
171
90
234
308
201
2S6
58
133
76
224
255
159
273
244
154
302
307
27
288
167
107
318
46
192
431
11,568
15,867
359
654
5,950
8,214
212
378
1,013
809
851
817
606
590
406
419
388
321
3,083
760
820
1,580
754
553
409
739
505
579
704
489
518
231
677
251
378
486
324
124
363
302
646
63
564
483
816
389
413
802
373
294
216
371
267
275
363
255
275
126
366
133
199
246
173
61
187
148
353
42
280
247
440
170
85
194
286
209
227
61
117
75
195
237
153
276
222
143
267
351
23
300
135
107
280
22
179
401
46
25
64
63
63
62
30
33
60
61
59
60
63
122
65
64
60
59
122
60
119 |
47
26
57
82
56
86
11
48
24
55
70
38
93
60
46
67
110
8
86
39
31
40
122
5,618
7,653
147
276
1,602
1,602
423
403
432
429
285
1,549
371
407
778
381
259
193
368
238
304
341
234
243
105
311
118
179
240
151
63
176
154
293
21
284
236
376
1,644
1,644
69
45
91
75
99
1122
100
99
60
80
42
40
84
47
32
63
56
97
94
69
130
33
29
61
92
49
65
10
42
21
57
66
44
73
61
47
70
76
6
73
33
28
80
SS
114
51
24
64
96
40
71
9
29
19
55
56
32
73
47
56
75
91
13
81
36
26
50
96
1,552
1,552
1,468
1,468
85
42
125
86
95
109
70
80
66
107
42
50
78
31
31
58
49
99
85
81
129
77
39
103
83
96
108
76
72
58
87
33
38
71
32
28
45
42
95
~70
65
98
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 157
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
32
23
37
66
42
66
13
29
33
48
59
36
68
47
48
66
96
7
85
32
20
63
38
82
43
20
44
72
51
46
14
19
17
46
60
34
57
50
34
59
70
7
64
40
23
57
48
28
54
66
48
44
12
28
24
44
53
32
71
49
36
55
76
9
68
26
12
58
~ 37
87
41
47
57
i      47
43
20
22
13
41
!      50
22
54
76
30
42
74
67
27
15
47
45
79
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
	
6
	
	
	
	
	
~~ 10
13
7
	
	
15
	
13
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
7
	
	
	
8
68
	
	
43
102
	
15
_
16
 .
146
1,348
1,348
1,298
1,298
1,275
1,275
1,130
1,130
105
105
si
49
31
930
881
685
359
157
544
335
146
994
99
	
	
	
	
162
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
203
219
147
187
164
136
516
125
2311
128
96
335
139
297
125
70
,     162
	
155
303
181
144
	
13
	
	
::
	
	
13
43
43
14
569
237
296
487
202
285
803
196
225
580
631
39
	
	
74
86
112
51
67
108
67
64
47
92
40
66
76
27
33
53
40
86
70
62
113
—
	
29
71
66
108
68
77
91
61
42
16
10
43
39
57
533
363
487
362
421
....
	
	
81
58
106
74
68
80
61
72
94
37
78
63
62
—__
34
97
60
68
115
80
63
94
68
77
86
54
57
-103
23
70
63
74
53
34
100
67
71
103
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
11
	
	
15
	
	
	
103
34
36
51
51
44
38
72
72
67
115
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
——
~~63
46
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
 .
	
	
 F 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)-—Continued
Elementary—Contin ued
505
481
146
503
329
251
238
72
245
178
254
243
74
258
151
83
74
40
65
43
83
54
71
93
37
70
72
	
35
67
Westview _	
42
12,168
18,598
735
790
1,554
6,301
9,600
379
427
813
5,867
8,998
356
363
741
1,899
1,899
1,936
1,936
1,702
1,702
Totals	
District No, 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary—
Hillside - -     	
	
3,079
554
260
383
488
470 '
373
560
536
564
546
1,619
275
152
208
256
231
206
297
290
277
251
1,460
279
108
175
232
239
167
263
246
287
295
56
57
54
52
55
Elementary—
Caulfeild -  .
Cedardale . 	
84
29
54
67
48
45
63
81
84
55
67
33
40
69
61
47
52
70
66
74
65
39
41
Glenmore.    	
Hollyburn - 	
74
63
58
80
75
West B ay                              .
56
57
68
Sub totals                    - -	
4,734
7,813
476
119
2,443
4,062
221
58
2,291
3,751
255
61
330
330
610
610
579
579
620
620
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—
595
11
51
13
495
13
9
120
218 '
122
251
9
53
279
10
25
4
268
7
5
64
107
67
142
4
22
316
1
26
9
227
6
4
56
111
55
109
5
31
89
Elementary—
3
12
2
68
2
2
20
19
19
26
1
15
8
4
66
4
3
14
26
13
31
3
16
3
12
2
63
1
1
23
31
39
22
13
18
1
13
1,365
1,960
408
923
171
30
330
259
30
76
375
279
152
640
320
82
30
94
725
1,004
211
479
93
15
170
145
13
39
201
141
94
322
165
50
15
55
640
956
197
444
78
15
160
114
17
37
174
138
58
318
155
32
15
39
159
159
189
189
13
38
36
4
14
54
31
26
85
44
17
4
9
188
188
19
31
39
1
14
49
32
15
74
34
17
6
11
172
172
District No. 47 (Powell River)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Texada— -
Elementary—
33
28
22
55
36
5
44
36
31
57
41
15
61
38
J  C Hill                           - - - 	
22
63
43
28
5
Stillwater 	
 .
2,697
4.199
1,425
2,208
1,272
1,991
274
274
362
375
323
342
356
389
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 159
ENROLMENT—
Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
69
66
71
47
72
81
64
62
74
51
64
72
_65
30
	
	
—;
—
—;
	
* *
68
47
 ;
	
32
	
	
  -
	
—  '
	
69
69
1,687
1,687
1,623
1,623
1,591
1,591
1,498
1,527 '
163
176
57
28
1,096
168
140
180
43
39
1,465
209
160
294
1,336
199
152
254
1,224
159
180
208
966
162
158
414
26
25
125
26
25
28
663
605
547
488 '
572
125
65
30
44
60
53
55
68
80
77
77
69
33
36
58
51
48
70
75
88
86
77
31
51
53
62
39
82
77
74 '
80
71
30
35
53
73
47
71
78
62
106
16
19
	
	
	
25
	
	
7
	
	
21
13
	
19
	
	
	
	
88
609
609
614
614
626
626
626
626
32
32
26
7
25
13
488
78
20
88
28
13
663
107
27
605
93
22
547
85
24
572
80
26
125
	
2
7
- ~
7
13
13
134
115
109
98
106
2
5
2
47
6
1
23
26
22
19
2
9
7
3
50
1
	
	
	
"
55
57
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
12
21
20
37
1
	
	
18
36
19
31
1
10
37
16
35
	
	
	
	
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
164
164
153
153
169
169
156
156
15
15
13
13
106
173
7
22
134
336
23
115
303
19
109
98
219
16
30
40
30
6
	
19
16
4
227
18
	
23
	
12
7
40
24
3
22
50
38
13
79
30
5
22
44
42
4
26
36
33
54
30
5
38
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
14
13
	
	
43
27
17
80
44
	
	
	
	
	
15
	
	
13
86
48
20
3
103
36
	
	
	
	
.
	
