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ANNUAL REPORT of the MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH FOR THE YEAR 1964 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1966

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
MOTOR-VEHICLE
BRANCH
FOR THE YEAR
1964
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Motor-
vehicle Branch for the year 1964.
R. W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
A ttorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1965.
  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Motor-vehicle
Branch for 1964. The Report deals with the various activities of the Branch and
the issuance of licences for the 1964 licence-year which ended February 28, 1965.
The constant growth in the level of business activity in British Columbia is
paralleled by the increased demand for the services rendered by the Motor-vehicle
Branch. Our economy is said to be on wheels. Highway transportation, in all its
facets, is an essential ingredient of our type of expanding economy. In 1964 the
Motor-vehicle Branch was confronted by more cars, more trucks, and more drivers—
all with their peculiar types of problems. This will also be the case in the years
ahead.
Areas of the Province which were well cared for by an intermittent level of
service a few years ago are now locations where there are volumes of business needing full-time attention. Particular reference is made to the areas where power-
development projects are located. Unfortunately, the numerical level of our staff
has not kept pace with the growth demands, and it has only been by diminishing
staff in the larger centres that service has been provided in the newly developing
areas. If we are to keep pace with the growth, more personnel is urgently needed,
particularly in the drivers' examination programme.
Indicative of the use of motor-vehicles in British Columbia is the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics report which shows that, at the end of 1964, there were 10
motor-vehicles for every 24 persons in British Columbia, compared to the national
rate of 10 vehicles for every 30 persons. British Columbia shares this lead with
Saskatchewan. For passenger automobiles only, British Columbia leads the country with 10 cars for every 30 persons. Ontario is next with 10 cars for every 33
persons, and the national rate is 10 cars for every 38 persons.
During 1964, development steps were taken toward an electronic data-
processing method of record-keeping. I am pleased to say that technical staff has
been selected from within our existing personnel, and the complex machine-
instruction programmes are well under way. The 1965 motor-vehicle licence records will go into the computer programme as Phase 1 of the development. The
1966 licence renewal applications will be prepared from the computer. Phase 2
will see driver licence records go into the system, commencing early in 1966. By
the end of 1967 it is hoped that Phase 3 will be realized so that the motor-vehicle
and driver licence records will then go into a direct-access computer to allow for
the servicing of information requests from the Courts, enforcement agencies, and
businesses from the various centres of the Province. When this has been achieved,
it will truly be said that information is as readily available at Dawson Creek and
Prince Rupert as it is in Victoria.
A valuable effect of the new record-keeping system will be a dramatic reduction in the space requirement for record-filing. The extensive use of microfilming
procedures and the subsequent destruction of documents will result in space, now
assigned to filing, being made available for other essential clerical use.   The benefits
 L 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of this aspect of the programme will first be seen in 1966, but its full value will not
be realized until two or three years later.
Previous Reports mentioned the potential dangers, from a fire-protection point
of view, in our inadequate record-storage facilities. These facilities are still a problem, which will continue in this manner for two or three years. At the end of that
period our filing space for vital records will be condensed sufficiently so they may
be retained in reasonably good fireproof accommodation. At that time back-up
records will be stored at a Government storage location situated some distance away
from our headquarters building.
Activities of the Branch are dealt with under the following headings:—
1. Licences.
2. Accidents and Convictions.
3. Driving Safety.
(a) Safety Responsibility.
(b) Examination of Drivers.
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme.
(d) Motor-vehicle Inspection.
4. Central Registry.
5. School Buses.
6. Staff.
1. LICENCES
Motor-vehicles licensed in British Columbia in 1964 reached the total of
705,380, as compared to 657,174 in 1963, an increase of 48,006 or 7.3 per cent.
The increase rate in British Columbia for 1964 continues the trend of previous years,
which sees the vehicle growth rate considerably in excess of the national average of
4 per cent.
Passenger-type motor-vehicles licensed in 1964 numbered 571,807, in increase
of 40,691 over the 1963 total of 531,116. Commercial-vehicle registration increased by 7,515 to the 1964 total of 133,573 from the 1963 total of 126,058.
The increase in motor-cycle registration of 3,733 from the 1963 total of 5,279
to the 1964 total of 9,012 (71 per cent) reveals clearly the renewed interest in that
field of highway transportation. For many years the number of licences in this
category was constant at slightly more than 4,000 vehicles. The advent of the small
types of motor-cycles has interested a whole new field of vehicle-users. All signs
indicate that registrations in this category will continue at the very high rate experienced in 1964.
Whilst trailer registrations continue to increase—the 1964 total of 66,725 is
an increase of 4,609 over the 62,116 registration total of 1963—the rate of increase
at 7.4 per cent is below the 10-per-cent growth rate in the previous years. It is of
interest to note that the increase in trailer registrations between 1957 and 1964 is
125 per cent.
The comparative statement of licences, permits, etc., for motor-vehicles, trailers, and chauffeurs covers the volumes in these categories during licence-years 1957
to 1964, inclusive:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964
L 7
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., Issued during
the Licence-years 1957 to 1964, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
Motor-vehicles—
Passenger (new) _   _ __
Passenger (renewal)   	
Total passenger  	
Commercial (new)	
Commercial (renewal) _   —
Total commercial  	
Total motor-vehicles ....
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle permits
Non-resident special motor-vehicle permits
Non-resident commercial motor-vehicle permits 	
Single trip    	
Quarterly permits _£	
Total _.	
Extra-provincial prorated trucks  —
Temporary operation permits _	
Passenger..  ...  	
Commercial __J __  	
Total   	
Transporter—
Original ..	
Additional J __:	
Motor-cycles—
New  : _	
Renewal  ._ 	
Total	
Trailers j    	
Extra-provincial prorated trailers 	
Motor-dealers—
Original licences  _ 	
Additional plates „_	
Original motor-cycle dealer licences	
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences	
Salesmen's licences _.__ 	
Transfers^—   .,
Passenger^ 1   	
Commercial	
Motor-cycle	
Trailers   	
Total transfers , . . .
Chauffeurs—■
Original Class A ._: .....
Original Class B _._	
Original Class C — _.:	
Searches * ,';";.: .
Safety responsibility insurance certificates filed
50,990  43
320,737 349,
576 49.
761 370,
2681 45,364
154|400,686
48,348 56.
419,022 438;
,822 67,659
486 463,457
76,388
495,419
371,727|393,337|419,422|446,050
15,6851 11.676J 12,985     9,603
100,432| 106,190] 108,956 104,618
116,117|117,866|121,941| 114,221
487,844|511,203]541,363|560,271
1,384
245
1,100
149
965
109
1,302
198
8,493
10,056
13,197
16,525
344
8,493]  10,056|  13,197]  16,869
467,370|495,308|531,116|   571,807
10,576   11,886] 13,830
106,095 108,843 j 112,228
16,604
116,969
116,67U120,729]126,058|   133,573
584,041|616,037]657,174|   705,380
1,343
187
1,551
157
1,6131       1,446
110|          111
15,831
2,471
12,069
1,772
12,478
2,241
13,221
2,746
18,302| 13,841] 14,719]     15,967
11,575
11,575
602
3,112
13,333
18,100
2,048
7,805
16,273
7,719
19,988
13,333| 18,100| 24,078
27,707
577
3,464
678
3,450
603
3,477
1,822
8,732 10,076
20,490 25,429
2,203
11,237
30,368
29,222| 35,505]  41,605
652   706  1,342
3,587  3,6831 3,937
9
67
4,209
4,803.
3,714|    4,041|    4,128|    4,080
4,239|    4,389|    5,279|       9,012
724
979
11
6
908
215,896
45,671
3,173
830
34,928
730
43,682
755
925
970
15
31
7
19
919
1,024
218,513
229,655
46,536
48,061
3,190
3,080
1,046
1,513
748
989
40
16
1,008
224,037
40,612
2,750
1,318
53,109
782
817
28
10
954
228,311
41,800
2,726
1,510
56,434
62,116
3,391
3,647
885
968
866
884
44
51
13
16
1,044
1,182
256,580
284,641
43,610
44,899
2,976
3,349
2,818
4,069
66,725
4,042
1,057
966
91
24
1,296
304,487
47,618
5,312
4,489
265,570]269,285]282,309|268,717
274,347|305,984|336,958|   361,906
5,251
4,269
65,159
805,528
13,123
5,207
5,295
4,112
4,485
61,556
64,359
639,269
328,115
12,785
13,018
5,368
4,756
65,209
887,170
12,297
5,518
5,672
5,891
4,925
5,010
5,320
64,446
63,677
67,781
1,493,937
796,687
641,992
12,523
13,741
14,281
5,910
5,432
72,484
1,619,395
15,563
Drivers' Licences
Drivers' licences issued in 1964 to applicants not previously licensed to drive
in British Columbia (original drivers' licences) totalled 55,321, an increase of 5.1
per cent over the 1963 total of 52,653. Original drivers' licences issued to applicants under 21 years of age numbered 24,036, and original licences to adult applicants totalled 31,285.
Licensed drivers at the end of 1964 were 814,483. Male drivers accounted
for 65.96 per cent of the total, or 537,239. Female drivers totalled 277,244. This
distribution continues the trend of previous years, which has seen the percentage of
male drivers gradually decline. Expectation is that this trend will continue for
some years.
 L 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table sets out statistical information on the number of drivers
in the various age-groups. Particular note is made of the number of drivers in the
" over 85 years " category, which continues to increase rapidly from 177 in 1962
to 255 in 1963, to 483 in 1964. Persons in this age-group, as is the case with all
drivers in the " 70 years and over " group, must requalify frequently in a driver's
re-examination, which includes a comprehensive medical examination.
The percentage distribution in the table closely follows the pattern noted in
previous years, with slight increases in the percentage of drivers under 25 years of
age and over 50 years of age.
Drivers' Licences—Statistical Information by Age-groups
Age
Year of Birth
Number
Per Cent
of Total
16-20 years.	
21-24   „	
25-30    „    	
31-35    „    	
36-40    „    	
41^15    „    	
46-50    „   	
51-55    „	
56-60    „    ...	
61-65    „    	
66-69    „	
70-75    „	
76-80    „    	
81-85    „	
Over 85 years....
Totals
1945-1949
1941-1944
1935-1940
1930-1934
1925-1929
1920-1924
1915-1919
1910-1914
1905-1909
1900-1904
1896-1899
1890-1895
1885-1889
1880-1884
1879 and prior
68,077
75,679
113,175
96.165
94,736
92,379
75,472
68,683
49.121
