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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing the reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1966]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Minister A. I. Bowering, B.A.Sc., P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing the reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS, AERIAL
TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION,
and ACCIDENT PREVENTION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1965
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  Victoria, B.C., January 27, 1966.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1965.
R. W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, B.C., January 20, 1966.
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,-—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1965.
A. J. BOWERING, B.A.Sc, P.Eng.,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1965
A. J. Bowering, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
INTRODUCTION
The year 1965 has been a dynamic one for the Department, resulting from
industrial activity related to hydro-power development and expansion of the pulp
and paper industry.
We have experienced an upsurge in railway activity with the extensions of the
Pacific Great Eastern and approximately 60 new spur lines or changes in existing
industrial-railway spurs being made. At the present time we have, in addition to the
two common-carrier railways, 36 industrial spur lines or minor railways in the Province. This number will increase as more pulp plants are built and new industry is
established in the near future.
The number and size of heavy loads of machinery moved by truck within the
Province increased considerably in 1965. Many of these heavy loads were moved
to provide necessary equipment for the new hydro projects and for construction
companies to build the dams and install equipment. Movement of these heavy loads
with a minimum of damage to highways and bridges has required a great deal of
concentrated effort on the part of the Weigh Scale Branch staff under the Director of
Operations, and they are to be commended on a job well done. Much heavy equipment must be moved to the various hydro-electric projects in 1966, and this will
present major problems, particularly during the spring break-up period when roads
will not carry as much weight.
Aerial-tramway construction during the year has been extensive, and winter
tourist business is being rapidly increased as a result. Most of these tramways are
being built for skiers to enjoy the natural beauty of our mountainous country. Two
major installations were under construction during the year, and the one at Garibaldi was opened for New Year's Day. The second large project, at Grouse Mountain, will be completed early in 1966.
We have experienced a year of intensive activity, and there is every indication
that 1966 will see even greater progress.
 V 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 7
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
(Licensing and Operations)
R. A. Hadfield, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
J. G. M. Lock, Director of Operations
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, through 13 motor licence offices and
45 Government Agencies, carries out the major portion of licensing of commercial
vehicles. Additional licensing, and particularly the licensing of non-resident vehicles, is taken care of at weigh-scales located at border points. At these locations,
weighmasters not only weigh the vehicles but issue non-resident, single trip, and
quarterly permits. This method of licensing out-of-Province vehicles has proven
very satisfactory to both the Government and operators.
The flexibility in operation which is provided for out-of-Province operators
through these weigh-scales has not only reduced the time required to obtain necessary permits, but it has meant that the permits are issued for the correct weight of
vehicle and load. Out-of-Province operators frequently use the facilities of these
border-point weigh-stations to contact their equipment operators en route or to
have them report back to their headquarters for information purposes or further
instructions.
The revenue from commercial-vehicle licences has increased more rapidly
during 1965, largely as a result of the dynamic industrial development which is
being experienced through the construction of major hydro-electric power projects
throughout the Province. The number of commercial vehicles registered in the
Province in 1965 was in excess of 146,000 trucks and 15,000 trailers. This is a
30-per-cent increase in a period of five years and an 8-per-cent increase over the
previous year.
Issuing of licence-plates generally is placing pressure upon existing facilities,
and new areas are being explored for the issuance of these plates. Where practical,
commercial-vehicle licence-plates will be issued at weigh-stations, beginning for the
1966 licence-year.
Continued co-operation between Departmental staff of the Motor-vehicle
Branch under the Superintendent and field staff of this Detmrtment make it possible
to co-ordinate available facilities for licensing within the Province.
INTERPROVINCIAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS
In the interprovincial and international trucking field, further progress has
been made during the year with improved operating conditions and flexibility
through agreements.
The prorate licence agreement which this Province has with 16 American
States is operating to the advantage of both the Province and commercial-vehicle
operators. Flexibility in operation is extremely important to owners of trucks, and
these agreements provide this flexibility at a reasonable cost.
Since the Province entered into reciprocity agreements with the Provinces of
Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and New Brunswick on the basis of licence fees
equal to $10 a gross ton, there has been an improvement in several interprovincial
operations. Two of the larger companies that previously operated through the
United States route to the Province of Ontario are now operating most of their
equipment on the Canadian route. This has added both licence fees and, more
particularly, fuel taxes to Provincial revenues.   In addition, these agreements have
 V 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
helped operators who are in the furniture-trucking business. In recent years
furniture has been brought into the Province and shipped out of the Province by
piggy-back rail shipment. Since these agreements have been signed, furniture
compames are re-establishing their operations to highway transport rather than rail
piggy-back haul.
In addition to the flexibility developed by reason of reciprocity agreements
between Canadian Provinces, longer units are being permitted, using 45-foot trailers,
which are operating mostly on the Trans-Canada Highway. This increases the
volume for lighter-weight shipments on these particular roads, which have been
built to accommodate the larger vehicles.
OPERATIONS
British Columbia is riding on the crest of an unparalleled wave of economic
prosperity, churned to record heights by major industrial development in all parts
of the Province. This vast industrial-expansion programme is reflected in the
increased number of commercial-vehicle registrations during 1965. There were an
additional 10,278 commercial vehicles registered and licensed in British Columbia
during 1965.
There is a general trend in the truck transportation industry to construct the
vehicle to do the job, and in so doing eliminate the limiting factor created by
standard-type vehicles.
A good example of this trend would be the dual-purpose vehicle which has a
low-slung tanker-type trailer unit with a flat-deck top. This vehicle can haul liquid
products or bulk freight, or both. This is important in that the economics of
vehicle operation are particularly enhanced when a back-haul load is virtually
assured. Other two-way haul units are in operation—namely, three-section tankers
which carry liquids in two sections and utilize the third section for a return load
of dry products.
There has been a noticeable expansion in the truck-logging field, with all
equipment, including a considerable number of new vehicles, operating to capacity.
This has been particularly evident on the Chetwynd-Hudson Hope Road as a result
of clearing operations presently under way at the Portage Mountain power-project
site.
A typical dual-purpose vehicle combining a tanker and a flat-deck.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 9
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Movement of an oversize load requiring the full co-operation of telephone- and
power-line companies.
An oversize load en route with pilot car in attendance.
 V 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
There is a heavy volume movement of portable housing units within the
Province. These buildings, which include sectional buildings, bunk-houses, office
buildings, and house trailers, are destined to provide living and operational accommodation at the camp-sites connected with the several major power projects under
way at the present time at Mica Creek, Arrow Lake, and Duncan Lake. Due to
the size of these units, special attention must be given by the Department, and strict
control of the movement of these units must be exercised so as not to disrupt the
normal traffic flow.
Similar problems occur when heavy equipment which is in excess of legal size
and weight limits is moved to the various major industrial projects in the Province.
The new ferry link between Prince Rupert and Alaska has brought an increase
in traffic volumes over Route No. 16, and it is anticipated that with the introduction
of the new British Columbia ferry-service operation between Kelsey Bay and Prince
Rupert, further increases in line-haul operation will occur.
With the construction of pulp-mills at various locations throughout the Province, a major industry is developing in the hauling of pulp-chips from the chippers
to the mills. This individual type of operation is particularly evident in the Vernon,
Kamloops, and Merritt areas, and on Vancouver Island where 63 truck-and-trailer
combinations are operating.
Contrary to the established operational procedures and in an effort to eliminate
unnecessary hauling, experiments are currently being conducted with portable chip
machines operating in the bush. This eliminates the haul from bush to chipper
and results in a saving of both time and money.
Renewed interest in mining in British Columbia has resulted in an increase in
mine haul operations. Several new mines have been placed in production, and in
a number of cases dual-purpose back-haul vehicles are being designed to carry out
these operations on an economic basis. Serious consideration is being given to
provide for rapid dumping of these vehicles in order to reduce turn-around time.
With the development of the Province's natural resources, particularly oil and
natural gas, a definite trend has been established in the movement of liquid byproducts of natural gas by tank truck on the public highway system. These
commodities, some of which are inflammable, toxic, or subject to chemical reaction,
are considered dangerous, requiring strict regulatory control. Necessary steps are
now being taken to properly identify these dangerous commodities and to regulate
their movement by commercial vehicle on the public highway system. This is a
very serious matter, requiring a great deal of study to assure that a full measure of
control is established and that public property and human life receive adequate
protection. The first step in this direction has been taken through the enforcement
of regulations which restrict the movement of such commodities, or any empty
vehicle having last contained such a commodity, through the Deas Tunnel.
To keep pace with the many changes in the pace of industrial development, the
Department constructed five new weigh-scales during 1965 at specific locations
within the Province. A new weigh-scale was installed on the main highway immediately south of Prince George to meet the demands of local and through traffic
in the area.
A further scale was installed at Chetwynd to accommodate the heavy movement of logging-trucks and construction equipment between the Portage Mountain
power-development site at Hudson Hope and Chetwynd.
A weigh-scale is currently under construction at Midway, which will provide
additional control and facilities for service to the truck transportation industry of
the area.   It is anticipated this new scale will be in operation in January, 1966.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V  11
New-type portable weigh-scales currently being tested by the Department of
Commercial Transport.
The Department operates mobile weigh-scale units in each of the six operational regions. These units, used primarily for spot checking in areas not fully
covered by permanent scales, utilize a portable type of weigh-scale, the operation of
which requires a reading to be taken at each individual wheel while the vehicle is
on the scale. As can be readily seen, this system of operation leaves room for
improvement, and in this regard a study is being made of a new-type scale.
One set of this new type of scale was purchased by the Department and placed
in service on Vancouver Island, where it was felt a good representation of the many
forms of truck transportation were in operation.   The new dynamic-type scales are
 V 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of improved design, easier to handle, and are hydraulically operated. The results
of these tests are being carefully scrutinized and recorded, and from preliminary
observation it is felt that the new scale will prove to be a great improvement over
the ones presently in use.
An increase of 17 per cent in the number of permits issued for the movement
of large and heavy loads is indicative of the expanding work of the Weigh Scale
Branch. Work which is presently being carried on for other departments of government may have to be curtailed in some areas in the near future due to this increased
industrial load.
The weigh-scale staff at. Chetwynd will be used in 1966 to issue licence-plates
for commercial vehicles. This is an added service to the industry, and where
possible will be extended to other areas.