	
7
16
21
	
	
	
28
340
340
326
326
342
342
317
340
27
27
22
19
20
2
361
245
231
180
28
322
16
 F 160
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
422
121
221
64
201
57
Pemberton	
	
543
7
176
142
17
261
16
150
285
101
124
285
258
7
93
74
6
134
8
69
138
49
63
1
39
16
6
62
7
19
43
17
24
2
18
29
8
39
6
14
49
15
18
Elementary—
Alta Lake 	
2
Brackendale 	
83
68
11
127
8
81
147
52
61
27
18
3
34
3
19
44
18
22
Signal Hill                _
Stawamus  	
Woodfibre                	
Sub-totals      	
Totals                       	
1,279
1,822
609
220
638
923
328
117
641
899
281
103
51
234
234
54
21
198
198
55
21
190
190
58
20
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
829
13
194 '
34
10
8
445
7
93
19
3
2
384
6
101
15
7
6
51
75
3
34
16
1
2
76
1
15
2
1
78
1
31
Elementary—
Bella Coola -	
8
259
1,088
278
238
101
124
569
133
126
55
135
519
145
112
46
51
56
131
19
95
27
32
18
42
120
26
Totals               	
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
	
14
12
617 '
21
14
78
314
11
9
44
303
10
5
34
60
3
5
14
77
4
4
11
Elementary—■
1
3
	
113
730
124
14
64
378
67
6
49
352
57
8
	
212
82
18
3
2.
15
3
16
82
District No. 51 (Portland Canal)
1
Totals            - - 	
138
297
759
408
18
504
M
402
567
283
273
73
163
400
207
10
261
5
193
300
169
126
65
134
359
201
8
243
6
209
267
114
147
	
21
75
8
78
83
98
53
46
18
69
5
82
4
72
94
41
51
16
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Elementary—
63
	
5
74
51
105
42
36
2,466
3,522
1
1,271
1,834
1,195
1,688
441
441
418
418
1
376
Totals       .  ~
376
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 161
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occu-
pa-
tional
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
12
15
104
40
89
25
92
19
61,
16
49 |
21
	
	
12
15
144
114
1
111
77
70
1
23
24
22
23
31
19
38
16
13
	
	
	
33
26
29
	
	
	
27
36
8
11
20
27
13
21
25
32
13
15
26
25
17
13
	
13
16
	
	
	
	
	
13
160
160
53
20
169
169
39
12
140
140
60
11
158
158
35
9
16
16
12
3
	
15
1
115
48
33
ill
39
8
70
35
6
13
6
144
53
46
77
20
13
	
73
3
25
3
1
1
51
1
26
5
3
2
71
2
23
44
1
26
3
6
99
1
81
47
33
41
	
11
3
	
-
	
1
1
2
	
1
	
	
	
11
33
106
35
28
11
37
88
35
22
8
26
97
30
24
9
29
73
27
31
9
3
3
3
102
19
17
9
81
15
8
8
47
16
3
3
41
11
13
3
14
6
i
33
16
1
2
	
13
74
2
1
5
65
2
15
63
3
11
67
2
16
14
1
l
45
4
1
31
22
2
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
82
12
3
17
82
12
1
14
77
12
1
12
79
12
2
16
1
l
5
i  50
i  11
22
4
2
1
	
	
13
14
31
12
 .
	
15
13
48
72
2
49
74
43
30
13
50
57
41
67
33
39
14
23
in
11
261
12
247
4
199
1
128
!  154
15
53
66
3
55
77
37
40
50
75
2
33
52
34
31
18
	
	
	
	
	
13
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
331
331
318
318
287
287
277
277
5
5
"~~ii
' iii
~261
199
128
154
13
23
247
15
 F 162
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 53 (Terrace)
Secondary—
190
780
88
387
102
393
	
	
970
477
21
422
237
111
39
62
232
79
317
58
201
12
475
243
8
216
133
63
20
30
132
49
141
29
111
4
495
234
13
206
104
48
19
32
100
30
176
29
90
8
	
88
6
69
34
27
9
13
I      37
16
66
8
47
2
79
3
60
27
35
5
10
27
15
61
15
34
2
Elementary—
67
3
35
35
23
5
16
Riverside
16
12
Thornhill
49
Two Mile                                           .—......,.,.,,.,...
14
27
3
2,268
3,238
434
299
193
74
554
34
1,179
1,654
224
163
98
44
277
12
1,089
1,584
210
136
95
30
277
22
	
422
422
48
25
11
79
6
373
.     373
35
29
10
81
7
305
Totals
305
District No. 54 (Smithers)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Silverthorne	
24
20
Elementary—
11
87
6
662
1,588
288
187
390
103
42
28
41
45
50
92
25
333
818
151
88
199
54
17
13
18
24
27
47
16
329
770
137
99
191
49
25
15
23
21
23
45
9
	
96
169
23
66
29
8
5
10
4
10
16
4
98
162
21
64
13
3
6
3
6
13
15
5
104
Totals
148
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
20
Elementary—
45
11
8
3
8
11
7
Topley.  _ _  _	
10
2
816
1,291
465
285
30
33
92
187
73
69
88
518
415
654
243
149
20
17
51
96
40
36
45
287
401
637
222
136
10
16
41
91
33
33
43
231
	
152
175
128
149
105
Totals.     .   ...   ,
125
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
47
5
6
12
37
26
16
17
81
47
4
3
16
28
10
16
12
49
24
Elementary—
Braeside
	
2
8
„_
12
36
9
10
16
73
1,090
1,840
1,103
454
671
592
984
542
247
332
498
856
561
207
339
	
200
247
138
185
166
Totals
190
District No. 57 (Prince George)
Junior Secondary—
	
Sub-totals.      	
1,125
579
546
	
	
	
	
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 163
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
1
_	
	
26
22
~~13
~ 15
58
213
50
171
32
162
13
80
11
104
	
	
54
3
75
36
48
13
15
271
221
194
93
115
73
3
43
22
26
7
10
27
9
38
10
30
1
60
2
72
18
7
5
26
11
41
6
16
2
56
1
68
24
6
8
27
8
35
5
24
2
	
	
	
18
23
33
	
	
	
22
8
27
23
	
 |
	
	
17
	
	
	
	
	
——
	
	
35
299
299
266
266
264
264
35
21
,16
72
6
248
248
28
21
10
64
56
56
48
26
221
86
25
194
84
12
93
68
10
~~115
57
8
35
13
15
15
15
271
83
18
25
35
28
11
80
4
21
24
5
79
5
	