33,577
18,041
17,687
8,275
2,933
483
814,483
8.36
9.29
13.90
11.81
11.63
11.34
9.27
8.43
6.03
4.12
2.21
2.17
1.02
0.36
0.06
100.00
Male 	
Female 	
Totals
Number
.. 537,239
.. 277,244
.. 814,483
Per Cent
65.96
34.04
100.00
Chauffeurs' Licences
The number of chauffeurs' licences issued in 1964 totalled 83,926, an increase
of 4,834 over the 1963 total of 78,992. The number of Class A category chauffeurs
licensed to drive buses stayed constant, increasing slightly to 5,910 from 5,891 in
1963. The Class B licences issued to taxi-drivers increased to 5,432 over the 1963
total of 5,320. The major increase in chauffeurs' licence issuance was for the Class
C licence required by truck-drivers. The 1964 total was 72,484, compared to
67,781 in 1963.
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The distribution of motor-vehicles in the various centres of the Province is
always of interest. The following table gives information concerning the numbers
of licences issued through the principal licence offices. Since vehicle-owners move
frequently from one area to another, and vehicles are often sold to new owners
residing in different locations from the previous owners, the table cannot be regarded
as an accurate population count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province.
However, the table does provide a guide as to the distribution of vehicles throughout
the Province, and it is of use to groups concerned with community planning projects
and development.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964 L 9
Summary of Passenger Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Motor-vehicle Act and
Commercial Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Department of Commercial
Transport Act, by Issuing Office, during 1964 Licence-year.
Issuing Office
Passenger Motor-vehicles
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
Commercial Motor-vehicles
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
Grand
Total
Abbotsford	
Alberni .	
Ashcroft.. 	
Atlin 	
Burns Lake 	
Chilliwack 	
Clinton	
Cloverdale  _.
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston  	
Dawson Creek1*-	
Duncan 	
Fernie 	
Fort Nelson 	
Fort St. John	
Ganges ~—_.: .__...:
Golden . _'.
Grand Forks. ;	
Kamloops	
Kaslo  i	
Kelowna  _.
Kitimat .	
Lillooet  	
Merritt.—  :_..
Mission	
Nanaimo.—  _.
Nelson  	
New Westminsters*-
North Vancouver^*..:
Oliver	
Penticton. __	
Pouce Coupe 	
Powell River... 	
Prince George 	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton  ...
Quesnel	
Revelstoke 	
Rossland—	
Salmon Arm _	
Smithers 	
Terrace	
Trail.___ 	
Vancouver**	
Vancouver East*	
Vancouver-Pt. Grey*
Vanderhoof 	
Vernon  	
Victorias*	
Williams Lake	
Prorate   ~. 	
Totals -
152
149
52
3
56
358
' 32
437
445
511
146
516
181
161
. 115
551
16
526
31
573
38
632
93
21
120
53
282
316
1,755
613
65
467
56
75
859
119
19
150
131
23
203
70
93
227
3,021
1,629
1,228
83
339
1,959
174
724
615
21
3
74
863
35
957
874
590
182
648
550
99
14
552
234
139
1,376
4
1,075
354
20
128
367
943
700
5,660
3,473
62
932
68
235
1,435
472
30
232
180
7
251
250
320
783
12,514
6,266
5,125
62
924
4,796
246
6,203
6,915
944
26
877
10,859
762
17,391
8,733
5,380
1,908
4,514
7,536
1,378
52
3,762
737
2,322
1,843
9,039
249
9,117
2,306
757
1,709
3,192
11,843
7,521
59,683
20,556
2,238
7,620
382
3,639
9,448
3,422
738
2,812
1,493
907
2,794
1,849
2,164
5,930
75,508
46,214
28,911
995
7,752
79,443
3,046
7,079
7,679
1,017
32
1,007
12,080
829
18,785
10,052
6,481
2,236
5,678
8,267
1,638
181
4,865
753
3,082
2,013
10,988
291
10,824
2,753
798
1,957
3,612
13,068
8,537
67,098
24,642
2,365
9,019
506
3,949
11,742
4,013
787
3,194
1,804
937
3,248
2,169
2,577
6,940
91,043
54,109
35,264
1,140
9,015
86,198
3,466
23
16
5
9
22
39
13
52
19
102
54
248
19
124
58
209
5
154
16
109
10
116
6
2
20
6
27
50
156
20
14
77
102
6
185
9
2
38
32
2
30
19
17
15
97
136
38
37
84
87
58
211
2,118
2,352
148
1,442
1,606
12
543
560
4
51
64
82
673
777
228
3,188
3,455
35
610
658
320
4,616
4,988
224
2,218
2,461
196
2,104
2,402
74
1,216
1,344
403
2,766
3,417
175
2,030
2,224
69
762
955
22
67
147
425
2,750
3,384
11
284
300
123
1,415
1,692
48
1,040
1,104
529
3,764
4,402
5
180
195
175
2,749
3,040
48
336
390
8
464
474
61
828
909
69
1,005
1,080
226
2,887
3,140
217
2,915
3,182
769
8,437
9,362
372
2,823
3,215
56
1,017
1,087
242
2,172
2,491
51
409
562
39
836
881
726
4,168
5,079
95
1,010
1,114
15
426
443
134
1,632
1,804
84
601
717
15
207
224
91
1,420
1,541
141
1,178
1,338
193
1,100
1,310
139
1,224
1,378
1,635
12,209
13,941
2,330
6,574
9,040
233
2,054
2,325
70
898
1,005
369
3,434
3,887
1,603
15,753
17,443
238
2,124
2,420
22
242
264
9,431
9,285
1,577
96
1,784
15,535
1,487
23,773
12,513
8,883
3,580
9,095
10,491
2,593
328
8,249
1,053
4,774
3,117
15,390
486
13,864
3,143
1,272
2,866
4,692
16,208
11,719
76,460
27,857
3,452
11,510
1,068
4,830
16,821
5,127
1,230
4,998
2,521
1,161
4,789
3,507
3,887
8,318
104,984
63,149
37,589
2,145
12,902
103,641
5,886
264
19,924
56,464    | 495,419 [ 571,807
2,794    | 13,810    | 116,969 |  133,573 | 705,380
* Correct motor-vehicle population for these areas is as follows:—
1 Dawson Creek (does not include 178 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate
throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 5,678;   commercial, 3,239.
2 New Westminster (includes issuance at Haney, and temporary office at Burnaby during rush period, and
mail-order issuance to New Westminster area from Victoria):   Passenger, 68,434;   commercial, 9,628.
3 North Vancouver (does not include 847 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that
operate throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 24,642;   commercial, 2,368.
4 Vancouver, Vancouver East, and Vancouver-Point Grey (includes issuance from Motor Licence Offices at
1730 West Georgia Street, 2410 Nanaimo Street, and 6237 West Boulevard, and mail-order issuance to Vancouver area from Victoria; does not include issuance at North Vancouver; does not include 147 commercial plates
issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia; issuance at Sechelt and Squam-
ish, which account through Vancouver, has been deducted):   Passenger, 192,082;   commercial, 25,762.
5 Victoria (does not include mail-order issuance to other areas; does not include 1,274 passenger and 4,084
commercial plates issued for Provincial Government vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia; does
not include 481 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia; issuance of 264 commercial plates to prorated vehicles has been deducted): Passenger, 61,203; commercial,
8,674.
 L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue
Revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch from licences, permits, and
other services, and in the payment of social services tax, increased by 8.3 per cent
to $24,499,972.31 in the 1964 licence-year. The increase was $1,882,276.19
over the 1963 total of $22,617,696.12. Social services tax collections amounted to
$1,858,056.04, as compared to $1,611,767.34 in 1963. These collections cover
motor-vehicle and trailer taxes on transactions which do not involve licensed motor-
dealers. The motor-dealers make their payments of tax collections directly to the
Consumer Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance.
Offices of this Branch collected 67.06 per cent of total collections, in the
amount of $16,431,224.53. Offices of the Department of Finance, which carry
out licence-issuing service in areas not served by the Motor-vehicle Branch, collected
the balance of 32.94 per cent. These percentages approximate closely those for the
1963 licence-year.
The locations of Motor-vehicle Branch offices are listed below, and the 1964
revenue collection at each office is shown:—
Vancouver     $3,734,778.01
Victoria        3,253,513.55
New Westminster       2,315,601.91
Vancouver East       2,187,502.17
Vancouver-Point Grey        1,031,330.20
Cloverdale   753,930.39
North Vancouver  739,303.60
Kamloops   598,341.55
Chilliwack   580,002.27
Dawson Creek  502,580.01
Abbotsford   3 30,013.18
Trail   247,748.81
Mission   156,578.88
Total   $ 16,431,224.53
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 11
Refunds
The Motor-vehicle Act provides that licence fees be refunded in some instances
where licences are surrendered to the Motor-vehicle Branch; for instance, the fee
for the unexpired full years of a driver's licence is refundable upon surrender of the
licence. Owners of vehicles who leave the Province, taking their vehicles with them,
may obtain refunds. Refunds are obtainable on commercial-vehicle licences where
vehicles are transferred, and the new owners are required to relicence at the gross
vehicle weight at which they intend to operate the vehicles.
Another statutory refund is made for vehicles, located east of the Cascades,
which are not operated in the winter months. Some years ago a large number of
these refunds was made, but the total continues to dwindle, reflecting on the ability
to operate vehicles on an all-year-round basis in practically every area of the
Province.
The following table sets out the number of refunds and the amounts of money
refunded for the 1964 licence-year:—
Type of Refund Number Amount
Drivers' licences     1,669 $4,584.00
Motor-vehicle licences, general refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger  1,073 $10,412.62
Dealers' licences        47 309.51
Chauffeurs' licences        17 25.50
Department of Commercial Transport Act—commercial      448 18,929.33
     1,585             29,676.96
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger  6,820 $39,266.25
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial      912 30,459.81
Farm commercial        41 514.64
7,773             70,240.70
Seasonal refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger        316 $1,965.03
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial       331 13,479.23
Farm commercial        63 1,026.95
        710             16,471.21
Refunds on transfers—
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial      382 $67,372.09
Farm commercial        39 803.76
        421             68,175.85
Totals   12,158 $189,148.72
 L 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
2. ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor-vehicle Accidents
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1954 to 1964:—
Accidents
Deaths
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Motor-
Number
per 1,000
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Fatal
Accidents
Year
vehicles
Registered
of
Accidents
Vehicles
Registered
Injuries
Deaths
Property
Damage
Accidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1954 _____
367,967
22,425
61.05
7,582
211
5.7
$325.67
7.38
181
6.33
1955	
405,578
22,030
55.10
8,263
225
5.6
392.79
7.51
194
6.47
1956	
450,493
24,905
55.34
9,700
316
7.0
437.05
9.03
272
7.77
1957 ._.._
487,844
25,976
53.24
9,521
252
5.1
482.76
6.70
224
5.96
1958 ......
506,398
24,583
48.54
9,814
282
5.5
480.72
7.01
246
6.12
1959	
536,120
25,536
47.63
10,541
309
5.7
478.79
7.55
268
6.55
1960	
566,144
26,091
46.08
11,311
294
5.2
474.78
6.73
253
5.79
1961	
589,917
27,203
46.11
12,101
320
5.4
475.08
7.07
272
6.01
1962	
609,215
29,077
44.65
13,382
385
6.3
489.05
7.96
322
6.66
1963.	
648,303
30,924
47.82
14,585
360
5.6
503.65
7.00
309
6.01
1964
700,048
38,368
54.81
16,911
393
5.6
523.39
6.90
345
6.06
CITIES
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
	