Region 1 (Vancouver Island)
Industrial activity in this area has increased considerably during 1965. This is
largely due to the major developments which are under way in the Gold River and
Campbell River areas, and is reflected in the increased volume movement of commercial vehicles generally on Vancouver Island, but more particularly in the movement of heavy construction equipment. Despite the fact that most of the movement
of logging-trucks is restricted to the many miles of private industrial roads on the
Central and Northern Vancouver Island areas, the general advancement of industrial
development has necessitated a higher degree of use of the public highway systems
for this purpose.
With the completion of the deep-sea shipping facilities at Cowichan Bay, the
movement of wood pulp-chips has increased considerably during 1965 in Central
Vancouver Island and particularly in the Lake Cowichan and Youbou areas.
There has been a slight change in the movement of lumber for export in that
the loading facilities at Crofton and Chemainus have taken predominance over the
Ogden Point shipping area at Victoria; however, this is only a minor change, and
Ogden Point still handles a considerable amount of export lumber.
Logging operations in the Sooke and Kelsey Bay-Say ward areas have been
operating at full capacity throughout the year.
Considerable activity is evident at the Mount Washington copper mine, and
at the present time several trucks are hauling from the mine to Hatch Point.
Restrictions were removed from the Port Alberni-Tofino Road during the year,
and as a result there has been a noticeable influx of heavy logging and construction
equipment moving within the area.
Region 2 (Lower Mainland)
The majority of the roads in the Powell River area are private, and as such are
not subject to the same control as the public highways; however, it is reported that
the area has retained its high rate of industrial activity during 1965, and that a high
standard of commercial-vehicle operation within the area is generally being maintained.
Logging operations in the Squamish-Pemberton area were fairly extensive
during the year, and the usual heavy timber shipments were maintained. At the
present time a plant is under construction in the Squamish industrial area for the
manufacture of liquid caustic soda, muriatic acid, and chlorine, which, when completed, will no doubt increase the truck hauling activity between Squamish and
Vancouver.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1965 V 13
With the completion of Highway No. 401 and the construction of the weigh-
scales at Port Mann, congestion at Pattullo Bridge weigh-scales has been relieved to
some degree. It is hoped that renovations to the weigh-scale building at Pattullo
Bridge, currently under way, will further relieve traffic congestion, particularly at
the southern end of the bridge.
The construction of the new Hunter Creek scales, located on either side of the
Trans-Canada Highway and serving both eastbound and westbound traffic, has
completely eliminated the dangerous situation which existed as a result of the
required left turn into the old Flood weigh-scale station.
The movement of nickel and copper concentrates to North Vancouver has been
particularly evident during the year. Heavy ore-carrying trucks are making two
trips daily from the Giant Mascot mining operations in the Choate area carrying
approximately 23 tons per load. Bethlehem copper mine is hauling six trips per
day of approximately 24 tons per load from the Ashcroft area to tidewater. These
concentrates are destined for the export market.
Truck logging in the Hope-Princeton, Yale, and Harrison areas of the Lower
Mainland continues to keep pace with the current demand for forest products.
Movement of general freight and heavy construction equipment in the Lower Fraser
Valley area has retained a high level due to increased construction activity in the
Lower Mainland area.
Region 3 (Southern Interior)
The year 1965 has been active, and the truck-logging industry has shown a
marked increase in the volume movement of forest products within the region.
Reconstruction of sections of Highway No. 5 north of Little Fort has opened up an
area of the Province which was previously virtually inaccessible, and no doubt this
trend will continue as additional sections of the highway are completed. Benefits
to be derived, both to the industry and the Province as a whole, are indicated in the
increase of commercial-vehicle traffic to be seen in the area. The Lumby-Enderby,
Kamloops, Merritt, Princeton, Lillooet-Pavilion, and Penticton areas were particularly active in the field of truck logging during the year, and the movement of lumber
by truck showed a marked increase in the Ashcroft area.
Movement of heavy construction equipment has been evident in the Vavenby
area for use in the construction of Highway No. 16 between Prince George and Tete
Jaune. A construction programme currently in progress at Bethlehem copper mine
necessitated the movement of a large number of construction vehicles into the area.
Due to the excessive weight involved, these were moved from Merritt via the Nicola
Valley to avoid the use of the bridge over the Thompson River at Ashcroft.
The hauling of pulpwood chips from Clearwater, Vernon, Magna Bay, Merritt,
and Cache Creek continues at a steady pace and will no doubt increase as the pulp-
mill in the Kamloops area has now been completed and placed in operation.
Region 4 (Kootenays)
Truck logging in the East Kootenay, Kaslo, Slocan, Greenwood, and Rock
Creek areas completed a year of heavy operation during 1965.
Export of lumber through border weigh-scale stations at Fernie and Golden
continued at a high rate, with Fernie reporting 3,201 trucks hauling a total of
50,239,776 board-feet of lumber and Golden reporting 3,906 vehicles carrying
69,070,575 board-feet. This movement of 120,000,000 board-feet of lumber is an
increase of 10,000,000 board-feet over the 1964 shipments through these same
two border check points.   In addition to this, there was a large number of transport
 V 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
trucks hauling plywood from British Columbia to the Prairie Provinces. Other
quantities of lumber were moved to the Province of Alberta through the Radium-
Kootenay National Park route.
Movement of heavy construction equipment through Golden for use at the
Mica Creek Dam site on the west leg of the Big Bend Highway has increased considerably. Construction of the Duncan Lake Dam has increased the movement of
heavy construction equipment into that area, and a large number of prefabricated
camp bunk-houses and house trailers were moved into the area for use in the
construction. During the year there were in excess of 200 trailers checked through
the Golden scale, destined for the B.C. Hydro camp-site at Mica Creek.
The Fernie scale reports that some 600 truck-loads of cattle, representing
10,970 head, were checked through the scale, destined for export markets. In
addition, 87 truck-loads of live bees moved through Fernie from California, destined for the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The completion of the new weigh-scale at Midway will enable the Department
to maintain better control of heavy traffic in the area and will provide a more accessible outlet for permits and advice to the local logging-truck operators.
Region 5 (Central Interior)
Truck logging in the Williams Lake, Quesnel, Prince George, Hazelton, and
Terrace areas has been heavy throughout the year, only relaxing during the early
spring when restrictions were imposed due to heavy frost conditions. The construction of two pulp-mills in the Prince George area is creating considerable work
for truck loggers in the Prince George area. Pulp-logs are being stockpiled at both
mill-sites in readiness for commencement of operation, which is scheduled for
early 1966.
The high rate of industrial development in the Prince George and surrounding
areas has initiated a large-volume movement of local truck and construction equipment through the Prince George weigh-scales. This, together with the Highway No.
97 relocation undertaken at Prince George, necessitated a new weigh-scale station
be constructed on the main highway immediately south of Prince George. This particular site was chosen to service through traffic and also local traffic using facilities
in the adjacent Pacific Great Eastern Railway industrial complex.
The Terrace and Hazelton areas supply a considerable amount of long poles,
the movement of which necessitates careful handling due to the excessive lengths
involved. The Department's portable weigh-scale unit makes frequent trips into
these areas to control the movement of these long loads and to assist operators.
There has been a steady increase in the line-haul freight shipments from the
United States and Southern British Columbia through the Prince George check
points. Some of these vehicles are destined for Prince Rupert, where a portion
of the freight is moved by ferry to Ketchikan, Alaska.
Region 6 (Northern Interior)
This region, which encompasses the whole of British Columbia north of the
Pine Pass, remains very active in the field of truck transportation. The B.C. Hydro
power-development project at Portage Mountain continues to dominate the field,
with a large volume of heavy construction equipment moving into the site from railhead at Fort St. John and Chetwynd. Due to the magnitude of the project and the
type and size of the equipment being used on this project, a steady liaison between
the contractors, the Department of Highways, and the Weigh Scale Branch staff in
the area is necessary.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1965
V 15
Reconstruction of the highway between Chetwynd and Hudson Hope and the
upsurge of industrial activity in the area made it necessary that a weigh-scale be
constructed at Chetwynd. This was completed and placed in operation in November, 1965, and has proven to be very satisfactory both to the Department and to the
truckers using this route.
The high rate of industrial development in the Chetwynd area has created a
problem in housing accommodation, and it was necessary for the Department to
purchase and install two mobile house trailers to accommodate the staff stationed at
the Chetwynd weigh-scale.
There has been a heavy increase in truck logging in the Chetwynd area, where
timber must be removed before the area is flooded by the Peace River dam.
Continued activity in the field of oil and gas development in the north-eastern
section of British Columbia is evidenced in the number of drilling rigs being
transported within the area. These drilling-rig units usually consist of a convoy of
from 6 to 7 vehicles to as many as 15 vehicles, most of which are hauling equipment
which is oversize and necessitates close supervision while travelling upon public
highways. This activity is more predominant in the Fort Nelson area and Boundary
Lake area of the Province.
Line-haul truck transportation destined for Alaska and travelling along the
Alaska Highway has remained steady and presents little or no problem to the
Department.
During the year, due to circumstances beyond its control, it was necessary for
the Cassiar Asbestos Company to employ a large number of commercial vehicles to
transport its products to rail-head at Fort St. John. With the co-operation of this
Department and the Department of Highways, this emergency substitute operation
was successfully completed, and the company has now resumed its normal shipping
programme.
PERMIT ISSUING OFFICES
Weigh-scales
Chetwynd
Kamloops
Ruskin
Dawson Creek
Midway
Rutland
Deas Island North
Pacific
Saanich
Deas Island South
Parks ville
Sicamous
Duncan
Pattullo Bridge
Tupper Creek
Fernie
Port Mann East
Vanderhoof
Fort Nelson
Port Mann West
Vernon
Fort St. John
Prince George North
Victoria
Golden
Prince George South
(term permits)
Hunter Creek
Quesnel
Williams Lake
Kaleden
Rossland
Portable Patrols
Yahk
Lower Mainland
Okanagan
Prince George
Nelson
Peace River
Victoria
Department of Finance Government Agents
Alberni
Clinton
Duncan
Ashcroft
Courtenay
Fernie
Atlin
Cranbrook
Fort Nelson
Burns Lake
Creston
Fort St. John
 V 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Golden
Grand Forks
Gulf Islands (Ganges)
Invermere
Kamloops
Kaslo
Kelowna
Kitimat
Lillooet
Merritt
Nanaimo
Nelson
Abbotsford
Chilliwack
Cloverdale
Dawson Creek
Kamloops
New Denver
New Westminster
Oliver
Penticton
Pouce Coupe
Powell River
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Princeton
Quesnel
Revelstoke
Rossland
Salmon Arm
Sechelt
Smithers
Squamish
Terrace
Vancouver
Vanderhoof
Vernon
Victoria
Williams Lake
Motor-vehicle Branch Offices
Mission
New Westminster
North Vancouver
Trail
Vancouver (Main)
Vancouver (East)
Vancouver (Point Grey)
Victoria
Miscellaneous
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport, Vancouver.