	
	
12
	
	
	
12
95
158
89
134
12
41
18
6
5
7
9
9
14
3
94
150
_21
54
11
8
2
4
2
11
1
74
123
~~27
44
10
5
2
3
	
26
15
126
89
18
68
12
78
40
65
26
12
15
Ill
65
20
	
13
48
11
4
7
7
10
11
10
6
15
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
3
	
1
	
13
114
127
112
124
38
5
4
11
19
13
10
15
66
93
114
83
110
15
15
14
	
13
	
85
94
14
13
108
134
26
80
79
12
40
68
26
43
25
9
24
9
6
12
25
6
10
16
65
18
5
6
14
21
9
7
12
64
21
	
	
	
	
15
21
	
	
	
	
	
105
	
	
	
6
9
	
6
149
173
143
181
138
156
141 |         9
162 |       23
25
91
335
66
6
13
9
160
108
154
332
	
68
405
II-
43
289
74
	
|
1
| 	
1 	
	
234
339
	
	
1      .....  1
	
1      573   1      486
66
	
 F 164
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pu
pils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
763
716
234
401
383
143
362
333
91
107
76
75
61
70
Kelly Road                                                 .
64
Sub-totals                                        . .
1,713
147
196
695
19
615
328
55
186
390
687
188
71
546
8
80
134
135
92
388
21
75
799
43
29
53
553
74
50
63
90
364
927
59
117
339
9
309
175
27
95
186
349
96
33
296
5
42
63
63
50
199
9
43
419
18
17
27
280
36
27
31
49
203
786
88
79
356
10
306
153
28
91
204
338
92
38
250
3
38
71
72
42
189
12
32
380
25
12
26
273
38
23
32
41
161
183
44
48
100
5
89
62
8
31
59
99
37
36
81
2
22
60
37
13
69
4
27
149
7
5
12
78
16
136
19
30
83
5
90
53
11
27
65
113
23
22
71
1
20
37
21
18
72
4
16
127
8
6
11
98
11
9
8
18
69
134
Elementary—
18
Bur.khnrn
22
73
4
89
49
"Fraserview
Giscome	
	
10
28
69
	
107
29
13
70
1
McLeod Lake... -   	
13
37
	
22
17
Peden Hill  	
57
Penny.  	
2
13
Quinson  -  	
Red Rock        	
	
104
7
3
3
88
Shady Valley    _                                     	
11
7
....
10
14
86
7
12
Vanway                    	
57
7,174
11,115
146
269
48
15
56
250
21
18
3,671
5,719
77
153
28
11
38
141
8
8
3,503
5,396
69
116
20
4
18
109
13
10
	
1,321
1,504
28
10
1
6
45
3
6
1,166
1,302
30
7
2
10
33
5
5
1,031
Totals        „  	
1,165
District No. 58 (McBride)
Secondary—McBride  ,  .„    	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Valemount  	
Elementary—■
35
6
4
10
32
3
7
408
823
478
633
479
427
102
234
464
232
355
268
209
60
174
359
246
278
211
218
42
71
99
62
92
62
Totals                                          	
97
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
15
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chetwynd            - -
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
9
Tate Creek               - -	
12
529
131
290
583
81
59
521
269
68
150
327
41
30
271
260
63
140
256
40
29
250
9
36
52
84
16
6
95
15
38
50
64
17
10
106
12
Elementary—
29
33
98
13
8
Grandview , 	
87
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 165
ENROLMENT—
Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
61
54
—
62
69
70
52
64
79
____.
83
114
116
90
83
	
50
62
.    ....
44
32
8
44
115
15
25
109
1
105
42
8
25
73
90
27
80
2
7
21
16
57
4
131
19
20
109
3
78
40
8
21
36
103
21
76
1
8
~~ 19
15
53
3
19
116
6
7
6
84
20
9
7
12
32
122
14
/    26
103
1
89
37
10
23
46
98
21
78
143
18
25
118
67
83
32
8
230
173
112
	
	
	
	
	
75
45
	
	
	
	
..      .
31
42
77
30
76
1
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
	
8
	
	
	
	
	
8
13
49
2
7
	
	
	
31
2
	
	
	
	
	
132
8
1
10
81
13
6
13
12
63
85
7
1
9
68
14
7
10
10
29
86
	
6
	
2
	
56
	
1
	
8
	
12
28
	
	
  |	
	
10
1,046
1,161
951
1,082
34
6
1
4
35
2
866
988
769
912
14
81
513
32
15
289
16
54
83
32
8
803
42
25
6
659
26
22
405
30
74
24
6
1
9
33
2
31
3
4
10
32
2
25
4
2
7
29
4
	
	
	
	
11
	
	
	
	
. „
	
11
51
75
48
82
51
82
46
71
6
73
48
...
30
200
26
11
	
47
51
161
27
81
16
183
44
27
16
37
20
170
42
114
15
218
48
108
83
91
74
64
124
9
8
14
12
16
	
	
14
28
37
79
14
13
74
12
16
36
75
7
7
66
133
34
84
1
129
108
81
...
48
54
14
7
63
	
31
14
	
	
8
	
|
15
15
  | 	
1
 F 166
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 59 (Peace River South)—Continued
Elementary—Contin ued
46
49
53
80
61
304
11
247
67
42
97
565
43
299
18
24
25
37
33
151
8
132
38
28
45
301
23
158
28
25
28
43
28
153
3
115
29
14
52
264
20
141
	
13
18
21
12
20
85
6
8
7
12
7
50
2
41
8
6
15
67
5
87
8
10
12
13
	
19
Parkhill    	
50
38
14
15
11
96
7
114
40
11
Rolla   	
2
South Taylor          	
16
60
9
74
Sub-totals -  - -
Totals       -	
3,629
5,748
572
491
113
18
358
207
14
10
12
49
29
53
690
56
147
14
39
35
58
38
69
274
30
139
97
75
56
1,908
3,032
307
258
59
8
187
109
4
4
4
28
12
29
356
28
75
8
21
15
33
20
40
140
15
69
50
33
25
1,721
2,716
265
233
54
10
171
98
10
6
8
21
17
24
334
28
72
6
18
20
25
18
29
134
15
70
47
42
31
753
762
606
621
21
2
51
31
2
12
4
11
119
12
33
2
12
3
9
4
6
34
6
31
16
11
9
592
604
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Elementary—
18
5
66
35
2
1
3
16
4
10
96
17
33
5
11
8
9
3
24
49
15
30
15
16
11
17
Altona	
	
1
61
Ambrose  	
Attachie            . -
Bear Flat               .  -
	
32
1
1
	
2
6
2
8
102
Goodlow   - 	
Grandhaven  -	
	
6
17
8
3
	
11
7
9
44
20
Tr anspine  	
10
10
Wonowon  - - -     -	
9
2,680
3,743
651
505
572
1,027
1,429
1,372
1,937
331
260
280
539
863
1,308
1,806
320
245
292
488
566
502
502
441
441
387
Totals
387
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Secondary—
	