Per Cent
— 100.0
— 100.0
1
Per Cent
— 100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
100.0
33
2
36
20
24
34
40
2
5
11
8
81
34
2
75
30
45
57
58
12
4
6
3
109
1
111
16
121
13
415
208
87
74
107
40
195
52
30
14
8
43
4,777
80
659
26
Per Cent
3.0
108.0
1
1
50.0
88.0
1
1
-10O.O
100.0
100.0
1
68.0
1
45.0
500.0
Fernie 	
1
1
100.0
—20.0
—45.0
1
100.0
-100.0
100.0
100.0
2
1
100.0
-100.0
100.0
100.0
200.0
—75.0
300.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—50.0
—63.0
2
86.0
100.0
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
1
4
2
1
4
1
92
11
134
16
459
148
66
44
61
52
94
44
16
7
5
24
4,312
60
543
32
21.0
45.0
Nanaimo _ _ _ _	
2
— 10.0
— 19.0
New Westminster. 	
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
4
2
1
4
1
200.0
-80.0
— 10.0
41.0
32.0
300.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—67.0
68.0
75.0
—23.0
2
3
2
2
107.0
18.0
88.0
	
100.0
60.0
Trail
13.0
-63.0
-100.0
79.0
Vancouver         	
37
1
9
1
69
44
1
3
19.0
-67.0
-100.0
38
1
8
1
43
1
3
11.0
33.0
21.0
White Rock         _ ...
— 19.0
Totals...         . 	
74
7.0
67
73
9.0
6,516
7,512
15.0
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L  13
The toll of motor-vehicle accidents continues to grow. During 1964 the
number of persons killed increased from 360 in 1963 to a new high of 393, an
increase of 9 per cent.
During 1964 reportable accidents totalled 38,368, an increase of 7,444 or
24 per cent over the 1963 total of 30,924. The number of fatal accidents increased
from 309 to 345, an increase of 36 or 12 per cent. Accidents resulted in a greater
number of personal injuries, totalling 16,911, an increase of 2,326 or 16 per cent
over the 1963 total of 14,585.
Accidents resulting in property damage increased from 21,145 to 26,913 in
1964, an increase of 5,768 or 27 per cent. The property damage as a result of
these accidents amounted to $20,081,488.85, an increase of $4,338,580.98 or
28 per cent.
The preceding table provides figures to show a substantial increase in the
accidents per 1,000 vehicles registered, though the deaths and fatal accidents per
100 million miles driven remains fairly constant. The percentage increase in all
types of motor-vehicle accidents in 1964 over 1963 is alarmingly high. It indicates
that there is a need for a solution to the problem of irresponsibility on our highways.
The following table sets out accident statistics of the various cities, municipalities, villages, and districts of British Columbia for 1963 and 1964:—
the Province for the Calendar Years 1963 and 1964
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
21
28
33.0
134
171
28.0
76
104
37.0
$44,308.00
$52,575.51
19.0
2
2
.
11
22
100.0
8
14
75.0
1,326.00
5,250.40
296.0
25
50
100.0
181
288
59.0
104
168
62.0
36,717.75
66,044.03
79.0
16
23
44.0
137
174
27.0
76
98
29.0
31,672.22
51,377.84
62.0
16
30
88.0
147
182
24.0
76
103
36.0
35,201.15
46,504.85
32.0
22
43
95.0
229
306
34.0
122
169
39.0
53,570.00
76,113.16
42.0
31
35
13.0
195
205
5.0
116
118
2.0
44,171.85
48,997.14
11.0
2
8
300.0
19
28
47.0
11
18
64.0
13,885.00
9,517.50
-32.0
5
4
—20.0
41
60
46.0
21
37
76.0
7,407.00
14,540.00
96.0
8
3
—63.0
42
48
14.0
25
27
8.0
10,034.00
10,991.77
10.0
5
3
-40.0
12
15
25.0
8
11
38.0
13,250.00
4,095.00
-69.0
51
79
55.0
455
763
68.0
239
393
64.0
111,185.01
195,907.56
76.0
4
12
200.0
2
7
250.0
700.00
3,810.00
444.0
69
71
3.0
392
492
26.0
219
262
20.0
82,417.22
121,417.22
48.0
5
10
100.0
56
115
105.0
33
63
91.0
15,253.74
29,360.91
92.0
92
90
-2.0
594
648
9.0
322
360
12.0
131,387.97
154,424.78
18.0
11
11
	
116
144
24.0
64
82
28.0
30,655.69
37,862.03
24.0
289
293
1.0
1,997
2,171
9.0
1,011
1,117
10.0
477,994.06
519,182.03
9.0
105
152
45.0
637
1,023
61.0
333
525
58.0
15'3,408._7
246,720.90
61.0
47
58
23.0
302
377
25.0
175
205
17.0
71,337.74
89,535.95
26.0
33
53
61.0
334
357
7.0
183
198
8.0
80,307.90
97,092.66
21.0
44
59
34.0
219
287
31.0
130
161
24.0
55,615.02
90,893.56
63.0
27
28
4.0
146
136
-7.0
82
78
—5.0
38,968.66
35,177.04
— 10.0
65
139
114.0
594
1,160
95.0
316
613
94.0
144,005.78
300,105.53
108.0
38
35
-8.0
305
366
20.0
167
201
20.0
79,459.50
78,550.47
— 1.0
12
22
83.0
102
179
75.0
58
103
78.0
20,248.70
39,678.51
96.0
5
10
100.0
36
85
136.0
22
46
109.0
5,929.99
13,697.59
131.0
3
8
167.0
41
57
39.0
23
36
57.0
10,683.65
17,114.94
60.0
17
26
53.0
154
256
66.0
84
143
70.0
35,805.76
59,763.74
67.0
3,088
3,455
12.0
16,905
20,501
21.0
9,044
11,327
25.0
3,801,212.38
4,860,521.83
28.0
41
57
39.0
279
378
35.0
145
212
46.0
68,679.12
92,509.62
35.0
380
467
23.0
2,732
3,180
16.0
1,411
1,642
16.0
569,220.50
656,631.36
15.0
21
24
14.0
120
164
37.0
68
92
35.0
28,427.64
41,550.23
46.0
4,596
5,377
17.0
27,668
34,350
24.0
14,774
18,733
27.0
$6,304,448.37
$8,167,697.21
30.0
 L 14
MUNICIPALITIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1963
1964
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
11
1
6
7
1
8
Per Cent
—36.0
33.0
-33.0
33.0
100.0
—50.0
100.0
— 14.0
-100.0
50.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
14.0
—33.0
200.0
25.0
27.0
100.0
11
1
3
6
1
6
Per Cent
-45.0
100.0
-33.0
33.0
100.0
991
17
152
145
109
63
12
1,048
34
159
3
210
173
35
1
Per Cent
6.0
100.0
5.0
100.0
3
3
2
4
1
3
3
2
4
1
3
1
5
6
45.0
59.0
—44.0
—92.0
6
-50.0
100.0
25.0
— 100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
14.0
—40.0
200.0
25.0
50.0
200.0
6
3
1
6
6
39
43
114
174
65
31
1
194
40
4
9
45
324
269
43
64
20
751
4
233
86
19
138
196
97
18
121.0
—56.0
7
6
1
4
6
1
21.0
Maple Ridge _	
Matsqui               	
13.0
49.0
—42.0
— 100.0
2
3
1
1
3
1
293
64
1
24
59
371
294
15
52
16
774
12
240
51.0
60.0
—75.0
5
1
8
4
3
5
2
1
8
3
3
5
167.0
31.0
7
6
1
4
7
5
1
4
15.0
9.0
—65.0
— 19.0
—20.0
Surrey 	
15
19
12
18
3.0
200.0
3
6
2
6
3.0
Totals     _ 	
82
94
15.0
70
85
21.0
3,956
4,432
12.0
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964       L 15
Province for the Calendar Years 1963 and 1964—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
651
709
9.0
4,033
4,730
17.0
2,055
2,516
22.0
$1,019,406.41
$1,252,671.31
23.0
10
23
130.0
64
113
77.0
40
71
78.0
22,870.15
38,903.68
70.0
88
86
-2.0
451
456
1.0
291
277
—5.0
138,020.12
145,077.87
5.0
	
2
100.0
1
5
400.0
1
4
300.0
110.00
1,450.00
1,218.0
98
141
44.0
561
844
50.0
313
466
49.0
160,338.21
207,027.43
29.0
56
91
63.0
288
385
34.0
181
237
31.0
89,574.42
142,443.43
59.0
37
29
-22.0
206
252
22.0
114
140
23.0
47,342.29
57,880.47
22.0
6
1
-83.0
28
10
—64.0
14
5
—64.0
5,726.00
2,049.89
—64.0
1
100.0
1
100.0
750.00
100.0
22
38
73.0
117
167
43.0
80
117
46.0
46,809.37
73,523.05
57.0
31
11
—65.0
194
186
—4.0
114
103
— 10.0
61,109.56
54,646.26
-11.0
66
92
39.0
393
433
10.0
223
265
19.0
127,042.35
153,468.56
21.0
111
122
10.0
485
533
10.0
295
325
10.0
157,681.06
168,508.88
7.0
47
55
17.0
259
300
16.0
161
187
16.0
99,519.73
94,712.42
-5.0
11
9
-18.0
70
55
—21.0
49
37
—24.0
31,923.90
19,565.98
—39.0
1
— 100.0
3
2
—33.0
2
1
—50.0
1,270.00
1,100.00
— 13.0
135
184
36.0
776
1,147
48.0
430
609
42.0
205,839.73
309,289.58
50.0
33
53
61.0
221
289
31.0
118
162
37.0
44,786.30
105,307.56
135.0
3
1
-67.0
7
2
—71.0
5
1
-80.0
2,295.00
650.00
-72.0
6
14
133.0
42
45
7.0
25
31
24.0
12,133.67
24,970.00
106.0
31
38
23.0
176
244
39.0
105
142
35.0
39,982.28
61,509.58
54.0
219
245
12.0
1,105
1,419
28.0
620
787
27.0
279,247.38
383,459.87
37.0
180
201
12.0
961
1,178
23.0
568
676
19.0
256,430.88
308,019.66
20.0
24
12
—50.0
85
77
-9.0
56
50
— 11.0
36,128.72
42,434.33
17.0
31
30
-3.0
142
110
-92.0
99
83
-16.0
64,861.42
54,414.38
— 16.0
12
11
-8.0
86
64
-26.0
52
43
— 17.0
24,041.55
14,595.50
—39.0
456
443
-3.0
2,163
2,388
10.0
1,229
1,377
12.0
583,020.06
720,875.07
24.0
3
2
—33.0
18
8
—56.0
11
5
-55.0
4,458.02
3,975.00
-11.0
148
159
7.0
947
1,071
13.0
502
563
12.0
251,128.79
278,225.18
11.0
2,516
2,802
11.0
13,882
16,514
19.0
7,753
9,281
20.0
$3,813,097.37|$4,721,504.94
24.0
 L 16
VILLAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1963
19.64
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
Per Cent
-100.0
400.0
-100.0
1
Per Cent
-100.0
200.0
— 100.0
100.0
-100.0
20
2
16
6
6
21
38
30
2
|  12
14
33
3
8
.15
4
11
11
Per Cent
—20.0
Alert Bay                            	
	
200.0
100.0
3
31
5
10
2
2
21
1
2
10
3
7
3
3
600.0
1
1
5
1
1
3
23.0
500.0
—80.0
1
1
1
1
1
1
500.0
100.0
— 100.0
1O0.0
— 100.0
600.0
Fort St. John        ■	
57.0
	
	
200.0
300.0
50.0
3
1
33.0
57.0
267.0
lbo.o
-100.0
— 100.0
5
3
17
15
2
32
2
14
3
100.0
1
9
28
200.0
1
1
1
89.0
1
—46.0
100.0
2
2
2
2
51
3
2
12
—37.0
—33.0
600.0
—75.0
5
2
28
6
15
42
20.0
650.0
50.0
100.6
	