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 17
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation )
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Engineer
RAILWAYS
During 1965 the common-carrier railways—namely, the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway and the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority—operated to full
capacity. Industrial railways and plant railways continued to expand both in numbers and in mileage of trackage. Logging-railways operated throughout the year
without incident, while the recreational railways, such as Stanley Park and Cowichan
Valley Museum railways, continued to haul the public in accordance with the rules
set forth by the Department in that respect.
Separate reports are submitted for the common-carrier main lines and for the
individual logging-railways. As the industrial in-plant railways have been on the
increase, perhaps a short resume of the activities of this phase of railroading should
be set forth as a matter of record.
The two new pulp-mills at Prince George and the new pulp-mill at Kamloops
each have installed an in-plant railway complex to handle chips and manufactured
products. These plants use " trackmobiles," which are a form of motive power
capable of moving one or two railway cars at a time. Several of the pulp-mills
employ their own steam or diesel locomotives to do the switching. In either case
the train crews involved require to be trained and certified in the interests of safety
and proper operation. In addition, the Department engineers are required to
check the plans and drawings of all track layouts and make inspections of the
track and motive power before such layouts are put in operation. Annual inspections of the track and motive power are then carried out. In most of the pulp-mill
operations the handling of chlorine gas by railway tank car is the rule, and our
engineers check carefully into this phase of the operation.
In plants like the McMahon at Taylor, our engineers check on the loading of
liquefied propane gas into railway tank cars as well as the loading and handling of
liquid sulphur. In other cases at the unloading points on the railways, our engineers
approve and inspect the facilities for unloading liquefied petroleum gas and refinery
products.
Where propane and butane are handled by the Canadian Pacific Railway, the
Canadian National Railway, or the Great Northern Railway, and the unloading
facilities are located other than on the rights-of-way of those railways operating
under Federal jurisdiction, the unloading and storage facilities are under Provincial
jurisdiction, and our engineers check into this phase of the operation under our Part
XII rules for the handling and storage of such commodities. This is considered most
necessary in the interests of public safety, and all our engineers have been appointed
Local Assistant Fire Marshals so that our efforts in this regard are integrated with
those of the office of the Fire Marshal.
The industrial spurs serving the lumber industry throughout the Province
require periodical inspections by our engineers. This is done in the interests of
safety, where standard clearances are maintained and clean-up work in and around
tracks must be maintained, particularly in chip-loading areas.
Prior to 1965, all railway cars were built in Eastern Canada, but in 1965 an
order was placed with the Vancouver Iron and Engineering Works for 109 high-side
 V  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
chip cars, 50 flat cars, and 10 89-foot piggy-back cars. The design for the cars
was checked by our engineers, and the cars themselves inspected before delivery.
Difficulty was experienced with the design of the safety appliances as the cars were
required to interchange with the transcontinental railways operating under Federal
jurisdiction and the Federal rules do not allow welding. A total of 150 railway
cars was built in Vancouver and delivered by the end of 1965.
Eight large 1,800-horsepower diesel locomotives were delivered to the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway in 1965 and one small 300-horsepower diesel locomotive for
a pulp-mill. These were checked and inspected by our engineers. In addition, a
number of " trackmobiles " were delivered for use at grain terminals and pulp-mills.
These required the application of air brakes, and the crews to operate the equipment
for the switching of railway cars required special instruction in the use of air in
switching.
The extensions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway were under construction
during 1965, and our engineers made token inspections as the pressure of other
work did not permit detailed inspections in all phases of construction.
The wharves and terminals in the Lower Mainland area required a great deal
of attention during 1965. This was due mainly to the lack of properly trained
personnel, such as locomotive operators and switchmen. Our engineers have been
required to train and certify a number of switchmen and operators in this special
work, and in most cases their certification has been restricted to the wharf and
terminal areas as such personnel is not experienced in main-line operation.
At the Surrey ship terminal, railway cars are loaded from the five major railways
in the United States. The connecting carrier is the Great Northern Railway. A
steamship of approximately 8,000 tons has been procured to operate between the
port of New Westminster and Alaska. This ship thus makes the rail link between
Alaska and the other 48 States of continental United States. The ship cannot by
United States law operate between two States, which explains why the terminal is
situated in British Columbia and served by the Great Northern Railway.
A problem arose at this terminal with respect to the number of men employed
commensurate with safety in the loading and unloading of the ship and the handling
of railway cars. The problem was aggravated to some extent due to the ship being
registered in Nigeria, so that the Canada Shipping Act did not apply to this vessel.
The matter was resolved by taking the stand that under railway law, while the rails
on the ship are connected physically to the rails of the railway, the rails on the ship
form part of the railway. The matter was therefore resolved, and the Department
stipulated the number of men required to safely load and unload the vessel with
railway cars, and no accidents have been reported during the year.
In the wharves and terminals of the Lower Mainland area, a problem has
arisen concerning qualified men to act as switchmen and locomotive engineers.
This has been resolved to a large extent by training programmes followed by the
certification of the men concerned. There are several terminals, including Vancouver
Wharves, Pacific Coast Bulk Terminals at Port Moody, Pacific Coast Terminals at
New Westminster, Johnston Terminals at Surrey, and other smaller terminals,
including switching operations at the grain elevators. In all cases, inspections have
been made where both company and union personnel have accompanied the inspecting engineer.   This has been done to assure safety and to prevent accidents.
A large travelling-type crane installed at Yarrows shipyard in Victoria early
in 1965 replaced a lighter crane which was inadequate to handle necessary
heavy loads. This new crane, which was inspected and certified by Department
engineers, has a capacity of 50 tons at a 40-foot radius. It is powered by electricity
and has a jib boom which may be raised to 165 feet and rotated around 360 degrees.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V  19
Mobile crane operating on steel rails recently installed at an industrial operation on
Vancouver Island.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Chief Engineer's Report
During the week of May 13, 1965, a general inspection was made of the
permanent way and facilities of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. An inspection
was also made of the spurs serving industry at various locations throughout the entire
railway system. The trip was made by track motor with appropriate officials of
the rauway present.
Between North Vancouver and Squamish it was noted considerable rail wear
was evident, and the officials pointed out that the rail was to be replaced between
 V 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Horseshoe Bay and Squamish by 100-pound steel during 1965. In fact, preparations were under way at the time of the inspection for the changing of this rail.
It was noted at Squamish preparations were under way for additional trackage
to serve a new chemical plant and to provide loading facilities to load liquefied
petroleum gas from railway cars to transpacific ships. Preparations were under
way at Squamish to increase the yard, which necessitated the relocation of public
roads and signalized railway crossings.
It was observed the 100-pound rail recendy laid on the mountain subdivision
increased the stability of the track and provided better operating conditions with
less derailments. A number of sidings had been recently built to accommodate
100-car trains. These were inspected. In one or two instances loggers were
instructed to remove gin-poles and other equipment located too close to the main
line.
The yards at Lillooet, Clinton, and Williams Lake were inspected and found
satisfactory with respect to safety and clean-up. The yard at Exeter was particularly clean and in good shape. However, throughout the Cariboo area the company
trader sidings were not clean. In one instance it was necessary to order the switch
spiked, with rail service cut off until the lumber company cleaned its tracks and did
other work commensurate with safety.
At Prince George it was noted the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is constructing a large industrial park several square miles in area. In one instance in this area
it was necessary to instruct contractors that guard-railings and red lanterns were to
be put up when deep excavations were made near tracks. This was done to protect
trainmen employed during the dark hours when contractors are not working but
trains are operating. In other instances private crossings of the railway required
identification. The new track scales were inspected at this point, as were various
completed trader sidings and trackage.
North of Prince George the trackage serving the two new pulp-mills was
inspected, as was the interchange trackage between the plants and the main-line
railway. Certain changes and betterments were ordered at the pulp-mill trackage
with respect to proper railway operation and safety of workmen. Crews were
instructed and follow-up inspections set up to see the work completed. In one
instance it was necessary to have stop signs moved to better serve the crossing of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway by private roadways serving the pulp-mills, and
instructions were issued to company security officers with respect to the enforcement
of the observance of stop signs at the railway. The track clearances were checked
in both plants and found to be in accordance with plans approved by the Department in this respect.
Further north it was observed the slide area at the Old Four Mile had withstood the rigours of a hard winter with very little track movement, and that the
alignment of the track north of Prince George was quite good for that time of year.
Trader sidings in the area north of Quesnel were inspected, and in a number
of cases it can be reported were found to be unsatisfactory. Sawmill operators were
given the alternative to either clean up their sidings and restore safe conditions or
service would be temporarily suspended until conditions were corrected. In this
regard the Department wrote letters, and it can be reported follow-up inspections
revealed that safe conditions were restored without a disruption of service.
The Dawson Creek subdivision was in satisfactory condition. This line is laid
mostly with 60- and 70-pound rail, but it must be borne in mind traffic does not
justify heavier steel, and the railway would be ill advised to replace this rail until
the density of traffic justifies a change in that direction.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 21
It can be reported on the main line between Chetwynd and Fort St. John the
road-bed is consolidating in a satisfactory manner, as relatively new track cannot
be expected to become stabilized except over a period of years.
A soil engineering study, instituted by the railway after construction, was
checked. The drainage provided is doing much to consolidate the soft glacial or
alluvial till so prevalent in this area.
It was noted the rail change programme, particularly in the Anderson Lake and
Seaton Lake areas, was in hand and showed progress at the time of inspection. On
Pavilion Mountain, south of Kelly Lake, the 100-pound rail replacement has improved operating conditions.
The overhead wire crossings of power-lines over the railway were examined
and a follow-up inspection ordered. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
engineers were to be in attendance during inspections of these proposed new
500,000-volt crossings of the railway to assure that standards equal to those on the
transcontinental railways are strictly adhered to.
In a number of cases where motive power was inspected, it was found to be
generally satisfactory; however, certain minor defects required attention.
In conclusion, it can be reported the permanent way of this railway is in
a satisfactory condition and is being properly maintained.—Robert E. Swanson,
P.Eng., Chief Engineer.