Oak Bay                  	
Victoria    -
4,184
830
907
882
650
944
896
942
2,273
435
462
460
343
510
476
462
1,911
395
445
422
307
434
420
480
	
Junior Secondary—
	
	
Esquimalt  	
	
	
S.J.Willis.. —	
6,051
3,148
2,903
	
	
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 167
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
6
13
6
15
15
42
3
31
13
8
15
75
10
7
4
10
45
2
36
5
6
15
95
8
6
1
9
	
	
	
	
2
9
	
	
~
	
	
	
—;
	
32
2
29
5
5
14
80
4
	
—;
2
32
11
11
78
	
	
—
	
—
	
	
	
14
—
	
	
	
	
—
24
	
	
84
497
594
419
522
18
4
37
34
1
3
3
3
378
468
271
468
29
29
37
27
20
13
320
168
226
131
84
43
341
374
63
185
191
170
44
24
2
41
20
1
	
22
284
15
1
43
30
4
1
3
1
37
25
2
2
1
	
2
	
22
	
	
3
15
5
10
71
7
22
1
7
4
5
4
6
38
5
16
9
12
6
	
	
4
6
89
6
13
2
1
3
5
7
7
35
2
16
8
6
10
7
6
86
5
16
2
2
	
16
81
2
13
2
30
1
	
	
	
	
7
9
6
4
37
2
16
14
11
7
5
10
7
6
37
	
2
	
	
	
	
7
	
	
10
18
8
4
	
	
	
7
1
	
	
16
331
331
314
314
317
317
295
295
52
52
25
309
170
252
244
249
425
538
16
22
27
13
248
168
103
23
59
164
264
131
296
238
239
438
605
	
„
	
25
	
	
	
22
	
47
20
14
27
613
221
248
207
170
209
177
175
1,816
1,708
	
	
45
21
21
23
17
15
264
301
298
251
327
335
338
257
306
314
229
323
384
358
	
	
	
	
	
25
17
35
25
28
	
26
. 	
	
129
116
114
2,114
2,171
1,407
	
 F  168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total        Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)—Continued
Elementary—•
Bank Street.    	
B eacon Hill	
Braefoot _ „ 	
Burnside     	
I
Cedar Hill	
Cloverdale _
Craigflower	
Doncaster	
Frank Hobbs..
George Jay	
Glanford 	
Gordon Head.
Hampton.
Handicapped Children's Clinic..
Hillcrest  _ _	
James Bay _	
Joan Crescent 	
Lake Hill _
Lampson Street .
Macaulay .
Margaret Jenkins .
Marigold	
McKenzie	
Monterey 	
North Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra .
Quadra Primary 	
Queen Alexandra Solarium.
Richmond	
Shelbourne  	
Sir James Douglas 	
South Park 	
Strawberry Vale	
Tillicum 	
Tolmie	
Uplands	
Victoria West-
View Royal	
Willows	
Sub totals.
Totals	
District No. 62 (Sooke)
Senior Secondary—Belmont	
Secondary—Edward Milne — _	
Junior Secondary—Elizabeth Fisher	
Elementary—■
Colwood	
Glenlake	
Happy Valley-
Jordan River....
Langford	
Metchosin	
Millstream	
Port Renfrew-
Sangster	
Saseenos	
Savory	
Sooke	
Sooke-Saanich .
Sub-totals .
Totals	
130
131
104
298
234
666
558
944
547
1,042
456
486
307
26
142
269
34
545
829
741
911
342
558
687
430
1,124
601
126
37
311
531
803
277
235
670
485
489
615
402
982
19,105
29,340
222
246
563
273
215
177
34
543
196
150
73
245
146
197
285
17
2,551
3,582
58
63
51
145
116
338
296
471
288
531
229
239
161
10
71
123
16
281
420
367
452
183
297
346
224
567
309
65
22
174
261
399
154
124
359
247
255
319
193
510
9,734
15,155
111
111
297
142
106
109
17
270
93
78
38
122
68
96
151
11
1,301
1,820
72
68
53
153
118
328
262
473
259
511
227
247
146
16
71
146
18
264
409
374
459
159
261
341
206
557
292
61
15
137
270
404
123
111
311
238
234
296
209
472
96
124
118
130
107
76
126
71
110
126
77
96
123
107
115
9,371
14,185
111
135
266
131
109
68
17
273
103
72
35
123
78
101
134
6
1,778
1,778
1,250
1,762
45
39
37
54
37
91
80
113
72
151
85
59
63
36
68
II
111
99
89
31
79
77
58
136
70
35
59
81
96
49
94
96
47
110
71
100
2,699
2,699
36
41
27
8
75
23
32
10
38
15
38
40
54
42
35
47
40
78
69
104
74
125
69
69
45
~34
56
"77
127
89
110
25
65
90
36
140
74
28
69
82
104
28
96
72
46
95
52
118
2,564
2,564
52
44
30
4
89
26
14
12
34
26
33
38
31
22
32
37
33
79
69
107
78
106
73
62
34
34
38
69
123
93
87
36
57
95
35
118
72
34
73
81
103
31
60
67
41
96
63
111
2,380
2,380
46
28
15
3
64
31
26
8
38
18
28
44
383 t 402
383 \    402
I	
349
349
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 169
ENROLMENT—
Continued
Pri-
Inter
Occu
Occu
Occu
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
medi
pa
pa
pa
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Special
rv
V
VI
VII
ate
Special
tional
1
tional
2
tional
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
	
28
46
60
34
64
50
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
80
64
77
66
73
66
79
56
-
81
105
140
170
35
83
100
76
129
76
107
88
101
70
67
61
58
78
51
89
53
68
34
51
32
48
7
19
38
56
68
51
71
48
21
	
13
43
109
124
112
123
7
87
78
76
72
10
115
138
123
142
7
41
36
38
36
16
67
85
63
94
57
97
44
78
	
38
57
58
38
124
76
145
82
161
78
174
72
29
21
16
71
39
67
78
73
69
4
106
111
95
81
7
29
37
65
82
64
32
68
37
65
29
77
29
69
18
	
	
15
54
56
52
67
68
58
61
67
 -
81
57
70
58
82
51
81
50
	
122
143
157
116
-     -
151
2,351
2,434
2,282
2,282
2,225
2,225
241
151
2,351
2,434
241
129
116
161
2,114
72
2,171
2,020
1,816
1,708
13
4
2
53
117
105
23
46
33
12
17
3
175
190
166
35
34
40
30
	
	
	
33
31
20
18
	
,    .	
32
18
30
25
6
2
7
4
. .	
...
	