	
—
4
17
9
14
100.0
10
3
6
70.0
100.0
200.0
1
1
133.0
1
1
1
1
22
1
1
19
2
41
7
6
17
3
3
2
5
1
5
86.0
lbo.o
600.0
ibb.b
-100.0
500.0
2
1
-11.0
Sechelt                             	
— 100.0
100.0
1
200.0
100.0
1
1
5
1
3
400.0
Warfield
—100.0
1	
1
— 100.0
6
100.0
Totals                  	
12
14
16.0
10
11!        10.0
342
526
54.0
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 17
Province for the Calendar Years 1963 and 1964—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
13
2
12
5
5
10
25
14
Per Cent
—8.0
150.0
100.0
233.0
4.0
250.0
95
7
13
19
182
40
2
26
18
14
143
3
4
34
11
43
25
9
115
16
33
46
232
74
Per Cent
21.0
129.0
154.0
142.0
27.0
85.0
— 100.0
228.0
179.0
52.0
567.0
30.0
94.0
191.0
44.0
72.0
89.0
100.0
75.0
16.0
— 10.0
100.0
44.0
-43.0
95.0
—29.0
100.0
35.0
273.0
84.0
100.0
38.0
14.0
139.0
100.0
96.0
167.0
300.0
19.0
33.0
—40.0
567.0
150.0
67.0
300.0
114.0
—75.0
64.0
56
5
7
12
97
21
1
66
12
23
32
134
39
Per Cent
18.0
140.0
22.9.0
167.0
38.0
86.0
— 100.0
6.0
208.0
144.0
54.0
600.0
233.0
91.0
300.0
48.0
67.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
13.0
2.0
100.0
38.0
—31.0
86.0
— 18.0
100.0
43.0
271.0
93.0
100.0
41.0
34.0
168.0
100.0
91.0
200.0
233.0
23.0
100.0
—5O.0
400.0
180.0
60.0
100.0
130.0
-67.0
80.0
$14,990.42
1,903.00
3,225.00
2,554.87
47,910.27
12,692.59
175.00
6,579.75
3,608.00
4,453.00
31,215.73
700.00
845.00
18,540.00
5,415.00
10,234.00
7,432.00
2,432.43
$28,903.25
2,342.55
11,023.00
16,547.33
68,616.72
31,256.29
Per Cent
93.0
23.0
242.0
3
24
4
548.0
43.0
146.0
— 100.0
6
2
1
12
1
2
6
2
8
8
24
3
7
13
4
7
6
—67.0
300.0
700.0
100.0
200.0
250.0
117.0
100.0
75.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
26
59
39
217
20
16
66
32
62
43
17
13
7
95
94
20
180
13
39
15
2
54
41
202
17
51
66
91
2
272
8
36
115
4
3
20
25
10
4
30
1
74
17
12
9
76
2
3
22
6
23
15
6
18
37
22
117
14
10
42
24
34
25
12
10
4
52
58
10
99
9
26
9
1
33
26
114
11
31
39
59
1
151
6
20
70
4
2
10
14
8
2
23
1
45
9,783.78
16,566.12
19,844.25
61,545.24
5,035.81
5,603.68
25,439.15
11,231.75
14,984.66
10,550.00
6,096.55
4,775.00
1,850.00
24,117.70
23,213.90
3,490.00
38,139.38
2,016.00
14,065.00
5,125.00
150.00
9,792.29
13,485.00
62,304.92
5,443.92
13,795.37
14,816.27
19,545.59
350.00
88,032.47
2,410.00
19,043.17
52,146.22
950.00
1,900.00
6,145.00
3,962.00
5,802.00
230.00
7,910.66
600.00
19,024.21
49.0
359.0
346.0
97.0
619.0
563.0
37.0
107.0
4
3
2
46.0
42.0
151.0
4
1
13
12
2
54
2
7
2
100.0
1
4
82
105
2
46
57
670.00
18,753.25
32,233.06
176.0
6
15
117.0
—20.0
100.0
—4.0
— 33.0
250.0
—50.0
29.0
—28.0
100.0
25
3
2
4
125
23
20
21
72
13
14
11
23
7
59
60,432.95
4,896.10
3,897.19
8,465.00
—37.0
—59.0
261.0
-40.0
100.0
4
1
16
6
9
23
2
12
6
11
50.0
800.0
44.0
100.0
50.0
100.0
120.0
40
11
110
37
58
38
11,687.00
1,915.00
29,619.11
— 16.0
604.0
110.0
100.0
8
3
5
22
29
22
9,741.02
14,016.88
7,143.12
42.0
6.0
174.0
100 0
18
1
1
8
2
22
2
6
15
1
4
2
4
1
5
6
22.0
100.0
500.0
88.0
-100.0
100.0
300.0
100.0
300.0
139
3
9
97
3
5
3
10
6
1
14
4
45
79
2
6
57
2
4
2
5
5
1
10
3
25
42,492.96
600.00
2,353.30
22,742.90
1,900.00
1,020.00
550.00
1,463.00
1,700.00
107.0
302.0
709.0
129.0
—50.0
1
1,017.0
1
1
241.0
100.0
3
1
2
67.0
— 100.0
200.0
2,760.00
2,650.00
10,792.93
187.0
—77.0
76.0
217
357
65.0
1,701
2,717
60.0
968
1,609
66.0
$469,400.83
$810,001.20
73.0
■
 L 18
UNORGANIZED
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
R.C.M.P. Detachment
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
2
2
Per Cent
100.0
—100.0
100.0
—75.0
700.0
1
1
2
Per Cent
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
—75.0
500.0
68
22
15
23
44
88
Per Cent
29.0
— 100.0
1
1
8
1
1
6
8
13
66
1
1
18
25
45
—47.0
Armstrong  _ _ —
4
1
4
1
—43.0
5O.0
100.0
Tob.6
100.0
1
2
3
1
1
3
100.0
-50.0
—25.0
6
21
28
14
3
200.0
2
5
2
4
19.0
—40.0
100.0
61.0
-100.0
10
45
55
42
26
36
11
—100.0
Burnaby  — -.
1
2
4
3
6
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
5
10O.O
—50.0
-50.0
100.0
—25.0
100.0
100.0
400.0
100 0
2
5
2
4
2
4
1
4
38
51
25
22
32
25
48
18.0
-20.0
50.0
50.0
100.0
100.0
400.0
8.0
68.0
18.0
13.0
Chilliwack  —	
1
.fin
1
38I    —21.0
Colwood   i
3
5
67.0
100.0
—25.0
3
4
33.0
112
185
2
64
53
19
48
41
115
65.0
100.0
2
4
1
6
5
3
4
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
2
1
4
4
3
4
3
1
1
3
1
2
2
4
3
100.0
50.0
62
54
13
45
65
96
21
14
30
16
79
5
105
28
12
10
57
34
39
43
115
40
42
112
10
110
35
5
16
22
19
3.0
Cranbrook   _ ._	
—2.0
46.0
—67.0
-40.0
—67.0
100.0
100.0
-100.0
300.0
—25.0
—75.0
—25.0
-67.0
100.0
100.0
7.0
— 37.0
20.0
451      114.0
Falkland .___ _ 	
2
1
4
17|        21.0
171    —44.0
Field      	
2
1
4
— 100.0
300.0
261        63.0
77
7
37
17
18
30
64
31
31
31
158
74
55
126
10
136
19
30
17
37
24
14
18
11
50
14
4
42
12
30
3.0
40.0
Fort St. John  	
4
3
—25.0
—65.0
—39.0
1
1
3
1
100.0
100.0
-40.0
1
1
3
100.0
100.0
—25.0
50.0
5
200.0
4
12.0
—9.0
1
5
21
6
2
9
1
3
10
3
1
9
1
— 100.0
-21.0
— 100.0
—38.0
—83.0
-44.0
—28.0
Hope  _	
100 Mile House _ 	
13
1
2
5
10
1
1
5
37.0
—67.0
85.0
31.0
Kamloops 	
	
—44.0
13.0
5
1
4
4
1
4
1
3
—20.0
300.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
200.0
4
1
4
4
1
3
1
3
300.0
100.0
50.0
100.0
200.0
24.0
-46.0
500.0
2
2
1
6.0
68.0
1
26.0
100.0
3
2
-33.0
2
2
15
12
26
12
35
36
15
15
96
9
29
200.0
-8.0
Lytton  	
1
6
500.0
1
3
200.0
-50.0
92.0
17.0
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
4
-50.0
	
21          1
— 86.0
Merritt  	
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
17.0
100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
—20.0
100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
Nanaimo __  	
Natal               	
1
1411        47.0
13|        44.0
21          7
331        14.0
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 19
Province for the Calendar Years 1963 and 1964—Continued
In
ury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damag
e
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1963
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
41
56
37.0
170
210
24.0
132
146
11.0
$79,565.52
$93,839.66
18.0
9
	
— 100.0
26
7
—73.0
18
6
-67.0
11,582.00
3,120.00
—73.0
6
5
-17.0
49
38
-23.0
34
28
—18.0
27,250.00
16,421.25
-40.0
11
6
-45.0
53
48
-9.0
39
34
— 13.0
25,897.35
25,732.00
-1.0
23
32
39.0
75
121
61.0
57
95
67.0
47,371.30
82,297.68
74.0
1
100.0
3
4
33.0
2
4
100.0
310.00
1,325.00
327.0
1
13
100.0
117.0
2
47
100.0
6.0
2
34
100.0
—3.0
900.00
17,486.00
100.0
6
50
35
19,262.00
9.0
10
12
20.0
124
132
6.0
81
91
12.0
47,451.31
54,489.55
15.0
■    18
22
22.0
93
106
14.0
66
72
9.0
48,646.78
57,849.77
19.0
9
-100.0
33
5
—85.0
22
2
—91.0
11,967.00
1,170.00
-90.0
2
— 100.0
5
1
— 80.0
3
1
—67.0
1,175.00
500.00
—57.0
2
100.0
6
22
267.0
3
11
267.0
1,085.00
51,648.10
5,027.50
54,263.18
363.0
20
28
40.0
117
103
12.0
85
74
— 13.0
5.0
30
36
20.0
179
238
33.0
113
149
32.0
68,475.67
84,902.01
24.0
16
28
75.0
87
116
33.0
64
77
20.0
39,860.88
54,561.78
37.0
11
17
55.0
48
69
44.0
36
51
42.0
28,885.00
117,349.00
306.0
18
20
11.0
91
106
16.0
61
78
28.0
39,071.53
48,171.88
23.0    :
12
7
—42.0
29
33
14.0
21
22
5.0
12,220.00
9,612.30
-21.0
27
26
—4.0
140
137
—2.0
96
100
4.0
64,000.93
87,448.00
37.0
336
5
481
100.0
43.0
203
3
307
100.0
51.0
1,488.22
236,392.94
100.0
53
100
89.0
111401.51
113.0
2
42
100.0
27.0
12
260
100.0
43.0
7
165
100.0
36.0
2,321.50
102,212.88
100.O
33
182
121
91,087.14
12.9":
32
32
128
137
7.0
94
111
18.0
68,326.00
22,759.55
76,049.60
36,502.91
11.0
10
12
20.0
49
88
80.0
32
65
' 103.0
60.0
29
26
— 10.0
130
151
16.0
102
106
4.0
45,809.77
50,278.35
ion
33
31
-6.0
150
131
— 13.0
99
97
-2.0
90,112.50
104,052.78
15.0
52
69
33.0
258
332
29.0
162
215
33.0
90,468.62
132,769.77
47.0
15
21
40.0
59
79
34.0
43
53
23.0
20,755.41
30,869.32
49.0
9
10
11.0
39
62
59.0
29
43
48.0
14,203.00
49,120.00
246.0
16
11
— 31.0
72
66
—8.0
53
50
—6.0
28,615.32
22,668.50
-21.0
10
11
10.0
56
62
11.0
41
46
12.0
27,019.00
34,100.00
26.0
47
47
	