Inspecting Engineer's Report on Annual Inspection
During 1965 numerous inspections were made by this Department with reference to the various operational phases of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Through the week of November 1st, the annual track inspection of the railway
was carried out by track motor in company with railway officials. Mr. R. Cudder-
ford, B.C. Hydro transmission engineer, was also present on the inspection trip for
the purpose of making a survey of all B.C. Hydro power-line crossings of the railway. Safe condition of the high-voltage wire crossings, such as dead-ending and
other necessary precautions, were discussed in detail during the inspection. Roadbed, track, bridges, and structures and all phases of the railway operation were
observed from North Vancouver to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.
Right-of-way conditions between North Vancouver and Squamish are, in
general, very good. Due to the rocky terrain through which this portion of the line
traverses, it requires continual attention by the maintenance crews to keep the track
in safe operating condition. The heavier steel laid between Horseshoe Bay and
Squamish has added greatly to the smooth operation of this portion of the railway.
Between Squamish and Lillooet, track conditions were observed and found to
be normal. Tie renewal, ballastery, and ditching have been carried out extensively,
resulting in a good stable condition of the road-bed.
Between Lillooet and Prince George the general condition of the track is good.
The extensive increase of freight traffic over the line includes heavy loadings, and
the necessity of using several motive-power units on each freight train makes it
imperative that a continuous programme of preventive maintenance is carried out,
especially in those areas where weather conditions affect the stability of the roadbed. It is often necessary to place " slow " orders over portions of the line until
the maintenance crews can make the necessary adjustments to keep the line in a
safe operating condition.
Between Prince George and Chetwynd, corrective measures have succeeded to
a large extent in stabilizing this portion of the road-bed, and, in general, the track
is in good order and is being properly maintained.
 V 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Between Chetwynd and Dawson Creek the road-bed is still in a very unsettled
condition due to the movement of the terrain over which the line passes. As a
result, considerable portions of the road-bed require more extensive maintenance
in order to keep the line in good order.
Between Chetwynd and Fort St. John the railway has invoked an extensive
maintenance programme and is in good order, with ground conditions leading into
the Peace River crossing fairly weU settled in most cases.
During April of 1965 a thorough check was made by track motor of all grade
crossings and industrial sidings between North Vancouver and Fort St. John. At
that time it was noted that a number of the sidings servicing lumber-mills and
chip-loading facilities were in an unsafe condition due to the accumulation of debris
that had been allowed to gather in the loading areas. This created a hazard to train
crews when switching operations were being carried out. At that time these conditions were brought to the attention of those responsible with instructions to rectify
them at once. It was noted that there is a marked improvement in most cases.
It is felt that the railway company would be justified in refusing service to any
industrial spur that is allowed to become unsafe for switching operations due to
neglect on the part of the user.
In conjunction with the Pacific Great Eastern Raflway Company engineering
departments, all public highway crossings, access crossings, and farm crossings were
rechecked as to status, and any additions, eliminations, or other changes during the
year were corrected and our records changed accordingly. A number of crossings
have been eliminated by overpasses, but to date there are 448 grade crossings over
the system, with the location and status of each one carried in our files for ready
reference.
Bulk-storage plants of the major oil companies at Squamish, Lillooet, Williams
Lake, and Quesnel which are serviced by railway tank cars were inspected. These
storage facilities are governed by regulations pursuant to the Railway Act and must
meet the requirements of these regulations with regard to the unloading of tank cars
in a safe manner.
The liquid-propane installations for the loading of deep-sea vessels from
railway tank cars at the railway terminal in Squamish is also governed by the same
regulations. From the approval of the installation plans until the final testing of the
various piping facilities, inspectors from this Department, in conjunction with
railway officials, made the necessary adjustments to ensure the safety of this
operation.
The increased demand by pulp-mills for huge quantities of wood chips has
resulted in the installation of facilities for the fast loading of railway chip cars of a
capacity of 6,400 cubic feet per car. These installations were observed during the
annual inspection. All installation plans had previously been checked and approved
by this Department. It was noted that loading of railway chip cars was being
efficiently carried out, resulting in a minimum of delay in the delivery of loaded cars
and the return of empties to the various lumber company sidings by the railway
company.
The inspection track motor while operating on the main line was classified as
an extra train operating under train orders issued by the dispatcher. As a result,
ample opportunity was provided during the inspection trip for a good insight into
the control of train movements by train orders and radiotelephone from the dispatcher's office in Vancouver. It can be stated that traffic movement and control is
being very efficiently carried out.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 23
One of the new steel trestles replacing the old timber trestles on the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway.
Ballast and Tie Renewal.—The ballast programme on the railway has gone
forward and has been kept up to standard, resulting in an improved track condition
over the system. The policy of replacing ties with creosoted ties has been carried
out during the year, and approximately 150,000 of these ties were placed in 1965.
Approximately 200 miles of right-of-way were treated with weed-killer spray during the year.
Bridges.—All bridges on the line were visually inspected and found to be
generally in good condition, with maintenance and renewal keeping well ahead of
deterioration. The coating of bridge deckings with the Rada-Decote and pea-gravel
mixture as fire protection against brake-shoe sparks has shown good results and is
being continued. Creekside Trestle, Mile 106.9, and Stone Creek Trestie, Mile
444.5, were renewed during 1965. Conditions of the north abutment of the Cottonwood Bridge were observed. Slope stabilization of the north-east approach was
carried out this year. A retaining-wall was constructed at the river bank with back-
sloping and drainways on the abutment, and at the time of the inspection no ground
movement was apparent.
Rail Re-lay.—Approximately 70 miles of rail re-lay were completed in 1965
by replacing 85-pound rail with 100-pound rail from Mile 11 to Mile 39.1, Mile
77.2 to Mile 79.5, Mile 122.8 to Mile 155.0, and Mile 159.5 to Mile 165.8. A
number of spurs and sidings were installed during 1965, as shown in the attached
appendix.
The new Stuart Lake subdivision, under construction, has had 12 miles of
track laid, and 12 miles of grade have been completed on the Kennedy Lake branch
line.
Shop and Repair Facilities.—The motive power and rolling-stock were inspected at regular intervals during the year by this Department. Maintenance was
good, and all locomotives and other power could be certified to be in order. Due
to the large increase in requirements of motive power and rolling-stock, it will be
necessary to increase the facilities for efficient maintenance and repairs. A modern
locomotive-shop is being constructed at the Prince George yard, which will also
include an up-to-date car repair and maintenance section.
 V 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The main locomotive and car repair-shops at Squamish, which handle all the
major repairs and overhauls for the entire system, will be enlarged in the near future
in order to meet the requirements of increased maintenance due to the large increase
in traffic being handled.
Prince George South Yard.—The Prince George South Yard industrial-development project is well advanced. Approximately 10 miles of new trackage have
been installed in the project area for the storage and make-up of car-loadings. This
also serves the numerous industrial sites acquired by such companies as British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Finning Tractor & Equipment Company
Limited, Canada Wire & Cable Company Limited, Dietrich-Collins Equipment
Limited, The Eddy Match Company Limited, and many other concerns requiring
separate trackage and warehouse facilities. Approximately 225 acres have been
cleared, and water and road facilities installed. A new railway administration
building and station facilities are included in the development of this complex. The
process of car-loadings and train make-up is greatly speeded up by the installation
of weigh-in-motion scales, so that train consists can be weighed and tabulated while
the train is passing over the scales at the rate of 4 miles per hour.
From the observations made during this track inspection, it can be stated that
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is being properly operated and maintained, and
the public and industry are being properly served.—/. H. Carmichael, Inspecting
Engineer.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On December 1, 1965, the annual inspection was made of the above railway
from Mile 0, New Westminster, to Mile 63.92, Chilliwack.
The inspection was made by track motor in company with Mr. W. Alcock,
roadmaster, and Mr. F. Friedel, superintendent of maintenance, Fraser Valley lines.
The railway is in excellent condition throughout its entire length. The results
of an efficient maintenance-of-way programme throughout the year are very evident
with regard to ballastery, tie renewal, weed control, ditching of wet cuts, and culvert
installations. All trestles, including the reconstructed Vedder River Bridge, were
observed and found to be in good, safe condition.
The reflectorization of all switch-stand targets has been completed and is much
superior to switch lamps previously in use, both as to visibility and dependability.
The new railway freight yard in New Westminster, completed this year and
officially opened for service on October 28th, takes in an area of 21 acres. The
initial stage of construction comprises a total of 7.4 miles of track to store 540 cars.
This will be increased to 10.4 miles of track with a capacity of 825 cars. The new
weigh-scales installed to service the yard have a capacity of 200 tons. The construction of this yard and its connection with several transcontinental railways
provide excellent service for the direct movement of freight to any point in Canada
and the United States. Approximately 10 miles of industrial spur tracks have been
added to the system during the year to service new plants and warehouses that
required trackage facilities, including the industrial-development site at Langley.
The motive power for the railway is comprised of 10 diesel-electric locomotives
of 900 horsepower, 2 of 600 horsepower, and 2 electric switching-locomotives. The
locomotives are inspected at regular intervals by this Department at the New Westminster maintenance-shops, and it can be stated that all motive power is being kept
in good serviceable condition by the mechanical staff.
The observations made during the inspection indicate that this railway is
being operated and maintained in a safe and efficient manner.—/. H. Carmichael,
Inspecting Engineer.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 25
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority freight traffic centre, New Westminster.
Crown Zellerbach Building Materials Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On October 6, 1965, an inspection was made of the railway and facilities
owned and operated by the above company at its Ladysmith Division.
The track was inspected between the Nanaimo Lake yard and the yards at
Ladysmith. Generally, the installation was found to be in good condition and is
being well maintained.
All bridges were found to be in good condition, with the exception of the piling
which is becoming rotten at the base at the lower end of the Nanaimo River Bridge.
It is learned that new piling will be driven during the coming Christmas shut-down.
It was again drawn to the attention of the section foreman, Mr. Tomsett, that
the wrecked car parts lying too close to the track at the Nanaimo River Camp
cut-off are dangerous and must be moved into the clear.
Unloader No. 3, Gas Switcher 107, and Rail Car 104 were inspected, reservoirs tested, and certificates issued to cover the inspections.
Dispatching procedure was inspected and found to be in order. — W. F.
Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Canadian Forest Products Limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
During the period of November 1 to 5, 1965, inspections were made of the
railway facilities owned and operated by the above-named company at its Engle-
wood Division.
In company with Railway Superintendent G. Lutz, Roadmaster M. Solecki,
and Bridge Foreman G. Collins, a trip was made by speeder over the main-haulage
line from Vernon Lake Camp to Beaver Cove. The inspection included all bridges
and the yards at Vernon Lake, Woss, Camp "A" Siding, Nimpkish, and Beaver
Cove.