15
72
82
77
51
IS
	
32
30
32
22
	
	
19
24
18
17
9
8
11
15
39
31
28
37
	
16
21
24
26
 	
	
	
30
21
25
22
.
4
17
42
34
43
32
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
36
365
336
355
299
26
	
36
365
336
355
299
26
25
21
5        247
243
212
150
128
 SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 63 (Saanich)
561
331
272
371
321
184
152
1%
240
147
120
175
	
	
	
Junior Secondary—
974
127
206
450
156
83
158
137
82
102
242
105
115
372
532
67
105
247
76
45
87
69
34
50
122
61
63
198
442
60
101
203
80
38
71
68
48
i          52
120
44
52
174
19
29
78
16
11
27
22
10
15
33
14
10
58
12
29
60
27
13
20
18
8
14
36
16
12
66
Elementary—
13
23
7.
23
13
23
21
10
18
34
19
10
43
2,335
3,870
483
31
18
31
18
1,224
2,077
226
13
10
21
12
1,111
1,793
257
18
8
10
6
34
3
342
342
28
7
1
3
3
331
331
44
7
1
326
Totals
326
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
32
Elementary—
Galiano Island	
3
2
4            6
—
1
SnM-rals
98
581
662
220
379
414
56
282
339
113
197
203
42
299
323
107
182
211
3
37
14
42
12
56
12
Totals
44
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
Junior Secondary—
Quamiohan
 .
1,013
491
161
17
62
170
90
116
132
547
91
47
86
189
86
42
96
227
145
22
513
286
91
11
34
82
43
55
65
294
48
22
46
97
47
24
54
135
60
10
,        500
205
70
6
28
88
47
61
67
253
43
25
40
92
39
18
42
92
85
12
-	
64
18
25
31
21
22
109
6
32
10
17
29
18
7
Elementary—
64
36
37
20
19
29
106
8
26
12
16
33
18
7
69
23
26
rfihhle. Will
39
17
20
7
86
Maple Bay-
Mill fl-.y
27
14
17
35
15
Westholme                                                     	
8
Sub-totals	
2,817
4,492
504
44
93
1,504
2,356
286
21
46
1,313
2,136
218
23
47
	
431
431
8
24
409
409
8
11
1
403
Totals
403
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Elementary—
Caycuse
Honeymoon Bay
8
16
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 171
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occu
Occu
Occu
Pri-
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
medi
pa
pa
pa
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
ate
tional
tional
tional
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
Special
Special
1
2
3
266 '
235
60
26
24
15
87
92
87
_
90
100
82
	
 .—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
114
151
106
	
	
27
16
18
22
	
26
24
15
291
343
275
	
	
.
29
34
25
37
,
72
59
54 i
51
24
18
23
25
	
	
	
	
 i
 .	
	
10
15
12
9
	
	
	
—
	
28
14
24
22
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
22
16
18
	
	
	
	
	
..
	
17
9
9 i
19
.
	
	
6
16
15
18
	
	
„
	
	
	
 .
33
35
35
36
	
	
	
19
11
9
17
	
...
	
	
	
	
	
15
14
10
14
15
15
	
	
	
	
	
——
	
42
41
63
59
	
-
	
	
	
15
341
300
317
348
15
.
  i
	
15
341
300
317
348
15
26
24
15
291
343
275 '
266
235
60
38
27
42
42
41
37
42
42
34
3
1
2
2
5
1
	
	
3
2
3
5
_
	
	
1
	
	
	
5
2
6
        i
	
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
5
	
	
	
1
	
	
	
11
10
10
13
12
1
	
	
	
	
49
37
52
55
	
	
	
53
38
42
42
34
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
22
159
281
175
25
	
	
	
	
	
	
35
33
	
■
79
184
70
127
711
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
141
164
109
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
35
33
	
404
3-61
180
	
	
	
77
82
53 I
66
16
	
17
18
23
15
28
	
	
 '
	
	
	
	
,
 i
	
	
	
22
26
12
33
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
25
i      26
	
	
	
	
- _
	
,	
	
	
	
	
13
13
.16
17
	
	
.	
 —
	
	
 .
11
19
15
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
	
91
82 i
84
44
.   .
	
—
—
—
	
	
	
 _
91
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
9
10
	
21
24
27
32
	
	
-
—
	
	
	
	
	
6
42
44
	
	
	
	
—
—
	
	
	
	
11
11
24
	
	
	
	
36
37
20
37
__
_
	
—
- _
	
12
27
24
31
	
.....
 _
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
——
	
48
350
388
340
388
60
	
	
	
	
48
350
388
340
388
60
35
33
22
404
361
339
281
175
25
	
4
111
5
	
	
6
4
5
127
115
92
60
95
	
	
16
11
15
	
	
	
	
	
-
 F 172
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
"I
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
J. H. Boyd                    _	
127
27
28
25
540
223
51
10
1           12
13
271
108
76
17
16
12
269
1115
64
53
39
38
6
6
5
50
32
25
3
4
6
42
29
6
4
4
77
Yount
32
Sub-totals                .           	
1,107
1,611
380
509
345
40
57
36
365
161
131
9
532
818
i        210
244
184
17
29
25
186
86
69
3
575
793
170
265
161
23
28
11
179
75
62
6
156
156
169
169
31
11
11
11
54
18
32
1
128
128
45
12
'      15
6
43
18
14
147
Totals
147
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
Secondary—Chemainus  -	
Elementary-Senior Secondary-—Ladysmith	
Elementary—
43
10
14
6
51
25
21
Thetis Island         	
—
1
Sub-totals
1,144
2,033
1,208
790
914
258
406
115
29
262
606
26
323
142
32
350
243
105
259
69
164
200
320
201
206
432
128
96
126
96
44
599
1,053
640
426
470
126
199
51
16
135
306
16
175
70
14
169
128
57
122
41
93
95
184
102
101
229
63
45
64
52
24
545
980
568
364
444
132
207
64
13
127
300
10
148
72
18
181
115
48
137
28
71
105
136
99
105
203
65
51
62
44
20
169
169
153
153
171
Totals
171
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
89
	
52
42
12
Elementary—
63
33
25
34
49
14
Christopher Robin	
37
33
5
60
43
7
44
34
21
40
24
46
93
54
33
28
19
22
19
6
38
35
4
38
36
6
35
31
12
40
19
29
89
38
30
23
19
22
17
8
38
33
3
54
34
7
Harewood— —	
44
34
38
22
39
40
40
37
Northfield-	
18
36
80
35
23
Rock City                                                     	
24
Rutherford  	
Seaview	
17
15
13
Waterloo   	
5
Sub-totals  	
5,238
8,150
370
479
42
85
105
29
23
2,677
4,213
188
255
21
49
54
16
6
2,561
3,937
182
224
21
36
51
13
17
252
252
774
774
39
7
15
16
4
690
690
35
4
12
13
6
663
Totals. -                	
663
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Parksville -	
Elementary—
48
3
	
11
23
Hilliers - -	
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 173
ENROLMENT—
Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
2
2
4
81
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
6
4
63
23
3
6
2
72
33
	