166
192
16.0
117
151
29.0
104,243.50
295,749.71
184.0
2
6
200.0
31
27
— 13.0
21
17
— 19.0
12,204.61
10,784.87
-12.0
61
27
-56.0
279
198
-29.0
176
132
-25.0
131,396.41
98,310.59
-25.0-
16
14
— 13.0
58
55
—5.0
40
35
— 13.0
23,940.00
24,076.25
1JO.
10
10
44
59
34.0
32
40
25.0
9,933.00
16,703.08
17,995.00
32,307.46
81.0
8
18
125.0
53
70
32.0
36
50
39.0
93.0
34
42
24.0
194
199
3.0
137
143
4.0
125,709.41
137,463.98
9.0,
22
20
-9.0
104
113
9.0
82
85
4.0
45,295.54
43,239.45
-5.0
14
20
43.0
62
79
7.0
48
58
21.0
34,115.00
37,316.43
9.0
24
22
—8.0
90
96
7.0
65
64
-2.0
58,556.50
36,655.42
-37.0 .
53
76
43.0
247
317
28.0
166
206
24.0
174,694.15
245,792.44
41.0
20
41
105.0
180
247
37.0
127
168
32.0
73,263.78
98,490.00
34.0,
26
32
23.0
173
124
—28.0
119
98
-18.0
93,568.69
66,077.95
-29.0
63
75
19.0
285
349
22.0
213
245
15.0
165,614.62
194,245.70
17.0
7
7
36
44
22.0
25
30
20.0
13,689.00
130,270.34
25,758.00
127,301.60
88.0
60
84
40.0
299
367
23.0
185
235
27.0
-2JJ
18
10
-44.0
68
57
— 16.0
54
41
—24.0
132,493.67
25,552.50
—81.0
4
17
325.0
61
108
77.0
47
76
62.0
21,952.53
42,411.86
93.0
8
8
	
31
41
32.0
26
28
8.0
18,724.00
21,258.05
14.0
13
24
85.0
91
105
15.0
59
76
29.0
30,496.46
46,419.04
52.0
13
15
15.0
45
67
49.0
38
50
32.0
39,104.85
62,343.41
59.0
8
100.0
36
100.0
24
100.0
17,771.15
36,456.21
100.0
43.0
9
12
33.0
53
72
36.0
36
54
50.0
25,515.54
5
8
60.0
48
67
40.0
37
44
19.0
19,358.00
40,889.25
111.0
18
29
61.0
52
94
81.0
39
71
82.0
35,200.00
49,038.45
39.0
7
6
— 14.0
23
26
13.0
17
19
12.0
8,892.92
10,681.00
20.0
3
2
-33.0
18
16
-11.0
15
10
— 33.0
5,738.65
4,955.00
-14.0
24
21
-13.0
98
115
17.0
80
80
	
40,456.39
53,160.30
31.0
7
9
29.0
37
43
16.0
26
30
15.0
15,367.00
19,150.10
25.0
9
14
56.0
72
106
47.0
48
69
44.0
24,325.66
38,025.24
56.0
61
77
26.0
252
360
43.0
154
217
41.0
92,860.63
142,049.86
53.0
6
5
-17.0
47
36
-23.0
33
23
-30.0
20,725.00
23,953.00
16.0
21
18
— 14.0
102
108
6.0
74
75
1.0
44,414.87
46,756.24
5.0
 41 20
UNORGANIZED—Continued
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
R.C.M.P. Detachment
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
I
1
1
PerCent
100.0
100.0   ;
-80.0
1
1
Per Cent
100.0
100.0
5
3
38
20
13
3
19
21
1
61
20
4
38
63
280
6
100
84
91
10
7
95
7
28
36
37
19
26
24
59
41
27
44
41
65
48
22
44
30
103
66
1
10
16
6
25
43
86
Per Cent
160.0
—50.0
	
5.0
100.0
5
1
4
1
-75.0
74
4
43
24
229
4
79
71
78
5
10
47
— 18.0
400.0
100.0
100.0
175.0
350.0
100.0
—40.0
— 100.0
100 0
P_rt Edward             ...    _ -
2
1
11
1
1
10
100.0
100.0
150.0
— 12.0
163.0
4
4
22.0
50.0
2
9
1
3
2
6
1
3
200.0
100.0
—25.0
-100.0
27.0
18.0
5
1
4
1
17.0
10O.O
—30.0
2
6
200.0
1
5
400.0
102.0
100.0
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
4
2
1
300.0
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
6
1
1
3
2
1
200.0
23
18
18
12
36
33
58
29
13
46
8
61
26
14
36
30
57
91
1
8
9
22.0
100.0
—50.0
-100.0
33.0
200.0
100.0
—50.0
-100.0
106.0
58.0
4
3
4
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
—28.0
200.0
—27.0
2.0
41.0
108.0
-67.0
-100.0
200.0
—71.0
—67.0
— 100.0
200.0
—67.0
—4.0
1
7
1
1
3
2
1
2
3
2
1
2
413.0
7.0
TraiL
85.0
100.0
—25.0
—75.0
-75.0
100.6
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
57.0
22.0
4
4
8
3
1
2
3
4
7
2
1
2
1
— 33.0
-75.0
-71.0
81.0
—27.0
1
100.0
25.0
Wells
1
1
78.0
1
100.0
1
1
2
27
62
70
—7.0
— 100.0
-31.0
Paftullo Bridge                       	
	
23.0
1              Totals
197
211
7.0
162
176
9.0
3,771
4,441
18.0
c;	
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT QF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 21,
Province for the Calendar Years 1963 and 1964—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Decrease
Increase
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
1963
1964
Increase
or(-)
1963
1964
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
5
7
40.0
35
39
11.0
22
25
14.0
8,960.00
13,420.00
50.0
3
3
14
23
64.0
10
16
60.0
1,775.00
4,065.00
30439.00
129.0
23
14
-39.0
85
79
-7.0
61
53
—13.0
31,042.28
-3.0
11
16
45.0
67
58
-13.0
52
47
— 10.0
34,296.00
29,696.00
-13.0'/.
1
34
100.0
13.0
11
129
100.0
6.0
6
86
100.0
2.0
4,278.25
54,506.25
100.0   ,
30
122
84
48,719.67
12.0   •
2
7
25O.0
14
45
221.0
10
23
130.0
4,620.00
17,726.16
284.0 ;
2
20
100.0
—5.0
27
140
100.0
23.0
16
105
100.0
36.0
12,225.00
81,377.14
100.0 :
21
114
77
51,363.00
59.0   1
18
40
122.0
65
163
151.0
49
108
120.0
21,203.71
56,724.38
168.0   '
134
157
17.0
669
863
29.0
452
574
,27.0
348,277.60
459,965.93
32.0 '
1
2
100.0
17
22
29.0
11
13
18.0
10,335.60
6,129.65
-41.0   '
43
42
—2.0
202
184
-9.0
156
130
— 17.0
161,091.75
102,845.82
-36.0 ;
40
43
8.0
188
168
-11.0
127
114
— 10.0
87,999.36
93,876.83
7.0 >
52
59
13.0
266
272
2.0
191
195
2.0
106,154.58
124,681.41
17.0 .
4
8
100.0
28
42
50.0
20
29
45.0
9,980.00
6,457.00
-35.0
6
6
40
35
—13.0
25
23
—8.0
11,530.55
11,730.00
139,991.78
2.0 •'.
28
51
82.0
154
230
49.0
108
165
53.0
79,513.75
76.0
2
100.0
6
100.0
3
100.0
2,534.00
100.0
11
17
55.0
53
71
34.0
40
52
30.0
31,038.00
61,532.00
98.0 '
12
23
92.0
67
106
58.0
47
69
47.0
29,292.00
40,576.34
39.0 1
12
19
58.0
61
97
59.0
48
69
44.0
28,780.95
50,117.21
74.0  •
6
13
117.0
35
68
94.0
24
42
75.0
21,608.25
28,874.04
34.0
17
11
—35.0
85
62
-27.0
58
46
-21.0
68,156.48
39,339.00
-42.0
20
17
-15.0
84
88
5.0
52
55
6.0
26,701.21
28,944.72
8.0 •
27
29
7.0
149
166
11.0
109
111
2.0
63,127.01
75,965.60
20.0
19
23
21.0
102
103
1.0
73
75
3.0
36,233.88
36,373.00
.5   .
9
16
78.0
34
55
62.0
29
42
45.0
20,300.00
85,014.00
319.0
30
31
3.0
139
186
34.0
104
131
26.0
71,182.23
64,809.06
-9.0
3
3
3
2
—33.0
1,600.00
17,335.00
2,000.00
50,741.85
25.0
5
19
280.0
38
87
129.0
24
58
142.0
193.0'
43
30
—30.0
182
185
2.0
138
130
—6.0
103,084.62
90,288.11
-12.0
14
22
57.0
67
121
81.0
48
74
54.0
26,923.20
41,198.61
53.0 .
10
15
50.0
42
64
52.0
35
50
43.0
16,567.88
26,285.35
59.0
22
30
36.0
157
228
45.0
90
129
43.0
42,362.97
58,360.15
38.0
17
19
12.0
94
104
11.0
69
67
-3.0
67,726.12
41,454.09
-39.0
33
55
67.0
182
208
14.0
133
148
11.0
71,362.40
97,568.51
37.0 '
45
39
-13.0
283
275
-3.0
199
193
— 3.0
180,198.13
125,668.66
-30.0
1
1
1
1
1
1
100.00
24,115.68
100.0   ■
4
7
75.0
21
49
133.0
16
35
119.0
8,889.00
171.0 ,
6
10
67.0
33
59
79.0
22
40
82.0
9,180.00
19,026.22
107.0 -
3
100.O
1
10
900.0
1
8
700.0
500.00
3,640.00
36,806.00
628.0
20
16
—20.0
84
74
— 12.0
57
51
— 11.0
35,738.93
3.0
35
24
—31.0
220
166
—25.0
104
72
— 31.0
57,827.81
40,435.45
—30.0
48
68
42.0
305
410
34.0
131
175
34.0
78,635.39
92,953.41
18.0
2,141
2,574
20.0
il0,838!12,986
20.0
7,429
8,745
18.0
$5,155,961.30
$6,382,285.50
24.0
 L'22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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6
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964       L 23
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—Continued
HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
26
497
1,034
16
334
781
7
235
469
7
128
305
10
96
227
1
62
189
5
87
219
9
320
1,001
7
460
1,262
13
269
751
9
330
982
8
427
1,083
10
499
1,181
10
522
1,322
14
644
1,532
10
798
1,789
23
1,029
2,491
31
1,031
2,382
24
594
1,349
26
696
1,564
23
608
1,445
15
512
1,262
25
454
1,173
16
472
1,110
6
10
12 to   1 a.m	
1 to   2 a.m	
2 to   3 a.m	
3 to   4 a.m	
4 to  5 a.m	
5 to   6 a.m	
6 to  7 a.m	
7 to   8 a.m	
8 to   9 a.m	
9 to 10 a.m	
10 to 11 a.m	
11 to 12    m	
12 to   1 p.m	
1 to   2 p.m	
2 to   3 p.m	
3 to   4 p.m	
4 to   5 p.m..	
5 to   6 p.m..	
6 to   7 p.m _
7 to   8 p.m	
8 to   9 p.m	
9 to 10 p.m	
10 to 11 p.m	
11 to 12 p.m	
Not stated	
Totals..
1,557
1,131
711
440
333'
252
311
1,331
1,730
1,032
1,320
1,519
1,689
1,854
2,190
2,597
3,543
3,444
1,967
2,286
2,076
1,789
1,652
1,598
16
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
4,925
67
1,588
3,270
4,593
30
1,284
3,279
4,818
37
1,341
3,440
5,006
35
1,443
3,528
5,080
37
1,391
3,652
6,358
49
1,785
4,524
7,583
90
2,277
5,216
5
1
4
1. Sunday_	
2. Monday	
3. Tuesday	
4. Wednesday..
5. Thursday	
6. Friday	
7. Saturday	
8. Not stated-
Totals..
38,368
345        |      11,110
26,913
TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Private passenger....
2. Truck..... 	
3. Bus	
4. Taxi 	
5. " Drive Yourself "..
6. Motor-cycle	
7. School bus 	
8. Ambulance	
9. Not stated.	
Totals. 	
57,725
367
16,262
41,096
7,323
91
1,882
5,350
353
6
121
226
475
154
321
170
1
57
112
440
4
358
78
42
15
27
15
5
10
24
	