 V 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The track is in very good condition throughout the whole main line, properly
ballasted, and, for the most part, well drained. A new reload with 8,200 feet of
accompanying trackage has been installed at Vernon Lake Camp and is ready for
operation.
The diversion at Mile 40 and the new bridge over Davie Creek have greatly
improved the approaches from both directions.
The track-maintenance programme in 1965 included the renewal of 7,500
yellow cedar ties and 4 miles of 80-pound rail, the latter replacing 70-pound rail
between Mile 28 and Mile 32. It is intended to replace a further 800 ties before
the end of the year.
Conditions noted were as follows:—
Beaver Cove Dump:  Generally good.   Some decking required at a later
date.
Beaver Cove Yard and Sidings: Renew packing missing from guard-rails
and switches.
Kokish Bridge:  O.K.
Elk Creek Bridge:  Nimpkish end dump requires shoring to prevent cap
from rolling.
East Fork: Ties poor due to previous car derailment.   This is not serious.
Tsulton Bridge:  Clear brush and small ties from around piling.
Halfway Island Bridge:    Bottom stringer crushing upstream side of
double-deck span.   Clear out brush.
Noomas Creek Bridge:  Shim piles at No. 1 bent, B.C. end.
Storey Creek Bridge:  Renew bad-order ties and guard-rail.
Kinman Creek Bridge:  Reinforce crushed cap, Nimpkish end.
Mile 21.5 Bridge:  Renew bad-order ties.
Steele Creek: In 1964 the downstream bottom stringer of the double-
deck span was found to have insect infestation, with the result that
the strength of the stringer was impaired. The infestation was
treated, but this did not repair the already damaged area. Company engineers have taken deflection readings while the span has
been under load, and it is learned that the deflection did not exceed
1 inch. However, steps should be taken to see that this condition
does not worsen, and this could be prevented by strengthening the
span until it can be renewed in 1966. A speed restriction of 6 miles
per hour has been imposed on this bridge for all traffic.
Twin Creek Bridges:   No. 2 Bridge has loose shims on Bents 1 and 2
and loose pile at Bent 3.
Gold Creek Bridge:   Batter pile loose west end of Bent 1, rail pile to
shim at west end dump, dump to be braced or shored from Bent 2,
crib up Bent 5.
Groves Creek and Davie Creek Bridges:  In good condition.
Maquilla Creek Bridge:  Caps crushing at piers on each end.
Fire Creek Bridge:  Install guard-rails.
Mile 38.9: Check culvert.   Excessive water on high side of track.
Ditching required between Mile 45 and Mile 47.
Renew packing missing from guard-rails and switches in Siding 1.
Some mile-post signs to renew between Woss and Vernon Camp.
Rail Cars 121, 125, 129, 130, and Diesel Locomotive No. 252 were inspected,
reservoirs tested, and certificates issued with defects noted.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 27
Mr. Louis J. Dempsey was examined as a head brakeman and passed
successfully.
An independent survey was conducted on all the railway bridges by Dobson
Construction Limited, and their findings have been taken into account in preparing
this report.—W. F. Thomas, Inspecting Engineer.
Equipment Inspections During 1965 Under the Railway Act
Following is a list of individual inspections carried out by Department engineers :
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers	
Air locomotives inspected and certified	
Electric locomotives inspected and certified
Self-powered rail cars inspected and certified
Diesel-electric locomotives and cranes inspected.
  36
  10
  6
  18
  69
Air reservoirs tested and inspected               230
Railway cars inspected on industrial railways  326
Railway cars inspected on common-carrier railways  202
Miles of track inspected 2,600
Aerial tramways inspected and certified  36
Railway conductors examined and certified ...                   20
  3
  4
  7
Power-car operators examined and certified	
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified
Steam-locomotive engineers examined and certified	
Motormen examined and certified (Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company of Canada, Limited)	
Accidents on logging and industrial railways	
Accidents investigated, British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway Division	
Accidents involving automobiles at crossings of Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
12
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage
Industrial Railways
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Main
Sidings,
etc.
Total
Gauge
1. Aluminum  Company  of  Canada
Ltd  	
2.
3.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd.
British Columbia Forest Products
Ltd 	
4. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd..
5. Canadian Forest Products Ltd...
6. Canadian Forest Products Ltd...
7. Canadian Industries Ltd	
8. Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd	
9. Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Co. of Canada, Ltd.
10. Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Co. of Canada, Ltd.
11. Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd	
Montreal..
Revelstoke .
Vancouver.
Montreal..
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Montreal	
Montreal.
Trail	
Trail..
Vancouver.
Kitimat..
Revelstoke .
Crof ton	
New Westminster
Nimpkish Valley...
Port Mellon	
James Island	
Watson Island .
Trail	
Kimberley..
Ladysmith-
2.90
0.92
1.50
3.00
3.19
2.50
3.00
I
91.00 | 19.10
0.50 f 0.50
6.25 I      1.25
7.01
19.00 |  	
1
9.00 l|    33.01
I
21.80 I      4.02
6.09
0.9>2l
4.00
6.00
110.10
1.00
7.50
7.01
19.00
42.01
25.82
Standard.
Standard.
Standard.
30" and
standard.
Standard.
Standard.
30" and
standard.
Standard.
18".
18", 36".
Standard.
 V 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage—Continued
Industrial Railways—Continued
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Main
Sidings,
etc.
Total
Gauge
12. Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd..	
Fernie	
Vancouver
Squamish	
Mesachie Lake
North Vancouver
Victoria-	
Victoria	
Kamloops
Vancouver   ..
Vancouver    .
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver   ._
Mesachie Lake
New Westminster
New Westminster
Calgary, Alta.
Vancouver .....
Vancouver
Vancouver.	
Vancouver
Honeymoon
Bay
Quesnel	
Michel	
1.53
1.53
'      3.00
0.30
1     7.50
2.00
0.30
0.20
2.70
5.39
4.10
2.20
1.00
1.50
1.30
3.16
0.33
4.70
5.20
3.76
3.51
30".
13   Elk Falls Co Ltd
3.00
0.30
1.50
1.90
0.30
0.20
2.70
3.81
3.10
Squamish	
Mesachie Lake
North Vancouver-
6.00
0.10
17. Island Tug & Barge Ltd.____	
Vancouver —	
Kamloops _ _____
Chemainus — ___
Dunsmuir District
Harmac Pulp Div.
Port Alberni	
Powell River	
19. Kamloops Pulp & Paper Ltd.
20. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and  Powell
River Ltd.
21. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and  Powell
River Ltd.
1.58
1.00
2.20
Standard.
Standard.
River Ltd.
1.00
River Ltd.
1.50 ]
River Ltd.
25. MacMillan,   Bloedel  and  Powell
River Ltd.
26. Northwood Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd.
1.30
3.16
Prince George _.
Crofton 	
Port Coquitlam
New Westminster..
Taylor 	
Prince George
Woodfibre 	
Twigg Island
North Vanoouver.-
Honeymoon Bay ~
Quesnel   	
0.33
2*8. Pacific Coast Bulk Terminals Ltd.
29. Pacific Coast Terminals Co. Ltd	
30. Pacific, Jefferson Lake, Westcoast
(Pacific Petroleums Ltd.)
31. Prince George Pulp & Paper Ltd. ..
4.70
0.71
3.54
C1)
5.20
3.05
Standard.
Standard.
1.25 1
2.00 |
7.00 |
0.95  |
1
1.25
2.00
7.60
0.95
35. Western Forest Industries Ltd. 	
36. Western Plywood (Cariboo) Ltd. ..
0.60
Standard.
!
1 Ferry slip.
Common-carrier Railways
37. British   Columbia   Hydro   and
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
76.58
35.29
111.87
Standard.
Power Authority
Hun ting don-
Chill iwack
1
I
38. Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.
Vancouver	
Vancouver to Fort
St. John and
Dawson Creek
788.60
1
!
166.10
954.70
Standard.
Recreational Railways
39. Cowichan Valley Forest Museum..
40. Stanley Park Miniature Railway
Duncan	
Vancouver
Saanich	
Duncan	
Vancouver	
Saanich	
0.875
0.42
0.20
0.1251
1.00
36".
18"
10"
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
Aerial tramways, or ropeways, have become a major mode of uphill transportation in British Columbia. Like Switzerland, British Columbia is endowed with
excellent winter playgrounds, so that Mont Blanc in the French Alps, the Matterhorn,
and other famous mountain playgrounds of Europe are being equalled in grandeur
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 29
in British Columbia by names like Garibaldi, Seymour, Granite, Big White, and
Forbidden Plateau, where recently uphill transportation has been provided by means
of ropeways so that our mountain ski areas now rank with the best anywhere.
The first common-carrier chair-lift in British Columbia was constructed in
1949 on Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver. To assure safety and to protect the
interests of the travelling public, the project was put under the jurisdiction of the
Railway Act and treated for all intents and purposes as a common-carrier railway.
The Grouse Mountain project was followed by a second chair-lift in 1951, and a
third lift was built in West Vancouver to gain access to Hollyburn Ridge.
In 1950 no rules existed anywhere in Canada, the United States, England,
Australia, or in any English-speaking country to govern passenger-carrying aerial
tramways. Therefore, the Department at that time conducted a survey of all ropeway facilities in the Western United States and subsequently published a report with
a draft of recommended regulations. This report was sent for comment to various
English-speaking countries, after which the British Columbia aerial-tramway regulations were published. The regulations were favourably accepted, and California
used the British Columbia regulations as a basis for the California State regulations
after an engineer from the Department acted as an adviser to the State board in
Sacramento at its request.
The British Columbia regulations were the first anywhere to be printed in
English, and as a result the Department for a number of years checked and approved
aerial-tramway designs for the Government of New Zealand. The American Standards Association used the original British Columbia regulations as a norm for the
American Standards Association standards on passenger-carrying aerial tramways
in the United States. It can therefore be assumed that British Columbia has played
the leading role in North America in formulating safety rules with respect to ski
lifts and transportation by ropeway.
In 1963 the Canadian Standards Association approached the Department. It
pointed out the need for a safety code or a Canadian standard to govern the construction and operation of passenger-carrying aerial tramways across the nation, as
no recognized standard existed except in British Columbia. Transportation by
ropeway was increasing, and much of the equipment was being imported from
France, Switzerland, and Norway, so that each European manufacturer was free to
impose any design he pleased, and safety was apt to be sacrificed to satisfy the
competitive trends of international trade. On the other hand, the purchasers in
Canada had no knowledge of the dangers involved, and in some cases they were
quite carried away by the idea of importing equipment from the ski countries of
Europe and took the safety facilities for granted.