	
88
19
	
14
	
	
14
14
125
125
50
7
17
125
125
136
136
107
107
87
65
	
6
20
4
17
5
10
127
83
84
115
75
117
92
72
86
60
70
68
95
53
47
	
44
67
	
	
	
56
13
14
3
	
13
67
21
23
1
83
23
13
3
25
14
11
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
186
186
130
130
189
189
104
191
29
29
167
344
329
192
158
230
108
174
13
20
17
32
10
41
138
455
100
399
83
30
276
327
49
55
18
38
121
5
40
	
84
15
45
51
21
	
15
42
25
42
112
7
41
30
	
	
	
	
29
	
37
73
2
53
29
2
50
32
14
38
32
187
12
	
	
	
	
	
37
	
	
	
4
36
41
14
30
6
33
39
22
37
21
	
74
28
37
	
	
	
	
14
16
	
	
	
27
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
58
34
14
9
17
13
25
11
8
63
44
20
14
21
13
9
43
154
16
14
21
9
8
	
199
	
	
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
	
	
87
713
713
689
689
692
692
624
708
54
54
32
17
41
673
58
65
603
61
67
512
76
455
86
399
72
87
30
12
83
16
48
11
14
24
56
10
11
20
4
34
7
9
19
59
13
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
  |     	
..
1
1
 F 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 69 (Qualicum)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Little Qualicum	
Nanoose..
Qualicum Beach.
Sub-totals..
Totals	
District No. 70 (Alberni)
Secondary—Alberni District	
Junior Secondary—A. W. Neill-
Elementary—
Alberni	
Beaver Creek—
C. T. Hilton	
Calgary	
Cherry Creek—
Eighth Avenue .
Faber	
Franklin River..
G. W. Gray	
Gill	
Glenwood—
John Howitt-
Maebelle	
Maquinna..
Redford	
Riverbend.
Sproat	
Wood	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
Senior Secondary—Courtenay	
Junior Secondary—
Comox	
Cumberland .
Lake Trail—
Sub-totals.
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Tsolum.
Elementary—
Arden	
Black Creek .
Brooklyn	
Comox	
Courtenay..
Cumberland	
Denman Island..
Fanny Bay	
Glacier View	
Hornby Island _
Puntledge Park.
Royston	
Sandwick...	
Union Bay	
Sub-totals ...
Totals	
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
Senior Secondary—Campbell River	
Secondary—Campbell River	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Manson's Landing  	
Sayward 	
Sub-totals. 	
Elementary—
Campbellton.
Cedar	
40
87
160
571
1,420
1,299
756
583
164
190
424
182
626
83
43
214
418
128
215
109
377
278
53
165
293
4,545
6,600
659
348
236
457
1,041
583
201
151
219
638
732
398
29
31
93
17
289
267
23
100
3,188
5,471
284
887
63
169
232
441
673
21
40
84
291
734
650
366
296
84
110
237
99
311
43
21
112
203
74
119
54
195
153
30
83
156
2,380
3,396
336
174
120
249
543  |
298
107
71
108
344
382
197
16
18
52
10
145
141
12
54
1,657
2,834
142
449
39
86
125
219
352
19
47
76
280
686
649
390
287
80
80
187
83
315
40
22
102
215
54
96
55
182
125
23
82
137
2,165
3,204
323
174
116
208
498
285
94
80
111
294
350
201
13
13
41
7
144
126
11
46
1,531
2,637
142
438
24
83
107
222
321
44
122
126
42
36
326
370
10
42
94
133
76
22
60
58
34
92
16
7
39
64
24
29
21
27
31
16
29
35
68
103
60
26
65
58
25
92
15
6
36
57
21
33
19
28
44
19
26
47
680
680
677
677
48
28
29
35
100
117
49
1
3
12
4
57
37
9
19
36
34
38
47
79
95
57
5
6
24
2
42
38
14
14
500
548
4
29
495
531
10
21
33
31
64   70
112   107
I
7
13
19
76
124
77
15
65
57
23
101
15
5
33
63
18
48
21
29
60
18
29
49
726
726
41
41
27
35
77
80
52
5
4
15
1
38
32
17
424
465
5
16
21
64
108
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 175
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
6
16
16
3
16
24
11
14
24
13
	
	
	
20
	
96
144
69
20
52
22
76
16
7
36
52
11
35
21
61
40
88
144
84
118
65
124
81
17
53
11
12
56
17
37
123
127
384
76
201
155
86
315
72
290
16
128
194
217
34
45
102
23
65
15
15
	
	
	
	
1
56
20
84
10
6
25
60
9
30
16
75
34
69
26
102
11
8
19
64
12
21
11
64
33
74
32
79
ZZ
	
	
3
26
58
11
19
56
28
30
	
	
22
	
	
37
22
	
	
	
	
14
	
	
22
62
15
37
16
33
	
 *
	
29
602
602
557
557
614
614
514
514
145
145
1
512
411
126
92
137
356
315
318
29
	
56
23
37
34
290
252
45
89
—_
	
	
115
94
144
107
50
129
	
	
17
7
37
30
35
32
67
90
49
72
28
23
17
7
353
80
355
48
286
52
	
	
49
20
22
36
54
84
46
6
6
13
1
34
31
60
20
69
57
46
7
3
40
31
~"l7
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
34
54
67
42
5
6
13
2
40
25
16
10
	
	
16
5
	
	
	
6
16
4
38
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
—	
	
	
	
12
12
9
37
416
453
365
414
325
397
290
350
10
26
403
222
8
11
252
133
37
23
17
7
433
338
318
132
74
2
89
19
20
24
28
281
7
13
238
3
7
4
21
2
17
6
14
7
20
5
25
62
73
19
54
90
20
53
89
27
57
72
	
20
19
10
2
5
17
	
	
22
 F 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 72 (Campbell River)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
124
291
108
149
205
50
10
9
352
63
145
59
75
106
28
7
3
183
61
146
49
74
99
22
3
6
169
37
17
28
50
18
21
29
1
1
71
21
37
17
26
33
7
2
3
56
25
Elm
44
12
18
26
13
1
1
2
Willow Point
39
2,412
3,815
1,043
26
171
56
194
207
21
132
57
16
11
598
18
62
18
19
239
1,240
1,956
575
15
86
27
99
118
12
66
26
8
8
323
8
30
8
9
128
1,172
1,859
468
11
85
29
95
89
9
66
31
8
3
275
10
32
10
10
111
55
55
395
428
23
8
20
24
9
19
8
7
4
90
10
6
8
7
32
379
410
17
3
16
29
12
20
9
5
3
87
8
8
5
6
36
352
Totals                                      	
373
District No. 75 (Mission)
Elementary—■
Bell Road                                                        	
28
11
21
27
	
15
6
4
4
98
	
7
Silverhill                                                 -	
5
Stave Falls                 	
6
29
1,845
2,888
464
6
81
32
241
52
12
971
1,546
227
2
34
18
134
35
4
874
1,342
237
4
47
14
107
17
8
	