8
16
66,567
469
|      18,862        |      47,236
5.                     RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
64
7
3
1
4
3
11
3
1
1
15
3
1
2
46
4
2
1
3
3
7. Not stated- - _ _	
8
Totals __ - 	
93
5
21
67
 L 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—Continued
6.                    MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
14,984
5,967
9,369
894
1,722
5,432
94
112
9
1
3
126
3,599
1,953
3,099
43
200
2,216
11,291
2. Head-on collision or head-on side-swipe  -
3,902
6,261
850
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction _
6. Not stated _	
1,519
3,090
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
7.     DRIVERS INVOLVED, DESCRIPTION OF
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male         ... i    	
55,297
10,535
735
405
51
13
15,403
3,361
98
39,489
7,123
3. Not stated      .               	
624
66,567
469
18,862
47,236
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 20 years	
2. 21 to 24 years	
3. 25 to 30 years _
4. 31 to 40 years	
5. 41 to 50 years	
6. 51 to 60 years	
7. 61 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over._
8,735
10,305
8,650
14,397
11,607
7,757
2,214
950
1,216
71
81
65
87
69
45
15
11
13
2,549
2,965
2,431
3,994
3,322
2,192
657
279
378
6,115
7,259
6,154
10,316
8,216
5,520
1,542
660
825
Driving Experience
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1,507
1,219
549
13,307
49,242
743
21
7
6
83
340
12
451
370
159
3,854
13,931
97
1,035
842
384
9,370
5. 5 years and over_— _  	
6. Not stated       —..            . _ _	
34,971
634
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
63,374
531
220
497
1,326
177
442
370
11
7
1
44
33
3
17,801
219
83
125
450
42
142
45,203
2. Extreme fatigue  ...  	
301
130
371
832
102
7. Not stated      	
297
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1
62,905                   407
784                     16
2,128                     34
750                     12
17,863
258
640
101
44,635
2. Unlicensed   	
510
1,454
637
1
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 25
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—-Continued
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
No improper driving —
Driving off roadway _ 	
Did not have right of way 	
Car standing in roadway (not parked)..
Following too close __	
On wrong side of road  _	
Failing to signal -
Through street—did not stop	
Passing at intersection	
Exceeding speed limit	
Careless driving _  	
Cutting in _  	
Car ran away —
Passing on curve or hill	
Passing on wrong side —
Hit and run _  	
Railroad—did not stop- 	
Cutting left corner  _	
Parked legally- -	
Driving through school-zone...	
Driving through safety-zone.	
Totals  -
33,247
3,863
5,716
2,335
3,965
1,775
812
1,399
372
957
5,687
670
513
149
114
679
62
360
3,610
20
35
201
63
21
3
3
34
2
5
1
46
44
5
4
1
11
3
1
15
9,966
1,134
1,405
784
1,223
459
203
413
77
312
1,896
99
97
28
23
100
18
63
439
7
12
23,080
2,666
4,290
1,548
2,739
1,282
607
981
294
599
3,747
571
411
117
90
568
41
296
3,156
13
21
66,340
465
18,758        |      47,117
TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No control present..
2. Police officer	
3. Automatic traffic signal	
4. Stop signs 	
5. Warning signs, slow signs, etc..
Totals 	
27,593
401
4,943
3,700
1,282
286
3
17
28
7,797
119
1,578
1,019
444
19,510
279
3,357
2,664
810
37,919
342
|      10,957 26,620
10.
PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Not known __.
2. Crossing at intersection—no signal..
3. In street, not at intersection .
4. Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle..
5. Crossing at intersection with signal 	
6. Crossing street diagonally, not at intersection	
7. Walking on or along highway 	
8. Playing in street...
9. Crossing at intersection against signal..
10. Not on roadway .
11. Getting on or off another vehicle..
12. Riding or hitching on vehicle	
13. Working on car or roadway 	
14. Crossing intersection diagonally...
15. In pedestrian crosswalk ._	
16. Standing on safety-isle..	
Totals  	
14
12
4
3
6
24
9
1
1
2
10
138
228
149
237
80
103
98
113
28
12
10
11
11
8
96
9
94
1,331
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fata!
Personal
Injury
1. Apparently normal...
2. Extreme fatigue	
3. Had physical defect..
4. Confused by traffic...
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
993
15
70
63
54
230
1,425
63
2
8
7
3
11
~94~
930
13
62
56
51
219
1,331
 L 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—Continued
CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Passengers   _ 	
2. Drivers      _ 	
3. Pedestrians 	
4. Bicyclists  — 	
5. Motor-cycle drivers 	
6. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.)_
7. Motor-cycle passengers	
8. Not stated   	
Totals...   -
8,239
6,851
1,425
376
303
25
84
1
17,304
138
151
94
4
4
2
8,101
6,700
1,331
372
299
23
84
1
393
16,911
NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Personal
Injury
2,530
114
243
26
46
99
1,715
3
10,945
119
529
3
273
5
525
102
19
2
3
3
	