The Canadian Standards Association set up a committee to formulate a Canadian standard safety code for passenger-carrying aerial tramways. The Chief
Engineer of the Department was appointed as chairman of the committee, with
engineers from each Provincial Government as members along with other engineers
representing the National parks of the Federal Government. Manufacturers in
Canada, the United States, and other countries are represented on the committee,
as are representatives from the wire-rope manufacturers and ski operators' associations across the nation.
Meetings have been held in Banff, Toronto, Vancouver, and Ottawa. The
next meeting is scheduled for Victoria, B.C., in April, 1966. The new Canadian
code is in its fourth draft, and it is expected it will be accepted and published in
1966. There will be a standing committee as with other C.S.A. codes to keep the
code abreast of the times and up to date.
 V 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
'I;-,''---":
Upper terminal, under construction, of the new Grouse Mountain aerial tramway.   This
multi-storied structure will incorporate a modern dining-room and cocktail lounge.
The year 1965 has been significant in the number of large aerial tramways, or
ropeways, constructed during the year. A large reversible tramway, which employs
two locked coil track ropes with attendant haulage and tail ropes to control two
50-passenger cabins or aerial coaches, is under construction on Grouse Mountain
in North Vancouver. The project, when completed, will cost $1,750,000. In order
to assess the magnitude of this project, it must be viewed as a complex involving
not only the tramway, but a huge lower terminal station housing the machinery,
operative personnel, cafeterias, ticket offices, waiting-rooms, washrooms, and a
parking area for hundreds of automobiles.
The upper station includes, in addition to the station landing area, an ultramodern dining-room and a cocktail lounge with the necessary amenities to accommodate the public. Access will be immediately available to the new Grouse
Mountain Chalet and the ski areas served by two chair-lifts, a T-bar, and several
rope tows.
In the Garibaldi and Alta Lake area, another huge mountain playground was
opened up in 1965 by the use of aerial tramways or ropeways. Whistler Mountain
and Mount Garibaldi are in the same general area, and the alpine meadows are
common to both mountains. Ski enthusiasts all agree that alpine meadows provide
the ultimate in snow conditions for ski-ing, and Whistler-Garibaldi is the only place
in the world which provides snow conditions where ski-ing may be done throughout
the 12 months of the year.
To gain access to the mountain area, a large and modern Swiss-built gondola-
lift has been installed which employs 62 four-passenger gondola cars travelling
uphill at 520 feet per minute to carry 600 passengers an hour to the mid-station,
where a double chair-lift 7,000 feet long transports 600 passengers an hour to the
alpine meadow area.    Here a modern Swiss-built T-bar is provided.    For those
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 31
Tower, under construction, of the Grouse Mountain aerial tramway.   Cleveland Dam and
Capilano Estates are visible in the background.
who do not wish to ski in the high-altitude meadow, a modern Swiss-built T-bar is
situated adjacent to the lower terminal of the gondola-lift at Alta Lake.
Two new modern hotels in an alpine motif have been constructed adjacent to
the lower terminal of the gondola, and in addition four new self-owned multi-storied
apartments have been built on high promontories so that the over-all effect when
completed will compare with Sun Valley, Idaho. The hotel and apartment area
with the lower terminal are adjacent to and served by the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, and in addition the new Squamish-Pemberton Highway is the main street
of the new recreational complex.
In the Rossland-Trail district another Swiss-built Mueller chair-lift has been
constructed during 1965. It carries 600 passengers per hour over its 9,000 feet,
raising the passengers 2,600 feet to the ski area. This lift was tested and approved
in December, 1965, so it was in operation for the 1965/66 ski season, augmenting
the existing facilities on Red Mountain where a chair-lift and poma-lift have been
operating for a number of years.
 V 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the Courtenay-Comox-Cumberland area, the Mount Becher Ski Development Society is extending a T-bar on the Forbidden Plateau.
In the Nanaimo district a poma-lift is being installed on Green Mountain in
the Nanaimo Lakes area. This project was not completed by the end of 1965 as a
heavy snow blanketed the terrain between Christmas and New Year's. This project
is a first in a rather unique way as it is served entirely by an industrial road. Crown
Zellerbach Canada Limited has entered into an agreement with the Green Mountain
Ski Club to allow access over the logging-road by the public when working conditions permit. A ski lodge is provided at Green Mountain to accommodate the
skiers. A chair-lift is proposed for 1966 to make the alpine meadows on Green
Mountain more accessible to the ski-ing public.
Near Kelowna, at Big White Mountain, excellent ski-ing conditions exist. Big
White is served by two T-bars, and a good road is maintained by the company
operating the tramway facilities. A new lodge or alpine hotel and additional ropeway facilities are planned for 1966.
T-bars were under construction during 1965 in the areas of Prince Rupert,
Terrace, Dawson Creek, Prince George, Penticton, Osoyoos, Kamloops, Blue River,
and Fernie. It is expected the year 1966 will see huge strides in the construction
and improvement of ski facilities, as well as summer tourist facilities, through the
use of aerial tramways or ropeways throughout British Columbia.
This dynamic development of the recreational areas of British Columbia by
the use of ropeway transport during 1965 has increased the aerial-tramway facilities
in British Columbia by over 30 per cent.
Aerial Tramways Registered with the Department of Commercial
Transport to December 31, 1965
Location No. and Name
Location
Gondola
Chair-
lift
T-bar
J-bar
Rope
Tow
Industrial
Freight
North Vancouver 	
1
1
....
2
1
1
1
2
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1   ,
1
1
1
1
1
"T
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
North Vancouver. 	
8. Kemano (Alcan) 	
Kemano 	
1
11. Wells   	
12. Dog Mountain (B.C. Telephone)
13. Mount Jarvis (CN.) _	
Wells  	
South-west of Hope 	
1
1
1
North of Kamloops	
_
2
17. Mount McKenzie	
18. Silver Star              	
Revelstoke 	
Vernon  	
East of Kelowna	
19. Big White  	
21. Pine Woods	
22. Amber Ski Hill       	
Princeton	
West of Penticton 	
West of Grand Forks	
Kimberley  	
26. North Star                       	
27. Fernie (Snow Valley) „	
28. Silver King    ..         	
29. Salmo	
Totals .         	
2
7
23
5   :
16
3
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1965
V 33
 V 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
•«•_ -*~ '--' '
Westcoast processing plant at Fort Nelson.
PIPE-LINES
The trend to expand pipe-line facilities for the transport of oil and natural gas
has continued through 1965 with bright prospects for 1966. In the Peace River
and to the north of the Peace River Block, exploration has continued, so that new
wells, both gas and oil, have continued to be brought into production, and consequently pipe-lines have been extended to transport the products to market.
In the Fort Nelson area, the Clarke Field and the Apache Field have become
substantial producers. With the advent of the new 30-inch Westcoast Transmission
line extension from Chetwynd to Fort Nelson, this northern area has become
important to the economy of British Columbia. As this gas is sour, a scrubbing
plant has been installed at Fort Nelson and is now operative.
The aforementioned 30-inch pipe-line was constructed to about half completion under the jurisdiction of the Department pursuant to the British Columbia
Pipe-lines Act, and all the pipe and appurtenances were approved and ordered
accordingly; however, due to financing arrangements, the Westcoast Transmission
Company Limited applied to the National Energy Board for leave to complete and
operate the line under Federal control and, after a public hearing, leave was granted,
so that the main line now operates under Federal jurisdiction with the gathering
system under Provincial jurisdiction.
The compressor-stations over the entire system of Westcoast Transmission are
inspected by Department inspectors as most of the appurtenances, such as pressure
vessels, engines, turbines, fire protection, including the safety of workmen, are
strictly Provincial matters. The same applies to the pumping-stations of the
Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line, and the Department inspectors, likewise, inspect
and certify these stations annually.
During 1965, pollution of streams and farm land was reported through the
Fish and Game Branch and through the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.   Engineers from the Department made investigations and reported that
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 35
the trouble had been corrected to the satisfaction of those authorities concerned.
In all cases the causes were leaks in pipe-lines due to earth movement.
A survey was made of the Inland Natural Gas Company's facilities in the
Penticton area with respect to the depth of cover. In all cases it was found the
pipe was buried deeper than required by the regulations; however, where earth
settlement or flooding occurs, there is no guarantee that a pipe-line might not be
exposed, but if the exposure is in muskeg, no danger exists to the public, and one
such small area was observed.
Problems have arisen with respect to subdivisions of land where a pipe-line
exists. In all cases, Department engineers, in applying the A.S.A. B31.8 Code,
found the pressure could be adjusted and the subdivision approved commensurate
with the population index as provided in the code.
In the Boundary Lake, Wildmint, and Milligan Fields it was necessary for
Department engineers to check on the scrubbers and other pressure vessels used at
the production batteries. It was found that over 400 unregistered pressure vessels
were in these fields, and the engineers registered the vessels and stamped British
Columbia numbers where such vessels met the requirements of the code.
In some of the older gasfields it is now necessary to install compressor-stations
so that the lower-pressure gas can be fed into high-pressure pipe-lines. In some
cases secondary recovery has progressed to the point where water-injection stations
are combined with compressor-stations. Our engineers test and certify all such
installations, and in many cases approve high-pressure water-injection lines as sometimes such lines are ultimately used for the transmission of high-pressure gas.
As these fields grow older, an increase in secondary recovery can be expected,
and recent developments indicate that unmarketable liquefied petroleum gas may
become an important factor in deep-well secondary recovery.
During the year, schemes to pipe natural gas to Vancouver Island have been
proposed. In addition, some study has been directed to liquefied methane gas to
serve Vancouver Island and for transpacific export. Department engineers study
all such proposals. It is expected that one day a break-through will occur so that
what seems unrealistic today will certainly be the realities of tomorrow.
There has been an increase in the handling of liquefied petroleum gas by
railway tank cars and jumbo cars. This has been brought about due to trial shipments of this product to Japan. The shipping-docks and rail unloading being under
the jurisdiction of the Railway Act has brought the Department engineers and
inspectors into this phase of work as public safety is involved. In one case it was
necessary to attend a Town Council meeting to assure the Reeve and Councillors
that the movement and storage in and adjacent to the town was quite safe. In all
cases the piping involved is tested in accordance with the pipe-line regulations, and
the handling and unloading of liquefied petroleum gas are in accordance with the
Department's regulations in that respect.