275
275
2
7
8
52
14
3
264
264
1
4
6
43
8
2
261
Totals                                               	
261
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary—■
51
15
4
Kent                                           —   ..
49
21
2
424
888
493
540
127
227
454
240
279
60
197
434
253
261
67
51
51
86
86
69
18
64
64
65
21
91
Totals                                             	
91
District No. 77 (Summerland)
Elementary—
84
Trout Creek    -  -
16
Sub-totals                                 	
667
1,160
276
59
28
45
35
276
44
14
339
579
146
23
14
28
19
150
25
5
328
581
130
36
14
17
16
126
19
9
87
87
9
6
8
7
52
9
5
86
86
8
3
6
4
31
6
1
100
Totals                                                	
100
District No. 78 (Enderby)
Secondary—Enderby     	
Elementary—
10
4
3
4
40
5
Trinity Creek 	
3
501
777
1
264
410
237
367
96
96
59
59
1
69
Totals                                   	
69
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 177
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
17
41
20
21
28
16
1
1
45
17
34
12
18
22
14
16
22
19
17
21
	
26
10
18
21
	
10
	
8
	
	
	
	
2
1
51
2
56
	
1
34
	
25
325
350
296
315
291
311
262
289
32
32
 28
8
25
20
20
24
11
301
245
241
232
248
195
208
187
138
145
19
5
28
9
25
33
7
24
15
36
23
8
28
10
33
42
22
14
6
23
	
43
29
13
	
23
10
20
10
	
79
	
71
74
67
32
	
	
11
8
5
17
	
	
	
44
35
31
32
	
	
267
267
249
249
43
267
267
48
230
230
58
1
11
32
32
17
11
11
245
66
~195
54
20
8
8
4
232
67
187
50
145
38
2
6
5
46
9
2
23
6
15
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
1
	
	
	
	
70
70
31
74
18
66
13
71
11
7
4
6
17
8
10
66
107
67
103
54
112
50
95
38
53
16
75
18
74
15
86
19
71
20
—
16
93
93
89
89
6
4
12
8
43
7
2
105
105
91
91
9
4
4
4
32
4
7
3
95
40
16
10
14
6
3
107
66
103
65
112
53
53
32
9
4
9
4
37
9
3'
8
3
3
4
31
4
	
	
	
	
	
8
2
	
	
	
	
8
75
75
82
82
53
53
57
57
2
2
3
is
53
8
14
3
66
40
32
	
 F 178
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Total
Boys
Girls
III
District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
Secondary—Ucluelet.    ..
150
43
17
78
260
79
21
10
42
128
71
22
7
36
132
	
15
2
14
33
10
3
17
34
Elementary—
Long Beach   	
8
2
14
32
Port Alhion
Tofino    —  	
Ucluelet 	
Sub-totals	
398
548
692
245
752
567
296
201
280
396
120
382
304
149
197
268
296
125
370
263
147
29
129
105
49
64
64
52
118
82
41
64
64
34
122
75
45
56
56
Totals
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
Elementary—
38
94
65
30
Kildala    	
1,860
2,552
146
16
15
36
193
84
48
955
1,351
81
10
9
26
106
37
23
905
1,201
65
6
6
10
87
47
25
312
312
293
293
54
4
7
6
11
276
276
4
1
5
16
48
227
227
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
Elementary—
Camp Mile 392
2
2
4
40
11
ri, w Carlson
392
538
51
24
14
15
16
97
211
292
30
13
7
9
9
43
181
246
21
11
7
6
7
54
	
28
82
12
4
5
1
4
17
74
74
3
3
1
2
13
59
59
2
9
4
4
4
17
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
Elementary—
Siib-t"tal«
166
217
526
64
11
22
52
19
120
43
81
111
272
36
4
11
25
10
61
24
85
106
254
28
7
11
27
9
59
19
68
31
43
89
1
3
11
2
27
7
19
22
70
5
3
7
3
28
6
38
Totals
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain)
61
District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Captain John Meares	
Elementary—
17
Zeballos 	
6
267
331
445
129
169
259
318
122
135
171
242
55
83
132
161
71
132
160
203
74
86
127
157
51
57
51
51
67
16
23
39
43
12
52
52
69
16
13
32
31
9
39
Totals
39
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Alert Bay
29
14
Port McNeill
16
U   H   Pirhmnnd
22
22
Woss Lake                   	
9
Sub-totals
1,442
231
i
744
118
698
113
57
37
200 |
35 |
1
170
23
112
31
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 179
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
2
1
12
35
	
39
32
40
17
22
8
6
8
28
3
5
29
	
	
	
8
35
17
17
	
17
50
50
14
78
60
28
50
50
29
75
68
24
37
37
23
80
39
27
43
43
17
17
	
14
9
17
90
17
39
154
32
158
40
133
22
103
13
18
26
56
73
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
17
	
	
	
9
180
180
196
196
169
169
181
181
1
1
5
31
17
17
13
14
133
19
9
9
154
43
1
158
30
90
103
18
1
7
39
16
2
1
4
43
15
2
2
5
40
15
	
	
	
	
	
ZZ
	
	
	
	
	
	
63
63
9
2
1
1
1
19
65
65
5
3
1
1
4
11
64
64
4
1
3
1
38
38
5
2
1
44
7
19
4
	
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
1
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
	
24
33
49
6
5
6
13
7
20
25
42
16
20
46
18
23
28
12
1
2
2
1
7
	
4
15
11
9
■ ■
7
34
9
8
	
	
24
15
	
	
2
1
5
5
23
3
	
2
8
	
	
	
ZZ
	
	
	
6
1
	
12
3
	
	
	
	
	
4
	
	
37
37
36
13
19
34
50
12
39
39
38
9
14
23
41
12
25
25
23
10
20
23
22
20
13
25
27
11
13
21
33
11
12
■	
	
10
19
21
14
13
20
20
14
1
16
24
11
13
16
27
7
11
27
5
14
16
10
7
9"
5
7
6
7
7
3
8
10
3
5
6
12
6
	
—_
—_
	
	
	