1. Slight shock and shake-up 	
2. Fractured skull  	
3. Fractured spine.— 	
4. Other fractures   	
5. Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.)..
6. Internal injuries   	
7. Concussion of brain  _  	
8. Severe general shock with bruises and cuts..
9. Cuts by glass (only) — _	
10. Drowned  	
11. Burned ..... _   	
12. Asphyxiated   	
13. Not stated - 	
Totals.
2,530
357
72
1,814
10,948
648
276
530
102
19
5
3
17,304
393
16,911
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal Property
Injury       Damage Only
Daylight 	
Darkness— 	
Artificial light—good	
Dusk or semi-darkness..
Artificial light—poor	
Not stated 	
22,046
11,053
2,320
2,295
457
197
135
170
15
13
11
1
6,326
3,263
669
636
157
59
15,585
7,620
1,636
1,646
289
137
Totals.
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
14.
PROPERTY DAMAGE.—Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $20,081,488.85;
amount for same period last year, $15,742,907.87.
15.                  CONDITION OF VEHICLES
Number of Vehicles
INVOLVED
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
61,780
1,954
1,010
261
181
413
135
176
57
59
410
131
422
7
10
4
2
4
2
1
1
1
12
3
17,629
353
311
89
69
112
43
50
20
17
125
44
43,729
1,594
689
168
no
6. Puncture or blow-out   	
7. Head-lights out (both).                        .   .     .
297
90
125
36
10. Head-light out (one light) _...._ ■
11. Other defects ..          	
41
273'
17   Not stated
84
Totals—                                   	
66,567
469
18,862
47,236
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964       L 27
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—Continued
16.
DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Going straight.
2. Turning left—
3. Turning right	
4. Slowing down or stopping	
5. Backing (not to or from curb)..
6. Skidding.
7. Leaving curb (including backing)..
8. Making U-turn  	
9. Overtaking..
10. Stopping (not at curb or off paved strip)..
11. Overtaking on right side	
12. Overtaking on left side  	
13. Avoiding object or pedestrian	
14. Not stated— 	
Totals..
40,439
8,075
3,736
4,790
997
3,437
601
121
382
1,892
177
579
1,119
222
310
70
29
6
4
23
2
5
3
9
6
2
12,053
2,039
899
1,603
105
818
74
26
107
612
37
130
307
52
66,567
469
18,862
28,076
5,966
2,808
3,181
888
2,596
525
95
270
1,277
140
440
806
168
47,236
17.
ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Dry surface..
2. Wet surface..
3. Icy surface.
4. Loose sand or gravel..
5. Snowy surface	
6. Muddy surface 	
7. Not stated 	
Totals _
18,042
13,058
3,674
949
2,140
107
398
198
106
20
5
15
5,679
3,905
722
255
371
25
153
12,165
9,047
2,932
689
1,754
82
244
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
18.                        ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
34,728
506
363
495
161
1,819
296
326
7
3
1
5
3
10,115
159
79
147
47
467
96
24,287
340
3. Obstruction in road	
284
345
113
6. Other.  	
1,347
197
7. Not stated..  _	
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
19.                           TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
33,814
2,734
1,100
319
29
225
147
306
25
3
4
5
2
9,957
627
344
67
8
51
56
23,551
2,082
753
2. Gravel —  __ ...	
3   Concrete ■ _	
4. Earth  _ _	
248
5. Brick or cobble    	
6. Other _	
21
169
7. Not stated	
89
Totals  	
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
 L 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1964—Continued
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1.   r.1-;..
18,796
9,727
5,467
768
2,858
90
662
198
69
53
11
11
3
5,665
2,902
1,585
234
504
28
192
12,933
2. Rain.                        	
6,756
3. Cloudy	
3,829
523
5. Snow    _	
2,343
62
7. Not stated. 	
467
Totals
38,368
345
11,110
26,913
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December 31,1963—648,303;
motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December 31, 1964—700,048.
Convictions
Included in the driving record of each person licensed to drive in this Province
is a record of Magistrates' reports of convictions of driving offences which are
received from all of the Courts in the Province. The Courts are conscientious in
making sure that this information is forthcoming, and I wish to express my appreciation for this high degree of co-operation. The information obtained from these
reports forms the basis of action taken under our Drivers' Improvement Programme.
During 1964 the number of convictions received for traffic offences in British
Columbia totalled 116,132, compared to 105,524 in 1963. This increase of 11,608
would again indicate the need for a more comprehensive traffic enforcement programme. However, the high volume of convictions must once again be related to
the problem, mentioned previously, of irresponsibility on the part of drivers on our
highways.
The following table summarizes the convictions under the various Statutes dealing with highway traffic. Impaired driving and speeding, two types of offences which
are a major cause of highway accidents, have both increased in number this year.
Also included in the following table are convictions from out of the Province. These
are convictions entered against British Columbia drivers while they are travelling in
other jurisdictions. Similar reports of out-of-Province drivers convicted in British
Columbia are sent to the Province or State in which they reside.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 29
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1961—64
Offences
1961 1962
1963
1964
Under Criminal Code of Canada-
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec. 192-
Causing bodily harm by criminal negligence, sec. 193 	
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle, sec. 221 (1) ..
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 221 (2)_ 	
Dangerous driving, sec. 221 (4)_.
Driving motor-vehicle while intoxicated, sec. 222  —	
Driving motor-vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol or drugs,
sec. 223    	
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec.
225 (3)
Motor-vehicle equipped with apparatus for making smoke screen,
sec. 226    __   	
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle without consent of owner, sec. 281
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Failing to obtain or display motor-vehicle licence or permit as required, sees. 3-10, 57.
Failing to notify re change of address, sees. 11, 18 (ID-
Failing to report change in motor-vehicle, sec. 12	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc., sec. 14..
Failing to notify of removal or destruction of motor-vehicle, sec.
16(1)
Failing to register as a tourist, sec. 17— 	
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1), (2)	
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than  as restricted on  driver's licence, sees. 18 (6), (7), (8)-  	
Driving without having driver's licence in possession at time, sec. 19
Driving while right to obtain licence is under suspension, sec. 20	
Driving as a chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit, sees.
21, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28—     _._ __
Operating as dealer without licence, misuse of dealer's plates, etc.,
sees. 29, 33, 34  _.   _. _	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit,
sees. 36-39  _  	
Operating vehicle not properly equipped, sec. 40-
Failing to obtain replacement of licence or chauffeur's badge if mutilated, sees. 41, 42.
Improper disposition of licence plate, dismantled vehicle, sec. 45-
Failing to report accident, etc., sec. 54_.
Making false statement, permitting another to use licence, etc., sec. 55
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc.,
sec. 56  _     	
Failing to stop on request of police or state proper name, sec. 58..
Altering number plates and using fictitious plates, sec. 59	
Responsibility of owner when not driver, sec. 68-
Permitting person not properly licensed to drive motor-vehicle, etc.,
sec. 69 _ _  	
Failing to surrender licence on suspension, sec. 99  	
Removing or releasing impounded vehicle without authority, sec. 100
Producing invalid financial liability card, etc., sec. 102	
Improper operation of emergency vehicle, sec. 123'. 	
Failing to  obey  emergency  instructions of  a  peace  officer,   sees.
122, 124
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Defacing traffic-control devices by advertising or removal, etc., sees.
129, 131, 136  	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees.
132, 133, 134, 135, 137 _._..
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139 	
Exceeding maximum speed-limit, sec. 140	
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141_.
Exceeding speed-limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143 	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146	
Leaving highway other than at intersection, sec. 147	
Infractions of " passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154. 	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-159,
160-162    	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167..
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172..
7
2
72
610
32
79
2,840
862
14
158
55
132
29
9
262
3
3
6
22
15,192
11
1
48
634
242
94
3,587
956
58
633
278
87
3,837
968
27
I
1,475
108
2
29
1
8
4,807
2,991
1,259
93
359
54
24
1,562
73
1
36
12
3,568
2,846
843
123
428
24
28
3
184
79
137
35
12
7
284
6
8
2
1
82
17,915
277
3,261
19,161
1,557
46
152
3,587
16
1,335
3,062
1,467
1,237
2,044
81
60
28
3,729
3,291
878
163
466
35
56
228
92
162
46
12
329
8
26
16,335
346
3,686
33,097
2,166
75
247
3,058
13
1,575
2,909
2,472
1,697
14.
38
786
388
112
4,373
920
4,518    |    5,588    j    5,892    |    6,638
2,443
24
133
16
3,777
3,629
934
167
384
59
51
105
1
291
98
141
50
8
15
357
7
49
16,298
127
4,138
36,069
2,648
120
307
4,387
12
1,866
3,162
3,019
2,018
 L 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1961-64-
Continued
Offences
1961
1962
1963
1964
Under Motor-vehicle Act—Continued
Failure by bicycle operators to obey rules, sec. 173..
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Illegal stopping or parking, sees. 178-181-
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182-
Illegal parking on private property, sec. 183-
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184-
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185_
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190  _. 	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191_
Opening door requirements, sec. 194  -	
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195- 	
Transporting explosives, sec. 196.
Failing to carry adequate safety equipment, sees. 197, 198	
Illegal use or defacement of signs, sec. 201 	
Motor-vehicle Act miscellaneous 	
Under Motor-vehicle Act regulations—
Operating defective vehicle after ordered off road, sees. 2.02, 7.09-
Number plates, sec. 3„
Driving without proper head-lamps, sees. 4.01-4.06	
Driving without tail-lamps,  reflectors, other required lamps,  sees.
4.07-4.10 _     	
Driving without clearance lamps, lamps on projections, etc., sees.
4.11-4.13    	
Driving without proper parking-lamps,  spot-lamps, turn-signal  devices, etc., sees. 4.14-4.22
Driving without adequate brakes, sees. 5, 6— 	
Driving  vehicle  with  defective horn  or miscellaneous equipment,
sees. 7.01, 7.02   ....   	
Driving vehicle without muffler, sec. 7.03 	
Driving vehicle without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear view,
sec. 7.04  	
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc., sec. 7.05 	
Driving without mud-guards, sec. 7.06
Failing to have proper connection between motor-vehicle and trailer,
sec. 7.07       	
Failing to obtain temporary permit for moving motor-vehicle or
trailer from place to place, sec. 14    	
Failing to sign driver's licence, sec. 15  	
Parking prohibited at yellow curb, sec. 18.01	
Oversize loads, sees. 19.01, 19.02, 19.03-
Inadequate  tires,   insecure  loads,   excessive   speed  with  unloaded
trailer, sec. 19.04  ____ 	
Excessive weight, sec. 19.05
Failure to report for weight inspection, sec. 19.06.  	
Failure to obtain overweight or oversize permits, sec. 19.07	
Failure of a dealer to maintain security while carrying on a business, sees. 20.01, 20.14    	
Miscellaneous infractions  _ _ 	
Summary—
Criminal Code of Canada..
Motor-vehicle Act 	
Motor-vehicle Act regulations.
Vancouver City by-laws _ _..
Juvenile Delinquents Act	
Total of all convictions in British Columbia-
Convictions from out of Province -	
Grand totals — _ _	
5
198
4,821
959
482
368
12
32
20
16
31
3
172
90
18
111
793
605
128
751
87
1,144
45
238
193
110
337
111
270
24
139
2
42
5,153
4,518
72,498
5,153
943
2,047
85,159
172
5,541
1,100
628
6
371
11
19
13
13
29
77
4
192
6
4
200
6,410
1,443
871
5
536
14
41
37
36
25
141
297
270
6,947
1,799
893
580
71
23
40
250
246
9
72,498    | 71,644
89,471    | 98,044
24
131
715
487
135
26
652
55
1,264
89
321
150
124
2
5
160
382
96
471
28
234
I
14
130
898
749
110
13
917
128
1,746
179
328
155
183
4
218
590
102
278
267
1
16
172
1,080
803
129
19
947
159
2,154
93
393
163
204
8
64
650
141
326
39
292
5,554
7,010
7,856
5,588
71,644
5,554
964
1.892
85,642
2,978
88,620
5,892
89,471
7,010
1,090
2,061
105,524
3,047
6,638
98,044
7,856
972
2,622
116,132
2,984
108,571    |119,116
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964       L 31
3. DRIVING SAFETY
(a) Safety Responsibility
Under present legislation, proof of financial responsibility is required to be
submitted by owners and drivers of motor-vehicles if, as a result of the operation
of a motor-vehicle, a judgment is rendered and such judgment remains unsatisfied.
Convictions for serious driving infractions and unsatisfactory driving records also
require persons to submit such proof. As a result of this operation, the Safety
Responsibility Division received 17,148 British Columbia financial responsibility
insurance certificates in 1964. These certificates were received from insurance companies licensed in this Province under the Insurance Act, and of this total number,
15,660 were actually accepted as proof of the policyholders' financial responsibility.
Filings increased 11.9 per cent over 1963, and a table with full information with
regard to this filing and cancellation of certificates is shown hereunder.
Comparisons of Financial Responsibility Certificates Received,
Filed, and Cancelled in 1963 and 1964
1963            1964
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
Total number of certificates received _	
15,948    |    17,148
13,991    |    15,660
1,957    |      1,488
11,404    |    12,993
1,603    j      1,651
984    |      1,016
13,587    |    16,384
$27,982    | $31,320
1,200
1,669
1,589
48
32
2,797
$3,338
469
7.5
11.9
23.9
Owners' policy certificates and sales agency certificates
filed  _ _       _	
13.9
2.9
3.2
20.5
11.9
An alternative method of submitting proof of financial responsibility, by way
of a bond of a guarantee or surety company, by a deposit of security with the Minister of Finance, or by satisfying the Superintendent of Insurance that they could be
classified as self-insurers, was taken advantage of by some of the larger corporations
in this Province. Upon receipt of appropriate certificates and bonds, 370 financial
responsibility cards were issued by this Division.
During 1964, 2,411 owners involved in accidents were unable to prove that
the operation of their motor-vehicles was insured or were in a position to respond
in damages. As a result, the " uninsured " drivers or owners had their licences
placed under suspension until they submitted proof of satisfaction of claims or deposited security sufficient in the opinion of the Superintendent to satisfy any judgment that could be made as a result of the accident. This is an increase of 18 per
cent over 1963, when 2,051 owners were affected.
Approximately 63,000 persons are required to maintain proof of their financial responsibility, and a complete file and cardex wheel system is maintained in
order to have effective control and assure as much protection as possible to all users
of the highways.
The attached tables indicate the various causes for suspension of licences of
persons coming within the scope of the safety responsibility legislation in 1964.
Also included is a table showing the various action categories where proof of financial requirements had been made.
■■
 L 32 ■■■.! ■.■ : BRITISH COLUMBIA
Suspension of Drivers' Licences by Court Orders and Court Recommendations, 1964
Months
Years
u
S
&
6
Under
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
1
2
'i
o
H
Death by criminal negligence—Acci-
19
7
14
2
1
57
245
3
9
1
1
118
172
87
57
1
30
7
18
2
1
37
188
2
1
9
84
63
25
7
1
36
8
27
9
119
377
11
4
12
99
63
48
29
1
2
7
2
5
47
111
2
7
10
6
1
1
1
5
2
1
47
12
27
5
21
116
62
8
2
1
4
5
3
28
53
2
4
1
34
14
31
8
15
108
313
1
8
5
1
11
12
15
2
3
38
90
1
3
8
2
4
i
i
12
13
21
8
8
40
117
1
1
Criminal negligence—
Accident  	
7
10
2
3
40
107
3
2
72
74
12
24
2
Failing to remain at scene of acci-
204
Dangerous driving—
83
164
Driving while intoxicated—
Accident  _	
29
66
Driving while ability impaired—
631
1,668
Driving while under suspension—
5
2
5
12
6
18
3
41
Conviction and judgment outside the
24
Suspension by Superintendent	
14
87
37
42
17
4
2
2
2
7
43
24
29
7
52
1
Driving without due care and attention—Accident  	
Exceeding speed-limit—Accident
534
453
273
146
Totals 	
349
793
475
843
200
8
500
110
648
190
268
4,384
Suspensions by Superintendent under Financial Responsibility Requirements