An application was made to the National Energy Board by Canadian Hydrocarbons Limited to construct a pipe-line from north-west of Calgary, through the
proximity of the Crowsnest Pass, and continue westward parallel to the Canada-
United States Border, and to terminate in Port Moody, B.C. Propane and other
liquefied petroleum gases were to be the principal products of the line. Officials of
the Department attended the hearings held in Calgary, Alta. The National Energy
Board had not, at the end of 1965, handed down its decision.
The Canadian Standards Association Committee on Gas and Oil Pipe-lines has
continued to be quite active during 1965. The Department's Chief Engineer has
continued to serve as Vice-Chairman of the Gas Pipe-line Committee, and reports
 V 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
progress in that the Oil Pipe-line Code has been voted upon with a majority vote,
as has the Gas Pipe-line Code; however, he points out there are a few areas where
it would be advantageous for the industry and the jurisdictional bodies to agree on
matters respecting the safety of pipe-lining being commensurate with the economics
of the industry as a whole.
Broadly speaking, therefore, it can be predicted British Columbia will see an
increase in the use of pipe-lines in 1966.
Annual Inspections Under the Pipe-lines Act, 1965
Miles of new pipe-line inspected and tested  131
Compressor-stations inspected   27
Pumping-stations inspected  16
Accidents investigated on pipe-lines     	
Gas distribution and metering stations inspected  13
Number of tank-farms inspected  5
Number of new extensions to pipe-line projects approved  65
Number of pipe-line crossings of railways inspected  2
Number of pipe-line crossings of highways inspected  3
Number of pipe-line crossings of other pipe-lines approved  23
Power-line crossings over pipe-line right-of-way approved  14
Approval of plans and specifications for pipe-line projects  65
Investigation of pipe-line problems involving subdivisions  4
Certificates of inspection issued under the Pipe-lines Act authorizing the operation of new extensions to pipe-line projects  65
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
Pipe-lines Approved, Inspected, and Tested, 1965
V 37
Name of Company
Oil or
Gas
Project
No.
Pipe-line Location
Altair Oil & Gas Co   	
Gas
1283
Buick Creek.
Dome Petroleum Ltd.- 	
1284
"
1280
"
1314
Rigel Creek.
1335
Boundary Lake.
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd.    	
;;
1282
1294
1301
1305
1316
1321
1322
1323
1324
1328
Prince George.
Kamloops.
Canoe.
Canim Lake.
Hudson Hope.
Chetwynd
Robson.
Hudson Hope.
Prince George.
Brilliant.
"
1288
Laprise.
"
1339
Fort Nelson.
"
1343
Buick Creek.
"
1344
Fort St. John.
Skelly Oil Co.	
"
1287
Jedney.
"
1341
Jedney.
Oil
1281
Fort St. John.
1285
Stoddart.
"
1295
Weasel.
<,
"
1296
Whitehall, West Beatton.
"
1297
Mink.
"
1298
Peejay.
"
1299
Bulrush.
"
1302
Nancy.
"
1303
Boundary Lake.
"
1304
Osprey.
"
1325
Bulrush.
"
1326
Wildmint.
"
1327
Peejay.
"
1333
Wildmint.
"
1334
Wildmint.
"
1342
Weasel.
Triad Oil Co. Ltd  	
Gas
1286
Laprise.
1289
Oil
1290
1291
1293
Aitken.
Aitken.
Milligan.
Western Natural Gas Co., Inc	
Gas
1300
Clarke Lake.
"
1338
Nig Creek.
 V 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 39
 V 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL ROADS
The year 1965 has been one of expansion in the logging industry, as illustrated
by the number of new log-hauling vehicles manufactured for use in the Province.
One major truck-manufacturer alone has produced over 120 logging-trucks for
industrial-road service.
The British Columbia logging industry is not one to mark time when it comes
to the use of new machines to facilitate the harvesting of our No. 1 natural resource.
In the past it has been portable spar trees and then log-truck trains. In 1965
rubber-tired log-skidders have found their place in the scheme of things. They are
most often used in steep, rough terrain, where their speed and flexibility make them
a welcome addition to log transportation.
However, it was discovered that the braking effort on the majority of these
machines was inadequate for the steep slopes on which they were required to work.
This was a case of the manufacturers and the Department having to " get their heads
together " and arrive at a solution. This was accomplished to the point where
these vehicles now have a good factor of safety, with some units having increased
their braking output by 100 per cent.
In the matter of accidents, once more fatalities have been recorded. While
this year there were only two truck-drivers killed, as compared to eight the previous
year, it is felt that these could have been avoided had the men taken the normal
precautions.
With over 7,000 truck-drivers certified as air-equipped vehicle operators, two
were suspended for failing to perform their duties in a safe manner. This small
percentage reflects the success experienced by the Department in the matter of
educating the operators of air-equipped logging-trucks in the operation, testing, and
maintenance of air-braking systems.
While runaways will continue to occur despite the best efforts of all concerned,
it is noteworthy that no accidents resulted from a failure of any of the safety equipment which is required to be installed under the Industrial Transportation Act.
:-£%» ,
Remains of a runaway logging-truck awaiting investigation by Departmental engineers.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1965
V 41
New air-brake equipment is constantly being produced by various manufacturers and is subject to testing and approval by the Department before being put to
use in the logging industry. It is felt in some quarters that the demands of the
Department are too rigid, but it is a matter of record that the State of California,
which most nearly approaches our standards, has in the past approved devices that
have been rejected in British Columbia. These devices subsequently proved to be
dangerous under certain conditions and had to be removed from use. Therefore,
while the standard of equipment required on logging-trucks operating on industrial
roads in British Columbia may seem unduly high, the results obtained justify this
more rigid requirement.
On the subject of accidents, seven investigations were conducted for the
R.C.M.P. highway patrol into truck-transport accidents where inspectors of the
Department were successful in determining the causes of the accidents. Again, as
in previous years, members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police were trained
in the inspection of air-equipped transport vehicles. The result of this is that a
greater number of transport units are inspected properly, which is a benefit to the
truckers as well as to the travelling public.
An increasing number of British Columbia vocational-school students received
instruction in the operation and maintenance of air brakes, and the Department has
been instrumental in the various schools obtaining air-brake equipment for training
purposes.
Mechanics in industry have again availed themselves of the night-school courses
on air brakes offered by the Department, and, as has been the case in the past years,
the classes were oversubscribed.
The public has begun to realize that industrial roads in the Province can open
up new summer and winter areas for sightseeing, camping, fishing, and hunting.
Access to these roads has been made available in many areas by logging companies,
and with continued co-operation by visitors regarding rules of the road and restricted
areas, there is reason to believe that in time many more people will be able to
enjoy these facilities.
Annual Inspections Under the Industrial Transportation Act
1963
1964   I   1965
Logging-trucks inspected..
Gravel-trucks inspected..._
Crummies (workmen's buses)..
Miscellaneous vehicles (including highway vehicles)
Air-brake lectures..    _
Lecture attendance   	
Logging-truck operators certified     ..
British Columbia vocational schools and other institutes (air-brake examinations) .
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (air-brake examinations) _ 	
388
34
277
412
33
373
361
122
5
573
44
244
303
23
534
528
108
20
295
68
158
110
21
450
350
158
28
 V 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Air-brake Lectures Conducted During 1965
Attendance
Date and Place at Lectures
January 27—Haney Correctional School  38
October 26—Haney Correctional School  34
February 2—Burnaby Vocational School  16
September 18—Burnaby Vocational School  15
March 22—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Cloverdale  25
July 15—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Princeton  4
June 9—Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Terrace  4
April 15—P.G.E. truck-drivers, Vancouver  5
July 30—P.G.E. truck-drivers, Vancouver  4
April 1—Col wood logging-truck drivers  13
June A—Nakusp logging-truck drivers  33
June 8—Kitimat logging-truck drivers  34
June 15—Port McNeil logging-truck drivers  10
June 17—Holberg logging-truck drivers   18
July 5—Hope logging-truck drivers  32
July 14—Princeton logging-truck drivers   30
July 27—Highways Department drivers, Cloverdale  27
July 28—Squamish logging-truck drivers  44
August 24—Powell River logging-truck drivers  26
November 25—Northwest Bay logging-truck drivers  24
December 2—Sooke logging-truck drivers  14
Total  450
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 43
ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAMME
In all branches of the Department, the importance of safety has been the consistent policy throughout the year. The importance of safety has been emphasized
at all levels, and supervisors have been constantly on the alert to improve the working habits of not only the staff, but also those members of the public with whom
our men in the field are brought into daily contact.
Our safety supervisor reports that at the weigh-stations the results of our
safety drives have been most rewarding, and weighmasters constantly endeavour to
impress the drivers of heavy vehicles that a properly loaded and well-maintained
vehicle in the hands of a competent driver is the best safety device on any highway.
In our Engineering Branch, safety to workmen and safety to the public has
been the theme over many years. The engineers report that truck-drivers, locomotive engineers, brakemen, ski-lift operators, and pipe-line constructors must be
properly trained in the use of equipment, otherwise accidents will occur. The
engineers point out that a safe workman is an asset to the industry which employs
him, but that in many phases of industry, such as transport, the industry does not
have the specialized technical personnel to train its employees in the use of air
brakes and in the maintenance of special braking equipment used on heavy grades.
Over the years our engineers have become not only experts in the intricacies
of air brakes, but they understand first hand the conditions under which the equipment is expected to perform. Consequently they put on lecture courses for heavy-
duty mechanics and conduct air-brake and driver courses for logging- and transport-
truck drivers. They go further by conducting special courses to train the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, the city police forces, and the drivers of heavy equipment
employed by the Department of Highways. Most truck transport companies insist
that an " air ticket " is a requisite to hold a job driving on the highways.
The Engineering Branch maintains a school or lecture-room in its Vancouver
office, complete with air-brake systems laid out on boards so the working of the
brakes can be seen and understood. Compressed air at 110 p.s.i. is available to
operate every phase of the various braking systems on display. Movie projectors
and still projectors, as well as blackboards and cut-aways of the various components,
are used to display for the edification of the more serious students. A similar lecture-
room has been set up at the Nanaimo Vocational School by our engineers, where
they lecture to all graduating classes of mechanic apprentices. Similar lecture-
rooms are planned for Prince George and Nelson.
As the work of driver education must go on in the remote areas of the Province, in logging and mining camps, as well as in Interior centres such as Kelowna
and Cranbrook, the engineers have rigged up two half-ton panel trucks with completely portable air-brake demonstration boards so that the boards may be demonstrated in a garage or in a convention hall. Air is supplied from the vehicles by
the use of 100-foot lengths of air hose. The two air-brake units are actually travelling schools, and each unit is equipped with both slide and movie projectors, as well
as with books or pamphlets, to prepare the applicants for examination. The units
have been taken to remote points such as the Queen Charlotte Islands to train
drivers of heavy equipment, and the industry gladly provides the transportation of
the unit to such remote areas.