164
29
137
20
118
17
116
16
—
12
	
102
10
98
7
79
5
42
35
1
	
 F 180
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1965/66
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
ll
Boys
16
10
15
6
94
45
48
28
7
4
14
6
19
7
7
5
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)—Continued
Elementary—
Coal Harbour	
Echo Bay-
Fort Rupert..
Kokish	
Mahatta River—
Nimpkish Lake..
Quatsino-
Winter Harbour..
Sub-totals_
Totals	
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary—Prince Charles	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
J. A. Cochran	
Kaslo 	
Sub-totals..
Elementary—
Argenta	
Canyon.
Crawford Bay_
Creston	
Erickson	
Gray Creek	
Jewett	
Lister	
South Creston..
Wynndel	
Yahk.	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Cassiar	
Elementary—
Atlin	
Good Hope Lake-
Lower Post	
Telegraph Creek—
48 Mile	
Sub-totals_
Totals	
Unattached
Elementary-Senior Secondary—University Hill-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—John Stubbs Memorial-
Elementary—
Comox Airport-
Eric Godson Memorial .
University Hill	
Sub-totals..
Totals	
Grand totals..
220 |
1,893
737
155
293
448 |
27
81
184
774
222
21
81
73
129
128
33
1,753 |
2,938 |
136
23
33
23
58
15
152
288
293
754
551
31
253
835 |
1,882 I
6
9
49
20
3
8
12
2
111
973
392
86
143
229
12
40
91
391
108
8
41
34
67
63
13 |
109
920
345
69
150
219
15
41
93
383
114
13
40
39
62
65
20
1,489
66
10
14
13
33
13
83
149
145
377
292
15
124
431
953
885
1,449
70
13
19
10
25
2
69
139
148
377
259
16
129
404
929
420,790 | 217,311 | 203,479
I      I
50
6
1
23
12
5
4
50
144
99
51
286
18
20
99
99
128
67
38
12
15
16
64
32
6
7
13
45
22
4
236
274
28
6
6
5
17
3
39
232
16
27
43
13
17
71
29
9
10
17
44
22
9
249
292
23
3
5
1
7
3
37 |
65 I
19
42
67
195
128
77
4
58
108
69
5
41
139 |
267 |
3
2
7
11
2
2
2
2
31
174
11
20
31
7
12
5
78
29
6
9
8
40
15
5
~214~
245
17
1
6
6
10
3
"26"
43
95
81
5
40
115 |  126
223 I  221
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
F 181
ENROLMENT—Continued
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
1
8
1
4
3
1
2
5
1
4
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
1
2
2
2
	
	
 .
18
211
8
165
15
150
4
136
	
	
4
116
139
35
44
ii"
129
26
29
12
25
105
156
23
27
42
132
19
13
36
109
7
14
	
8
11
28
25
27
22
25
25
27
22
25
79
50
55
32
21
	
13
37
96
33
20
11
21
7
15
42
102
25
13
34
96
35
	
33
119
39
	
	
	
11
38
	
	
	
	
10
12
14
12
11
16
*
	
 *
	
	
	
23
5
9
3
11
238
263
12
4
6
3
7
1
234
261
12
4
4
4
9
3
216
238
13
3
4
2
6
1
218 |       38
243 |       38
i
8  1
""206
6
  1 	
130
11
25
8
11
218
17
184
164
28
2
2
2
2
	
	
-
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
21
33
24
36
61
57
5
34
16
29
8
16
52
39
64
4
	
1
18
64
40
2
6
51
30
	
	
41
47
38
75
60
3
38
50
63
3
42
	
5
8
	
	
	
	
	
5
101
176
96
157
108
158
68
159
8
8
	
2
106
81
5
  .
41
47
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
	
	
 F 182 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1965/66
RECAPITULATION OF ENROLMENT BY TYPE
Type of School
Total
Enrolment
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Senior Secondary—
4,118
3,719
	
	
	
RirlQ
Totals
7,837 | .     |        |
Secondary—
37,952     .
35,364 1      —
	
Girls
Totals
73 316 1
Junior Secondary—
Boys
18,916
17,474
	
	
	
Girls
Totals
36,390 | |, [	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
11,785
11,004
135
114
388
358
412
323
359
Girls
295
Totals
22,789 |     249
746 |     735 |     654
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
9,138
8,i607
147
1130
679
587
564
543
502
fiirls
509
Totals
17,745 |     277> | 1,266
1,107
1,011
Elementary—
(135,402
1.7,311
6,475   21,194
6,079 119,262
19,141
18.173
18,307
17.6511
Oirls
Totals
262,713 112,554 |40,456
37,314
35,958
Grand totals—
217,311
203,479
6,757
6,323
22,261
20,207
20,117
19,039
19,168
Girls
18,455
Totals
420,790
13,080
42,468
39,156
37,623
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
OF SCHOOL, GRADE, AND SEX OF PUPILS
F 183
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
1
Occupational
2
Occupational
3
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
	
zzlzz
	
	
46
40
	
	
	
, 1,941
1,797
1,674
1,588
457
294
-     |      .      | _ ...
 — 1 —   1   -   -
	
	
86 | ..         |      —
 | 3,738
3,262
751
	
	
	
-----
13
590
382
429
263
357
260
5,685
5,407
5,591
5,357
7,447     8,901
7,035 1 8,420
7,853
, 7,557
1,086
683
-  |    —
	
  - 1   1       13
972
'692
617 |11,092 |10,948
14,482 |17,321  |15,410
1,769
	
	
	
1
9
6
493
262
438
251
1
304 1 7,129
183 1 6,635
6,434
6,084
1
4,109 I
4,053 1     ... .
	
	
	
  | 	
 (	
15
755
689
487 |13,7I64 |12,5I18
8,162 | .   — |
16
11
385
430
432
398
410     1,149
407 1     972
21
18
245
158
121
110
124
101
1,774
1,75.1
1,744
1,660
1,538    1,379     1,139
1,538 | 1,265' [ 1,085
14
10
27 1     815 |,     830
817
2,121
39
403
2311
225 | 3,525
3,404
3,076 | 2,644 | 2,224
24
65        513
41  |     446
519
473
480
460
997
863
103
47
92
78
58
45
23
24
1,879
1,840
1,602
1,637
907
881
5
3
3
	
106 |     959
992
940 | 1,860
,     150
170
103
47 | 3,7119 | 3,239
1,788 |         5 1        6 | 	
1,593   17,625
819 ]16,948
16,917
16,558
16,836
16,105
15,067
14,327
2,184
1,312
	
-       1       54
1       63
7
12
1             1
1            1     	
2,412 |34,573 |33,475
32,941  |29,394
3,496
	
	
 |     117
19
3 |         1  | 	
1,674
871
18,523   17,868
17,824 |ll7,429
17,726
16,972
17,213
16,162
2,330
1,383
1,420
880
1,046
669
854
608
16,521
15,696
15,378
14,750
14,002  12,227   10,669
13,509 |ll,482 |10,233
1,557
987
2,545
36,347
35,297
34,698
33,375
3,713
2,300
1,715
1,462
32,217
30,128
27,511  123,709 120,902
1             1
2,544
 EXAMINATION PAPERS
Copies of examination papers for Grade XII and Grade XIII prepared
by the Department of Education may be obtained, in booklet form only, from
the Director, Textbook Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.   Payment
in full must accompany each order.
LIST OF EXAMINATION BOOKLETS AVAILABLE FOR SALE
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1960  $0.70
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1961        .70
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1962        .70
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1963                                 .             .       .35
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1964        .35
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1965        .35
Grade XII Examination Booklet, 1966        .35
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1960        .50
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1961        .50
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1962        .50
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1963        .30
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1964        .30
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1965        .30
Grade XIII Examination Booklet, 1966    —       .30
I
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1967
5,060-1066-9300

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