Offence
Careless driving—Accident
Dangerous driving—
Accident	
No accident
Criminal negligence-
Accident 	
No accident
Drunken driving—
Accident 	
No accident
Impaired driving—
Accident	
No accident
Failing to remain at scene of accident
Driving under suspension—
Accident 	
No accident	
Suspension due to accident	
Speeding—Accident.
Unsatisfied judgment—Accident	
Conviction and judgment outside Province
Drivers' Licences
Suspended Reinstated
1,988
104
201
6
5
26
59
2,074
52
129
13
21
10
48
812
534
2,607
2,207
483
359
9
18
75
92
2,013
2,198
18
12
141
24
101
124
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 33
Suspensions by Superintendent under Financial Responsibility
Requirements—Continued      ;
Offence
Unsatisfactory driving record
Suspension by Superintendent
Proof of financial responsibility requested by Superintendent	
Death by criminal negligence	
Bodily harm by criminal negligence	
Further or additional proof of financial responsibility    3,654
Adjudged juvenile delinquent	
Drivers'
Licences
Suspended
Reinstated
43
125
185
161
2
6
3,654
3,916
133
Totals
12,665
12,123
(b) Examination of Drivers
A total of 117,423 persons was examined in 1964 to determine their fitness to
drive a motor-vehicle. This compares with the 1963 total of 122,458. Examinations given to applicants for original licences totalled 66,531, compared to 63,010
in 1963.
The Branch is conducting examinations on a daily basis in the major centres
of the Province. The smaller communities are being serviced by travelling units on
approximately a monthly basis, depending upon the demand for examinations.
The emphasis in our re-examination programme is now placed on those drivers,
who come to the attention of our Driver Improvement Programme due to poor
driving records, drivers of 70 years of age and over who are now re-examined every
two years, and Class A and B chauffeurs who are also re-examined every two years.
The following tables provide a summary of examinations of applicants for
original drivers' licences. The tables show that 11,692 failed some part of the
driver's examination; however, all but a small percentage eventually qualified in
the complete examination.
 L 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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L 37
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 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 41'
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme
An important step in the British Columbia system of driver's licence control is
the Drivers' Improvement Programme. This programme was developed as a means
of dealing with drivers who were continually being involved in motor-vehicle accidents or traffic offences which resulted in Court convictions. The operational procedure of this programme is as follows:—
(1) Upon receipt of a conviction or accident report, the record of the driver
concerned is screened. During 1964 this involved the screening of 114,-
726 records.
(2) An adjudication of the record is made to determine the appropriate action.
(3) The action deemed necessary is implemented.   This action could be:—
(a) A warning letter mailed to the driver which points out to him'
our concern caused by his driving record. In 1964 we forwarded 5,226
warning letters.
(b) A notice requiring the driver to report for a personal interview
with a member of this Branch. We conducted 2,372 interviews during'
1964.
(c) An action to suspend the driving privilege of the driver con-,
cerned.
When suspension action is deemed necessary, the driver is always given an
opportunity to show cause why his licence should not be suspended. When a driver
makes a submission and the Branch determines that some consideration should be
given, the period of suspension may be varied or the driver may be placed on probation. Submissions are made by personal interview or by written representation,
frequently through legal counsel. During 1964 we notified 5,763 drivers of our'
intention to suspend their drivers' licences. As a result of these notices, 3,107
licences were suspended and 1,867 were placed on probation: for a period of one
year.
i-.i v.O " j   .
. .ii ■.-. t ;•'
 L 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table provides a brief summary of the number of drivers who
were dealt with in the Drivers' Improvement Programme during 1964:—
Warning Letters, Interviews, and Suspensions, January to December, 1964
A
ge
16-20
Years
21-24
Years
25-30
Years
31-40
Years
41-50
Years
51-60
Years
61-64
Years
65-69
Years
70 and
Over
Total
1,400
45
1,051
10
300
120
634
4
734
4
116
260
122
402
7
1,122
11
15
47
1,224
5
27
15
446
248
519
1
6
6
892
1
5
5
272
368
191
428
5
6
5
916
12
31
39
775
3
13
11
233
143
374
1
6
10
520
4
8
166
162
111
293
1
7
1
908
7
18
37
824
8
12
13
174
128
397
1
4
7
512
4
6
148
134
97
364
6
7
6
514
4
7
29
517
4
6
73
51
288
1
6
256
1
2
62
43
43
217
1
6
6
243
7
12
288
2
1
6
26
22
111
3
139
1
27
15
25
124
1
3
4
71
1
1
10
50
1
2
6
4
29
1
44
5
9
7
21
1
26
5
26
4
1
14
7
1
1
1
17
26
1
6
3
1
1
5,226
Class B chauffeurs  _
79
214
5,763
22
Notices of intent to suspend
60
Female  	
67
1,262
718
2,372
3
. Previously suspended
Interviews and hearings
37
Result of notices to suspend,
interviews, and submissions—
3,107
1
14
Female   ._	
Previously suspended
Previously warned	
Previously on probation	
Driver's licence placed on
probation	
Class A chauffeurs	
26
798
992
597
1,867
14
30
29
Impaired:  First, 3,826; second, 1,133.
Records adjudicated, 114,726.
(<_) Motor-vehicle Inspection
A programme of motor-vehicle inspection, through the use of a mobile inspection unit, commenced operation on August 17, 1964. The unit consists of a panel
truck and trailer, and it is outfitted with equipment to check vehicle front-end assemblies, wheel alignment, and brake and headlamp adjustments. In addition, physical
checks are made by the inspection unit staff of other vehicle lamps, muffler assemblies, the condition of window glass, windshield-wipers, tires, etc.
The mobile unit visited 14 communities in the Province before the end of 1964.
A total of 8,150 vehicles was inspected. Of that number, 67 per cent were rejected
on the first inspection. The following table shows the number of rejected vehicles
on which defects were corrected and subsequently passed upon reinspection. The
table indicates the types of defects which caused rejection.
Presented for inspection during this period  8,150
Passed on original inspection  2,629
Percentage rejected on original inspection        67
Passed on reinspection  2,815
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1964       L 43>
Causes of rejection were one or more of the following:— ■
(1) Number-plates and rear plate light  1,105
(2) Horn L_L:  41
(3) Visibility and glass condition '  176
(4) Rear-view mirror      	
(5) Tail-light  80       ;
(6) Stop-light  425
(7) Headlight  3,886
(8) Turn signals '-  112
(9) Other lights    61
(10) Reflector  4
(11) Steering mechanism      192
(12) Wheel alignment      963
(13) Muffler and exhaust system      474
(14) Tires  ,        69
(15) Service brakes      513
(16) Parking brakes      354
(17) Miscellaneous       112
The vehicle inspection programme is operated on a voluntary basis. Its success depends upon community support and sponsorship so that the maximum number of interested motorists may be encouraged to subject their vehicles to the critical
inspection routine. We enjoyed enthusiastic community support during 1964, with
the result that it was often not possible to inspect all the vehicles which were brought
to the testing locations.
Prior to the visit of an inspection unit to a community, groups of citizens who
are interested in traffic safety are approached to sponsor a week of vehicle inspection.
Sponsorship involves developing publicity, arranging for a suitable testing location,
and providing some voluntary help to assist the two qualified mechanics who are
assigned to the programme by the Branch.
The aims of the programme are (a) the examination of vehicles and (b) the
development of public interest in the need to maintain vehicles in safe mechanical
condition. Surprise has been expressed at the high percentage of inspection rejections. This is even more alarming when one considers that the vehicles inspected
were voluntarily submitted. The percentage would be much higher if it were possible to examine the many vehicles in doubtful mechanical condition on the highways whose owners have no intention of submitting them to a voluntary inspection.
Public interest in the programme has been high. Requests for visits from the
mobile unit have been received from many communities. The need for additional
equipment and personnel to expand the programme is evident.
4. CENTRAL REGISTRY
Documents issued under the Bills of Sale Act, the Conditional Sales Act, the
Assignment of Book Accounts Act, and Mechanics' Lien Act, which concern all
types of personal chattels, are registered in the Central Registry, which is a responsibility of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles in his capacity as Registrar-General.
The Central Registry provides a means of confining a search to one location in thd
Province to learn of encumbrances which might be registered against personal
chattels.
In July, 1962, we commenced the microfilm storage of documents in the Central Registry, and in 1964 we began to experience the full value of this method of
 L 44 :   , ;  . BRITISH COLUMBIA
storage. It has resulted in a faster processing of documents and in a great reduction
of the/amount of storage space required.
Jn 1964 a total of 183,762 documents was accepted for filing, an increase of
22,888 over 1963. The total value of search fees amounted to $107,407.50, an
increase of $26,433.50 over 1963. Searches are requested by telephone, telegram,
letter^ and by personal appearance at the Registry. It has been only through the
use of- microfilmed documents that the staff has been able to cope with this increase
and still give search information quickly and accurately. The total revenue collected
for services in the Central Registry was $640,295, an increase of $93,208 or 17 per
cent qver 1963.
( 5. SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from the public schools in the Province is the responsibility
of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. The control extends to the setting of
minimum standards for the construction and maintenance of school buses and
provides for periodic inspection of school buses. This inspection is carried out on
behalf of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles by mechanical inspectors of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police and by the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public
Utilities Commission. It is also necessary that evidence of satisfactory insurance
coverage, in accordance with the carrying capacity of each school bus, be supplied
to the Superintendent.
In 1964 the number of permits issued for vehicles to be used as school buses
totalled 856, compared to the 1963 figure of 719. These vehicles were involved in
41 accidents and, although no lives were lost, 32 persons were injured. Of this
number, 28 were students. In only 11 of these accidents were injuries incurred, and
one accident resulted in the minor injury of 17 students.
6. STAFF
, The total number of employees of this Branch at December 31, 1964, was
323, compared to 296 at the same date in 1963. Permanent staff personnel
totalled 266, an increase of 8 over the 1963 total of 258. Temporary employees
at December 31, 1964, totalled 57, compared to 38 in 1963. The increase in
temporary employees was due to the early receipt of 1965 licence renewal applications and the inability of the Civil Service Commission to supply staff borrowed
from other Government departments, as had been possible in several previous years.
Increased work loads in other departments made the loan of personnel for periods
up to two months an impractical proposition.
We continue to be grateful to the Chairman of the Liquor Control Board for
his splendid co-operation in providing clerks in many centres to assist in our licence-
renewal peak periods. Up to 50 clerks are provided in this manner for periods
ranging from a few days to two months.
. At the end of 1964, staff-training was under way for the pending conversion to
an electronic data-processing method of record-keeping. Fortunately, key positions
in the new programme have all been filled from careful selection of existing staff
members. This has cultivated incentive, and it will certainly be beneficial in that
programme designers will have an excellent background of motor-vehicle and driver
licence requirements.
I am sincerely grateful for the ingenuity which is continually exhibited by our
staff. Their initiative and loyalty have been the most important factors in providing
us with the ability to cope with a rapidly expanding work situation.   At times, staff
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1964       L 45
shortages have been a serious problem, and the physical limitation of the headquarters office has been very difficult. New methods of carrying on business have
been effective in overcoming these obstacles.
Our many Branch licence and examining offices continue to handle ever-
increasing work loads, generally without the benefit of additional staff. It is hoped
that some relief in their work details will be eliminated within the next few years as
a result of the electronic data-processing conversion.
December 31, 1964, saw the retirement of Mr. George Lindsay from the position of Superintendent, which he had held since 1952. During his years as head
of the Branch, he was responsible for the development of many of the programmes
now vigorously being pursued by the Branch. He developed a level of public
relations which made the objectives of the Branch known to all citizens of the
Province.
Of particular note was Mr. Lindsay's strength in the development of the
Drivers' Improvement Programme and the degree of fairness to all with which he
administered it. His term as Superintendent saw great increases in vehicle registrations in British Columbia, and his leadership was an inspiration to all who were
fortunate in serving under him. His tireless energy was reflected in the efforts
of others, and it played no small part in developing progressive work programmes
to keep pace with increasing demands.   His example will long be remembered.
CONCLUSION
More vehicles are driven more miles by more drivers each year. Accidents
continue to increase at what is considered to be an alarming rate. There is not
likely to be an end to these increases in the years immediately ahead. We are
truly a society on wheels, but that is no reason for us to placidly accept the detrimental increases in accidents with their ugly effects in the loss of life, personal
injury, and astronomical property-damage losses.
Solutions to the traffic-accident problem must continually be sought. It has
been said that traffic safety involves engineering, education, and enforcement. Emphasis on all three of these aspects must be accelerated and co-ordinated.
Driving a vehicle is now considered to be a necessity by the majority of people.
It is an essential skill in earning a living, yet surely this necessity must need to take
second place to the public welfare and safety. Perhaps the answer lies in an
appropriate education programme, commencing in the schools, aimed at effectively
imparting the knowledge of the responsibilities which face those who drive and fully
informing them of the social consequences of those who fail to meet their responsibilities.   A long-range public education programme is urgently needed.
Our problems are not limited to the training of the young people. Many older
drivers need to update their driving knowledge to keep abreast of the ever-changing
traffic trends. Unfortunately, the number of pedestrians killed is alarmingly high.
All too often the pedestrian, dressed in dark clothes, ventures out into the street or
highway which may not be too well illuminated, and the motorist receives little or
no warning of his presence. It would be of great benefit to the motorists if the
pedestrians, as a safety precaution, were to wear light-coloured clothing or some
white object on their clothing. Safety education aimed at the older age-group of
our citizens needs to be much more effective.
I am grateful that we continue to enjoy the splendid co-operation of members
of your Department in fulfilling our duties. These people offer willing assistance
whenever it is required.   Our close liaison continues with Courts, as it does with the
 L 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
several enforcement agencies throughout the Province. The Branch enjoys a fine
relationship with many business and community groups throughout the Province
which are vitally interested in the many aspects of the automotive industry and the
goals of highway safety. Without the co-operation of these official, business, and
community groups, our tasks would be infinitely more difficult and, undoubtedly,
less effective.   To all concerned, we extend our sincere thanks and appreciation.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
RAYMOND A. HADFIELD,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966

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