The engineers hope to install a lecture-room for railway air brakes, as they are
required to train engineers and brakemen for the expanding rail facilities serving
the wharves and terminals in the Lower Mainland area.
 V 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Traffic on all logging and industrial roads which are not public highways comes
under the jurisdiction of the Department. Engineers advise the companies as to
safe traffic procedures and assist them in formulating special rules to accommodate
the public on company roads or to assure safety where traffic flows through company
towns such as Kitimat, Kemano, Cassiar, Ocean Falls, Beaver Cove, and many
other such areas not served by public roads. Public protection and safety is therefore of prime importance in this phase of our work.
In ski areas of British Columbia our engineers have approved over 50 lifts,
or ropeways, serving the public. In a number of cases, passengers are carried
through the air by ropeways, and it is conceivable under these conditions that accidents could happen. However, the safety record is good, since a very strict code
of regulations is enforced and engineers make periodical safety inspections in all
areas each year with respect to all matters which might lead to accidents.
Safety programmes on railways under the Department's jurisdiction have been
intensified under the direction of the Chief Engineer. Specific reports respecting
railways are set forth in the railway section. In addition, special committees have
been set up to advise on the handling of compressed gases such as chlorine and
liquefied petroleum. This has been done in the interests of public safety, with the
activities of these committees extending to transport on highways.
The Department is represented on the Safety Council, and all meetings are
attended in an effort to lend support and to keep abreast with every phase of accident prevention.
,-,
:
HL m if
■I:
Si I     1   WH    liWlL MP*1!
~:.i:.\'-~Ji;ii:/X
Safety awards presented to nine Provincial departments, including a Bronze Award of Merit
to the Department of Commercial Transport, November, 1965.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965 V 45
ACCOUNTS BRANCH
D. I. Ewan, C.O.A., Senior Clerk
A revenue increase of 9 per cent for commercial vehicles this year again indicates a steady increase of commercial-vehicle traffic throughout the Province. An
increase of 19 per cent in oversize and overweight permit revenue is indicative of
the trend toward the greater use of restricted-route permits, oversize and overweight
permits. There was a 12-per-cent increase in restricted-route permits issued over
last year.
A further indication of the growth of the commercial trucking industry within
the Province is shown by the number of temporary motive-fuel emblems issued by
this Department in the field. In assisting the Motive Fuel Branch of the Department of Finance, weighmasters have issued 4,626 of these emblems during 1965,
compared to 3,325 in the preceding year.
During February, 1965, the invoicing of charge account permits was switched
from manual ledgers to data-processing equipment. The amount of time saved in
preparing invoices themselves (12 minutes as against 24 man-hours) has enabled
us to keep up with the steadily increasing volume of permits issued in the field and
to increase the level of auditing. During the year 48 new accounts have been
opened, while only 11 have been cancelled. At December 31, 1965, there were
434 active accounts.
The system of auditing company reports of overweight vehicles operating under
the authority of a term permit is proving quite effective. Reports are received from
all weigh-scales within the Province of the movement of such vehicles. These are
compared with the returns from the company, and any discrepancy is brought to the
attention of the company for correction. During the year there were only 39 cases
where changes were required.
As indicated in the last Annual Report, new mileage charts were prepared and
circulated to all issuing offices during the year. These were also provided to industry through various organizations.
Statistics are now being kept of the number of vehicles hauling used household
goods from Provinces which have entered into reciprocal agreements with British
Columbia. As these agreements were completed earlier in the year, complete figures
for a 12-month period are not available. The trend, however, indicates a freer
movement of these vehicles, and it is anticipated that in future years these agreements will be of great value to the industry.
The continued acceptance of the prorate agreement with 16 American States
is indicated by statistics kept in the Department and shows an increase of revenue
from the companies prorating vehicles. These statistics include, other than licence
and decal fees, such allied operating assessments as motor-carrier fees, motor-fuel
taxes, non-resident permit fees, and social service taxes. In order to assess the
scope of prorate operations and to audit returns from the companies, this office
maintains a record of mileages operated by prorated vehicles within the Province.
This information is gathered from all border-crossing weigh-scales, which report
monthly all vehicles entering the Province under prorate licences together with the
mileage of each trip. This mileage is summarized and made available to any
Government department requiring this type of information, and in particular is
used to check applications from companies for licences in the following year.
Other statistics have been kept, and surveys have been made relating to the
class, number, type, and weight of vehicles operating within the Province and across
 V 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Provincial boundaries. The approximate mileage operated by commercial vehicles
in British Columbia is recorded, and various factors concerning the use of nonresident commercial-vehicle permits are tabulated. These facts are used to audit
returns from companies and to check applications for new licences.
The following tables show results of the activities of the Weigh Scale Branch
during the past year. Other tables relating to the Engineering Branch are included
elsewhere in this Report.
Table 1.—Revenue from Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes
for Passenger and Commercial Vehicles
Fiscal Year Amount Fiscal Year Amount
1953/54   $15,963,000 1959/60   $28,582,000
1954/55   17,455,000 1960/61   30,093,000
1955/56   19,820,000 1961/62   39,262,000
1956/57   22,593,000 1962/63   43,129,000
1957/58   24,500,000 1963/64   46,420,000
1958/59   26,100,000 1964/65   50,865,000
1 Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
Table 2.—Summary of Commercial-vehicle Licences and Permits Issued,
January 1, 1965, to December 31, 1965
Number of
Number of
Number of
Non-resident
Permits
Issued
Number of
Number of
Number of
Commercial
Commercial
Temporary
Oversize and
Vehicle-
Month
Vehicles Reg
Trailers Reg
Operation
Overweight
Checked
istered and
istered and
Permits
Permits
at Weigh-
Licensed1
Licensed1
Issued
Issued
stations
January	
20,588
5,287
826
1,827
2,061
87,020
February	
71,194
5,450
865
1,870
2,899
96,295
March	
19,607
1,280
1,463
3,943
2,803
96,900
April  	
6,976
419
1,355
3,330
1,761
99,912
May	
5,741
575
1,049
3,623
1,971
79,950
June	
5,094
489
1,688
3,616
3,605
88,090
July   	
3,698
302
1,496
3,478
2,775
109,753
August	
2,994
316
1,672
3,263
3,384
93,552
September	
2,977
432
1,748
2,980
2,342
97,371
October.	
2,622
186
1,257
2,855
3,603
123,253
November 	
2,458
157
1,213
2,799
2,861
100,006
December	
2,200
125
1,150
2,500
2,600
109,228
Totals
146,149
15,018
15,782
36,084
32,665
1,181,330
i Includes vehicles licensed under prorate agreement with American States.
Table 3.
—-Summary of Prorate Operation
, 1965
Companies
Prorated
Tractor
Units
Trailer
Units
59
202
238
2,076
181
United States     	
4,286
Totals  	
261
2,314
4,467
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1965
V 47
Table 4.—Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections from Commercial
Licence and Permit Fees for Five-year Period 1960/61 to 1964/65,
Inclusive.
Source
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
Commercial motor-vehicle licences
Non-resident commercial permits _
$7,541,536.02
401,976.11
60,325.00
$7,938,605.82
478,156.17
57,452.34
$8,253,251.46
381,673.01
61,408.52
62,909.21'
368,715.57
$8,910,152.29 | $9,706,485.52
404,410.49 |       410,645.40
74,298.71  |         81,223.2--
Temporary operation permits	
Oversize and overweight permits —
45,765.00
317,568.53
58,442.51
321,730.55 i
66,001.38 |         80,692.20
447,680.61 |       530,171.28
$8.367.170.66  1  $8,854,387.39
$9,127,957.77
$9,902,543.48 !$10.809.217.62
Table 5.—Summary of Violation Notices Issued, January 1,
to December 31, 1965
1965,
Licence and Permit Violations
Gross vehicle weight	
Motor-vehicle registration	
Licence-plates 	
Trailer plates	
Quarterly licence	
Non-resident permit 	
Temporary operation permit	
Motive-fuel emblem	
Overweight permit required	
Oversize permit required 	
Restricted-route permit	
Highway-crossing permit	
Proration	
Other 	
Total violations 	
Total number of vehicles checked
1,782
775
770
168
26
50
10
76
31
44
368
26
3
15
4,144
1,181,330
Motor-carrier Violations
Motor-carrier plates not displayed
Motor-carrier licence not carried _
Conditions of licence not carried __
Operating otherwise than permitted by licence
Total violations	
549
494
382
430
Total number of vehicles checked
1,855
15,864
Oversize and Overweight Violations
Oversize and overweight violations issued  783
Oversize and overweight prosecutions, including those through
Royal Canadian Mounted Police  947
 V 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERSONNEL
A. Shaw, C.O.A., Administrative Officer
Activity in the field of personnel management was quite intensive during 1965
and resulted in the following staff changes being made:—
Retirement of field personnel  1
Resignations of field personnel  7
New appointments, casual employees  11
New appointments, permanent employees  1
Transfers within the Department  10
There were seven resignations from the field staff of the Weigh Scale Branch,
all of which were in the interest of personal advancement of the individuals
concerned.
Mr. Elden F. McKay retired from service on the 10th of August, 1965, after
2>Vz years as a weighmaster with this Department. Mr. McKay served at the Parks-
ville weigh-scale station on Vancouver Island.
To fill the vacancies occasioned by the aforementioned resignations and retirement, competitions were held in Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, Prince George,
Golden, Hunter Creek, Cranbrook, Creston, and Vancouver during the year.
It is of interest to note that the high degree of interest shown in the competitions for positions with this Department is being maintained, as is indicated by the
number of applications received in the various centres of the Province.
As the degree of industrial activity increases in a particular area of the Province, it often becomes necessary that increased service must be rendered by the
Weigh Scale Branch staff in that particular area. This situation requires that staff
be transferred from other areas of the Province to take care of the additional work
load incurred through the increased industrial activity.
In the economic interests of the Department generally, and in some instances
as a result of personal requests, several transfers of weighmasters to other locations
within the scope of Departmental operations were made during the year.
The staff at the end of the year comprised the following: Civil Servants, 19;
casual employees (weighmasters), 78; temporary employees, 2.
In accordance with policies established, the status of weighmasters has been
changed from a " casual " classification to that of " permanent." The necessary
administrative changes in this regard are currently being undertaken, and it is
anticipated that change-over will be complete at an early date in 1966.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
360-166-1522

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